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Sample records for acid sodium hydroxide

  1. Recovery of acids and sodium hydroxide from solutions of sodium sulfate and sodium chloride with the use of bipolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrinskaya, G.A.; Pavlova, T.V.; Shatalov, A.Ya.

    1985-09-01

    The authors examined the kinetic laws governing the electrodialysis recovery of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid, as well as sodium hydroxide, from 1M sodium chloride and 0.5 M sodium sulfate solutions and from a mixture of these salts with the use of the MB-1, MB-2, and MB-3 bipolar membranes. Kinetic plots of the current density and the concentration of the acid and the base in the chambers next to the bipolar membranes during the electrodialysis treatment of 1M sodium chloride, 0.5 M sodium sulfate, and solutions are presented. It was established that it is better to use the MB-3 membrane for the electrodialysis conversion of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate into acids and sodium hydroxide owing to the high rate and current efficiency and low expenditure of electrical energy and degree of contamination of the products obtained by the salts. It was also established that the resistance of the MB-1 and MB-2 bipolar membranes is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of the MB-3 membrane.

  2. Computed phase diagrams for the system: Sodium hydroxide-uric acid-hydrochloric acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. E.; Gregory, T. M.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.

    1987-07-01

    Renal stone formation is made complex by the variety of solid phases that are formed, by the number of components in the aqueous phase, and by the multiplicity of ionic dissociation and association processes that are involved. In the present work we apply phase diagrams calculated by the use of equilibrium constants from the ternary system sodium hydroxide-uric acid-water to simplify and make more rigorous the understanding of the factors governing dissolution and precipitation of uric acid (anhydrous and dihydrate) and sodium urate monohydrate. The system is then examined in terms of four components. Finally, procedures are described for fluids containing more than four components. The isotherms, singular points, and fields of supersaturation and undersaturation are shown in various forms of phase diagrams. This system has two notable features: (1) in the coordinates -log[H 2U] versus -log[NaOH], the solubility isotherms for anhydrous uric acid and uric acid dihydrate approximate straight lines with slopes equal to +1 over a wide range of concentrations. As a result, substantial quantities of sodium acid urate monohydrate can precipitate from solution or dissolve without changing the degree of saturation of uric acid significantly. (2) The solubility isotherm for NaHU·H 2O has a deltoid shape with the low-pH branch having a slope of infinity. As a result of the vertical slope of this isotherm, substantial quantities of uric acid can dissolve or precipitate without changing the degree of saturation of sodium acid urate monohydrate significantly. The H 2U-NaOH singular point has a pH of 6.87 at 310 K in the ternary system.

  3. Sodium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Medical Management Guidelines for Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) . Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. Available at: www.atsdr.cdc. ...

  4. Removal of ash from Indian Assam coking coal using sodium hydroxide and acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Shankar, R.H.

    2000-03-01

    Mineral matter (ash) removal from Assam coking coal by leaching with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide and acid (HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF) solutions has been investigated at a temperature of 75 C. The parameters tested were concentration of NaOH, type of acid, concentration of acids, and number of acid leaching steps. Total ash removed increased with increase of NaOH and acid concentrations up to the range studied. For the same experimental conditions, treatment of caustic leached coal in HCl acid resulted in better demineralization than in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or HNO{sub 3} acid. In the NaOH-HNO{sub 3} leaching method, a higher concentration (>20%) of HNO{sub 3} acid had an adverse effect on the de-ashing of coal. The NaOH-HF leaching process has been found to be the most effective method of coal de-ashing. The two acid treatment steps (HCl-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HCl-HNO{sub 3}) after caustic leaching are the next most effective methods of coal de-ashing. The removal of mineral matter (including S) from coal is expected to decrease the graphite reactivity and thus the atmospheric pollution (due to the generation of smaller quantities of CO and SO{sub 2} gases).

  5. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  8. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  9. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride solution and also by reacting... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg. No. 1310-73-2) is also known...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  16. Sorbents based on asbestos with a layer of an hydroxyethylcyclam derivative of PVC containing aquacomplexes of sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide with aza-crown groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Novikov, A. K.; Petrova, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    Aquacomplexes of sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide with aza-crown groups are synthesized in cavities of a sorbent from the porous layer of a PVC cyclam-derivative grafted onto fibers of asbestos fabric. The structure of sorbents with complexes is studied and their adsorption characteristics are determined. It is shown that the affinity of the developed surface toward ethanol, benzene, and hexane depends on the nature of complexes in the pore walls, and the volume of cavities formed as a result of the pores on the developed asbestos surface being coated with networks of aza-crown groups is larger than that of cavities with walls of aza-crown groups in the layers of a PVC cyclam derivative. Indicators of H+- and OH--conductivity of sorbents with complexes as electrochemical bridges are determined. It is shown that the major part of H+- and OH--ions moves through complexes with aza-crown groups in the region of cavities formed of pores on the surface of asbestos.

  17. Complications of sodium hydroxide chemical matrixectomy: nail dystrophy, allodynia, hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bostancı, Seher; Koçyiğit, Pelin; Güngör, Hilayda Karakök; Parlak, Nehir

    2014-11-01

    Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. PMID:25514278

  18. 68. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING OF THE CAUSTIC SODA (SODIUM HYDROXIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING OF THE CAUSTIC SODA (SODIUM HYDROXIDE) BUILDING, LOOKING AT CAUSTIC SODA MEASURING TANKS. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  19. Sodium-hydroxide solution treatment on sandstone cores

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    This research was performed to study the effect of sodium hydroxide solution on the sandstone core samples and to develop a method whereby the permeability of the samples could be increased by the injection of sodium hydroxide solution. This work should provide the first step in developing a technique that can be used in the stimulation of oil and gas wells. A series of tests was conducted in which sodium hydroxide solution with concentrations ranging from 0.25 N to 2.00 N was injected into a number of Berea sandstone cores. The tests were conducted at room temperature and at 180{degree}F. In some cases the core sample were damaged by the injection of fresh water which resulted in a marked reduction in the permeability of the cores prior to the injection of sodium hydroxide solution. Based on laboratory testing with measurements of uniaxial compressive strength, SEM examination and X-ray analysis, it was found that sodium hydroxide interacted with sandstone to promote (1) partial dissolution of the sandstone minerals; (2) sandstone weight loss; (3) increased porosity; (4) weakening of the sandstone cores; and (5) changes in permeability. The interaction increased with increasing temperature and increasing sodium hydroxide concentration. However, at concentrations higher than 1.00 N, the degree of increase in permeability was not as large even though the sandstone weight loss and the increase in porosity did increase.

  20. Pseudo-hydroxide extraction in the separation of sodium hydroxide from aqueous solutions using alkyl phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun Ah; Moyer, Bruce A

    2006-01-01

    Pseudo-hydroxide extraction of sodium hydroxide from aqueous solution using four alkyl phenols of nearly identical molecular weight in 1-octanol at 25 degrees C was examined to understand the effect of alkyl substituents. The order of extraction strength among the four alkyl phenols tested was 4-tert-octylphenol. 3,5-di-tertbutylphenol. 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol. A good correlation with phenol pK(a) was observed, indicating that extraction strength is determined by phenol acidity, as modified by steric effects in proximity to the phenol - OH group. The effective partition ratios (P-eff) of two phenols from 1 M NaOH solution were determined, showing that the phenols remain predominantly in the 1-octanol phase even when converted to their sodium salts. However, the hydrophobicity of the tested phenols may not be sufficient for process purposes. The equilibrium constants for the governing extraction equilibria were determined by modeling the data using the program SXLSQI, supporting the cation-exchange extraction mechanism. The proposed mechanism consists of two simple sets of equilibria for a. Ion-pair extraction to give Na+OH- ion pairs and corresponding free ions in 1-octanol the phase and b. Cation exchange by monomeric phenol molecules (HAs) to form monomeric organic-phase Na(+)A(-) ion pairs and corresponding free organic-phase ions.

