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Sample records for acid sites involved

  1. Aspartic Acid 397 in Subunit B of the Na+-pumping NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae Forms Part of a Sodium-binding Site, Is Involved in Cation Selectivity, and Affects Cation-binding Site Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Michael E.; Juárez, Oscar; Cho, Jonathan; Barquera, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-pumping NADH:quinone complex is found in Vibrio cholerae and other marine and pathogenic bacteria. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase oxidizes NADH and reduces ubiquinone, using the free energy released by this reaction to pump sodium ions across the cell membrane. In a previous report, a conserved aspartic acid residue in the NqrB subunit at position 397, located in the cytosolic face of this protein, was proposed to be involved in the capture of sodium. Here, we studied the role of this residue through the characterization of mutant enzymes in which this aspartic acid was substituted by other residues that change charge and size, such as arginine, serine, lysine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. Our results indicate that NqrB-Asp-397 forms part of one of the at least two sodium-binding sites and that both size and charge at this position are critical for the function of the enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that this residue is involved in cation selectivity, has a critical role in the communication between sodium-binding sites, by promoting cooperativity, and controls the electron transfer step involved in sodium uptake (2Fe-2S → FMNC). PMID:24030824

  2. Transcriptome sequencing revealed the transcriptional organization at ribosome-mediated attenuation sites in Corynebacterium glutamicum and identified a novel attenuator involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Neshat, Armin; Mentz, Almut; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2014-11-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum belongs to the order Corynebacteriales and is used as a producer of amino acids at industrial scales. Due to its economic importance, gene expression and particularly the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis has been investigated extensively. Applying the high-resolution technique of transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), recently a vast amount of data has been generated that was used to comprehensively analyze the C. glutamicum transcriptome. By analyzing RNA-seq data from a small RNA cDNA library of C. glutamicum, short transcripts in the known transcriptional attenuators sites of the trp operon, the ilvBNC operon and the leuA gene were verified. Furthermore, whole transcriptome RNA-seq data were used to elucidate the transcriptional organization of these three amino acid biosynthesis operons. In addition, we discovered and analyzed the novel attenuator aroR, located upstream of the aroF gene (cg1129). The DAHP synthase encoded by aroF catalyzes the first step in aromatic amino acid synthesis. The AroR leader peptide contains the amino acid sequence motif F-Y-F, indicating a regulatory effect by phenylalanine and tyrosine. Analysis by real-time RT-PCR suggests that the attenuator regulates the transcription of aroF in dependence of the cellular amount of tRNA loaded with phenylalanine when comparing a phenylalanine-auxotrophic C. glutamicum mutant fed with limiting and excess amounts of a phenylalanine-containing dipeptide. Additionally, the very interesting finding was made that all analyzed attenuators are leaderless transcripts.

  3. Identification of critical amino acid residues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase: definition of the ATP site involved in carboxy-phosphate formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Lim, A L; Powers-Lee, S G

    1997-08-15

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetases (CPSases) utilize two molecules of ATP at two homologous domains, B and C, with ATP(B) used to form the enzyme-bound intermediate carboxy-phosphate and ATP(C) used to phosphorylate the carbamate intermediate. To further define the role of one CPSase peptide suggested by affinity labeling studies to be near the ATP(B) site, we have carried out site-directed mutagenic analysis of peptide 234-242 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine-specific CPSase. Mutants E234A, E234D, E236A, E236D and E238A were unable to complement the CPSase-deficient yeast strain LPL26 whereas mutants Y237A, E238D, R241K, R241E and R241P supported LPL26 growth as well as wild-type CPSase. Kinetic analysis of E234A and Y237A indicated impaired utilization of ATP(B) but not of ATP(C). D242A, a temperature-sensitive mutant, retained no detectable activity when assayed in vitro. These findings, together with the affinity labeling data and primary sequence analysis, strongly suggest that the yeast CPSase peptide 234-242 is located at the ATP(B) site and that some of its residues are important for functioning of the enzyme. D242 appears to occupy a critical structural position and E234, E236 and E238 appear to be critical for function, with the spatial arrangement of the carboxyl side chain also critical for E234 and E236.

  4. Implementation of an ex situ stabilization technique at the Sand Springs superfund site to solidify and stabilize acid tar sludges involving a quick-lime based stabilization process and innovative equipment design

    SciTech Connect

    McManus, R.W.; Grajczak, P.; Wilcoxson, J.C.; Webster, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    An old refinery site was safely remediated a year before schedule and for 25% less than final engineering estimates for the stabilization remedy thanks to energetic project management and innovative design involving ex situ stabilization/solidification of acid tar sludges. A quicklime based process, Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR{trademark}), was employed to solidify and stabilize (SS) over 103,000 cubic meters (135,000 cubic yards) of petroleum waste, mostly acidic tarry sludge. The SS process was selected over competing methods because it afforded minimal volume increase, could readily achieve Record of Decision (ROD) specified physical and chemical treatment goals, could be implemented with treatment equipment that minimized emissions, and could be performed with low reagent usage and at low cost. To ensure treatment goals were achieved and an accelerated schedule met, a custom designed and fabricated transportable treatment unit (TTU) was employed to implement the process. The treated material was visually soil-like in character, it was left in stockpiles for periods of time, and it was placed and compacted in the on site landfill using standard earth-moving equipment.

  5. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  6. Who and What Does Involvement Involve? A Multi-Sited Field Study of Involvement of Relatives in Danish Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Oute, Jeppe; Petersen, Anders; Huniche, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an account of aspects of a multi-sited field study of involvement of relatives in Danish psychiatry. By following metaphors of involvement across three sites of the psychiatric system-a family site, a clinical site and a policy site-the first author (J.O.) investigated how, and on what grounds, involvement of relatives is perceived in Danish psychiatry. Paradoxically, the current understanding of involvement of relatives fails to take into consideration the perspectives of the relatives per se and families that were being studied. By analyzing involvement from a discourse theoretical perspective laid out by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, the aim of this study is to show how the dominant discourse about involvement at the political and clinical sites is constituted by understandings of mentally ill individuals and by political objectives of involvement. The analysis elucidates how a psycho-ideological discourse positions the mentally ill person as weak, incapable, and ineffective. By contrast, the supporting relative is positioned as a strong, capable, and effective co-therapist. Furthermore, the analysis considers how this dominant discourse of involvement is constituted by a broader discourse of neoliberalism and market orientation, which justifies involvement as a subtle institutionalization of social control. The article highlights that the role of the relative as a co-therapist may be contested by the families' discourse, which emphasizes issues concerning the responsibility toward the mental health of the ill individual as well as toward the psychological milieu of the family.

  7. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  8. Coarse-Grained Model for Water Involving a Virtual Site.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingsen; Shen, Hujun

    2016-02-04

    In this work, we propose a new coarse-grained (CG) model for water by combining the features of two popular CG water models (BMW and MARTINI models) as well as by adopting a topology similar to that of the TIP4P water model. In this CG model, a CG unit, representing four real water molecules, consists of a virtual site, two positively charged particles, and a van der Waals (vdW) interaction center. Distance constraint is applied to the bonds formed between the vdW interaction center and the positively charged particles. The virtual site, which carries a negative charge, is determined by the locations of the two positively charged particles and the vdW interaction center. For the new CG model of water, we coined the name "CAVS" (charge is attached to a virtual site) due to the involvment of the virtual site. After being tested in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of bulk water at various time steps, under different temperatures and in different salt (NaCl) concentrations, the CAVS model offers encouraging predictions for some bulk properties of water (such as density, dielectric constant, etc.) when compared to experimental ones.

  9. Splicing of many human genes involves sites embedded within introns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Zirkel, Anne; Diermeier, Sarah; O'Reilly, Dawn; Murphy, Shona; Längst, Gernot; Cook, Peter R.; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3′ end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site at exon 2 is made. Second, genome-wide analysis shows that >60% of active genes yield products generated by such intermediate intron splicing. These products are present at ∼15% the levels of primary transcripts, are encoded by conserved sequences similar to those found at canonical acceptors, and marked by distinctive structural and epigenetic features. Finally, using targeted genome editing, we demonstrate that inhibiting the formation of these splicing intermediates affects efficient exon–exon splicing. These findings greatly expand the functional and regulatory complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:25897131

  10. Going with the Flow: Web Sites and Customer Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Deon; van Niekerk, Raymond; Berthon, Jean-Paul; Davies, Tony

    1999-01-01

    Investigates structures of commercial Web sites, and analyzes patterns that emerge, which may be of future use as guidelines to businesses intending to establish a Web presence. Discusses classifying Web sites, explains the theory of flow, and describes an experiment with college students who evaluated Web sites and measured flow. (Author/LRW)

  11. Involvement of carnitine acyltransferases in peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism by the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed Central

    Pagot, Y; Belin, J M

    1996-01-01

    This article provides information about peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii. The existence of inducible mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and peroxisomal carnitine octanoyl-transferase activities was demonstrated after culture of this yeast in a medium containing methyl oleate. The subcellular sites and induction patterns were studied. The inhibition of carnitine octanoyl- and palmitoyl-transferases by chlorpromazine to a large extent prevented the otherwise observed metabolism-dependent inactivation of thiolase by 2-bromofatty acids in vivo. We concluded that the metabolism of long- and medium-chain fatty acids in the peroxisome of this yeast involved carnitine intermediates. PMID:8837442

  12. Mexican American Parental Involvement in Site Based Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Delores C.

    This study used interviews, home visits, observations of parent meetings, and informal discussions to examine parental involvement at a Texas elementary school with a high concentration of Mexican American families. In 1997-98, the school's Parent Involvement Cadre (1995-1997) was replaced with a new system of subject-related and support…

  13. Characterization of Enzymes Involved in Fatty Acid Elongation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-11

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene involved in synthesis of 1,3- beta - glucan in vitro. J Bacteriol, 1995. 177(11): p. 3227-34. 39. Ladeveze, V...which conferred resistance to echinocandins and had defects in "- glucan synthase activities [38]. ELO2 was also reported as FEN1, a mutant...required for heterologous fatty acid elongase activity encodes a microsomal beta -keto-reductase. J Biol Chem, 2002. 277(13): p. 11481-8. 4. Chang, S.I

  14. Evi-2, a common integration site involved in murine myeloid leukemogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchberg, A M; Bedigian, H G; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1990-01-01

    BXH-2 mice have the highest incidence of spontaneous retrovirally induced myeloid leukemia of any known inbred strain and, as such, represent a valuable model system for identifying cellular proto-oncogenes involved in myeloid disease. Chronic murine leukemia viruses often induce disease by insertional activation or mutation of cellular proto-oncogenes. These loci are identified as common viral integration sites in tumor DNAs. Here we report on the characterization of a novel common viral integration site in BXH-2 myeloid leukemias, designated Evi-2. Within the cluster of viral integration sites that define Evi-2, we identified a gene that has the potential for encoding a novel protein of 223 amino acids. This putative proto-oncogene possesses all of the structural features of a transmembrane protein. Within the transmembrane domain is a "leucine zipper," suggesting that Evi-2 is involved in either homopolymer or heteropolymer formation, which may play an important role in the normal functioning of Evi-2. Interestingly, the human homolog of Evi-2 has recently been shown to be tightly linked to the von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis locus, suggesting a role for Evi-2 in human disease as well. Images PMID:2167436

  15. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  16. Drug-facilitated sexual assault involving gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Matthew E

    2002-09-01

    The first case involving an alleged sexual assault linked to the use of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in Oklahoma is reported. A-48-year-old Caucasian woman taking amitriptyline was known to have voluntarily ingested a sports drink containing a relaxing health product. She purportedly experienced unconsciousness that persisted for approximately 4 h. The toxicological testing on urine identified GHB, amitriptyline, and nortriptyline using a capillary Hewlett-Packard 6890 gas chromatograph coupled to a Hewlett-Packard 5973 mass selective detector (MSD). The GHB concentration in urine was 26.9 microg/mL. Urine concentrations of amitriptyline and nortriptyline were not determined. The analytical method used for identifying and quantitating GHB can be applied to matters of forensic interests.

  17. Synthesis of Site-Specifically (13)C Labeled Linoleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Zhu, Hui; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-10-12

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) catalyzes the C-H abstraction from the reactive carbon (C-11) in linoleic acid as the first and rate-determining step in the formation of alkylhydroperoxides. While previous labeling strategies have focused on deuterium labeling to ascertain the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects for this reaction, there is an emerging interest and need for selectively enriched (13)C isotopologues. In this report, we present synthetic strategies for site-specific (13)C labeled linoleic acid substrates. We take advantage of a Corey-Fuchs formyl to terminal (13)C-labeled alkyne conversion, using (13)CBr4 as the labeling source, to reduce the number of steps from a previous fatty acid (13)C synthetic labeling approach. The labeled linoleic acid substrates are useful as nuclear tunneling markers and for extracting active site geometries of the enzyme-substrate complex in lipoxygenase.

  18. Site-selective Alkane Dehydrogenation of Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-14

    dehydrogenation of fatty acids Contract/Grant#: FA9550-10-1-0532 Final Reporting Period: 15 September 2011 to 14 September 2011...directly incorporate fatty acids into the ligand. The preparation of the acyl phosphines (1-5) was easily accomplished starting from the corresponding...AFOSR Final Report Final Report 
 The proposed research examines the site-selective dehydrogenation of alkanes. The alkanes employed were fatty

  19. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J.; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  20. Strengths of hydrogen bonds involving phosphorylated amino acid side chains.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Daniel J; Chorny, Ilya; Groban, Eli S; Wong, Sergio E; Levine, Elisheva; Rapp, Chaya S; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2007-01-31

    Post-translational phosphorylation plays a key role in regulating protein function. Here, we provide a quantitative assessment of the relative strengths of hydrogen bonds involving phosphorylated amino acid side chains (pSer, pAsp) with several common donors (Arg, Lys, and backbone amide groups). We utilize multiple levels of theory, consisting of explicit solvent molecular dynamics, implicit solvent molecular mechanics, and quantum mechanics with a self-consistent reaction field treatment of solvent. Because the approximately 6 pKa of phosphate suggests that -1 and -2 charged species may coexist at physiological pH, hydrogen bonds involving both protonated and deprotonated phosphates for all donor-acceptor pairs are considered. Multiple bonding geometries for the charged-charged interactions are also considered. Arg is shown to be capable of substantially stronger salt bridges with phosphorylated side chains than Lys. A pSer hydrogen-bond acceptor tends to form more stable interactions than a pAsp acceptor. The effect of phosphate protonation state on the strengths of the hydrogen bonds is remarkably subtle, with a more pronounced effect on pAsp than on pSer.

  1. Site contamination health risk assessment case study involving tenant relocation from a former gasworks site.

    PubMed

    Turczynowicz, Len; Fitzgerald, D James; Nitschke, Monika; Mangas, Sam; McLean, Angela

    2007-10-01

    An Adelaide suburban public-housing residential site with 16 apartments was investigated after complaints of odor in some yard areas. A distinct 0.5-m layer of dark, odorous (tarry), contaminant material, which in some areas had been covered with plastic sheeting, was subsequently found beneath the topsoil across most of the site. This material appeared to extend beneath the apartments. Analysis indicated high levels of cyanide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consistent with gasworks waste. Historical investigation revealed that the site was originally owned by a gas company and that a large gasometer (gas-storage tank) existed in one corner of the site. This finding of significant soil contamination precipitated a decision by the health and housing authorities to notify tenants immediately and to plan for their relocation. In addition to tending to the consequent personal disruption and logistical difficulties this posed, a detailed risk assessment process was developed. Urine samples were collected before and after relocation and analyzed for 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), a biomarker for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. In addition, samples of tap water, indoor and outdoor air, indoor and ceiling dust, carpets, and soil from tillage areas were analyzed for PAHs. Data indicated a low health risk associated with tenancy on the site. This report presents details of the health risk assessment process undertaken and discusses vindicative reasons for tenant relocation.

  2. Multiple allosteric sites are involved in the modulation of insulin-degrading-enzyme activity by somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Grazia R; Di Muzio, Elena; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Di Pierro, Donato; Polticelli, Fabio; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Somatostatin is a cyclic peptide, released in the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system, where it is involved in the regulation of cognitive and sensory functions, motor activity and sleep. It is a substrate of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), as well as a modulator of its activity and expression. In the present study, we have investigated the modulatory role of somatostatin on IDE activity at 37 °C and pH 7.3 for various substrates [i.e. insulin, β-amyloid (Aβ)1-40 and bradykinin], aiming to quantitatively characterize the correlation between the specific features of the substrates and the regulatory mechanism. Functional data indicate that somatostatin, in addition to the catalytic site of IDE (being a substrate), is also able to bind to two additional exosites, which play different roles according to the size of the substrate and its binding mode to the IDE catalytic cleft. In particular, one exosite, which displays high affinity for somatostatin, regulates only the interaction of IDE with larger substrates (such as insulin and Aβ1-40 ) in a differing fashion according to their various modes of binding to the enzyme. A second exosite, which is involved in the regulation of enzymatic processing by IDE of all substrates investigated (including a 10-25 amino acid long amyloid-like peptide, bradykinin and somatostatin itself, which had been studied previously), probably acts through the alteration of an 'open-closed' equilibrium.

  3. Bacterial Diversity at an Acid Mine Drainage Site in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynor, J.; Sawyer, T.; Riley, F. E.; Moulton, K. D.; Rothschild, L. J.; Duboise, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in acidic mine drainage at a historic Maine iron mining site was investigated by isolation of environmental DNA, PCR amplification of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing.

  4. Modeling lanthanide series binding sites on humic acid.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul E

    2009-02-01

    Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir-sorption-isotherm metal-complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing various experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with an ionic strength of 10(-3) mol L(-1). The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowledge of surface complexation parameters, was used to solve the existing discrepancies in LnHA binding constants and site densities. The application of the LPM to experimental data revealed the presence of two discrete metal binding sites at low humic acid concentrations (5 mg L(-1)), with log metal complexation constants (logK(S,j)) of 2.65+/-0.05 and 7.00 (depending on Ln). The corresponding site densities were 2.71+/-0.57x10(-8) and 0.58+/-0.32x10(-8) mol of Ln(3+)/mg of HA (depending on Ln). Total site densities of 3.28+/-0.28x10(-8), 4.99+/-0.02x10(-8), and 5.01+/-0.01x10(-8) mol mg(-1) were obtained by LPM for humic acid, for humic acid concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1), respectively. These results confirm that lanthanide binding occurs mainly at weak sites (i.e., ca. 80%) and second at strong sites (i.e., ca. 20%). The first group of discrete metal binding sites may be attributed to carboxylic groups (known to be the main binding sites of Ln in HA), and the second metal binding group to phenolic moieties. Moreover, this study evidences heterogeneity in the distribution of the binding sites among Ln. Eventually, the LPM approach produced feasible and reasonable results, but it was less sensitive to error and did not require an a priori assumption of the number and concentration of binding sites.

  5. U.S. EPA Superfund Program's Policy for Community Involvement at Radioactively Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Pat; Walker, Stuart

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes the Superfund program's statutory requirements for community involvement. It also discusses the efforts the Superfund program has made that go beyond these statutory requirements to involve communities. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implements the Superfund program under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). From the beginning of the Superfund program, Congress envisioned a role for communities. This role has evolved and expanded during the implementation of the Superfund program. Initially, the CERCLA statute had community involvement requirements designed to inform surrounding communities of the work being done at a site. CERCLA's provisions required 1) development of a community relations plan for each site, 2) establishment of information repositories near each site where all publicly available materials related to the site would be accessible for public inspection, 3) opportunities for the public to comment on the proposed remedy for each site and 4) development of a responsiveness summary responding to all significant comments received on the proposed remedy. In recognition of the need for people living near Superfund sites to be well-informed and involved with decisions concerning sites in their communities, SARA expanded Superfund's community involvement activities in 1986. SARA provided the authority to award Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs) to local communities enabling them to hire independent technical advisors to assist them in understanding technical issues and data about the site. The Superfund Community Involvement Program has sought to effectively implement the statutory community involvement requirements, and to go beyond those requirements to find meaningful ways to involve citizens in the cleanup of sites in their communities. We've structured our program around

  6. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-06

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment.

  7. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  8. Acid precipitation at 3 sites in the Klang Valley, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, E.; Yap, S.K.; Azimi, S.

    1996-12-31

    A study which examined spatial variation, dust and chemical composition factors associated with precipitation pH in the Klang Valley had been conducted. Precipitation samples were collected on a monthly basis at 3 different locations during the periods of 1993-1995. These long term sites were situated at varying distance from the industrial zone of the Klang Valley. Data were collected on a monthly basis and where possible after every rainfall. This included the field pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and analysis of chemical components. To date, the general pH trend at these stations is decreasing towards the acid range. The site furthest from the industrial zone had the highest pH values while site closest to the industrial zone had the lowest pH. There appeared to be a correlation between the precipitation pH and electrical conductivity (EC), the EC readings increased with increased acidity. Variations in precipitation pH was closely associated with the changes in sulfate concentration. The pH of precipitation is determined not only by the anions, but also by the concentration of cations in the atmosphere which neutralized the acidity by forming salts. The main cause for the decrease in the pH values is the significant increase of acidic components and decrease of soil-oriented components (Mg and Ca) in the rain water.

  9. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  10. Effects of Folic Acid on Secretases Involved in Aβ Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Bai, Dong; Li, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is identified as the core protein of neuritic plaques. Aβ is generated by the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via the APP cleaving enzyme (α-secretase, or β-secretase) and γ-secretase. Previous studies indicated that folate deficiency elevated Aβ deposition in APP/PS1 mice, and this rise was prevented by folic acid. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether folic acid could influence the generation of Aβ by regulating α-, β-, and γ-secretase. Herein, we demonstrated that folic acid reduced the deposition of Aβ42 in APP/PS1 mice brain by decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of β-secretase [beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)] and γ-secretase complex catalytic component—presenilin 1 (PS1)—in APP/PS1 mice brain. Meanwhile, folic acid increased the levels of ADAM9 and ADAM10, which are important α-secretases in ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. However, folic acid has no impact on the protein expression of nicastrin (Nct), another component of γ-secretase complex. Moreover, folic acid regulated the expression of miR-126-3p and miR-339-5p, which target ADAM9 and BACE1, respectively. Taken together, the effect of folic acid on Aβ deposition may relate to making APP metabolism through non-amyloidogenic pathway by decreasing β-secretase and increasing α-secretase. MicroRNA (miRNA) may involve in the regulation mechanism of folic acid on secretase expression. PMID:27618097

  11. Effects of Folic Acid on Secretases Involved in Aβ Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Bai, Dong; Li, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Liu, Huan

    2016-09-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is identified as the core protein of neuritic plaques. Aβ is generated by the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via the APP cleaving enzyme (α-secretase, or β-secretase) and γ-secretase. Previous studies indicated that folate deficiency elevated Aβ deposition in APP/PS1 mice, and this rise was prevented by folic acid. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether folic acid could influence the generation of Aβ by regulating α-, β-, and γ-secretase. Herein, we demonstrated that folic acid reduced the deposition of Aβ42 in APP/PS1 mice brain by decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of β-secretase [beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)] and γ-secretase complex catalytic component-presenilin 1 (PS1)-in APP/PS1 mice brain. Meanwhile, folic acid increased the levels of ADAM9 and ADAM10, which are important α-secretases in ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. However, folic acid has no impact on the protein expression of nicastrin (Nct), another component of γ-secretase complex. Moreover, folic acid regulated the expression of miR-126-3p and miR-339-5p, which target ADAM9 and BACE1, respectively. Taken together, the effect of folic acid on Aβ deposition may relate to making APP metabolism through non-amyloidogenic pathway by decreasing β-secretase and increasing α-secretase. MicroRNA (miRNA) may involve in the regulation mechanism of folic acid on secretase expression.

  12. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  13. Electrophysiological evidence for acidic, basic, and neutral amino acid olfactory receptor sites in the catfish

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Electrophysiological experiments indicate that olfactory receptors of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, contain different receptor sites for the acidic (A), basic (B), and neutral amino acids; further, at least two partially interacting neutral sites exist, one for the hydrophilic neutral amino acids containing short side chains (SCN), and the second for the hydrophobic amino acids containing long side chains (LCN). The extent of cross-adaptation was determined by comparing the electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses to 20 "test" amino acids during continuous bathing of the olfactory mucosa with water only (control) to those during each of the eight "adapting" amino acid regimes. Both the adapting and test amino acids were adjusted in concentrations to provide approximately equal response magnitudes in the unadapted state. Under all eight adapting regimes, the test EOG responses were reduced from those obtained in the unadapted state, but substantial quantitative differences resulted, depending upon the molecular structure of the adapting stimulus. Analyses of the patterns of EOG responses to the test stimuli identified and characterized the respective "transduction processes," a term used to describe membrane events initiated by a particular subset of amino acid stimuli that are intricately linked to the origin of the olfactory receptor potential. Only when the stimulus compounds interact with different transduction processes are the stimuli assumed to bind to different membrane "sites." Four relatively independent L-alpha-amino acid transduction processes (and thus at least four binding sites) identified in this report include: (a) the A process for aspartic and glutamic acids; (b) the B process for arginine and lysine; (c) the SCN process for glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and possibly cysteine; (d) the LCN process for methionine, ethionine, valine, norvaline, leucine, norleucine, glutamic acid-gamma-methyl ester, histidine, phenylalanine, and also

  14. Acidity of edge surface sites of montmorillonite and kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Lu, Xiancai; Sprik, Michiel; Cheng, Jun; Meijer, Evert Jan; Wang, Rucheng

    2013-09-01

    Acid-base chemistry of clay minerals is central to their interfacial properties, but up to now a quantitative understanding on the surface acidity is still lacking. In this study, with first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) based vertical energy gap technique, we calculate the acidity constants of surface groups on (0 1 0)-type edges of montmorillonite and kaolinite, which are representatives of 2:1 and 1:1-type clay minerals, respectively. It shows that tbnd Si-OH and tbnd Al-OH2OH groups of kaolinite have pKas of 6.9 and 5.7 and those of montmorillonite have pKas of 7.0 and 8.3, respectively. For each mineral, the calculated pKas are consistent with the experimental ranges derived from fittings of titration curves, indicating that tbnd Si-OH and tbnd Al-OH2OH groups are the major acidic sites responsible to pH-dependent experimental observations. The effect of Mg substitution in montmorillonite is investigated and it is found that Mg substitution increases the pKas of the neighboring tbnd Si-OH and tbnd Si-OH2 groups by 2-3 pKa units. Furthermore, our calculation shows that the pKa of edge tbnd Mg-(OH2)2 is as high as 13.2, indicating the protonated state dominates under common pH. Together with previous adsorption experiments, our derived acidity constants suggest that tbnd Si-O- and tbnd Al-(OH)2 groups are the most probable edge sites for complexing heavy metal cations.

  15. Inorganic Nitrogen Cycling in an Extreme Acid Mine Drainage Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnejais, L. H.; Smith, R. L.; Nordstrom, D. K.; Banfield, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Weathering of the massive sulfide ore body at Iron Mountain, northern California has generated sulfuric acid solutions with pH values ranging from 0.5 to 1, temperatures up to 50°C and high concentrations of toxic metals. Communities of microorganisms catalyze the oxidation of iron and sulfur that generates this extreme environment. The nitrogen requirements of these organisms and the nitrogen cycling within these waters are not understood. By adapting the chemiluminescence detection method of Baeseman (2004) we have constrained the stability of nitrate and nitrite species in acidic, high ferrous iron solutions and have measured a time series of the nitrate concentrations at sites within Iron Mountain. The half-life of nitrite is less than an hour due to reactions with ferrous ions, while nitrate is found at concentrations of up to 10 μM within the mine. By coupling this information with geochemical and microbial community information at each site together with culture enrichment studies using various nitrogen sources we hope to gain insight into the pathways of nitrogen utilization in this extreme environment. References Baeseman, J.L. (2004) Denitrification in acid-impacted mountain stream sediments. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Colorado, Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering.

  16. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  17. Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited impact on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental involvement, we hypothesized that involving parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures involving 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the impact of an intervention without parental involvement with one that included active parental involvement by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental involvement was not necessary to improve the intervention's impact on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial impact was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental involvement is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to involve parents.

  18. Binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Belatik, A; Hotchandani, S; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-02-01

    Retinoids are effectively transported in the bloodstream via serum albumins. We report the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with retinol and retinoic acid at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze retinoid binding site, the binding constant and the effects of complexation on BSA stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that retinoids bind BSA via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions with overall binding constants of K(Ret)(-BSA) = 5.3 (±0.8) × 10(6) M(-1) and K(Retac-BSA) = 2.3 (±0.4) × 10(6) M(-1). The number of bound retinoid molecules (n) was 1.20 (±0.2) for retinol and 1.8 (±0.3) for retinoic acid. Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in retinoid-BSA complexes stabilized by H-bonding network. The retinoid binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix from 61% (free BSA) to 36% (retinol-BSA) and 26% (retinoic acid-BSA) with an increase in turn and random coil structures indicating a partial protein unfolding. The results indicate that serum albumins are capable of transporting retinoids in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Nature of the sites involved in the process of cesium desorption from vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Dzene, Liva; Tertre, Emmanuel; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Three particle size fractions of sodium-saturated vermiculite (10-20, 1-2 and 0.1-0.2 μm), differing only in their ratios of external-to-total sorption sites, were used to probe the nature of the sites involved in desorption of cesium ions. The sorption was investigated for initial aqueous concentrations of cesium ranging from 5.6×10(-4) to 1.3×10(-2) mol/L, and the cesium desorption was probed by exchange with ammonium ions. The results showed that (1) the amounts of desorbed cesium were strongly dependent on the particle size for a given initial aqueous cesium concentration and (2) the amounts of desorbed cations (Na(+) and Cs(+)) strongly decreased with increasing initial cesium aqueous concentration, irrespective of the particle size investigated. Quantitative analysis of these results suggested that cesium ions sorbed on external (edge+basal) sorption sites can be desorbed by ammonium ions. As a contrast, most of cesium ions sorbed on interlayer sites remain fixed due to the collapse of the structure under aqueous conditions. This study provides important information, such as the nature of the sites involved in the exchange process, when the thermodynamic formalism is considered to describe the ion-exchange process involving cesium and high-charge swelling clay minerals in polluted soil environments.

  20. A voice from the high wire: Public involvement in a co-operative siting process

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, D.J.L.

    1995-05-01

    The author is a public consultation and communications consultant to the Siting Task Force (STF), Low level Radioactive Waste Management. The STF is a Canadian government-appointed yet independent body implementing a voluntary, co-operative siting process for a long term storage or disposal facility for 1 million cubic metres of LLRW. The presentation will document the experiences of and lessons learned by the author during her role developing and implementing a public involvement program for the process. The Co-operative Siting Process is a new approach to siting controversial facilities. It is based on the belief that communities should accept such a facility in their backyard and not be forced against their will on technical or political grounds. A formal `ground rules-up-front` process was developed and is now being carried out, with completion slated for April, 1995. Putting these rules and theories into practice has resulted in significant changes being made to the work plan for technical activities, and in a sober second look at the intricacies involved in planning and carrying out a thorough and efficient public involvement program that remain practical and cost-effective. There is a delicate balancing act between meaningful public participation that lays the foundation for trust, confidence and consensus, and public involvement that can result in the process being side-tracked and legitimate solutions and technical activities becoming mired in political and personal agendas.

  1. Genetic and epigenetic determinants mediate proneness of oncogene breakpoint sites for involvement in TCR translocations.

    PubMed

    Larmonie, N S D; van der Spek, A; Bogers, A J J C; van Dongen, J J M; Langerak, A W

    2014-03-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) translocations are a genetic hallmark of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lead to juxtaposition of oncogene and TCR loci. Oncogene loci become involved in translocations because they are accessible to the V(D)J recombination machinery. Such accessibility is predicted at cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS) sites ('Type 1') as well as other sites that are subject to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) ('Type 2') during early stages of thymocyte development. As chromatin accessibility markers have not been analyzed in the context of TCR-associated translocations, various genetic and epigenetic determinants of LMO2, TAL1 and TLX1 translocation breakpoint (BP) sites and BP cluster regions (BCRs) were examined in human thymocytes to establish DSB proneness and heterogeneity of BP site involvement in TCR translocations. Our data show that DSBs in BCRs are primarily induced in the presence of a genetic element of sequence vulnerability (cRSSs, transposable elements), whereas breaks at single BP sites lacking such elements are more likely induced by chance or perhaps because of patient-specific genetic vulnerability. Vulnerability to obtain DSBs is increased by features that determine chromatin organization, such as methylation status and nucleosome occupancy, although at different levels at different BP sites.

  2. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  3. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  4. An epoxide hydrolase involved in the biosynthesis of an insect sex attractant and its use to localize the production site.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latief, Mohatmed; Garbe, Leif A; Koch, Markus; Ruther, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes occurring in virtually any living organism. They catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxide containing lipids and are involved in crucial mechanisms, such as the detoxification of xenobiotics or the regulation of inflammation and blood pressure. Here, we describe a function of a putative EH gene in the biosynthesis of a sex attractant in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis and use this gene to localize the site of pheromone production. Males of this parasitic wasp release a mixture of (4R,5R)-( threo-) and (4R,5S)-( erythro-)5-hydroxy-4-decanolide (HDL) to attract virgin females. Using a stable isotope labeled precursor, we demonstrated that vernolic acid ( erythro-12,13-epoxy-octadec-9Z-enoic acid) is converted by N. vitripennis males to threo-HDL. This suggested the involvement of an EH in hydrolyzing the fatty acid epoxide under inversion of the stereochemistry into the respective diol, which might be further processed by chain shortening and lactonization to HDL. We cloned a putative N. vitripennis EH gene (Nasvi-EH1) encoding 470 amino acids and localized its transcripts in the male rectal papillae by in situ RT-PCR. Chemical analyses and histological studies confirmed that males synthesize the sex attractant in the rectal vesicle and release it via the anal orifice. Involvement of Nasvi-EH1 in HDL biosynthesis was established by RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Injection of Nasvi-EH1 dsRNA into male abdomens inhibited pheromone biosynthesis by 55% and suppressed the targeted gene transcripts in the rectal vesicle by 95%.

  5. An epoxide hydrolase involved in the biosynthesis of an insect sex attractant and its use to localize the production site

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-latief, Mohatmed; Garbe, Leif A.; Koch, Markus; Ruther, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes occurring in virtually any living organism. They catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxide containing lipids and are involved in crucial mechanisms, such as the detoxification of xenobiotics or the regulation of inflammation and blood pressure. Here, we describe a function of a putative EH gene in the biosynthesis of a sex attractant in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis and use this gene to localize the site of pheromone production. Males of this parasitic wasp release a mixture of (4R,5R)-(threo-) and (4R,5S)-(erythro-)5-hydroxy-4-decanolide (HDL) to attract virgin females. Using a stable isotope labeled precursor, we demonstrated that vernolic acid (erythro-12,13-epoxy-octadec-9Z-enoic acid) is converted by N. vitripennis males to threo-HDL. This suggested the involvement of an EH in hydrolyzing the fatty acid epoxide under inversion of the stereochemistry into the respective diol, which might be further processed by chain shortening and lactonization to HDL. We cloned a putative N. vitripennis EH gene (Nasvi-EH1) encoding 470 amino acids and localized its transcripts in the male rectal papillae by in situ RT-PCR. Chemical analyses and histological studies confirmed that males synthesize the sex attractant in the rectal vesicle and release it via the anal orifice. Involvement of Nasvi-EH1 in HDL biosynthesis was established by RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Injection of Nasvi-EH1 dsRNA into male abdomens inhibited pheromone biosynthesis by 55% and suppressed the targeted gene transcripts in the rectal vesicle by 95%. PMID:18579785

  6. The unique character of involvement in multi-site evaluation settings.

    PubMed

    Toal, Stacie A; King, Jean A; Johnson, Kelli; Lawrenz, Frances

    2009-05-01

    As the number of large federal programs increases, so, too, does the need for a more complete understanding of how to conduct evaluations of such complex programs. The research literature has documented the benefits of stakeholder participation in smaller-scale program evaluations. However, given the scope and diversity of projects in multi-site program evaluations, traditional notions of participatory evaluation do not apply. The purpose of this research is to determine the ways in which stakeholders are involved in large-scale, multi-site STEM evaluations. This article describes the findings from a survey of 313 program leaders and evaluators and from follow-up interviews with 12 of these individuals. Findings from this study indicate that attendance at meetings and conferences, planning discussions within the project related to use of the program evaluation, and participation in data collection should be added to the list of activities that foster feelings of evaluation involvement among stakeholders. In addition, perceptions of involvement may vary according to breadth or depth of evaluation activities, but not always both. Overall, this study suggests that despite the contextual challenges of large, multi-site evaluations, it is feasible to build feelings of involvement among stakeholders.

  7. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  8. Remedial action at the Acid/Pueblo Canyon site, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    The Acid/Pueblo Canyon site (TA-45) was designated in 1976 for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During the period 1943 to 1964 untreated and treated liquid wastes generated by nuclear weapons research activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were discharged into the two canyons. A survey of the site conducted by LASL in 1976 to 1977 identified two areas where radiological contamination exceeded criteria levels. The selected remedial action was based on extensive radiological characterization and comprehensive engineering assessments and comprised the excavation and disposal of 390 yd/sup 3/ of contaminated soil and rock. This document describes the background to the remedial action, the parties involved in administering and executing it, the chronology of the work, verification of the adequacy of the remedial action, and the cost incurred. 14 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  9. A Novel Class of Plant Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Orsellinic Acid Biosynthesis from Rhododendron dauricum

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Futoshi; Iijima, Miu; Yamanaka, Eriko; Takahashi, Hironobu; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Saeki, Haruna; Morimoto, Satoshi; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Kurosaki, Fumiya; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rhododendron dauricum L. produces daurichromenic acid, the anti-HIV meroterpenoid consisting of sesquiterpene and orsellinic acid (OSA) moieties. To characterize the enzyme responsible for OSA biosynthesis, a cDNA encoding a novel polyketide synthase (PKS), orcinol synthase (ORS), was cloned from young leaves of R. dauricum. The primary structure of ORS shared relatively low identities to those of PKSs from other plants, and the active site of ORS had a unique amino acid composition. The bacterially expressed, recombinant ORS accepted acetyl-CoA as the preferable starter substrate, and produced orcinol as the major reaction product, along with four minor products including OSA. The ORS identified in this study is the first plant PKS that generates acetate-derived aromatic tetraketides, such as orcinol and OSA. Interestingly, OSA production was clearly enhanced in the presence of Cannabis sativa olivetolic acid cyclase, suggesting that the ORS is involved in OSA biosynthesis together with an unidentified cyclase in R. dauricum. PMID:27729920

  10. Primary Sjögren's Syndrome with two extraglandular sites involvement - case report.

    PubMed

    Szturmowicz, Monika; Wilińska, Ewelina; Paczek, Anna; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Opoka, Lucyna; Gątarek, Juliusz; Langfort, Renata; Rowińska-Zakrzewska, Ewa; Torbicki, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) is a chronic, slowly progressive inflammatory autoimmune disorder, characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, leading to decrease of glandular secretion. In 40-60% of pSS patients, extraglandular disease develops. We present the case of a patient with two extraglandular sites involvement in the course of pSS manifesting with progressive respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  11. UMAMIT14 is an amino acid exporter involved in phloem unloading in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Julien; Pratelli, Réjane; Zhao, Chengsong; Sonawala, Unnati; Collakova, Eva; Pilot, Guillaume; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2016-12-01

    Amino acids are the main form of nitrogen transported between the plant organs. Transport of amino acids across membranes is mediated by specialized proteins: importers, exporters, and facilitators. Unlike amino acid importers, amino acid exporters have not been thoroughly studied, partly due to a lack of high-throughput techniques enabling their isolation. Usually Multiple Acids Move In and out Transporters 14 (UMAMIT14) from Arabidopsis shares sequence similarity to the amino acid facilitator Silique Are Red1 (UMAMIT18), and has been shown to be involved in amino acid transfer to the seeds. We show here that UMAMIT14 is also expressed in root pericycle and phloem cells and mediates export of a broad range of amino acids in yeast. Loss-of-function of UMAMIT14 leads to a reduced shoot-to-root and root-to-medium transfer of amino acids originating from the leaves. These fluxes were further reduced in an umamti14 umamit18 double loss-of-function mutant. This study suggests that UMAMIT14 is involved in phloem unloading of amino acids in roots, and that UMAMIT14 and UMAMIT18 are involved in the radial transport of amino acids in roots, which is essential for maintaining amino acid secretion to the soil.

  12. UMAMIT14 is an amino acid exporter involved in phloem unloading in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Julien; Pratelli, Réjane; Zhao, Chengsong; Sonawala, Unnati; Collakova, Eva; Pilot, Guillaume; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are the main form of nitrogen transported between the plant organs. Transport of amino acids across membranes is mediated by specialized proteins: importers, exporters, and facilitators. Unlike amino acid importers, amino acid exporters have not been thoroughly studied, partly due to a lack of high-throughput techniques enabling their isolation. Usually Multiple Acids Move In and out Transporters 14 (UMAMIT14) from Arabidopsis shares sequence similarity to the amino acid facilitator Silique Are Red1 (UMAMIT18), and has been shown to be involved in amino acid transfer to the seeds. We show here that UMAMIT14 is also expressed in root pericycle and phloem cells and mediates export of a broad range of amino acids in yeast. Loss-of-function of UMAMIT14 leads to a reduced shoot-to-root and root-to-medium transfer of amino acids originating from the leaves. These fluxes were further reduced in an umamti14 umamit18 double loss-of-function mutant. This study suggests that UMAMIT14 is involved in phloem unloading of amino acids in roots, and that UMAMIT14 and UMAMIT18 are involved in the radial transport of amino acids in roots, which is essential for maintaining amino acid secretion to the soil. PMID:27856708

  13. Regulatory involvement of abscisic acid in potato tuber wound-healing.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward C; Suttle, Jeffrey C; Pederson, Shana M

    2008-01-01

    Rapid wound-healing is crucial in protecting potato tubers from infection and dehydration. Wound-induced suberization and the accumulation of hydrophobic barriers to reduce water vapour conductance/loss are principal protective wound-healing processes. However, little is known about the cognate mechanisms that effect or regulate these processes. The objective of this research was to determine the involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) in the regulation of wound-induced suberization and tuber water vapour loss (dehydration). Analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that ABA concentrations varied little throughout the tuber, but were slightly higher near the periderm and lowest in the pith. ABA concentrations increase then decrease during tuber storage. Tuber wounding induced changes in ABA content. ABA content in wound-healing tuber discs decreased after wounding, reached a minimum by 24 h, and then increased from the 3rd to the 7th day after wounding. Wound-induced ABA accumulations were reduced by fluridone (FLD); an inhibitor of de novo ABA biosynthesis. Wound-induced phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity was slightly reduced and the accumulation of suberin poly(phenolics) and poly(aliphatics) noticeably reduced in FLD-treated tissues. Addition of ABA to the FLD treatment restored phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity and suberization, unequivocally indicating that endogenous ABA is involved in the regulation of these wound-healing processes. Similar experiments showed that endogenous ABA is involved in the regulation of water vapour loss, a process linked to wax accumulation in wound-healing tubers. Rapid reduction of water vapour loss across the wound surface is essential in preventing desiccation and death of cells at the wound site; live cells are required for suberization. These results unequivocally show that endogenous ABA is involved in the regulation of wound-induced suberization and the processes that protect surface cells from water vapour

  14. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Michinao; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Okinaga, Toshinori; Habu, Manabu; Yoshioka, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  15. Epidermal Permeability Barrier Recovery Is Delayed in Vitiligo-Involved Sites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J.; Man, W.Y.; Lv, C.Z.; Song, S.P.; Shi, Y.J.; Elias, P.M.; Man, M.Q.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives Prior studies have demonstrated that both the skin surface pH and epidermal permeability barrier function vary with skin pigmentation types. Although melanin deficiency is the main feature of vitiligo, alterations in cutaneous biophysical properties in vitiligo have not yet been well defined. In the present study, stratum corneum (SC) hydration, the skin surface pH and epidermal permeability barrier function in vitiligo were evaluated. Methods A total of 30 volunteers with vitiligo comprising 19 males and 11 females aged 13–51 years (mean age: 27.91 ± 2.06 years) were enrolled in this study. The skin surface pH, SC hydration, melanin/erythema index and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured by respective probes connected to a Courage-Khazaka MPA5. SC integrity was determined by measuring the TEWL following each D-Squame application. The barrier recovery rate was assessed at 5 h following barrier disruption by repeated tape stripping. Results In addition to SC hydration, both melanin and erythema index were significantly lower in vitiligo lesions than in contralateral, nonlesional sites, while no difference in skin surface pH between vitiligo-involved and uninvolved areas was observed. In addition, neither the basal TEWL nor SC integrity in the involved areas differed significantly from that in the uninvolved areas. However, barrier recovery in vitiligo-involved sites was significantly delayed in comparison with uninvolved sites (40.83 ± 5.39% vs. 58.30 ± 4.71%; t = 2.441; p < 0.02). Conclusion Barrier recovery following tape stripping of the SC is delayed in vitiligo. Therefore, improvement in epidermal permeability barrier function may be an important unrecognized factor to be considered in treating patients with vitiligo. PMID:20185976

  16. A Sialic Acid Binding Site in a Human Picornavirus

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Hähnlein-Schick, Irmgard; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Arnberg, Niklas; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v) and enterovirus 70 (EV70) cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC), a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC. PMID:25329320

  17. Metaproteomics and ultrastructure characterization of Komagataeibacter spp. involved in high-acid spirit vinegar production.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Barrao, Cristina; Saad, Maged M; Cabello Ferrete, Elena; Bravo, Daniel; Chappuis, Marie-Luise; Ortega Pérez, Ruben; Junier, Pilar; Perret, Xavier; Barja, François

    2016-05-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are widespread microorganisms in nature, extensively used in food industry to transform alcohols and sugar alcohols into their corresponding organic acids. Specialized strains are used in the production of vinegar through the oxidative transformation of ethanol into acetic acid. The main AAB involved in the production of high-acid vinegars using the submerged fermentation method belong to the genus Komagataeibacter, characterized by their higher ADH stability and activity, and higher acetic acid resistance (15-20%), compared to other AAB. In this work, the bacteria involved in the production of high-acid spirit vinegar through a spontaneous acetic acid fermentation process was studied. The analysis using a culture-independent approach revealed a homogeneous bacterial population involved in the process, identified as Komagataeibacter spp. Differentially expressed proteins during acetic acid fermentation were investigated by using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. Most of these proteins were functionally related to stress response, the TCA cycle and different metabolic processes. In addition, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and specific staining of polysaccharide SDS-PAGE gels confirmed that Komagataeibacter spp. lacked the characteristic polysaccharide layer surrounding the outer membrane that has been previously reported to have an important role in acetic acid resistance in the genus Acetobacter.

  18. Metabolic diversity in biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by lactic acid bacteria involving conjugated fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2009-08-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum AKU 1009a effectively transforms linoleic acid to conjugated linoleic acids of cis-9,trans-11-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) and trans-9,trans-11-18:2. The transformation of various polyunsaturated fatty acids by washed cells of L. plantarum AKU 1009a was investigated. Besides linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid [cis-9,cis-12,cis-15-octadecatrienoic acid (18:3)], gamma-linolenic acid (cis-6,cis-9,cis-12-18:3), columbinic acid (trans-5,cis-9,cis-12-18:3), and stearidonic acid [cis-6,cis-9,cis-12,cis-15-octadecatetraenoic acid (18:4)] were found to be transformed. The fatty acids transformed by the strain had the common structure of a C18 fatty acid with the cis-9,cis-12 diene system. Three major fatty acids were produced from alpha-linolenic acid, which were identified as cis-9,trans-11,cis-15-18:3, trans-9,trans-11,cis-15-18:3, and trans-10,cis-15-18:2. Four major fatty acids were produced from gamma-linolenic acid, which were identified as cis-6,cis-9,trans-11-18:3, cis-6,trans-9,trans-11-18:3, cis-6,trans-10-18:2, and trans-10-octadecenoic acid. The strain transformed the cis-9,cis-12 diene system of C18 fatty acids into conjugated diene systems of cis-9,trans-11 and trans-9,trans-11. These conjugated dienes were further saturated into the trans-10 monoene system by the strain. The results provide valuable information for understanding the pathway of biohydrogenation by anaerobic bacteria and for establishing microbial processes for the practical production of conjugated fatty acids, especially those produced from alpha-linolenic acid and gamma-linolenic acid.

  19. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  20. Identification of an immunodominant antigenic site involving the capsid protein VP3 of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, L H; Jansen, R W; Stapleton, J T; Cohen, J I; Lemon, S M

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus, an hepatotropic picornavirus, is a common cause of acute hepatitis in man for which there is no available vaccine. Competitive binding studies carried out in solid phase suggest that neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis A virus recognize a limited number of epitopes on the capsid surface, although the polypeptide locations of these epitopes are not well defined. Neutralization-escape mutants, selected for resistance to monoclonal antibodies, demonstrate broad cross-resistance to other monoclonal antibodies. Sequencing of virion RNA from several of these mutants demonstrated that replacement of aspartic acid residue 70 of capsid protein VP3 (residue 3070) with histidine or alanine confers resistance to neutralization by monoclonal antibody K2-4F2 and prevents binding of this antibody and other antibodies with similar solid-phase competition profiles. These results indicate that residue 3070 contributes to an immunodominant antigenic site. Mutation at residue 102 of VP1 (residue 1102) confers partial resistance against antibody B5-B3 and several other antibodies but does not prevent antibody attachment. Both VP3 and VP1 sites align closely in the linear peptide sequences with sites of neutralization-escape mutations in poliovirus and human rhinovirus, suggesting conservation of structure among these diverse picornaviruses. However, because partial neutralization resistance to several monoclonal antibodies (2D2, 3E1, and B5-B3) was associated with mutation at either residue 3070 or residue 1102, these sites appear more closely related functionally in hepatitis A virus than in these other picornaviruses. PMID:2460866

  1. Nitrous Acid at Concordia (Inland Site) and Dumont d'Urville (Costal Site), East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbrat, M.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.; Gallée, H.; Kleffman, J.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most recent important finding made in Antarctica after the discovery of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone hole in the early 80's was the discovery of a very oxidizing canopy over the South Pole region in relation with unexpected high levels of NO. There is a strong need however to extend investigations of the oxidation capacity of the lower atmosphere at the scale of the whole Antarctic continent, and in particular, over East Antarctica. That motivated the OPALE (Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export) project. Indeed the limited data gained by using aircraft sampling during ANTCI 2003 suggest that over the East Antarctic plateau even higher NO emissions persist. Among several not yet resolved questions related to the high level of oxidants over Antarctica is the role of nitrous acid (HONO). During the austral summer 2010/2011 the levels of nitrous acid (HONO) were for the first time investigated at Concordia (75°06'S, 123°33'E) and Dumont D'Urville (66°40'S, 140°01'E), two stations located in East Antarctica. Also for the first time in Antarctica, HONO was measured by deploying a long path absorption photometer (LOPAP). At Concordia, from the end of December 2010 to mid January 2011 HONO mixing ratios at 1 m above the snow surface ranged between 5 and 60 pptv. Diurnal cycles were observed with levels peaking in the morning (06:30 to 07:30) and the evening (19:00 to 20:00). At Dumont d'Urville, background mixing ratios close to 2 pptv were observed in February 2011. No clear diurnal cycles were observed at that site but several events of air masses export from inland Antarctica were encountered with enhanced HONO levels reaching 10 pptv at night. These first HONO data gained in East Antarctica are discussed in terms of sources and sinks along with synoptic weather conditions.

  2. Adsorption and characterization of MCPA on DDTMA- and raw-montmorillonite: Surface sites involved.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Cintia C; Fernández, Mariela A; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    The 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy acid (MCPA) is an herbicide widely used in agriculture, which generates a great concern about contamination of surface water and serious consequences for human health and the environment. In this work, the adsorption of MCPA on an Argentine montmorillonite (MMT) and its organo-montmorillonite product (OMMT) with different dodecyl trimethyl ammonium loading was investigated. MCPA adsorption on OMMT increases at least 3 times, with respect to the amount determined for MMT. X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analyses indicated the inner (interlayer) and outer surface participate as adsorption sites. Changes in surface electric charge and also interlayer expansion suggest that dimethyl amine (MCPA counterion) was also surface-adsorbed. The larger aggregates of OMMT, without and with MCPA, obtained compared to those of MMT samples, generate an improvement in the coagulation efficiency. This property, particularly after MCPA retention, allows an easier separation of the solids from the solution and enables a simple technological process application.

  3. Involved site radiation therapy for the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Portlock, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy technology has permitted the development of new treatment planning techniques. Involved field, involved node, and involved site radiotherapy fields are discussed and compared. Indications for and implications of combined modality therapy are examined, particularly as pertinent to the adolescent and young adult population. PMID:26767184

  4. Layered materials with coexisting acidic and basic sites for catalytic one-pot reaction sequences.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-17

    Acidic montmorillonite-immobilized primary amines (H-mont-NH(2)) were found to be excellent acid-base bifunctional catalysts for one-pot reaction sequences, which are the first materials with coexisting acid and base sites active for acid-base tamdem reactions. For example, tandem deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation proceeded successfully with the H-mont-NH(2), affording the corresponding condensation product in a quantitative yield. The acidity of the H-mont-NH(2) was strongly influenced by the preparation solvent, and the base-catalyzed reactions were enhanced by interlayer acid sites.

  5. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  6. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic. PMID:2064600

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis for the functional study of transcription factors involved in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Kong, Que; Yuan, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is largely coordinated by a complex network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs), co-factors, and their cognate cis-regulatory elements in the genome. TFs are multidomain proteins that arise evolutionarily through protein domain shuffling. The modular nature of TFs has led to the idea that specific modules of TFs can be re-designed to regulate desired gene(s) through protein engineering. Utilization of designer TFs for the control of metabolic pathways has emerged as an effective approach for metabolic engineering. We are interested in engineering the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, Myc-type) transcription factors. Using site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, in combination with efficient and high-throughput screening systems, we have identified and characterized several amino acid residues critical for higher transactivation activity of a Myc-like bHLH transcription factor involved in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Site-directed and saturation mutagenesis should be generally applicable to engineering of all TFs.

  8. Two forms of Drosophila melanogaster Gs alpha are produced by alternate splicing involving an unusual splice site.

    PubMed

    Quan, F; Forte, M A

    1990-03-01

    G proteins are responsible for modulating the activity of intracellular effector systems in response to receptor activation. The stimulatory G protein Gs is responsible for activation of adenylate cyclase in response to a variety of hormonal signals. In this report, we describe the structure of the gene for the alpha subunit of Drosophila melanogaster Gs. The gene is approximately 4.5 kilobases long and is divided into nine exons. The exon-intron structure of the Drosophila gene shows substantial similarity to that of the human gene for Gs alpha. Alternate splicing of intron 7, involving either use of an unusual TG or consensus AG 3' splice site, results in transcripts which code for either a long (DGs alpha L) or short (DGs alpha S) form of Gs alpha. These subunits differ by inclusion or deletion of three amino acids and substitution of a Ser for a Gly. The two forms of Drosophila Gs alpha differ in a region where no variation in the primary sequence of vertebrate Gs alpha subunits has been observed. In vitro translation experiments demonstrated that the Drosophila subunits migrate anomalously on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular weights of 51,000 and 48,000. Additional Gs alpha transcript heterogeneity reflects the use of multiple polyadenylation sites.