  1. Sequential soil washing techniques using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide for remediating arsenic-contaminated soils in abandoned iron-ore mines.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min; Hwang, Jung Sung; Choi, Sang Il

    2007-01-01

    Sequential washing techniques using single or dual agents [sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions] were applied to arsenic-contaminated soils in an abandoned iron-ore mine area. We investigated the best remediation strategies to maximize arsenic removal efficiency for both soils and arsenic-containing washing solution through conducting a series of batch experiments. Based on the results of a sequential extraction procedure, most arsenic prevails in Fe-As precipitates or coprecipitates, and iron exists mostly in the crystalline forms of iron oxide. Soil washing by use of a single agent was not effective in remediating arsenic-contaminated soils because arsenic extractions determined by the Korean standard test (KST) methods for washed soils were not lower than 6mg kg(-1) in all experimental conditions. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that iron-ore fines produced mobile colloids through coagulation and flocculation in water contacting the soils, containing dissolved arsenic and fine particles of ferric arsenate-coprecipitated silicate. The first washing step using 0.2M HCl was mostly effective in increasing the cationic hydrolysis of amorphous ferrihydrite, inducing high removal of arsenic. Thus, the removal step of arsenic-containing flocs can lower arsenic extractions (KST methods) of washed soils. Among several washing trials, alternative sequential washing using 0.2M HCl followed by 1M HCl (second step) and 1M NaOH solution (third step) showed reliable and lower values of arsenic extractions (KST methods) of washed soils. This washing method can satisfy the arsenic regulation of washed soil for reuse or safe disposal application. The kinetic data of washing tests revealed that dissolved arsenic was easily readsorbed into remaining soils at a low pH. This result might have occurred due to dominant species of positively charged crystalline iron oxides characterized through the sequential extraction procedure. However

  2. Sodium hydroxide catalyzed monodispersed high surface area silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Snehasis; Dixit, Chandra K.; Bist, Itti; Abdel Jalil, Karim; Suib, Steven L.; Rusling, James F.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of the synthesis kinetics and our ability to modulate medium conditions allowed us to generate nanoparticles via an ultra-fast process. The synthesis medium is kept quite simple with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as precursor and 50% ethanol and sodium hydroxide catalyst. Synthesis is performed under gentle conditions at 20 °C for 20 min Long synthesis time and catalyst-associated drawbacks are most crucial in silica nanoparticle synthesis. We have addressed both these bottlenecks by replacing the conventional Stober catalyst, ammonium hydroxide, with sodium hydroxide. We have reduced the overall synthesis time from 20 to 1/3 h, ∼60-fold decrease, and obtained highly monodispersed nanoparticles with 5-fold higher surface area than Stober particles. We have demonstrated that the developed NPs with ∼3-fold higher silane can be used as efficient probes for biosensor applications.

  3. Engineering evaluation of a sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. G.; Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    An engineering evaluation of thermal energy storage prototypes was performed in order to assess the development status of latent heat storage media. The testing and the evaluation of a prototype sodium hydroxide module is described. This module stored off-peak electrical energy as heat for later conversion to domestic hot water needs.

  4. IR manifestation of water intermediates formation with sodium hydroxide and sodium salts in KBr matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinvald, I. I.; Vorotyntsev, V. M.; Vorotyntsev, I. V.; Kalagaev, I. Yu.; Vorotyntsev, A. V.; Salkina, S. V.; Petukhov, A. N.; Spirin, I. A.; Grushevskaya, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The association of water with sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate and sodium nitrate in a KBr matrix at room temperature, exhibited by FTIR data, was established. It was found that water intermediates form due to the intermolecular hydrogen bond and can be stabilized in the solid phase. The revealed clusters can exist in several shape of hydrates shell with different geometry and number of involved water molecules.

  5. Decomposition of Niobium Ore by Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Wei, Chang; Zheng, Shi-Li; Sun, Qing

    2013-02-01

    The decomposition kinetics of niobium ore in the NaOH system was studied experimentally. The results show that the reaction products are sodium metaniobate and sodium niobate formed by the reaction of pyrochlore with sodium hydroxide under roasting. The effects of temperature, particle size, and mass ratio of alkali-to-ore were studied. The conversion rate of niobium exceeded 99 pct after 20 minutes at 923 K (650 °C) with a mass ratio of alkali-to-ore 1.2:1 and with initial particle size 75 to 106 μm. The kinetic study indicates that the shrinking core model is applicable and the process is controlled by a chemical reaction. The activation energy was calculated to be 78.82 kJ mol-1.

  6. Effect of sodium hydroxide on anionic surfactant distribution in a two-phase system based on TBP in n-dodecane

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S.D.; Balakhonov, V.G.; Semenov, E.N.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1988-11-01

    Measurements have been made on the effects of sodium hydroxide on the distributions for the sodium salts of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA), di-n-butylphosphoric acid (DBPA), and lauric acid in a system composed of a 30% TBP solution in n-dodecane and aqueous sodium hydroxide. As the alkali concentration in the aqueous phase is reduced from 10 to 0.01 M, the distribution coefficients decrease for the anionic surfactants as well as TBP. Dilute sodium hydroxide solution thus enable one to remove extractant and diluent acid decomposition products from the organic phase, particularly ones having long alkyl chains, which tend to stabilize the emulsions in alkali-carbonate treatment. The distribution coefficients for these surfactants have appreciable effects on the type of stabilized emulsion. At 10 M alkali concentration, micellar aggregates are formed by sodium laurate in the organic phase.

  7. Extended development of a sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. E.; Rowny, P. E.; Cohen, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    The post-test evaluation of a single heat exchanger sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module for use in solar electric generation is reported. Chemical analyses of the storage medium used in the experimental model are presented. The experimental verification of the module performance using an alternate heat transfer fluid, Caloria HT-43, is described. Based on these results, a design analysis of a dual heat exchanger concept within the storage module is presented. A computer model and a reference design for the dual system (storage working fluid/power cycle working fluid) were completed. The dual system is estimated to have a capital cost of approximately one half that of the single heat exchanger concept.

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1997-06-01

    Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

  9. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  10. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  11. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  12. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  13. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  14. Catalytic and inhibiting effects of lithium peroxide and hydroxide on sodium chlorate decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.C.; Zhang, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Chemical oxygen generators based on sodium chlorate and lithium perchlorate are used in airplanes, submarines, diving, and mine rescue. Catalytic decomposition of sodium chlorate in the presence of cobalt oxide, lithium peroxide, and lithium hydroxide is studied using thermal gravimetric analysis. Lithium peroxide and hydroxide are both moderately active catalysts for the decomposition of sodium chlorate when used alone, and inhibitors when used with the more active catalyst cobalt oxide.

  15. ION RECOGNITION APPROACH TO VOLUME REDUCTION OF ALKALINE TANK WASTE BY SEPARATION AND RECYCLE OF SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND SODIUM NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 3-year collaborative project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Bruce A. Moyer) and the University of North Texas (Prof. Alan P. Marchand) is proposed to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide and other predominant sodium salts such as sodium nitrate f...

  16. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR and powder x-ray diffraction studies of sodium aluminate speciation and the mechanistics of aluminum hydroxide precipitation upon acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, S.M.; Hanna, J.V.

    1994-08-24

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR, powder X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopic investigations of freeze-dried sodium aluminates and aluminum hydroxides formed through acid hydrolysis have been undertaken, with OH/Al hydrolysis ratios between 5.3 and 2.8 being analyzed. Numerous {sup 27}AlNMR resonances were observed, the intensities of which vary as a function of OH/Al ratio, and these have been assigned to four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum species constituting a variety of structural moieties. The dominant species at an OH/Al ratio above 4.4 appears to be a Q{sup o}Na[Al(OH);{sub 4}] salt, as indicated by a {sup 27}Al resonance at 86.6 ppm. In addition, a second, broader resonance at 71.3 ppm demonstrates the simultaneous existence of further four-coordinate aluminum species linked thorough oxo bonds to other four-coordinate aluminums (e.g., Q{sup 2} [Al(OH);{sub 2}(OAl){sub 2}];{sup x-}). At an OH/Al ratio between 4.4 and 4.1, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four- and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al ratios fo 4.0 and below, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four-and six-coordinate aluminum. AT OH/Al ratios of 4.0 and below, a water-insoluble phase exists possessing four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al{le}3.9 range exhibits {sup 27}Al chemical shifts similar to those reported for transitional aluminas such as {gamma}-, {eta}-, and 0-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and an infrared spectrum similar to pseudo-spinel gels, suggesting that a pseudo-spinel intermediate is the first phase involved in the crystallization of gibbsite. The resonance assigned to five-coordinate aluminum probably results from species involved in the transformation of the pseudo-spinal phase to pseudo-boehmite. The formation of gibbssite on the acid hydrolysis of alkaline sodium aluminate solutions thus appears to follow the pathway pseudo-spinel {r_arrow} pseudo-boehmite {r_arrow} bayerite {r_arrow} gibbsite. 82 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The mechanism of thermal-gradient mass transfer in the sodium hydroxide-nickel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Charles E

    1958-01-01

    "Thermal-gradient mass transfer" was investigated in the molten sodium hydroxide-nickel system. Possible mechanisms (physical, electrochemical, and chemical) are discussed in terms of experimental and theoretical evidence. Experimental details are included in appendixes.