  9. Highly selective Lewis acid sites in desilicated MFI zeolites for dihydroxyacetone isomerization to lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Dapsens, Pierre Y; Mondelli, Cecilia; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2013-05-01

    Desilication of commercial MFI-type (ZSM-5) zeolites in solutions of alkali metal hydroxides is demonstrated to generate highly selective heterogeneous catalysts for the aqueous-phase isomerization of biobased dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to lactic acid (LA). The best hierarchical ZSM-5 sample attains a LA selectivity exceeding 90 %, which is comparable to that of the state-of-the-art catalyst (i.e., the Sn-beta zeolite); this optimized hierarchical catalyst is recyclable over three runs. The Lewis acid sites, which are created through desilication along with the introduction of mesoporosity, are shown to play a crucial role in the formation of the desired product; these cannot be achieved by using other post-synthetic methods, such as steaming or impregnation of aluminum species. Desilication of other metallosilicates, such as Ga-MFI, also leads to high LA selectivity. In the presence of a soluble aluminum source, such as aluminum nitrate, alkaline-assisted alumination can introduce these unique Lewis acid centers in all-silica MFI zeolites. These findings highlight the potential of zeolites in the field of biomass-to-chemical conversion, and expand the applicability of desilication for the generation of selective catalytic centers.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

  11. Targeted gene disruption identifies three PPR-DYW proteins involved in RNA editing for five editing sites of the moss mitochondrial transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shotaro; Ichinose, Mizuho; Tasaki, Eiji; Aoki, Yoshiaki; Komura, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Mamoru

    2010-11-01

    In plant organelles, RNA editing frequently occurs in many transcripts, but little is known about its molecular mechanism. Eleven RNA editing sites are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens mitochondria. Recently PpPPR_71, one member of 10 DYW-subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR-DYW) proteins, has been identified as a site-specific recognition factor for RNA editing in the mitochondrial transcript. In this study, we disrupted three genes encoding a PPR-DYW protein-PpPPR_56, PpPPR_77, and PpPPR_91-to investigate whether they are involved in RNA editing. Transient expression of an N-terminal amino acid sequence fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) suggests that the three PPR-DYW proteins are targeted to mitochondria. Disruption of each gene by homologous recombination revealed that PpPPR_56 was involved in RNA editing at the nad3 and nad4 sites, PpPPR_77 at the cox2 and cox3 sites, and PpPPR_91 at the nad5-2 site in the mitochondrial transcripts. The nucleotide sequences surrounding the two editing sites targeted by a single PPR-DYW protein share 42 to 56% of their identities. Thus, moss PPR-DYW proteins seem to be site-specific factors for RNA editing in mitochondrial transcripts.

  12. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo S.; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma–axon recordings combined with axonal Na+ and Ca2+ imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na+ channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  13. Probing the Sites of Interactions of Rotaviral Proteins Involved in Replication

    PubMed Central

    Viskovska, Maria; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Hu, Liya; Chow, Dar-Chone; Hurwitz, Amy M.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Palzkill, Timothy; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication and packaging of the rotavirus genome occur in cytoplasmic compartments called viroplasms, which form during virus infection. These processes are orchestrated by yet-to-be-understood complex networks of interactions involving nonstructural proteins (NSPs) 2, 5, and 6 and structural proteins (VPs) 1, 2, 3, and 6. The multifunctional enzyme NSP2, an octamer with RNA binding activity, is critical for viroplasm formation with its binding partner, NSP5, and for genome replication/packaging through its interactions with replicating RNA, the viral polymerase VP1, and the inner core protein VP2. Using isothermal calorimetry, biolayer interferometry, and peptide array screening, we examined the interactions between NSP2, VP1, VP2, NSP5, and NSP6. These studies provide the first evidence that NSP2 can directly bind to VP1, VP2, and NSP6, in addition to the previously known binding to NSP5. The interacting sites identified from reciprocal peptide arrays were found to be in close proximity to the RNA template entry and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) exit tunnels of VP1 and near the catalytic cleft and RNA-binding grooves of NSP2; these sites are consistent with the proposed role of NSP2 in facilitating dsRNA synthesis by VP1. Peptide screening of VP2 identified NSP2-binding sites in the regions close to the intersubunit junctions, suggesting that NSP2 binding could be a regulatory mechanism for preventing the premature self-assembly of VP2. The binding sites on NSP2 for NSP6 were found to overlap that of VP1, and the NSP5-binding sites overlap those of VP2 and VP1, suggesting that interaction of these proteins with NSP2 is likely spatially and/or temporally regulated. IMPORTANCE Replication and packaging of the rotavirus genome occur in cytoplasmic compartments called viroplasms that form during virus infection and are orchestrated by complex networks of interactions involving nonstructural proteins (NSPs) and structural proteins (VPs). A multifunctional RNA

  14. Contrasting microbial functional genes in two distinct saline-alkali and slightly acidic oil-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuting; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Guanghe

    2014-07-15

    To compare the functional gene structure and diversity of microbial communities in saline-alkali and slightly acidic oil-contaminated sites, 40 soil samples were collected from two typical oil exploration sites in North and South China and analyzed with a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0). The overall microbial pattern was significantly different between the two sites, and a more divergent pattern was observed in slightly acidic soils. Response ratio was calculated to compare the microbial functional genes involved in organic contaminant degradation and carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur cycling. The results indicated a significantly low abundance of most genes involved in organic contaminant degradation and in the cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in saline-alkali soils. By contrast, most carbon degradation genes and all carbon fixation genes had similar abundance at both sites. Based on the relationship between the environmental variables and microbial functional structure, pH was the major factor influencing the microbial distribution pattern in the two sites. This study demonstrated that microbial functional diversity and heterogeneity in oil-contaminated environments can vary significantly in relation to local environmental conditions. The limitation of nitrogen and phosphorus and the low degradation capacity of organic contaminant should be carefully considered, particularly in most oil-exploration sites with saline-alkali soils.

  15. A novel ISWI is involved in VSG expression site downregulation in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Katie; Wand, Matthew; Foulston, Lucy; Young, Rosanna; Harley, Kate; Terry, Stephen; Ersfeld, Klaus; Rudenko, Gloria

    2007-05-02

    African trypanosomes show monoallelic expression of one of about 20 telomeric variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene-expression sites (ESs) while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. We screened for genes involved in ES silencing using flow cytometry and RNA interference (RNAi). We show that a novel member of the ISWI family of SWI2/SNF2-related chromatin-remodelling proteins (TbISWI) is involved in ES downregulation in Trypanosoma brucei. TbISWI has an atypical protein architecture for an ISWI, as it lacks characteristic SANT domains. Depletion of TbISWI by RNAi leads to 30-60-fold derepression of ESs in bloodstream-form T. brucei, and 10-17-fold derepression in insect form T. brucei. We show that although blocking synthesis of TbISWI leads to derepression of silent VSG ES promoters, this does not lead to fully processive transcription of silent ESs, or an increase in ES-activation rates. VSG ES activation in African trypanosomes therefore appears to be a multistep process, whereby an increase in transcription from a silent ES promoter is necessary but not sufficient for full ES activation.

  16. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  1. Hypericum perforatum hydroxyalkylpyrone synthase involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis--phylogeny, site-directed mutagenesis, and expression in nonanther tissues.

    PubMed

    Jepson, Christina; Karppinen, Katja; Daku, Rhys M; Sterenberg, Brian T; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2014-09-01

    Anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzyme (ASCL), an ancient plant type III polyketide synthase, is involved in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the stable biopolymer found in the exine layer of the wall of a spore or pollen grain. The gene encoding polyketide synthase 1 from Hypericum perforatum (HpPKS1) was previously shown to be expressed mainly in young flower buds, but also in leaves and other tissues at lower levels. Angiosperm ASCLs, identified by sequence and phylogenetic analyses, are divided into two sister clades, the Ala-clade and the Val-clade, and HpPKS1 belongs to the Ala-clade. Recombinant HpPKS1 produced triketide and, to a lesser extent, tetraketide alkylpyrones from medium-chain (C6) to very long-chain (C24) fatty acyl-CoA substrates. Like other ASCLs, HpPKS1 also preferred hydroxyl fatty acyl-CoA esters over the analogous unsubstituted fatty acyl-CoA esters. To study the structural basis of the substrate preference, mutants of Ala200 and Ala215 at the putative active site and Arg202 and Asp211 at the modeled acyl-binding tunnel were constructed. The A200T/A215Q mutant accepted decanoyl-CoA, a poor substrate for the wild-type enzyme, possibly because of active site constriction by bulkier substitutions. The substrate preference of the A215V and A200T/A215Q mutants shifted toward nonhydroxylated, medium-chain to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA substrates. The R202L/D211V double mutant was selective for acyl-CoA with chain lengths of C16-C18, and showed a diminished preference for the hydroxylated acyl-CoA substrates. Transient upregulation by abscisic acid and downregulation by jasmonic acid and wounding suggested that HpPKS1, and possibly other Ala-clade ASCLs, may be involved in the biosynthesis of minor cell wall components in nonanther tissues.

  2. Results of employee involvement in planning and implementing the Treatwell 5-a-Day work-site study.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M K; Lederman, R; Potter, S; Stoddard, A; Sorensen, G

    2000-04-01

    When work-site health promotion programs incorporate theories of community organization, it is likely that employee ownership and participation are enhanced. This article reports quantitative indicators of involvement of Employee Advisory Board (EAB) members in the Treatwell 5-a-Day work-site study and examines relationships between EAB member time spent on project activities and work-site size, with indicators of the extent of implementation and variables associated with behavior change and work-site support. The results reported here indicate that a greater number of EAB member hours spent on program activities was associated with a greater number of events implemented. Smaller work-site size was associated with greater employee awareness of the program and greater participation in project activities as reported on the employee survey. These results suggest that the number of hours employee representatives devote to project activities might be an important consideration in planning employee involvement in work-site health promotion programming.

  3. Regulation of the expression of key genes involved in HDL metabolism by unsaturated fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects, and possible mechanisms of action, of unsaturated fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in HDL metabolism in HepG2 cells. The mRNA concentration of target genes was assessed by real time PCR. Protein concentrations were determined by wes...

  4. The imidazoline site involved in control of insulin secretion: characteristics that distinguish it from I1- and I2-sites.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. L.; Brown, C. A.; Scarpello, K. E.; Morgan, N. G.

    1994-01-01

    1. The nature of the binding site mediating the insulin secretagogue activity of certain imidazoline compounds remains unclear and the pharmacology of the I1- and I2-imidazoline sites, described in many tissues, does not correlate with the observed responses to imidazolines in islets. In the present paper, we describe further results which support the concept that the islet imidazoline site may represent a novel subtype of imidazoline receptor. 2. Culture of rat isolated islets in the presence of imidazoline secretagogues (either efaroxan or phentolamine) resulted in loss of responsiveness on subsequent re-exposure to these agents. However, culture of islets with either idazoxan or UK14,304 (imidazoline ligands that do not stimulate insulin secretion) did not lead to any loss of response when the islets were subsequently exposed to efaroxan. By contrast, islets cultured with UK14,304 (a potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist), displayed loss of sensitivity to noradrenaline, consistent with down-regulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors. 3. In order to characterize the imidazoline site further, radioligand binding studies were performed in membranes from RINm5F insulinoma cells using [3H]-RX821002, an imidazoline insulin secretagogue that does not interact significantly with imidazoline sites in other tissues. [3H]-RX821002 labelled alpha 2-adrenoceptors with high affinity (2.01 +/- 0.7 nM) but also labelled a second, non-adrenoceptor site with much lower affinity. 4. Under conditions of alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade (in the presence of adrenaline), efaroxan displaced [3H]-RX821002 binding to the low affinity site, in a dose-dependent manner.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952865

  5. Jasmonic acid involves in grape fruit ripening and resistant against Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haifeng; Zhang, Cheng; Pervaiz, Tariq; Zhao, Pengcheng; Liu, Zhongjie; Wang, Baoju; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Lin; Fang, Jinggui; Qian, Jianpu

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex process that is regulated by a signal network. Whereas the regulatory mechanism of abscisic acid has been studied extensively in non-climacteric fruit, little is know about other signaling pathways involved in this process. In this study, we performed that plant hormone jasmonic acid plays an important role in grape fruit coloring and softening by increasing the transcription levels of several ripening-related genes, such as the color-related genes PAL1, DFR, CHI, F3H, GST, CHS, and UFGT; softening-related genes PG, PL, PE, Cell, EG1, and XTH1; and aroma-related genes Ecar, QR, and EGS. Lastly, the fruit anthocyanin, phenol, aroma, and cell wall materials were changed. Jasmonic acid positively regulated its biosynthesis pathway genes LOS, AOS, and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase (OPR) and signal pathway genes COI1 and JMT. RNA interference of grape jasmonic acid pathway gene VvAOS in strawberry fruit appeared fruit un-coloring phenotypes; exogenous jasmonic acid rescued this phenotypes. On the contrary, overexpression of grape jasmonic acid receptor VvCOI1 in the strawberry fruit accelerated the fruit-ripening process and induced some plant defense-related gene expression level. Furthermore, jasmonic acid treatment or strong jasmonic acid signal pathway in strawberry fruit make the fruit resistance against Botrytis cinerea.

  6. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  7. Tranexamic acid induces kaolin intake stimulating a pathway involving tachykinin neurokinin 1 receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Hitoshi; Kawarai-Shimamura, Asako; Kuwagata, Makiko; Orito, Kensuke

    2014-01-15

    Tranexamic acid suppresses post-partum haemorrhage and idiopathic menorrhagia through its anti-fibrinolytic action. Although it is clinically useful, it is associated with high risks of side effects such as emesis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tranexamic acid-induced emesis is very important to explore appropriate anti-emetic drugs for the prevention and/or suppression of emesis. In this study, we examined the receptors involved in tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats, which reflects the drug's clinical emetogenic potential in humans. Further, we examined the brain regions activated by administration of tranexamic acid and elucidated pivotal pathways of tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. We examined the effects of ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, domperidone, a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist, and aprepitant, a tachykinin neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats. Then, we determined the brain regions that showed increased numbers of c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Finally, we examined the effects of an antagonist(s) that reduced tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake on the increase in c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Aprepitant significantly decreased tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. However, neither ondansetron nor domperidone decreased kaolin intake. Tranexamic acid significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactive cells by approximately 5.5-fold and 22-fold in the area postrema and nucleus of solitary tract, respectively. Aprepitant decreased the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in both areas. Tranexamic acid induced kaolin intake possibly via stimulation of tachykinin NK1 receptors in rats. The tachykinin NK1 receptor could be targeted to prevent and/or suppress emesis in patients receiving tranexamic acid.

  8. Dual mechanism of activation of plant plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase by acidic phospholipids: evidence for a phospholipid binding site which overlaps the calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Meneghelli, Silvia; Fusca, Tiziana; Luoni, Laura; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2008-09-01

    The effect of phospholipids on the activity of isoform ACA8 of Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+-ATPase was evaluated in membranes isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain K616 expressing wild type or mutated ACA8 cDNA. Acidic phospholipids stimulated the basal Ca2+-ATPase activity in the following order of efficiency: phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate > phosphatidylserine > phosphatidylcholine approximately = phosphatidylethanolamine approximately = 0. Acidic phospholipids increased V(max-Ca2+) and lowered the value of K(0.5-Ca2+) below the value measured in the presence of calmodulin (CaM). In the presence of CaM acidic phospholipids activated ACA8 by further decreasing its K(0.5-Ca2+) value. Phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and, with lower efficiency, phosphatidylserine bound peptides reproducing ACA8 N-terminus (aa 1-116). Single point mutation of three residues (A56, R59 and Y62) within the sequence A56-T63 lowered the apparent affinity of ACA8 for phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate by two to three fold, indicating that this region contains a binding site for acidic phospholipids. However, the N-deleted mutant Delta74-ACA8 was also activated by acidic phospholipids, indicating that acidic phospholipids activate ACA8 through a complex mechanism, involving interaction with different sites. The striking similarity between the response to acidic phospholipids of ACA8 and animal plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase provides new evidence that type 2B Ca2+-ATPases share common regulatory properties independently of structural differences such as the localization of the terminal regulatory region at the N- or C-terminal end of the protein.

  9. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  10. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  11. Interaction of metal ions with acid sites of biosorbents peat moss and Vaucheria and model substances alginic and humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, R.H.; Martin, J.R.; Crist, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between added metal ions and acid sites of two biosorbents, peat moss and the alga Vaucheria, was studied. Results were interpreted in terms of two model substances, alginic acid, a copolymer of guluronic and mannuronic acids present in marine algae, and humic acid in peat moss. For peat moss and Vaucheria at pH 4--6, two protons were displaced per Cd sorbed, after correction for sorbed metals also displaced by the heavy metal. The frequent neglect of exchange of heavy metals for metals either sorbed on the native material or added for pH adjustment leads to erroneous conclusions about proton displacement stoichiometry. Proton displacement constants K{sub ex}{sup H} decreased logarithmically with pH and had similar slopes for alginic acid and biosorbents. This pH effect was interpreted as an electrostatic effect of increasing anionic charge making proton removal less favorable. The maximum number of exchangeable acid sites (capacity C{sub H}) decreased with pH for alginic acid but increased with pH for biosorbents. Consistent with titration behavior, this difference was explained in terms of more weak acid sites in the biosorbents.

  12. Interstitial telomeric sequences in human chromosomes cluster with common fragile sites, mutagen sensitive sites, viral integration sites, cancer breakpoints, proto-oncogenes and breakpoints involved in primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Adekunle, S.S.A.; Wyandt, H.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Recently we mapped the telomeric repeat sequences to 111 interstitial sites in the human genome and to sites of gaps and breaks induced by aphidicolin and sister chromatid exchange sites detected by BrdU. Many of these sites correspond to conserved fragile sites in man, gorilla and chimpazee, to sites of conserved sister chromatid exchange in the mammalian X chromosome, to mutagenic sensitive sites, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes, breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and to breakpoints indicated as the sole anomaly in neoplasia. This observation prompted us to investigate if the interstitial telomeric sites cluster with these sites. An extensive literature search was carried out to find all the available published sites mentioned above. For comparison, we also carried out a statistical analysis of the clustering of the sites of the telomeric repeats with the gene locations where only nucleotide mutations have been observed as the only chromosomal abnormality. Our results indicate that the telomeric repeats cluster most with fragile sites, mutagenic sensitive sites and breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and least with cancer breakpoints, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes and other genes with nucleotide mutations.

  13. Locating the binding sites of folic acid with milk α- and β-caseins.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-12

    We located the binding sites of folic acid with milk α- and β-caseins at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various folic acid contents. FTIR, UV-visible, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyze folic acid binding sites, the binding constant, and the effect of folic acid interaction on the stability and conformation of caseins. Structural analysis showed that folic acid binds caseins via both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts with overall binding constants of K(folic acid-α-caseins) = 4.8 (±0.6) × 10(4) M(-1) and K(folic acid-β-caseins) = 7.0 (±0.9) × 10(4) M(-1). The number of bound acid molecules per protein was 1.5 (±0.4) for α-casein and 1.4 (±0.3) for β-casein complexes. Molecular modeling showed different binding sites for folic acid on α- and β-caseins. The participation of several amino acids in folic acid-protein complexes was observed, which was stabilized by hydrogen bonding network and the free binding energy of -7.7 kcal/mol (acid-α-casein) and -8.1 kcal/mol (acid-β-casein). Folic acid complexation altered protein secondary structure by the reduction of α-helix from 35% (free α-casein) to 33% (acid-complex) and 32% (free β-casein) to 26% (acid-complex) indicating a partial protein destabilization. Caseins might act as carriers for transportation of folic acid to target molecules.

  14. Prevalence of Common Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas and Subtypes of Hodgkin Lymphoma by Nodal Site of Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Camille; Do, Catherine; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; de Paiva, Geisilene Russano; Valmary, Séverine; Brousset, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) represent a heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoid tumors, which have distinct histological and/or biological characteristics with preferential nodal involvement. However, none of the previous studies have assessed the prevalence of common NHL and HL subtypes at each nodal site of involvement. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of HL and NHL subtypes depending on their nodal sites of involvement. We conducted a single-center retrospective study of 938 lymphoma cases diagnosed in the Pathology Department of Toulouse Purpan Hospital in France between 2001 and 2008, taking into account the site that corresponded to the diagnostic biopsy. The most frequent sites were cervical lymph nodes (36.8% of all cases), inguinal lymph nodes (16.4%), axillary lymph nodes (11.9%), and supraclavicular lymph nodes (11%). We found an unexpected association between intraparotid nodes and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and between inguinal nodes and follicular lymphoma. The risk of having classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) was 15 times greater in patients with mediastinal lymphoma compared to those with other sites of involvement. Regarding HL, nodal and extranodal mediastinal sites and supraclavicular nodes were more likely to be involved by nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (NSCHL). In addition, intra-abdominal lymph nodes were more frequently involved by lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphoma compared to inguinal nodes where NLPHL predominated. Our study shows that some lymph node sites have a disproportionate prevalence of specific subtypes of lymphoma. Identifying these sites may aid to diagnose and better elucidate the pathogenesis of these tumors. PMID:26107683

  15. The heparan and heparin metabolism pathway is involved in regulation of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Michal, Jennifer J; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; MacNeil, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Six genes involved in the heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism pathway, DSEL (dermatan sulfate epimerase-like), EXTL1 (exostoses (multiple)-like 1), HS6ST1 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 1), HS6ST3 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 3), NDST3 (N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (heparan glucosaminyl) 3), and SULT1A1 (sulfotransferase family, cytosolic, 1A, phenol-preferring, member 1), were investigated for their associations with muscle lipid composition using cattle as a model organism. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/multiple nucleotide length polymorphisms (MNLPs) were identified in five of these six genes. Six of these mutations were then genotyped on 246 Wagyu x Limousin F(2) animals, which were measured for 5 carcass, 6 eating quality and 8 fatty acid composition traits. Association analysis revealed that DSEL, EXTL1 and HS6ST1 significantly affected two stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity indices, the amount of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and the relative amount of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in skeletal muscle (P<0.05). In particular, HS6ST1 joined our previously reported SCD1 and UQCRC1 genes to form a three gene network for one of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity indices. These results provide evidence that genes involved in heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism are also involved in regulation of lipid metabolism in bovine muscle. Whether the SNPs affected heparan sulfate proteoglycan structure is unknown and warrants further investigation.

  16. Yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid: acidic conditions caused by the organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures induce expression of intracellular metal metabolism genes regulated by Aft1p.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2006-09-01

    Using two types of genome-wide analysis to investigate yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid, we found that the acidic condition affects metal metabolism. The first type is an expression analysis using DNA microarrays to investigate 'acid shock response' as the first step to adapt to an acidic condition, and 'acid adaptation' by maintaining integrity in the acidic condition. The other is a functional screening using the nonessential genes deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression analysis showed that genes involved in stress response, such as YGP1, TPS1 and HSP150, were induced under the acid shock response. Genes such as FIT2, ARN1 and ARN2, involved in metal metabolism regulated by Aft1p, were induced under the acid adaptation. AFT1 was induced under acid shock response and under acid adaptation with lactic acid. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-fused Aft1p was localized to the nucleus in cells grown in media containing lactic acid, acetic acid, or hydrochloric acid. Both analyses suggested that the acidic condition affects cell wall architecture. The depletion of cell-wall components encoded by SED1, DSE2, CTS1, EGT2, SCW11, SUN4 and YNL300W and histone acetyltransferase complex proteins encoded by YID21, EAF3, EAF5, EAF6 and YAF9 increased resistance to lactic acid. Depletion of the cell-wall mannoprotein Sed1p provided resistance to lactic acid, although the expression of SED1 was induced by exposure to lactic acid. Depletion of vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase and high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins caused acid sensitivity. Moreover, our quantitative PCR showed that expression of PDR12 increased under acid shock response with lactic acid and decreased under acid adaptation with hydrochloric acid.

  17. Retinoic acid signalling centres in the avian embryo identified by sites of expression of synthesising and catabolising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Blentic, Aida; Gale, Emily; Maden, Malcolm

    2003-05-01

    Retinoic acid is an important signalling molecule in the developing embryo, but its precise distribution throughout development is very difficult to determine by available techniques. Examining the distribution of the enzymes by which it is synthesised by using in situ hybridisation is an alternative strategy. Here, we describe the distribution of three retinoic acid synthesising enzymes and one retinoic acid catabolic enzyme during the early stages of chick embryogenesis with the intention of identifying localized retinoic acid signalling regions. The enzymes involved are Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3, and Cyp26A1. Although some of these distributions have been described before, here we assemble them all in one species and several novel sites of enzyme expression are identified, including Hensen's node, the cardiac endoderm, the presumptive pancreatic endoderm, and the dorsal lens. This study emphasizes the dynamic pattern of expression of the enzymes that control the availability of retinoic acid as well as the role that retinoic acid plays in the development of many regions of the embryo throughout embryogenesis. This strategy provides a basis for understanding the phenotypes of retinoic acid teratology and retinoic acid-deficiency syndromes.

  18. Identification of a Desaturase Involved in Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Albel; Varela, Cristian; Bhatt, Kiranmai; Veerapen, Natacha; Lee, Oona Y. C.; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Minnikin, David E.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Teramoto, Kanae; Bhatt, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Mycolic acids are unique long chain fatty acids found in the cell walls of mycobacteria including the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The introduction of double bonds in mycolic acids remains poorly understood, however, genes encoding two potential aerobic desaturases have been proposed to be involved in this process. Here we show that one of these genes, desA1, is essential for growth of the saprophytic Mycobacterium smegmatis. Depletion of desA1 in a M. smegmatis conditional mutant led to reduction of mycolic acid biosynthesis and loss of viability. The DesA1-depleted cells exhibited two other phenotypes: using 14[C]-labelling, we detected the accumulation of minor mycolic acid-related species that migrated faster in a silver TLC plate. Spiral Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopic analysis suggested the presence of species with sizes corresponding to what were likely monoenoic derivatives of α-mycolic acids. Additionally, conditional depletion led to the presence of free fatty acyl species of lengths ~C26-C48 in the lysing cells. Cell viability could be rescued in the conditional mutant by Mycobacterium tuberculosis desA1, highlighting the potential of desA1 as a new drug target in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:27741286

  19. Trimethylamine as a probe molecule to differentiate acid sites in Y-FAU zeolite: FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Francisca Romero; Blasin-Aubé, Vanessa; Saussey, Jacques; Marie, Olivier; Daturi, Marco

    2006-07-06

    In heterogeneous catalysis acidity has a very important influence on activity and selectivity: correct determination of acidic properties is a base to improve industrial processes. The aim of this work was to study trimethylamine (TMA) as a probe molecule able to distinguish between the different Brønsted acid sites in zeolitic frameworks. Our work mainly focused on faujasite-type zeolites because the HY zeolite is one of the most used acidic catalysts in industrial processes. In this paper, typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species (formed in supercages) are detected in the HY zeolite. TMA interacting by hydrogen bonding with the acid sites located in the sodalite units is also observed. The wavenumbers of some typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species appear to depend on the acidic strength, and a complementary study with ZSM-5 and X-FAU samples confirms this proposition.

  20. One-dimensional alignment of strong Lewis acid sites in a porous coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Takashi; Higuchi, Masakazu; Yuasa, Akihiro; Higashimura, Hideyuki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2013-11-18

    A new lanthanoid porous coordination polymer, La-BTTc (BTTc = benzene-1,3,5-tris(2-thiophene-5-carboxylate)), was synthesized and structurally characterized to have densely aligned one-dimensional open metal sites, which were found to act as strong Lewis acid sites after the removal of the coordinated solvent.

  1. Involvement of a lipoxygenase-like enzyme in abscisic Acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Bell, E; Mullet, J E

    1992-07-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that abscisic acid (ABA) is derived from 9'-cis-neoxanthin or 9'-cis-violaxanthin with xanthoxin as an intermediate. (18)O-labeling experiments show incorporation primarily into the side chain carboxyl group of ABA, suggesting that oxidative cleavage occurs at the 11, 12 (11', 12') double bond of xanthophylls. Carbon monoxide, a strong inhibitor of heme-containing P-450 monooxygenases, did not inhibit ABA accumulation, suggesting that the oxygenase catalyzing the carotenoid cleavage step did not contain heme. This observation, plus the ability of lipoxygenase to make xanthoxin from violaxanthin, suggested that a lipoxygenase-like enzyme is involved in ABA biosynthesis. To test this idea, the ability of several soybean (Glycine max L.) lipoxygenase inhibitors (5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and naproxen) to inhibit stress-induced ABA accumulation in soybean cell culture and soybean seedlings was determined. All lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly inhibited ABA accumulation in response to stress. These results suggest that the in vivo oxidative cleavage reaction involved in ABA biosynthesis requires activity of a nonheme oxygenase having lipoxygenase-like properties.

  2. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress.

  3. Predicting Protein–Protein Interaction Sites Using Sequence Descriptors and Site Propensity of Neighboring Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu-Hao; Li, Kuo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Information about the interface sites of Protein–Protein Interactions (PPIs) is useful for many biological research works. However, despite the advancement of experimental techniques, the identification of PPI sites still remains as a challenging task. Using a statistical learning technique, we proposed a computational tool for predicting PPI interaction sites. As an alternative to similar approaches requiring structural information, the proposed method takes all of the input from protein sequences. In addition to typical sequence features, our method takes into consideration that interaction sites are not randomly distributed over the protein sequence. We characterized this positional preference using protein complexes with known structures, proposed a numerical index to estimate the propensity and then incorporated the index into a learning system. The resulting predictor, without using structural information, yields an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.675, recall of 0.597, precision of 0.311 and accuracy of 0.583 on a ten-fold cross-validation experiment. This performance is comparable to the previous approach in which structural information was used. Upon introducing the B-factor data to our predictor, we demonstrated that the AUC can be further improved to 0.750. The tool is accessible at http://bsaltools.ym.edu.tw/predppis. PMID:27792167

  4. Homology modeling and identification of amino acids involved in the catalytic process of Mycobacterium tuberculosis serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juanjuan; Zang, Shizhu; Ma, Yufang; Owusu, Lawrence; Zhou, Lei; Jiang, Tao; Xin, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Serine acetyltransferase (CysE) belongs to the hexapeptide acetyltransferase family and is involved in the biosynthesis of L‑cysteine in microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis CysE is regarded as a potential target for anti‑tuberculosis (TB) drugs; however, the structure and active sites of M. tuberculosis CysE remain unknown. The present study aimed to predict the secondary structure and to construct a 3D model for M. tuberculosis CysE using bioinformatics analysis. To determine the essential amino acids that are associated with CysE enzymatic activity, amino acid sequences from several microorganisms were compared, and a consensus sequence was identified. Subsequently, site‑directed mutagenesis was used to generate mutant M. tuberculosis CysE proteins. Enzyme assays demonstrated that D67A, H82A and H117A mutants abolished ~75% activity of M. tuberculosis CysE. Prediction of the protein structure and identification of the active amino acids for M. tuberculosis CysE is essential for designing inhibitors, which may aid the discovery of effective anti‑TB drugs.

  5. The relationship between involvement in and use of evaluation in multi-site evaluations.

    PubMed

    Roseland, Denise; Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao

    2015-02-01

    This research explores the relationship between participation in evaluation and the use of evaluation findings and processes within three large-scale multi-site evaluations. Using canonical correlation analysis and a collection of 20 interviews, this study describes and tests the relationship between these two critical conceptual powerhouses in evaluation. Using data that were collected as a part of the NSF-funded research Beyond Evaluation Use (Lawrenz & King, 2009), this study found that some theories and beliefs about participatory evaluation contribute to use and influence in similar ways as in single-site evaluations. The differences identified in this research highlight potential planning and implementation considerations that might allow multi-site evaluators and funders of multi-site evaluation to enhance use and influence of multi-site evaluations.

  6. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  7. Changes in actin dynamics are involved in salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Jindřiška; Janda, Martin; Fišer, Radovan; Sašek, Vladimír; Kocourková, Daniela; Burketová, Lenka; Dušková, Jiřina; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics are one of the crucial players in many physiological as well as non-physiological processes in plant cells. Positioning of actin filament arrays is necessary for successful establishment of primary lines of defense toward pathogen attack, depolymerization leads very often to the enhanced susceptibility to the invading pathogen. On the other hand it was also shown that the disruption of actin cytoskeleton leads to the induction of defense response leading to the expression of PATHOGENESIS RELATED proteins (PR). In this study we show that pharmacological actin depolymerization leads to the specific induction of genes in salicylic acid pathway but not that involved in jasmonic acid signaling. Life imaging of leafs of Arabidopsis thaliana with GFP-tagged fimbrin (GFP-fABD2) treated with 1 mM salicylic acid revealed rapid disruption of actin filaments resembling the pattern viewed after treatment with 200 nM latrunculin B. The effect of salicylic acid on actin filament fragmentation was prevented by exogenous addition of phosphatidic acid, which binds to the capping protein and thus promotes actin polymerization. The quantitative evaluation of actin filament dynamics is also presented.

  8. Organic acids in cloud water and rainwater at a mountain site in acid rain areas of South China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Xueqiao; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characteristics of organic acids and to identify their source, cloud water and rainwater samples were collected at Mount Lu, a mountain site located in the acid rain-affected area of south China, from August to September of 2011 and March to May of 2012. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of organic acids in cloud water was 38.42 μeq/L, ranging from 7.45 to 111.46 μeq/L, contributing to 2.50 % of acidity. In rainwater samples, organic acid concentrations varied from 12.39 to 68.97 μeq/L (VWM of 33.39 μeq/L). Organic acids contributed significant acidity to rainwater, with a value of 17.66 %. Formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid were the most common organic acids in both cloud water and rainwater. Organic acids had an obviously higher concentration in summer than in spring in cloud water, whereas there was much less discrimination in rainwater between the two seasons. The contribution of organic acids to acidity was lower during summer than during spring in both cloud water (2.20 % in summer vs 2.83 % in spring) and rainwater (12.24 % in summer vs 19.89 % in spring). The formic-to-acetic acid ratio (F/A) showed that organic acids were dominated by primary emissions in 71.31 % of the cloud water samples and whole rainwater samples. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis determined four factors as the sources of organic acids in cloud water, including biogenic emissions (61.8 %), anthropogenic emissions (15.28 %), marine emissions (15.07 %) and soil emissions (7.85 %). The findings from this study imply an indispensable role of organic acids in wet deposition, but organic acids may have a limited capacity to increase ecological risks in local environments.

  9. Characterization of a domoic acid binding site from Pacific razor clam.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Vera L; Bill, Brian D

    2004-08-10

    The Pacific razor clam, Siliqua patula, is known to retain domoic acid, a water-soluble glutamate receptor agonist produced by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. The mechanism by which razor clams tolerate high levels of the toxin, domoic acid, in their tissues while still retaining normal nerve function is unknown. In our study, a domoic acid binding site was solubilized from razor clam siphon using a combination of Triton X-100 and digitonin. In a Scatchard analysis using [3H]kainic acid, the partially-purified membrane showed two distinct receptor sites, a high affinity, low capacity site with a KD (mean +/- S.E.) of 28 +/- 9.4 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 12 +/- 3.8 pmol/mg protein and a low affinity, high capacity site with a mM affinity for radiolabeled kainic acid, the latter site which was lost upon solubilization. Competition experiments showed that the rank order potency for competitive ligands in displacing [3H]kainate binding from the membrane-bound receptors was quisqualate > ibotenate > iodowillardiine = AMPA = fluorowillardiine > domoate > kainate > L-glutamate. At high micromolar concentrations, NBQX, NMDA and ATPA showed little or no ability to displace [3H]kainate. In contrast, Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate showed linearity, indicating the presence of a single binding site with a KD and Bmax of 500 +/- 50 nM and 14 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These results suggest that razor clam siphon contains both a high and low affinity receptor site for kainic acid and may contain more than one subtype of glutamate receptor, thereby allowing the clam to function normally in a marine environment that often contains high concentrations of domoic acid.

  10. Modular organization of residue-level contacts shape the selection pressure on individual amino acid sites of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2017-02-22

    Understanding the molecular evolution of macromolecular complexes in the light of their structure, assembly and stability is of central importance. Here we address how the modular organization of native molecular contacts shapes the selection pressure on individual residue sites of ribosomal complexes. The bacterial ribosomal complex is represented as a residue contact network where nodes represent amino acid/nucleotide residues and edges represent their van der Waals interactions. We find statistically overrepresented native amino acid-nucleotide contacts (OaantC, one amino acid contacts one or multiple nucleotides, inter-nucleotide contacts are disregarded). Contact number is defined as the number of nucleotides contacted. Involvement of individual amino acids in OaantCs with smaller contact numbers is more random, while only a few amino acids significantly contribute to OaantCs with higher contact numbers. An investigation of structure, stability and assembly of bacterial ribosome depicts the involvement of these OaantCs in diverse biophysical interactions stabilizing the complex, including high-affinity protein-RNA contacts, inter-protein cooperativity, inter-subunit bridge, packing of multiple ribosomal RNA domains etc. Amino acid-nucleotide constituents of OaantCs with higher contact numbers are generally associated with significantly slower substitution rates compared to that of OaantCs with smaller contact numbers. This evolutionary rate heterogeneity emerges from the strong purifying selection pressure that conserves the respective amino acid physicochemical properties relevant to the stabilizing interaction with OaantC nucleotides. An analysis of relative molecular orientations of OaantC residues and their interaction energetics provides the biophysical ground of purifying selection conserving OaantC amino acid physicochemical properties.

  11. Transcriptional activation by the acidic domain of Vmw65 requires the integrity of the domain and involves additional determinants distinct from those necessary for TFIIB binding.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; Greaves, R; O'Hare, P

    1993-09-01

    In this work we have examined the requirements for activity of the acidic domain of Vmw65 (VP16) by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the region in the context of GAL4 fusion proteins. The results indicate that the present interpretation of what actually constitutes the activation domain is not correct. We demonstrate, using a promoter with one target site which is efficiently activated by the wild-type (wt) fusion protein, that amino acids distal to residue 453 are critical for activity. Truncation of the domain or substitution of residues in the distal region almost completely abrogate activity. However, inactivating mutations within the distal region are complemented by using a promoter containing multiple target sites. Moreover, duplication of the proximal region, but not the distal region, restores the ability to activate a promoter with a single target site. These results indicate some distinct qualitative difference between the proximal and distal regions. We have also examined the binding of nuclear proteins to the wt domain and to a variant with the distal region inactivated by mutation. The lack of activity of this variant is not explained by a lack of binding of TFIIB, a protein previously reported to be the likely target of the acidic domain. Therefore some additional function is involved in transcriptional activation by the acid domain, and determinants distinct from those involved in TFIIB binding are required for this function. Analysis of the total protein profiles binding to the wt and mutant domains has demonstrated the selective binding to the wt domain of a 135-kDa polypeptide, which is therefore a candidate component involved in this additional function. This is the first report to provide evidence for the proposal of a multiplicity of interactions within the acidic domain, by uncoupling requirements for one function from those for another.

  12. Student Involvement with the Regionally Important Geomorphological Site (RIGS) Scheme: An Opportunity to Learn Geomorphology and Gain Transferable Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Lindsey

    1996-01-01

    Outlines student involvement with a conservation project that aims to develop a Regionally Important Geological/Geomorphological Site network (RIGS) at a county level in the United Kingdom. Emphasis is placed on identifying, describing, evaluating, and documenting land forms of educational, research, historical, and/or aesthetic value. (MJP)

  13. Biological control of bacterial wilt in Arabidopsis thaliana involves abscissic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong Xin; Tasset, Céline; Hanemian, Mathieu; Barlet, Xavier; Hu, Jian; Trémousaygue, Dominique; Deslandes, Laurent; Marco, Yves

    2012-06-01

    Means to control bacterial wilt caused by the phytopathogenic root bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum are limited. Mutants in a large cluster of genes (hrp) involved in the pathogenicity of R. solanacearum were successfully used in a previous study as endophytic biocontrol agents in challenge inoculation experiments on tomato. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this resistance remained unknown. We developed a protection assay using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant and analyzed the events underlying the biological control by genetic, transcriptomic and molecular approaches. High protection rates associated with a significant decrease in the multiplication of R. solanacearum were observed in plants pre-inoculated with a ΔhrpB mutant strain. Neither salicylic acid, nor jasmonic acid/ethylene played a role in the establishment of this resistance. Microarray analysis showed that 26% of the up-regulated genes in protected plants are involved in the biosynthesis and signalling of abscissic acid (ABA). In addition 21% of these genes are constitutively expressed in the irregular xylem cellulose synthase mutants (irx), which present a high level of resistance to R. solanacearum. We propose that inoculation with the ΔhrpB mutant strain generates a hostile environment for subsequent plant colonization by a virulent strain of R. solanacearum.

  14. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  15. Endotracheal Involvement as an Unusual Extranodal Site of Recurrence from Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Verde, Franco; McGeehan, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas are uncommon subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with poor overall survival ranging from 3-5 years. Patients are often middle aged men who would present with generalized lymphadenopathy and typical constitutional symptoms. Extranodal disease is typically found in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, and central nervous system. Lung involvement is typically restricted to parenchymal lesions. Endotracheal involvement is quite uncommon with less than 5% of cases. We present an unusual case of treated mantle cell lymphoma recurring 7 years later with only endotracheal involvement demonstrated by fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography.

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Is Involved in the Toxic Activity of Boric Acid against Saprolegnia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shimaa E.; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A. A.; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4–24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp. PMID:25354209

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaa E; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A A; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  18. Lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-19

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  19. Expression analysis for genes involved in arachidonic acid biosynthesis in Mortierella alpina CBS 754.68.

    PubMed

    Samadlouie, Hamid-Reza; Hamidi-Esfahani, Zohreh; Alavi, Seyed-Mehdi; Varastegani, Boshra

    2014-01-01

    The time courses for production of fungal biomass, lipid, phenolic and arachidonic acid (ARA) as well as expression of the genes involved in biosynthesis of ARA and lipid were examined in Mortierella alpina CBS 754.68. A significant increase in the arachidonic acid content in lipids that coincided with reduced levels of lipid was obtained. Reduced gene expression occurred presumably due to the steady reduction of carbon and nitrogen resources. However, these energy resources were inefficiently compensated by the breakdown of the accumulated lipids that in turn, induced up-regulated expression of the candidate genes. The results further indicated that the expression of the GLELO encoding gene is a rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of ARA in the early growth phase.

  20. The involvement of coordinative interactions in the binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase to titanium dioxide-Localization of a putative binding site.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Avraham; Babin, Gilad; Ganoth, Assaf; Kayouf, Nivin Samir; Nitoker Eliaz, Neta; Mukkala, Srijana; Tsfadia, Yossi; Fleminger, Gideon

    2017-02-28

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used in orthodontic and orthopedic implants by virtue to their high biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and high resistance to corrosion. Biointegration of the implants with the tissue requires strong interactions, which involve biological molecules, proteins in particular, with metal oxide surfaces. An exocellular high-affinity titanium dioxide (TiO2 )-binding protein (TiBP), purified from Rhodococcus ruber, has been previously studied in our lab. This protein was shown to be homologous with the orthologous cytoplasmic rhodococcal dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (rhDLDH). We have found that rhDLDH and its human homolog (hDLDH) share the TiO2 -binding capabilities with TiBP. Intrigued by the unique TiO2 -binding properties of hDLDH, we anticipated that it may serve as a molecular bridge between Ti-based medical structures and human tissues. The objective of the current study was to locate the region and the amino acids of the protein that mediate the protein-TiO2 surface interaction. We demonstrated the role of acidic amino acids in the nonelectrostatic enzyme/dioxide interactions at neutral pH. The observation that the interaction of DLDH with various metal oxides is independent of their isoelectric values strengthens this notion. DLDH does not lose its enzymatic activity upon binding to TiO2 , indicating that neither the enzyme undergoes major conformational changes nor the TiO2 binding site is blocked. Docking predictions suggest that both rhDLDH and hDLDH bind TiO2 through similar regions located far from the active site and the dimerization sites. The putative TiO2 -binding regions of both the bacterial and human enzymes were found to contain a CHED (Cys, His, Glu, Asp) motif, which has been shown to participate in metal-binding sites in proteins.

  1. Community Involvement as an Effective Institutional Control at the Weldon Spring Site, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Deyo, Y.E.; Pauling, T.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) was conducted for the purpose of remediating a portion of a former trinitrotoluene and dinitrotoluene production plant that was operational from 1941 to 1945 and a former uranium refinery that was operational from 1957 to 1966. Surface remediation activities concluded in 2001 with the completion of a 45-acre (.18 square kilometer) on-site engineered disposal facility. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities at the site were officially transferred to the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2003. The Weldon Spring Site is located within the St. Louis, Missouri, metropolitan area (population 3 million). DOE's close relationship with surrounding land owners created a need for innovative solutions to long-term surveillance and maintenance issues at the site. Through a Secretarial proclamation, a plan was established for development of a comprehensive public involvement and education program. This program would act as an institutional control to communicate the historical legacy of the site and would make information available about contamination present at the site to guide people in making decisions about appropriate site activities. In August 2002, the Weldon Spring Site Interpretive Center opened to the public with exhibits about the history of the area, the remediation work that was completed, and a site information repository that is available to visitors. In addition, the Hamburg Trail for hiking and biking was constructed as a joint DOE/MDC effort. The 8-mile trail travels through both DOE and MDC property; a series of historical markers posted along its length to communicate the history of the area and the remediation work that was done as part of WSSRAP activities. A ramp and viewing platform with informational plaques were constructed on the disposal cell to provide an additional mechanism for public education. With a basic marketing program, site visitor-ship has

  2. Tissue Specific Expression Levels of Apoptosis Involved Genes Have Correlations with Codon and Amino Acid Usage

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Iman; Salavaty, Abbas; Nasiri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Different mechanisms, including transcriptional and post transcriptional processes, regulate tissue specific expression of genes. In this study, we report differences in gene/protein compositional features between apoptosis involved genes selectively expressed in human tissues. We found some correlations between codon/amino acid usage and tissue specific expression level of genes. The findings can be significant for understanding the translational selection on these features. The selection may play an important role in the differentiation of human tissues and can be considered for future studies in diagnosis of some diseases such as cancer. PMID:28154517

  3. Atmospheric geochemistry of formic and acetic acids at a mid-latitude temperate site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Beecher, K. M.; Harriss, R. C.; Cofer, R. W., III

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas, the aerosol, and the rainwater phases were determined in samples collected 1-2 m above ground level at an open field site in eastern Virginia. These acids were found to occur principally (98 percent or above) in the gas phase, with a marked annual seasonality, averaging 1890 ppt for formate and 1310 ppt for acetate during the growing season, as compared to 695 ppt and 700 ppt, respectively, over the nongrowing season. The data support the hypothesis that biogenic emissions from vegatation are important sources of atmospheric formic and acetic acid during the local growing season. The same time trends were observed for precipitation, although with less defined seasonality. The relative increase of the acetic acid/formic acid ratio during the nongrowing season points to the dominance of anthropogenic inputs of acetic acid from motor vehicles and biomass combustion in the wintertime.

  4. X-ray studies on crystalline complexes involving amino acids and peptides. XLII. Adipic acid complexes of L- and DL-arginine and supramolecular association in arginine-dicarboxylic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Siddhartha; Singh, Desh Deepak; Vijayan, M

    2005-02-01

    The adipic acid complexes of DL-arginine and L-arginine are made up of zwitterionic, singularly positively charged arginium ions and doubly negatively charged adipate ions, with a 2:1 stoichiometry. One of the two crystallographically independent arginium ions in the L-arginine complex has a conformation hitherto unobserved in crystal structures containing the amino acid. In the present study the structural data on arginine complexes of saturated dicarboxylic acids with 0-5 C atoms separating the two carboxyl functions are given. In terms of molecular aggregation, formic and acetic acid complexes behave in a similar way to those involving fairly long carboxylic acids such as adipic acid. By and large, the supramolecular assembly in complexes involving dicarboxylic acids with 3 or more C atoms separating the carboxyl groups (glutaric, adipic and pimelic acids), and those involving formic and acetic acids, have common features. The aggregation patterns in complexes involving oxalic, malonic and maleic acids do not share striking features among themselves (except for the mode of hydrogen-bonded dimerization of arginium ions) or with those involving larger dicarboxylic acids. Complexes of succinic acid, the shortest linear dicarboxylic acid, share features with those involving shorter as well as longer dicarboxylic acids. The difference in the behaviour of long and short dicarboxylic acids and the ambiguous behaviour of succinic acid can be broadly related to their lengths.

  5. Binding of coumarins to site I of human serum albumin. Effect of the fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zatón, A M; Ferrer, J M; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; Marquínez, M A

    1995-07-14

    It is known that binding site I on human serum albumin (HSA) consists of a zone of two overlapping regions: the specific binding region represented by warfarin binding and the specific binding region represented by azapropazone and phenylbutazone binding. In this paper binding parameters to defatted HSA and to HSA with fatty acids (molar ratio of fatty acid/HSA = 4) were compared. High-affinity binding sites for warfarin, 4-chromanol, 4-hydroxycoumarin, coumarin, 3-acetylcoumarin and phenylbutazone (759,549 M-1 > Ka > 67,024 M-1) constitute binding site I on HSA. In this binding area defatted HSA can bind two molecules of warfarin, but the presence of fatty acids diminish the binding capacity of warfarin to HSA (2 > n > 1).

  6. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-05-06

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevoflurane action on the bacterial NaV channel NaChBac by using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, electrophysiology, and kinetic analysis. Structural modeling revealed multiple sevoflurane interaction sites possibly associated with NaChBac modulation. Electrophysiologically, sevoflurane favors activation and inactivation at low concentrations (0.2 mM), and additionally accelerates current decay at high concentrations (2 mM). Explaining these observations, kinetic modeling suggests concurrent destabilization of closed states and low-affinity open channel block. We propose that the multiple effects of sevoflurane on NaChBac result from simultaneous interactions at multiple sites with distinct affinities. This multiple-site, multiple-mode hypothesis offers a framework to study the structural basis of general anesthetic action.

  7. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevoflurane action on the bacterial NaV channel NaChBac by using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, electrophysiology, and kinetic analysis. Structural modeling revealed multiple sevoflurane interaction sites possibly associated with NaChBac modulation. Electrophysiologically, sevoflurane favors activation and inactivation at low concentrations (0.2 mM), and additionally accelerates current decay at high concentrations (2 mM). Explaining these observations, kinetic modeling suggests concurrent destabilization of closed states and low-affinity open channel block. We propose that the multiple effects of sevoflurane on NaChBac result from simultaneous interactions at multiple sites with distinct affinities. This multiple-site, multiple-mode hypothesis offers a framework to study the structural basis of general anesthetic action. PMID:24753583

  8. Endocytosis of lysosomal acid phosphatase; involvement of mannose receptor and effect of lectins.

    PubMed

    Imai, K; Yoshimura, T

    1994-08-01

    Acid phosphatase and beta-glucosidase are unique among lysosomal enzymes in that they have both high mannose and complex type sugasr chains, whereas oligosaccharide chains of lysosomal enzymes in matrix are of high mannose type. We have previously shown that beta-glucosidase was endocytosed into macrophages via an unidentified receptor different from a mannose/fucose receptor (K. Imai, Cell Struct. Funct. 13, 325-332, 1988). Here, we show that uptake of acid phosphatase purified from rat liver lysosomes into rat macrophages was inhibited by ligands for a mannose/fucose receptor and was mediated via an apparently single binding site with Kuptake of 24.7 nM. These results indicate that acid phosphatase and beta-glucosidase recognize different types of receptors even if they have similar sugar chains. Polyvalent concanavalin A which binds both to the enzyme and to macrophages specifically stimulated the uptake in a dose dependent manner, whereas wheat germ agglutinin and phytohaemagglutinin did not.

  9. Activation of Hepatic Lipase Expression by Oleic Acid: Possible Involvement of USF1

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, Diederik; van Leeuwen, Marije; Akdogan, Deniz; Adams, Hadie; Jansen, Hans; Verhoeven, Adrie J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression mainly through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), but how monounsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression is poorly understood. In HepG2 cells, oleate supplementation has been shown to increase secretion of hepatic lipase (HL). We hypothesized that oleate affects HL gene expression at the transcriptional level. To test this, we studied the effect of oleate on HL promoter activity using HepG2 cells and the proximal HL promoter region (700 bp). Oleate increased HL expression and promoter activity 1.3–2.1 fold and reduced SREBP activity by 50%. Downregulation of SREBP activity by incubation with cholesterol+25-hydroxycholesterol had no effect on HL promoter activity. Overexpression of SREBP2, but not SREBP1, reduced HL promoter activity, which was effected mainly through the USF1 binding site at -307/-312. Oleate increased the nuclear abundance of USF1 protein 2.7 ± 0.6 fold, while USF1 levels were reduced by SREBP2 overexpression. We conclude that oleate increases HL gene expression via USF1. USF1 may be an additional fatty acid sensor in liver cells. PMID:22253973

  10. Increased urinary lysophosphatidic acid in mouse with subtotal nephrectomy: potential involvement in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Koryun; Baïotto, Anna; Dupuy, Aude; Marsal, Dimitri; Denis, Colette; Vinel, Claire; Sicard, Pierre; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P; Klein, Julie; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Increased incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with consecutive progression to end-stage renal disease represents a significant burden to healthcare systems. Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a classical hallmark of CKD and is well correlated with the loss of renal function. The bioactive lysophospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting through specific G-protein-coupled receptors, was previously shown to be involved in TIF development in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Here, we study the role of LPA in a mouse subjected to subtotal nephrectomy (SNx), a more chronic and progressive model of CKD. Five months after surgical nephron reduction, SNx mice showed massive albuminuria, extensive TIF, and glomerular hypertrophy when compared to sham-operated animals. Urinary and plasma levels of LPA were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. LPA was significantly increased in SNx urine, not in plasma, and was significantly correlated with albuminuria and TIF. Moreover, SNx mice showed significant downregulation in the renal expression of lipid phosphate phosphohydrolases (LPP1, 2, and 3) that might be involved in reduced LPA bioavailability through dephosphorylation. We concluded that SNx increases urinary LPA through a mechanism that could involve co-excretion of plasma LPA with albumin associated with a reduction of its catabolism in the kidney. Because of the previously demonstrated profibrotic activity of LPA, the association of urinary LPA with TIF suggests the potential involvement of LPA in the development of advanced CKD in the SNx mouse model. Targeting LPA metabolism might represent an interesting approach in CKD treatment.