  18. Influence and hydrolysis kinetics in titanyl sulfate solution from the sodium hydroxide molten salt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijing; Chen, Desheng; Chu, Jinglong; Li, Jie; Xue, Tianyan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Dong; Qi, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Hydrated titanium dioxide (HTD) was precipitated by thermal hydrolysis in purified titanyl sulfate solution (TSS) obtained through the sodium hydroxide molten salt clean method. Various factors including the stirring speed and initial concentrations of TiOSO4, sulfuric acid, and sodium ion were studied. The main influence factors in the hydrolysis process were the initial concentrations of TiOSO4 and sulfuric acid. Contrary to the ferrous ion, the sodium ion improved the ionic activity of Ti4+, but did not decrease the crystal size. The Boltzman growth model (x=A2+(A1-A2)/{1+exp[(t-t0)/dt)]}, which focuses on two main parameters (CTiOSO4 and CH2SO4), fits the hydrolysis process well with R2>0.97. An increase in sulfuric acid concentration negatively affected the hydrolysis rates and the value of A2, while t0 increased. An increase in titanyl sulfate concentration directly reduced the hydrolysis rates and particle size of HTD, contrary to the trend for the value of t0. A simulation software called 1stopt was used to observe the relationship between Z (A1, A2, t0, dt) and a, b (CTiO2 and CH2SO4).

  19. Kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium hydroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, V. S. T.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-08-01

    The kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium hydroxide solution were investigated in a stirred reactor, under temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 85 °C, oxygen partial pressures of up to 1 atm, particle size fractions from -150 + 106 to -38 + 10µm (-100 + 150 mesh to -400 mesh + 10 µ), and pH values of up to 12.5. The surface reaction is represented by the rate equation:- dN/dt = Sbk″pO0.5 2[oH- 0.25/(1 + k‴ pO2 0.5) where N represents moles of pyrite, S is the surface area of the solid particles, k″ and k″ are constants, b is a stoichiometric factor, pO2 is the oxygen partial pressure, and [OH-] is the hydroxyl ion concentration. The corresponding fractional conversion ( X) vs time behavior follows the shrinking particle model for chemical reaction control: 1 - (1 - X)1/3 = k ct The rate increases with the reciprocal of particle size and has an activation energy of 55.6 kJ/mol (13.6 kcal/mol). The relationship between reaction rate and oxygen partial pressure resembles a Langmuir-type equation and thus suggests that the reaction involves adsorption or desorption of oxygen at the interface. The square-root rate law may be due to the adsorption of a dissociated oxygen molecule. The observed apparent reaction order with respect to the hydroxyl ion concentration is a result of a complex combination of processes involving the oxidation and nydrolysis of iron, oxidation and hydrolysis of sulfur, and the oxygen reduction.

  20. Intercalation studies of zinc hydroxide chloride: Ammonia and amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) is a layered hydroxide salt with formula Zn5(OH)8Cl2·2H2O. It was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time and results were compared with intercalation products of the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate and a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide. Ammonia was intercalated into ZHC, while no significant intercalation occurred in ZHN. Aspartic acid intercalation was only achieved by co-precipitation at pH=10 with ZHC and pH=8 with zinc hydroxide nitrate. Higher pH resistance in ZHC favored total deprotonation of both carboxylic groups of the Asp molecule. ZHC conferred more thermal protection against Asp combustion presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 °C while the exothermic event in ZHN was 366 °C and in the LDH at 276 °C.

  1. Intercalation studies of zinc hydroxide chloride: Ammonia and amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2012-01-15

    Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) is a layered hydroxide salt with formula Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O. It was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time and results were compared with intercalation products of the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate and a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide. Ammonia was intercalated into ZHC, while no significant intercalation occurred in ZHN. Aspartic acid intercalation was only achieved by co-precipitation at pH=10 with ZHC and pH=8 with zinc hydroxide nitrate. Higher pH resistance in ZHC favored total deprotonation of both carboxylic groups of the Asp molecule. ZHC conferred more thermal protection against Asp combustion presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 Degree-Sign C while the exothermic event in ZHN was 366 Degree-Sign C and in the LDH at 276 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: The zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) with formula Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was tested as intercalation matrix. In comparison with the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZHN) and layered double hydroxides (LDH), ZHC was the best matrix for thermal protection of Asp combustion, presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 Degree-Sign C, while the highest exothermic event in ZHN was at 366 Degree-Sign C, and in the LDH it was at 276 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZHC has higher chemical and thermal stability than zinc hydroxide nitrate and LDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} molecules can be intercalated into ZHC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amino group of amino acids limits the intercalation by ion-exchange.

  2. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  3. Sulfur removal from Gediz lignite using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions under mild oxidative conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S.

    1999-11-01

    Sulfur removal from a high-sulfur Turkish lignite (Gediz) using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions having dissolved oxygen was investigated under mild oxidative conditions. Effects of the parameters such as sodium hydroxide/lignite weight ratio, temperature, and partial pressure of oxygen were investigated within the ranges of 0.05--0.8, 423--498 K, and 1--2 MPa, respectively. Optimum values of these parameters were determined regarding sulfur removal and coal recovery. Influences of dry oxidation of the lignite sample as a pretreatment at 573 K and subsequent washing of some treated lignite samples with 1 N HCl were investigated.

  4. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  5. An empirical model to estimate density of sodium hydroxide solution: An activator of geopolymer concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2016-02-01

    Geopolymer concrete is zero-Portland cement concrete containing alumino-silicate based inorganic polymer as binder. The polymer is obtained by chemical activation of alumina and silica bearing materials, blast furnace slag by highly alkaline solutions such as hydroxide and silicates of alkali metals. Sodium hydroxide solutions of different concentrations are commonly used in making GPC mixes. Often, it is seen that sodium hydroxide solution of very high concentration is diluted with water to obtain SHS of desired concentration. While doing so it was observed that the solute particles of NaOH in SHS tend to occupy lower volumes as the degree of dilution increases. This aspect is discussed in this paper. The observed phenomenon needs to be understood while formulating the GPC mixes since this influences considerably the relationship between concentration and density of SHS. This paper suggests an empirical formula to relate density of SHS directly to concentration expressed by w/w.

  6. Effects of pH adjustment and sodium ions on sour taste intensity of organic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protonated organic acid species have been shown to be the primary stimuli responsible for sour taste of organic acids. However, we have observed that sour taste may be modulated when the pH of acid solutions is raised using sodium hydroxide. Objectives were to evaluate the effect of pH adjustment on...

  7. The study of modified calcium hydroxides with surfactants for acid gas removal during incineration.

    PubMed

    Tseng, H H; Wey, M Y; Lu, C Y

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to use additives to extend the sulfation reaction of the calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) used to control SO2 emission from incineration processes. There are two reasons for adding surfactants (surface-active agent): (1) to provide an appropriate dispersion of the Ca(OH)2', thus preventing particle agglomeration due to humidity; (2) to alter the sulfation reaction environment by adsorbing heterogeneous materials on the surface of the Ca(OH)2 to extend the adsorption equilibrium. A dry scrubber integrated with a fabric filter was employed to study the effect of surfactants on the removal efficiency of acid gas in the flue gas with Ca(OH)2 as the sorbent. The operating parameters evaluated include: (1) the different surfactants (calcium lignosulfonate, sodium lignosulfonate, alkyl naphthalene sodium sulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates) and (2) the composition of acid gas (i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NO) and hydrogen chloride (HCl)). The results show that modified Ca(OH)2 with surfactants could effectively decrease the emission of acid gas during incineration. Different additives had individual absorption efficiencies on different acid gases. On the whole, sodium lignosulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates had better sorption capacity for SO2 and NO, but not for HCl. In addition, when SO2 coexisted with NO and HCl, the concentration of NO and HCl will result in decrease or increase of the removal efficiency of SO2. PMID:11924579