  11. Peptide bond formation does not involve acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Beringer, Malte; Adio, Sarah; Rodnina, Marina V

    2006-05-01

    Ribosomes catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between aminoacyl esters of transfer RNAs within a catalytic center composed of ribosomal RNA only. Here we show that the reaction of P-site formylmethionine (fMet)-tRNA(fMet) with a modified A-site tRNA substrate, Phelac-tRNA(Phe), in which the nucleophilic amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl group, does not show the pH dependence observed with small substrate analogs such as puromycin and hydroxypuromycin. This indicates that acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues is not important in the reaction with the full-size substrate. Rather, the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation by positioning the tRNAs, or their 3' termini, through interactions with rRNA that induce and/or stabilize a pH-insensitive conformation of the active site and provide a preorganized environment facilitating the reaction. The rate of peptide bond formation with unmodified Phe-tRNA(Phe) is estimated to be >300 s(-1).

  12. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P.

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F --> Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) --> σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  13. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F → Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) → σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  14. Site-specific fatty acid-conjugation to prolong protein half-life in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Mizuta, Yukina; Takasu, Akinori; Hahn, Young S.; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are indispensable in treating numerous human diseases. However, therapeutic proteins often suffer short serum half-life. In order to extend the serum half-life, a natural albumin ligand (a fatty acid) has been conjugated to small therapeutic peptides resulting in a prolonged serum half-life via binding to patients' serum albumin in vivo. However, fatty acid-conjugation has limited applicability due to lack of site-specificity resulting in the heterogeneity of conjugated proteins and a significant loss in pharmaceutical activity. In order to address these issues, we exploited the site-specific fatty acid-conjugation to a permissive site of a protein, using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition, by linking a fatty acid derivative to p-ethynylphenylalanine incorporated into a protein using an engineered pair of yeast tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. As a proof-of-concept, we show that single palmitic acid conjugated to superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) in a site-specific manner enhanced a protein's albumin-binding in vitro about 20 times and the serum half-life in vivo 5 times when compared to those of the unmodified sfGFP. Furthermore, the fatty acid conjugation did not cause a significant reduction in the fluorescence of sfGFP. Therefore, these results clearly indicate that the site-specific fatty acid-conjugation is a very promising strategy to prolong protein serum half-life in vivo without compromising its folded structure and activity. PMID:23735573

  15. Ascorbic acid and reactive oxygen species are involved in the inhibition of seed germination by abscisic acid in rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Zhang, Aying; Li, Yingxuan; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Jia, Liguo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-03-01

    The antagonism between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in controlling seed germination, but the mechanism of antagonism during this process is not known. The possible links among ABA, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ascorbic acid (ASC), and GA during rice seed germination were investigated. Unlike in non-seed tissues where ROS production is increased by ABA, ABA reduced ROS production in imbibed rice seeds, especially in the embryo region. Such reduced ROS also led to an inhibition of ASC production. GA accumulation was also suppressed by a reduced ROS and ASC level, which was indicated by the inhibited expression of GA biosynthesis genes, amylase genes, and enzyme activity. Application of exogenous ASC can partially rescue seed germination from ABA treatment. Production of ASC, which acts as a substrate in GA biosynthesis, was significantly inhibited by lycorine which thus suppressed the accumulation of GA. Consequently, expression of GA biosynthesis genes was suppressed by the low levels of ROS and ASC in ABA-treated seeds. It can be concluded that ABA regulates seed germination in multiple dimensions. ROS and ASC are involved in its inhibition of GA biosynthesis.

  16. Functional site profiling and electrostatic analysis of cysteines modifiable to cysteine sulfenic acid.

    PubMed

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Knutson, Stacy T; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2008-02-01

    Cysteine sulfenic acid (Cys-SOH), a reversible modification, is a catalytic intermediate at enzyme active sites, a sensor for oxidative stress, a regulator of some transcription factors, and a redox-signaling intermediate. This post-translational modification is not random: specific features near the cysteine control its reactivity. To identify features responsible for the propensity of cysteines to be modified to sulfenic acid, a list of 47 proteins (containing 49 known Cys-SOH sites) was compiled. Modifiable cysteines are found in proteins from most structural classes and many functional classes, but have no propensity for any one type of protein secondary structure. To identify features affecting cysteine reactivity, these sites were analyzed using both functional site profiling and electrostatic analysis. Overall, the solvent exposure of modifiable cysteines is not different from the average cysteine. The combined sequence, structure, and electrostatic approaches reveal mechanistic determinants not obvious from overall sequence comparison, including: (1) pKaS of some modifiable cysteines are affected by backbone features only; (2) charged residues are underrepresented in the structure near modifiable sites; (3) threonine and other polar residues can exert a large influence on the cysteine pKa; and (4) hydrogen bonding patterns are suggested to be important. This compilation of Cys-SOH modification sites and their features provides a quantitative assessment of previous observations and a basis for further analysis and prediction of these sites. Agreement with known experimental data indicates the utility of this combined approach for identifying mechanistic determinants at protein functional sites.

  17. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  18. Effect of sun elevation upon remote sensing of ocean color over an acid waste dump site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Photographic flights were made over an ocean acid waste dump site while dumping was in progress. The flights resulted in wide angle, broadband, spectral radiance film exposure data between the wavelengths of 500 to 900 nanometers for sun elevation angles ranging from 26 to 42 degrees. It is shown from densitometer data that the spectral signature of acid waste discharged into ocean water can be observed photographically, the influence of sun elevation upon remotely sensed apparent color can be normalized by using a single spectral band ratioing technique, and photographic quantification and mapping of acid waste through its suspended iron precipitate appears possible.

  19. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J; Keimowitz, Alison R; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N

    2014-09-25

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949-1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m(2)) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale.

  20. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J.; Keimowitz, Alison R.; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949–1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m2) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale. PMID:25598701

  1. Proposed framework for cleanup and site restoration following a terrorist incident involving radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Conklin, W Craig

    2005-11-01

    Cleanup following a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or improvised nuclear device (IND) is likely to be technically challenging, costly, and politically charged. Lessons learned from the Top Officials 2 exercise and the increased threat of terrorist use of an RDD or IND have driven federal officials to push for an agreed-upon process for determining appropriate cleanup levels. State and local authorities generally have the ultimate responsibility for final public health decisions in their jurisdictions. In response to terrorist attacks, local authorities are likely to request federal assistance in assessing the risk and establishing appropriate cleanup levels. It is realistic to expect local and state requests for significant federal assistance in planning and implementing recovery operations. State and local authorities may desire "shared accountability" with the federal government in setting the appropriate cleanup levels. Government officials at all levels will face pressure to say how clean is clean enough and how quickly people can re-enter affected areas. Issues arising include (1) the nature of the relationship between the federal, state, and local leadership involved in the recovery efforts and (2) where the funding for recovery comes from. Many agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have long been involved in cleanup activities involving radioactive materials. These agencies have recognized the need for a participatory process and realize the need to remain flexible when faced with possible unprecedented environmental challenges following a terrorist attack. Currently, the Department of Homeland Security has a committee process underway, with participation of the EPA, NRC, DOE, and other federal agencies, to try to resolve these issues and to begin engaging state, local, and tribal governments, and others as

  2. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  3. Effective and site-specific phosphoramidation reaction for universally labeling nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Hsing-Yin; Ko, Ni Chien; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Min Hui; Wang, Li-Fang; Wang, Yun-Ming; Chang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Eng-Chi; Wang, Tzu-Pin

    2014-03-15

    Here we report efficient and selective postsynthesis labeling strategies, based on an advanced phosphoramidation reaction, for nucleic acids of either synthetic or enzyme-catalyzed origin. The reactions provided phosphorimidazolide intermediates of DNA or RNA which, whether reacted in one pot (one-step) or purified (two-step), were directly or indirectly phosphoramidated with label molecules. The acquired fluorophore-labeled nucleic acids, prepared from the phosphoramidation reactions, demonstrated labeling efficacy by their F/N ratio values (number of fluorophores per molecule of nucleic acid) of 0.02-1.2 which are comparable or better than conventional postsynthesis fluorescent labeling methods for DNA and RNA. Yet, PCR and UV melting studies of the one-step phosphoramidation-prepared FITC-labeled DNA indicated that the reaction might facilitate nonspecific hybridization in nucleic acids. Intrinsic hybridization specificity of nucleic acids was, however, conserved in the two-step phosphoramidation reaction. The reaction of site-specific labeling nucleic acids at the 5'-end was supported by fluorescence quenching and UV melting studies of fluorophore-labeled DNA. The two-step phosphoramidation-based, effective, and site-specific labeling method has the potential to expedite critical research including visualization, quantification, structural determination, localization, and distribution of nucleic acids in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Identification of Genes Involved in Indole-3-Acetic Acid Biosynthesis by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 Strain Using Transposon Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elisete P.; Soares, Cleiton de Paula; Galvão, Patrícia G.; Imada, Eddie L.; Simões-Araújo, Jean L.; Rouws, Luc F. M.; de Oliveira, André L. M.; Vidal, Márcia S.; Baldani, José I.

    2016-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a beneficial nitrogen-fixing endophyte found in association with sugarcane plants and other important crops. Beneficial effects of G. diazotrophicus on sugarcane growth and productivity have been attributed to biological nitrogen fixation process and production of phytohormones especially indole-3-acetic acid (IAA); however, information about the biosynthesis and function of IAA in G. diazotrophicus is still scarce. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify genes and pathways involved in IAA biosynthesis in this bacterium. In our study, the screening of two independent Tn5 mutant libraries of PAL5T strain using the Salkowski colorimetric assay revealed two mutants (Gdiaa34 and Gdiaa01), which exhibited 95% less indolic compounds than the parental strain when grown in LGIP medium supplemented with L-tryptophan. HPLC chromatograms of the wild-type strain revealed the presence of IAA and of the biosynthetic intermediates indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) and indole-3-lactate (ILA). In contrast, the HPLC profiles of both mutants showed no IAA but only a large peak of non-metabolized tryptophan and low levels of IPyA and ILA were detected. Molecular characterization revealed that Gdiaa01 and Gdiaa34 mutants had unique Tn5 insertions at different sites within the GDI2456 open read frame, which is predicted to encode a L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO). GDI2456 (lao gene) forms a cluster with GDI2455 and GDI2454 ORFs, which are predicted to encode a cytochrome C and an RidA protein, respectively. RT-qPCR showed that transcript levels of lao. cccA, and ridA genes were reduced in the Gdiaa01 as compared to PAL5T. In addition, rice plants inoculated with Gdiaa01 showed significantly smaller root development (length, surface area, number of forks and tips) than those plants inoculated with PAL5T. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that G. diazotrophicus PAL5T produces IAA via the IPyA pathway in cultures supplemented with tryptophan and

  5. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S; Infield, Daniel T; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z; McCarty, Nael A

    2014-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1-6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues.

  6. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S.; Infield, Daniel T.; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1–6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues. PMID:25024266

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of BaiA, An Enzyme Involved in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis in Human Gut Microbe

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Park, In-Hee; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Farr, Carol L.; Tien, Henry J.; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Lesley, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant influence of secondary bile acids on human health and disease, limited structural and biochemical information is available for the key gut microbial enzymes catalyzing its synthesis. Herein, we report apo- and co-factor bound crystal structures of BaiA2, a short chain dehydrogenase/reductase from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 that represent the first protein structure of this pathway. The structures elucidated the basis of co-factor specificity and mechanism of proton relay. A conformational restriction involving Glu42 located in the co-factor binding site seems crucial in determining co-factor specificity. Limited flexibility of Glu42 results in imminent steric and electrostatic hindrance with 2′-phosphate group of NADP(H). Consistent with crystal structures, steady-state kinetic characterization performed with both BaiA2 and BaiA1, a close homolog with 92% sequence identity, revealed specificity constant (kcat/KM) of NADP+ at least an order of magnitude lower than NAD+. Substitution of Glu42 with Ala improved specificity towards NADP+ by 10- fold compared to wild type. The co-factor bound structure uncovered a novel nicotinamide-hydroxyl ion (NAD+-OH−) adduct contraposing previously reported adducts. The OH− of the adduct in BaiA2 is distal to C4 atom of nicotinamide and proximal to 2′-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety. Moreover, it is located at intermediary distances between terminal functional groups of active site residues Tyr157 (2.7 Å) and Lys161 (4.5 Å). Based on these observations we propose an involvement of NAD+-OH− adduct in proton relay instead of hydride transfer as noted for previous adducts. PMID:23836456

  8. Isolated Gastrointestinal Sarcoidosis Involving Multiple Gastrointestinal Sites Presenting as Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gaye, Bilkisu; Makary, Raafat; Monteiro, Carmela; Eid, Emely

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic and systemic disorder characterized by the formation of non-caseating granulomas. Very few cases of isolated gastrointestinal sarcoidosis have been reported, and even fewer, if any, report gastrointestinal sarcoidosis within multiple gastrointestinal sites concomitantly. We present a 42-year-old white man with chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain for more than 3 years. Mucosal biopsies revealed non-caseating microgranulomas in the stomach, throughout the small intestine, colon, and rectum. Prednisone therapy was initiated with a rapid improvement in symptoms and complete resolution of diarrhea within 3 weeks. PMID:28119949

  9. Efficient solid acid catalyst containing Lewis and Brønsted Acid sites for the production of furfurals.

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, Michael G; Gupta, Dinesh; Saha, Basudeb; Patra, Astam K; Bhaumik, Asim; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembled nanoparticulates of porous sulfonated carbonaceous TiO2 material that contain Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites were prepared by a one-pot synthesis method. The material was characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption, pyridine FTIR spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, N2 -sorption, atomic absorbance spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The carbonaceous heterogeneous catalyst (Glu-TsOH-Ti) with a Brønsted-to-Lewis acid density ratio of 1.2 and more accessible acid sites was effective to produce 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural from biomass-derived mono- and disaccharides and xylose in a biphasic solvent that comprised water and biorenewable methyltetrahydrofuran. The catalyst was recycled in four consecutive cycles with a total loss of only 3 % activity. Thus, Glu-TsOH-Ti, which contains isomerization and dehydration catalytic sites and is based on a cheap and biorenewable carbon support, is a sustainable catalyst for the production of furfurals, platform chemicals for biofuels and chemicals.

  10. Absolute acidity of clay edge sites from ab-initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazi, Sami; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Salanne, Mathieu; Sprik, Michiel; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-10-01

    We provide a microscopic understanding of the solvation structure and reactivity of the edges of neutral clays. In particular we address the tendency to deprotonation of the different reactive groups on the (0 1 0) face of pyrophyllite. Such information cannot be inferred directly from titration experiments, which do not discriminate between different sites and whose interpretation resorts to macroscopic models. The determination of the corresponding pKa then usually relies on bond valence models, sometimes improved by incorporating some structural information from ab-initio simulations. Here we use density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations, combined with thermodynamic integration, to compute the free energy of the reactions of water with the different surface groups, leading to a deprotonated site and an aqueous hydronium ion. Our approach consistently describes the clay and water sides of the interface and includes naturally electronic polarization effects. It also allows to investigate the structure and solvation of all sites separately. We find that the most acidic group is SiOH, due to its ability to establish strong hydrogen bonds with adsorbed water, as it also happens on the quartz and amorphous silica surfaces. The acidity constant of AlOH2 is only 1 pKa unit larger. Finally, the pKa of AlOH is outside the possible range in water and this site should not deprotonate in aqueous solution. We show that the solvation of surface sites and hence their acidity is strongly affected by the proximity of other sites, in particular for AlOH and AlOH2 which share the same Al. We discuss the implications of our findings on the applicability of bond valence models to predict the acidity of edge sites of clays.

  11. Cloning, Functional Characterization and Site-Directed Mutagenesis of 4-Coumarate: Coenzyme A Ligase (4CL) Involved in Coumarin Biosynthesis in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yao, Ruolan; Zhao, Yucheng; Xu, Sheng; Huang, Chuanlong; Luo, Jun; Kong, Lingyi

    2017-01-01

    Coumarins are the main bioactive compounds in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn, a common Chinese herbal medicine. Nevertheless, the genes involved in the biosynthesis of core structure of coumarin in P. praeruptorum have not been identified yet. 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formation of hydroxycinnamates CoA esters, and plays an essential role at the divergence point from general phenylpropanoid metabolism to major branch pathway of coumarin. Here, three novel putative 4CL genes (Pp4CL1, Pp4CL7, and Pp4CL10) were isolated from P. praeruptorum. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant proteins revealed that Pp4CL1 utilized p-coumaric and ferulic acids as its two main substrates for coumarin biosynthesis in P. praeruptorum. Furthermore, Pp4CL1 also exhibited activity toward caffeic, cinnamic, isoferulic, and o-coumaric acids and represented a bona fide 4CL. Pp4CL7 and Pp4CL10 had no catalytic activity toward hydroxycinnamic acid compounds. But they had close phylogenetic relationship to true 4CLs and were defined as 4CL-like genes. Among all putative 4CLs, Pp4CL1 was the most highly expressed gene in roots, and its expression level was significantly up-regulated in mature roots compared with seedlings. Subcellular localization studies showed that Pp4CL1 and Pp4CL10 proteins were localized in the cytosol. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of Pp4CL1 demonstrated that amino acids of Tyr-239, Ala-243, Met-306, Ala-309, Gly-334, Lys-441, Gln-446, and Lys-526 were essential for substrate binding or catalytic activities. The characterization and site-directed mutagenesis studies of Pp4CL1 lays a solid foundation for elucidating the biosynthetic mechanisms of coumarins in P. praeruptorum and provides further insights in understanding the structure-function relationships of this important family of proteins.

  12. Cloning, Functional Characterization and Site-Directed Mutagenesis of 4-Coumarate: Coenzyme A Ligase (4CL) Involved in Coumarin Biosynthesis in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Yao, Ruolan; Zhao, Yucheng; Xu, Sheng; Huang, Chuanlong; Luo, Jun; Kong, Lingyi

    2017-01-01

    Coumarins are the main bioactive compounds in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn, a common Chinese herbal medicine. Nevertheless, the genes involved in the biosynthesis of core structure of coumarin in P. praeruptorum have not been identified yet. 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formation of hydroxycinnamates CoA esters, and plays an essential role at the divergence point from general phenylpropanoid metabolism to major branch pathway of coumarin. Here, three novel putative 4CL genes (Pp4CL1, Pp4CL7, and Pp4CL10) were isolated from P. praeruptorum. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant proteins revealed that Pp4CL1 utilized p-coumaric and ferulic acids as its two main substrates for coumarin biosynthesis in P. praeruptorum. Furthermore, Pp4CL1 also exhibited activity toward caffeic, cinnamic, isoferulic, and o-coumaric acids and represented a bona fide 4CL. Pp4CL7 and Pp4CL10 had no catalytic activity toward hydroxycinnamic acid compounds. But they had close phylogenetic relationship to true 4CLs and were defined as 4CL-like genes. Among all putative 4CLs, Pp4CL1 was the most highly expressed gene in roots, and its expression level was significantly up-regulated in mature roots compared with seedlings. Subcellular localization studies showed that Pp4CL1 and Pp4CL10 proteins were localized in the cytosol. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of Pp4CL1 demonstrated that amino acids of Tyr-239, Ala-243, Met-306, Ala-309, Gly-334, Lys-441, Gln-446, and Lys-526 were essential for substrate binding or catalytic activities. The characterization and site-directed mutagenesis studies of Pp4CL1 lays a solid foundation for elucidating the biosynthetic mechanisms of coumarins in P. praeruptorum and provides further insights in understanding the structure–function relationships of this important family of proteins. PMID:28144249

  13. Effect of acidic amino acids engineered into the active site cleft of Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Turunen, Ossi

    2015-01-01

    Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase (XYN11A) shows optimal activity at pH 6-7 and 75-80 °C. We studied how mutation to aspartic acid (N46D and V48D) in the vicinity of the catalytic acid/base affects the pH activity of highly thermophilic GH11 xylanase. Both mutations shifted the pH activity profile toward acidic pH. In general, the Km values were lower at pH 4-5 than at pH 6, and in line with this, the rate of hydrolysis of xylotetraose was slightly faster at pH 4 than at pH 6. The N46D mutation and also lower pH in XYN11A increased the hydrolysis of xylotriose. The Km value increased remarkably (from 2.5 to 11.6 mg/mL) because of V48D, which indicates the weakening of binding affinity of the substrate to the active site. Xylotetraose functioned well as a substrate for other enzymes, but with lowered reaction rate for V48D. Both N46D and V48D increased the enzyme inactivation by ionic liquid [emim]OAc. In conclusion, the pH activity profile could be shifted to acidic pH due to an effect from two different directions, but the tightly packed GH11 active site can cause steric problems for the mutations.

  14. Are carboxyl groups the most acidic sites in amino acids? Gas-phase acidities, photoelectron spectra, and computations on tyrosine, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and their conjugate bases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhixin; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Kass, Steven R

    2009-01-28

    Deprotonation of tyrosine in the gas phase was found to occur preferentially at the phenolic site, and the conjugate base consists of a 70:30 mixture of phenoxide and carboxylate anions at equilibrium. This result was established by developing a chemical probe for differentiating these two isomers, and the presence of both ions was confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Equilibrium acidity measurements on tyrosine indicated that deltaG(acid)(o) = 332.5 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1) and deltaH(acid)(o) = 340.7 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1). Photoelectron spectra yielded adiabatic electron detachment energies of 2.70 +/- 0.05 and 3.55 +/- 0.10 eV for the phenoxide and carboxylate anions, respectively. The H/D exchange behavior of deprotonated tyrosine was examined using three different alcohols (CF3CH2OD, C6H5CH2OD, and CH3CH2OD), and incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms was observed. Two pathways are proposed to account for these results, and all of the experimental findings are supplemented with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and G3B3 calculations. In addition, it was found that electrospray ionization of tyrosine from a 3:1 (v/v) CH3OH/H2O solution using a commercial source produces a deprotonated [M-H]- anion with the gas-phase equilibrium composition rather than the structure of the ion that exists in aqueous media. Electrospray ionization from acetonitrile, however, leads largely to the liquid-phase (carboxylate) structure. A control molecule, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, was found to behave in a similar manner. Thus, the electrospray conditions that are employed for the analysis of a compound can alter the isomeric composition of the resulting anion.

  15. LIME TREATMENT LAGOONS TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATING ACID MINE DRAINAGE FROM TWO MINING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Runoff and drainage from active and inactive mines are someof the most environmentally damaging land uses i the US. Acid Mine drainage (AMD) from mining sites across the country requires treatment because of high metal concentrations that exceed regulatory standards for safe disc...

  16. Positive Darwinian selection at single amino acid sites conferring plant virus resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Explicit evaluation of the accuracy and power of Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods for detecting site-specific positive Darwinian selection presents a challenge because selective consequences of single amino acid changes are generally unknown. We exploit extensive molecular and functional cha...

  17. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  18. Possible involvement of undissociated acid molecules in the acid response of the chorda tympani nerve of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, K; Shimizu, Y; Watanabe, K; Tonosaki, K

    2000-05-01

    To test whether undissociated acid is capable of exciting the chorda tympani nerves in rats, we have used buffered acid solutions as taste stimuli. These solutions were prepared by adding alkali to weak acids, such as acetic acid, so that the proportion of undissociated and dissociated acids was varied whereas keeping the total acid concentration constant. When acetic acid solutions, adjusted to wide ranges of pH by NaOH, were applied to the tongue, the response magnitude of the chorda tympani nerves was not varied systematically with pH changes. However, if the sodium effect was eliminated by amiloride or replacement of cation by potassium or Tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane; NH(2)C(CH(2)OH)(3) (Tris-base), the chorda tympani response was reduced systematically as pH increased. Similar results were obtained with citric acid and ascorbic acid. This pH-dependent change in taste nerve response to acid cannot be solely attributed to the proton gradient because the response magnitude induced by hydrogen itself, which was estimated from responses to strong acids, was much smaller than that by equi-pH acetic acid ( approximately 85%). Thus we cannot explain the pH-dependent responses of the chorda tympani nerves to weak acids unless effects of undissociated acid molecules are postulated. It is therefore concluded that undissociated acids in weak acid solutions can be a stimulant to taste receptor cells.

  19. 1-FFT amino acids involved in high DP inulin accumulation in Viguiera discolor

    PubMed Central

    De Sadeleer, Emerik; Vergauwen, Rudy; Struyf, Tom; Le Roy, Katrien; Van den Ende, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Fructans are important vacuolar reserve carbohydrates with drought, cold, ROS and general abiotic stress mediating properties. They occur in 15% of all flowering plants and are believed to display health benefits as a prebiotic and dietary fiber. Fructans are synthesized by specific fructosyltransferases and classified based on the linkage type between fructosyl units. Inulins, one of these fructan types with β(2-1) linkages, are elongated by fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferases (1-FFT) using a fructosyl unit from a donor inulin to elongate the acceptor inulin molecule. The sequence identity of the 1-FFT of Viguiera discolor (Vd) and Helianthus tuberosus (Ht) is 91% although these enzymes produce distinct fructans. The Vd 1-FFT produces high degree of polymerization (DP) inulins by preferring the elongation of long chain inulins, in contrast to the Ht 1-FFT which prefers small molecules (DP3 or 4) as acceptor. Since higher DP inulins have interesting properties for industrial, food and medical applications, we report here on the influence of two amino acids on the high DP inulin production capacity of the Vd 1-FFT. Introducing the M19F and H308T mutations in the active site of the Vd 1-FFT greatly reduces its capacity to produce high DP inulin molecules. Both amino acids can be considered important to this capacity, although the double mutation had a much higher impact than the single mutations. PMID:26322058

  20. 1-FFT amino acids involved in high DP inulin accumulation in Viguiera discolor.

    PubMed

    De Sadeleer, Emerik; Vergauwen, Rudy; Struyf, Tom; Le Roy, Katrien; Van den Ende, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Fructans are important vacuolar reserve carbohydrates with drought, cold, ROS and general abiotic stress mediating properties. They occur in 15% of all flowering plants and are believed to display health benefits as a prebiotic and dietary fiber. Fructans are synthesized by specific fructosyltransferases and classified based on the linkage type between fructosyl units. Inulins, one of these fructan types with β(2-1) linkages, are elongated by fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferases (1-FFT) using a fructosyl unit from a donor inulin to elongate the acceptor inulin molecule. The sequence identity of the 1-FFT of Viguiera discolor (Vd) and Helianthus tuberosus (Ht) is 91% although these enzymes produce distinct fructans. The Vd 1-FFT produces high degree of polymerization (DP) inulins by preferring the elongation of long chain inulins, in contrast to the Ht 1-FFT which prefers small molecules (DP3 or 4) as acceptor. Since higher DP inulins have interesting properties for industrial, food and medical applications, we report here on the influence of two amino acids on the high DP inulin production capacity of the Vd 1-FFT. Introducing the M19F and H308T mutations in the active site of the Vd 1-FFT greatly reduces its capacity to produce high DP inulin molecules. Both amino acids can be considered important to this capacity, although the double mutation had a much higher impact than the single mutations.

  1. Brønsted acid sites based on penta-coordinated aluminum species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zichun; Jiang, Yijiao; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Duk Kim, Kyung; Stampfl, Catherine; Baiker, Alfons; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Huang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Zeolites and amorphous silica-alumina (ASA), which both provide Brønsted acid sites (BASs), are the most extensively used solid acid catalysts in the chemical industry. It is widely believed that BASs consist only of tetra-coordinated aluminum sites (AlIV) with bridging OH groups in zeolites or nearby silanols on ASA surfaces. Here we report the direct observation in ASA of a new type of BAS based on penta-coordinated aluminum species (AlV) by 27Al-{1H} dipolar-mediated correlation two-dimensional NMR experiments at high magnetic field under magic-angle spinning. Both BAS-AlIV and -AlV show a similar acidity to protonate probe molecular ammonia. The quantitative evaluation of 1H and 27Al sites demonstrates that BAS-AlV co-exists with BAS-AlIV rather than replaces it, which opens new avenues for strongly enhancing the acidity of these popular solid acids.

  2. Brønsted acid sites based on penta-coordinated aluminum species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zichun; Jiang, Yijiao; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Duk Kim, Kyung; Stampfl, Catherine; Baiker, Alfons; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Huang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites and amorphous silica-alumina (ASA), which both provide Brønsted acid sites (BASs), are the most extensively used solid acid catalysts in the chemical industry. It is widely believed that BASs consist only of tetra-coordinated aluminum sites (AlIV) with bridging OH groups in zeolites or nearby silanols on ASA surfaces. Here we report the direct observation in ASA of a new type of BAS based on penta-coordinated aluminum species (AlV) by 27Al-{1H} dipolar-mediated correlation two-dimensional NMR experiments at high magnetic field under magic-angle spinning. Both BAS-AlIV and -AlV show a similar acidity to protonate probe molecular ammonia. The quantitative evaluation of 1H and 27Al sites demonstrates that BAS-AlV co-exists with BAS-AlIV rather than replaces it, which opens new avenues for strongly enhancing the acidity of these popular solid acids. PMID:27976673

  3. Structural analysis of loci involved in pSAM2 site-specific integration in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-01-01

    pSAM2 is an 11-kb plasmid integrated in the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and ATCC15154 genomes and found additionally as a free replicon in an uv derivative. After transfer into S. ambofaciens DSM40697 (devoid of pSAM2) or into Streptomyces lividans, specific integration of pSAM2 occurred very efficiently. A 58-bp sequence (att) present in both pSAM2 (attP) and S. ambofaciens strain DSM40697 (attB) attachment regions is found at the boundaries (attL and attR) of integrated pSAM2 in S. ambofaciens strain ATCC23877. The S. lividans chromosomal integration zone contained an imperfectly conserved att sequence (attB), and the integration event of pSAM2 was located within a 49-bp sequence of attB. Only one primary functional attB sequence was present in the S. lividans or S. ambofaciens DSM40697 total DNA. The integration zone of S. lividans hybridized with the integration zone of S. ambofaciens DSM40697. The two integration zones were homologous only to the right side of the att sequence. The conserved region contained an open reading frame (ORF A) with a stop codon located 99 bp from the attB sequence in both strains. S. ambofaciens DSM40697 contained DNA sequences related to pSAM2 on the left side of the att site. The att sequence was included in a region conserved in Streptomyces antibioticus, Streptomyces actuosus, Streptomyces bikiniensis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces glaucescens, and Streptomyces parvulus. Site-specific integration of a pSAM2 derivative was characterized in another unrelated strain, Streptomyces griseofuscus. This strain contained an imperfectly conserved 58-bp attB sequence, and the integration event took place within a 45-bp sequence of attB. Site-specific integration of pSAM2 in three nonrelated Streptomyces strains suggests the wide host range of pSAM2 integration in Streptomyces.

  4. Two non-consensus Clp binding sites are involved in upregulation of the gum operon involved in xanthan polysaccharide synthesis in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hua; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Hsiao, Yi-Min; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2010-09-01

    Biosynthesis of xanthan polysaccharide, a virulence factor of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), involves the gum operon and the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) homologue Clp. Clp was shown to have the same DNA binding specificity as the CRP at positions 5, 6, and 7 (GTG motif) of the left arm. Therefore, Clp binding sites (CBSs) have typically been identified by pattern searching of the Xcc genome using the consensus CRP binding sequence. Here, results of a reporter assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggest that Clp upregulates the gum operon by binding to two non-consensus sites, in which a more conserved right arm may compensate for the lack of conservation in the left arm, a high GC content in the central region (6 bp) may be important for binding, and binding may be enhanced if the GC-rich central region is palindromic. These suggest that atypical CBSs exist in Xcc promoters and that Clp, while retaining the capacity to bind typical CBSs, has evolved to bind atypical CBS because: 1) Clp shares only moderate homology with the CRP and is modulated by cyclic di-GMP; and 2) Xcc has a higher GC content (65%) than Escherichia coli (50%).

  5. Jasmonic Acid, Abscisic Acid, and Salicylic Acid Are Involved in the Phytoalexin Responses of Rice to Fusarium fujikuroi, a High Gibberellin Producer Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Ilenia; Amaral Carneiro, Greice; Spadaro, Davide; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2015-09-23

    Fusarium fujikuroi, the causal agent of bakanae disease, is the main seedborne pathogen on rice. To understand the basis of rice resistance, a quantitative method to simultaneously detect phytohormones and phytoalexins was developed by using HPLC-MS/MS. With this method dynamic profiles and possible interactions of defense-related phytohormones and phytoalexins were investigated on two rice cultivars, inoculated or not with F. fujikuroi. In the resistant cultivar Selenio, the presence of pathogen induced high production of phytoalexins, mainly sakuranetin, and symptoms of bakanae were not observed. On the contrary, in the susceptible genotype Dorella, the pathogen induced the production of gibberellin and abscisic acid and inhibited jasmonic acid production, phytoalexins were very low, and bakanae symptoms were observed. The results suggested that a wide range of secondary metabolites are involved in plant defense against pathogens and phytoalexin synthesis could be an important factor for rice resistance against bakanae disease.

  6. Phage Genetic Sites Involved in λ Growth Inhibition by the Escherichia Coli Rap Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, P.; Guarneros, G.

    1989-01-01

    The rap mutation of Escherichia coli prevents the growth of bacteriophage λ. We have isolated phage mutants that compensate for the host deficiency. The mutations, named bar, were genetically located to three different loci of the λ genome: barI in the attP site, barII in the cIII ea10 region, and barIII within or very near the imm434 region. The level of λ leftward transcription correlates with rap exclusion. Phage λ mutants partially defective in the pL promoter or in pL-transcript antitermination showed a Bar(-) phenotype. Conversely, mutants constitutive for transcription from the pI or pL promoters were excluded more stringently by rap bacteria. We conclude that rap exclusion depends on the magnitude of transcription through the wild type bar loci in the phage genome. PMID:2523838

  7. A Preliminary Geophysical Study Involving Remote Sensing at the Archaeological Site Trinchera Cave, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, L.; Bank, C.

    2003-12-01

    Resistivity, magnetic, seismic, and geodetic surveys were performed at Trinchera cave, an archaeological site ˜50 km east of Trinidad, Colorado, in order to locate the foundation walls of an ancient jacal structure. This structure, a shelter built during the Apishapa phase (earlier than 750 years before present), was reported - and backfilled - during a 1974 excavation; recent excavations have failed to again find it. The cave is a ˜8 m high overhang, the bottom of which marks the contact between the Dakota formation (yellowish-brown, fine-grained sandstone) and the underlying Purgatoire formation (bedded, organic-rich shale). The foundation was reported to be made of blocks of sandstone surrounded by cave fill/soil that is estimated to be 1.5 m thick in the cave. A total station survey mapped the topography beneath the overhang (the cave, ˜30 by 8 m) and within the adjacent creek. This part of the study should be useful to tie together future archaeological and geophysical work. Our magnetic map of the area is inconclusive due to the presence of metallic pipes left at the site by previous excavations and because of the overhang. Seismic refraction tests yielded varying thicknesses of the cave fill (0.7-2.3 m); however we experienced problems with the equipment in the field and realized that a 1-D model is insufficient to explain the data. A future reflection experiment might produce more useful seismic data. Our most reliable results were obtained by resistivity profiling. They show a more resistive structure in the SW part of the cave, about 1 m from the overhang and at a model depth of 2 m. We interpret this as the `lost' foundation.

  8. Site-specific factor involved in the editing of the psbL mRNA in tobacco plastids.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, S; Carrer, H; Maliga, P

    1995-01-01

    In tobacco plastids, functional psbL mRNA is created by editing an ACG codon to an AUG translation initiation codon. To determine if editing may occur in a chimeric mRNA, the N-terminal part of psbL containing the editing site was translationally fused with the aadA and kan bacterial genes. The chimeric constructs were introduced into the tobacco plastid genome by targeted gene insertion. Editing of the chimeric mRNAs indicated that the 98 nt fragment spanning the psbL editing site contains all cis information required for editing. Expression of the chimeric gene transcripts led to a significant decrease in the editing efficiency of the endogenous psbL mRNA. However, the efficiency of editing in the transplastomic lines was unchanged for four sites in the rpoB and ndhB mRNAs. Reduced efficiency of psbL editing, but not of the other four sites, in the transplastomic lines indicates depletion of psbL-specific editing factor(s). This finding implicates the involvement of site-specific factors in editing of plastid mRNAs in higher plants. Images PMID:7796820

  9. Molecular Design of a Chiral Brønsted Acid with Two Different Acidic Sites: Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction of Azopyridinecarboxylate with Amidodienes Catalyzed by Chiral Carboxylic Acid-Monophosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, Norie; Tabuse, Hideaki; Noda, Hirofumi; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Katsunori; Izumiseki, Atsuto; Funayama, Kosuke; Egawa, Fuyuki; Okada, Shino; Adachi, Hiroaki; Terada, Masahiro

    2016-09-07

    A chiral Brønsted acid containing two different acidic sites, chiral carboxylic acid-monophosphoric acid 1a, was designed to be a new and effective concept in catalytic asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of azopyridinecarboxylate with amidodienes. The multipoint hydrogen-bonding interactions among the carboxylic acid, monophosphoric acid, azopyridinecarboxylate, and amidodiene achieved high catalytic and chiral efficiency, producing substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridazines with excellent stereocontrol in a single step. This constitutes the first example of regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective azo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions by chiral Brønsted acid catalysis.

  10. Involvement of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Liver Injury Caused by Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bei; Zou, Weiying; Hu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Fangming; Zhou, Ling; Yang, Shulong; Kuang, Haibin; Wu, Lei; Wei, Jie; Wang, Jinglei; Zou, Ting; Zhang, Dalei

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is widely present in the environment and has been reported to induce hepatic toxicity in animals and humans. In this study, mice were orally administered different concentrations of PFOA (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day). Histological examination showed that the exposure to PFOA for 14 consecutive days led to serious hepatocellular injury and obvious inflammatory cell infiltration. In addition, malondialdehyde formation and hydrogen peroxide generation, indicators of oxidative stress, were significantly induced by PFOA treatment in the liver of mice. Furthermore, hepatic levels of interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and C-reactive protein, markers of inflammatory response, were markedly increased by exposure to PFOA in mice. These results demonstrated that PFOA-induced hepatic toxicity may be involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory response in mice. PMID:24724082

  11. p-Coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum: structural insights into the active site and decarboxylation catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Angulo, Iván; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Campillo, Nuria; Páez, Juan A; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M

    2010-05-15

    p-Coumaric acid decarboxylases (PDCs) catalyze the nonoxidative decarboxylation of hydroxycinnamic acids to generate the corresponding vinyl derivatives. Despite the biotechnological relevance of PDCs in food industry, their catalytic mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we report insights into the structural basis of catalysis for the homodimeric PDC from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPDC). The global fold of LpPDC is based on a flattened beta-barrel surrounding an internal cavity. Crystallographic and functional analyses of single-point mutants of residues located within this cavity have permitted identifying a potential substrate-binding pocket and also to provide structural evidences for rearrangements of surface loops so that they can modulate the accessibility to the active site. Finally, combination of the structural and functional data with in silico results enables us to propose a two-step catalytic mechanism for decarboxylation of p-coumaric acid by PDCs where Glu71 is involved in proton transfer, and Tyr18 and Tyr20 are involved in the proper substrate orientation and in the release of the CO(2) product.

  12. Unveiling of novel regio-selective fatty acid double bond hydratases from Lactobacillus acidophilus involved in the selective oxyfunctionalization of mono- and di-hydroxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Oh, Hye-Jin; Park, Chul-Soon; Hong, Seung-Hye; Park, Ji-Young; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is the first time demonstration of cis-12 regio-selective linoleate double-bond hydratase. Hydroxylation of fatty acids, abundant feedstock in nature, is an emerging alternative route for many petroleum replaceable products thorough hydroxy fatty acids, carboxylic acids, and lactones. However, chemical route for selective hydroxylation is still quite challenging owing to low selectivity and many environmental concerns. Hydroxylation of fatty acids by hydroxy fatty acid forming enzymes is an important route for selective biocatalytic oxyfunctionalization of fatty acids. Therefore, novel fatty acid hydroxylation enzymes should be discovered. The two hydratase genes of Lactobacillus acidophilus were identified by genomic analysis, and the expressed two recombinant hydratases were identified as cis-9 and cis-12 double-bond selective linoleate hydratases by in vitro functional validation, including the identification of products and the determination of regio-selectivity, substrate specificity, and kinetic parameters. The two different linoleate hydratases were the involved enzymes in the 10,13-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid biosynthesis. Linoleate 13-hydratase (LHT-13) selectively converted 10 mM linoleic acid to 13S-hydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid with high titer (8.1 mM) and yield (81%). Our study will expand knowledge for microbial fatty acid-hydroxylation enzymes and facilitate the designed production of the regio-selective hydroxy fatty acids for useful chemicals from polyunsaturated fatty acid feedstocks.

  13. Identification of lactic acid bacteria involved in the spoilage of pasteurized "foie gras" products.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, S; André, S; Hue, I; Prévost, H; Pilet, M F

    2010-07-01

    The spoiling microflora of a re-packaged French "foie gras" product was studied. A total of 54 isolates, originating from two different factories, were identified using phenotypical and molecular methods (partial 16S rDNA sequencing). Weissella viridescens was the main species detected in the products from factory 1 (64% of the isolates). These products had a low lactic acid concentration and were considered as non-spoiled. The microflora of factory 2 was dominated mainly by the genus Lactobacillus (95% of the isolates), and the high lactic acid concentration of these products was linked with a strong spoilage. Among the 30 Lactobacillus strains, three species were predominant: Lactobacillus sakei (nine isolates), Lactobacillus coryniformis (eight isolates) and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (five isolates). Challenge tests were performed to confirm the involvement of the Lactobacillus strains in the spoilage of the product. Sterile "foie gras" samples were inoculated with 14 LAB strains from the collection. The most acidifying strains belonged to the species L. sakei, Lactobacillus plantarum and L. paraplantarum. This confirmed the role of the strains from the Lactobacillus genus as the main spoilers of "foie gras" products and will be useful to design new quality protocols and extend the shelf-life of these products.

  14. The alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid-elicited retching involves dopaminergic inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, T; Yamada, K

    1980-05-01

    Alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid (alpha-NOAA), one of the jumping-inducers, elicited a dose-dependent retching behavior at doses ranging from 250 to 550 mg/kg in mice and vomiting at a dose of 550 mg/kg in pigeons. Protoveratrine-A (PV-A, 0.1 mg/kg), a veratrum alkaloid, also induced retching in mice and vomiting in pigeons, while apomorphine (2 mg/kg) produced neither retching in mice nor vomiting in pigeons though it induced feeding in pigeons. The retching elicited by alpha-NOAA or PV-A was not significantly affected by scopolamine, aminooxyacetic acid and gamma-butyrolactone, but was markedly inhibited by apomorphine (2 mg/kg), this inhibitory effect being antagonized without significance by haloperidol which did not itself augment the retching. These results imply that the retching elicited by alpha-NOAA or PV-A seems to involve at least in part an inhibition of dopaminergic neuron activity.

  15. Effect of okadaic acid on cultured clam heart cells: involvement of MAPkinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Hanana, Houda; Talarmin, Hélène; Pennec, Jean-Pierre; Droguet, Mickael; Morel, Julie; Dorange, Germaine

    2012-12-15

    Okadaic acid (OA) is one of the main diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins and a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. The downstream signal transduction pathways following the protein phosphatase inhibition are still unknown and the results of most of the previous studies are often conflicting. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of OA on heart clam cells and to analyse its possible mechanisms of action by investigating the signal transduction pathways involved in OA cytotoxicity. We showed that OA at 1 µM after 24 h of treatment induces disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, rounding and detachment of fibroblastic cells. Moreover, treatment of heart cells revealed a sequential activation of MAPK proteins depending on the OA concentration. We suggest that the duration of p38 and JNK activation is a critical factor in determining cell apoptosis in clam cardiomyocytes. In the opposite, ERK activation could be involved in cell survival. The cell death induced by OA is a MAPK modulated pathway, mediated by caspase 3-dependent mechanism. OA was found to induce no significant effect on spontaneous beating rate or inward L-type calcium current in clam cardiomyocytes, suggesting that PP1 was not inhibited even by the highest dose of OA.

  16. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K.; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding. PMID:26735581

  17. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding.

  18. Interprofessional collaboration and family member involvement in intensive care units: emerging themes from a multi-sited ethnography.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Scott; McMillan, Sarah E; Kachan, Natasha; Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Kitto, Simon

    2015-05-01

    This article presents emerging findings from the first year of a two-year study, which employed ethnographic methods to explore the culture of interprofessional collaboration (IPC) and family member involvement in eight North American intensive care units (ICUs). The study utilized a comparative ethnographic approach - gathering observation, interview and documentary data relating to the behaviors and attitudes of healthcare providers and family members across several sites. In total, 504 hours of ICU-based observational data were gathered over a 12-month period in four ICUs based in two US cities. In addition, 56 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a range of ICU staff (e.g. nurses, doctors and pharmacists) and family members. Documentary data (e.g. clinical guidelines and unit policies) were also collected to help develop an insight into how the different sites engaged organizationally with IPC and family member involvement. Directed content analysis enabled the identification and categorization of major themes within the data. An interprofessional conceptual framework was utilized to help frame the coding for the analysis. The preliminary findings presented in this paper illuminate a number of issues related to the nature of IPC and family member involvement within an ICU context. These findings are discussed in relation to the wider interprofessional and health services literature.

  19. Involvement of vacuolar sequestration and active transport in tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hop iso-alpha-acids.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, Lucie A; Walsh, Michael C; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop alpha-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-alpha-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-alpha-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-alpha-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-alpha-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-alpha-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-alpha-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-alpha-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-alpha-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators.

  20. Evidence of sulphur and nitrogen deposition signals at the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network sites.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M

    2005-09-01

    Some recent studies of trends in sulphate in surface waters have alluded to possible lag effects imposed by catchment soils, resulting in discrepancies between trends in deposition and run-off. To assess the extent of these possible effects in the UK, sulphate concentration data from the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWMN) sites are compared with estimates of sulphur deposition at each site. From these data, input-output budgets are computed at an annual time scale. The estimated budgets suggest a close association between catchment sulphur inputs and outputs at an annual scale, with well-balanced annual budgets at most sites, indicative of only minor lag effects. A similar analysis of the AWMN site nitrogen budget shows little evidence of an association between nitrogen inputs and outputs at this time scale.

  1. Identification of a Bidirectional Splicing Enhancer: Differential Involvement of SR Proteins in 5′ or 3′ Splice Site Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Popielarz, Michel; Hildwein, Georges; Stevenin, James

    1999-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing whose modulation occurs during infection, through the use of three different 5′ splice sites and of one major or one minor 3′ splice site. Although this pre-mRNA has been extensively used as a model to compare the transactivation properties of SR proteins, no cis-acting element has been identified in the transcript sequence. Here we describe the identification and the characterization of a purine-rich splicing enhancer, located just upstream of the 12S 5′ splice site, which is formed from two contiguous 9-nucleotide (nt) purine motifs (Pu1 and Pu2). We demonstrate that this sequence is a bidirectional splicing enhancer (BSE) in vivo and in vitro, because it activates both the downstream 12S 5′ splice site through the Pu1 motif and the upstream 216-nt intervening sequence (IVS) 3′ splice site through both motifs. UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the BSE interacts with several SR proteins specifically, among them 9G8 and ASF/SF2, which bind preferentially to the Pu1 and Pu2 motifs, respectively. Interestingly, we show by in vitro complementation assays that SR proteins have distinct transactivatory properties. In particular, 9G8, but not ASF/SF2 or SC35, is able to strongly activate the recognition of the 12S 5′ splice site in a BSE-dependent manner in wild-type E1A or in a heterologous context, whereas ASF/SF2 or SC35, but not 9G8, activates the upstream 216-nt IVS splicing. Thus, our results identify a novel exonic BSE and the SR proteins which are involved in its differential activity. PMID:10523623

  2. Characterization of Naphthaleneacetic Acid Binding to Receptor Sites on Cellular Membranes of Maize Coleoptile Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of and optimum conditions for saturable (“specific”) binding of [14C]naphthaleneacetic acid to sites located on membranous particles from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles are described. Most, if not all, of the specific binding appears to be due to a single kinetic class of binding sites having a KD of 5 to 7 × 10−7m for naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA). Binding of NAA is insensitive to high monovalent salt concentrations, indicating that binding is not primarily ionic. However, specific binding is inhibited by Mg2+ or Ca2+ above 5 mm. Specific binding is improved by organic acids, especially citrate. Binding is heat-labile and is sensitive to agents that act either on proteins or on lipids. Specific binding is reversibly inactivated by reducing agents such as dithioerythritol; a reducible group, possibly a disulfide group, may be located at the binding site and required for its function. The affinity of the specific binding sites for auxins is modified by an unidentified dialyzable, heat-stable, apparently amphoteric, organic factor (“supernatant factor”) found in maize tissue. PMID:16659851

  3. Two amino acid sequences direct Aspergillus nidulans protein kinase C (PkcA) localization to hyphal apices and septation sites.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Hayes, Loretta; Hill, Terry W; Loprete, Darlene M; DelBove, Claire E; Shapiro, Justin A; Henley, Jordan L; Dawodu, Omolola O

    2015-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans ortholog of protein kinase C (pkcA) is involved in the organism's putative cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, and PkcA also is highly localized at growing tips and forming septa. In the present work we identify the regions within PkcA that are responsible for its localization to hyphal tips and septation sites. To this end, we used serially truncated pkcA constructs and expressed them as green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeras and identified two regions that direct PkcA localization. The first region is a 10 amino-acid sequence near the carboxyl end of the C2 domain that is required for localization to hyphal tips. Proteins containing this sequence also localize to septation sites. A second region between C2 and C1B (encompassing C1A) is sufficient for localization to septation sites but not to hyphal tips. We also report that localization to hyphal tips and septation sites alone is not sufficient for truncated constructs to complement hypersensitivity to the cell wall compromising agent calcofluor white in a strain bearing a mutation in the pkcA gene. Taken together, these results suggest that localization and stress response might be independent.

  4. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  5. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2016-11-01

    Developing efficient and inexpensive catalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) constitutes one of the grand challenges in the fabrication of commercially viable fuel cell devices and metal–air batteries for future energy applications. Despite recent achievements in designing advanced Pt-based and Pt-free catalysts, current progress primarily involves an empirical approach of trial-and-error combination of precursors and synthesis conditions, which limits further progress. Rational design of catalyst materials requires proper understanding of the mechanistic origin of the ORR and the underlying surface properties under operating conditions that govern catalytic activity. Herein, several different groups of iron-based catalysts synthesized via different methods and/or precursors were systematically studied by combining multiple spectroscopic techniques under ex situ and in situ conditions in an effort to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the synthesis-products correlations, nature of active sites, and the reaction mechanisms. These catalysts include original macrocycles, macrocycle-pyrolyzed catalysts, and Fe-N–C catalysts synthesized from individual Fe, N, and C precursors including polymer-based catalysts, metal organic framework (MOF)-based catalysts, and sacrificial support method (SSM)-based catalysts. The latter group of catalysts is most promising as not only they exhibit exceptional ORR activity and/or durability, but also the final products are controllable. We show that the high activity observed for most pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts can mainly be attributed to a single active site: non-planar Fe–N4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high potential for the Fe2+/3+ redox transition in acidic electrolyte/environment. The high intrinsic ORR activity, or turnover frequency (TOF), of this site is shown to be accounted for by redox catalysis mechanism that highlights the dominant role

  6. Effective treatment of PAH contaminated Superfund site soil with the peroxy-acid process.

    PubMed

    Scott Alderman, N; N'Guessan, Adeola L; Nyman, Marianne C

    2007-07-31

    Peroxy-organic acids are formed by the chemical reaction between organic acids and hydrogen peroxide. The peroxy-acid process was applied to two Superfund site soils provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Initial small-scale experiments applied ratios of 3:5:7 (v/v/v) or 3:3:9 (v/v/v) hydrogen peroxide:acetic acid:deionized (DI) water solution to 5g of Superfund site soil. The experiment using 3:5:7 (v/v/v) ratio resulted in an almost complete degradation of the 14 EPA regulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Bedford LT soil during a 24-h reaction period, while the 3:3:9 (v/v/v) ratio resulted in no applicable degradation in Bedford LT lot 10 soil over the same reaction period. Specific Superfund site soil characteristics (e.g., pH, total organic carbon content and particle size distribution) were found to play an important role in the availability of the PAHs and the efficiency of the transformation during the peroxy-acid process. A scaled-up experiment followed treating 150g of Bedford LT lot 10 soil with and without mixing. The scaled-up processes applied a 3:3:9 (v/v/v) solution resulting in significant decrease in PAH contamination. These findings demonstrate the peroxy-acid process as a viable option for the treatment of PAH contaminated soils. Further work is necessary in order to elucidate the mechanisms of this process.

  7. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  8. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  9. Moleculary imprinted polymers with metalloporphyrin-based molecular recognition sites coassembled with methacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Mukawa, T; Matsui, J; Higashi, M; Shimizu, K D

    2001-08-15

    A diastereoselective molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for (-)-cinchonidine, PPM(CD), was prepared by the combined use of methacrylic acid and vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin as functional monomers. Compared to MIPs using only methacrylic acid or zinc porphyrin as a functional monomer, PM(CD) and PP(CD), respectively, PPM(CD) showed higher binding ability for (-)-cinchonidine in chromatographic tests using the MIP-packed columns. Scatchard analysis gave a higher association constant of PPM(CD) for (-)-cinchonidine (1.14 x 10(7) M(-1)) than those of PP(CD) (1.45 x 10(6) M(-1)) and PM(CD) (6.78 x 10(6) M(-1)). The affinity distribution of binding sites estimated by affinity spectrum analysis showed a higher percentage of high-affinity sites and a lower percentage of low-affinity sites in PPM(CD). The MIPs containing a zinc(II) porphyrin in the binding sites, PPM(CD) and PP(CD), showed fluorescence quenching according to the binding of (-)-cinchonidine, and the quenching was significant in the low-concentration range, suggesting that the high-affinity binding sites contain the porphyrin residue. The correlation of the relative fluorescence intensity against log of (-)-cinchonidine concentrations showed a linear relationship. These results revealed that the MIP having highly specific binding sites was assembled by the two functional monomers, vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin and methacrylic acid, and they cooperatively worked to yield the specific binding. In addition, the zinc(II) porphyrin-based MIPs appeared to act as fluorescence sensor selectively responded by binding events of the template molecule.