  8. Autopsy results of a case of ingestion of sodium hydroxide solution.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo; Nagasaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Sodium hydroxide is a strongly corrosive alkali. We describe herein a case of suicide by ingestion of sodium hydroxide. A man in his 80s was found dead with a mug and a bottle of caustic soda. Macroscopically, liquefaction and/or disappearance of esophagus, trachea and lung tissue and a grayish discoloration of the mucosa of the stomach were seen along with blackish brown coloration of the skin, mouth, and oral cavity. The contents of the gastrointestinal tract showed a pH level of 7-8 on pH indicator strips. Histopathologically, liquefactive necrosis of remnant lung tissue and the stomach were seen. As biological reactions such as vasodilatation and inflammation were not detected in these organs, only a short number of hours must have passed between ingestion and death. This human case provides valuable information concerning the direct irritation induced by systemic exposure to corrosive substances. PMID:26989301

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in fluoride-bearing minerals after decomposition by fusion with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Adelantado, J V; Martinez, V P; Moreno, A C; Reig, F B

    1985-03-01

    The decomposition of highly insoluble minerals (fluorspar and cryolite) by fusion with molten alkali-metal hydroxides is studied. The introduction of additives such as aluminium compounds or sodium peroxide to obtain total liberation of fluoride from calcium fluoride samples, is tested. The fusion is done in a silver crucible with a Bunsen burner. The cooled melt is easily soluble, giving solutions suitable for spectrophotometric fluoride determination by the Zr(IV)-fluoride-Erichrome Cyanine R method. PMID:18963832

  10. Susceptibility of carbon steel to stress corrosion cracking in sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Flis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel and decarburized steel was studied in 8.5 M sodium hydroxide at 100 ?C. Potentiodynamic experiments were performed to determine the potential values to be applied in slow strain rate(ssr) experiments. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the surfaces of corroded samples. Severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed on the carbon steel samples in comparison to the decarburized steel samples.

  11. Rumen fermentation and starch degradation by Holstein steers fed sodium-hydroxide- or formaldehyde-treated wheat.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Tóth, T; Fábián, J

    2006-06-01

    The authors investigated the effect of feeding 2% sodium-hydroxide-treated (as-fed basis) or 2% formaldehyde-treated (crude protein basis) wheat to rumen-, duodenal- and ileocaecal-cannulated Holstein steers on rumen fermentation and ruminal and postruminal starch degradation. Feeding 2 kg/day wheat treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or formaldehyde did not affect negatively the main parameters of rumen fermentation, i.e. pH, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production, and microbial activity. Fibre degradation in the rumen was significantly improved when NaOH-treated wheat was fed. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that feeding NaOH- and formaldehyde-treated wheat to steers significantly increased the amount of starch that reached the small intestine. The amount of starch that entered the duodenum increased by 57% and 75% when steers were fed NaOH- and formaldehyde-treated wheat compared to the control phase, respectively. This higher quantity of starch was digested and absorbed, which can provide an increased glucose supply to the animals. PMID:16841758

  12. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. PMID:22806549

  13. Accidental contamination of a German town's drinking water with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Lendowski, Luba; Färber, Harald; Holy, Andreas; Darius, Anke; Ehrich, Bernd; Wippermann, Christine; Küfner, Bernd; Exner, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Case report of a very serious drinking water incident putting up to 50,000 inhabitants of a town near Bonn in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany at risk. A concentrated solution of highly alkaline water by sodium hydroxide was accidentally washed into the town's drinking water at a pumping station and increased the pH-value of the water to 12. Residents who came into contact with the contaminated water immediately had a toxic reaction. The incident was detected by complaints from customers and after that was stopped within several hours. The pipes were flushed and the customers were warned not to use the water till the all clear. After this immediate management there was an investigation and the cause of the incident was detected as an accidental release of accumulated sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. The lack of a network alarm system and the automatic cut-off mechanisms as deficiencies in the design of the station were rectified by the water company immediately after the incident. PMID:25687345

  14. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide on Activated Carbons Impregnated with Sodium Hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Viviane; Baskova, Svetlana; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Two activated carbons of different origin were impregnated with the solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) of various concentrations up to 10 wt %, and the effect of impregnation on the catalytic performance of the carbons was evaluated. The catalytic activity was analyzed in terms of the capacity of carbons for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conversion and removal from hydrogen-rich fuel streams and the emission times of H2S and the products of its oxidation [e.g., sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS)]. The results of impregnation showed a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of both carbons proportional to the amount of NaOH introduced. NaOH introduces hydroxyl groups (OH-) on the surface of the activated carbon that increase its surface reactivity and its interaction with sulfur-containing compounds.

  15. Sodium Hydroxide Enhances Extractability and Analysis of Proanthocyanidins in Ensiled Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia).

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Aina; Drake, Chris; Grosse Brinkhaus, Anja; Girard, Marion; Copani, Giuseppe; Dohme-Meier, Frigga; Bee, Giuseppe; Niderkorn, Vincent; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2015-11-01

    Little information exists on the effects of ensiling on condensed tannins or proanthocyanidins. The acetone-butanol-HCl assay is suitable for measuring proanthocyanidin contents in a wide range of samples, silages included, but provides limited information on proanthocyanidin composition, which is of interest for deciphering the relationships between tannins and their bioactivities in terms of animal nutrition or health. Degradation with benzyl mercaptan (thiolysis) provides information on proanthocyanidin composition, but proanthocyanidins in several sainfoin silages have proved resistant to thiolysis. We now report that a pretreatment step with sodium hydroxide prior to thiolysis was needed to enable their analysis. This alkaline treatment increased their extractability from ensiled sainfoin and facilitated especially the release of larger proanthocyanidins. Ensiling reduced assayable proanthocyanidins by 29%, but the composition of the remaining proanthocyanidins in silage resembled that of the fresh plants. PMID:26484985

  16. Effect of Berry Size and Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment on the Drying Characteristics of Blueberries under Infrared Radiation Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research studied the effect on the drying characteristics of blueberries under infrared radiation (IR) heating of berry size and dipping pretreatment in hot sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Changes in the microstructure and diffusion coefficient of the berries after the NaOH pretreatment were...

  17. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  18. Effect of additions of sodium hydroxide on the catalytic activity of partially deactivated skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in aqueous-organic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, M. V.; Afineevskii, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The effect the concentration of sodium hydroxide has on the catalytic activity of skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in ternary methanol-water-sodium hydroxide solutions with a methanol content of 0.11 mole fractions and different concentrations of sodium hydroxide is studied. The key role of the solvent during changes in the activity of skeletal nickel in the hydrogenation reaction of sodium maleate is assumed, based on data on the redistribution of individual forms of adsorbed hydrogen.

  19. Sedimentation and deformation of an aqueous sodium hydroxide drop in vegetable oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Hyacinthe, Hyaquino; Ward, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The addition of water droplets in fuels is known to provide benefits such as decreased Nitrous Oxide NOx emissions. Unfortunately the shelf life of a water-fuel emulsion is limited by the sedimentation rate of the water droplets. It is well known that adding surfactants can significantly slow the sedimentation rate due to the introduction of Marangoni stresses. In the case of a vegetable oil fuel, adding sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to the water droplets will produce surfactants through saponification in the form of sodium-carboxylate salts. Pendant drops of aqueous NaOH solutions with pH between 11 and 13 will be suspended in several oils such as corn, olive, canola and soybean oil in order to measure the interfacial tension. The change in interfacial tension with time will be used to estimate the surfactant concentration and the saponification rate. Then individual drops will be placed in the oils to observe the settling velocity and drop deformation. NSF CBET.

  20. Chemical comminution of coal in pressurized binary system of carbon-dioxide and sodium-hydroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mamaghani, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical comminution of coal involves introduction of reactive chemical agent into a coal seam converting the monolithic coal into a particulate slurry of coal particles. A pressurized binary system of carbon dioxide and sodium hydroxide solution and a pressurized system of carbon dioxide and water were used as the chemical reagents and their comminution ability were studied under different conditions of reactor pressure, reagent concentration, reaction time, and reactor temperature. These variables showed significant effects on the fragmentation rates. It was shown that comminution rates increased with a rise in reactor pressure and temperature. The maximum comminution rates were obtained around 7 molar sodium hydroxide concentration. The activation energy of the chemical comminution was calculated to be around 4650 calories per gram mole. The comminution rates ranged from 0.5 to 355.0 cm{sup 2}/hr-g. The Iowa coal proved to react better with these systems than Ohio coal.

  1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of ensiled sorghum forage and wheat straw to increase methane production.

    PubMed

    Sambusiti, C; Ficara, E; Rollini, M; Manzoni, M; Malpei, F

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sodium hydroxide pretreatment on the chemical composition and the methane production of ensiled sorghum forage and wheat straw. NaOH pretreatment was conducted in closed bottles, at 40 °C for 24 h. Samples were soaked in a NaOH solution at different dosages (expressed in terms of total solids (TS) content) of 1 and 10% gNaOH/gTS, with a TS concentration of 160 gTS/L. At the highest NaOH dosage the reduction of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin was 31, 66 and 44%, and 13, 45 and 3% for sorghum and wheat straw, respectively. The concentration of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) in the liquid phase after the pretreatment was also improved both for wheat straw and sorghum (up to 24 and 33%, respectively). Total sugars content increased up to five times at 10% gNaOH/gTS with respect to control samples, suggesting that NaOH pretreatment improves the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses. The Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests showed that the NaOH pretreatment favoured the anaerobic degradability of both substrates. At 1 and 10% NaOH dosages, the methane production increased from 14 to 31% for ensiled sorghum forage and from 17 to 47% for wheat straw. The first order kinetic constant increased up to 65% for sorghum and up to 163% for wheat straw. PMID:23032777

  2. Anaerobic tissue-dissolving abilities of calcium hydroxide and sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Yang, S F; Rivera, E M; Baumgardner, K R; Walton, R E; Stanford, C

    1995-12-01

    Closed root canals likely have an oxygen-free environment; most bacteria in canals are anaerobic. These bacteria and other debris are difficult to remove. Unknown is tissue dissolution with chemicals under these anaerobic conditions. This study evaluated and compared dissolving properties of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on bovine pulp tissue in aerobic and anaerobic environments. Sixty bovine pulp specimens were dried, then randomly divided into six groups. Groups A and B were immersed in Ca(OH)2 + water solution, whereas group C and D were in 2.5% NaOCl. Groups E and F (controls) specimens were placed in distilled water. Groups A, C, and E were incubated anaerobically, and groups B, D, and F were incubated under regular atmospheric conditions, all for 7 days. Percentages of weight loss were compared between groups. Results showed the following: (a) both chemicals partially dissolved pulp tissue, (b) anaerobic environment did not alter tissue-dissolving properties of Ca(OH)2 or NaOCl, and (c) Ca(OH)2 and NaOCl were equal and more effective than water. PMID:8596083

  3. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  4. Platelets to rings: Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate on Zn-Al layered double hydroxide morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Ceren; Unal, Ugur; Yagci Acar, Havva

    2012-03-15

    In the current study, influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the crystallization of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated. Depending on the SDS concentration coral-like and for the first time ring-like morphologies were obtained in a urea-hydrolysis method. It was revealed that the surfactant level in the starting solution plays an important role in the morphology. Concentration of surfactant equal to or above the anion exchange capacity of the LDH is influential in creating different morphologies. Another important parameter was the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Surfactant concentrations well above CMC value resulted in ring-like structures. The crystallization mechanism was discussed. - Graphical abstract: Dependence of ZnAl LDH Morphology on SDS concentration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-situ intercalation of SDS in ZnAl LDH was achieved via urea hydrolysis method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology of ZnAl LDH intercalated with SDS depended on the SDS concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ring like morphology for SDS intercalated ZnAl LDH was obtained for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth mechanism was discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Template assisted growth of ZnAl LDH was proposed.

  5. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-03

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  6. IGA of alloy 600 in high-temperature solutions of sodium hydroxide contaminated with carbonate. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, R.; Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-05-01

    Alloy 600 was tested in sodium hydroxide contaminated with sodium carbonate at 300/sup 0/C and 315/sup 0/C to examine its resistance to intergranular attack (IGA) under controlled cathodic and anodic potentials. Specimens of alloy 600 were studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires under constant load and wires without any applied tensile stress. The material was mainly used in its mill annealed condition, although some specimens were studied as solution annealed and solution annealed plus sensitized. Unlike the last two metallurgical states, the mill annealed alloy 600 material was rather sensitive to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a range of anodic potentials.

  7. Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T.; Galkin, A.; Bachilova, N.; Blynskiy, A.; Maev, V.; Wells, D.; Herrick, A.; Michelbacher, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

  8. Investigation by bioassay of the efficacy of sodium hydroxide treatment on the inactivation of mouse-adapted scrapie.

    PubMed

    Unal, A; Thyer, J; Uren, E; Middleton, D; Braun, M; Maher, D

    2007-06-01

    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) has been shown to reduce the infectivity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents. This study investigated the efficacy of sodium hydroxide at 0.1M, 0.25M and 0.5M concentrations for the inactivation of mouse-adapted scrapie strain ME7. Times and temperatures modelled conditions used in an industrial plasma fractionation plant for sanitisation of ultrafilters, and the sodium hydroxide component of Clean In Place sanitisation. The concentration of scrapie ME7 brain homogenate in NaOH test solutions was 1% (w/v). At the end of incubation periods, the samples were adjusted to neutral pH prior to intracerebral inoculation into mice for bioassay. The conditions of 0.1M NaOH at 60 degrees C for 2min and 0.25M NaOH at 30 degrees C for 60min were found to inactivate 3.96 and 3.93logs of scrapie, respectively. Use of 0.5M NaOH at 30 degrees C for 60 or 75min was found to inactivate >or=4.23 and 4.15logs of scrapie. This indicates that the use of these conditions in an industrial process would substantially reduce prion infectivity. PMID:17074508

  9. Silicic acid competes for dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) immobilization by the iron hydroxide plaque mineral goethite.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Michael; Daus, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    A surface complexation modeling approach was used to extend the knowledge about processes that affect the availability of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in the soil rhizosphere in presence of a strong sorbent, e.g., Fe plaques on rice roots. Published spectroscopic and molecular modeling information suggest for the organoarsenical agent to form bidentate-binuclear inner-sphere surface complexes with Fe hydroxides similar to the inorganic As oxyanions. However, since also the ubiquitous silicic acid oxyanion form the same bidentate binuclear surface complexes, our hypothesis was that it may have an effect on the adsorption of DMA by Fe hydroxides in soil. Our experimental batch equilibrium data show that DMA is strongly adsorbed in the acidic pH range, with a steep adsorption edge in the circumneutral pH region between the DMA acidity constant (pKa=6.3) and the point of zero charge value of the goethite adsorbent (pHpzc=8.6). A 1-pK CD-MUSIC surface complexation model was chosen to fit the experimental adsorption vs. pH data. The same was done for silicic acid batch equilibrium data with our goethite adsorbent. Both model parameters for individual DMA and silicic acid adsorption were then merged into one CD-MUSIC model to predict the binary DMA+Si adsorption behavior. Silicic acid (500 μM) was thus predicted by the model to strongly compete for DMA with up to 60% mobilization of the latter at a pH6. This model result could be verified subsequently by experimental batch equilibrium data with zero adjustable parameters. The thus quantified antagonistic relation between DMA and silicic acid is discussed as one of factors to explain the increase of the DMA proportion in rice grains as observed upon silica fertilization of rice fields. PMID:25478657

  10. 21 CFR 182.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acid phosphate. 182.6085 Section 182.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  11. 21 CFR 582.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 582.6085 Section 582.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 582.1087 Section 582.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 582.1087 Section 582.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 182.1087 Section 182.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate....

  15. 21 CFR 182.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 182.6085 Section 182.6085...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6085 Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  16. 21 CFR 582.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 582.6085 Section 582.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 182.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 182.6085 Section 182.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 582.6085 Section 582.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 182.1087 Section 182.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate....

  20. 21 CFR 182.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 182.6085 Section 182.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 182.1087 Section 182.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate....

  2. 21 CFR 582.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 582.6085 Section 582.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 582.1087 Section 582.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 582.1087 Section 582.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 182.1087 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 182.1087 Section 182.1087 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate....

  7. 21 CFR 182.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 182.6085 Section 182.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 582.6085 - Sodium acid phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acid phosphate. 582.6085 Section 582.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium acid phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and....1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  11. Variation in photoreactivity of iron hydroxides taken from an acidic mountain stream

    SciTech Connect

    Hrncir, D.C.; McKnight, D.

    1998-07-15

    The photoreduction of iron hydroxides is known to exert significant influence over many biogeochemical processes in streams impacted by acid main drainage. Using laboratory and in-stream measurements, the variation in reactivity of iron hydroxides taken from a stream receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) was studied. The reactivity decreased for material collected at sites progressively downstream from the AMD inflow. In the presence of two simple organic ligands, photoreduction increased for the fresher iron hydroxides but remained unchanged for the older hydroxides. The importance of ligand coordination to the enhancement of photoreduction in natural waters was further demonstrated in experiments using two types of fulvic acids. In-stream measurements of hydrogen peroxide concentration are consistent with the conclusions drawn from the batch experiments. Iron hydroxides were observed to age over time, becoming less photoreactive. This aging was accompanied by an increase in crystallinity. The loss of photoreactivity for the older material can be explained by a decrease in the number of active surface sites, a change in the nature of the surface sites, or a combination of both.