  10. Identification of genes and pathways involved in the synthesis of Mead acid (20:3n-9), an indicator of essential fatty acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ichi, Ikuyo; Kono, Nozomu; Arita, Yuka; Haga, Shizuka; Arisawa, Kotoko; Yamano, Misato; Nagase, Mana; Fujiwara, Yoko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (Mead acid, 20:3n-9) is synthesized from oleic acid during a state of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD). Mead acid is thought to be produced by the same enzymes that synthesize arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but the genes and the pathways involved in the conversion of oleic acid to Mead acid have not been fully elucidated. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cultured cells are generally very low compared to those in mammalian tissues. In this study, we found that cultured cells, such as NIH3T3 and Hepa1-6 cells, have significant levels of Mead acid, indicating that cells in culture are in an EFAD state under normal culture conditions. We then examined the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of fatty acid desaturases and elongases on the level of Mead acid, and found that knockdown of Elovl5, Fads1, or Fads2 decreased the level of Mead acid. This and the measured levels of possible intermediate products for the synthesis of Mead acid such as 18:2n-9, 20:1n-9 and 20:2n-9 in the knocked down cells indicate two pathways for the synthesis of Mead acid: pathway 1) 18:1n-9→(Fads2)→18:2n-9→(Elovl5)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9 and pathway 2) 18:1n-9→(Elovl5)→20:1n-9→(Fads2)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9.

  11. The role of outer surface/inner bulk Brønsted acidic sites in the adsorption of a large basic molecule (simazine) on H-Y zeolite.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Filomena; Pansini, Michele; Marocco, Antonello; Bonelli, Barbara; Garrone, Edoardo; Esposito, Serena

    2015-11-21

    The simple means adopted for investigating H-Y zeolite acidity in water is the pH-dependence of the amount of a basic molecule adsorbed under isochoric conditions, a technique capable of yielding, under equilibrium conditions, an estimate of the pKa value of the involved acidic centres: the behaviour with temperature of adsorbed amounts yields instead some information on thermodynamics. Simazine (Sim, 2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine) was chosen as an adsorbate because its transverse dimension (7.5 Å) is close to the opening of the supercage in the faujasite structure of H-Y (7.4 Å). In short term measurements, Sim adsorption at 25 °C occurs only at the outer surface of H-Y particles. Two types of mildly acidic centres are present (with pKaca. 7 and ca. 8, respectively) and no strong one is observed. Previous adsorption of ammonia from the gas phase discriminates between the two. The former survives, and shows features common with the silanols of amorphous silica. The latter is suppressed: because of this and other features distinguishing this site from silanol species (e.g. the formation of dimeric Sim2H(+) species, favoured by coverage and unfavoured by temperatures of adsorption higher than ambient temperature) a candidate is an Al based site. We propose a Lewis centre coordinating a water molecule, exhibiting acidic properties. This acidic water molecule can be replaced by the stronger base ammonia, also depleting inner strong Brønsted sites. A mechanism for the generation of the two sites from surface Brønsted species is proposed. Long term adsorption measurements at 25 °C already show the onset of the interaction with inner strongly acidic Brønsted sites: because of its size, activation is required for Sim to pass the supercage openings and reach inner acidic sites. When adsorption is run at 40-50 °C, uptake is much larger and increases with temperature. Isochoric measurements suggest a pKa value of ca. 3 compatible with its marked acidic

  12. The human chromosomal fragile sites more often involved in constitutional deletions and duplications - A genetic and statistical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Dora Prata; Sequeira, Inês J.; Figueiredo, Carlos; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2016-12-01

    Human chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) are heritable loci or regions of the human chromosomes prone to exhibit gaps, breaks and rearrangements. Determining the frequency of deletions and duplications in CFSs may contribute to explain the occurrence of human disease due to those rearrangements. In this study we analyzed the frequency of deletions and duplications in each human CFS. Statistical methods, namely data display, descriptive statistics and linear regression analysis were applied to analyze this dataset. We found that FRA15C, FRA16A and FRAXB are the most frequently involved CFSs in deletions and duplications occurring in the human genome.

  13. Generation of Food-Grade Recombinant Lactic Acid Bacterium Strains by Site-Specific Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. Cruz; Alonso, Juan C.; Suárez, Juan E.; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2000-01-01

    The construction of a delivery and clearing system for the generation of food-grade recombinant lactic acid bacterium strains, based on the use of an integrase (Int) and a resolvo-invertase (β-recombinase) and their respective target sites (attP-attB and six, respectively) is reported. The delivery system contains a heterologous replication origin and antibiotic resistance markers surrounded by two directly oriented six sites, a multiple cloning site where passenger DNA could be inserted (e.g., the cI gene of bacteriophage A2), the int gene, and the attP site of phage A2. The clearing system provides a plasmid-borne gene encoding β-recombinase. The nonreplicative vector-borne delivery system was transformed into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 and, by site-specific recombination, integrated as a single copy in an orientation- and Int-dependent manner into the attB site present in the genome of the host strain. The transfer of the clearing system into this strain, with the subsequent expression of the β-recombinase, led to site-specific DNA resolution of the non-food-grade DNA. These methods were validated by the construction of a stable food-grade L. casei ATCC 393-derived strain completely immune to phage A2 infection during milk fermentation. PMID:10831443

  14. A highly Conserved Aspartic Acid Residue of the Chitosanase from Bacillus Sp. TS Is Involved in the Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanping; Zhao, Shuangzhi; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhengying; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2016-11-01

    The chitosanase from Bacillus sp. TS (CsnTS) is an enzyme belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 8. The sequence of CsnTS shares 98 % identity with the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17. Crystallography analysis and site-direct mutagenesis of the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17 identified the important residues involved in the catalytic interaction and substrate binding. However, despite progress in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the chitosanase from the family GH8, the functional roles of some residues that are highly conserved throughout this family have not been fully elucidated. This study focused on one of these residues, i.e., the aspartic acid residue at position 318. We found that apart from asparagine, mutation of Asp318 resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. In-depth investigations showed that mutation of this residue not only impaired enzymatic activity but also affected substrate binding. Taken together, our results showed that Asp318 plays an important role in CsnTS activity.

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of genes involved in rosmarinic acid biosynthesis from Prunella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Shin, YouJin; Tuan, Pham Anh; Li, Xiaohua; Park, Yunji; Park, Nam-il; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Prunella vulgaris L., commonly known as "self-heal" or "heal-all," is a perennial herb with a long history of medicinal use. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), and 4-coumarate:coenzyme-A (CoA) ligase (4CL) are important enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and in the accumulation of rosmarinic acid (RA), which is a major secondary metabolite in P. vulgaris. In this study, we isolated cDNAs encoding PvPAL, PvC4H, and Pv4CL from P. vulgaris using rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amino acid sequence alignments of PvPAL, PvC4H, and Pv4CL showed high sequence identity to those of other plants. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to determine the transcript levels of genes involved in RA biosynthesis in the flowers, leaves, stems, and roots of P. vulgaris. The transcript levels of PvPAL, PvC4H, and Pv4CL1 were the highest in flowers, whereas Pv4CL2 was the highest in roots. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis also showed the highest RA content in the flowers (3.71 mg/g dry weight). We suggest that the expression of the PvPAL, PvC4H, and Pv4CL1 genes is correlated with the accumulation of RA. Our results revealed that P. vulgaris flowers are appropriate for medicinal usage, and our findings provide support for increasing RA production in this plant.

  16. CitI, a Transcription Factor Involved in Regulation of Citrate Metabolism in Lactic Acid Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mauricio G.; Magni, Christian; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma

    2005-01-01

    A large variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can utilize citrate under fermentative conditions. Although much information concerning the metabolic pathways leading to citrate utilization by LAB has been gathered, the mechanisms regulating these pathways are obscure. In Weissella paramesenteroides (formerly called Leuconostoc paramesenteroides), transcription of the citMDEFCGRP citrate operon and the upstream divergent gene citI is induced by the presence of citrate in the medium. Although genetic experiments have suggested that CitI is a transcriptional activator whose activity can be modulated in response to citrate availability, specific details of the interaction between CitI and DNA remained unknown. In this study, we show that CitI recognizes two A+T-rich operator sites located between citI and citM and that the DNA-binding affinity of CitI is increased by citrate. Subsequently, this citrate signal propagation leads to the activation of the cit operon through an enhanced recruitment of RNA polymerase to its promoters. Our results indicate that the control of CitI by the cellular pools of citrate provides a mechanism for sensing the availability of citrate and adjusting the expression of the cit operon accordingly. In addition, this is the first reported example of a transcription factor directly functioning as a citrate-activated switch allowing the cell to optimize the generation of metabolic energy. PMID:16030208

  17. Novel ionic liquid with both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites for Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoyue; Ye, Weidong; Song, Xiaohua; Ma, Wenxin; Lao, Xuejun; Shen, Runpu

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquid with both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites has been synthesized and its catalytic activities for Michael addition were carefully studied. The novel ionic liquid was stable to water and could be used in aqueous solution. The molar ratio of the Lewis and Brønsted acid sites could be adjusted to match different reactions. The results showed that the novel ionic liquid was very efficient for Michael addition with good to excellent yields within several min. Operational simplicity, high stability to water and air, small amount used, low cost of the catalyst used, high yields, chemoselectivity, applicability to large-scale reactions and reusability are the key features of this methodology, which indicated that this novel ionic liquid also holds great potential for environmentally friendly processes.

  18. Site-directed spin labeling studies on nucleic acid structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Glenna Z.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) uses electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to monitor the behavior of a stable nitroxide radical attached at specific locations within a macromolecule such as protein, DNA, or RNA. Parameters obtained from EPR measurements, such as internitroxide distances and descriptions of the rotational motion of a nitroxide, provide unique information on features near the labeling site. With recent advances in solid-phase synthesis of nucleic acids and developments in EPR methodologies, particularly pulsed EPR technologies, SDSL has been increasingly used to study the structure and dynamics of DNA and RNA at the level of the individual nucleotides. This chapter summarizes the current SDSL studies on nucleic acids, with discussions focusing on literature from the last decade. PMID:18929141

  19. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  20. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 120-B-1, 105-B Battery Acid Sump, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-057

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-09-25

    The 120-B-1 waste site, located in the 100-BC-1 Operable Unit of the Hanford Site, consisted of a concrete battery acid sump that was used from 1944 to 1969 to neutralize the spent sulfuric acid from lead cell batteries of emergency power packs and the emergency lighting system. The battery acid sump was associated with the 105-B Reactor Building and was located adjacent to the building's northwest corner. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  1. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  2. Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in formalin-induced pain is attenuated by 4-phenylbutyric acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Jianmei; Li, Meirong; Zhong, Feng; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yuezhu; Wang, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological and inflammatory responses. Peripheral inflammatory responses can induce central sensitization and trigger inflammatory pain. However, there is little research on the relationship between ER stress and inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined whether the ER stress response is involved in peripheral inflammatory pain using a formalin-induced rat pain model. Methods Rats were divided into the following five groups: control, formalin, formalin + vehicle, formalin + 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) (40 mg/kg) and formalin + 4-PBA (100 mg/kg). Formalin-induced pain was assessed behaviorally by recording licking activity. The expression levels of immunoglobulin-binding protein (BIP), activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6), phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (p-IRE1), phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (p-PERK) and c-fos were quantitatively assessed by Western blot, and the distribution of BIP, ATF6 and c-fos in the lumbar enlargement of spinal cord were identified by immunohistochemistry in spinal dorsal horn slices. In addition, the concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the spinal cord were tested by biochemical measurement and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Results Intraperitoneal injection of 4-PBA at the dose of 100 mg/kg before formalin injection significantly decreased nociceptive behavior in the second phase compared with control, formalin, formalin + vehicle and formalin + 4-PBA (40 mg/kg) (P<0.05). Western blot showed that formalin injection significantly upregulated the expression of BIP, ATF6, p-PERK and c-fos in the spinal cord. This upregulation was reduced by peritoneal injection of 4-PBA (P<0.05), while expression of p-IRE1 was not altered by formalin treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed markedly increased staining density for BIP, ATF6 and c-fos in the superficial spinal dorsal horn after

  3. Lysyl oxidase-like 4 involvement in retinoic acid epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Comptour, Aurélie; Rouzaire, Marion; Belville, Corinne; Bonnin, Nicolas; Daniel, Estelle; Chiambaretta, Frédéric; Blanchon, Loïc; Sapin, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A and its active forms (retinoic acids/RAs) are known to have pro-healing properties, but their mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. This work aimed to identify the cellular and molecular processes by which atRA (all-trans RA) improves wound healing, using an in vivo model of mouse corneal alkali burns and an in vitro cellular human corneal epithelial injury model. Regulation by atRA has been studied on most of the cellular events that occur in wound healing. We investigated the direct influence of atRA on a specific target gene known to be involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) dynamics, one of the pathways contributing to epithelial repair. Our results demonstrate that atRA promotes corneal epithelial wound healing by acting preferentially on migration. The induction of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression by atRA in the corneal epithelium environment was established as essential in the mechanism of atRA-dependent wound healing. Our study describes for the first time a direct link between a retinoic-induced gene and protein, LOXL4, and its general clinical pro-healing properties in ECM dynamics. PMID:27597564

  4. Involvement of endogenous salicylic acid in iron-deficiency responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Liu, Kaidong; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong; Sun, Tao; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-07-01

    Several phytohormones have been demonstrated to be involved in iron (Fe) homeostasis. We took advantage of a salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis defective mutant phytoalexin deficient 4 (pad4: T-DNA Salk_089936) to explore the possible effects of endogenous SA on the morphological and physiological responses to Fe deprivation. The morphological and physiological analysis was carried out between Col-0 and the pad4 mutant. Under an Fe-deficiency treatment, Col-0 showed more severe leaf chlorosis and root growth inhibition compared with the pad4 mutant. The soluble Fe concentrations were significantly higher in pad4 than in Col-0 under the Fe-deficiency treatment. Fe deficiency significantly induced SA accumulation in Col-0 and the loss-of-function of PAD4 blocked this process. The requirement of endogenous SA accumulation for Fe-deficiency responses was confirmed using a series of SA biosynthetic mutants and transgenic lines. Furthermore, a comparative RNA sequencing analysis of the whole seedling transcriptomes between Col-0 and the pad4 mutant was also performed. Based on the transcriptome data, the expression levels of many auxin- and ethylene-response genes were altered in pad4 compared with Col-0. Fe deficiency increases SA contents which elevates auxin and ethylene signalling, thereby activating Fe translocation via the bHLH38/39-mediated transcriptional regulation of downstream Fe genes.

  5. Cellular Site in Bacillus subtilis of a Nuclease Which Preferentially Degrades Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Birnboim, H. C.

    1966-01-01

    Birnboim, H. C. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, N.Y.). Cellular site in Bacillus subtilis of a nuclease which preferentially degrades single-stranded nucleic acids. J. Bacteriol. 91:1004–1011. 1966.—A nuclease, identified by a marked preference for single-stranded nucleic acids, has been demonstrated in extracts of Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was associated with the cell wall-membrane fraction of mechanically disrupted cells and was released from cells which had been converted to protoplasts by lysozyme. The nuclease activity prepared by the latter procedure was found to be activated and solubilized by treatment with trypsin. The enzyme had about 2% activity on native deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as compared with denatured DNA. By use of CsCl analytical density gradient ultracentrifugation, this preparation was shown to degrade denatured DNA selectively in mixtures of native and denatured DNA. PMID:4956329

  6. Multiple site-selective insertions of non-canonical amino acids into sequence-repetitive polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I-Lin; Patterson, Melissa A.; Carpenter Desai, Holly E.; Mehl, Ryan A.; Giorgi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A simple and efficient method is described for introduction of non-canonical amino acids at multiple, structurally defined sites within recombinant polypeptide sequences. E. coli MRA30, a bacterial host strain with attenuated activity for release factor 1 (RF1), is assessed for its ability to support the incorporation of a diverse range of non-canonical amino acids in response to multiple encoded amber (TAG) codons within genetic templates derived from superfolder GFP and an elastin-mimetic protein polymer. Suppression efficiency and isolated protein yield were observed to depend on the identity of the orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and the non-canonical amino acid substrate. This approach afforded elastin-mimetic protein polymers containing non-canonical amino acid derivatives at up to twenty-two positions within the repeat sequence with high levels of substitution. The identity and position of the variant residues was confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis of the full-length polypeptides and proteolytic cleavage fragments resulting from thermolysin digestion. The accumulated data suggest that this multi-site suppression approach permits the preparation of protein-based materials in which novel chemical functionality can be introduced at precisely defined positions within the polypeptide sequence. PMID:23625817

  7. Fatty acid binding sites of human and bovine albumins: Differences observed by spin probe ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Vladimir; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Berezenko, Stephen; Schnurr, Kerstin; Gurachevsky, Andrey

    2009-09-01

    Bovine and human serum albumins and recombinant human albumin, all non-covalently complexed with 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acids, were investigated by ESR spectroscopy in solution over a range of pH values (5.5-8.0) and temperatures (25-50 °C), with respect to the allocation and mobility of fatty acid (FA) molecules bound to the proteins and conformation of the binding sites. In all proteins bound FA undergo a permanent intra-albumin migration between the binding sites and inter-domain residence. Nature identity of the recombinant human albumin to its serum-derived analog was observed. However, the binding sites of bovine albumin appeared shorter in length and wider in diameter than those of human albumin. Presumably, less tightly folded domains in bovine albumin allow better penetration of water molecules in the interior of the globule that resulted in higher activation energy of FA dissociation from the binding site. Thus, the sensitive technique based on ESR non-covalent spin labeling allowed quantitative analysis and reliable comparison of the fine features of binding proteins.

  8. The impact of acid treatment on soilwater chemistry at the Humex site

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.D.; Ranneklev, S.B.; Mykkelbost, T.C. )

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acid treatment on soil water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic chemistry are being monitored at the Humic Lake Acidification Experiment (HUMEX) in western Norway. The HUMEX project involves artificial acidification of half of a dystrophic lake and the corresponding drainage basin. Soil water chemistry data were collected from 30 monitoring lysimeters and 130 grid lysimeters. The samples from the monitoring lysimeters were collected before and, for a period of two years, after the onset of acid treatment. Operationally-defined functional fractions of DOC showed that hydrophilic (HPI) and hydrophobic (HPO) acids account for 60% to 90% of the DOC. In soils rich in DOC, the HPO acids were dominant, whereas in mineral soil horizons low in DOC, the HPI acid fractions were highest. The amount of DOC relative to labile aluminum and iron may determine the HPO/HPI acid ratio. The sulphate concentration has increased more in the treated than in the reference side. Coincident decreases in DOC and organically complexes aluminum (Al[sub 0]) concentrations were observed for surface histosol locations. The temporal and spatial variations in c(Al[sub 0]) were mainly explained by variation in c(DOC). 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Critical amino acid residues involved in the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter kNBC1-mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Abuladze, Natalia; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Sassani, Pakan; Liu, Weixin; Tatishchev, Sergei; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2005-06-15

    We have previously reported a topological model of the electrogenic Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) cotransporter (NBC1) in which the cotransporter spans the plasma membrane 10 times with N- and C-termini localized intracellularly. An analysis of conserved amino acid residues among members of the SLC4 superfamily in both the transmembrane segments (TMs) and intracellular/extracellular loops (ILs/ELs) provided the basis for the mutagenesis approach taken in the present study to determine amino acids involved in NBC1-mediated ion transport. Using large-scale mutagenesis, acidic and basic amino acids putatively involved in ion transport mediated by the predominant variant of NBC1 expressed in the kidney (kNBC1) were mutated to neutral and/or oppositely charged amino acids. All mutant kNBC1 cotransporters were expressed in HEK-293T cells and the Na(+)-dependent base flux of the mutants was determined using intracellular pH measurements with 2',7'-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Critical glutamate, aspartate, lysine, arginine and histidine residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were detected that were essential for kNBC1-mediated Na(+)-dependent base transport. In addition, critical phenylalanine, serine, tyrosine, threonine and alanine residues in TMs and ILs/ELs were detected. Furthermore, several amino acid residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were shown to be essential for membrane targeting. The data demonstrate asymmetry of distribution of kNBC1 charged amino acids involved in ion recognition in putative outward-facing and inward-facing conformations. A model summarizing key amino acid residues involved in kNBC1-mediated ion transport is presented.

  10. Critical amino acid residues involved in the electrogenic sodium–bicarbonate cotransporter kNBC1-mediated transport

    PubMed Central

    Abuladze, Natalia; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Sassani, Pakan; Liu, Weixin; Tatishchev, Sergei; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2005-01-01

    We have previously reported a topological model of the electrogenic Na+–HCO3− cotransporter (NBC1) in which the cotransporter spans the plasma membrane 10 times with N- and C-termini localized intracellularly. An analysis of conserved amino acid residues among members of the SLC4 superfamily in both the transmembrane segments (TMs) and intracellular/extracellular loops (ILs/ELs) provided the basis for the mutagenesis approach taken in the present study to determine amino acids involved in NBC1-mediated ion transport. Using large-scale mutagenesis, acidic and basic amino acids putatively involved in ion transport mediated by the predominant variant of NBC1 expressed in the kidney (kNBC1) were mutated to neutral and/or oppositely charged amino acids. All mutant kNBC1 cotransporters were expressed in HEK-293T cells and the Na+-dependent base flux of the mutants was determined using intracellular pH measurements with 2′,7′-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Critical glutamate, aspartate, lysine, arginine and histidine residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were detected that were essential for kNBC1-mediated Na+-dependent base transport. In addition, critical phenylalanine, serine, tyrosine, threonine and alanine residues in TMs and ILs/ELs were detected. Furthermore, several amino acid residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were shown to be essential for membrane targeting. The data demonstrate asymmetry of distribution of kNBC1 charged amino acids involved in ion recognition in putative outward-facing and inward-facing conformations. A model summarizing key amino acid residues involved in kNBC1-mediated ion transport is presented. PMID:15817634

  11. The Arabidopsis thaliana REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE1 Gene Encodes an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Involved in Ferulic Acid and Sinapic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesh B.; Bastress, Kristen L.; Ruegger, Max O.; Denault, Jeff W.; Chapple, Clint

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has significantly advanced our understanding of the phenylpropanoid pathway but has left in doubt the pathway by which sinapic acid is synthesized in plants. The reduced epidermal fluorescence1 (ref1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates only 10 to 30% of the sinapate esters found in wild-type plants. Positional cloning of the REF1 gene revealed that it encodes an aldehyde dehydrogenase, a member of a large class of NADP+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Consistent with this finding, extracts of ref1 leaves exhibit low sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. These data indicate that REF1 encodes a sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase required for sinapic acid and sinapate ester biosynthesis. When expressed in Escherichia coli, REF1 was found to exhibit both sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and further phenotypic analysis of ref1 mutant plants showed that they contain less cell wall–esterified ferulic acid. These findings suggest that both ferulic acid and sinapic acid are derived, at least in part, through oxidation of coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde. This route is directly opposite to the traditional representation of phenylpropanoid metabolism in which hydroxycinnamic acids are instead precursors of their corresponding aldehydes. PMID:14729911

  12. [Kv3.4 channel is involved in rat pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid].

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Bi, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Rong; Zhu, Da-Ling

    2006-02-25

    We have reported that hypoxia increases the activation of 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), which converts arachidonic acid (AA) into 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in small pulmonary arteries (PAs). Through inhibition of Kv channels, 15-HETE causes more robust concentration-dependent contraction of PA rings from the hypoxic compared to the normoxic controls. However, the subtypes of Kv channels inhibited by 15-HETE are incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to identify the contribution of Kv3.4 channel in the process of pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 15-HETE using the tension studies of PA rings from rat with Kv3.4 channel blocker in tissue bath; to explore the role of vascular endothelium in15-HETE-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction through denuded endothelia of PA rings; and to define the downregulation of 15-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channel in cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) with RT-PCR and Western blot. In the present study, healthy Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: Group A with normal oxygen supply and group B with hypoxia. Six days later, the rats were killed. Pulmonary artery rings were prepared for organ bath experiments. Firstly, different concentrations of 15-HETE (10~1 000 nmol/L) were added to the Krebs solution. The isometric tension was recorded using a four-channel force-displacement transducer. Then Kv3.4 channel blocker, 100 nmol/L BDS-I, was added, followed by adding 1 mumol/L 15-HETE, and the isometric tension was recorded. Furthermore, RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to identify the influence of 15-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channel in cultured rat PASMCs.The results showed the PA tension was significantly increased both in groups A and B by 15-HETE in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.05), especially in group B (P<0.05 compared to control); denuded endothelia enhanced 15-HETE concentration-related constrictions in rat PA rings; Kv3.4 channel blocker, BDS

  13. Identification of sites responsible for the potentiating effect of niflumic acid on ClC-Ka kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Zifarelli, G; Liantonio, A; Gradogna, A; Picollo, A; Gramegna, G; De Bellis, M; Murgia, AR; Babini, E; Conte Camerino, D; Pusch, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: ClC-K kidney Cl− channels are important for renal and inner ear transepithelial Cl− transport, and are potentially interesting pharmacological targets. They are modulated by niflumic acid (NFA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in a biphasic way: NFA activates ClC-Ka at low concentrations, but blocks the channel above ∼1 mM. We attempted to identify the amino acids involved in the activation of ClC-Ka by NFA. Experimental approach: We used site-directed mutagenesis and two-electrode voltage clamp analysis of wild-type and mutant channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Guided by the crystal structure of a bacterial CLC homolog, we screened 97 ClC-Ka mutations for alterations of NFA effects. Key results: Mutations of five residues significantly reduced the potentiating effect of NFA. Two of these (G167A and F213A) drastically altered general gating properties and are unlikely to be involved in NFA binding. The three remaining mutants (L155A, G345S and A349E) severely impaired or abolished NFA potentiation. Conclusions and implications: The three key residues identified (L155, G345, A349) are localized in two different protein regions that, based on the crystal structure of bacterial CLC homologs, are expected to be exposed to the extracellular side of the channel, relatively close to each other, and are thus good candidates for being part of the potentiating NFA binding site. Alternatively, the protein region identified mediates conformational changes following NFA binding. Our results are an important step towards the development of ClC-Ka activators for treating Bartter syndrome types III and IV with residual channel activity. PMID:20649569

  14. Microbial Communities in Biofilms of an Acid Mine Drainage Site Determined by Phospholipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, S.; Fang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Phospholipids were extracted to determine the microbial biomass and community structure of biofims from an acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Green Valley coal mine site (GVS) in western Indiana. The distribution of specific biomarkers indicated the presence of a variety of microorganisms. Phototrophic microeukaryotes, which include Euglena mutabilis, algae, and cyanobacteria were the most dominant organisms, as indicated by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The presence of terminally methyl branched fatty acids suggests the presence of Gram-positive bacteria, and the mid-methyl branched fatty acids indicates the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Fungi appear to also be an important part of the AMD microbial communities as suggested by the presence of 18:2 fatty acid. The acidophilic microeukaryotes Euglena dominated the biofilm microbial communities. These microorganisms appear to play a prominent role in the formation and preservation of stromatolites and in releasing oxygen to the atmosphere by oxygenic photosynthesis. Thus, the AMD environment comprises a host of microorganisms spreading out within the phylogenetic tree of life. Novel insights on the roles of microbial consortia in the formation and preservation of stromatolites and the production of oxygen through photosynthesis in AMD systems may have significance in the understanding of the interaction of Precambrian microbial communities in environments that produced microbially-mediated sedimentary structures and that caused oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere.

  15. Characterizing Surface Acidic Sites in Mesoporous-Silica-Supported Tungsten Oxide Catalysts Using Solid State NMR and Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Hu, Mary Y.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-18

    The acidic sites in dispersed tungsten oxide supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica were investigated using a combination of pyridine titration, both fast-, and slow-MAS {sup 15}N NMR, static {sup 2}H NMR, and quantum chemistry calculations. It is found that the bridged acidic -OH groups in surface adsorbed tungsten dimers (i.e., W-OH-W) are the Broensted acid sites. The unusually strong acidity of these Broensted acid sites is confirmed by quantum chemistry calculations. In contrast, terminal W-OH sites are very stable and only weakly acidic as are terminal Si-OH sites. Furthermore, molecular interactions between pyridine molecules and the dimer Broensted and terminal W-OH sites for dispersed tungsten oxide species is strong. This results in restricted molecular motion for the interacting pyridine molecules even at room temperature, i.e., a reorientation mainly about the molecular 2-fold axis. This restricted reorientation makes it possible to estimate the relative ratio of the Broensted (tungsten dimer) to the weakly acidic terminal W-OH sites in the catalyst using the slow-MAS {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N CP PASS method.

  16. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  17. Metal ion blockage of tritium incorporation into gamma-carboxyglutamic acid of prothrombin. Stoichiometry of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to Gd3+ for the high affinity sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, S.P.; Saini, R.; Katz, A.; Cai, G.Z.; Maki, S.L.; Brodsky, G.L.

    1988-07-15

    Prothrombin possesses two high affinity and four low affinity gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-dependent gadolinium binding sites. Earlier work has shown that tritium can be specifically incorporated at the gamma-carbon of Gla in proteins at pH 5. In the present work we show that inclusion of saturating concentrations of Ca2+ in nondenaturing buffer systems ranging from pH 5.5 to 8.5 prevents the exchange of tritium into all 10 Gla residues of prothrombin. Similarly, saturating concentrations of Gd3+ prevent tritium incorporation into Gla at pH 5.5. Positive cooperativity was observed for the binding of Gd3+ to human prothrombin (at pH 5.5) for the two high affinity sites (Kd congruent to 35 nM). The four low affinity sites bind Gd3+ with a Kd congruent to 5 microM. Incubation of prothrombin ranging in concentrations from 10 to 40 microM with 2 eq of Gd3+ at pH 5.5 prevents 5.7 (average of seven determinations) Gla residues from tritium incorporation. Sedimentation velocity experiments conducted at pH 5.5 indicate that prothrombin in the presence of saturating concentrations of Gd3+ polymerizes, most likely, to a trimer. Further, in the presence of 2 eq of Gd3+, calculated percent weight average concentration of monomer prothrombin is congruent to 100% at 10 microM, approximately equal to 95% at 20 microM, and congruento to 80% at 40 microM protein concentration. Thus, it appears that under conditions in which prothrombin primarily exists as a monomer, occupancy of the initial two metal binding sites by Gd3+ involves six Gla residues.

  18. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Giudetti, Anna M.; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V.; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  19. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  20. Fatty acid composition differences between adipose depot sites in dairy and beef steer breeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Lei, Z M; Wu, J P; Brown, M A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to compare fatty acid composition of longissimus dorsi (LD) and kidney fat (KF) in Holstein steers (HS), Simmental steers (SS) and Chinese LongDong Yellow Cattle steers (CLD). All steers received the same nutrition and management but in different locations. Cattle were harvested at approximately 550 kg and fatty acid composition of longissimus dorsi and kidney fat was analyzed in samples taken after 3 days of aging. There was evidence (P < 0.05) that C18:3n6 was greater in KF than LD in CLD cattle but not in HS or SS cattle. Percentage C18:1n9, C18:2n6, C18:3n3, and n6 fatty acids were greater in LD than KF for all breeds (P < 0.05), but the difference between fat sources for n6 in CLD cattle was smaller than the other two breeds. The LD had greater percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and a greater ratio of n6:n3 PUFAs compared to the KF in each breed (P < 0.05). The △(9)-desaturase catalytic activity index was greater in LD than in KF in each breed group (P < 0.05). Percentage cis-9, trans-11 CLA was greater in KF than LD in HS (P < 0.05) but not SS or CLD cattle. These results indicate fatty acid percentages generally differed between longissimus dorsi fat and kidney fat. Further, there was some indication that some of these differences between fatty acid deposition sites were not consistent across breed group.

  1. Abscisic acid and transpiration rate are involved in the response to boron toxicity in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Macho-Rivero, Miguel Ángel; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan José; Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2016-12-09

    Boron (B) is an essential microelement for vascular plant development, but its toxicity is a major problem affecting crop yields in arid and semi-arid areas of the world. In the literature, several genes involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and responses are upregulated in Arabidopsis roots after treatment with excess B. It is known that the AtNCED3 gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme for ABA biosynthesis, plays a key role in the plant response to drought stress. In this study, root AtNCED3 expression and shoot ABA content were rapidly increased in wild-type plants upon B-toxicity treatment. The Arabidopsis ABA-deficient nced3-2 mutant had higher transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and accumulated more B in their shoots than wild-type plants, facts that were associated with the lower levels of ABA in this mutant. However, in wild-type plants, B toxicity caused a significant reduction in stomatal conductance, resulting in a decreased transpiration rate. This response could be a mechanism to limit the transport of excess B from the roots to the leaves under B toxicity. In agreement with the higher transpiration rate of the nced3-2 mutant, this genotype showed an increased leaf B concentration and damage upon exposure to 5 mM B. Under B toxicity, ABA application decreased B accumulation in wild-type and nced3-2 plants. In summary, this work shows that excess B applied to the roots leads to rapid changes in AtNCED3 expression and gas exchange parameters that would contribute to restrain the B entry into the leaves, this effect being mediated by ABA.

  2. Dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase: absence of increased enzyme catabolism and multiplicity of effector sites in repression. Hemoprotein involvement.

    PubMed

    Argus, M F; Arcos, J C; Pastor, K M; Wu, B C; Venkatesan, N

    1976-05-01

    Evidence is presented that the previously observed decrease of the Vmax of hepatic microsomal demethylation of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), following pretreatment of rats with 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), is not due to increase in the rate of breakdown but to decrease of de novo synthesis. Determinations of Vmax at time intervals in the transition from the high steady-state level induced by a carbohydrate-devoid casein diet, down to the low steady-state level of carbohydrate-containing basal diet, yielded two consecutive slopes; descent from the basal diet level to the lower steady-state level following pretreatment with MC yielded one slope. Plotting these slopes against the initial Vmax values gave a typical exponential curve (or straight line if the logs of slopes are used) indicating that the rate of enzyme decay in the MC-treated animals is not greater than that expected from normal enzyme catabolism. A multiplicity of effector sites appears to be involved in the repressor action of different structural types; for example, repression by MC (46.6%) and by phenobarbital (23.9%) in combination are approximately additive (62.0%), rather than competitive, indicating that the two agents act at different sites. A P-450 type cytochrome is involved in the demethylation of DMN. DMN-demethylase is inhibited by carbon monoxide, but the susceptibility to CO is far greater than that observed previously with 3,4-benzopyrene hydroxylation; inhibition of DMN-demethylase as a function of CO concentration follows typical enzyme kinetics. However, while both phenobarbital and MC powerfully repress the DMN-demethylase, we have confirmed that they are strong inducers of the synthesis of P-450 and P-448, respectively, as estimated from the difference spectra.

  3. Innovative use of a bacterial enzyme involved in sialic acid degradation to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis in glycoengineered insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system is widely used for recombinant protein production, but it is suboptimal for recombinant glycoprotein production because it does not provide sialylation, which is an essential feature of many glycoprotein biologics. This problem has been addressed by metabolic engineering, which has extended endogenous insect cell N-glycosylation pathways and enabled glycoprotein sialylation by baculovirus/insect cell systems. However, further improvement is needed because even the most extensively engineered baculovirus/insect cell systems require media supplementation with N-acetylmannosamine, an expensive sialic acid precursor, for efficient recombinant glycoprotein sialylation. Our solution to this problem focused on E. coli N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate 2′-epimerase (GNPE), which normally functions in bacterial sialic acid degradation. Considering that insect cells have the product, but not the substrate for this enzyme, we hypothesized that GNPE might drive the reverse reaction in these cells, thereby initiating sialic acid biosynthesis in the absence of media supplementation. We tested this hypothesis by isolating transgenic insect cells expressing E. coli GNPE together with a suite of mammalian genes needed for N-glycoprotein sialylation. Various assays showed that these cells efficiently produced sialic acid, CMP-sialic acid, and sialylated recombinant N-glycoproteins even in growth media without N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, this study demonstrated that a eukaryotic recombinant protein production platform can be glycoengineered with a bacterial gene, that a bacterial enzyme which normally functions in sialic acid degradation can be used to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis, and that insect cells expressing this enzyme can produce sialylated N-glycoproteins without N-acetylmannosamine supplementation, which will reduce production costs in glycoengineered baculovirus/insect cell systems. PMID:23022569

  4. Genetic Incorporation of the Unnatural Amino Acid p-Acetyl Phenylalanine into Proteins for Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Eric G.B.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful tool for the characterization of protein structure and dynamics; however, its application in many systems is hampered by the reliance on unique and benign cysteine substitutions for the site-specific attachment of the spin label. An elegant solution to this problem involves the use of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids (UAAs) containing reactive functional groups that are chemically orthogonal to those of the 20 amino acids found naturally in proteins. These unique functional groups can then be selectively reacted with an appropriately functionalized spin probe. In this chapter, we detail the genetic incorporation of the ketone-bearing amino acid p-acetyl phenylalanine (pAcPhe) into recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Incorporation of pAcPhe is followed by chemoselective reaction of the ketone side chain with a hydroxylamine-functionalized nitroxide to afford the spin-labeled side chain “K1,” and we present two protocols for successful K1 labeling of proteins bearing site-specific pAcPhe. We outline the basic requirements for pAcPhe incorporation and labeling, with an emphasis on practical aspects that must be considered by the researcher if high yields of UAA incorporation and efficient labeling reactions are to be achieved. To this end, we highlight recent advances that have led to increased yields of pAcPhe incorporation, and discuss the use of aniline-based catalysts allowing for facile conjugation of the hydroxylamine spin label under mild reaction conditions. To illustrate the utility of K1 labeling in proteins where traditional cysteine-based SDSL methods are problematic, we site-specifically K1 label the cellular prion protein at two positions in the C-terminal domain and determine the interspin distance using double electron–electron resonance EPR. Recent advances in UAA incorporation and ketone-based bioconjugation, in combination with the commercial availability of all requisite

  5. Recognition of the 3' splice site RNA by the U2AF heterodimer involves a dynamic population shift.

    PubMed

    Voith von Voithenberg, Lena; Sánchez-Rico, Carolina; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Madl, Tobias; Zanier, Katia; Barth, Anders; Warner, Lisa R; Sattler, Michael; Lamb, Don C

    2016-11-15

    An essential early step in the assembly of human spliceosomes onto pre-mRNA involves the recognition of regulatory RNA cis elements in the 3' splice site by the U2 auxiliary factor (U2AF). The large (U2AF65) and small (U2AF35) subunits of the U2AF heterodimer contact the polypyrimidine tract (Py-tract) and the AG-dinucleotide, respectively. The tandem RNA recognition motif domains (RRM1,2) of U2AF65 adopt closed/inactive and open/active conformations in the free form and when bound to bona fide Py-tract RNA ligands. To investigate the molecular mechanism and dynamics of 3' splice site recognition by U2AF65 and the role of U2AF35 in the U2AF heterodimer, we have combined single-pair FRET and NMR experiments. In the absence of RNA, the RRM1,2 domain arrangement is highly dynamic on a submillisecond time scale, switching between closed and open conformations. The addition of Py-tract RNA ligands with increasing binding affinity (strength) gradually shifts the equilibrium toward an open conformation. Notably, the protein-RNA complex is rigid in the presence of a strong Py-tract but exhibits internal motion with weak Py-tracts. Surprisingly, the presence of U2AF35, whose UHM domain interacts with U2AF65 RRM1, increases the population of the open arrangement of U2AF65 RRM1,2 in the absence and presence of a weak Py-tract. These data indicate that the U2AF heterodimer promotes spliceosome assembly by a dynamic population shift toward the open conformation of U2AF65 to facilitate the recognition of weak Py-tracts at the 3' splice site. The structure and RNA binding of the heterodimer was unaffected by cancer-linked myelodysplastic syndrome mutants.

  6. Photoinduced electron transfer involving eosin-tryptophan conjugates. Long-lived radical pair states for systems incorporating aromatic amino acid side chains

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Farahat, C.W.; Oh, C. )

    1994-07-14

    The electron-transfer photochemistry of the covalent derivatives of the dye eosin, in which the xanthene dye is covalently attached to the amino acid L-tryptophan via the thiohydantoin derivative, the tryptophan dipeptide, and an ethyl ester derivative, has been investigated. The singlet excited state of the dye is significantly quenched on attachment of the aromatic amino acid residue. Dye triplet states are also intercepted through intramolecular interaction of excited dye and amino acid pendants. Flash photolysis experiments verify that this interaction involves electron transfer from the indole side chains of tryptophan. Rate constants for electron transfer are discussed in terms of the distance relationships for the eosin chromophore and aromatic redox sites on peptide derivatives, the pathway for [sigma]-[pi] through-bond interaction between redox sites, and the multiplicity and state of protonation for electron-transfer intermediates. Selected electron-transfer photoreactions were studied under conditions of binding of the peptide derivatives in a high molecular weight, water-soluble, globular polymer, poly(vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone). 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Involvement of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kalachova, Tetiana; Iakovenko, Oksana; Kretinin, Sergii; Kravets, Volodymyr

    2013-05-01

    Salicylic acid is associated with the primary defense responses to biotic stress and formation of systemic acquired resistance. However, molecular mechanisms of early cell reactions to phytohormone application are currently undisclosed. The present study investigates the participation of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signal transduction cascade. The activation of lipid signaling enzymes within 15 min of salicylic acid application was shown in Arabidopsis thaliana plants by measuring the phosphatidic acid accumulation. Adding of primary alcohol (1-butanol) to the incubation medium led to phosphatidylbutanol accumulation as a result of phospholipase D (PLD) action in wild-type and NADPH-oxidase RbohD deficient plants. Salicylic acid induced rapid increase in NADPH-oxidase activity in histochemical assay with nitroblue tetrazolium but the reaction was not observed in presence of 1-butanol and NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodide (DPI). The further physiological effect of salicylic acid and inhibitory analysis of the signaling cascade were made in the guard cell model. Stomatal closure induced by salicylic acid was inhibited by 1-butanol and DPI treatment. rbohD transgenic plants showed impaired stomatal reaction upon phytohormone effect, while the reaction to H2O2 did not differ from that of wild-type plants. Thus a key role of NADPH-oxidase D-isoform in the process of stomatal closure in response to salicylic acid has been postulated. It has enabled to predict a cascade implication of PLD and NADPH oxidase to salicylic acid signaling pathway.

  8. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  9. Evidence for the involvement of GPR40 and NADPH oxidase in palmitic acid-induced superoxide production and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Graciano, Maria Fernanda; Valle, Maíra Mello; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex have been shown to be involved in the fatty acid amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). The effect of palmitic acid on superoxide production and insulin secretion by INS-1E cells and the possible involvement of GPR40 and NADPH oxidase in these processes were examined in this study. Cells were incubated during 1 h with palmitic acid in low and high glucose concentrations, a GPR40 agonist (GW9508) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium, DPI) and PKC (calphostin C). GW9508 induced superoxide production at 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations and stimulated insulin secretion at 16.7 mM glucose concentration involving both PKC and NADPH oxidase activation. Palmitic acid induced superoxide production through NADPH oxidase and GPR40-dependent pathways and the stimulation of insulin secretion in the presence of a high glucose concentration was reduced by knockdown of GPR40 using siRNA. Our results suggest that palmitic acid induces superoxide production and potentiates GSIS through NADPH oxidase and GPR40 pathways in pancreatic ? cells.

  10. Ethanol potentiation of GABAergic transmission in cultured spinal cord neurons involves gamma-aminobutyric acidA-gated chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, A.K.; Ticku, M.K.

    1988-08-01

    The interaction of ethanol with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated 36-Cl-influx and its modulation by various drugs was investigated in C57 mice spinal cord cultured neurons. Ethanol (5-100 mM) potentiated the effect of GABA on /sup 36/Cl-influx; whereas at concentrations greater than or equal to 50 mM ethanol activated Cl- channels directly. The effect of ethanol was specific for GABAA receptor-gated Cl- channels, as ethanol did not potentiate glycine-induced /sup 36/Cl-influx in the same neurons. Both the enhancing and direct effects of ethanol on /sup 36/Cl-influx were blocked by GABA antagonists like bicuculline, picrotoxinin and inverse agonists of the benzodiazepine site like the imidazodiazepine R015-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo (1,5 alpha), (1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) and N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142). Ethanol potentiating effect of GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl-influx was also reversed by methyl-6,7-dimethyl-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate. The effects of the inverse agonists were blocked by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist R015-1788. Both R015-4513 and FG-7142 reversed direct and GABA potentiating effects of ethanol effect at concentrations lower than those that exhibit inverse agonistic activity in the /sup 36/Cl-influx assay in cultured neurons. These results suggest that ethanol facilitation of GABAAergic transmission involves GABA receptor-gated Cl- channels and that this interaction may be responsible for some of the pharmacological effects of ethanol.

  11. Epidemiology and sites of involvement of invasive fungal infections in patients with haematological malignancies: a 20-year autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Russell E; Cahyame-Zuniga, Lizebeth; Leventakos, Konstantinos; Chamilos, Georgios; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Tamboli, Pheroze; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Bodey, Gerald P; Luna, Mario; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-11-01

    Autopsy studies remain an essential tool for understanding the patterns of fungal disease not detected ante mortem with current diagnostic approaches. We collected data concerning the microbiological trends, patient clinical characteristics and sites of involvement for invasive fungal infections (IFIs) identified at autopsy in a single large cancer treatment centre over a 20-year period (1989-2008). The autopsy rate and IFI prevalence both declined significantly during the study period. The prevalence of Aspergillus spp. decreased significantly from the first 15 years of the study (from 0.12 to 0.14 cases per 100 autopsies to 0.07 in 2004-2008; P = 0.04), with only Mucorales accounting for a greater proportion of IFIs over the duration of the study period (0.06 to 0.2 cases per 100 autopsies, P = 0.04). After 2003, moulds accounted for the majority of infections identified at autopsy in the spleen, kidney, heart and gastrointestinal tract. Despite a trend of decreasing prevalence from 1989 to 2004, invasive candidiasis increased in prevalence during later periods 2004-2008 (0.02-0.05 per 100 autopsies) with decreasing kidney, heart and spleen involvement. Despite a declining autopsy rate, these data suggest a decreasing prevalence overall of IFIs with changing patterns of dissemination in patients with haematological malignancies.

  12. Expert Radiation Oncologist Interpretations of Involved-Site Radiation Therapy Guidelines in the Management of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, involved-site radiation therapy (ISRT) guidelines have been developed and published to replace the previous concept of involved-field radiation therapy for patients with lymphoma. However, these ISRT guidelines may be interpreted in different ways, posing difficulties for prospective clinical trials. This study reports survey results regarding interpretation of the ISRT guidelines. Methods and Materials: Forty-four expert lymphoma radiation oncologists were asked to participate in a survey that included 7 different cases associated with 9 questions. The questions pertained to ISRT contouring and asked respondents to choose between 2 different answers (no “correct” answer) and a third write-in option allowed. Results: Fifty-two percent of those surveyed responded to the questionnaire. Among those who responded, 72% have practiced for >10 years, 46% have treated >20 Hodgkin lymphoma cases annually, and 100% were familiar with the ISRT concept. Among the 9 questions associated with the 7 cases, 3 had concordance among the expert radiation oncologists of greater than 70%. Six of the questions had less than 70% concordance (range, 56%-67%). Conclusions: Even among expert radiation oncologists, interpretation of ISRT guidelines is variable. Further guidance for ISRT field design will be needed to reduce variability among practicing physicians.

  13. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  14. Involvement of glutathione peroxidase 1 in growth and peroxisome formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in oleic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Ohdate, Takumi; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to use some fatty acids, such as oleic acid, as a sole source of carbon. β-oxidation, which occurs in a single membrane-enveloped organelle or peroxisome, is responsible for the assimilation of fatty acids. In S. cerevisiae, β-oxidation occurs only in peroxisomes, and H(2)O(2) is generated during this fatty acid-metabolizing pathway. S. cerevisiae has three GPX genes (GPX1, GPX2, and GPX3) encoding atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins. Here we show that expression of GPX1 was induced in medium containing oleic acid as a carbon source in an Msn2/Msn4-dependent manner. We found that Gpx1 was located in the peroxisomal matrix. The peroxisomal Gpx1 showed peroxidase activity using thioredoxin or glutathione as a reducing power. Peroxisome biogenesis was induced when cells were cultured with oleic acid. Peroxisome biogenesis was impaired in gpx1∆ cells, and subsequently, the growth of gpx1∆ cells was lowered in oleic acid-containing medium. Gpx1 contains six cysteine residues. Of the cysteine-substituted mutants of Gpx1, Gpx1(C36S) was not able to restore growth and peroxisome formation in oleic acid-containing medium, therefore, redox regulation of Gpx1 seems to be involved in the mechanism of peroxisome formation.

  15. The epsilon subunit of DNA polymerase III Is involved in the nalidixic acid-induced SOS response in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pohlhaus, Jennifer Reineke; Long, David T; O'Reilly, Erin; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2008-08-01

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs such as nalidixic acid target DNA gyrase in Escherichia coli. These inhibitors bind to and stabilize a normally transient covalent protein-DNA intermediate in the gyrase reaction cycle, referred to as the cleavage complex. Stabilization of the cleavage complex is necessary but not sufficient for cell killing--cytotoxicity apparently results from the conversion of cleavage complexes into overt DNA breaks by an as-yet-unknown mechanism(s). Quinolone treatment induces the bacterial SOS response in a RecBC-dependent manner, arguing that cleavage complexes are somehow converted into double-stranded breaks. However, the only proteins known to be required for SOS induction by nalidixic acid are RecA and RecBC. In hopes of identifying additional proteins involved in the cytotoxic response to nalidixic acid, we screened for E. coli mutants specifically deficient in SOS induction upon nalidixic acid treatment by using a dinD::lacZ reporter construct. From a collection of SOS partially constitutive mutants with disruptions of 47 different genes, we found that dnaQ insertion mutants are specifically deficient in the SOS response to nalidixic acid. dnaQ encodes DNA polymerase III epsilon subunit, the proofreading subunit of the replicative polymerase. The deficient response to nalidixic acid was rescued by the presence of the wild-type dnaQ gene, confirming involvement of the epsilon subunit. To further characterize the SOS deficiency of dnaQ mutants, we analyzed the expression of several additional SOS genes in response to nalidixic acid using real-time PCR. A subset of SOS genes lost their response to nalidixic acid in the dnaQ mutant strain, while two tested SOS genes (recA and recN) continued to exhibit induction. These results argue that the replication complex plays a role in modulating the SOS response to nalidixic acid and that the response is more complex than a simple on/off switch.

  16. In situ detection of salicylic acid binding sites in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Wen; Deng, Da-Yi; Yu, Ying; Liu, Fang-Fei; Lin, Bi-Xia; Cao, Yu-Juan; Hu, Xiao-Gang; Wu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-02-01

    The determination of hormone-binding sites in plants is essential in understanding the mechanisms behind hormone function. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that regulates responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In order to label SA-binding sites in plant tissues, a quantum dots (QDs) probe functionalized with a SA moiety was successfully synthesized by coupling CdSe QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) to 4-amino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (PAS), using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyllaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as the coupling agent. The probe was then characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, as well as UV/vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The results confirmed the successful conjugation of PAS to CdSe QDs and revealed that the conjugates maintained the properties of the original QDs, with small core diameters and adequate dispersal in solution. The PAS-CdSe QDs were used to detect SA-binding sites in mung bean and Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in vitro and in vivo. The PAS-CdSe QDs were effectively transported into plant tissues and specifically bound to SA receptors in vivo. In addition, the effects of the PAS-CdSe QDs on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in the tips of A. thaliana seedlings were investigated. Both SA and PAS-CdSe QDs had similar effects on the trend in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentrations, suggesting that the PAS-CdSe QDs maintained the bioactivity of SA. To summarize, PAS-CdSe QDs have high potential as a fluorescent probe for the in vitro/in vivo labeling and imaging of SA receptors in plants.

  17. The species- and site-specific acid-base properties of penicillamine and its homodisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Szilvay, András; Noszál, Béla

    2014-08-01

    Penicillamine, penicillamine disulfide and 4 related compounds were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations and case-tailored evaluation methods. The resulting acid-base properties are quantified in terms of 14 macroscopic and 28 microscopic protonation constants and the concomitant 7 interactivity parameters. The species- and site-specific basicities are interpreted by means of inductive and shielding effects through various intra- and intermolecular comparisons. The thiolate basicities determined this way are key parameters and exclusive means for the prediction of thiolate oxidizabilities and chelate forming properties in order to understand and influence chelation therapy and oxidative stress at the molecular level.

  18. Site Specific Incorporation of Amino Acid Analogues into Proteins In Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-11

    Positions in CCR5 ( ) and rhodopsin ( ) subjected to site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids are indicated. Figure 15. Expression...of functional CCR5 mutants containing Acp or Bzp at positions 28, 96, or 260. HEK293T cells were transfected with plasmids carrying the genes for... CCR5 -wt or CCR5 mutant with an amber mutation at position I28, F96, or F260. Plasmids encoding Bst-Yam and E. coli TyrRS (AcpRS or BzpRS) were co

  19. The rice OsLpa1 gene encodse a novel protein involved in phytic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice low phytic acid 1 (OsLpa1) gene was originally identified using a forward genetics approach. Mutation of this gene resulted in a 45% reduction in rice seed phytic acid with a molar-equivalent increase in inorganic phosphorus; however, the rice lpa1 mutant does not appear to differ significa...

  20. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  1. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaofang; Yu Xiaobo; Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng; Guan Jingqi; Kan Qiubin

    2011-02-15

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  2. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  3. The Structure and Density of Mo and Acid Sites in Mo-ExchangedH-ZSMZ Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Borry III, Richard W.; Kim, Young Ho; Huffsmith, Anne; Reimer,Jeffrey A.; Iglesia, Enrique

    1999-03-01

    Mo/H-ZSM5 (1.0-6.3 wt percent Mo; Mo/Al = 0.11-0.68) catalysts for CH4 aromatization were prepared from physical mixtures of MoO3 and H-ZSM5 (Si/Al= 14.3). X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis of physical mixtures treated in air indicate that MoOx species migrate onto the external ZSM5 surface at about 623 K. Between 773 and 973 K, MoOx species migrate inside zeolite channels via surface and gas phase transport, exchange at acid sites, and react to form H2O. The amount of H2O evolved during exchange and the amount of residual OH groups detected by isotopic equilibration with D2 showed that each Mo atom replaces one H+ during exchange. This stoichiometry and the requirement for charge compensation suggest that exchanged species consist of (Mo2O5)2+ditetrahedral structures interacting with two cation exchange sites. The proposed mechanism may provide a general framework to describe the exchange of multivalent cations onto Al sites in zeolites. As the Mo concentration exceeds that required to form a MoOx monolayer on the external zeolite surface ({approx}4 wt percent Mo for the H-ZSM5 used), Mo species sublime as (MoO3)n oligomers or extract Al from the zeolite framework to form inactive Al2(MoO4)3 domains detectable by 27Al NMR. These (Mo2O5)2+ species reduce to form the active MoCx species during the initial stages of CH4 conversion reactions. Optimum CH4 aromatization rates were obtained on catalysts with intermediate Mo contents ({approx}0.4Mo/Al), because both MoCx and acid sites are required to activate CH4 and to convert the initial C2H4 products into C6+ aromatics favored by thermodynamics.