  12. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  13. Effect of washing broiler carcasses in potassium hydroxide and lauric acid on native bacterial flora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the bactericidal effect of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA) on the native bacterial flora of broiler carcasses. Carcasses were placed in solutions of 1.0% KOH and 2.0 % LA or in distilled water (control) and washed by shaking for 1 min on a mechani...

  14. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution (w/v). Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing li...

  15. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) (w/v) solution. Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing l...

  16. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broilers after multiple washing in potassium hydroxide and lauric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number of various types of bacteria on skin of processed broilers was determined after each of five consecutive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA). Breast skin was taken from carcasses obtained from a commercial processing facility. Portions of skin were washe...

  17. Role of lauric acid-potassium hydroxide concentration on bacterial contamination of spray washed broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with various concentrations of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions. Fifty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing line of...

  18. Effect of Washing Broiler Carcasses in Potassium Hydroxide and Lauric Acid on Native Bacterial Flora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the bactericidal effect of mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA) on the native microflora of broiler carcasses. Eviscerated carcasses obtained from a local, commercial poultry processing facility were placed in solutions of 1.0% KOH and 2.0 ...

  19. Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology—High Hydroxide Leaching: FY10 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Neiner, Doinita; Peterson, Reid A.; Rapko, Brian M.; Russell, Renee L.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2011-02-04

    Boehmite leaching tests were carried out at NaOH concentrations of 10 M and 12 M, temperatures of 85°C and 60°C, and a range of initial aluminate concentrations. These data, and data obtained during earlier 100°C tests using 1 M and 5 M NaOH, were used to establish the dependence of the boehmite dissolution rate on hydroxide concentration, temperature, and initial aluminate concentration. A semi-empirical kinetic model for boehmite leaching was fitted to the data and used to calculate the NaOH additions required for leaching at different hydroxide concentrations. The optimal NaOH concentration for boehmite leaching at 85°C was estimated, based on minimizing the amount of Na that had to be added in NaOH to produce a given boehmite conversion.

  20. Facile, room-temperature pre-treatment of rice husks with tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide: Enhanced enzymatic and acid hydrolysis yields.

    PubMed

    Lau, B B Y; Luis, E T; Hossain, M M; Hart, W E S; Cencia-Lay, B; Black, J J; To, T Q; Aldous, L

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous solutions of tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide have been evaluated as pretreatment media for rice husks, prior to sulphuric acid hydrolysis or cellulase enzymatic hydrolysis. Varying the water:tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide ratio varied the rate of delignification, as well as silica, lignin and cellulose solubility. Pre-treatment with 60wt% hydroxide dissolved the rice husk and the regenerated material was thus heavily disrupted. Sulphuric acid hydrolysis of 60wt%-treated samples yielded the highest amount of glucose per gram of rice husk. Solutions with good lignin and silica solubility but only moderate to negligible cellulose solubility (10-40wt% hydroxide) were equally effective as pre-treatment media for both acid and enzymatic hydrolysis. However, pre-treatment with 60wt% hydroxide solutions was incompatible with downstream enzymatic hydrolysis. This was due to significant incorporation of phosphonium species in the regenerated biomass, which significantly inhibited the activity of the cellulase enzymes. PMID:26342336

  1. Amended safety assessment of sodium picramate and picramic acid.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Alan Andersen, F

    2009-01-01

    Sodium picramate is the sodium salt of picramic acid, a substituted phenolic compound. Sodium picramate and picramic acid function as hair colorants; they are reportedly used in 31 and 3 hair-dye products, respectively. No concentration-of-use data were available for sodium picramate, but picramic acid was reported to be used at 0.6%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel recognized that adding picramic acid to a hair-dye formulation likely results in formation of a salt such as sodium picramate, which suggested that safety test data for one ingredient would be applicable to the other. Hair dyes containing these ingredients bear a caution statement and patch test instructions for determining whether the product causes skin irritation. The panel finds that the available data support the safety of these colorants in hair dyes and expects that sodium picramate would be used at concentrations comparable to those reported for picramic acid. PMID:20086193

  2. Inactivation kinetics of model and relevant blood-borne viruses by treatment with sodium hydroxide and heat.

    PubMed

    Borovec, S; Broumis, C; Adcock, W; Fang, R; Uren, E

    1998-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of a clean-in-place system for the inactivation of viruses present in human plasma, the effect of 0.1 M sodium hydroxide at 60 degrees C on viral infectivity was investigated. Inactivation of the following model and relevant viruses were followed as a function of time: human hepatitis A virus (HAV), canine parvovirus (CPV; a model for human parvovirus B-19) pseudorabies virus (PRV, a model for hepatitis B virus), and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, a model for hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus). Infectivity of CPV was determined by a novel in situ EIA method which will prove useful for studies to validate parvovirus inactivation or removal. Infectivity of BVDV, PRV and CPV were shown to be reproducibly inactivated below the limit of detection by 0.1 M NaOH at 60 degrees C within 30 s. HAV was inactivated to below the limit of detection within 2 min. Treatment with heat alone also resulted in some log reduction for all viruses tested except for CPV which remained unaffected after heating at 60 degrees C for 16 min. Treatment of HAV with hydroxide alone (up to 1.0 m) at 15 degrees C did not lead to rapid inactivation. Collectively, these data suggest that 0.1 M NaOH at 60 degrees C for two min should be sufficient to inactivate viruses present in process residues. PMID:10208725

  3. ALUMINUM READINESS EVALUATION FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENRATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; MASSIE HL

    2011-01-27

    A Technology Readiness Evaluation (TRE) performed by AREV A Federal Services, LLC (AFS) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) shows the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process invented and patented (pending) by AFS has reached an overall Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. The LiHT process removes aluminum and regenerates sodium hydroxide. The evaluation used test results obtained with a 2-L laboratory-scale system to validate the process and its critical technology elements (CTEs) on Hanford tank waste simulants. The testing included detailed definition and evaluation for parameters of interest and validation by comparison to analytical predictions and data quality objectives for critical subsystems. The results of the TRE would support the development of strategies to further mature the design and implementation of the LiHT process as a supplemental pretreatment option for Hanford tank waste.

  4. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium... the polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method...

  5. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium... the polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and....1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6), also known as Glauber's salt... by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient is used as...

  10. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food and... Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium polyacrylate (CAS... polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method entitled...

  11. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium... the polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  13. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  14. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1650 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... salts. 721.1650 Section 721.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1650 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts. (a) Chemical substances... alkyl benzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts (PMNs P-88-1783, P-88-2231, P-88-2237, and P-88-2530)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1650 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... salts. 721.1650 Section 721.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1650 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts. (a) Chemical substances... alkyl benzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts (PMNs P-88-1783, P-88-2231, P-88-2237, and P-88-2530)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1650 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... salts. 721.1650 Section 721.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1650 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts. (a) Chemical substances... alkyl benzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts (PMNs P-88-1783, P-88-2231, P-88-2237, and P-88-2530)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1650 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... salts. 721.1650 Section 721.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1650 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts. (a) Chemical substances... alkyl benzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts (PMNs P-88-1783, P-88-2231, P-88-2237, and P-88-2530)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1650 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... salts. 721.1650 Section 721.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1650 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts. (a) Chemical substances... alkyl benzenesulfonic acid and sodium salts (PMNs P-88-1783, P-88-2231, P-88-2237, and P-88-2530)...