  4. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Density consistent with SIA was observed in a pocket located at the base of capsid protrusions surrounding icosahedral 3-fold axes. Site-directed mutagenesis substitution of the amino acids forming this pocket with structurally equivalent residues from AAV2, a heparan sulfate binding serotype, followed by cell binding and transduction assays, further mapped the critical residues conferring SIA binding to AAV1 and AAV6. For both viruses five of the six binding pocket residues mutated (N447S, V473D, N500E, T502S, and W503A) abolished SIA binding, whereas S472R increased binding. All six mutations abolished or decreased transduction by at least 50% in AAV1. Surprisingly, the T502S substitution did not affect transduction efficiency of wild-type AAV6. Furthermore, three of the AAV1 SIA binding site mutants—S472R, V473D, and N500E—escaped recognition by the anti-AAV1 capsid antibody ADK1a. These observations demonstrate that common key capsid surface residues dictate both virus binding and entry processes, as well as antigenic reactivity. This study identifies an important functional capsid surface “hot spot” dictating receptor attachment, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity which could prove useful for vector engineering. IMPORTANCE The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector gene delivery system has shown promise in several clinical trials and an AAV1-based vector has been approved as the first gene therapy treatment. However, limitations still exist with respect

  5. Inhibition of spoilage mould conidia by acetic acid and sorbic acid involves different modes of action, requiring modification of the classical weak-acid theory.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Malcolm; Plumridge, Andrew; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhardt; Archer, David B

    2009-11-30

    Fungal spoilage of many foods is prevented by weak-acid preservatives such as sorbic acid or acetic acid. We show that sorbic and acetic acids do not both inhibit cells by lowering of internal pH alone and that the "classical weak-acid theory" must be revised. The "classical weak-acid theory" suggests that all lipophilic acids with identical pK(a) values are equally effective as preservatives, causing inhibition by diffusion of molecular acids into the cell, dissociation, and subsequent acidification of the cytoplasm. Using a number of spoilage fungi from different genera, we have shown that sorbic acid was far more toxic than acetic acid, and no correlation existed between resistance to acetic acid and resistance to sorbic acid. The molar ratio of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (acetic: sorbic) was 58 for Paecilomyces variotii and 14 for Aspergillus phoenicis. Using flow cytometry on germinating conidia of Aspergillusniger, acetic acid at pH 4.0 caused an immediate decline in the mean cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) falling from neutrality to approximately pH 4.7 at the MIC (80 mM). Sorbic acid also caused a rapid but far smaller drop in pH(i), at the MIC (4.5 mM); the pH remained above pH 6.3. Over 0-5 mM, a number of other weak acids caused a similar fall in cytoplasmic pH. It was concluded that while acetic acid inhibition of A. niger conidia was due to cytoplasmic acidification, inhibition by sorbic acid was not. A possible membrane-mediated mode of action of sorbic acid is discussed.

  6. The hydrophobic amino acids involved in the interdomain association of phospholipase D1 regulate the shuttling of phospholipase D1 from vesicular organelles into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Hoon; Min, Do Sik

    2012-10-31

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to generate the lipid second messenger, phosphatidic acid. PLD is localized in most cellular organelles, where it is likely to play different roles in signal transduction. PLD1 is primarily localized in vesicular structures such as endosomes, lysosomes and autophagosomes. However, the factors defining its localization are less clear. In this study, we found that four hydrophobic residues present in the N-terminal HKD catalytic motif of PLD1, which is involved in intramolecular association, are responsible for vesicular localization. Site-directed mutagenesis of the residues dramatically disrupted vesicular localization of PLD1. Interestingly, the hydrophobic residues of PLD1 are also involved in the interruption of its nuclear localization. Mutation of the residues increased the association of PLD1 with importin-β, which is known to mediate nuclear importation, and induced the localization of PLD1 from vesicles into the nucleus. Taken together, these data suggest that the hydrophobic amino acids involved in the interdomain association of PLD1 are required for vesicular localization and disturbance of its nuclear localization.

  7. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  8. Effect of process parameters on succinic acid production in Escherichia coli W3110 and enzymes involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Gupta, Pritesh; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2006-09-01

    The effect of process optimization on succinic acid production by Escherichia coli W3110 and on enzymes involved in the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle was studied. Approximately, 7.02 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 60 h at pH 7.0 in 500 mL anaerobic bottles containing 300 mL of the medium, wherein the sucrose concentration was 2.5%, the ratio of tryptone to ammonium hydrogen phosphate was 1:1, and the concentration of magnesium carbon ate was 1.5%. When these optimized fermentation conditions were employed in a 10 L bioreactor, 11.2 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 48 h. This is a 10-fold increase in succinic acid production from the initial titer of 0.94 g L-1. This clearly indicates the importance of process optimization, where by manipulating the media composition and production conditions, a remarkable increase in the production of the desired biomolecule can be obtained. The production of succinic acid is a multi-step reaction through the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle. A linear relationship was observed between succinic acid production and the enzyme activities. The enzyme activities were found to increase in the order phospho-enol-pyruvate carboxylaseacid, since it catalyzes the phosphorylation of oxaloacetic acid to yield phospho-enol-pyruvate.

  9. Involvement of acidic microenvironment in the pathophysiology of cancer-associated bone pain.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Masako; Nagae, Maho; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Hiraga, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Bone pain is one of the most common complications in cancer patients with bone metastases. Although the mechanism of cancer-associated bone pain is poorly understood, clinical observations that inhibitors of osteoclasts such as bisphosphonates (BPs) efficiently reduce bone pain suggest a potential role of osteoclasts, which play a central role in the development and progression of bone metastasis. Osteoclasts dissolve bone minerals by releasing protons through the a3 isoform of the vacuolar-H(+)-ATPase, creating acidic microenvironments. In addition, cancer cells, inflammatory cells and immune cells that reside in bone metastases also produce acidic conditions by releasing protons. It has been well-known that acidic conditions due to proton release cause pain. Our study showed that the sensory nociceptive neurons innervate bone and these neurons express acid-sensing nociceptors such as the acid-sensing ion channels and transient receptor potential channel-vanilloid subfamily members. Acid signals received by these nociceptors subsequently activate intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in sensory neurons. The understanding of the nociceptive events following proton release and subsequent creation of acidic microenvironments leads us to design novel molecular-based approaches for reducing bone pain associated with cancer and inflammation.

  10. Sequence of the bphD gene encoding 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-(phenyl/chlorophenyl)hexa-2,4-dienoic acid (HOP/cPDA) hydrolase involved in the biphenyl/polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway in Comamonas testosteroni: evidence suggesting involvement of Ser112 in catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, D; Fraser, J; Sylvestre, M; Larose, A; Khan, A; Bergeron, J; Juteau, J M; Sondossi, M

    1995-04-14

    The nucleotide sequence of bphD, encoding 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-(phenyl/chlorophenyl)hexa-2,4-dienoic acid hydrolase involved in the biphenyl/polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Comamonas testosteroni strain B-356, was determined. Comparison of the deduced amino-acid sequence with published sequences led to the identification of a 'lipase box', containing a consensus pentapeptide sequence GlyXaaSerXaaGly. This suggested that the mechanism of action of this enzyme may involve an Asp-Ser-His catalytic triad similar to that of classical lipases and serine hydrolases. Further biochemical and genetic evidence for the active-site involvement of Ser112 was obtained by showing that a semipurified enzyme was inhibited by PMSF, a classic inhibitor of serine hydrolases, and by site-directed Ser112-->Ala mutagenesis.

  11. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  12. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions.

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the detection of IMP and L-amino acids by mouse taste sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, S; Delay, R J; Delay, E R

    2016-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to be involved in the detection of umami and L-amino acid taste. These include the heterodimer taste receptor type 1 member 1 (T1r1)+taste receptor type 1 member 3 (T1r3), taste and brain variants of mGluR4 and mGluR1, and calcium sensors. While several studies suggest T1r1+T1r3 is a broadly tuned lLamino acid receptor, little is known about the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in L-amino acid taste transduction. Calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells (TSCs) of T1r3-GFP and T1r3 knock-out (T1r3 KO) mice was performed using the ratiometric dye Fura 2 AM to investigate the role of different mGluRs in detecting various L-amino acids and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). Using agonists selective for various mGluRs such as (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (an mGluR1 agonist) and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (an mGluR4 agonist), we evaluated TSCs to determine if they might respond to these agonists, IMP, and three L-amino acids (monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine and L-arginine). Additionally, we used selective antagonists against different mGluRs such as (RS)-L-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) (an mGluR1 antagonist), and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (an mGluR4 antagonist) to determine if they can block responses elicited by these L-amino acids and IMP. We found that L-amino acid- and IMP-responsive cells also responded to each agonist. Antagonists for mGluR4 and mGluR1 significantly blocked the responses elicited by IMP and each of the L-amino acids. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the involvement of taste and brain variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4 in L-amino acid and IMP taste responses in mice, and support the concept that multiple receptors contribute to IMP and L-amino acid taste.

  14. Vacuolar transporter Avt4 is involved in excretion of basic amino acids from the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Takayuki; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Sugimoto, Naoko; Ishimoto, Masaya; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Basic amino acids (lysine, histidine and arginine) accumulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles should be mobilized to cytosolic nitrogen metabolism under starvation. We found that the decrease of vacuolar basic amino acids in response to nitrogen starvation was impaired by the deletion of AVT4 gene encoding a vacuolar transporter. In addition, overexpression of AVT4 reduced the accumulation of basic amino acids in vacuoles under nutrient-rich condition. In contrast to AVT4, the deletion and overexpression of AVT3, which encodes the closest homologue of Avt4p, did not affect the contents of vacuolar basic amino acids. Consistent with these, arginine uptake into vacuolar membrane vesicles was decreased by Avt4p-, but not by Avt3p-overproduction, whereas various neutral amino acids were excreted from vacuolar membrane vesicles in a manner dependent on either Avt4p or Avt3p. These results suggest that Avt4p is a vacuolar amino acid exporter involving in the recycling of basic amino acids.

  15. Involvement of Acetobacter orientalis in the production of lactobionic acid in Caucasian yogurt ("Caspian Sea yogurt") in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, T; Kiso, T; Nakano, H; Ooe, K; Kimura, T; Murakami, H

    2009-01-01

    Lactobionic acid was first found in a Caucasian fermented milk product popularly known as "Caspian Sea yogurt" in Japan. The presence of lactobionic acid in the fermented milk was indicated by the results of both high-performance anion-exchange chromatographic analysis with pulsed amperometric detection and mass spectrometric analysis. Thereafter, the acid was purified from the yogurt and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance. A substantial amount of lactobionic acid was found to be accumulated in the upper layer of the yogurt, especially within 10 mm from the surface. A total of 45 mg of lactobionic acid per 100 g of the upper yogurt layer was collected after 4 d of fermentation. The annual intake of lactobionic acid in individuals consuming 100 g of the yogurt every day would be 0.5 to 1.0 g. A lactose-oxidizing bacterium was isolated from the fermented milk and was identified as Acetobacter orientalis. Washed A. orientalis cells oxidized monosaccharides such as d-glucose at considerable rates, although their activities for substrates such as lactose, maltose, and cellobiose were much lower. When A. orientalis cells were cultivated in cow's milk, they exhibited lactose-oxidizing activity, suggesting that this bacterium was the main organism involved in the production of lactobionic acid in the yogurt.

  16. Neurodegeneration in methylmalonic aciduria involves inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and synergistically acting excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okun, Jürgen G; Hörster, Friederike; Farkas, Lilla M; Feyh, Patrik; Hinz, Angela; Sauer, Sven; Hoffmann, Georg F; Unsicker, Klaus; Mayatepek, Ertan; Kölker, Stefan

    2002-04-26

    Methylmalonic acidurias are biochemically characterized by an accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) and alternative metabolites. There is growing evidence for basal ganglia degeneration in these patients. The pathomechanisms involved are still unknown, a contribution of toxic organic acids, in particular MMA, has been suggested. Here we report that MMA induces neuronal damage in cultures of embryonic rat striatal cells at a concentration range encountered in affected patients. MMA-induced cell damage was reduced by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, antioxidants, and succinate. These results suggest the involvement of secondary excitotoxic mechanisms in MMA-induced cell damage. MMA has been implicated in inhibition of respiratory chain complex II. However, MMA failed to inhibit complex II activity in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart. To unravel the mechanism underlying neuronal MMA toxicity, we investigated the formation of intracellular metabolites in MMA-loaded striatal neurons. There was a time-dependent intracellular increase in malonate, an inhibitor of complex II, and 2-methylcitrate, a compound with multiple inhibitory effects on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting their putative implication in MMA neurotoxicity. We propose that neuropathogenesis of methylmalonic aciduria may involve an inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle by accumulating toxic organic acids, and synergistic secondary excitotoxic mechanisms.

  17. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  18. Hatching success in salamanders and chorus frogs at two sites in Colorado, USA: Effects of acidic deposition and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Campbell, D.H.; Corn, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The snowpack in the vicinity of the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area is among the most acidic in the western United States. We analyzed water chemistry and examined hatching success in tiger salamanders and chorus frogs at ponds there and at nearby Rabbit Ears Pass (Dumont) to determine whether acid deposition affects amphibians or their breeding habitats at these potentially sensitive locations. We found a wide range of acid neutralizing capacity among ponds within sites; the minimum pH recorded during the experiment was 5.4 at one of 12 ponds with all others at pH ??? 5.7. At Dumont, hatching success for chorus frogs was greater in ponds with low acid neutralizing capacity; however, lowest pHs were >5.8. At current levels of acid deposition, weather and pond characteristics are likely more important than acidity in influencing hatching success in amphibian larvae at these sites.

  19. Hygroscopic Behavior of Multicomponent Aerosols Involving NaCl and Dicarboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yu-Cong; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2016-02-25

    Atmospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds. The hygroscopicity of mixed particles is closely related to their chemical composition and interactions between components, which is still poorly understood. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of submicron particles composed of NaCl and dicarboxylic acids including oxalic acid (OA), malonic acid (MA), and succinic acid (SA) with various mass ratios are investigated with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) system. Both the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method and extended aerosol inorganics model (E-AIM) are applied to predict the water uptake behaviors of sodium chloride/dicarboxylic acid mixtures. For NaCl/OA mixed particles, the measured growth factors were significantly lower than predictions from the model methods, indicating a change in particle composition caused by chloride depletion. The hygroscopic growth of NaCl/MA particles was well described by E-AIM, and that of NaCl/SA particles was dependent upon mixing ratio. Compared with model predictions, it was determined that water uptake of the NaCl/OA mixture could be enhanced and could be closer to the predictions by addition of levoglucosan or malonic acid, which retained water even at low relative humidity (RH), leading to inhibition of HCl evaporation during dehydration. These results demonstrate that the coexisting hygroscopic species have a strong influence on the phase state of particles, thus affecting chemical interactions between inorganic and organic compounds as well as the overall hygroscopicity of mixed particles.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  1. Evaluation Of Sludge Heel Dissolution Efficiency With Oxalic Acid Cleaning At Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sudduth, Christie; Vitali, Jason; Keefer, Mark

    2014-01-08

    The chemical cleaning process baseline strategy at the Savannah River Site was revised to improve efficiency during future execution of the process based on lessons learned during previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning activities and to account for operational constraints imposed by safety basis requirements. These improvements were also intended to transcend the difficulties that arise from waste removal in higher rheological yield stress sludge tanks. Tank 12 implemented this improved strategy and the bulk oxalic acid cleaning efforts concluded in July 2013. The Tank 12 radiological removal results were similar to previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning campaigns despite the fact that Tank 12 contained higher rheological yield stress sludge that would make removal more difficult than the sludge treated in previous cleaning campaigns. No appreciable oxalate precipitation occurred during the cleaning process in Tank 12 compared to previous campaigns, which aided in the net volume reduction of 75-80%. Overall, the controls established for Tank 12 provide a template for an improved cleaning process.

  2. Site directed mutagenesis of StSUT1 reveals target amino acids of regulation and stability.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Undine; Wiederhold, Elena; Pustogowa, Jelena; Hackel, Aleksandra; Grimm, Bernhard; Kühn, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Plant sucrose transporters (SUTs) are functional as sucrose-proton-cotransporters with an optimal transport activity in the acidic pH range. Recently, the pH optimum of the Solanum tuberosum sucrose transporter StSUT1 was experimentally determined to range at an unexpectedly low pH of 3 or even below. Various research groups have confirmed these surprising findings independently and in different organisms. Here we provide further experimental evidence for a pH optimum at physiological extrema. Site directed mutagenesis provides information about functional amino acids, which are highly conserved and responsible for this extraordinary increase in transport capacity under extreme pH conditions. Redox-dependent dimerization of the StSUT1 protein was described earlier. Here the ability of StSUT1 to form homodimers was demonstrated by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis and Xenopus leavis using Western blots, and in plants by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Mutagenesis of highly conserved cysteine residues revealed their importance in protein stability. The accessibility of regulatory amino acid residues in the light of StSUT1's compartmentalization in membrane microdomains is discussed.

  3. Pore architecture and ion sites in acid-sensing ion channels and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Eric B; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Gouaux, Eric

    2009-07-30

    Acid-sensing ion channels are proton-activated, sodium-selective channels composed of three subunits, and are members of the superfamily of epithelial sodium channels, mechanosensitive and FMRF-amide peptide-gated ion channels. These ubiquitous eukaryotic ion channels have essential roles in biological activities as diverse as sodium homeostasis, taste and pain. Despite their crucial roles in biology and their unusual trimeric subunit stoichiometry, there is little knowledge of the structural and chemical principles underlying their ion channel architecture and ion-binding sites. Here we present the structure of a functional acid-sensing ion channel in a desensitized state at 3 A resolution, the location and composition of the approximately 8 A 'thick' desensitization gate, and the trigonal antiprism coordination of caesium ions bound in the extracellular vestibule. Comparison of the acid-sensing ion channel structure with the ATP-gated P2X(4) receptor reveals similarity in pore architecture and aqueous vestibules, suggesting that there are unanticipated yet common structural and mechanistic principles.

  4. Characteristics of fluoride in pore-water at accidental hydrofluoric acid spillage site, Gumi, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, E. H.; Lee, H. A.; Lee, J.; Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Yoon, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    A leakage accident of hydrofluoric acid (HF) occurred in Gumi, South Korea at Sep. 2012. The study site is located in the borderline between a large-scale industrial complex and a rural area. The HF plume was made immediately, and moved toward the rural area through air. After the accident, 212 ha of farm land were influenced and most of crops were withered. To recover the soil, CaO was applied after six months. Although several studies have done to estimate the extension and movement of HF plume in the air and to assess the impact on human health or plant after the incident, the long-term fate of fluoride (F) in the affected soils is not identified clearly. Thus, this study aimed to understand the behavior of F in the soil after HF releasing from accident site through chemical analysis and geochemical modeling. Within the radius of 1 km of accident site, 16 pore-water and soil samples were collected. The semi-quantitative soil composition (i.e., Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti), total F, total P, OM contents in soil, and soil pH have already been measured, and pore-water compositions are also identified. From these experimental and modeling data, we could be evaluate if impact of accident exists until now, and also could be select and identify existing form of fluoride in soil and pore-water.

  5. Two sites on P-selectin (the lectin and epidermal growth factor-like domains) are involved in the adhesion of monocytes to thrombin-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J F; McGregor, J L

    1994-01-01

    P-selectin, also known as GMP-140, PADGEM or CD62, is expressed on the surface of thrombin-activated platelets and endothelial cells (EC). It is a member of the selectin family of adhesion molecules that regulate leucocyte interactions with the blood vessel wall. In this study we have found that peptides derived from both the lectin (residues 19-34 and 51-61) and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like (residues 127-139) domains inhibit the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), elutriated monocytes and a monocytic cell line (U937) to thrombin-activated EC. This inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and the peptide most active at the lowest concentrations was the one derived from the EGF-like motif (127-139). The scrambled forms of these peptides, identical in amino acid composition to the authentic peptides but with altered sequences, were not inhibitory. Thrombin-activated platelets supported adhesion of U937 cells and this adhesion was dramatically inhibited by the two peptides derived from the lectin-like domain (residues 19-34 and 51-61). All three peptides, when conjugated to BSA and coated on plastic plates, mediated U937 cell adhesion. This study shows, for the first time, that two sites on P-selectin, the lectin and EGF-like domains, are involved in the adhesion of monocytes to thrombin-activated EC. PMID:7526845

  6. The Biofilm Lifestyle Involves an Increase in Bacterial Membrane Saturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Brissonnet, Florence; Trotier, Elsa; Briandet, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation on contact surfaces contributes to persistence of foodborne pathogens all along the food and feed chain. The specific physiological features of bacterial cells embedded in biofilms contribute to their high tolerance to environmental stresses, including the action of antimicrobial compounds. As membrane lipid adaptation is a vital facet of bacterial response when cells are submitted to harsh or unstable conditions, we focused here on membrane fatty acid composition of biofilm cells as compared to their free-growing counterparts. Pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium) were cultivated in planktonic or biofilm states and membrane fatty acid analyses were performed on whole cells in both conditions. The percentage of saturated fatty acids increases in biofilm cells in all cases, with a concomitant decrease of branched-chain fatty acids for Gram-positive bacteria, or with a decrease in the sum of other fatty acids for Gram-negative bacteria. We propose that increased membrane saturation in biofilm cells is an adaptive stress response that allows bacteria to limit exchanges, save energy, and survive. Reprogramming of membrane fluidity in biofilm cells might explain specific biofilm behavior including bacterial recalcitrance to biocide action. PMID:27840623

  7. The Biofilm Lifestyle Involves an Increase in Bacterial Membrane Saturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Brissonnet, Florence; Trotier, Elsa; Briandet, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation on contact surfaces contributes to persistence of foodborne pathogens all along the food and feed chain. The specific physiological features of bacterial cells embedded in biofilms contribute to their high tolerance to environmental stresses, including the action of antimicrobial compounds. As membrane lipid adaptation is a vital facet of bacterial response when cells are submitted to harsh or unstable conditions, we focused here on membrane fatty acid composition of biofilm cells as compared to their free-growing counterparts. Pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium) were cultivated in planktonic or biofilm states and membrane fatty acid analyses were performed on whole cells in both conditions. The percentage of saturated fatty acids increases in biofilm cells in all cases, with a concomitant decrease of branched-chain fatty acids for Gram-positive bacteria, or with a decrease in the sum of other fatty acids for Gram-negative bacteria. We propose that increased membrane saturation in biofilm cells is an adaptive stress response that allows bacteria to limit exchanges, save energy, and survive. Reprogramming of membrane fluidity in biofilm cells might explain specific biofilm behavior including bacterial recalcitrance to biocide action.

  8. Prevalence of Common Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas and Subtypes of Hodgkin Lymphoma by Nodal Site of Involvement: A Systematic Retrospective Review of 938 Cases.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Camille; Do, Catherine; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; de Paiva, Geisilene Russano; Valmary, Séverine; Brousset, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) represent a heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoid tumors, which have distinct histological and/or biological characteristics with preferential nodal involvement. However, none of the previous studies have assessed the prevalence of common NHL and HL subtypes at each nodal site of involvement. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of HL and NHL subtypes depending on their nodal sites of involvement.We conducted a single-center retrospective study of 938 lymphoma cases diagnosed in the Pathology Department of Toulouse Purpan Hospital in France between 2001 and 2008, taking into account the site that corresponded to the diagnostic biopsy. The most frequent sites were cervical lymph nodes (36.8% of all cases), inguinal lymph nodes (16.4%), axillary lymph nodes (11.9%), and supraclavicular lymph nodes (11%). We found an unexpected association between intraparotid nodes and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and between inguinal nodes and follicular lymphoma. The risk of having classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) was 15 times greater in patients with mediastinal lymphoma compared to those with other sites of involvement. Regarding HL, nodal and extranodal mediastinal sites and supraclavicular nodes were more likely to be involved by nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (NSCHL). In addition, intra-abdominal lymph nodes were more frequently involved by lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphoma compared to inguinal nodes where NLPHL predominated.Our study shows that some lymph node sites have a disproportionate prevalence of specific subtypes of lymphoma. Identifying these sites may aid to diagnose and better elucidate the pathogenesis of these tumors.

  9. Overexpression of a Gene Involved in Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Substantially Increases Phytic Acid and Total Phosphorus in Rice Seeds.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Yusuke; Shimizu, Tomoe; Miyamoto, Masanobu; Nishida, Sho; Yoshida, Kaoru T

    2015-04-24

    The manipulation of seed phosphorus is important for seedling growth and environmental P sustainability in agriculture. The mechanism of regulating P content in seed, however, is poorly understood. To study regulation of total P, we focused on phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate; InsP₆) biosynthesis-related genes, as InsP₆ is a major storage form of P in seeds. The rice (Oryza sativa L.) low phytic acid mutant lpa1-1 has been identified as a homolog of archael 2-phosphoglycerate kinase. The homolog might act as an inositol monophosphate kinase, which catalyzes a key step in InsP₆ biosynthesis. Overexpression of the homolog in transgenic rice resulted in a significant increase in total P content in seed, due to increases in InsP₆ and inorganic phosphates. On the other hand, overexpression of genes that catalyze the first and last steps of InsP₆ biosynthesis could not increase total P levels. From the experiments using developing seeds, it is suggested that the activation of InsP₆ biosynthesis in both very early and very late periods of seed development increases the influx of P from vegetative organs into seeds. This is the first report from a study attempting to elevate the P levels of seed through a transgenic approach.

  10. Structural and Functional Characterization of PseC, an Aminotransferase Involved in the Biosynthesis of Pseudaminic Acid, an Essential Flagellar Modification in Helicobacter Pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenhofen,I.; Lunin, V.; Julien, J.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.; Brisson, J.; Aubry, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori flagellin is heavily glycosylated with the novel sialic acid-like nonulosonate, pseudaminic acid (Pse). The glycosylation process is essential for assembly of functional flagellar filaments and consequent bacterial motility. As motility is a key virulence factor for this and other important pathogens, the Pse biosynthetic pathway offers potential for novel therapeutic targets. From recent NMR analyses, we determined that the conversion of UDP-a-D-GlcNAc to the central intermediate in the pathway, UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-AltNAc, proceeds by formation of UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-arabino-4-hexulose by the dehydratase/epimerase PseB (HP0840) followed with amino transfer by the aminotransferase, PseC (HP0366). The central role of PseC in the H. pylori Pse biosynthetic pathway prompted us to determine crystal structures of the native protein, its complexes with pyridoxal phosphate alone and in combination with the UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-AltNAc product, the latter being converted to the external aldimine form in the enzyme's active site. In the binding site, the AltNAc sugar ring adopts a 4C1 chair conformation which is different from the predominant 1C4 form found in solution. The enzyme forms a homodimer where each monomer contributes to the active site, and these structures have permitted the identification of key residues involved in stabilization, and possibly catalysis, of the {beta}-L-arabino intermediate during the amino transfer reaction. The essential role of Lys183 in the catalytic event was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. This work presents for the first time a nucleotide-sugar aminotransferase co-crystallized with its natural ligand, and in conjunction with the recent functional characterization of this enzyme, will assist in elucidating the aminotransferase reaction mechanism within the Pse biosynthetic pathway.

  11. Attenuated murine cytomegalovirus binds to N-acetylglucosamine, and shift to virulence may involve recognition of sialic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, R M; Graves, M C

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of cells with lectins specific for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) blocked infection by mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV), and GlcNAc pretreatment of the lectin blocked this effect. MCMV failed to infect N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase)-treated mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF). GlcNAc and GlcNAc-containing synthetic oligosaccharides directly inhibited viral infectivity. Ulex lectin inhibition of infection was shown to be due to inhibition of surface adsorption of 35S-labeled virus. Also, GlcNAcase eluted 35S-labeled virus adsorbed to MEF at 4 degrees C and inhibited plaque formation if added after adsorption at this temperature. These findings indicate that GlcNAc binding is involved in attachment rather than in some later step in infection. High-performance thin-layer chromatography overlay of [35S]MCMV indicated that it binds to a GlcNAc-containing asialoglycolipid. Analogous experiments indicated that MCMV made virulent by in vivo salivary gland passage binds to sialic acids in addition to GlcNAc. Treatment of MEF with sialic acid-binding lectins blocked infectivity. Incubation of virus with sialic acids also prevented infection. N-acetylneuraminic acid was 10(3)-fold more potent than N-glycolylneuraminic acid. Sialidase-treated target cells were not efficiently infected by the virus. Thus, MCMV binds to GlcNAc on the cell surface, and the shift to virulence (by in vivo salivary gland passage) correlates with viral recognition of sialic acids. Images PMID:2170680

  12. Involvement of yeast HSP90 isoforms in response to stress and cell death induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Fernandes, Angela; Carreto, Laura; Rodrigues, Fernando; Holcik, Martin; Santos, Manuel A S; Ludovico, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced apoptosis in yeast is accompanied by an impairment of the general protein synthesis machinery, yet paradoxically also by the up-regulation of the two isoforms of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone family, Hsc82p and Hsp82p. Herein, we show that impairment of cap-dependent translation initiation induced by acetic acid is caused by the phosphorylation and inactivation of eIF2α by Gcn2p kinase. A microarray analysis of polysome-associated mRNAs engaged in translation in acetic acid challenged cells further revealed that HSP90 mRNAs are over-represented in this polysome fraction suggesting preferential translation of HSP90 upon acetic acid treatment. The relevance of HSP90 isoform translation during programmed cell death (PCD) was unveiled using genetic and pharmacological abrogation of HSP90, which suggests opposing roles for HSP90 isoforms in cell survival and death. Hsc82p appears to promote survival and its deletion leads to necrotic cell death, while Hsp82p is a pro-death molecule involved in acetic acid-induced apoptosis. Therefore, HSP90 isoforms have distinct roles in the control of cell fate during PCD and their selective translation regulates cellular response to acetic acid stress.

  13. Multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclases and cytochrome P450 involved in the biosynthesis of apple fruit triterpenic acids.

    PubMed

    Andre, Christelle M; Legay, Sylvain; Deleruelle, Amélie; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels; Punter, Matthew; Brendolise, Cyril; Cooney, Janine M; Lateur, Marc; Hausman, Jean-François; Larondelle, Yvan; Laing, William A

    2016-09-01

    Apple (Malus × domestica) accumulates bioactive ursane-, oleanane-, and lupane-type triterpenes in its fruit cuticle, but their biosynthetic pathway is still poorly understood. We used a homology-based approach to identify and functionally characterize two new oxidosqualene cyclases (MdOSC4 and MdOSC5) and one cytochrome P450 (CYP716A175). The gene expression patterns of these enzymes and of previously described oxidosqualene cyclases were further studied in 20 apple cultivars with contrasting triterpene profiles. MdOSC4 encodes a multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclase producing an oleanane-type triterpene, putatively identified as germanicol, as well as β-amyrin and lupeol, in the proportion 82 : 14 : 4. MdOSC5 cyclizes 2,3-oxidosqualene into lupeol and β-amyrin at a ratio of 95 : 5. CYP716A175 catalyses the C-28 oxidation of α-amyrin, β-amyrin, lupeol and germanicol, producing ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, betulinic acid, and putatively morolic acid. The gene expression of MdOSC1 was linked to the concentrations of ursolic and oleanolic acid, whereas the expression of MdOSC5 was correlated with the concentrations of betulinic acid and its caffeate derivatives. Two new multifuntional triterpene synthases as well as a multifunctional triterpene C-28 oxidase were identified in Malus × domestica. This study also suggests that MdOSC1 and MdOSC5 are key genes in apple fruit triterpene biosynthesis.

  14. Thermotolerance and antioxidant systems in Agrostis stolonifera: involvement of salicylic acid, abscisic acid, calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Larkindale, Jane; Huang, Bingru

    2004-04-01

    This study investigated whether pre-treating plants with specific putative signaling components and heat acclimation would induce tolerance of a cool-season grass, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera var. palustris), to subsequent heat stress and whether thermotolerance induction of those pretreatments was associated with the regulation of antioxidant regenerating enzymes. The treatments included foliar application of salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), calcium chloride (CaCl2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, a precursor of ethylene prior to the exposure of plants to heat stress (35 degrees C) in a growth chamber. Physiological measurements including turf quality, leaf photosynthetic rate, and levels of oxidative damage demonstrated that all treatments increased heat tolerance. The better heat tolerance for pre-treated plants as compared to controls was related to the protection of oxidative damage under heat stress. APX activity increased over the first 2 days and 5 days of heating for ACC and CaCl2 respectively, but for only 12 h for H2O2. SA and ABA pre-treatments had no effects on APX activity earlier, but maintained APX activity at a significantly higher level than in controls after 24 h of heating. SA and ABA pre-treatments had no effects on POX activity. ACC treatment significantly increased POX activity. Pre-treatment with CaCl2, H2O2, and HA reduced POX activity, particularly during the later phase of heating. Plants treated with SA, CaCl2, H2O2 and HA had lower CAT activity than their control plants prior to heating and within 48 h of heat stress. ABA and ACC pre-treatments maintained higher CAT activity than the controls after 48 h of heating. ACC, CaCl2, or HA pre-treatments increased SOD activity only before 5 days of heat stress. SA and ABA pre-treatments had less effect on APX activity earlier under heat stress. These results suggest that specific groups of potential signaling molecules may induce

  15. Role of Criegee Intermediates in Formation of Sulfuric Acid at BVOCs-rich Cape Corsica Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukui, A.; Dusanter, S.; Sauvage, S.; Gros, V.; Bourrianne, T.; Sellegri, K.; Wang, J.; Colomb, A.; Pichon, J. M.; Chen, H.; Kalogridis, C.; Zannoni, N.; Bonsang, B.; Michoud, V.; Locoge, N.; Leonardis, T.

    2015-12-01

    Oxidation of SO2 in reactions with stabilised Criegee Intermediates (sCI) was suggested as an additional source of gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the atmosphere, complementary to the conventional H2SO4 formation in reaction of SO2 with OH radicals. Evaluation of the importance of this additional source is complicated due to large uncertainty in the mechanism and rate constants for the reactions of different sCI with SO2, water vapor and other atmospheric species. Here we present an evaluation of the role of sCI in H2SO4 production at remote site on Cape Corsica near the North tip of Corsica Island (Ersa station, Western Mediterranean). In July 2013 comprehensive field observations including gas phase (OH and RO2 radicals, H2SO4, VOCs, NOx, SO2, others) and aerosol measurements were conducted at this site in the frame of ChArMEx project. During the field campaign the site was strongly influenced by local emissions of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs), including isoprene and terpenes, forming different sCI in reactions with ozone and, hence, presenting additional source of H2SO4 via sCI+SO2. However, this additional source of H2SO4 at the Ersa site was found to be insignificant. The observed concentrations of H2SO4 were found to be in good agreement with those estimated from the H2SO4 condensation sink and the production of H2SO4 only in the reaction of OH with SO2, without accounting for any additional H2SO4 source. Using the BVOCs observations we present estimation of the upper limit for the rate constants of H2SO4 production via reactions of different sCI with SO2.

  16. Identification of amino acid residues involved in heme binding and hemoprotein utilization in the Porphyromonas gingivalis heme receptor HmuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Olczak, Teresa; Guo, Hwai-Chen; Dixon, Dabney W; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2006-02-01

    We have previously identified and characterized a heme/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR, in Porphyromonas gingivalis. To analyze the conserved amino acid residues of HmuR that may be involved in hemin/hemoprotein binding and utilization, we constructed a series of P. gingivalis A7436 hmuR mutants with amino acid replacements and characterized the ability of these mutants to utilize hemin and hemoproteins. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to introduce mutations H95A, H434A, H95A-H434A, YRAP420-423YAAA, and NPDL442-445NAAA into HmuR in both P. gingivalis and Escherichia coli. Point mutations at H95 and H434 and in the NPDL motif of HmuR resulted in decreased binding to hemin, hemoglobin, and human serum albumin-hemin complex. Notably, mutations of these conserved sites and motifs led to reduced growth of P. gingivalis when human serum was used as the heme source. Analysis using a three-dimensional homology model of HmuR indicated that H95, H434, and the NPDL motif are present on apical or extracellular loops of HmuR, while the YRAP motif is present on the barrel wall. Taken together, these results support a role for H95, H434, and the NPDL motif of the P. gingivalis HmuR protein in heme binding and utilization of serum hemoproteins and the HmuR YRAP motif in serum hemoprotein utilization.

  17. Distribution of D-amino acids in vinegars and involvement of lactic acid bacteria in the production of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mutaguchi, Yuta; Ohmori, Taketo; Akano, Hirofumi; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Levels of free D-amino acids were compared in 11 vinegars produced from different sources or through different manufacturing processes. To analyze the D- and L-amino acids, the enantiomers were initially converted into diastereomers using pre-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde plus N-acethyl-L-cysteine or N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-cysteine. This was followed by separation of the resultant fluorescent isoindol derivatives on an octadecylsilyl stationary phase using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The analyses showed that the total D-amino acid level in lactic fermented tomato vinegar was very high. Furthermore, analysis of the amino acids in tomato juice samples collected after alcoholic, lactic and acetic fermentation during the production of lactic fermented tomato vinegar showed clearly that lactic fermentation is responsible for the D-amino acids production; marked increases in D-amino acids were seen during lactic fermentation, but not during alcoholic or acetic fermentation. This suggests lactic acid bacteria have a greater ability to produce D-amino acids than yeast or acetic acid bacteria.

  18. Putative binding sites for arachidonic acid on the human cardiac Kv1.5 channel

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia‐Yu; Ding, Wei‐Guang; Kojima, Akiko; Seto, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In human heart, the Kv1.5 channel contributes to repolarization of atrial action potentials. This study examined the electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms underlying arachidonic acid (AA)‐induced inhibition of the human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) channel. Experimental Approach Site‐directed mutagenesis was conducted to mutate amino acids that reside within the pore domain of the hKv1.5 channel. Whole‐cell patch‐clamp method was used to record membrane currents through wild type and mutant hKv1.5 channels heterologously expressed in CHO cells. Computer docking simulation was conducted to predict the putative binding site(s) of AA in an open‐state model of the Kv1.5 channel. Key Results The hKv1.5 current was minimally affected at the onset of depolarization but was progressively reduced during depolarization by the presence of AA, suggesting that AA acts as an open‐channel blocker. AA itself affected the channel at extracellular sites independently of its metabolites and signalling pathways. The blocking effect of AA was attenuated at pH 8.0 but not at pH 6.4. The blocking action of AA developed rather rapidly by co‐expression of Kvβ1.3. The AA‐induced block was significantly attenuated in H463C, T480A, R487V, I502A, I508A, V512A and V516A, but not in T462C, A501V and L510A mutants of the hKv1.5 channel. Docking simulation predicted that H463, T480, R487, I508, V512 and V516 are potentially accessible for interaction with AA. Conclusions and Implications AA itself interacts with multiple amino acids located in the pore domain of the hKv1.5 channel. These findings may provide useful information for future development of selective blockers of hKv1.5 channels. PMID:26292661

  19. Phenylboronic acid is a more potent inhibitor than boric acid of key signaling networks involved in cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Erin M; Bradke, Tiffany A; Plopper, George E

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies from our lab have shown that both boric (BA) and phenylboronic- acid (PBA) inhibit the migration of prostate cancer cell lines, as well as non-tumorigenic prostate cells. Our results indicate that PBA is more potent than BA in targeting metastatic and proliferative properties of cancer cells. Here we focus on the impact of BA and PBA on Rho family of GTP-binding proteins and their downstream targets. Treatment with 1mM PBA and BA decreases activities of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 in DU-145 metastatic prostate cancer cells, but not in normal RWPE-1 prostate cells. Furthermore, ROCKII activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase decrease as a result of either PBA or BA treatment in DU-145 cells, suggesting these compounds target actomyosin-based contractility.

  20. Acid catalyzed alcoholysis of sulfinamides: unusual stereochemistry, kinetics and a question of mechanism involving sulfurane intermediates and their pseudorotation.

    PubMed

    Bujnicki, Bogdan; Drabowicz, Józef; Mikołajczyk, Marian

    2015-02-11

    The synthesis of optically active sulfinic acid esters has been accomplished by the acid catalyzed alcoholysis of optically active sulfinamides. Sulfinates are formed in this reaction with a full or predominant inversion of configuration at chiral sulfur or with predominant retention of configuration. The steric course of the reaction depends mainly on the size of the dialkylamido group in the sulfinamides and of the alcohols used as nucleophilic reagents. It has been found that bulky reaction components preferentially form sulfinates with retention of configuration. It has been demonstrated that the stereochemical outcome of the reaction can be changed from inversion to retention and vice versa by adding inorganic salts to the acidic reaction medium. The unusual stereochemistry of this typical bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction, as confirmed by kinetic measurements, has been rationalized in terms of the addition-elimination mechanism, A-E, involving sulfuranes as intermediates which undergo pseudorotations.

  1. Hormonal diterpenoids derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are involved in the blue-light avoidance response of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid hormones that regulate growth and development in flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene, but it does not produce GA. Disruption of the ent-kaurene synthase gene in P. patens suppressed caulonemal differentiation. Application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid restored differentiation, suggesting that derivative(s) of ent-kaurenoic acid, but not GAs, are endogenous regulator(s) of caulonemal cell differentiation. The protonemal growth of P. patens shows an avoidance response under unilateral blue light. Physiological studies using gene mutants involved in ent-kaurene biosynthesis confirmed that diterpenoid(s) regulate the blue-light response. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings, and provide data for the ent-kaurene oxidase gene-disrupted mutant.

  2. An investigation into possible xenobiotic-endobiotic inter-relationships involving the amino acid analogue drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and plasma amino acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C; Angulo, Santigo; Barbas, Coral

    2012-05-01

    The amino acid derivative, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, is an anti-oxidant agent extensively employed as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of human pulmonary conditions. A major biotransformation route of this drug, which displays considerable variation in capacity in man, involves the oxidation of the sulfide moiety to the inactive S-oxide metabolite. Previous observations have indicated that fasted plasma L-cysteine concentrations and fasted plasma L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate ratios were correlated with the degree of sulfoxidation of this drug and that these particular parameters may be used as endobiotic biomarkers for this xenobiotic metabolism. It has been proposed also that the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, was responsible for the drug sulfoxidation. Further in this theme, the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in 100 human volunteers was investigated with respect to it potential correlation with fasted plasma amino acid concentrations. Extensive statistical analyses showed no significant associations or relationships between the degree of drug S-oxidation and fasted plasma amino acid concentrations, especially with respect to the sulfur-containing compounds, methionine, L-cysteine, L-cysteine sulfinic acid, taurine and free inorganic sulfate, also the derived ratios of L-cysteine/L-cysteine sulfinic acid and L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate. It was concluded that plasma amino acid levels or derived ratios cannot be employed to predict the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (or vice versa) and that it is doubtful if the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, has any involvement in the metabolism of this drug.

  3. Mechanisms of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) toxicity: Involvement of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor alpha (PPAR) molecular signals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are members of a family of environmentally persistent perfluorinated compounds and are found in the serum of wildlife and humans. PFOS and PFOA are developmentally toxic in rats and mice. Exposure in utero reduces...

  4. Involvement of a universal amino acid synthesis impediment in cytoplasmic male sterility in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Fu, Hong-Fei; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Chai, Wei-Guo

    2016-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), we studied the different maturation processes of sterile and fertile pepper anthers. A paraffin section analysis of the sterile anthers indicated an abnormality of the tapetal layer and an over-vacuolization of the cells. The quantitative proteomics results showed that the expression of histidinol dehydrogenase (HDH), dihydroxy-acid dehydratase (DAD), aspartate aminotransferase (ATAAT), cysteine synthase (CS), delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), and glutamate synthetase (GS) in the amino acid synthesis pathway decreased by more than 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of DAD, ATAAT, CS and P5CS showed a 2- to 16-fold increase in the maintainer line anthers. We also found that most of the amino acid content levels decreased to varying degrees during the anther tapetum period of the sterile line, whereas these levels increased in the maintainer line. The results of our study indicate that during pepper anther development, changes in amino acid synthesis are significant and accompany abnormal tapetum maturity, which is most likely an important cause of male sterility in pepper. PMID:26987793

  5. Fabrication of hydrophobic polymer foams with double acid sites on surface of macropore for conversion of carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianming; Mao, Yanli; Gao, Heping; Xiong, Qingang; Qiu, Fengxian; Zhang, Tao; Niu, Xiangheng

    2016-06-05

    Herein we reported a simple and novel synthetic strategy for the fabrication of two kinds of hydrophobic polymer foam catalysts (i.e. Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) and HPFs-1-H(+)) with hierarchical porous structure, inhomogeneous acidic composition and Lewis-Brønsted double acid sites distributed on the surface, which was used to one-pot conversion of carbohydrate (such as cellulose, glucose and fructose) to a key chemical platform (i.e. 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, HMF). The water-in-oil (W/O) high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs), stabilized by both Span 80 and acidic prepolymers as analogous particles offered the acidic actives, were used as the template for simultaneous polymerization of oil phase in the presence of divinylbenzene (DVB) and styrene (St). After subsequent ion-exchange process, Lewis and Brønsted acid sites derived from exchanged Cr(3+) and H(+) ion were both fixed on the surface of cell of the catalysts. The HPFs-1-H(+) and Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) had similar hierarchical porous, hydrophobic surface and acid sites (HPFs-1-H(+) with macropores ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm, uniform mesopores in 14.4 nm, water contact angle of 122° and 0.614 mmolg(-1) of Brønsted acid sites, as well as Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) with macropores ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm, uniform mesopores in 13.3 nm, water contact angle of 136° and 0.638 mmolg(-1) of Lewis-Brønsted acid sites). It was confirmed that Lewis acid sites of catalyst had a slight influence on the HMF yield of fructose came from the function of Brønsted acid sites, and Lewis acid sites were in favor of improving the HMF yield from cellulose and glucose. This work opens up a simple and novel route to synthesize multifunctional polymeric catalysts for efficient one-pot conversion of carbohydrate to HMF.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Detection of the Thiomonas Population and the Thiomonas Arsenite Oxidase Involved in Natural Arsenite Attenuation Processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Hovasse, Agnès; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Desoeuvre, Angélique; Farasin, Julien; Hery, Marina; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France) is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron) attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with FISH and pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ. PMID:26870729

  7. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation.

  8. 36C1 measurements and the hydrology of an acid injection site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vourvopoulos, G.; Brahana, J.V.; Nolte, E.; Korschinek, G.; Priller, A.; Dockhorn, B.

    1990-01-01

    In an area in western Tennessee (United States), an industrial firm is injecting acidic (pH = 0.1) iron chloride into permeable zones of carbonate rocks at depths ranging from 1000 to 2200 m below land surface. Overlying the injection zone at a depth of approximately 500 m below land surface is a regional fresh-water aquifer, the Knox aquifer. A study is currently underway to investigate whether the injection wells are hydraulically isolated from the fresh-water aquifer. Drilling of a test well that will reach a total depth of 2700 m has been initiated. The 36Cl content of 15 samples from the Knox aquifer, from monitor wells in the vicinity of the injection site, and from the test well have been analyzed. ?? 1990.

  9. BTX abatement using Chilean natural zeolite: the role of Brønsted acid sites.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, S; Valdés, H; Manero, M-H; Zaror, C A

    2012-01-01

    In wastewater treatment facilities, air quality is not only affected by conventional unpleasant odour compounds; toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are also found. In this study, the adsorptive capacity of Chilean natural zeolite toward VOC removal was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of zeolite chemical surface properties on VOC elimination was also investigated. Three modified zeolite samples were prepared from a natural Chilean zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz). Natural and modified zeolite samples were characterised by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analyses and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Chemical modifications of natural zeolite showed the important role of Brønsted acid sites on the abatement of VOCs. The presence of humidity has a negative effect on zeolite adsorption capacity. Natural zeolites could be an interesting option for benzene, toluene and xylene vapour emission abatement.

  10. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  11. Primary Angle Closure and Sequence Variants within MicroRNA Binding Sites of Genes Involved in Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haihong; Zhang, Junfang; Zhu, Rongrong; Hu, Nan; Lu, Hong; Yang, Mei; Qin, Bai; Shi, Jian; Guan, Huaijin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The formation of primary angle closure (PAC) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) is regulated by a tissue remodeling pathway that plays a critical role in eye development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful gene expression regulators and may exert their effects on tissue remodeling genes. This study investigated the associations between gene variants (single-nucleotide polymorphism, SNP) in miRNA binding sites in the 3’-UTR region of genes involved in eye development and PAC. Methods The sample consisted of 232 PAC subjects and 306 controls obtained from a population-based cohort in the Funing District of Jiangsu, China. The markers include 9 SNPs in the COL11A1, PCMTD1, ZNRF3, MTHFR, and ALPPL2 genes respectively. SNP genotyping was performed with a TaqMan-MGB probe using an RT-PCR system. Results Of the 9 SNPs studied, the frequency of the minor A allele of COL11A1 rs1031820 was higher in the PAC group than in the control group in allele analysis (p = 0.047). The genotype analysis indicated that MTHFR rs1537514 is marginally associated with PAC (p = 0.014). The CC genotype of rs1537514 was present solely in the PAC group. However, the differences lost significance after Bonferroni correction. Conclusion Our study reveals a possible association of COL11A1 and MTHFR with PAC in the Han Chinese population. These results will contribute to an improved understanding of the genetic basis of PACG. PMID:27824919

  12. Characterization of lysosomal acid lipase by site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, S; Du, H; Grabowski, G A

    1995-11-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is essential for the hydrolysis of cholesterol esters and triglycerides that are delivered to the lysosomes via the low density lipoprotein receptor system. The deficiency of LAL is associated with cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman's disease (WD). We cloned the human LAL cDNA and expressed the active enzyme in the baculovirus system. Two molecular forms (M(r) approximately 41,000 and approximately 46,000) with different glycosylation were found intracellularly, and approximately 24% of the M(r) approximately 46,000 form was secreted into the medium. Tunicamycin treatment produced only an inactive M(r) approximately 41,000 form. This result implicates glycosylation occupancy in the proper folding for active-site function. Catalytic activity was greater toward cis- than trans-unsaturated fatty acid esters of 4-methylumbelliferone and toward esters with 7-carbon length acyl chains. LAL cleaved cholesterol esters and mono-, tri-, and diglycerides. Heparin had a biphasic effect on enzymatic activity with initial activation followed by inhibition. Inhibition of LAL activity by tetrahydrolipstatin and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggested the presence of active serines in binding/catalytic domain(s) of the protein. Site-directed mutagenesis at two putative active centers, GXSXG, showed that Ser153 was important to catalytic activity, whereas Ser99 was not and neither was the catalytic nucleophile. Three reported mutations (L179P, L336P, and delta AG302 deletion) from CESD patients were created and expressed in the Sf9 cell system. None cleaved cholesterol esters, and L179P and L336P cleaved only triolein at approximately 4% of wild-type levels. These results suggest that mechanisms, in addition to LAL defects, may operate in the selective accumulation of cholesterol esters or triglycerides in CESD and WD patients.

  13. Involvement of a Non-Human Sialic Acid in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samraj, Annie N.; Läubli, Heinz; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are common monosaccharides that are widely expressed as outer terminal units on all vertebrate cell surfaces, and play fundamental roles in cell–cell and cell–microenvironment interactions. The predominant sialic acids on most mammalian cells are N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Neu5Gc is notable for its deficiency in humans due to a species-specific and species-universal inactivating deletion in the CMAH gene encoding the hydroxylase that converts CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc. However, Neu5Gc is metabolically incorporated into human tissues from dietary sources (particularly red meat), and detected at even higher levels in some human cancers. Early life exposure to Neu5Gc-containing foods in the presence of certain commensal bacteria that incorporate dietary Neu5Gc into lipooligosaccharides can lead to generation of antibodies that are also cross-reactive against Neu5Gc-containing glycans in human tissues (“xeno-autoantigens”). Such anti-Neu5Gc “xeno-autoantibodies” are found in all humans, although ranging widely in levels among individuals, and displaying diverse and variable specificities for the underlying glycan. Experimental evidence in a human-like Neu5Gc-deficient Cmah−/−mouse model shows that inflammation due to “xenosialitis” caused by this antigen–antibody interaction can promote tumor progression, suggesting a likely mechanism for the well-known epidemiological link between red meat consumption and carcinoma risk. In this review, we discuss the history of this field, mechanisms of Neu5Gc incorporation into tissues, the origin and specificities of human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies, their use as possible cancer biomarkers, implications of xenosialitis in cancer initiation and progression, and current and future approaches toward immunotherapy that could take advantage of this unusual human-specific phenomenon. PMID:24600589

  14. Involvement of a non-human sialic Acid in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Samraj, Annie N; Läubli, Heinz; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are common monosaccharides that are widely expressed as outer terminal units on all vertebrate cell surfaces, and play fundamental roles in cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions. The predominant sialic acids on most mammalian cells are N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Neu5Gc is notable for its deficiency in humans due to a species-specific and species-universal inactivating deletion in the CMAH gene encoding the hydroxylase that converts CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc. However, Neu5Gc is metabolically incorporated into human tissues from dietary sources (particularly red meat), and detected at even higher levels in some human cancers. Early life exposure to Neu5Gc-containing foods in the presence of certain commensal bacteria that incorporate dietary Neu5Gc into lipooligosaccharides can lead to generation of antibodies that are also cross-reactive against Neu5Gc-containing glycans in human tissues ("xeno-autoantigens"). Such anti-Neu5Gc "xeno-autoantibodies" are found in all humans, although ranging widely in levels among individuals, and displaying diverse and variable specificities for the underlying glycan. Experimental evidence in a human-like Neu5Gc-deficient Cmah(-) (/) (-) mouse model shows that inflammation due to "xenosialitis" caused by this antigen-antibody interaction can promote tumor progression, suggesting a likely mechanism for the well-known epidemiological link between red meat consumption and carcinoma risk. In this review, we discuss the history of this field, mechanisms of Neu5Gc incorporation into tissues, the origin and specificities of human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies, their use as possible cancer biomarkers, implications of xenosialitis in cancer initiation and progression, and current and future approaches toward immunotherapy that could take advantage of this unusual human-specific phenomenon.

  15. Adipocyte membrane glycerol permeability is involved in the anti-adipogenic effect of conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana V; Madeira, Ana; Lopes, Paula A; Pires, Virgínia M R; Alfaia, Cristina M; Prates, José A M; Moura, Teresa; Soveral, Graça

    2015-03-06

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a group of minor fatty acids from ruminant origin, has long been recognized as a body fat lowering agent. Given the trans(t)10,cis(c)12-CLA well documented interference on lipolysis, we hypothesized for adipocytes altered permeation to glycerol when supplemented with this isomer. 3T3-L1 murine differentiated adipocytes were medium supplemented with linoleic acid (LA) and individual or combined c9,t11 and t10,c12-CLA isomers. Adipocytes treated with the t10,c12-CLA isomer and CLA mixture showed reduced triacylglycerols content (p < 0.001), re-enforcing the t10,c12-CLA as the anti-adipogenic CLA isomer. This finding was supported by decreased Δ9-desaturase index and adipocyte differentiation markers for the t10,c12-CLA group (p < 0.001), which suggest reduced lipogenesis and differentiation, respectively. The glycerol permeability was higher in all CLA treated cells compared to control and LA groups (p < 0.05). The increase in glycerol permeability agrees with both reduced triacylglycerols and non-osmotic cellular volume in the t10,c12-CLA and CLA mixture groups. Taken together, our data suggest that the increased adipocyte plasma membrane glycerol fluxes may be part of the anti-adipogenic response to CLA treatments.