  4. Optimization of alkaline sulfite pretreatment and comparative study with sodium hydroxide pretreatment for improving enzymatic digestibility of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Pang, Bo; Wang, Haisong; Li, Haiming; Lu, Jie; Niu, Meihong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, alkaline sulfite pretreatment of corn stover was optimized. The influences of pretreatments on solid yield, delignification, and carbohydrate recovery under different pretreatment conditions and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of pretreatment was evaluated by enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency and the total sugar yield. The optimum pretreatment conditions were obtained, as follows: the total titratable alkali (TTA) of 12%, liquid/solid ratio of 6:1, temperature of 140 °C, and holding time of 20 min. Under those conditions, the solid yield was 55.24%, and the removal of lignin was 82.68%. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates of glucan and xylan for pretreated corn stover were 85.38% and 70.36%, and the total sugar yield was 74.73% at cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g and β-glucosidase loading of 10 IU/g for 48 h. Compared with sodium hydroxide pretreatment with the same amount of total titratable alkali, the total sugar yield was raised by about 10.43%. Additionally, the corn stover pretreated under the optimum pretreatment conditions was beaten by PFI at 1500 revolutions. After beating, enzymatic hydrolysis rates of glucan and xylan were 89.74% and 74.06%, and the total sugar yield was 78.58% at the same enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. Compared with 1500 rpm of PFI beating after sodium pretreatment with the same amount of total titratable alkali, the total sugar yield was raised by about 14.05%. PMID:25773993

  5. Phase Stability of Chromium(III) Oxide Hydroxide in Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; E.P. Opalka

    2003-07-08

    Grimaldiite ({alpha}-CrOOH) is shown to transform to a sodium-chromium(III)-hydroxyphosphate compound (SCHP) in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures via CrOOH(s) + 4Na{sup +} + 2HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = Na{sub 4}Cr(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(s) + H{sub 2}O. X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that SCHP possesses an orthorhombic lattice having the same space group symmetry (Ibam, No.72) as sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate. A structurally-consistent designation for SCHP is Na{sub 3}Cr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} NaOH; the molar volume of SCHP is estimated to be 1552 cm{sup 3}. The thermodynamic equilibrium for the above reaction was defined in the system Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O for Na/P molar ratios between 2.0 and 2.4. On the basis of observed reaction threshold values for sodium phosphate concentration and temperature, the standard molar entropy (S{sup o}), heat capacity (C{sub p}{sup o}) and free energy of formation ({Delta}G{sub f}{sup o}) for SCHP were calculated to be 690 J/(mol-K), 622 J/(mol-K) and -3509.97 kJ/mol, respectively.

  6. Selective separation of hydroxide from alkaline nuclear tank waste by liquid-liquid extraction with weak hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Chambliss, C Kevin; Haverlock, Tamara I; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Moyer, Bruce A

    2002-04-15

    Recovery and recycle of caustic reagents in industrial processes offer potential means of pollution prevention, as investigated herein for particular needs related to the cleanup of alkaline nuclear waste. Specifically, the recovery of hydroxide from alkaline media by liquid-liquid extraction can be effected utilizing weak hydroxy acids, as demonstrated for NaOH utilizing a series of lipophilic fluorinated alcohols and alkylated phenols dissolved in 1-octanol. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the hydroxy acids, the phenols being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. After extraction, NaOH is effectively recoverable from the organic phase upon contact with water. The weakest hydroxy acids are the most efficiently stripped, NaOH recovery being nearly quantitative in a single contact. In competitive extraction experiments, good selectivity for hydroxide recovery over other anions such as nitrate and chloride was demonstrated. Since the order of extraction favors larger anions, the exceptional preference for hydroxide implies that the extraction occurs by deprotonation of the hydroxy acids in a cation-exchange process. Stripping therefore occurs by hydrolysis to regenerate the neutral hydroxy acid, liberating NaOH to the aqueous phase. Since hydroxide equivalents rather than actual hydroxide ions are transferred to the solvent, the process is termed "pseudohydroxide extraction." Hydroxide recovery from a simulant of alkaline nuclear tank waste (Hanford DSSF simulant) was also demonstrated in repeated extraction and stripping cycles. PMID:11993889

  7. 21 CFR 186.1770 - Sodium oleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium oleate. 186.1770 Section 186.1770 Food and....1770 Sodium oleate. (a) Sodium oleate (C18H33O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 143-19-1) is the sodium salt of oleic.... Commercially, sodium oleate is made by mixing and heating flaked sodium hydroxide and oleic acid. (b)...

  8. Antimycobacterial, antimicrobial, and biocompatibility properties of para-aminosalicylic acid with zinc layered hydroxide and Zn/Al layered double hydroxide nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Saifullah, Bullo; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Webster, Thomas J; Geilich, Benjamin M; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis by chemotherapy is complicated due to multiple drug prescriptions, long treatment duration, and adverse side effects. We report here for the first time an in vitro therapeutic effect of nanocomposites based on para-aminosalicylic acid with zinc layered hydroxide (PAS-ZLH) and zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (PAS-Zn/Al LDH), against mycobacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and Gram-negative bacteria. The nanocomposites demonstrated good antimycobacterial activity and were found to be effective in killing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A biocompatibility study revealed good biocompatibility of the PAS-ZLH nanocomposites against normal human MRC-5 lung cells. The para-aminosalicylic acid loading was quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. In summary, the present preliminary in vitro studies are highly encouraging for further in vivo studies of PAS-ZLH and PAS-Zn/Al LDH nanocomposites to treat tuberculosis. PMID:25114509

  9. Production of cellulosic ethanol from cotton processing residues after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fockink, Douglas Henrique; Maceno, Marcelo Adriano Corrêa; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2015-01-01

    In this study, production of cellulosic ethanol from two cotton processing residues was investigated after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide. Pretreatment performance was investigated using a 2(2) factorial design and the highest glucan conversion was achieved at the most severe alkaline conditions (0.4g NaOH g(-1) of dry biomass and 120°C), reaching 51.6% and 38.8% for cotton gin waste (CGW) and cotton gin dust (CGD), respectively. The susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was also investigated and the best condition was achieved at the lowest total solids (5wt%) and the highest enzyme loading (85mg of Cellic CTec2 g(-1) of dry substrate). However, the highest concentration of fermentable sugars - 47.8 and 42.5gL(-1) for CGD and CGW, respectively - was obtained at 15wt% total solids using this same enzyme loading. Substrate hydrolysates had no inhibitory effects on the fermenting microorganism. PMID:25841187

  10. Countercurrent washing of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal after leaching with molten mixtures of sodium and potassium hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chriswell, C.D.; Shah, N.D.; Markuszewski, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Molten caustic leaching is an advanced chemical coal-cleaning process which results in the removal of over 90% of the sulfur and ash from coal. One of the steps in this process is the water washing of caustic-leached coals to remove unreacted caustic and impurities released by reactions with the molten caustic. A countercurrent procedure, designed for efficient washing with minimal water consumption, has been evaluated in the present work. A Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was leached with a one-to-one mixture of molten sodium and potassium hydroxides, and the resulting coal-caustic cake was washed using this countercurrent procedure. The countercurrent washing did result in recovery of caustic at predicted concentrations, and a relatively ash-free and sulfur-free coal was the final product. However, significant problems occurred during the countercurrent washing, all of which could be linked with the formation of a massive precipitate of carbonates from the alkaline process streams. The mass of the precipitate retained fluids and thus led to far lower than predicted recoveries of caustic solutions. the precipitate also caused a significant decrease in filtration rates.

  11. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) before a colonoscopy (examination of the inside of the colon to check ...

  12. ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27

    Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

  13. Enhanced thermal- and photo-stability of acid yellow 17 by incorporation into layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qian; Feng Yongjun; Feng Junting; Li Dianqing

    2011-06-15

    2,5-dichloro-4-(5-hydroxy-3-methyl-4-(sulphophenylazo) pyrazol-1-yl) benzenesulphonate (DHSB) anions, namely acid yellow 17 anions, have been successfully intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH) to produce a novel organic-inorganic pigment by a simple method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS), and the dye-intercalated LDH was analyzed by various techniques, e.g., XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TG-DTA and ICP. The d-spacing of the prepared LDH is 2.09 nm. Furthermore, the incorporation of the DHSB aims to enhance the thermal- and photo-stability of the guest dye molecule, for example, the less color change after accelerated thermal- and photo-aging test. - Graphical abstract: Acid yellow anions were successfully assembled into ZnAl layered double hydroxides (LDH) to produce a novel organic-inorganic composite pigment by a simple method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Highlights: > Acid yellow 17 was directly intercalated into ZnAl-LDH to form a novel pigment. > The pigment was prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps. > The intercalation of dye anions enhances its thermal- and photo-stability.

  14. Electrodialysis recovery of boric acid and potassium hydroxide from eluates of SWC facilities at NPP with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnik, S.N.; Virich, P.M.; Kramskikh, E.Y.; Masanov, O.L.; Turovsky, I.P.