  16. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving MTORC2 Signaling Suppression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhifeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Wang, Ying; Ren, Jiafa; Dai, Yifan; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-04-10

    Epidemiologic studies showed the correlation between the deficiency of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), however, the role and mechanisms for n-3 PUFAs in protecting against kidney fibrosis remain obscure. In this study, NRK-49F cells, a rat kidney interstitial fibroblast cell line, were stimulated with TGFβ1. A Caenorhabditis elegans fat-1 transgenic mouse model in which n-3 PUFAs are endogenously produced from n-6 PUFAs owing to the expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase were deployed. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one member of n-3 PUFAs family, could suppress TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation at a dose and time dependent manner. Additionally, DHA could largely inhibit TGFβ1-stimulated Akt but not S6 or Smad3 phosphorylation at a time dependent manner. To decipher the role for n-3 PUFAs in protecting against kidney fibrosis, fat-1 transgenic mice were operated with unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO). Compared to the wild types, fat-1 transgenics developed much less kidney fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation accompanied by less p-Akt (Ser473), p-Akt (Thr308), p-S6 and p-Smad3 in kidney tissues at day 7 after UUO. Thus, n-3 PUFAs can attenuate fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis, which may be associated with the inhibition of mTORC2 signaling.

  17. Involvement of Abscisic Acid in Ethylene-Induced Cotyledon Abscission in Cotton Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, J. C.; Hultstrand, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv LG102) seedlings raised from seeds exposed to 100 [mu]M norflurazon (NFZ) during imbibition contained reduced levels of free abscisic acid (ABA) and were visibly achlorophyllous. Exposure of untreated cotton seedlings to ethylene concentrations >1 [mu]L/L for 24 h resulted in cotyledon abscission. In contrast, exposure of NFZ-treated seedlings to concentrations of ethylene [less than or equal to]50 [mu]L/L elicited no cotyledon abscission. Application of ABA, an ABA analog, or jasmonic acid to NFZ-treated seedlings restored ethylene-induced abscission. Isolated cotyledonary node explants prepared from NFZ-treated seedlings exhibited an altered dose-response pattern of ethylene-induced petiole abscission. Endogenous levels of free IAA were unaltered in NFZ-treated seedlings. Ethylene treatment (50 [mu]L/L, 24 h) had no effect on free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in either control or NFZ-treated seedlings. Levels of conjugated (ester plus amide) IAA were substantially increased in NFZ-treated seedlings regardless of ethylene treatment. These results indicate that endogenous ABA plays an essential, but physiologically undefined, role in ethylene-induced cotyledon abscission in cotton. PMID:12231720

  18. Type III polyketide synthase is involved in the biosynthesis of protocatechuic acid in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yangyong; Xiao, Jing; Pan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Genomic studies have shown that not only plants but also filamentous fungi contain type III polyketide synthases. To study the function of type III polyketide synthase (AnPKSIII) in Aspergillus niger, a deletion strain (delAnPKSIII) and an overexpression strain (oeAnPKSIII) were constructed in A. niger MA169.4, a derivative of the wild-type (WT) A. niger ATCC 9029 that produces large quantities of gluconic acid. Alterations in the metabolites were analyzed by HPLC when the extract of the overexpression strain was compared with extracts of the WT and deletion strains. Protocatechuic acid (PCA; 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3.2 mg/l) was isolated and identified as the main product of AnPKSIII when inductively expressed in A. niger MA169.4. The molecular weight of PCA was 154.1 (m/z 153.1 [M-H](-)), was detected by ESI-MS in the negative ionization mode, and (1)H and (13)C NMR data confirmed its structure.

  19. Growth suppression by ursodeoxycholic acid involves caveolin-1 enhanced degradation of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Rebecca; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to prevent colon tumorigenesis in animal models and in humans. In vitro work indicates that this bile acid can suppress cell growth and mitogenic signaling suggesting that UDCA may be an anti-proliferative agent. However, the mechanism by which UDCA functions is unclear. Previously we showed that bile acids may alter cellular signaling by acting at the plasma membrane. Here we utilized EGFR as a model membrane receptor and examined the effects that UDCA has on its functioning. We found that UDCA promoted an interaction between EGFR and caveolin-1 and this interaction enhanced UDCA-mediated suppression of MAP kinase activity and cell growth . Importantly, UDCA treatment led to recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase, c-Cbl, to the membrane, ubiquitination of EGFR, and increased receptor degradation. Moreover, suppression of c-Cbl activity abrogated UDCA's growth suppression activities suggesting that receptor ubiquitination plays an important role in UDCA's biological activities. Taken together these results suggest that UDCA may act to suppress cell growth by inhibiting the mitogenic activity of receptor tyrosine kinases such as EGFR through increased receptor degradation. PMID:19446582

  20. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving MTORC2 Signaling Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhifeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Wang, Ying; Ren, Jiafa; Dai, Yifan; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies showed the correlation between the deficiency of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), however, the role and mechanisms for n-3 PUFAs in protecting against kidney fibrosis remain obscure. In this study, NRK-49F cells, a rat kidney interstitial fibroblast cell line, were stimulated with TGFβ1. A Caenorhabditis elegans fat-1 transgenic mouse model in which n-3 PUFAs are endogenously produced from n-6 PUFAs owing to the expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase were deployed. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one member of n-3 PUFAs family, could suppress TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation at a dose and time dependent manner. Additionally, DHA could largely inhibit TGFβ1-stimulated Akt but not S6 or Smad3 phosphorylation at a time dependent manner. To decipher the role for n-3 PUFAs in protecting against kidney fibrosis, fat-1 transgenic mice were operated with unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO). Compared to the wild types, fat-1 transgenics developed much less kidney fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation accompanied by less p-Akt (Ser473), p-Akt (Thr308), p-S6 and p-Smad3 in kidney tissues at day 7 after UUO. Thus, n-3 PUFAs can attenuate fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis, which may be associated with the inhibition of mTORC2 signaling. PMID:28393852

  1. Identification of Arg-12 in the active site of Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Stoughton, D M; Zapata, G; Picone, R; Vann, W F

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase catalyses the synthesis of CMP-sialic acid from CTP and sialic acid. The active site of the 418 amino acid E. coli enzyme was localized to its N-terminal half. The bacterial CMP-sialic acid synthetase enzymes have a conserved motif, IAIIPARXXSKGLXXKN, at their N-termini. Several basic residues have been identified at or near the active site of the E. coli enzyme by chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis. Only one of the lysines in the N-terminal motif, Lys-21, appears to be essential for activity. Mutation of Lys-21 in the N-terminal motif results in an inactive enzyme. Furthermore, Arg-12 of the N-terminal motif appears to be an active-site residue, based on the following evidence. Substituting Arg-12 with glycine or alanine resulted in inactive enzymes, indicating that this residue is required for enzymic activity. The Arg-12-->Lys mutant was partially active, demonstrating that a positive charge is required at this site. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals changes in k(cat), K(m) and K(s) for CTP, which implicates Arg-12 in catalysis and substrate binding. PMID:10510306

  2. Site-specific acid-base properties of pholcodine and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Z; Hosztafi, S; Noszál, B

    2006-11-01

    The acid-base properties of pholcodine, a cough-depressant agent, and related compounds including metabolites were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations, and are characterised in terms of macroscopic and microscopic protonation constants. New N-methylated derivatives were also synthesized in order to quantitate site- and nucleus-specific protonation shifts and to unravel microscopic acid-base equilibria. The piperidine nitrogen was found to be 38 and 400 times more basic than its morpholine counterpart in pholcodine and norpholcodine, respectively. The protonation data show that the molecule of pholcodine bears an average of positive charge of 1.07 at physiological pH, preventing it from entering the central nervous system, a plausible reason for its lack of analgesic or addictive properties. The protonation constants of pholcodine and its derivatives are interpreted by comparing with related molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The pH-dependent relative concentrations of the variously protonated forms of pholcodine and morphine are depicted in distribution diagrams.

  3. The Heparan and Heparin Metabolism Pathway is Involved in Regulation of Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six genes involved in the heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism pathway, DSEL (dermatan sulfate epimerase-like), EXTL1 (exostoses (multiple)-like 1), HS6ST1 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 1), HS6ST3 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 3), NDST3 (N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (heparan gl...

  4. Elevation of cellular NAD levels by nicotinic acid and involvement of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Nobumasa; Yamada, Kazuo; Shibata, Tomoko; Osago, Harumi; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Tsuchiya, Mikako

    2007-08-24

    NAD plays critical roles in various biological processes through the function of SIRT1. Although classical studies in mammals showed that nicotinic acid (NA) is a better precursor than nicotinamide (Nam) in elevating tissue NAD levels, molecular details of NAD synthesis from NA remain largely unknown. We here identified NA phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) in humans and provided direct evidence of tight link between NAPRT and the increase in cellular NAD levels. The enzyme was abundantly expressed in the small intestine, liver, and kidney in mice and mediated [(14)C]NAD synthesis from [(14)C]NA in human cells. In cells expressing endogenous NAPRT, the addition of NA but not Nam almost doubled cellular NAD contents and decreased cytotoxicity by H(2)O(2). Both effects were reversed by knockdown of NAPRT expression. These results indicate that NAPRT is essential for NA to increase cellular NAD levels and, thus, to prevent oxidative stress of the cells. Kinetic analyses revealed that NAPRT, but not Nam phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT, also known as pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor or visfatin), is insensitive to the physiological concentration of NAD. Together, we conclude that NA elevates cellular NAD levels through NAPRT function and, thus, protects the cells against stress, partly due to lack of feedback inhibition of NAPRT but not NamPRT by NAD. The ability of NA to increase cellular NAD contents may account for some of the clinically observed effects of the vitamin and further implies a novel application of the vitamin to treat diseases such as those associated with the depletion of cellular NAD pools.

  5. Purification, enzymatic properties, and active site environment of a novel manganese(III)-containing acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Y; Kawabe, H; Tanaka, H; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A

    1981-10-25

    A new manganese-containing acid phosphatase has been isolated and crystallized from sweet potato tubers. The pure enzyme contains one atom of manganese per Mr = 110,000 polypeptide and shows phosphatase activity toward various phosphate substrates. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 and the enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, AsO43-, and MoO42-. This stable metalloenzyme is red-violet in color with an intense absorption band at 515 nm (epsilon - 2460). Our electronic, circular dichroism, and electron spin resonance findings strongly indicate that the Mn-valence state of the native enzyme is trivalent. When the Mn-enzyme is excited by the 5145 A line of Ar+ laser, prominent Raman lines at 1230, 1298, 1508, and 1620 cm-1 were detected. This Raman spectrum can probably be interpreted in terms of internal vibration of a coordinated tyrosine phenolate anion. The tryptophan-modified enzyme showed a positive Raman band at 370 cm-1, which is preferentially assigned to a Mn(III)-S streching mode. The modification of the Mn-enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide led to a large decrease in the fluorescence intensity of 335 nm which was dominated by its tryptophan residues within a considerable hydrophobic environment. The acid phosphatase activity was significantly decreased by the tryptophan modification. With respect to the active site donor sets, the Mn(III)-containing acid phosphatase is distinctly different from the Zn(II)-containing alkaline phosphatase. Of interest is also the appreciable similarity of some enzymatic and spectroscopic properties between the present enzyme and uteroferrin.

  6. The reaction mechanism for the SCR process on monomer V(5+) sites and the effect of modified Brønsted acidity.

    PubMed

    Arnarson, Logi; Falsig, Hanne; Rasmussen, Søren B; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; Moses, Poul Georg

    2016-06-22

    The energetics, structures and activity of a monomeric VO3H/TiO2(001) catalyst are investigated for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction by the use of density functional theory (DFT). Furthermore we study the influences of a dopant substitute in the TiO2 support and its effects on the known properties of the SCR system such as Brønsted acidity and reducibility of vanadium. We find for the reduction part of the SCR mechanism that it involves two Ti-O-V oxygen sites. One is a hydroxyl possessing Brønsted acidity which contributes to the formation of NH4(+), while the other accepts a proton which charge stabilizes the reduced active site. In the reduction the proton is donated to the latter due to a reaction between NH3 and NO that forms a H2NNO molecule which decomposes into N2(g) and H2O(g). A dopant substitution of 10 different dopants: Si, Ge, Se, Zr, Sn, Te, Hf, V, Mo and W at each of the sites, which participate in the reaction, modifies the energetics and therefore the SCR activity. We find that Brønsted acidity is a descriptor for the SCR activity at low temperatures. Based on this descriptor we find that Zr, Hf and Sn have a positive effect as they decrease the activation energy for the SCR reaction.

  7. Biological degradation of 4-chlorobenzoic acid by a PCB-metabolizing bacterium through a pathway not involving (chloro)catechol.

    PubMed

    Adebusoye, Sunday A

    2017-02-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain SK-3, previously isolated on polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures, was found to aerobically utilize a wide spectrum of substituted aromatic compounds including 4-fluoro-, 4-chloro- and 4-bromobenzoic acids as a sole carbon and energy source. Other chlorobenzoic acid (CBA) congeners such as 2-, 3-, 2,3-, 2,5-, 3,4- and 3,5-CBA were all rapidly transformed to respective chlorocatechols (CCs). Under aerobic conditions, strain SK-3 grew readily on 4-CBA to a maximum concentration of 5 mM above which growth became impaired and yielded no biomass. Growth lagged significantly at concentrations above 3 mM, however chloride elimination was stoichiometric and generally mirrored growth and substrate consumption in all incubations. Experiments with resting cells, cell-free extracts and analysis of metabolite pools suggest that 4-CBA was metabolized in a reaction exclusively involving an initial hydrolytic dehalogenation yielding 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, which was then hydroxylated to protocatechuic acid (PCA) and subsequently metabolized via the β-ketoadipate pathway. When strain SK-3 was grown on 4-CBA, there was gratuitous induction of the catechol-1,2-dioxygenase and gentisate-1,2-dioxygenase pathways, even if both were not involved in the metabolism of the acid. While activities of the modified ortho- and meta-cleavage pathways were not detectable in all extracts, activity of PCA-3,4-dioxygenase was over ten-times higher than those of catechol-1,2- and gentisate-1,2-dioxygenases. Therefore, the only reason other congeners were not utilized for growth was the accumulation of CCs, suggesting a narrow spectrum of the activity of enzymes downstream of benzoate-1,2-dioxygenase, which exhibited affinity for a number of substituted analogs, and that the metabolic bottlenecks are either CCs or catabolites of the modified ortho-cleavage metabolic route.

  8. Coexisting Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Lupus Vulgaris Involving the Vaccination Site and Lichen Scrofulosorum in an Immunocompetent Boy.

    PubMed

    Angoori, Gnaneshwar Rao

    2016-09-01

    The coexistence of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-induced lupus vulgaris involving the site of vaccination with lichen scrofulosorum is rare. Herein we report a 3-year-old boy who presented with lupus vulgaris at the vaccination site 3 weeks after neonatal BCG vaccination followed by the development of lichen scrofulosorum approximately 2.5 years later. Characteristic clinical morphology, typical histopathology, and positive DNA polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium bovis confirmed the clinical diagnosis.

  9. Neurologic syndrome associated with homozygous mutation at MAG sialic acid binding site.

    PubMed

    Roda, Ricardo H; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Boucekkine, Houda; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-08-01

    The MAG gene encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an abundant protein involved in axon-glial interactions and myelination during nerve regeneration. Several members of a consanguineous family with a clinical syndrome reminiscent of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and demyelinating leukodystrophy on brain MRI were recently found to harbor a homozygous missense p.Ser133Arg MAG mutation. Here, we report two brothers from a nonconsanguineous family afflicted with progressive cognitive impairment, neuropathy, ataxia, nystagmus, and gait disorder. Exome sequencing revealed the homozygous missense mutation p.Arg118His in MAG. This Arg118 residue in immunoglobulin domain 1 is critical for sialic acid binding, providing a compelling mechanistic basis for disease pathogenesis.

  10. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  11. Biphasic effects of baclofen on phrenic motoneurons: possible involvement of two types of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Lalley, P M

    1983-08-01

    Intravenous injections of baclofen have two general dose-dependent effects on phrenic motoneurons in anesthetized cats. Small doses (0.5-1.5 mg/kg) increase the frequency of action potentials recorded from single motoneurons and from the phrenic nerve, whereas large doses (2-10 mg/kg) reduce or abolish action potentials. The increase in frequency produced by small doses is accompanied by membrane depolarization and, in most experiments, by increased input resistance. Large doses hyperpolarize phrenic motoneurons and produce greater increases in input resistance. Extracellular recording during microelectrophoretic application of baclofen reveals only one effect, depression of cell firing, at all effective current strengths. The low dose stimulatory effect of i.v. baclofen is attributed to disinhibition, whereas the depression by large doses is attributed to disfacilitation. During incomplete inhibition by baclofen, CO2 administration further depresses phrenic nerve activity. Bicuculline (100-600 micrograms/kg i.v.) and picrotoxin (900 micrograms/kg i.v.) restore firing depressed by baclofen, whereas strychnine (80-1280 micrograms/kg) does not. 3-Aminopropanesulfonic acid (5-75 mg/kg i.v.) an agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor sites, depresses phrenic nerve activity. It is suggested that the low dose stimulatory effects are related to actions at gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors, whereas the high dose depressant effects are related, at least in part, to activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

  12. Conserved amino acid motifs from the novel Piv/MooV family of transposases and site-specific recombinases are required for catalysis of DNA inversion by Piv.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Buchner, J M; Thiel, W H; Gernert, K M; Karls, A C

    2001-02-01

    Piv, a site-specific invertase from Moraxella lacunata, exhibits amino acid homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements. The functions of conserved amino acid motifs that define this novel family of both transposases and site-specific recombinases (Piv/MooV family) were examined by mutagenesis of fully conserved amino acids within each motif in Piv. All Piv mutants altered in conserved residues were defective for in vivo inversion of the M. lacunata invertible DNA segment, but competent for in vivo binding to Piv DNA recognition sequences. Although the primary amino acid sequences of the Piv/MooV recombinases do not contain a conserved DDE motif, which defines the retroviral integrase/transposase (IN/Tnps) family, the predicted secondary structural elements of Piv align well with those of the IN/Tnps for which crystal structures have been determined. Molecular modelling of Piv based on these alignments predicts that E59, conserved as either E or D in the Piv/MooV family, forms a catalytic pocket with the conserved D9 and D101 residues. Analysis of Piv E59G confirms a role for E59 in catalysis of inversion. These results suggest that Piv and the related IS110/IS492 transposases mediate DNA recombination by a common mechanism involving a catalytic DED or DDD motif.

  13. Planarian D-amino acid oxidase is involved in ovarian development during sexual induction.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Takanobu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Haruka; Ono, Mizuki; Aoki, Manabu; Matsumoto, Midori; Ishida, Tetsuo; Horiike, Kihachiro; Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying switching from asexual to sexual reproduction, namely sexual induction, we developed an assay system for sexual induction in the hermaphroditic planarian species Dugesia ryukyuensis. Ovarian development is the initial and essential step in sexual induction, and it is followed by the formation of other reproductive organs, including the testes. Here, we report a function of a planarian D-amino acid oxidase, Dr-DAO, in the control of ovarian development in planarians. Asexual worms showed significantly more widespread expression of Dr-DAO in the parenchymal space than did sexual worms. Inhibition of Dr-DAO by RNAi caused the formation of immature ovaries. In addition, we found that feeding asexual worms 5 specific D-amino acids could induce the formation of immature ovaries that are similar to those observed in Dr-DAO knockdown worms, suggesting that Dr-DAO inhibits the formation of immature ovaries by degrading these D-amino acids. Following sexual induction, Dr-DAO expression was observed in the ovaries. The knockdown of Dr-DAO during sexual induction delayed the maturation of the other reproductive organs, as well as ovary. These findings suggest that Dr-DAO acts to promote ovarian maturation and that complete sexual induction depends on the production of mature ovaries. We propose that Dr-DAO produced in somatic cells prevents the onset of sexual induction in the asexual state, and then after sexual induction, the female germ cells specifically produce Dr-DAO to induce full maturation. Therefore, Dr-DAO produced in somatic and female germline cells may play different roles in sexual induction.

  14. Involvement of Sialic Acid on Endothelial Cells in Organ-Specific Lymphocyte Recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Steven D.; Singer, Mark S.; Yednock, Ted A.; Stoolman, Lloyd M.

    1985-05-01

    Mouse lymphocytes incubated on cryostat-cut sections of lymphoid organs (lymph nodes and Peyer's patches) specifically adhere to the endothelium of high endothelial venules (HEV), the specialized blood vessels to which recirculating lymphocytes attach as they migrate from the blood into the parenchyma of the lymphoid organs. Treatment of sections with sialidase eliminated the binding of lymphocytes to peripheral lymph node HEV, had no effect on binding to Peyer's patch HEV, and had an intermediate effect on mesenteric lymph node HEV. These results suggest that sialic acid on endothelial cells may be an organ-specific recognition determinant for lymphocyte attachment.

  15. Differential Amino Acid, Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Perpetuations Involved in a Subtype of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Chinese Medicine Cold Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongtao; Niu, Xuyan; Gu, Yan; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Yue, Kevin; Zhang, Ge; Pan, Xiaohua; Jiang, Miao; Tan, Yong; Kong, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenli; Xu, Guowang; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Pattern classification is a key approach in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and it is used to classify the patients for intervention selection accordingly. TCM cold and heat patterns, two main patterns of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had been explored with systems biology approaches. Different regulations of apoptosis were found to be involved in cold and heat classification in our previous works. For this study, the metabolic profiling of plasma was explored in RA patients with typical TCM cold or heat patterns by integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platforms in conjunction with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Three main processes of metabolism, including amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid were focused on for function analysis. The results showed that 29 and 19 differential metabolites were found in cold and heat patterns respectively, compared with healthy controls. The perturbation of amino acid metabolism (increased essential amino acids), carbohydrate metabolism (galactose metabolism) and lipid metabolism, were found to be involved in both cold and heat pattern RA. In particular, more metabolic perturbations in protein and collagen breakdown, decreased glycolytic activity and aerobic oxidation, and increased energy utilization associated with RA cold pattern patients. These findings may be useful for obtaining a better understanding of RA pathogenesis and for achieving a better efficacy in RA clinical practice. PMID:27775663

  16. Plant immunity induced by COS-OGA elicitor is a cumulative process that involves salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    van Aubel, Géraldine; Cambier, Pierre; Dieu, Marc; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Plant innate immunity offers considerable opportunities for plant protection but beside flagellin and chitin, not many molecules and their receptors have been extensively characterized and very few have successfully reached the field. COS-OGA, an elicitor that combines cationic chitosan oligomers (COS) with anionic pectin oligomers (OGA), efficiently protected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) grown in greenhouse against powdery mildew (Leveillula taurica). Leaf proteomic analysis of plants sprayed with COS-OGA showed accumulation of Pathogenesis-Related proteins (PR), especially subtilisin-like proteases. qRT-PCR confirmed upregulation of PR-proteins and salicylic acid (SA)-related genes while expression of jasmonic acid/ethylene-associated genes was not modified. SA concentration and class III peroxidase activity were increased in leaves and appeared to be a cumulative process dependent on the number of sprayings with the elicitor. These results suggest a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) mechanism of action of the COS-OGA elicitor and highlight the importance of repeated applications to ensure efficient protection against disease.

  17. Possible involvement of delta-6-desaturase in control of melanoma growth by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N S; Duncan, J R

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on BL6 melanoma growth in cell culture and of safflower oil (SFO) which contains LA and evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains GLA, on melanoma growth when grown in mice. The delta-6-desaturase activity of the melanoma cells in the two systems was also examined and an attempt made to relate the activity of the enzyme to the effects of GLA on cell and tumour growth. LA and GLA were found to be equipotent in inhibiting growth of the in vitro cultured BL6 cells which were found to contain an appreciable level of delta-6-desaturase activity. EPO was however found to be a more potent promoter of in vivo melanoma growth in mice than SFO. Melanomas grown in mice were found to lack delta-6-desaturase activity suggesting that the EPO diet, by providing GLA, was able to compensate for the loss of enzyme activity in the melanomas. The possibility that melanomas in mice have a requirement for GLA for growth while in in vitro cultured cells excess GLA inhibits the growth of the cells through an increase in lipid peroxidation is discussed.

  18. Structure of a Bacterial ABC Transporter Involved in the Import of an Acidic Polysaccharide Alginate.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yukie; Itoh, Takafumi; Kaneko, Ai; Nishitani, Yu; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-09-01

    The acidic polysaccharide alginate represents a promising marine biomass for the microbial production of biofuels, although the molecular and structural characteristics of alginate transporters remain to be clarified. In Sphingomonas sp. A1, the ATP-binding cassette transporter AlgM1M2SS is responsible for the import of alginate across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we present the substrate-transport characteristics and quaternary structure of AlgM1M2SS. The addition of poly- or oligoalginate enhanced the ATPase activity of reconstituted AlgM1M2SS coupled with one of the periplasmic solute-binding proteins, AlgQ1 or AlgQ2. External fluorescence-labeled oligoalginates were specifically imported into AlgM1M2SS-containing proteoliposomes in the presence of AlgQ2, ATP, and Mg(2+). The crystal structure of AlgQ2-bound AlgM1M2SS adopts an inward-facing conformation. The interaction between AlgQ2 and AlgM1M2SS induces the formation of an alginate-binding tunnel-like structure accessible to the solvent. The translocation route inside the transmembrane domains contains charged residues suitable for the import of acidic saccharides.

  19. A class frequency mixture model that adjusts for site-specific amino acid frequencies and improves inference of protein phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Widely used substitution models for proteins, such as the Jones-Taylor-Thornton (JTT) or Whelan and Goldman (WAG) models, are based on empirical amino acid interchange matrices estimated from databases of protein alignments that incorporate the average amino acid frequencies of the data set under examination (e.g JTT + F). Variation in the evolutionary process between sites is typically modelled by a rates-across-sites distribution such as the gamma (Γ) distribution. However, sites in proteins also vary in the kinds of amino acid interchanges that are favoured, a feature that is ignored by standard empirical substitution matrices. Here we examine the degree to which the pattern of evolution at sites differs from that expected based on empirical amino acid substitution models and evaluate the impact of these deviations on phylogenetic estimation. Results We analyzed 21 large protein alignments with two statistical tests designed to detect deviation of site-specific amino acid distributions from data simulated under the standard empirical substitution model: JTT+ F + Γ. We found that the number of states at a given site is, on average, smaller and the frequencies of these states are less uniform than expected based on a JTT + F + Γ substitution model. With a four-taxon example, we show that phylogenetic estimation under the JTT + F + Γ model is seriously biased by a long-branch attraction artefact if the data are simulated under a model utilizing the observed site-specific amino acid frequencies from an alignment. Principal components analyses indicate the existence of at least four major site-specific frequency classes in these 21 protein alignments. Using a mixture model with these four separate classes of site-specific state frequencies plus a fifth class of global frequencies (the JTT + cF + Γ model), significant improvements in model fit for real data sets can be achieved. This simple mixture model also reduces the long-branch attraction problem

  20. Chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation at a semi-urban site in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Lee, X. Q.; Cao, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation in Southwest China, 105 rainwater samples were collected at a semi-urban site in Anshun from June 2007 to June 2008. Organic acids and major anions were analyzed along with pH and electrical conductivity. The pH values varied from 3.57 to 7.09 for all the rainfall events sampled, with an average of 4.67 which was typical acidic value. Formic, acetic and oxalic acids were found to be the predominant carboxylic acids and their volume weighted average (VWA) concentrations were 8.77, 6.93 and 2.84 μmol l -1, respectively. These organic acids were estimated to account for 8.1% to the total free acidity (TFA) in precipitation. The concentrations of the majority organic acids at studied site had a clear seasonal pattern, reaching higher levels during the non-growing season than those in growing season, which was attributed to dilution effect of heavy rainfall during the growing season. The seasonal variation of wet deposition flux of these organic acids confirmed higher source strength of biogenic emissions from vegetation during the growing season. Formic-to-acetic acids ratio (F/A), an indicator of primary versus secondary sources of these organic acids, suggested that primary sources from vehicular emission, biomass burning, soil and vegetation emissions were dominant sources. In addition, the lowest concentrations of organic acids were found under type S, when air masses originated from the marine (South China Sea) during Southern Asian Monsoon period. And the highest concentrations were observed in precipitation events from Northeast China (type NE), prevailing mostly during winter with the lowest rainfall.

  1. DNA Methylation Perturbations in Genes Involved in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Associated with Depression and Suicide Risk

    PubMed Central

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Galfalvy, Hanga; Chen, Sean; Huang, Yung-yu; Cooper, Thomas B.; Burke, Ainsley K.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and risk of suicide. Long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs) are obtained in the diet or produced by sequential desaturation and elongation of shorter-chain precursor fatty acids linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3). We compared DNA methylation patterns in genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in major depressive disorder (MDD) with (n = 22) and without (n = 39) history of suicide attempt, and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (n = 59). Plasma levels of selected PUFAs along the LC-PUFA biosynthesis pathway were determined by transesterification and gas chromatography. CpG methylation levels for the main human LC-PUFA biosynthetic genes, fatty acid desaturases 1 (Fads1) and 2 (Fads2), and elongation of very long-chain fatty acids protein 5 (Elovl5), were assayed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Associations between PUFA levels and diagnosis or suicide attempt status did not survive correction for multiple testing. However, MDD diagnosis and suicide attempts were significantly associated with DNA methylation in Elovl5 gene regulatory regions. Also the relative roles of PUFA levels and DNA methylation with respect to diagnostic and suicide attempt status were determined by least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression analyses. We found that PUFA associations with suicide attempt status were explained by effects of Elovl5 DNA methylation within the regulatory regions. The observed link between plasma PUFA levels, DNA methylation, and suicide risk may have implications for modulation of disease-associated epigenetic marks by nutritional intervention. PMID:25972837

  2. A decade of monitoring at Swiss Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) sites: can we observe trends in atmospheric acid deposition and in soil solution acidity?

    PubMed

    Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Thimonier, Anne; Schmitt, Maria; Walthert, Lorenz; Waldner, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Trends in atmospheric acid deposition and in soil solution acidity from 1995 or later until 2007 were investigated at several forest sites throughout Switzerland to assess the effects of air pollution abatements on deposition and the response of the soil solution chemistry. Deposition of the major elements was estimated from throughfall and bulk deposition measurements at nine sites of the Swiss Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research network (LWF) since 1995 or later. Soil solution was measured at seven plots at four soil depths since 1998 or later. Trends in the molar ratio of base cations to aluminum (BC/Al) in soil solutions and in concentrations and fluxes of inorganic N (NO(3)-N + NH(4)-N), sulfate (SO(4)-S), and base cations (BC) were used to detect changes in soil solution chemistry. Acid deposition significantly decreased at three out of the nine study sites due to a decrease in total N deposition. Total SO(4)-S deposition decreased at the nine sites, but due to the relatively low amount of SO(4)-S load compared to N deposition, it did not contribute to decrease acid deposition significantly. No trend in total BC deposition was detected. In the soil solution, no trend in concentrations and fluxes of BC, SO(4)-S, and inorganic N were found at most soil depths at five out of the seven sites. This suggests that the soil solution reacted very little to the changes in atmospheric deposition. A stronger reduction in base cations compared to aluminum was detected at two sites, which might indicate that acidification of the soil solution was proceeding faster at these sites.

  3. The fatty acid transport protein Fat1p is involved in the export of fatty acids from lipid bodies in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Dulermo, Thierry; Thevenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2014-09-01

    In order to live, cells need to import different molecules, such as sugars, amino acids or lipids, using transporters. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ScFAT1 gene encodes the long-chain fatty acid transporter; however, the transport of fatty acids (FAs) in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has not yet been studied. In contrast to what has previously been found for ΔScfat1 strains, ΔYlfat1 yeast was still able to grow on substrates containing short-, medium- or long-chain FAs. We observed a notable difference in cell lipid content between wild-type (WT) and deletion mutant strains after 24 h of culture in minimal oleate medium: in the WT strain, lipids represented 24% of cell dry weight (CDW), while they accounted for 37% of CDW in the ΔYlfat1 strain. This result indicates that YlFat1p is not involved in cell lipid uptake. Moreover, we also observed that fatty acid remobilisation was decreased in the ΔYlfat1 strain and that fluorescence-tagged YlFat1p proteins localised to the interfaces between lipid bodies, which suggests that YlFat1p may play a role in the export of FAs from lipid bodies.

  4. Site-specific protein adducts of 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal in human THP-1 monocytic cells: Protein carbonylation is diminished by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan; Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Singhal, Mudita; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2010-01-01

    The protein targets and sites of modification by 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE) in human monocytic THP-1 cells after exogenous exposure to HNE were examined using a multi-pronged proteomic approach involving electrophoretic, immunoblotting and mass spectrometric methods. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal anti-HNE antibodies showed several proteins as targets of HNE adduction. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with ascorbic acid resulted in reduced levels of HNE-protein adducts. Biotinylation of Michael-type HNE adducts using an aldehyde-reactive hydroxylamine-functionalized probe (aldehyde-reactive probe, ARP) and subsequent enrichment facilitated the identification and site-specific assignment of the modifications by LC-MS/MS analysis. Sixteen proteins were unequivocally identified as targets of HNE adduction and eighteen sites of HNE modification at Cys and His residues were assigned. HNE exposure of THP-1 cells resulted in the modification of proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization and regulation, proteins associated with stress responses and enzymes of the glycolytic and other metabolic pathways. This study yielded the first evidence of site-specific adduction of HNE to Cys-295 in tubulin α-1B chain, Cys-351 and Cys-499 in α-actinin-4, Cys-328 in vimentin, Cys-369 in D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and His-246 in aldolase A. PMID:20043646

  5. Cloning and characterization of a locus encoding an indolepyruvate decarboxylase involved in indole-3-acetic acid synthesis in Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E

    1996-01-01

    Erwinia herbicola 299R synthesizes indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) primarily by the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. A gene involved in the biosynthesis of IAA was cloned from strain 299R. This gene (ipdC) conferred the synthesis of indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol upon Escherichia coli DH5 alpha in cultures supplemented with L-tryptophan. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product has high similarity to that of the indolepyruvate decarboxylase of Enterobacter cloacae. Regions within pyruvate decarboxylases of various fungal and plant species also exhibited considerable homology to portions of this gene. This gene therefore presumably encodes an indolepyruvate decarboxylase (IpdC) which catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid to indole-3-acetaldehyde. Insertions of Tn3-spice within ipdC abolished the ability of strain 299R to synthesize indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol and reduced its IAA production in tryptophan-supplemented minimal medium by approximately 10-fold, thus providing genetic evidence for the role of the indolepyruvate pathway in IAA synthesis in this strain. An ipdC probe hybridized strongly with the genomic DNA of all E. herbicola strains tested in Southern hybridization studies, suggesting that the indolepyruvate pathway is common in this species. Maximum parsimony analysis revealed that the ipdC gene is highly conserved within this group and that strains of diverse geographic origin were very similar with respect to ipdC. PMID:8900003

  6. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. 1. Acid hydrolysis and factors involved

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting acid hydrolysis of sweet potato powder (SPP) to fermentable sugars were examined. These include HCl concentration, temperature, time, and levels of SPP. Maximum reducing sugar, reported as dextrose equivalent (DE), was detected after 24 min hydrolysis (1% SPP) in 0.034N HCl heated at 154 degrees celcius. These samples also had 3.43% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) based on dry weight. A high level of HMF (9.2%) was detected in 1% SPP heated at 154 degrees C in 0.10N HCl for 18 min. The lowest concentration of HMF formed (1.8%), at maximal DE of 61%, was established in samples containing 5% SPP and heated at 154 degrees C in 0.034N HCl for 48 min. Aqueous extracts of uncured SPP, examined by HPLC, contained glucose, fructose and sucrose, butdegreaded SPP had only glucose and fructose. Products of degraded SPP, under appropriate conditions, could be used for alcohol fermentation. (Refs. 18).

  7. Root-fed salicylic acid in grape involves the response caused by aboveground high temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Tao; Liu, Yue-Ping; Huang, Wei-Dong

    2008-06-01

    In order to investigate the transportation and distribution of salicylic acid (SA) from root to aboveground tissues in response to high temperature, the roots of grape plant were fed with (14)C-SA before high temperature treatment. Radioactivity results showed that progressive increase in SA transportation from root to aboveground as compared with the control varied exactly with the heat treatment time. Radioactivity results of leaves at different stem heights indicated that the increase in SA amount at the top and middle leaves during the early period was most significant in comparison with the bottom leaves. The up-transportation of SA from root to aboveground tissues was dependent on xylem rather than phloem. Auto-radiographs of whole grape plants strongly approved the conclusions drawn above. Root-derived SA was believed to be a fundamental source in response to aboveground high temperature.

  8. Dopaminergic inhibition involved in the alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid-induced jumping behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Furukawa, T

    1980-05-16

    alpha-Naphthoxyacetic acid (alpha-NOAA), one of the retching-inducers, elicited a dose-dependent jumping behavior shortly after i.p. administration in doses ranging from 250 to 700 mg/kg in ddY mice, the incidence of jumping being 97% at a dose of 700 mg/kg. alpha-NOAA also induced hypothermia, retching, head shaking, salivation and lacrimation. Phentolamine, reserpine, disulfiram, tranylcypromine, haloperidol, scopolamine, bicuculline, diazepam and lithium among the drugs tested inhibited to a certain degree but not markedly the alpha-NOAA-induced jumping behavior. However, the behavior was markedly inhibited by a dopaminergic agonist, apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and this inhibitory effect was significantly antagonized by a dopaminergic antagonist, haloperidol (2 mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that the jumping behavior elicited by alpha-NOAA may be due to the inhibition of dopaminergic neuron activity.

  9. Potassium loss is involved in tobacco cell death induced by palmitoleic acid and ceramide.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jeanne; Chin, Chee-Kok

    2007-09-01

    Tobacco cell death induced by palmitoleic acid (16:1), ceramide, and KCN was found to possess features associated with program cell death (PCD), including cell volume decrease, loss of membrane integrity, DNA damage, nuclear and plastid disorganization, and chromatin condensation. Cell volume decrease was found to be caused by loss of intracellular K(+). Ba(2+) was able to prevent the K(+) loss and it also protected the cells from death induced by 16:1 and ceramide but not KCN. The results suggest that K(+) loss is a critical step in plant PCD. The inability of Ba(2+) to prevent cell death was most likely due to its other effects of KCN, i.e., inhibition of cytochrome oxidase in the respiratory chain and generation of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Involvement of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 2 in the hepatic uptake of taurine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Saori; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Fujinawa, Jun; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2012-08-01

    Taurine is essential for the hepatic synthesis of bile salts and, although taurine is synthesized mainly in pericentral hepatocytes, taurine and taurine-conjugated bile acids are abundant in periportal hepatocytes. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that the active supply of taurine to hepatocytes from the blood stream is a key regulatory factor. The purpose of the present study is to investigate and identify the transporter responsible for taurine uptake by periportal hepatocytes. An in vivo bolus injection of [(3)H]taurine into the rat portal vein demonstrated that 25% of the injected [(3)H]taurine was taken up by the liver on a single pass. The in vivo uptake was significantly inhibited by GABA, taurine, β-alanine, and nipecotic acid, a GABA transporter (GAT) inhibitor, each at a concentration of 10 mM. The characteristics of Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent [(3)H]taurine uptake by freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were consistent with those of GAT2 (solute carrier SLC6A13). Indeed, the K(m) value of the saturable uptake (594 μM) was close to that of mouse SLC6A13-mediated taurine transport. Although GABA, taurine, and β-alanine inhibited the [(3)H]taurine uptake by > 50%, each at a concentration of 10 mM, GABA caused a marked inhibition with an IC(50) value of 95 μM. The [(3)H]taurine uptake exhibited a significant reduction when the GAT2 gene was silenced. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that GAT2 was localized on the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes predominantly in the periportal region. These results suggest that GAT2 is responsible for taurine transport from the circulating blood to hepatocytes predominantly in the periportal region.

  11. Characterization of purple acid phosphatases involved in extracellular dNTP utilization in Stylosanthes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan-Dao; Xue, Ying-Bin; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Guo-Dao; Tian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Stylo (Stylosanthes spp.) is a pasture legume predominant in tropical and subtropical areas, where low phosphorus (P) availability is a major constraint for plant growth. Therefore, stylo might exhibit superior utilization of the P pool on acid soils, particularly organic P. However, little is known about mechanisms of inorganic phosphate (Pi) acquisition employed by stylo. In this study, the utilization of extracellular deoxy-ribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) and the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms were examined for two stylo genotypes with contrasting P efficiency. Results showed that the P-efficient genotype, TPRC2001-1, was superior to the P-inefficient genotype, Fine-stem, when using dNTP as the sole P source. This was reflected by a higher dry weight and total P content for TPRC2001-1 than for Fine-stem, which was correlated with higher root-associated acid phosphatase (APase) activities in TPRC2001-1 under low P conditions. Subsequently, three PAP members were cloned from TPRC2001-1: SgPAP7, SgPAP10, and SgPAP26. Expression levels of these three SgPAPs were up-regulated by Pi starvation in stylo roots. Furthermore, there was a higher abundance of transcripts of SgPAP7 and SgPAP10 in TPRC2001-1 than in Fine-stem. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that these three SgPAPs were localized on the plasma membrane. Overexpression of these three SgPAPs could result in significantly increased root-associated APase activities, and thus extracellular dNTP utilization in bean hairy roots. Taken together, the results herein suggest that SgPAP7, SgPAP10, and SgPAP26 may differentially contribute to root-associated APase activities, and thus control extracellular dNTP utilization in stylo. PMID:27194738

  12. Some Lewis acid-base adducts involving boron trifluoride as electrolyte additives for lithium ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Mengyun; Madec, L.; Xia, J.; Hall, D. S.; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Three complexes with boron trifluoride (BF3) as the Lewis acid and different Lewis bases were synthesized and used as electrolyte additives in Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2/graphite and Li[Ni0.42Mn0.42Co0.16]O2/graphite pouch cells. Lewis acid-base adducts with a boron-oxygen (Bsbnd O) bond were trimethyl phosphate boron trifluoride (TMP-BF) and triphenyl phosphine oxide boron trifluoride (TPPO-BF). These were compared to pyridine boron trifluoride (PBF) which has a boron-nitrogen (Bsbnd N) bond. The experimental results showed that cells with PBF had the least voltage drop during storage at 4.2 V, 4.4 V and 4.7 V at 40 °C and the best capacity retention during long-term cycling at 55 °C compared to cells with the other additives. Charge-hold-discharge cycling combined with simultaneous electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that impedance growth in TMP-BF and TPPO-BF containing cells was faster than cells containing 2%PBF, suggesting that PBF is useful for impedance control at high voltages (>4.4 V). XPS analysis of the SEI films highlighted a specific reactivity of the PBF-derived SEI species that apparently hinders the degradation of both LiPF6 and solvent during formation and charge-hold-discharge cycling. The modified SEI films may explain the improved impedance, the smaller voltage drop during storage and the improved capacity retention during cycling of cells containing the PBF additive.

  13. Amino acid residues involved in the substrate specificity of TauT/SLC6A6 for taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Tohru; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine transporter (TauT/SLC6A6) is an "honorary" γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter because of its low affinity for GABA. The sequence analysis of TauT implied the role of Gly57, Phe58, Leu306 and Glu406 in the substrate recognition of TauT, and amino acid-substitutions were performed. Immunocytochemistry supported no marked effect of mutations on the expression of TauT. TauT-expressing oocytes showed a reduction in [(3)H]taurine uptake by G57E, F58I, L306Q and E406C, and change in [(3)H]GABA uptake by G57E and E406C, suggesting their significant roles in the function of TauT. G57E lost the activity of [(3)H]taurine and [(3)H]GABA uptake, suggesting that Gly57 is involved in the determination of substrate pocket volume and in the interaction with substrates. E406C exhibited a decrease and an increase in the affinity for taurine and GABA, respectively, suggesting the involvement of Glu406 in the substrate specificity of TauT. The inhibition study supported the role of Glu406 in the substrate specificity since [(3)H]taurine and [(3)H]GABA uptake by E406C was less sensitive to taurine and β-alanine, and more sensitive to GABA and nipecotic acid than was the case with wild type of TauT. F58I had an increased affinity for GABA, suggesting the involvement of Phe58 in the substrate accessibility. The kinetic parameters showed the decreased and increased affinities of L306Q for taurine and GABA, respectively, supporting that substrate recognition of TauT is conformationally regulated by the branched-side chain of Leu306. In conclusion, the present results suggest that these residues play important roles in the transport function and substrate specificity of TauT.

  14. Profiles of fatty acids and 7-O-acyl okadaic acid esters in bivalves: can bacteria be involved in acyl esterification of okadaic acid?

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    The presence of 7-O-acyl okadaic acid (OA) esters was studied by LC-MS in the digestive glands of blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) from Albufeira lagoon, located 20km south of Lisbon. The profile of free and total fatty acids (FA) was analysed using a similar LC separation with a reversed phase C8 column and mass spectrometry detection. In mussel the free FA profile was reflected in the FA esterified to OA, being palmitic acid for instance the most abundant in both cases. In cockle, 7-O-acyl esters with palmitic acid were almost absent and esters with a C16:0 isomer were dominant, followed by esters with C15:1 and C15:0. The cockle free FA profile was similar to mussel, and in accordance with literature findings in bivalves. After hydrolysis, a major difference in the FA profile occurred in both species, presenting a high percentage of a C16:0 isomer. The isomer found in general lipids and bound to OA seemed to be related, presenting similar relative retention times (RRT) to C16:0, differing from expected RRT of monomethyl-branched isomers (iso- or anteiso-). A tentative identification was made with the multimethyl-branched isoprenoid, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanoic acid (TMTD). TMTD is a product of phytol degradation. This was also suspected when the proportion of this compound in relation to palmitic acid was reduced in vivo in mussels fed a chlorophyll-free diet. Extensive esterification of OA by, among others, phytol-degrading bacteria is discussed as a plausible hypothesis in cockle, but not in mussel, due to the relatively high specific proportion of odd-numbered and branched FA.

  15. Multiple binding sites involved in the effect of choline esters on decarbamoylation of monomethylcarbamoyl- or dimethylcarbamoly-acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Sok, D E; Kim, Y B; Choi, S J; Jung, C H; Cha, S H

    1994-01-01

    Multiple binding sites for inhibitory choline esters in spontaneous decarbamoylation of dimethylcarbamoyl-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were suggested from a wide range of IC50 values, in contrast with a limited range of AC50 values (concentration giving 50% of maximal activation) at a peripheral activatory site. Association of choline esters containing a long acyl chain (C7-C12) with the hydrophobic zone in the active site could be deduced from a linear relationship between the size of the acyl group and the inhibitory potency in either spontaneous decarbamoylation or acetylthiocholine hydrolysis. Direct support for laurylcholine binding to the active site might come from the competitive inhibition (Ki 33 microM) of choline-catalysed decarbamoylation by laurylcholine. Moreover, its inhibitory action was greater for monomethylcarbamoyl-AChE than for dimethylcarbamoyl-AChE, where there is a greater steric hindrance at the active centre. In further support, the inhibition of pentanoylthiocholine-induced decarbamoylation by laurylcholine was suggested to be due to laurylcholine binding to a central site rather than a peripheral site, similar to the inhibition of spontaneous decarbamoylation by laurylcholine. Supportive data for acetylcholine binding to the active site are provided by the results that acetylcholine is a competitive inhibitor (Ki 7.6 mM) of choline-catalysed decarbamoylation, and its inhibitory action was greater for monomethylcarbamoyl-AChE than for dimethylcarbamoyl-AChE. Meanwhile, choline esters with an acyl group of an intermediate size (C4-C6), more subject to steric exclusion at the active centre, and less associable with the hydrophobic zone, appear to bind preferentially to a peripheral activity site. Thus the multiple effects of choline esters may be governed by hydrophobicity and/or a steric effect exerted by the acyl moiety at the binding sites. PMID:8053896

  16. Carboxylic acids in gas and PM2.5 particulate phase at a rural mountain site in northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. M.; Khan, A. R.; Khwaja, H. A.

    2009-12-01

    Low molecular weight carboxylic acids are important constituents of the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate matter in rural and polluted regions. The knowledge on their source is sparse, however, and organic aerosols in general need to better characterized. Atmospheric gas- and particle-phase carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, pyruvic, glyoxalic, benzoaic, adipic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) and related compounds were measured during August 2002 at a rural site, Whiteface Mountain, NY. Formic and acetic acids were present in the PM2.5 fraction and in the gas phase. Other seven carboxylic acids were below the detection limit in all samples. Formic and acetic acid were present in the atmosphere mostly in the gaseous form with less than 10% in the PM2.5 fraction. Concentrations of formic acid and acetic acid were in the 0.5 - 2.4 ppbv and 0.6 - 1.9 ppbv ranges, respectively. Formic-to-acetic acid ratios less than one (0.88) were recorded, likely due to an increase in acetic acid contribution from direct emissions. In the fine particulate mode (PM2.5 ) the concentrations for acetic acid and formic acid were 120 - 400 and 10 - 180 ng/m3 , respectively. Backward trajectory data indicate that air mass originated at midwestern region on August 5th and gradually moved towards north on August 9th. Correlation of formic acid with sulfate was investigated to interpret their possible secondary formation pathways. A strong correlation (0.73) was observed between formic acid and sulfate in PM2.5 particulates. Since the source of sulfate found at Whiteface Mountain widely accepted as anthropogenic, its association with formic acid indicated that the later might have anthropogenic source.

  17. Involvement of PKA, CaMKII, PKC, MAPK/ERK and PI3K in the acute antidepressant-like effect of ferulic acid in the tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Ana Lúcia Bertarello; Zomkowski, Andréa Dias Elpo; Maraschin, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia Severo; Tasca, Carla Inês

    2012-12-01

    Ferulic acid (FA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid) is a phytochemical compound naturally present in several plants and foods that is approved as an antioxidant additive and food preservative. It exerts a beneficial action in chronic mild stress-induced depressive-like behavior and produces an acute antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test (TST) through the activation of the serotonergic system. This study was aimed at investigating the possible involvement of signaling pathways in the antidepressant-like effect of acute and oral administration of FA, in the TST in mice. The anti-immobility effect of orally administered FA (0.01mg/kg, p.o.) was prevented by pretreatment of mice with H-89 (1μg/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of PKA), KN-62 (1μg/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of CaMKII), GF109203X (5ng/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of PKC), U0126 (5μg/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of MAPK/ERK) or LY294002 (10nmol/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of PI3K), all involved with neurotrophic signaling pathways. The results demonstrated that FA exerts antidepressant-like effect in the TST in mice, through the activation of signaling pathways related to neuroplasticity, neurogenesis and cell survival.

  18. Atmospheric oxalic acid and related secondary organic aerosols in Qinghai Lake, a continental background site in Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Cao, Junji

    2013-11-01

    Summertime PM2.5 aerosols collected from Qinghai Lake (3200 m a.s.l.), a remote continental site in the northeastern part of Tibetan Plateau, were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyals. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant dicarboxylic acid in the samples, followed by malonic, succinic and azelaic acids. Total dicarboxylic acids (231 ± 119 ng m-3), ketocarboxylic acids (8.4 ± 4.3 ng m-3), and α-dicarbonyls (2.7 ± 2.1 ng m-3) at the Tibetan background site are 2-5 times less than those detected in lowland areas such as 14 Chinese megacities. Compared to those in other urban and marine areas enhancements in relative abundances of C2/total diacids and diacids-C/WSOC of the PM2.5 samples suggest that organic aerosols in the region are more oxidized due to strong solar radiation. Molecular compositions and air mass trajectories demonstrate that the above secondary organic aerosols in the Qinghai Lake atmosphere are largely derived from long-range transport. Ratios of oxalic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal to levoglucosan in PM2.5 aerosols emitted from household burning of yak dung, a major energy source for Tibetan in the region, are 30-400 times lower than those in the ambient air, which further indicates that primary emission from biomass burning is a negligible source of atmospheric oxalic acid and α-dicarbonyls at this background site.

  19. Isotope geochemistry of waters affected by acid mine drainage in old labour sites (SE, Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Agudo, Ines; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel; Recio, Clemente

    2015-04-01

    The ore deposits of this zone have iron, lead and zinc as the main metal components. Iron is present in oxides, hydroxides, sulfides, sulfates, carbonates, and silicates; lead and zinc occur in sulfides (galena and sphalerite, respectively), carbonates, sulfates, and lead or zinc-bearing (manganese, iron) oxides. Mining started with the Romans and activity peaked in the second half of the 19th century and throughout the 20th century until the 1980's. From 1940 to 1957, mineral concentration was made by froth flotation and, prior to this, by gravimetric techniques. The mining wastes, or tailings, with a very fine particle size were deposited inland (tailings dams) and, since 1957, huge releases were made in directly the sea coast. The objective of this work was to evaluate processes affecting waters from abandoned mine sites by way of stable isotopic analysis, particularly H and O stable isotopes from water and S and O from dissolved sulfates. Several common chemical and physical processes, such as evaporation, water-rock interaction and mixing could alter water isotopic composition. Evaporation, which causes an enrichment in δD and δ18O in the residual water, is an important process in semiarid areas. The results obtained indicate that, for sites near the coast, waters are meteoric, and marine infiltration only takes place in the deepest layers near the shore or if water remains stagnated in sediments with low permeability. The main source of sulfate was the oxidation of sulfides, resulting in the liberation of acid, sulfate and metals. In order to assess the mechanism responsible for sulfide oxidation, the stoichiometric isotope balance model and the general isotope balance model were tested, suggesting that the oxidation via Fe3+ was predominant in the surface, and controlled by A. ferrooxidans, while at depth, sulfate reduction occurred.

  20. Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonic acid binding sites in brain: evidence for a subpopulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate sites.

    PubMed

    Hechler, V; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Maitre, M

    1990-03-02

    Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonate (THCA), a compound naturally present in rat brain, possesses high-affinity binding sites with a heterogeneous distribution which are superimposable with those for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Binding studies of THCA on rat brain membranes revealed two binding components, one of high affinity (Kd1, 7 nM, Bmax1 42 fmol/mg protein) and the other of low affinity (Kd2, 2 microM, Bmax2 13 pmol/mg protein). Displacement curves of [3H]THCA by THCA and GHB or of [3H]GHB by THCA are in favour of the existence of a specific high affinity site for THCA. Quantitative autoradiography with image analysis of [3H]THCA binding in rat brain slices indicated that [3H]THCA high affinity binding was displaced at a lower potency by GHB. THCA showed also some selectivity in displacing [3H]GHB from its high affinity binding site (Kd = 95 nM). This mutual overlap favours a subpopulation of GHB receptors, which have THCA as a natural ligand, showing partial agonistic properties compared to GHB. The functional significance of this result remains unknown.

  1. Low molecular weight (C1-C10) monocarboxylic acids, dissolved organic carbon and major inorganic ions in alpine snow pit sequence from a high mountain site, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Matsumoto, Kohei; Tachibana, Eri; Aoki, Kazuma

    2012-12-01

    Snowpack samples were collected from a snow pit sequence (6 m in depth) at the Murodo-Daira site near the summit of Mt. Tateyama, central Japan, an outflow region of Asian dusts. The snow samples were analyzed for a homologous series of low molecular weight normal (C1-C10) and branched (iC4-iC6) monocarboxylic acids as well as aromatic (benzoic) and hydroxy (glycolic and lactic) acids, together with major inorganic ions and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The molecular distributions of organic acids were characterized by a predominance of acetic (range 7.8-76.4 ng g-1-snow, av. 34.8 ng g-1) or formic acid (2.6-48.1 ng g-1, 27.7 ng g-1), followed by propionic acid (0.6-5.2 ng g-1, 2.8 ng g-1). Concentrations of normal organic acids generally decreased with an increase in carbon chain length, although nonanoic acid (C9) showed a maximum in the range of C5-C10. Higher concentrations were found in the snowpack samples containing dust layer. Benzoic acid (0.18-4.1 ng g-1, 1.4 ng g-1) showed positive correlation with nitrate (r = 0.70), sulfate (0.67), Na+ (0.78), Ca2+ (0.86) and Mg+ (0.75), suggesting that this aromatic acid is involved with anthropogenic sources and Asian dusts. Higher concentrations of Ca2+ and SO42- were found in the dusty snow samples. We found a weak positive correlation (r = 0.43) between formic acid and Ca2+, suggesting that gaseous formic acid may react with Asian dusts in the atmosphere during long-range transport. However, acetic acid did not show any positive correlations with major inorganic ions. Hydroxyacids (0.03-5.7 ng g-1, 1.5 ng g-1) were more abundant in the granular and dusty snow. Total monocarboxylic acids (16-130 ng g-1, 74 ng g-1) were found to account for 1-6% of DOC (270-1500 ng g-1, 630 ng g-1) in the snow samples.

  2. A Model for the Active-Site Formation Process in DMSO Reductase Family Molybdenum Enzymes Involving Oxido-Alcoholato and Oxido-Thiolato Molybdenum(VI) Core Structures.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Sato, Masanori; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Mieda, Kaoru; Ogura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Giles, Logan J; Pokhrel, Amrit; Kirk, Martin L; Itoh, Shinobu

    2016-02-15

    New bis(ene-1,2-dithiolato)-oxido-alcoholato molybdenum(VI) and -oxido-thiolato molybdenum(VI) anionic complexes, denoted as [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) (E = O, S; L = dimethoxycarboxylate-1,2-ethylenedithiolate), were obtained from the reaction of the corresponding dioxido-molybdenum(VI) precursor complex with either an alcohol or a thiol in the presence of an organic acid (e.g., 10-camphorsulfonic acid) at low temperature. The [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) complexes were isolated and characterized, and the structure of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) was determined by X-ray crystallography. The Mo(VI) center in [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) exhibits a distorted octahedral geometry with the two ene-1,2-dithiolate ligands being symmetry inequivalent. The computed structure of [Mo(VI)O(SR)L2](-) is essentially identical to that of [Mo(VI)O(OR)L2](-). The electronic structures of the resulting molybdenum(VI) complexes were evaluated using electronic absorption spectroscopy and bonding calculations. The nature of the distorted O(h) geometry in these [Mo(VI)O(EEt)L2](-) complexes results in a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital wave function that possesses strong π* interactions between the Mo(d(xy)) orbital and the cis S(p(z)) orbital localized on one sulfur donor from a single ene-1,2-dithiolate ligand. The presence of a covalent Mo-S(dithiolene) bonding interaction in these monooxido Mo(VI) compounds contributes to their low-energy ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions. A second important d-p π bonding interaction derives from the ∼180° O(oxo)-Mo-E-C dihedral angle involving the alcoholate and thiolate donors, and this contributes to ancillary ligand contributions to the electronic structure of these species. The formation of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) and [Mo(VI)O(SEt)L2](-) from the dioxidomolybdenum(VI) precursor may be regarded as a model for the active-site formation process that occurs in the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes.

  3. Iodine 125-lysergic acid diethylamide binds to a novel serotonergic site on rat choroid plexus epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yagaloff, K.A.; Hartig, P.R.

    1985-12-01

    /sup 125/I-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 125/I-LSD) binds with high affinity to serotonergic sites on rat choroid plexus. These sites were localized to choroid plexus epithelial cells by use of a novel high resolution stripping film technique for light microscopic autoradiography. In membrane preparations from rat choroid plexus, the serotonergic site density was 3100 fmol/mg of protein, which is 10-fold higher than the density of any other serotonergic site in brain homogenates. The choroid plexus site exhibits a novel pharmacology that does not match the properties of 5-hydroxytryptamine-1a (5-HT1a), 5-HT1b, or 5-HT2 serotonergic sites. /sup 125/I-LSD binding to the choroid plexus site is potently inhibited by mianserin, serotonin, and (+)-LSD. Other serotonergic, dopaminergic, and adrenergic agonists and antagonists exhibit moderate to weak affinities for this site. The rat choroid plexus /sup 125/I-LSD binding site appears to represent a new type of serotonergic site which is located on non-neuronal cells in this tissue.

  4. Influence of Turning and Environmental Contamination on the Dynamics of Populations of Lactic Acid and Acetic Acid Bacteria Involved in Spontaneous Cocoa Bean Heap Fermentation in Ghana▿

    PubMed Central

    Camu, Nicholas; González, Ángel; De Winter, Tom; Van Schoor, Ann; De Bruyne, Katrien; Vandamme, Peter; Takrama, Jemmy S.; Addo, Solomon K.; De Vuyst, Luc

    2008-01-01

    The influence of turning and environmental contamination on six spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentations performed in Ghana was studied through a multiphasic approach, encompassing both microbiological (culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques) and metabolite target analyses. A sensory analysis of chocolate made from the fermented, dried beans was performed as well. Only four clusters were found among the isolates of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) identified: Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter ghanensis, Acetobacter senegalensis, and a potential new Acetobacter lovaniensis-like species. Two main clusters were identified among the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated, namely, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum. No differences in biodiversity of LAB and AAB were seen for fermentations carried out at the farm and factory sites, indicating the cocoa pod surfaces and not the general environment as the main inoculum for spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentation. Turning of the heaps enhanced aeration and increased the relative population size of AAB and the production of acetic acid. This in turn gave a more sour taste to chocolate made from these beans. Bitterness was reduced through losses of polyphenols and alkaloids upon fermentation and cocoa bean processing. PMID:17993565

  5. Site-directed mutations and kinetic studies show key residues involved in alkylammonium interactions and reveal two sites for phosphorylcholine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Boetsch, Cristhian; Domenech, Carlos E; González-Nilo, Fernado D; Lisa, Angela T

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine (Pcho) to produce choline and inorganic phosphate. PchP belongs to the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HAD) and possesses the three characteristic motifs of this family: motif I ((31)D and (33)D), motif II ((166)S), and motif III ((242)K, (261)G, (262)D and (267)D), which fold to form the catalytic site that binds the metal ion and the phosphate moiety of Pcho. Based on comparisons to the PHOSPHO1 and PHOSPHO2 human enzymes and the choline-binding proteins of Gram-(+) bacteria, we selected residues (42)E and (43)E and the aromatic triplet (82)YYY(84) for site-directed mutagenesis to study the interactions with Pcho and p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrates of PchP. Because mutations in (42)E, (43)E and the three tyrosine residues affect both the substrate affinity and the inhibitory effect produced by high Pcho concentrations, we postulate that two sites, one catalytic and one inhibitory, are present in PchP and that they are adjacent and share residues.

  6. Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts involved in the fermentation ofamabere amaruranu, a Kenyan fermented milk

    PubMed Central

    Nyambane, Bitutu; Thari, William M; Wangoh, John; Njage, Patrick M K

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous fermented milk products contain microbiota composed of technologically important species and strains which are gradually getting lost with new technologies. We investigated the microbial diversity inamabere amaruranu, a traditionally fermented milk product from Kenya. Sixteen samples of the product from different containers were obtained. One hundred and twenty isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and 67 strains of yeasts were identified using API 50 CH and API 20 C AUX identification kits, respectively. The average pH of all the traditional fermented samples was 4.00 ± 0.93. Lactobacilli, yeasts, and molds as well asEnterobacteriaceae counts from the plastic containers were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those from gourd.Enterobacteriaceae were below 1.00 ± 1.11 log10 cfu/mL in products from the gourds and 2.17 ± 1.92 log10 cfu/mL from the plastic containers. The LAB species were identified asStreptococcus thermophilus (25%),Lactobacillus plantarum (20%), andLeuconostoc mesenteroides (20%). The predominant yeasts wereSaccharomyces cerevisiae (25%),Trichosporum mucoides (15%),Candida famata (10%), andCandida albicans (10%). The type of vessel used for fermentation had no significant influence on the type of isolated and identified species. The diverse mixture of LAB and yeasts microflora forms a potential consortium for further product innovation inamabere amaruranu and other fermented milk products. PMID:25493187

  7. On the early toxic effect of quinolinic acid: involvement of RAGE.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan; Newport, Glenn; Divine, Becky; Wu, Qiangen; Paule, Merle G; Tobón-Velasco, J César; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-04-26

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN)-induced toxicity is characterized by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors over-activation, excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. The characterization of toxic cascades produced by QUIN during the first hours after its striatal infusion is relevant for understanding toxic mechanisms. The role of the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) in the early toxic pattern induced by QUIN was evaluated. RAGE expression - assessed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence - was enhanced in the striata of QUIN-lesioned rats at 2h post-lesion. QUIN-induced RAGE up-regulation was accompanied by expression of a RAGE target molecule, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), and genes encoding for different enzymes. Other toxic markers linked to RAGE activation were increased by QUIN, including NO formation, premature glial response, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear condensation. Our results suggest that RAGE up-regulation may play a role in the early stages of QUIN toxicity.

  8. The involvement of L-type amino acid transporters in theanine transport.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Kimura, Toru; Tachiki, Takashi; Anzai, Naohiko; Sakurai, Takuya; Ushimaru, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    L-Theanine has favorable physiological effects in terms of human health, but the mechanisms that transport it to its target organs or cells are not completely defined. To identify the major transport mechanisms of L-theanine, we screened for candidate transporters of L-3H-theanine in several mammal cell lines that intrinsically express multiple transporters with various specificities. All of the cells tested, T24, HepG2, COS1, 293A, Neuro2a, and HuH7, absorbed L-3H-theanine. Uptake was significantly inhibited by the addition of L-leucine and by a specific inhibitor of the system L transport system, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). L-3H-Theanine uptake occurred mostly independently of Na+. These results indicate that L-theanine was taken up via a system L like transport system in all of the cells tested. Additionally, in experiments using cells stably expressing two system L isoforms, LAT1 and LAT2, we found that the two isoforms mediated L-theanine transport to similar extents. Taken together, our results indicate that L-theanine is transported mostly via the system L transport pathway and its isoforms.

  9. Waking action of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) involves histamine and GABAA receptor block.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Yevgenij; Schubring, Stephan R; Yao, Quiaoling; Zhao, Yan; Li, Sha; May, Andrea; Haas, Helmut L; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Sergeeva, Olga A

    2012-01-01

    Since ancient times ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a constituent of bile, is used against gallstone formation and cholestasis. A neuroprotective action of UDCA was demonstrated recently in models of Alzheimer's disease and retinal degeneration. The mechanisms of UDCA action in the nervous system are poorly understood. We show now that UDCA promotes wakefulness during the active period of the day, lacking this activity in histamine-deficient mice. In cultured hypothalamic neurons UDCA did not affect firing rate but synchronized the firing, an effect abolished by the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine. In histaminergic neurons recorded in slices UDCA reduced amplitude and duration of spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In acutely isolated histaminergic neurons UDCA inhibited GABA-evoked currents and sIPSCs starting at 10 µM (IC(50) = 70 µM) and did not affect NMDA- and AMPA-receptor mediated currents at 100 µM. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors composed of α1, β1-3 and γ2L subunits expressed in HEK293 cells displayed a sensitivity to UDCA similar to that of native GABA(A) receptors. The mutation α1V256S, known to reduce the inhibitory action of pregnenolone sulphate, reduced the potency of UDCA. The mutation α1Q241L, which abolishes GABA(A)R potentiation by several neurosteroids, had no effect on GABA(A)R inhibition by UDCA. In conclusion, UDCA enhances alertness through disinhibition, at least partially of the histaminergic system via GABA(A) receptors.

  10. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato - 1. Acid hydrolysis and factors involved

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting acid hydrolysis of sweet potato powder (SPP) to fermentable sugars were examined. These include HCl concentration, temperature, time, and levels of SPP. Maximum reducing sugar, reported as dextrose equivalent (DE), was detected after 24 min hydrolysis (1% SPP) in 0.034N HCl heated at 154/degree/C. These samples also had 3.43% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) based on dry weight. A high level of HMF (9.2%) was detected in 1% SPP heated at 154/degree/C in 0.10N HCl for 18 min. The lowest concentration of HMF formed (1.8%), at maximal DE of 61%, was established in samples containing 5% SPP and heated at 154/degree/C in 0.034N HCl for 48 min. Aqueous extracts of uncured SPP, examined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography, contained glucose, fructose and sucrose, but degraded SPP had only glucose and fructose. Products of degraded SPP, Under appropriate conditions, could be used for alcohol fermentation. 18 refs.

  11. Isolation and dynamic expression of four genes involving in shikimic acid pathway in Camellia sinensis 'Baicha 1' during periodic albinism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu-Jun; Zhao, Zhen; Xin, Hua-Hong; Wang, Ming-Le; Wang, Wei-Dong; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xing-Hui

    2016-10-01

    Flavonoids are the main flavor components and functional ingredients in tea, and the shikimic acid pathway is considered as one of the most important pathways in flavonoid biosynthesis, but little was known about the function of regulatory genes in the metabolism phenolic compounds in tea plant (Camellia sinensis), especially related genes in shikimic acid pathway. The dynamic changes of catechin (predominant flavonoid) contents were analyzed in this study, and four genes (CsPPT, CsDAHPS, CsSDH and CsCS) involving in shikimic acid pathway in C. sinensis albino cultivar 'Baicha 1' were cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA sequences of these genes were obtained using reverse transcription-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. At the albinistic stage, the amounts of all catechins decreased to the lowest levels, when epigallocatechin gallate was the highest, whereas gallocatechin-3-O-gallate the lowest. Gene expression patterns analyzed by qRT-PCR showed that CsPPT and CsDAHPS were highly expressed in flowers and buds, while CsSDH and CsCS showed high expression levels in buds and leaves. It was also found that the transcript abundance of shikimic acid biosynthetic genes followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and was affected by albinism. The transcript levels of CsPPT and CsDAHPS were decreased at albinistic stage followed elevated expression, whereas CsSDH and CsCS were increased only at re-greening stage. Taken together, these findings suggested that these four genes in C. sinensis may play different roles in shikimic acid biosynthesis and these genes may have divergent functions.

  12. Elucidating the structure of surface acid sites on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Chupas, P. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Halder, G. J.

    2011-05-12

    Differential pair distribution function analysis was applied to resolve, with crystallographic detail, the structure of catalytic sites on the surface of nanoscale {gamma}-Al{sup 2}O{sub 3}. The structure was determined for a basic probe molecule, monomethylamine (MMA), bound at the minority Lewis acid sites. These active sites were found to be five-coordinate, forming distorted octahedra upon MMA binding. This approach could be applied to study the interaction of molecules at surfaces in dye-sensitized solar cells, nanoparticles, sensors, materials for waste remediation, and catalysts.

  13. Vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and haematological variables among Thai construction site workers in urban Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Tungtrongchitr, R; Pongpaew, P; Phonrat, B; Chanjanakitskul, S; Paksanont, S; Migasena, P; Schelp, F P

    1995-01-01

    Serum vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and haematological variables were investigated in eighty-seven male and nineteen female construction site workers in Bangkok. Haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit and MCHC were found to be higher in male than in female workers. Serum ferritin was slightly higher in males than in females. Serum B12 was found to be higher in male than in female workers and serum folic acid level were significantly higher in female than in male workers. Vitamin B12 deficiency was found in 2.3 per cent and folic acid deficiency in 6.9 per cent of the male workers. Serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were normal for female workers. The adequate serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid might be the result of the habit of the workers to consume tonic drinks which contain glucose, caffeine, and vitamins especially vitamins B6, and B12.

  14. Localization of antigenic sites of the S glycoprotein of feline infectious peritonitis virus involved in neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement.

    PubMed Central

    Corapi, W V; Darteil, R J; Audonnet, J C; Chappuis, G E

    1995-01-01

    The S glycoprotein of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) has been shown to contain the antigenic sites responsible for eliciting both neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement. To determine the region of S responsible, overlapping DNA fragments spanning the entire S gene were cloned and expressed as fusion proteins by in vitro transcription and translation. Fusion proteins containing relevant epitopes were identified by radioimmunoprecipitation with neutralizing and enhancing FIPV-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A region spanning residues 509 to 673 reacted with most MAbs tested. Translation in the presence of microsomal membranes did not enhance reactivity, suggesting that glycosylation is not essential for recognition by the MAbs. To localize the antigenic sites further, several MAb-resistant (mar) mutants of FIPV were cloned and sequenced. Amino acid residues that contribute to the neutralizing and enhancing epitopes were localized to two regions, designated A1 and A2, which show partial overlap with the homologous antigenic site A of transmissible gastroenteritis virus. Site A1 contains residues 568 and 591 and is homologous with part of subsite Aa of transmissible gastroenteritis virus. Site A2 contains residues 643, 649, and 656. Double mutations in sites A1 and A2 were found in mar mutants derived from neutralizing and enhancing MAbs 23F4.5 and 18A7.4, while a single mutation in site A2 was found in a mar mutant derived from MAb 24H5.4, which is neutralizing but not enhancing. The data suggest that site A2, which includes residues 643 to 656, is a dominant neutralizing site of FIPV and that sites A1 and A2 may act in concert to induce antibody-dependent enhancement. PMID:7707508

  15. Identification of Transport Proteins Involved in Free Fatty Acid Efflux in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M.; Politz, Mark G.; Kruziki, Max A.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli has been used as a platform host for studying the production of free fatty acids (FFA) and other energy-dense compounds useful in biofuel applications. Most of the FFA produced by E. coli are found extracellularly. This finding suggests that a mechanism for transport across the cell envelope exists, yet knowledge of proteins that may be responsible for export remains incomplete. Production of FFA has been shown to cause cell lysis, induce stress responses, and impair basic physiological processes. These phenotypes could potentially be diminished if efflux rates were increased. Here, a total of 15 genes and operons were deleted and screened for their impact on cell viability and titer in FFA-producing E. coli. Deletions of acrAB and rob and, to a lower degree of statistical confidence, emrAB, mdtEF, and mdtABCD reduced multiple measures of viability, while deletion of tolC nearly abolished FFA production. An acrAB emrAB deletion strain exhibited greatly reduced FFA titers approaching the tolC deletion phenotype. Expression of efflux pumps on multicopy plasmids did not improve endogenous FFA production in an acrAB+ strain, but plasmid-based expression of acrAB, mdtEF, and an mdtEF-tolC artificial operon improved the MIC of exogenously added decanoate for an acrAB mutant strain. The findings suggest that AcrAB-TolC is responsible for most of the FFA efflux in E. coli, with residual activity provided by other resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily-type efflux pumps, including EmrAB-TolC and MdtEF-TolC. While the expression of these proteins on multicopy plasmids did not improve production over the basal level, their identification enables future engineering efforts. PMID:23104810

  16. Involvement of Abscisic Acid in Regulating Water Status in Phaseolus vulgaris L. during Chilling 1

    PubMed Central

    Pardossi, Alberto; Vernieri, Paolo; Tognoni, Franco

    1992-01-01

    During the first hours of chilling, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv Mondragone) seedlings suffer severe water stress and wilt without any significant increase in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) content (P. Vernieri, A. Pardossi, F. Tognoni [1991] Aust J Plant Physiol 18: 25-35). Plants regain turgor after 30 to 40 h. We hypothesized that inability to rapidly synthesize ABA at low temperatures contributes to chilling-induced water stress and that turgor recovery after 30 to 40 h is mediated by changes in endogenous ABA content. Entire bean seedlings were subjected to long-term (up to 6 d) chilling (3°C, 0.2-0.4 kPa vapor pressure deficit, 100 μmol·m−2·s−1 photosynthetic photon flux density, continuous fluorescent light). During the first 24 h, stomata remained open, and plants rapidly wilted as leaf transpiration exceeded root water absorption. During this phase, ABA did not accumulate in leaves or in roots. After 24 h, ABA content increased in both tissues, leaf diffusion resistance increased, and plants rehydrated and regained turgor. No osmotic adjustment was associated with turgor recovery. Following turgor recovery, stomata remained closed, and ABA levels in both roots and leaves were elevated compared with controls. The application of ABA (0.1 mm) to the root system of the plants throughout exposure to 3°C prevented the chilling-induced water stress. Excised leaves fed 0.1 mm ABA via the transpiration stream had greater leaf diffusion resistance at 20 and 3°C compared with non-ABA fed controls, but the amount of ABA needed to elicit a given degree of stomatal closure was higher at 3°C compared with 20°C. These findings suggest that endogenous ABA may play a role in ameliorating plant water status during chilling. PMID:16653112

  17. High-Temperature Decomposition of Brønsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

    2011-12-31

    The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

  18. Evolution of translation machinery in recoded bacteria enables multi-site incorporation of nonstandard amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Amiram, Miriam; Haimovich, Adrian D; Fan, Chenguang; Wang, Yane-Shih; Aerni, Hans-Rudolf; Ntai, Ioanna; Moonan, Daniel W; Ma, Natalie J; Rovner, Alexis J; Hong, Seok Hoon; Kelleher, Neil L; Goodman, Andrew L; Jewett, Michael C; Söll, Dieter; Rinehart, Jesse; Isaacs, Farren J

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the genetic code with nonstandard amino acids (nsAAs) has enabled biosynthesis of proteins with diverse new chemistries. However, this technology has been largely restricted to proteins containing a single or few nsAA instances. Here we describe an in vivo evolution approach in a genomically recoded Escherichia coli strain for the selection of orthogonal translation systems capable of multi-site nsAA incorporation. We evolved chromosomal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) with up to 25-fold increased protein production for p-acetyl-L-phenylalanine and p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzF). We also evolved aaRSs with tunable specificities for 14 nsAAs, including an enzyme that efficiently charges pAzF while excluding 237 other nsAAs. These variants enabled production of elastin-like-polypeptides with 30 nsAA residues at high yields (~50 mg/L) and high accuracy of incorporation (>95%). This approach to aaRS evolution should accelerate and expand our ability to produce functionalized proteins and sequence-defined polymers with diverse chemistries. PMID:26571098

  19. Identification of amino acid residues involved in substrate specificity of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases using a bioinformatics-guided approach

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kimberly M; Shanklin, John

    2007-01-01

    Background The large amount of available sequence information for the plant acyl-ACP thioesterases (TEs) made it possible to use a bioinformatics-guided approach to identify amino acid residues involved in substrate specificity. The Conserved Property Difference Locator (CPDL) program allowed the identification of putative specificity-determining residues that differ between the FatA and FatB TE classes. Six of the FatA residue differences identified by CPDL were incorporated into the FatB-like parent via site-directed mutagenesis and the effect of each on TE activity was determined. Variants were expressed in E. coli strain K27 that allows determination of enzyme activity by GCMS analysis of fatty acids released into the medium. Results Substitutions at four of the positions (74, 86, 141, and 174) changed substrate specificity to varying degrees while changes at the remaining two positions, 110 and 221, essentially inactivated the thioesterase. The effects of substitutions at positions 74, 141, and 174 (3-MUT) or 74, 86, 141, 174 (4-MUT) were not additive with respect to specificity. Conclusion Four of six putative specificity determining positions in plant TEs, identified with the use of CPDL, were validated experimentally; a novel colorimetric screen that discriminates between active and inactive TEs is also presented. PMID:17201914

  20. The ellagic acid derivative 4,4'-di-O-methylellagic acid efficiently inhibits colon cancer cell growth through a mechanism involving WNT16.

    PubMed

    Ramírez de Molina, Ana; Vargas, Teodoro; Molina, Susana; Sánchez, Jenifer; Martínez-Romero, Jorge; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Dávalos, Alberto; Calani, Luca; Del Rio, Daniele; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Reglero, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) and some derivatives have been reported to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest, and modulate some important cellular processes related to cancer. This study aimed to identify possible structure-activity relationships of EA and some in vivo derivatives in their antiproliferative effect on both human colon cancer and normal cells, and to compare this activity with that of other polyphenols. Our results showed that 4,4'-di-O-methylellagic acid (4,4'-DiOMEA) was the most effective compound in the inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation. 4,4'-DiOMEA was 13-fold more effective than other compounds of the same family. In addition, 4,4'-DiOMEA was very active against colon cancer cells resistant to the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluoracil, whereas no effect was observed in nonmalignant colon cells. Moreover, no correlation between antiproliferative and antioxidant activities was found, further supporting that structure differences might result in dissimilar molecular targets involved in their differential effects. Finally, microarray analysis revealed that 4,4'-DiOMEA modulated Wnt signaling, which might be involved in the potential antitumor action of this compound. Our results suggest that structural-activity differences between EA and 4,4'-DiOMEA might constitute the basis for a new strategy in anticancer drug discovery based on these chemical modifications.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, recycling, and degradation during three leaf developmental stages in celery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Guang-Long; Li, Hui; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important nutrient in the human body and performs various healthy functions. With considerable medicinal properties, celery (Apium graveolens L.) could be a good source of AsA for human health. However, the biosynthetic, recycling, and degradation pathways of AsA in celery have yet to be characterized. To study the metabolic pathways involved in AsA, the genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, recycling, and degradation were isolated from celery, and their expression profiles and AsA levels were analyzed in the leaf blades and petioles of two celery varieties at three different growth stages. AsA levels were higher in 'Ventura' compared with 'Liuhehuangxinqin' in both tissues possibly because of different transcription levels of genes, such as L-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH), L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), and glutathione reductase (GR). Results revealed that the D-mannose/L-galactose pathway may be the predominant pathway in celery, and the D-galacturonic acid pathway appeared to contribute largely to AsA accumulation in petioles than in leaf blades in 'Liuhehuangxinqin.' AsA contents are regulated by complex regulatory mechanisms and vary at different growth stages, tissues, and varieties in celery. The results provide novel insights into AsA metabolic pathways in leaf during celery growth and development.

  2. Exploring Regulation Genes Involved in the Expression of L-Amino Acid Oxidase in Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju; Lin, Jianxun; Zhao, Minyan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) is believed to play important biological and ecological roles in marine niches, thus attracting increasing attention to understand the regulation mechanisms underlying its production. In this study, we investigated genes involved in LAAO production in marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1 using transposon mutagenesis. Of more than 4,000 mutants screened, 15 mutants showed significant changes in LAAO activity. Desired transposon insertion was confirmed in 12 mutants, in which disrupted genes and corresponding functionswere identified. Analysis of LAAO activity and lao gene expression revealed that GntR family transcriptional regulator, methylase, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, TonB-dependent heme-receptor family, Na+/H+ antiporter and related arsenite permease, N-acetyltransferase GCN5, Ketol-acid reductoisomerase and SAM-dependent methytransferase, and their coding genes may be involved in either upregulation or downregulation pathway at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational and/or posttranslational level. The nhaD and sdmT genes were separately complemented into the corresponding mutants with abolished LAAO-activity. The complementation of either gene can restore LAAO activity and lao gene expression, demonstrating their regulatory role in LAAO biosynthesis. This study provides, for the first time, insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating LAAO production in Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1, which is important to better understand biological and ecological roles of LAAO. PMID:25815733

  3. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  4. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. ); Knapp, F.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  5. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St.; Knapp, F.F.

    1992-03-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  6. Site-specific dynamics of amyloid formation and fibrillar configuration of Aβ(1-23) using an unnatural amino acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyang; Lantz, Richard; Cosme, Patrick; Rivera, Nelson; Andino, Carlos; Gonzalez, Walter G; Terentis, Andrew C; Wojcikiewicz, Ewa P; Oyola, Rolando; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Du, Deguo

    2015-04-25

    We identify distinct site-specific dynamics over the time course of Aβ1-23 amyloid formation by using an unnatural amino acid, p-cyanophenylalanine, as a sensitive fluorescent and Raman probe. Our results also suggest the key role of an edge-to-face aromatic interaction in the conformational conversion to form and stabilize β-sheet structure.

  7. Processes involved in retinoic acid production of small embryonic palatal shelves and limb defects.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B D; Hill, L G; Birnbaum, L S

    1990-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is teratogenic to the embryonic mouse, producing malformations in many developing systems, including the limb bud and palate. High incidences of limb defects and cleft palate are induced at doses which are not maternally toxic and do not increase resorptions. Exposure to RA on gestational day (GD) 10 results in small palatal shelves, which fail to make contact on GD 14. The formation of small shelves could be a consequence of increased cell death, reduced proliferation, a combination of these effects, or some other effect such as inhibition of extracellular matrix production. After exposure to 100 mg RA/kg on GD 10, proliferation in mesenchymal cells of the palatal shelves was not reduced from GD 12 to GD 14 and the levels of cell death in control and treated shelves did not differ when observed by light and electron microscopy. The present study examines the effects of RA on cell death and proliferation from GDs 10-12 and compares the effects in palatal shelves and limb buds. Embryonic mice were exposed to RA suspended in corn oil (100 mg/kg on GD 10), a dose that was teratogenic but not maternally toxic or embryolethal. Embryos were collected at 4, 12, 24, 36, or 48 hr postexposure, and tissues which form the palate or limb were dissected from the embryos, stained by a modified Feulgen procedure, and whole mounted on slides. Mitotic index (MI) and percentage dead cells were determined for mesenchymal cells of the first visceral arch, maxillary process, or palatal shelf (depending on stage of development) and forelimb buds. In the palatal tissues from GD 10 to GD 12, RA did not significantly alter MI and percentage dead cells was significantly increased only at 4 hr postexposure. Some whole embryos were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At 48 hr (GD 12) a reduction in the size of the shelves was not apparent on SEM. In the limb buds, RA did not increase percentage dead cells, but MI was significantly decreased. A

  8. Involvement of Arabidopsis RACK1 in Protein Translation and Its Regulation by Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Wang, Shucai; Valerius, Oliver; Hall, Hardy; Zeng, Qingning; Li, Jian-Feng; Weston, David; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that RACK1 functions as a negative regulator of ABA responses in Arabidopsis, but the molecular mechanism of the action of RACK1 in these processes remains elusive. Global gene expression profiling revealed that approximately 40% of the genes affected by ABA treatment were affected in a similar manner by the rack1 mutation, supporting the view that RACK1 is an important regulator of ABA responses. On the other hand, co-expression analysis revealed that >80% of the genes co-expressed with RACK1 encode ribosome proteins, implying a close relationship between RACK1 s function and the ribosome complex. These results implied that the regulatory role for RACK1 in ABA responses may be partially due to its putative function in protein translation, which is one of the major cellular processes that mammalian and yeast RACK1 is involved in. Consistently, all three Arabidopsis RACK1 homologous genes, namely RACK1A, RACK1B and RACK1C, complemented the growth defects of the S. cerevisiae cpc2/rack1 mutant. In addition, RACK1 physically interacts with Arabidopsis Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6), whose mammalian homologue is a key regulator of 80S ribosome assembly. Moreover, rack1 mutants displayed hypersensitivity to anisomycin, an inhibitor of protein translation, and displayed characteristics of impaired 80S functional ribosome assembly and 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis in a ribosome profiling assay. Gene expression analysis revealed that ABA inhibits the expression of both RACK1 and eIF6. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1 may be required for normal production of 60S and 80S ribosomes and that its action in these processes may be regulated by ABA.

  9. Solubilization and purification of the glucosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of teichuronic acid by fragments of Micrococcus luteus cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, K.M.; Anderson, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of teichuronic acid have been demonstrated in cytoplasmic membrane fragments recovered from lysozyme treated Micrococcus luteus cells. Solubilization of the glucosyltransferase activity was effected with aqueous solutions of Triton X-100, Nonidet P-40, Tween 20, or Thesit. Thesit proved most amenable for recovery of glucosyltransferase activity as well as spectrophotometric protein determinations. Recovery of the glucosyltranferase activity was aided during purification by inclusion of 15% glycerol, 0.75% Thesit, 20 mM magnesium ion and 2 mM 2-mercaptoethanol in all buffers. Glucosyltransferase activity was monitored by the transfer of (/sup 14/C)glucose from UDP-(/sup 14/C)glucose to an artificial acceptor. Although the natural acceptor is presumed to be an undecaprenyl diphosphate-activated oligosaccharide, alternate acceptors such as isolated cell wall fractions containing teichuronic acid served equally well. Highly purified teichuronic acid devoid of peptidoglycan was the most effective alternate acceptor. The glucosyltransferase was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose yielding an overall 200-fold increase in specific activity.

  10. P-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE from Medicago sativa is involved in vitamin E biosynthesis and abscisic acid-mediated seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jishan; Chen, Zhihong; Ban, Liping; Wu, Yudi; Huang, Jianping; Chu, Jinfang; Fang, Shuang; Wang, Zan; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2017-01-01

    P-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE (HPPD) is the first committed enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin E, and is characterized by catalyzing the conversion of p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate (HPP) to homogentisic acid (HGA). Here, an HPPD gene was cloned from Medicago sativa L. and designated MsHPPD, which was expressed at high levels in alfalfa leaves. PEG 6000 (polyethylene glycol), NaCl, abscisic acid and salicylic acid were shown to significantly induce MsHPPD expression, especially in the cotyledons and root tissues. Overexpression of MsHPPD was found to significantly increase the level of β-tocotrienol and the total vitamin E content in Arabidopsis seeds. Furthermore, these transgenic Arabidopsis seeds exhibited an accelerated germination time, compared with wild-type seeds under normal conditions, as well as under NaCl and ABA treatments. Meanwhile, the expression level of several genes associated with ABA biosynthesis (NCED3, NCED5 and NCED9) and the ABA signaling pathway (RAB18, ABI3 and ABI5) were significantly down-regulated in MsHPPD-overexpressing transgenic lines, as well as the total free ABA content. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MsHPPD functions not only in the vitamin E biosynthetic pathway, but also plays a critical role in seed germination via affecting ABA biosynthesis and signaling. PMID:28084442

  11. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    PubMed

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins involved in mycolic acid synthesis and transport localize dynamically to the old growing pole and septum.

    PubMed

    Carel, Clément; Nukdee, Kanjana; Cantaloube, Sylvain; Bonne, Mélanie; Diagne, Cheikh T; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Zerbib, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism that controls space-time coordination of elongation and division of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is critical for fighting the tubercle bacillus. Most of the numerous enzymes involved in the synthesis of Mycolic acid - Arabinogalactan-Peptidoglycan complex (MAPc) in the cell wall are essential in vivo. Using a dynamic approach, we localized Mtb enzymes belonging to the fatty acid synthase-II (FAS-II) complexes and involved in mycolic acid (MA) biosynthesis in a mycobacterial model of Mtb: M. smegmatis. Results also showed that the MA transporter MmpL3 was present in the mycobacterial envelope and was specifically and dynamically accumulated at the poles and septa during bacterial growth. This localization was due to its C-terminal domain. Moreover, the FAS-II enzymes were co-localized at the poles and septum with Wag31, the protein responsible for the polar localization of mycobacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The dynamic localization of FAS-II and of the MA transporter with Wag31, at the old-growing poles and at the septum suggests that the main components of the mycomembrane may potentially be synthesized at these precise foci. This finding highlights a major difference between mycobacteria and other rod-shaped bacteria studied to date. Based on the already known polar activities of envelope biosynthesis in mycobacteria, we propose the existence of complex polar machinery devoted to the biogenesis of the entire envelope. As a result, the mycobacterial pole would represent the Achilles' heel of the bacillus at all its growing stages.

  13. Salicylic acid transport in Ricinus communis involves a pH-dependent carrier system in addition to diffusion.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Françoise; Chollet, Jean-François; Legros, Sandrine; Jousse, Cyril; Lemoine, Rémi; Faucher, Mireille; Bush, Daniel R; Bonnemain, Jean-Louis

    2009-08-01

    Despite its important functions in plant physiology and defense, the membrane transport mechanism of salicylic acid (SA) is poorly documented due to the general assumption that SA is taken up by plant cells via the ion trap mechanism. Using Ricinus communis seedlings and modeling tools (ACD LogD and Vega ZZ softwares), we show that phloem accumulation of SA and hydroxylated analogs is completely uncorrelated with the physicochemical parameters suitable for diffusion (number of hydrogen bond donors, polar surface area, and, especially, LogD values at apoplastic pHs and Delta LogD between apoplast and phloem sap pH values). These and other data (such as accumulation in phloem sap of the poorly permeant dissociated form of monohalogen derivatives from apoplast and inhibition of SA transport by the thiol reagent p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid [pCMBS]) lead to the following conclusions. As in intestinal cells, SA transport in Ricinus involves a pH-dependent carrier system sensitive to pCMBS; this carrier can translocate monohalogen analogs in the anionic form; the efficiency of phloem transport of hydroxylated benzoic acid derivatives is tightly dependent on the position of the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring (SA corresponds to the optimal position) but moderately affected by halogen addition in position 5, which is known to increase plant defense. Furthermore, combining time-course experiments and pCMBS used as a tool, we give information about the localization of the SA carrier. SA uptake by epidermal cells (i.e. the step preceding the symplastic transport to veins) insensitive to pCMBS occurs via the ion-trap mechanism, whereas apoplastic vein loading involves a carrier-mediated mechanism (which is targeted by pCMBS) in addition to diffusion.

  14. Involvement of Conserved Amino Acids in the C-Terminal Region of LINE-1 ORF2p in Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Christian, Claiborne M; Sokolowski, Mark; deHaro, Dawn; Kines, Kristine J; Belancio, Victoria P

    2017-03-01

    Long interspersed element 1 (L1) is the only currently active autonomous retroelement in the human genome. Along with the parasitic SVA and short interspersed element Alu, L1 is the source of DNA damage induced by retrotransposition: a copy-and-paste process that has the potential to disrupt gene function and cause human disease. The retrotransposition process is dependent upon the ORF2 protein (ORF2p). However, it is unknown whether most of the protein is important for retrotransposition. In particular, other than the Cys motif, the C terminus of the protein has not been intensely examined in the context of retrotransposition. Using evolutionary analysis and the Alu retrotransposition assay, we sought to identify additional amino acids in the C terminus important for retrotransposition. Here, we demonstrate that Gal4-tagged and untagged C-terminally truncated ORF2p fragments possess residual potential to drive Alu retrotransposition. Using sight-directed mutagenesis we identify that while the Y1180 amino acid is important for ORF2p- and L1-driven Alu retrotransposition, a mutation at this position improves L1 retrotransposition. Even though the mechanism of the contribution of Y1180 to Alu and L1 mobilization remains unknown, experimental evidence rules out its direct involvement in the ability of the ORF2p reverse transcriptase to generate complementary DNA. Additionally, our data support that ORF2p amino acids 1180 and 1250-1262 may be involved in the reported ORF1p-mediated increase in ORF2p-driven Alu retrotransposition.

  15. Forced Ambiguity of the Leucine Codons for Multiple-Site-Specific Incorporation of a Noncanonical Amino Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Inchan; Choi, Eun Sil

    2016-01-01

    Multiple-site-specific incorporation of a noncanonical amino acid into a recombinant protein would be a very useful technique to generate multiple chemical handles for bioconjugation and multivalent binding sites for the enhanced interaction. Previously combination of a mutant yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase variant and the yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA containing the AAA anticodon was used to incorporate a noncanonical amino acid into multiple UUU phenylalanine (Phe) codons in a site-specific manner. However, due to the less selective codon recognition of the AAA anticodon, there was significant misincorporation of a noncanonical amino acid into unwanted UUC Phe codons. To enhance codon selectivity, we explored degenerate leucine (Leu) codons instead of Phe degenerate codons. Combined use of the mutant yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA containing the CAA anticodon and the yPheRS_naph variant allowed incorporation of a phenylalanine analog, 2-naphthylalanine, into murine dihydrofolate reductase in response to multiple UUG Leu codons, but not to other Leu codon sites. Despite the moderate UUG codon occupancy by 2-naphthylalaine, these results successfully demonstrated that the concept of forced ambiguity of the genetic code can be achieved for the Leu codons, available for multiple-site-specific incorporation. PMID:27028506

  16. Dynamic HypA zinc site is essential for acid viability and proper urease maturation in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Hu, Heidi Q.; Merrell, D. Scott; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires urease activity in order to survive in the acid environment of the human stomach. Urease is regulated in part by nickelation, a process that requires the HypA protein, which is a putative nickel metallochaperone that is generally associated with hydrogenase maturation. However, in H. pylori, HypA plays a dual role. In addition to an N-terminal nickel binding site, HypA proteins also contain a structural zinc site that is coordinated by two rigorously conserved CXXC sequences, which in H. pylori are flanked by His residues. These structural Zn sites are known to be dynamic, converting from Zn(Cys)4 centers at pH 7.2 to Zn(Cys)2(His)2 centers at pH 6.3 in the presence of Ni(II) ions. In this study, mutant strains of H. pylori that express zinc site variants of the HypA protein are used to show that the structural changes in the zinc site are important for the acid viability of the bacterium, and that a reduction in acid viability in these variants can be traced in large measure to deficient urease activity. This in turn leads to a model that connects the Zn(Cys)4 coordination to urease maturation. PMID:25608738

  17. Formycin triphosphate as a probe for the ATP binding site involved in the activation of guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Chang, C H; Yu, Z N; Song, D L

    1992-10-01

    Formycin A triphosphate (FTP), a fluorescent analog of ATP, slightly increased basal guanylate cyclase activity, but significantly potentiated guanylate cyclase activity stimulated by atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in rat lung membranes. FTP potentiated ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity with an EC50 at about 90 microM and inhibited ATP-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity with an IC50 at about 100 microM. These results indicate that FTP binds more tightly than ATP for the same binding site. Therefore, FTP would be an excellent tool for studying the ATP binding site.

  18. Accurate Three States Model for Amino Acids with Two Chemically Coupled Titrating Sites in Explicit Solvent Atomistic Constant pH Simulations and pKa Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Plamen; Donnini, Serena; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2017-01-10

    Correct protonation of titratable groups in biomolecules is crucial for their accurate description by molecular dynamics simulations. In the context of constant pH simulations, an additional protonation degree of freedom is introduced for each titratable site, allowing the protonation state to change dynamically with changing structure or electrostatics. Here, we extend previous approaches for an accurate description of chemically coupled titrating sites. A second reaction coordinate is used to switch between two tautomeric states of an amino acid with chemically coupled titratable sites, such as aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), and histidine (His). To this aim, we test a scheme involving three protonation states. To facilitate charge neutrality as required for periodic boundary conditions and Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) electrostatics, titration of each respective amino acid is coupled to a "water" molecule that is charged in the opposite direction. Additionally, a force field modification for Amber99sb is introduced and tested for the description of carboxyl group protonation. Our three states model is tested by titration simulations of Asp, Glu, and His, yielding a good agreement, reproducing the correct geometry of the groups in their different protonation forms. We further show that the ion concentration change due to the neutralizing "water" molecules does not significantly affect the protonation free energies of the titratable groups, suggesting that the three states model provides a good description of biomolecular dynamics at constant pH.

  19. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues, and the buried cysteine residue in ficin.

    PubMed

    Husain, S S; Lowe, G

    1970-04-01

    Ficin that had been prepared from the latex of Ficus glabrata by salt fractionation and chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose was completely and irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-(14)C]acetone and then treated with N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide in 6m-guanidinium chloride. After reduction and carboxymethylation of the labelled protein, it was digested with trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two radioactive peptides and two coloured peptides were isolated chromatographically and their sequences determined. The radioactive peptides revealed the amino acid sequences around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues and showed a high degree of homology with the omino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues in papain. The coloured peptides allowed the amino acid sequence around the buried cysteine residue in ficin to be determined.

  20. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2–4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0–6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0–6.0). PMID:26581099

  1. Identifying involvement of Lys251/Asp252 pair in electron transfer and associated proton transfer at the quinone reduction site of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1.

    PubMed

    Kuleta, Patryk; Sarewicz, Marcin; Postila, Pekka; Róg, Tomasz; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-10-01

    Describing dynamics of proton transfers in proteins is challenging, but crucial for understanding processes which use them for biological functions. In cytochrome bc1, one of the key enzymes of respiration or photosynthesis, proton transfers engage in oxidation of quinol (QH2) and reduction of quinone (Q) taking place at two distinct catalytic sites. Here we evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis the contribution of Lys251/Asp252 pair (bacterial numbering) in electron transfers and associated with it proton uptake to the quinone reduction site (Qi site). We showed that the absence of protonable group at position 251 or 252 significantly changes the equilibrium levels of electronic reactions including the Qi-site mediated oxidation of heme bH, reverse reduction of heme bH by quinol and heme bH/Qi semiquinone equilibrium. This implicates the role of H-bonding network in binding of quinone/semiquinone and defining thermodynamic properties of Q/SQ/QH2 triad. The Lys251/Asp252 proton path is disabled only when both protonable groups are removed. With just one protonable residue from this pair, the entrance of protons to the catalytic site is sustained, albeit at lower rates, indicating that protons can travel through parallel routes, possibly involving water molecules. This shows that proton paths display engineering tolerance for change as long as all the elements available for functional cooperation secure efficient proton delivery to the catalytic site.

  2. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid modulates the enterocyte Caco-2 cell expression of microRNAs involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Martin, Roberto; Daimiel, Lidia; Richardson, Kris; Giordano, Elena; Nicod, Nathalie; García-Carrasco, Belén; Soares, Sara M A; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Lasunción, Miguel A; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, Jose M; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of the long-chain ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and greater chemoprevention. However, the mechanisms underlying the biologic effects of DHA remain unknown. It is well known that microRNAs (miRNAs) are versatile regulators of gene expression. Therefore, we aimed to determine if the beneficial effects of DHA may be modulated in part through miRNAs. Loss of dicer 1 ribonuclease type III (DICER) in enterocyte Caco-2 cells supplemented with DHA suggested that several lipid metabolism genes are modulated by miRNAs. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that are differentially modulated by fatty acids. Among the miRNAs modulated by DHA were miR-192 and miR-30c. Overexpression of either miR-192 or miR-30c in enterocyte and hepatocyte cells suggested an effect on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, some of which were confirmed by endogenous inhibition of these miRNAs. Our results show in enterocytes that DHA exerts its biologic effect in part by regulating genes involved in lipid metabolism and cancer. Moreover, this response is mediated through miRNA activity. We validate novel targets of miR-30c and miR-192 related to lipid metabolism and cancer including nuclear receptor corepressor 2, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, DICER, caveolin 1, ATP-binding cassette subfamily G (white) member 4, retinoic acid receptor β, and others. We also present evidence that in enterocytes DHA modulates the expression of regulatory factor X6 through these miRNAs. Alteration of miRNA levels by dietary components in support of their pharmacologic modulation might be valuable in adjunct therapy for dyslipidemia and other related diseases.

  5. Neuronal transport of acid hydrolases and peroxidase within the lysosomal system or organelles: involvement of agranular reticulum-like cisterns.

    PubMed

    Broadwell, R D; Oliver, C; Brightman, M W

    1980-04-01

    Neurosecretory neurons of the hyperosmotically stressed hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system have been a useful model with which to demonstrate interrelationships among perikaryal lysosomes, agranular reticulum-like cisterns, endocytotic vacuoles, and the axoplasmic transport of acid hydrolases and horseradish peroxidase. Supraoptic neurons from normal mice and mice given 2% salt water to drink for 5--8 days have been studied using enzyme cytochemical techniques for peroxidase and lysosomal acid hydrolases. Peroxidase-labeling of these neurons was accomplished by intravenous injection or cerebral ventriculocisternal perfusion of the protein as previously reported (Broadwell and Brightman, '79). Compared to normal controls, supraoptic cell bodies from hyperosmotically stimulated mice contained elevated concentrations of peroxidase-labeled dense bodies demonstrated to be secondary lysosomes and acid hydrolase-positive and peroxidase-positive cisterns either attached or unattached to secondary lysosomes. These cisterns were smooth-surfaced and 400--1,000 A wide. Their morphology was similar to that of the agranular reticulum. Some of the cisterns contained both peroxidase and acid hydrolase activities. The cisterns probably represent an elongated form of lysosome and, therefore, are not elements of the agranular reticulum per se. By virtue of their direct connections with perikaryal secondary lysosomes, these cisterns may provide the route by which acid hydrolases and exogenous macromolecules can leave perikaryal secondary lysosomes for anterograde flow down the axon. Very few smooth-surfaced cisterns were involved in the retrograde transport of peroxidase within pituitary stalk axons from normal and salt-treated mice injected intravenously with peroxidase. Peroxidase undergoing retrograde transport was predominantly in endocytotic structures such as vacuoles and cup-shaped organelles, which deliver this exogenous macromolecule directly to secondary lysosomes for

  6. Involvement of ethylene in gibberellic acid-induced sulfur assimilation, photosynthetic responses, and alleviation of cadmium stress in mustard.

    PubMed

    Masood, Asim; Khan, M Iqbal R; Fatma, Mehar; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2016-07-01

    The role of gibberellic acid (GA) or sulfur (S) in stimulation of photosynthesis is known. However, information on the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced photosynthetic responses and cadmium (Cd) tolerance is lacking. This work shows that ethylene is involved in S-assimilation, photosynthetic responses and alleviation of Cd stress by GA in mustard (Brassica juncea L.). Plants grown with 200 mg Cd kg(-1) soil were less responsive to ethylene despite high ethylene evolution and showed photosynthetic inhibition. Plants receiving 10 μM GA spraying plus 100 mg S kg(-1) soil supplementation exhibited increased S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses under Cd stress. Application of GA plus S decreased oxidative stress of plants grown with Cd and limited stress ethylene formation to the range suitable for promoting sulfur use efficiency (SUE), glutathione (GSH) production and photosynthesis. The role of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and reversal of photosynthetic inhibition by Cd was substantiated by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis with the use of aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The suppression of S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses by inhibiting ethylene in GA plus S treated plants under Cd stress indicated the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and Cd stress alleviation. The outcome of the study is important to unravel the interaction between GA and ethylene and their role in Cd tolerance in plants.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification of BAHD Acyltransferases and In vivo Characterization of HQT-like Enzymes Involved in Caffeoylquinic Acid Synthesis in Globe Artichoke

    PubMed Central

    Moglia, Andrea; Acquadro, Alberto; Eljounaidi, Kaouthar; Milani, Anna M.; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Genre, Andrea; Cankar, Katarina; Beekwilder, Jules; Comino, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) is a rich source of compounds promoting human health (phytonutrients), among them caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs), mainly represented by chlorogenic acid (CGA), and dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs). The enzymes involved in their biosynthesis belong to the large family of BAHD acyltransferases. Following a survey of the globe artichoke genome, we identified 69 BAHD proteins carrying the catalytic site (HXXXD). Their phylogenetic analysis together with another 43 proteins, from 21 species, representative of the BAHD family, highlighted their grouping in seven major clades. Nine globe artichoke acyltransferases clustered in a sub-group of Clade V, with 3 belonging to hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 2 to hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) like proteins. We focused our attention on the former, HQT1, HQT2, and HQT3, as they are known to play a key role in CGA biosynthesis. The expression of genes coding for the three HQTs and correlation of expression with the CQA content is reported for different globe artichoke tissues. For the first time in the globe artichoke, we developed and applied the virus-induced gene silencing approach with the goal of assessing in vivo the effect of HQT1 silencing, which resulted in a marked reduction of both CGA and diCQAs. On the other hand, when the role of the three HQTs was assessed in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana through their transient overexpression, significant increases in mono- and diCQAs content were observed. Using transient GFP fusion proteins expressed in N. benthamiana leaves we also established the sub-cellular localization of these three enzymes. PMID:27721818

  8. Genome-Wide Identification of BAHD Acyltransferases and In vivo Characterization of HQT-like Enzymes Involved in Caffeoylquinic Acid Synthesis in Globe Artichoke.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Andrea; Acquadro, Alberto; Eljounaidi, Kaouthar; Milani, Anna M; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Genre, Andrea; Cankar, Katarina; Beekwilder, Jules; Comino, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) is a rich source of compounds promoting human health (phytonutrients), among them caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs), mainly represented by chlorogenic acid (CGA), and dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs). The enzymes involved in their biosynthesis belong to the large family of BAHD acyltransferases. Following a survey of the globe artichoke genome, we identified 69 BAHD proteins carrying the catalytic site (HXXXD). Their phylogenetic analysis together with another 43 proteins, from 21 species, representative of the BAHD family, highlighted their grouping in seven major clades. Nine globe artichoke acyltransferases clustered in a sub-group of Clade V, with 3 belonging to hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 2 to hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) like proteins. We focused our attention on the former, HQT1, HQT2, and HQT3, as they are known to play a key role in CGA biosynthesis. The expression of genes coding for the three HQTs and correlation of expression with the CQA content is reported for different globe artichoke tissues. For the first time in the globe artichoke, we developed and applied the virus-induced gene silencing approach with the goal of assessing in vivo the effect of HQT1 silencing, which resulted in a marked reduction of both CGA and diCQAs. On the other hand, when the role of the three HQTs was assessed in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana through their transient overexpression, significant increases in mono- and diCQAs content were observed. Using transient GFP fusion proteins expressed in N. benthamiana leaves we also established the sub-cellular localization of these three enzymes.

  9. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-09

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA.

  10. Effects of acidic recharge on groundwater at the St. Kevin Gulch site, Leadville, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, S.S.; Harrison, W.J.; Walton-Day, K.

    2001-01-01

    The acid rock drainage-affected stream of St. Kevin Gulch recharges the Quaternary sand and gravel aquifer of Tennessee Park, near Leadville, Colorado, lowering pH and contributing iron, cadmium, copper, zinc and sulphate to the ground-water system. Dissolved metal mobility is controlled by the seasonal spring runoff as well as oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions in the aquifer. Oxidizing conditions occur in the unconfined portions of the aquifer whilst sulphate-reducing conditions are found down gradient where semi-confined groundwater flow occurs beneath a natural wetland. Iron-reducing conditions occur in the transition from unconfined to semi-confined groundwater flow. Dissolved iron concentrations are low to not detectable in the alluvial fan recharge zone and increase in a down gradient direction. The effects of low-pH, metal-rich recharge are pronounced during low-flow in the fall when there is a defined area of low pH groundwater with elevated concentrations of dissolved zinc, cadmium, copper and sulphate adjacent to St. Kevin Gulch. Dissolved metal and sulphate concentrations in the recharge zone are diluted during spring runoff, although the maximum concentrations of dissolved zinc, cadmium, copper and sulphate occur at selected down gradient locations during high flow. Dissolved zinc, cadmium and copper concentrations are low to not detectable, whereas dissolved iron concentrations are greatest, in groundwater samples from the sulphate-reducing zone. Attenuation of zinc, cadmium and copper beneath the wetland suggests sulphide mineral precipitation is occurring in the semi-confined aquifer, in agreement with previous site investigations and saturation index calculations. Adsorption of dissolved zinc, cadmium and copper onto iron hydroxides is a minor attenuation process due to the low pH of the groundwater system.

  11. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  12. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M.J.; Bladen, C. )

    1991-06-11

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 {mu}M for the agonist ({plus minus})-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, ({plus minus})-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since ({minus})-PN200-110 (1-200 {mu}M) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP{gamma}S) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP{beta}S) on binding parameters. GTP{gamma}S did increase the ability of ({plus minus})-({sup 3}H)PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites.

  13. Structure and Mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus TarS, the Wall Teichoic Acid β-glycosyltransferase Involved in Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    King, Dustin T.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Baumann, Lars; Gale, Robert T.; Brown, Eric D.; Withers, Stephen G.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in teichoic acids as targets for antibiotic drug design against major clinical pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, reflecting the disquieting increase in antibiotic resistance and the historical success of bacterial cell wall components as drug targets. It is now becoming clear that β-O-GlcNAcylation of S. aureus wall teichoic acids plays a major role in both pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. Here we present the first structure of S. aureus TarS, the enzyme responsible for polyribitol phosphate β-O-GlcNAcylation. Using a divide and conquer strategy, we obtained crystal structures of various TarS constructs, mapping high resolution overlapping N-terminal and C-terminal structures onto a lower resolution full-length structure that resulted in a high resolution view of the entire enzyme. Using the N-terminal structure that encapsulates the catalytic domain, we furthermore captured several snapshots of TarS, including the native structure, the UDP-GlcNAc donor complex, and the UDP product complex. These structures along with structure-guided mutants allowed us to elucidate various catalytic features and identify key active site residues and catalytic loop rearrangements that provide a valuable platform for anti-MRSA drug design. We furthermore observed for the first time the presence of a trimerization domain composed of stacked carbohydrate binding modules, commonly observed in starch active enzymes, but adapted here for a poly sugar-phosphate glycosyltransferase. PMID:27973583

  14. Staphylococcal pathogenicity island DNA packaging system involving cos-site packaging and phage-encoded HNH endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Carpena, Nuria; Alonso, Juan C; Novick, Richard P; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2014-04-22

    Staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are the prototypical members of a widespread family of chromosomally located mobile genetic elements that contribute substantially to intra- and interspecies gene transfer, host adaptation, and virulence. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain helper phages and their efficient encapsidation into phage-like infectious particles. Most SaPIs use the headful packaging mechanism and encode small terminase subunit (TerS) homologs that recognize the SaPI-specific pac site and determine SaPI packaging specificity. Several of the known SaPIs do not encode a recognizable TerS homolog but are nevertheless packaged efficiently by helper phages and transferred at high frequencies. In this report, we have characterized one of the non-terS-coding SaPIs, SaPIbov5, and found that it uses two different, undescribed packaging strategies. SaPIbov5 is packaged in full-sized phage-like particles either by typical pac-type helper phages, or by cos-type phages--i.e., it has both pac and cos sites--a configuration that has not hitherto been described for any mobile element, phages included--and uses the two different phage-coded TerSs. To our knowledge, this is the first example of SaPI packaging by a cos phage, and in this, it resembles the P4 plasmid of Escherichia coli. Cos-site packaging in Staphylococcus aureus is additionally unique in that it requires the HNH nuclease, carried only by cos phages, in addition to the large terminase subunit, for cos-site cleavage and melting.

  15. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  16. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  17. Amino acid sequence around the active-site serine residue in the acyltransferase domain of goat mammary fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, J; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, M M; Roepstorff, P; Knudsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Goat mammary fatty acid synthetase was labelled in the acyltransferase domain by formation of O-ester intermediates by incubation with [1-14C]acetyl-CoA and [2-14C]malonyl-CoA. Tryptic-digest and CNBr-cleavage peptides were isolated and purified by high-performance reverse-phase and ion-exchange liquid chromatography. The sequences of the malonyl- and acetyl-labelled peptides were shown to be identical. The results confirm the hypothesis that both acetyl and malonyl groups are transferred to the mammalian fatty acid synthetase complex by the same transferase. The sequence is compared with those of other fatty acid synthetase transferases. PMID:3922356

  18. Distribution and integrated assessment of lead in an abandoned lead-acid battery site in Southwest China before redevelopment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Guanlin

    2016-06-01

    Lead-acid battery sites have contributed enormous amounts of lead to the environment, significantly affecting its global biogeochemical cycle and leaving the potential risks to human health. An abandoned lead-acid battery site prepared for redevelopment was selected in order to study the distribution of lead in soils, plants, rhizosphere soils and soil solutions. In total, 197 samples from 77 boreholes were collected and analyzed. Single extractions by acetic acid (HOAc) were conducted to assess the bioavailability and speciation of lead in soils for comparison with the parts of the plants that are aboveground. Health risks for future residential development were evaluated by the integrated exposure uptake biokinetic (IEUBK) model. The results indicated that lead concentrations in 83% of the soil samples exceeded the Chinese Environmental Quality Standard for soil (350 mg/kg for Pb) and mainly occurred at depths between 0 and 1.5 m while accumulating at the surface of demolished construction waste and miscellaneous fill. Lead concentrations in soil solutions and HOAc extraction leachates were linked closely to the contents of aboveground Broussonetia papyrifera and Artemisia annua, two main types of local plants that were found at the site. The probability density of lead in blood (PbB) in excess of 10 µg/dL could overtake the 99% mark in the residential scenario. The findings provided a relatively integrated method to illustrate the onsite investigations and assessment for similar sites before remediation and future development from more comprehensive aspects.

  19. Relaxase DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing that involve different sequence elements of the nic site.

    PubMed

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-03-19

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR(2)). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR(2) proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR(2) and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR(2) cruciform and recognition of the distal IR(2) arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR(2) was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR(2)-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place.

  20. Biochemical characterization of enoyl reductase involved in Type II fatty acid synthesis in the intestinal coccidium Eimeria tenella (Phylum Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaomin; Lorraine Fuller, A; McDougald, Larry R; Tan, Xiangshi; Cai, Jianping; Wang, Feng; Sacchettini, James C; Zhu, Guan

    2007-07-01

    An enoyl reductase (EtENR) closely related to those of green algae and involved in Type II fatty acid synthesis was characterized and localized to the apicoplast in the coccidium Eimeria tenella. Biochemical analysis using native EtENR protein extracted from parasites confirmed its function as an enoyl reductase using NADH as a cofactor. However, the recombinant form (rEtENR) expressed in bacteria was only able to oxidize NADH, but unable to transfer the electron to enoyl-CoA, possibly due to the inappropriate folding of rEtENR expressed in bacteria. The functions of both native and recombinant EtENR could be inhibited by triclosan (IC(50)=1.45 microM), suggesting that this enzyme may be explored as a drug target against coccidiosis.

  1. Cloning and expression of a CYP720B orthologue involved in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids in Pinus brutia.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases mediate a broad range of oxidative reactions involved in the biosynthesis of both primary and secondary metabolites in plants. Until now, only two P450 genes, CYP720B1 from Pinus taeda and CYP720B4 from Picea sitchensis, have been functionally characterised and described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the cloning and expression of CYP720B from Pinus brutia due to its suggested role in the synthesis of bioactive compounds used for chemical defence against insects. A PCR product of the P. brutia CYP720B gene was cloned into the pCR8/GW/TOPO cloning vector. After optimising the sequence for codon usage in yeast, it was transferred into the inducible expression vector pYES-DEST52 and transfected into the S. cerevisiae INVSc1 strain. Sequence analysis showed that the P. brutia CYP720B gene contains an open reading frame of 1,464 nucleotides, which encodes a 53,570 Da putative protein of 487 amino acid residues. The putative protein contains the classic heme-binding sequence motif that is conserved in all P450 enzymes. It shares 99 and 61% identity with the deduced amino acid sequences of CYP720B1 from Pinus taeda and CYP720B4 from Picea sitchensis, respectively. Recombinant CYP720B protein expression was confirmed using western blot analysis. Furthermore, recombinant CYP720B was functionally active, showing a Soret peak at approximately 448 nm in the reduced CO difference spectra. These data suggest that the cloned gene is an orthologue of CYP720B in P. brutia and might be involved in DRA biosynthesis.

  2. Silencing of ABCC13 transporter in wheat reveals its involvement in grain development, phytic acid accumulation and lateral root formation

    PubMed Central

    Bhati, Kaushal Kumar; Alok, Anshu; Kumar, Anil; Kaur, Jagdeep; Tiwari, Siddharth; Pandey, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Low phytic acid is a trait desired in cereal crops and can be achieved by manipulating the genes involved either in its biosynthesis or its transport in the vacuoles. Previously, we have demonstrated that the wheat TaABCC13 protein is a functional transporter, primarily involved in heavy metal tolerance, and a probable candidate gene to achieve low phytate wheat. In the current study, RNA silencing was used to knockdown the expression of TaABCC13 in order to evaluate its functional importance in wheat. Transgenic plants with significantly reduced TaABCC13 transcripts in either seeds or roots were selected for further studies. Homozygous RNAi lines K1B4 and K4G7 exhibited 34–22% reduction of the phytic acid content in the mature grains (T4 seeds). These transgenic lines were defective for spike development, as characterized by reduced grain filling and numbers of spikelets. The seeds of transgenic wheat had delayed germination, but the viability of the seedlings was unaffected. Interestingly, early emergence of lateral roots was observed in TaABCC13-silenced lines as compared to non-transgenic lines. In addition, these lines also had defects in metal uptake and development of lateral roots in the presence of cadmium stress. Our results suggest roles of TaABCC13 in lateral root initiation and enhanced sensitivity towards heavy metals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that wheat ABCC13 is functionally important for grain development and plays an important role during detoxification of heavy metals. PMID:27342224

  3. Silencing of ABCC13 transporter in wheat reveals its involvement in grain development, phytic acid accumulation and lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Bhati, Kaushal Kumar; Alok, Anshu; Kumar, Anil; Kaur, Jagdeep; Tiwari, Siddharth; Pandey, Ajay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Low phytic acid is a trait desired in cereal crops and can be achieved by manipulating the genes involved either in its biosynthesis or its transport in the vacuoles. Previously, we have demonstrated that the wheat TaABCC13 protein is a functional transporter, primarily involved in heavy metal tolerance, and a probable candidate gene to achieve low phytate wheat. In the current study, RNA silencing was used to knockdown the expression of TaABCC13 in order to evaluate its functional importance in wheat. Transgenic plants with significantly reduced TaABCC13 transcripts in either seeds or roots were selected for further studies. Homozygous RNAi lines K1B4 and K4G7 exhibited 34-22% reduction of the phytic acid content in the mature grains (T4 seeds). These transgenic lines were defective for spike development, as characterized by reduced grain filling and numbers of spikelets. The seeds of transgenic wheat had delayed germination, but the viability of the seedlings was unaffected. Interestingly, early emergence of lateral roots was observed in TaABCC13-silenced lines as compared to non-transgenic lines. In addition, these lines also had defects in metal uptake and development of lateral roots in the presence of cadmium stress. Our results suggest roles of TaABCC13 in lateral root initiation and enhanced sensitivity towards heavy metals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that wheat ABCC13 is functionally important for grain development and plays an important role during detoxification of heavy metals.

  4. Quantitative assessment of the preferences for the amino acid residues flanking archaeal N-linked glycosylation sites.

    PubMed

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide to an asparagine residue in polypeptide chains. Using positional scanning peptide libraries, we assessed the effects of amino acid variations on the in vitro glycosylation efficiency within and adjacent to an N-glycosylation consensus, Asn-X-Ser/Thr, with an archaeal OST from Pyrococcus furiosus. The amino acid variations at the X(-2), X(-1) and X(+1) positions in the sequence X(-2)-X(-1)-Asn-X-Ser/Thr-X(+1) strongly influenced the glycosylation efficiency to a similar extent at position X. The rank orders of the amino acid preferences were unique at each site. We experimentally confirmed that the archaeal OST does not require an acidic residue at the -2 position, unlike the eubacterial OSTs. Pro was disfavored at the -1 and +1 positions, although the exclusion was not as strict as that at X, whereas Pro was the most favored amino acid residue among those studied at the -2 position. The overall amino acid preferences are correlated with a conformational propensity to extend around the sequon. The results of the library experiments revealed that the optimal acceptor sequence was PYNVTK, with a K(m) of 10 µM. The heat-stable, single-subunit OST of P. furiosus is a potential candidate enzyme for the production of recombinant glycoproteins in bacterial cells. Quantitative assessment of the amino acid preferences of the OST enzyme will facilitate the proper design of a production system.

  5. Staphylococcal pathogenicity island DNA packaging system involving cos-site packaging and phage-encoded HNH endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Carpena, Nuria; Alonso, Juan C.; Novick, Richard P.; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are the prototypical members of a widespread family of chromosomally located mobile genetic elements that contribute substantially to intra- and interspecies gene transfer, host adaptation, and virulence. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain helper phages and their efficient encapsidation into phage-like infectious particles. Most SaPIs use the headful packaging mechanism and encode small terminase subunit (TerS) homologs that recognize the SaPI-specific pac site and determine SaPI packaging specificity. Several of the known SaPIs do not encode a recognizable TerS homolog but are nevertheless packaged efficiently by helper phages and transferred at high frequencies. In this report, we have characterized one of the non–terS-coding SaPIs, SaPIbov5, and found that it uses two different, undescribed packaging strategies. SaPIbov5 is packaged in full-sized phage-like particles either by typical pac-type helper phages, or by cos-type phages—i.e., it has both pac and cos sites—a configuration that has not hitherto been described for any mobile element, phages included—and uses the two different phage-coded TerSs. To our knowledge, this is the first example of SaPI packaging by a cos phage, and in this, it resembles the P4 plasmid of Escherichia coli. Cos-site packaging in Staphylococcus aureus is additionally unique in that it requires the HNH nuclease, carried only by cos phages, in addition to the large terminase subunit, for cos-site cleavage and melting. PMID:24711396

  6. Jasmonic acid influences mycorrhizal colonization in tomato plants by modifying the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Sartorius, Miriam; Martínez de la Vega, Octavio; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2008-06-01

    The role of jasmonic acid (JA) on mycorrhizal colonization by Glomus fasciculatum in tomato plants was examined using mutant plants overexpressing prosystemin (PS) or affected in the synthesis of JA (suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses 2, spr2). The degree of mycorrhizal colonization was determined by measuring frequency (F%) and intensity (M%) of colonization and arbuscule abundance (A%). Gene expression and biochemical analyses were also performed in roots to detect changes in carbon (C) partitioning. Colonization was similar in mycorrhizal PS and wild-type roots, except for a higher A% in the former. Conversely, colonization was severely reduced in roots of spr2 mutants. No association was found between levels of expression of genes coding for systemic wound responsive proteins (or SWRPs) and other defense-related proteins in roots and mycorrhization levels in these plants. On the other hand, the degree of mycorrhizal colonization correlated with changes in the transcriptional regulation of a number of genes involved in sucrose hydrolysis and transport, cell wall invertase activity and mycorrhizal-specific fatty acid content in roots. The results obtained suggest that one of the mechanisms by which JA might operate to modulate the mycorrhization process could be through its influence on the regulation of C partitioning in the plant. The significant colonization increase observed in mycorrhizal spr2 plants supplied with exogenous methyl jasmonate supports its role as a positive regulator of the symbiosis.

  7. Anti-aggregatory effect of boswellic acid in high-fat fed rats: involvement of redox and inflammatory cascades

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A high-fat diet is one of the main dietary factors promoting platelet aggregation. The present study was conducted to elucidate the involvement of boswellic acid (BA) on the platelet hyperaggregability in HFD-fed rats. As platelet hyperaggregability in HFD rats is closely linked to inflammation and enhanced free radical production, the present study was extended to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect of BA on HFD-promoted platelet aggregation. Material and methods Rats were assigned to normal, HFD-fed, aspirin-treated (30 mg/kg), and BA-treated (250 and 500 mg/kg) groups. Results Boswellic acid administration in a high dose was effective in attenuating the severity of hyperlipidemia and platelet aggregation, indicated by lower collagen/epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation, as evidenced by the significant increase (p < 0.05) in the circulating platelet count and reduction in the number of thrombi in the lungs. Moreover, it attenuated the oxidative stress and the intensity of inflammatory mediators associated with platelet hyperaggregability, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects on interlukin-1β, COX-2 and tumor necrosis factor-α, indicating that the antiplatelet activity of BA is likely a consequence of controlling oxidative stress and inflammation. Conclusions The present data suggest that BA shows a promising anti-aggregatory effect by attenuating the enhanced hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress and inflammation associated with HFD. PMID:27904529

  8. Pyrosequencing reveals the key microorganisms involved in sludge alkaline fermentation for efficient short-chain fatty acids production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Li, Xiang; Xiao, Naidong; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-05-07

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been regarded as the excellent carbon source of wastewater biological nutrient removal, and sludge alkaline (pH 10) fermentation has been reported to achieve highly efficient SCFAs production. In this study, the underlying mechanisms for the improved SCFAs production at pH 10 were investigated by using 454 pyrosequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to analyze the microbial community structures in sludge fermentation reactors. It was found that sludge fermentation at pH 10 increased the abundances of Pseudomonas sp. and Alcaligenes sp., which were able to excrete extracellular proteases and depolymerases, and thus enhanced the hydrolysis of insoluble sludge protein and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Meanwhile, the abundance of acid-producing bacteria (such as Clostridium sp.) in the reactor of pH 10 was also higher than that of uncontrolled pH, which benefited the acidification of soluble organic substrates. Further study indicated that sludge fermentation at pH 10 significantly decreased the number of methanogenic archaea, resulting in lower SCFAs consumption and lower methane production. Therefore, anaerobic sludge fermentation under alkaline conditions increased the abundances of bacteria involved in sludge hydrolysis and acidification, and decreased the abundance of methanogenic archaea, which favored the competition of bacteria over methanogens and resulted in the efficient production of SCFAs.

  9. Durum wheat seedling responses to simultaneous high light and salinity involve a fine reconfiguration of amino acids and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, Pasqualina; Ciarmiello, Loredana F; Annunziata, Maria Grazia; Pacifico, Severina; Iannuzzi, Federica; Mirto, Antonio; D'Amelia, Luisa; Dell'Aversana, Emilia; Piccolella, Simona; Fuggi, Amodio; Carillo, Petronia

    2017-03-01

    Durum wheat plants are extremely sensitive to drought and salinity during seedling and early development stages. Their responses to stresses have been extensively studied to provide new metabolic targets and improving the tolerance to adverse environments. Most of these studies have been performed in growth chambers under low light [300-350 µmol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), LL]. However, in nature plants have to face frequent fluctuations of light intensities that often exceed their photosynthetic capacity (900-2000 µmol m(-2) s(-1) ). In this study we investigated the physiological and metabolic changes potentially involved in osmotic adjustment and antioxidant defense in durum wheat seedlings under high light (HL) and salinity. The combined application of the two stresses decreased the water potential and stomatal conductance without reducing the photosynthetic efficiency of the plants. Glycine betaine (GB) synthesis was inhibited, proline and glutamate content decreased, while γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), amides and minor amino acids increased. The expression level and enzymatic activities of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase, asparagine synthetase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as other enzymatic activities of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, were analyzed. Antioxidant enzymes and metabolites were also considered. The results showed that the complex interplay seen in durum wheat plants under salinity at LL was simplified: GB and antioxidants did not play a main role. On the contrary, the fine tuning of few specific primary metabolites (GABA, amides, minor amino acids and hexoses) remodeled metabolism and defense processes, playing a key role in the response to simultaneous stresses.

  10. An ortholog of farA of Aspergillus nidulans is implicated in the transcriptional activation of genes involved in fatty acid utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Poopanitpan, Napapol; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Akinori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} POR1 is a Yarrowia lipolytica ortholog of farA involved in fatty acid response in A. nidulans. {yields} Deletion of POR1 caused growth defects on fatty acids. {yields} {Delta}por1 strain exhibited defects in the induction of genes involved in fatty acid utilization. -- Abstract: The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica effectively utilizes hydrophobic substrates such as fatty acids and n-alkanes. To identify a gene(s) regulating fatty acid utilization in Y. lipolytica, we first studied homologous genes to OAF1 and PIP2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but their disruption did not change growth on oleic acid at all. We next characterized a Y. lipolytica gene, POR1 (primary oleate regulator 1), an ortholog of farA encoding a transcriptional activator that regulates fatty acid utilization in Aspergillus nidulans. The deletion mutant of POR1 was defective in the growth on various fatty acids, but not on glucose, glycerol, or n-hexadecane. It exhibited slight defect on n-decane. The transcriptional induction of genes involved in {beta}-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation by oleate was distinctly diminished in the {Delta}por1 strains. These data suggest that POR1 encodes a transcriptional activator widely regulating fatty acid metabolism in Y. lipolytica.

  11. A comparison of copper and acid site zeolites for the production of nitric oxide for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Russell, Samantha E; González Carballo, Juan María; Orellana-Tavra, Claudia; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Morris, Russell E

    2017-03-21

    Copper-exchanged and acidic zeolites are shown to produce nitric oxide (NO) from a nitrite source in biologically active (nanomolar) concentrations. Four zeolites were studied; mordenite, ferrierite, ZSM-5 and SSZ-13, which had varying pore size, channel systems and Si/Al ratios. ZSM-5 and SSZ-13 produced the highest amounts of NO in both the copper and acid form. The high activity and regeneration of the copper active sites makes them good candidates for long-term NO production. Initial cytotoxicity tests have shown at least one of the copper zeolites (Cu-SSZ-13) to be biocompatible, highlighting the potential usage within biomedical applications.

  12. Mapping of colicin E2 and colicin E3 plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid EcoR-1-sensitive sites.

    PubMed

    Inselburg, J; Johns, V

    1975-01-01

    Colicin plasmids E2 and E3 (Col E2 and Col E3) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been shown to contain, respectively, two and three EcoR1 restriction endonuclease-sensitive sites. This was determined by measuring the DNA fragments generated after EcoR1 endonuclease treatment by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The structure of heteroduplex Col E2-col E3 DNA molecules formed from EcoR1-generated fragments permitted a localization of the EcoR1-sensitive sites on the plasmid chromosomes.

  13. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  14. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W; Burnham, W McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-06-08

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy.

  15. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  16. Expression of Genes Involved in Iron and Sulfur Respiration in a Novel Thermophilic Crenarchaeon Isolated from Acid-Sulfate-Chloride Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubal, M.; Macur, R.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    Acidic geothermal springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an excellent opportunity to study microbial populations and their relationship with geochemical processes such as redox cycling and biomineralization of iron. Fourteen acid-sulfate-chloride (ASC) and acid-sulfate (AS) geothermal springs located in (YNP) have been extensively characterized for aqueous chemistry, solid phase mineral deposition and microbial diversity and distribution. The oxidation of Fe(II) with oxygen as an electron acceptor is exergonic under these conditions, consequently, Fe(II) may be an important electron donor driving primary production in ASC and AS habitats, and products of biomineralization (e.g. Fe[III]-oxides of varying crystallinity and structure, as well as jarosite in some cases) are common in the outflow channels of these environments. Recently, we isolated a novel Metallosphaera-like microorganism (Metallosphaera strain MK1) from an ASC spring in Norris Geyser Basin, YNP. Clone libraries (16S rRNA gene) from multiple sites suggest that microorganisms closely related to strain MK1 (between 98-100 percent similarity) dominate many spring locations between 55-80 C. The in situ abiotic oxidation rate of Fe(II) has been shown to be very slow in these systems and Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been directly implicated in biotic Fe(II) oxidation. Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been submitted for full genome sequencing and is yielding gene sequences related to the terminal oxidases SOXABC and SOXM super-complex. In addition, sequences from a recently characterized terminal oxidase FOX complex involved in Fe(II) and pyrite oxidation from Sulfolobus metallicus have been found in Metallosphaera strain MK1. A protein complex analogous to Metallosphaera sedula has been identified in strain MK1 and this complex has also been expressed in cells grown on pyrite and Fe(II). Other sequences identified in Metallosphaera strain MK1 that are involved in respiration are the TQO

  17. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of heterodinuclear complexes modeling active sites in purple acid phospatases.

    PubMed

    Jarenmark, Martin; Haukka, Matti; Demeshko, Serhiy; Tuczek, Felix; Zuppiroli, Luca; Meyer, Franc; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2011-05-02

    To model the heterodinuclear active sites in plant purple acid phosphatases, a mononuclear synthon, [Fe(III)(H(2)IPCPMP)(Cl(2))][PF(6)] (1), has been generated in situ from the ligand 2-(N-isopropyl-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)aminomethyl)-6-(N-(carboxylmethyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amino methyl)-4-methylphenol (IPCPMP) and used to synthesize heterodinuclear complexes of the formulas [Fe(III)M(II)(IPCPMP)(OAc)(2)(CH(3)OH)][PF(6)] (M = Zn (2), Co (3), Ni (4), Mn (5)), [Fe(III)Zn(II)(IPCPMP)(mpdp)][PF(6)] (6) (mpdp = meta-phenylene-dipropionate), and [Fe(III)Cu(II)(IPCPMP) (OAc)}(2)(μ-O)][PF(6)] (7). Complexes 2-4, 6, and 7 have been crystallographically characterized. The structure of 6 is a solid state coordination polymer with heterodinuclear monomeric units, and 7 is a tetranuclear complex consisting of two heterodinuclear phenolate-bridged Fe(III)Cu(II) units bridged through a μ-oxido group between the two Fe(III) ions. Mössbauer spectra confirm the presence of high spin Fe(III) in an octahedral environment for 1, 3, and 5 while 2 and 4 display relaxation effects. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate weak antiferromagnetic coupling for 3, 4, and 5 and confirm the assignment of the metal centers in 2-5 as high spin Fe(III)-M(II) (M = Zn, Co (high spin), Ni (high spin), Mn (high spin)). Complexes 2-5 are intact in acetonitrile solution as indicated by IR spectroscopy (for 2-4) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) but partly dissociate to hydroxide species and a mononuclear complex in water/acetonitrile solutions. UV-vis spectroscopy reveal pH-dependent behavior, and species that form upon increasing the pH have been assigned to μ-hydroxido-bridged Fe(III)M(II) complexes for 2-5 although 2 and 3 is further transformed into what is propsed to be a μ-oxido-bridged tetranuclear complex similar to 7. Complexes 2-5 enhance phosphodiester cleavage of 2-hydroxy-propyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) and bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP), but

  19. Tetraplex PCR assay involving double gene-sites discriminates beef and buffalo in Malaysian meat curry and burger products.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Hossain, S M Azad; Asing; Nizar, Nina Naquiah Ahmad; Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Ali, Lokman; Asaduzzaman, Md; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque

    2017-06-01

    Replacement of beef by buffalo and vice versa is frequent in global markets, but their authentication is challenging in processed foods due to the fragmentation of most biomarkers including DNA. The shortening of target sequences through use of two target sites might ameliorate assay reliability because it is highly unlikely that both targets will be lost during food processing. For the first time, we report a tetraplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting two different DNA regions in beef (106 and 120-bp) and buffalo (90 and 138-bp) mitochondrial genes to discriminate beef and buffalo in processed foods. All targets were stable under boiling, autoclaving and microwave cooking conditions. A survey in Malaysian markets revealed 71% beef curries contained buffalo but there was no buffalo in beef burgers. The assay detected down to 0.01ng DNA and 1% meat in admixed and burger products.

  20. Inhibition of microorganisms involved in deterioration of an archaeological site by silver nanoparticles produced by a green synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-González, Rogelio; Martínez-Gómez, Miriam Araceli; González-Chávez, Ma Del Carmen A; Mendoza Hernández, José Carlos

    2016-09-15

    The Citadel, part of the pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan and listed as a World Heritage Site, harbors irreplaceable archaeological walls and murals. This city was abandoned by the 7th century and its potential deterioration represents a noteworthy loss of the world's cultural heritage. This research consisted of isolation and identification of bacteria and fungi contributing to this deterioration from walls of a pre-Hispanic city. In addition, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) produced, using a green synthesis method, were tested as potential inhibitors of microbes. AgNP of different sizes and concentrations were tested using in situ assays. Leaf aqueous extracts from two plants species (Foeniculum vulgare and Tecoma stans) and two extraction procedures were used in the NP synthesis. The potential of AgNP as preventive/corrective treatments to protect stucco materials from biodeterioration, as well as the microbial inhibition on three stone materials (stucco, basalt and calcite) was analyzed. Twenty-three bacterial species belonging to eight genera and fourteen fungal species belonging to seven genera were isolated from colored stains, patinas and biofilms produced on the surfaces of archaeological walls from the pre-Hispanic city, Teotihuacan. AgNP from F. vulgare were more effective for in vitro microbial growth inhibition than those from T. stans. Bacteria were less sensitive to AgNP than fungi; however, sensitivity mainly depended on the microbial strain and the plant extract used to prepare AgNP. The use of AgNP as a preventive or corrective treatment to decrease microbial colonization in three kinds of stone used in historical walls was successful. Calcite was more colonized by Alternaria alternata, but less by Pectobacterium carotovorum. This is the first study at different scales (in vitro and tests on different stone types) of inhibition of biodeterioration-causing microorganisms isolated from an archaeological site by green synthesized AgNP.

  1. Cloning of a human cDNA encoding a novel enzyme involved in the elongation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A E; Bobik, E G; Dorado, J; Kroeger, P E; Chuang, L T; Thurmond, J M; Parker-Barnes, J M; Das, T; Huang, Y S; Mukerji, P

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein ELO2p is involved in the elongation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Among several sequences with limited identity with the S. cerevisiae ELO2 gene, a consensus cDNA sequence was identified from the LifeSeq(R) database of Incyte Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Human liver cDNA was amplified by PCR using oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' and 3' ends of the putative human cDNA sequence. The resulting full-length sequence, termed HELO1, consisted of 897 bp, which encoded 299 amino acids. However, in contrast with the ELO2 gene, expression of this open reading frame in S. cerevisiae demonstrated that the encoded protein was involved in the elongation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, as determined by the conversion of gamma-linolenic acid (C(18:3, n-6)) into dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (C(20:3, n-6)), arachidonic acid (C(20:4, n-6)) into adrenic acid (C(22:4, n-6)), stearidonic acid (C(18:4, n-3)) into eicosatetraenoic acid (C(20:4, n-3)), eicosapentaenoic acid (C(20:5, n-3)) into omega3-docosapentaenoic acid (C(22:5, n-3)) and alpha-linolenic acid (C(18:3, n-3)) into omega3-eicosatrienoic acid (C(20:3, n-3)). The predicted amino acid sequence of the open reading frame had only 29% identity with the yeast ELO2 sequence, contained a single histidine-rich domain and had six transmembrane-spanning regions, as suggested by hydropathy analysis. The tissue expression profile revealed that the HELO1 gene is highly expressed in the adrenal gland and testis. Furthermore, the HELO1 gene is located on chromosome 6, best known for encoding the major histocompatibility complex, which is essential to the human immune response. PMID:10970790

  2. Highly efficient one-step conversion of cyclohexane to adipic acid using single-site heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Raja, Robert; Thomas, John Meurig; Xu, Mingcan; Harris, Kenneth D M; Greenhill-Hooper, Michael; Quill, Kieran

    2006-01-28

    A solid source of 'active' oxygen (acetylperoxyborate, APB), when dissolved in aqueous solution in the presence of a single-site microporous catalyst containing redox centres (Fe(III)AlPO-31, Mn(III)AlPO-5, Fe(III)AlPO-5), converts cyclohexane with high efficiency (ca. 88%) and exceptionally high selectivity (ca. 81%) to adipic acid at 383 K; this procedure is also effective in converting styrene to styrene oxide and -pinene and (+)-limonene to their corresponding epoxides.

  3. Identification of protein SUMOylation sites by mass spectrometry using combined microwave-assisted aspartic acid cleavage and tryptic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Osula, Omoruyi; Swatkoski, Stephen; Cotter, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMO (Small-Ubiquitin-like MOdifier) is a post-translational modifier of protein substrates at lysine residues that conjugates to proteins in response to various changes in the cell. As a result of SUMO modification, marked changes in transcription regulation, DNA repair, subcellular localization, and mitosis, among other cellular processes, are known to occur. However, while the identification of ubiquitylation sites by mass spectrometry is aided in part by the presence of a small di-amino acid GlyGly “tag” that remains on lysine residues following tryptic digestion, SUMOylation poses a particular challenge as the absence of a basic residue near to the SUMO C-terminus results in a significant 27 or 32 amino acid sequence branch conjugated to the substrate peptide. MS/MS analyses of these branch peptides generally reveal abundant fragment ions resulting from cleavage of the SUMO tail, but which obscure those needed for characterizing the target peptide sequence. Other approaches for identifying SUMO substrates exist and include overexpression of the SUMO isoforms using an N-terminal histidine tag, as well as site-directed mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the SUMO sequence. Here, we employ combined enzymatic/chemical approaches which serve to shorten the SUMO tag, and thus help to simplify SUMO spectra, making interpretation of mass spectra and location of the SUMOylation site easier. As described in this report, we demonstrate a method for identifying SUMOylation sites using three commercially available SUMO- modified isoforms, and by employing acid-only and acid/trypsin cleavage strategies. These approaches were carried out using MALDI-TOF and LC/MS instrumentation, along with CID and ETD fragmentation. PMID:22576878

  4. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  5. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  6. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  7. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Monoamines tissue content analysis reveals restricted and site-specific correlations in brain regions involved in cognition.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A; Dellu-Hagedorn, F; De Deurwaerdère, P

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine (DA), noradrenalin (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) monoaminergic systems are deeply involved in cognitive processes via their influence on cortical and subcortical regions. The widespread distribution of these monoaminergic networks is one of the main difficulties in analyzing their functions and interactions. To address this complexity, we assessed whether inter-individual differences in monoamine tissue contents of various brain areas could provide information about their functional relationships. We used a sensitive biochemical approach to map endogenous monoamine tissue content in 20 rat brain areas involved in cognition, including 10 cortical areas and examined correlations within and between the monoaminergic systems. Whereas DA content and its respective metabolite largely varied across brain regions, the NA and 5-HT contents were relatively homogenous. As expected, the tissue content varied among individuals. Our analyses revealed a few specific relationships (10%) between the tissue content of each monoamine in paired brain regions and even between monoamines in paired brain regions. The tissue contents of NA, 5-HT and DA were inter-correlated with a high incidence when looking at a specific brain region. Most correlations found between cortical areas were positive while some cortico-subcortical relationships regarding the DA, NA and 5-HT tissue contents were negative, in particular for DA content. In conclusion, this work provides a useful database of the monoamine tissue content in numerous brain regions. It suggests that the regulation of these neuromodulatory systems is achieved mainly at the terminals, and that each of these systems contributes to the regulation of the other two.

  9. Two GC boxes (Sp1 sites) are involved in regulation of the activity of the epithelium-specific MUC1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, A; Lu, P J; Peat, N; Morris, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J

    1996-07-26

    In this report, we have analyzed the function of two Sp1 sites present in the epithelium-specific MUC1 promoter. Using promoter-reporter gene (CAT) constructs, we found that mutagenesis of either of the Sp1 binding motifs at -576/-568 and -99/-90, reduced transcription in MUC1-expressing epithelial cell lines. However, abolition of the binding site at -99/-91 by mutagenesis also resulted in increased transcriptional activity in non-epithelial cell lines, suggesting involvement of the site in tissue-specific expression. In vitro binding assays revealed a novel binding motif at -101/-89 (AGGGGGCGGGGTT), which overlaps but differs from the Sp1 consensus motif by having an adenine residue in the 5'-flanking sequence. The 5'-flanking sequence appeared to be important for binding of an Sp1-unrelated factor (SpA) but not for binding of Sp1. Site-directed mutagenesis of the motif into a site able to bind Sp1, but unable to bind SpA, resulted in an increased level of transcription of the CAT reporter gene in all cell lines tested, suggesting a repressive effect of the novel factor on transcription. The ratio between the Sp1 and SpA binding activity in nuclear extracts correlated with both promoter activity and the levels of endogenous transcription in different breast cancer cell lines. Our results are consistent with the idea that the relative activities of the two factors may be involved in the up-regulation of expression of the MUC1 gene seen in breast and other carcinomas.

  10. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  11. Localization of the site of the murine IgG1 molecule that is involved in binding to the murine intestinal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J K; Tsen, M F; Ghetie, V; Ward, E S

    1994-10-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a recombinant Fc hinge fragment has recently been used to localize the site of the murine IgG1 molecule that is involved in the control of catabolism (the "catabolic site"). In the current study, the effects of these CH2 and CH3 domain mutations (Ile 253 to Ala 253, His 310 to Ala 310, Gln 311 to Asn 311, His 433 to Ala 433 and Asn 434 to Gln 434) on intestinal transfer of Fc hinge fragments in neonatal mice have been analyzed. Studies using direct transfer and competition assays demonstrate that the mutations affect the transmission from intestinal lumen into serum in a way that correlates closely with the effects of the mutations on pharmacokinetics. Binding studies of several of the Fc hinge fragments to isolated neonatal brush borders have been used to confirm the in vivo transmission data. These analyses have resulted in the localization of the binding site for the intestinal transfer receptor, FcRn, to specific residues of the murine Fc hinge fragment. These residues are located at the CH2-CH3 domain interface and overlap with both the catabolic site and staphylococcal protein A (SpA) binding site. The pH dependence of IgG1 or Fc fragment binding to FcRn is consistent with the localization of the FcRn interaction site to a region of the Fc that encompasses two histidine residues (His 310 and His 433). To assess whether one or two FcRn binding sites per Fc hinge are required for intestinal transfer, a hybrid Fc hinge fragment comprising a heterodimer of one Fc hinge with the wild-type IgG1 sequence and a mutant Fc hinge with a defective catabolic site (mutated at His 310, Gln 311, His 433 and Asn 434) has been analyzed in direct and competition transmission assays. The studies demonstrate that the Fc hybrid is transferred with significantly reduced efficiency compared to the wild type Fc hinge homodimer and indicate that the binding to FcRn, and possibly subsequent transfer, is enhanced by the presence of two FcRn binding sites per

  12. NH3 adsorption on the Lewis and Bronsted acid sites of MoO3 (0 1 0) surface: A cluster DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Fan, Junyan; Zuo, Zhijun; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of NH3 on the Lewis and Bronsted acid sites of MoO3 (0 1 0) surface has been investigated based on the density functional theory (DFT) method using the clusters models. The calculated results indicate that NH3 could strongly adsorb on both the Lewis and Bronsted acid sites in the form of NH3 species and NH4+ respectively, whereas the adsorption on the Lewis acid site is found to be more favorable energetically than that on the Bronsted acid site. For the Lewis acid site Mulliken population analysis shows a donation of lone pairs from NH3 to the surface and activation of N-H bond. The overlaps of N-s, N-p and Mo-d orbitals suggest the strong interaction between N and Mo atoms. For the Bronsted acid site N-H bond is also activated by the formation of NH4+ species. The hybridizations between H and O atoms as well as N and H atoms are the major reasons for strong chemical adsorption of NH3 and the existence of NH4+ species, which partly attributed to the presence of N-H… O hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, the formation of a second Lewis acid site at adjacent or diagonal site results in slight changes of adsorption stability, structural changes and charge redistributions, suggesting its small influence on NH3 adsorption.

  13. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  14. Structural comparison of AP endonucleases from the exonuclease III family reveals new amino acid residues in human AP endonuclease 1 that are involved in incision of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mursalimov, Aibek; Grin, Inga; Alili, Doria; Koshenov, Zhanat; Akishev, Zhiger; Maksimenko, Andrei; Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Saparbaev, Murat; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Moréra, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: DNA glycosylase-initiated base excision repair (BER) and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease-initiated nucleotide incision repair (NIR). In the BER pathway, an AP endonuclease cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3'-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases, whereas in the NIR pathway, the same AP endonuclease incises DNA 5' to an oxidized base. The majority of characterized AP endonucleases possess classic BER activities, and approximately a half of them can also have a NIR activity. At present, the molecular mechanism underlying DNA substrate specificity of AP endonucleases remains unclear mainly due to the absence of a published structure of the enzyme in complex with a damaged base. To identify critical residues involved in the NIR function, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of Bacillus subtilis AP endonuclease ExoA and compared its crystal structure with the structures of other AP endonucleases: Escherichia coli exonuclease III (Xth), human APE1, and archaeal Mth212. We found conserved amino acid residues in the NIR-specific enzymes APE1, Mth212, and ExoA. Four of these positions were studied by means of point mutations in APE1: we applied substitution with the corresponding residue found in NIR-deficient E. coli Xth (Y128H, N174Q, G231S, and T268D). The APE1-T268D mutant showed a drastically decreased NIR activity and an inverted Mg(2+) dependence of the AP site cleavage activity, which is in line with the presence of an aspartic residue at the equivalent position among other known NIR-deficient AP endonucleases. Taken together, these data show that NIR is an evolutionarily conserved function in the Xth family of AP endonucleases.

  15. Assembly of ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) inward rectifier K+ channel subunits involves multiple interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Koster, J C; Bentle, K A; Nichols, C G; Ho, K

    1998-04-01

    The ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) channel is formed by a tetrameric complex of subunits, each characterized by cytoplasmic N- and C-termini and a core region of two transmembrane helices flanking a pore-forming segment. To delineate the general regions mediating the assembly of ROMK1 subunits we constructed epitope-tagged N-terminal, C-terminal, and transmembrane segment deletion mutants. Nonfunctional subunits with N-terminal, core region, and C-terminal deletions had dominant negative effects when coexpressed with wild-type ROMK1 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, coexpression of these nonfunctional subunits with Kv 2.1 (DRK1) did not suppress Kv 2.1 currents in control oocytes. Interactions between epitope-tagged mutant and wild-type ROMK1 subunits were studied in parallel by immunoprecipitating [35S]-labeled oocyte membrane proteins. Complexes containing both wild-type and mutant subunits that retained H5, M2, and C-terminal regions were coimmunoprecipitated to a greater extent than complexes consisting of wild-type and mutant subunits with core region and/or C-terminal deletions. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple interaction sites located in the core region and cytoplasmic termini of ROMK1 subunits mediate homomultimeric assembly.

  16. Assembly of ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) inward rectifier K+ channel subunits involves multiple interaction sites.

    PubMed Central

    Koster, J C; Bentle, K A; Nichols, C G; Ho, K

    1998-01-01

    The ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) channel is formed by a tetrameric complex of subunits, each characterized by cytoplasmic N- and C-termini and a core region of two transmembrane helices flanking a pore-forming segment. To delineate the general regions mediating the assembly of ROMK1 subunits we constructed epitope-tagged N-terminal, C-terminal, and transmembrane segment deletion mutants. Nonfunctional subunits with N-terminal, core region, and C-terminal deletions had dominant negative effects when coexpressed with wild-type ROMK1 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, coexpression of these nonfunctional subunits with Kv 2.1 (DRK1) did not suppress Kv 2.1 currents in control oocytes. Interactions between epitope-tagged mutant and wild-type ROMK1 subunits were studied in parallel by immunoprecipitating [35S]-labeled oocyte membrane proteins. Complexes containing both wild-type and mutant subunits that retained H5, M2, and C-terminal regions were coimmunoprecipitated to a greater extent than complexes consisting of wild-type and mutant subunits with core region and/or C-terminal deletions. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple interaction sites located in the core region and cytoplasmic termini of ROMK1 subunits mediate homomultimeric assembly. PMID:9545044

  17. Theoretical study of the complementarity in halogen-bonded complexes involving nitrogen and halogen as negative sites.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Vakili, Mahshad; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    This article analyzes the interplay between X···N and X···X halogen bonds interactions in NCX···NCX···XCH3 complexes, where X=Cl and Br. To better understand the properties of these systems, the corresponding dyads were also studied. These effects are studied theoretically in terms of geometric and energetic features of the complexes, which are computed by ab initio methods. The estimated values of cooperative energy (E coop) are all negative with much larger E coop in absolute value for the NCBr···NCBr···BrCH3 system. The effect of X···N on the properties of X···X is larger than that of X···X bonding on the properties of X···N. These results can be understood in terms of the electrostatic potentials of the negative sites with which the positive regions on the halogens are interacting. The nature of halogen bond interactions of the complexes is analyzed using parameters derived from the energy decomposition analysis.

  18. Conceptual Model of Uranium in the Vadose Zone for Acidic and Alkaline Wastes Discharged at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Historically, uranium was disposed in waste solutions of varying waste chemistry at the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The character of how uranium was distributed in the vadose zone during disposal, how it has continued to migrate through the vadose zone, and the magnitude of potential impacts on groundwater are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions in the vadose zone. These geochemical reactions can be significantly influenced by the disposed-waste chemistry near the disposal location. This report provides conceptual models and supporting information to describe uranium fate and transport in the vadose zone for both acidic and alkaline wastes discharged at a substantial number of waste sites in the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The conceptual models include consideration of how co-disposed acidic or alkaline fluids influence uranium mobility in terms of induced dissolution/precipitation reactions and changes in uranium sorption with a focus on the conditions near the disposal site. This information, when combined with the extensive information describing uranium fate and transport at near background pH conditions, enables focused characterization to support effective fate and transport estimates for uranium in the subsurface.

  19. In situ fluorescence labelling of jasmonic acid binding sites in plant tissues with cadmium-free quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qiumei; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Lin, Bixia; Wei, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescence labelling of plant hormone binding sites is an important analytical technique in research on the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone activities. The authors synthesised a jasmonic acid (JA)-conjugated ZnS:Mn quantum dot (QD) probe, with a cubic structure and average hydrodynamic sizes of about 17.0 nm. The maximum fluorescence emission of the probe was recorded at about 585 nm. The probe was used for fluorescence labelling of JA binding sites in mung bean seedling tissues. Analysis revealed that the probe exhibited high selectivity to JA binding sites and good performance in eliminating interference from background fluorescence in plant tissues. In addition, the probe did not exhibit any apparent biotoxicity, and is much more suitable than probes constructed from CdTe QDs for the analysis of biological samples.

  20. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  1. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L.

    2010-01-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  2. The active site sulfenic acid ligand in nitrile hydratases can function as a nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard

    2014-01-29

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) catalyzes the hydration of nitriles to their corresponding commercially valuable amides at ambient temperatures and physiological pH. Several reaction mechanisms have been proposed for NHase enzymes; however, the source of the nucleophile remains a mystery. Boronic acids have been shown to be potent inhibitors of numerous hydrolytic enzymes due to the open shell of boron, which allows it to expand from a trigonal planar (sp(2)) form to a tetrahedral form (sp(3)). Therefore, we examined the inhibition of the Co-type NHase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase) by boronic acids via kinetics and X-ray crystallography. Both 1-butaneboronic acid (BuBA) and phenylboronic acid (PBA) function as potent competitive inhibitors of PtNHase. X-ray crystal structures for BuBA and PBA complexed to PtNHase were solved and refined at 1.5, 1.6, and 1.2 Å resolution. The resulting PtNHase-boronic acid complexes represent a "snapshot" of reaction intermediates and implicate the cysteine-sulfenic acid ligand as the catalytic nucleophile, a heretofore unknown role for the αCys(113)-OH sulfenic acid ligand. Based on these data, a new mechanism of action for the hydration of nitriles by NHase is presented.

  3. Kinetics and crystal structure of a mutant Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (Asp-369-->Asn): a mechanism involving one zinc per active site.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T T; Xu, X; Kantrowitz, E R

    1994-11-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, an aspartate side chain involved in binding metal ions in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (Asp-369) was replaced, alternately, by asparagine (D369N) and by alanine (D369A). The purified mutant enzymes showed reduced turnover rates (kcat) and increased Michaelis constants (Km). The kcat for the D369A enzyme was 5,000-fold lower than the value for the wild-type enzyme. The D369N enzyme required Zn2+ in millimolar concentrations to become fully active; even under these conditions the kcat measured for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenol phosphate was 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the wild-type enzyme. Thus the kcat/Km ratios showed that catalysis is 50 times less efficient when the carboxylate side chain of Asp-369 is replaced by the corresponding amide; and activity is reduced to near nonenzymic levels when the carboxylate is replaced by a methyl group. The crystal structure of D369N, solved to 2.5 A resolution with an R-factor of 0.189, showed vacancies at 2 of the 3 metal binding sites. On the basis of the kinetic results and the refined X-ray coordinates, a reaction mechanism is proposed for phosphate ester hydrolysis by the D369N enzyme involving only 1 metal with the possible assistance of a histidine side chain.

  4. Complete amino acid sequence of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (transaminase B) of Salmonella typhimurium, identification of the coenzyme-binding site and sequence comparison analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Feild, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the subunit of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase of Salmonella typhimurium was determined by automated Edman degradation of peptide fragments generated by chemical and enzymatic digestion of S-carboxymethylated and S-pyridylethylated transaminase B. Peptide fragments of transaminase B were generated by treatment of the enzyme with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, endoproteinase Lys-C, and cyanogen bromide. Protocols were developed for separation of the peptide fragments by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ion-exchange HPLC, and SDS-urea gel electrophoresis. The enzyme subunit contains 308 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 33,920 daltons. The coenzyme-binding site was determined by treatment of the enzyme, containing bound pyridoxal 5-phosphate, with tritiated sodium borohydride prior to trypsin digestion. Monitoring radioactivity incorporation and peptide map comparisons with an apoenzyme tryptic digest, allowed identification of the pyridoxylated-peptide which was isolated by reverse-phase HPLC and sequenced. The coenzyme-binding site is a lysyl residue at position 159. Some peptides were further characterized by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

  5. An Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized RRL protein mediates abscisic acid signal transduction through mitochondrial retrograde regulation involving ABI4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Li, Juanjuan; Liu, Jianping; Liu, Kede

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling have been studied for many years; however, how mitochondria-localized proteins play roles in ABA signalling remains unclear. Here an Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRL (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH-LIKE) was shown to function in ABA signalling. A previous study had revealed that the Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRG (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH) is required for cell division in the root meristem. RRL shares 54% and 57% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with RRG; nevertheless, RRL shows a different function in Arabidopsis. In this study, disruption of RRL decreased ABA sensitivity whereas overexpression of RRL increased ABA sensitivity during seed germination and seedling growth. High expression levels of RRL were found in germinating seeds and developing seedlings, as revealed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining of ProRRL-GUS transgenic lines. The analyses of the structure and function of mitochondria in the knockout rrl mutant showed that the disruption of RRL causes extensively internally vacuolated mitochondria and reduced ABA-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) in the alternative respiratory pathway is increased by mitochondrial retrograde regulation to regain ROS levels when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is impaired. The APETALA2 (AP2)-type transcription factor ABI4 is a regulator of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a (AOX1a) in mitochondrial retrograde signalling. This study showed that ABA-induced AOX1a and ABI4 expression was inhibited in the rrl mutant, suggesting that RRL is probably involved in ABI4-mediated mitochondrial retrograde signalling. Furthermore, the results revealed that ABI4 is a downstream regulatory factor in RRL-mediated ABA signalling in seed germination and seedling growth.

  6. In Candida parapsilosis the ATC1 Gene Encodes for an Acid Trehalase Involved in Trehalose Hydrolysis, Stress Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Martínez-Esparza, María; Maicas, Sergi; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos; Valentín, Eulogio

    2014-01-01

    An ORF named CPAR2-208980 on contig 005809 was identified by screening a Candida parapsilosis genome data base. Its 67% identity with the acid trehalase sequence from C. albicans (ATC1) led us to designate it CpATC1. Homozygous mutants that lack acid trehalase activity were constructed by gene disruption at the two CpATC1 chromosomal alleles. Phenotypic characterization showed that atc1Δ null cells were unable to grow on exogenous trehalose as carbon source, and also displayed higher resistance to environmental challenges, such as saline exposure (1.2 M NaCl), heat shock (42°C) and both mild and severe oxidative stress (5 and 50 mM H2O2). Significant amounts of intracellular trehalose were specifically stored in response to the thermal upshift in both wild type and mutant strains. Analysis of their antioxidant activities revealed that catalase was only triggered in response to heat shock in atc1Δ cells, whereas glutathione reductase was activated upon mild oxidative stress in wild type and reintegrant strains, and in response to the whole set of stress treatments in the homozygous mutant. Furthermore, yeast cells with double CpATC1 deletion were significantly attenuated in non-mammalian infection models, suggesting that CpATC1 is required for the pathobiology of the fungus. Our results demonstrate the involvement of CpAtc1 protein in the physiological hydrolysis of external trehalose in C. parapsilosis, where it also plays a major role in stress resistance and virulence. PMID:24922533

  7. Observation of new particle formation and measurement of sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines and highly oxidized organic molecules at a rural site in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bergen, Anton; Heinritzi, Martin; Leiminger, Markus; Lorenz, Verena; Piel, Felix; Simon, Mario; Sitals, Robert; Wagner, Andrea C.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The exact mechanisms for new particle formation (NPF) under different boundary layer conditions are not known yet. One important question is whether amines and sulfuric acid lead to efficient NPF in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs) are involved in NPF. We conducted field measurements at a rural site in central Germany in the proximity of three larger dairy farms to investigate whether there is a connection between NPF and the presence of amines and/or ammonia due to the local emissions from the farms. Comprehensive measurements using a nitrate chemical ionization-atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), particle counters and differential mobility analyzers (DMAs), as well as measurements of trace gases and meteorological parameters, were performed. We demonstrate here that the nitrate CI-APi-TOF is suitable for sensitive measurements of sulfuric acid, amines, a nitrosamine, ammonia, iodic acid and HOMs. NPF was found to correlate with sulfuric acid, while an anti-correlation with RH, amines and ammonia is observed. The anti-correlation between NPF and amines could be due to the efficient uptake of these compounds by nucleating clusters and small particles. Much higher HOM dimer (C19/C20 compounds) concentrations during the night than during the d