    1993-12-31

    To extract boric acid and potassium hydroxide from regenerates of SWC-2-46 facilities, an electrodialysis-sorption process has been devised consisting of the following operations: separation of boron-alkaline regenerate solution into desorbate and wash water; filling of desalination and concentration chambers, respectively, with desorbate and was water of electrodialysis equipment; production of boric acid and potassium hydroxide from desorbate by electrodialysis; removal of chloride-ion from boric acid solution on ion-exchange filter AB-17-18. The flow-sheet was tested and boron containing alkaline regeneration solutions were recovered from Novovoronezh NPP.

  15. Acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaofei; Miao, Xiaolou; Lv, Huiping; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jiqin; He, Hua; Yang, Zhiqiang; Pan, Hu

    2014-06-01

    Usnic acid, a major active compound in lichens, was first isolated in 1884. Since then, usnic acid and its sodium salt (sodium usnic acid) have been used in medicine, perfumery, cosmetics, and other industries due to its extensive biological activities. However, its acaricidal activity has not been studied. In this paper, we investigated the acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro. After evaluating the acaricidal activity and toxicity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid in vitro, the results showed that at doses of 250, 125, and 62.5 mg/ml, usnic acid and sodium usnic acid can kill mites with 91.67, 85.00, and 55.00% and 100, 100, and 60.00% mortality after treatment 24 h. The LT50 values were 4.208, 8.249, and 16.950 h and 3.712, 7.339, and 15.773 h for usnic acid and sodium usnic acid, respectively. Sodium usnic acid has a higher acaricidal activity than usnic acid, which may be related to the difference in their structures. PMID:24770718

  16. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM HYDROXIDE FROM BISMUTH HYDROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Watt, G.W.

    1958-08-19

    An tmproved method is described for separating plutonium hydroxide from bismuth hydroxide. The end product of the bismuth phosphate processes for the separation amd concentration of plutonium is a inixture of bismuth hydroxide amd plutonium hydroxide. It has been found that these compounds can be advantageously separated by treatment with a reducing agent having a potential sufficient to reduce bismuth hydroxide to metalltc bisinuth but not sufficient to reduce the plutonium present. The resulting mixture of metallic bismuth and plutonium hydroxide can then be separated by treatment with a material which will dissolve plutonium hydroxide but not metallic bismuth. Sodiunn stannite is mentioned as a preferred reducing agent, and dilute nitric acid may be used as the separatory solvent.

  17. Chemical Decontamination with N-Acetyl-l-Cysteine–Sodium Hydroxide Improves Recovery of Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Organisms from Cultured Milk

    PubMed Central

    Bradner, L.; Robbe-Austerman, S.; Beitz, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is shed into the milk and feces of cows with advanced Johne's disease, allowing the transmission of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk. The parameters investigated included chemical decontamination with N-acetyl-l-cysteine–sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH), alone and in combination with antibiotics (vancomycin, amphotericin B, and nalidixic acid), and the efficacy of solid (Herrold's egg yolk medium [HEY]) and liquid (Bactec 12B and para-JEM) culture media. For each experiment, raw milk samples from a known noninfected cow were inoculated with 102 to 108 CFU/ml of live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms. The results indicate that an increased length of exposure to NALC-NaOH from 5 to 30 min and an increased concentration of NaOH from 0.5 to 2.0% did not affect the viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Additional treatment of milk samples with the antibiotics following NALC-NaOH treatment decreased the recovery of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells more than treatment with NALC-NaOH alone. The Bactec 12B medium was the superior medium of the three evaluated for the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk, as it achieved the lowest threshold of detection. The optimal conditions for NALC-NaOH decontamination were determined to be exposure to 1.50% NaOH for 15 min followed by culture in Bactec 12B medium. This study demonstrates that chemical decontamination with NALC-NaOH resulted in a greater recovery of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from milk than from samples treated with hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HPC). Therefore, it is important to optimize milk decontamination protocols to ensure that low concentrations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be detected. PMID:23637290

  18. 21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride, acid copolymer, and... maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride, acid copolymer, and... maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride, acid copolymer, and... maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...

  1. Sodium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms For skin exposure, the person may receive: Irrigation (washing of the skin). Perhaps every few hours ... For eye exposure, the person may receive: Extensive irrigation to flush out the eye Medicines

  2. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler chickens after successive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the size of the populations of different groups of bacteria in the normal flora of the skin of processed broilers were examined after each of five consecutive washings with mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA). Skin from commercially processed broiler carcasses was ...

  3. Effect of various concentrations of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid on native bacterial flora of broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the bactericidal effect of various concentrations of potassium hydroxide (KOH)-lauric acid (LA) solutions on the native bacterial flora of broiler carcasses. A mixture of 1.0% KOH and 2.0% LA (wt/vol) was prepared, and then filter sterilized by passage through...

  4. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and sodium oleate in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Han, K.N.; Guan, Y.C.

    1998-08-01

    Inhibition of mild steel corrosion by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (C{sub 12}H{sub 25}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SO{sub 3}Na [SDBS]) and sodium oleate (CH{sub 3}[CH{sub 2}]{sub 7}CH{double_bond}CH[CH{sub 2}]{sub 7}COONa) in acidic solutions was investigated using a potentiostat, a lock-in amplifier, a contact angle goniometer, A fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, and an ultraviolet (UV)/visible spectrophotometer. In the presence of the organic inhibitors, the corrosion rate was reduced significantly, Anionic SDBS was adsorbed on the positively charged mild steel surface through the electrostatic attraction. However, for sodium oleate, the soluble oleic acid (CH{sub 3}[CH{sub 2}]{sub 7}CH{double_bond}CH[CH]{sub 7}COOH) chemisorbed on the steel surface at the first stage. Then, insoluble colloid adsorbed on the chemisorbed surface through van der Waals forces.

  5. Simulation of carbon dioxide absorption by sodium hydroxide solution in a packed bed and studying the effect of operating parameters on absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanbakhsh, Farzad; Soltani Goharrizi, Ata'ollah; Hashemipour Rafsanjani, Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In this study. simulation of carbon dioxide absorption by Sodium Hydroxide solution in a packed bed has been investigated. At first, mass and energy balances were applied around a differential height of the bed. So, the governing equations were obtained. Surface renewal theory by Danckwerts was used to represent the mass transfer operation Finally, by changing the operating parameters like solvent temperature, inlet gas composition pressure and height of the bed, the effect of these parameters on the absorption and the composition of carbon dioxide in exit stream have been investigated. (authors)

  6. Kinetic Study of Mass Transfer by Sodium Hydroxide in Nickel Under Free-convection Conditions /by Don R. Mosher and Robert A. Lad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Don R; Lad, Robert A

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using static capsules fabricated from "L" nickel tubing to determine the effect of temperature level, temperature gradient, and test duration on corrosion and mass transfer by molten sodium hydroxide under free-convection conditions. A base temperature range from 1000 degrees to 1600 degrees F with temperature differences to 500 degrees was studied. The rate of mass transfer was found to be strongly dependent on both temperature level and gradient. The rate shows little tendency to decrease for test durations up to 200 hours, although the concentration of nickel in the melt approaches a limited value after 100 hours.

  7. Synthesis of protocatechuic acid-zinc/aluminium-layered double hydroxide nanocomposite as an anticancer nanodelivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Gani, Shafinaz Abd; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid, an active anticancer agent, has been intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide at Zn/Al=2) using two different preparation methods, co-precipitation and ion-exchange, which are labelled as PZAE and PZAC, respectively. The release of protocatechuate from the nanocomposites occurred in a controlled manner and was fitted satisfactorily to pseudo-second order kinetics. The basal spacing of the resulting nanocomposites PZAE and PZAC was 10.2 and 11.0 Å, respectively, indicating successful intercalation of protocatechuate anions into the interlayer galleries of Zn/Al-NO3-LDH in a monolayer arrangement with angles of 24 and 33° from the z-axis in PZAE and PZAC, respectively. The formation of nanocomposites was further confirmed by a Fourier transform infrared study. Thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analyses indicated that the thermal stability of the intercalated protocatechuic acid was significantly enhanced compared to its free protocatechuic acid, and the drug content in the nanocomposites was estimated to be approximately 32.6% in PZAE and 29.2% in PZAC. Both PZAE and PZAC nanocomposites inhibit the growth of human cervical, liver and colorectal cancer cell lines and exhibit no toxic effects towards normal fibroblast 3T3 cell after 72 h of treatment.

  8. Sodium and Potassium Interactions with Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Pascal; D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions are essential cofactors for the structure and functions of nucleic acids. Yet, the early discovery in the 70s of the crucial role of Mg(2+) in stabilizing tRNA structures has occulted for a long time the importance of monovalent cations. Renewed interest in these ions was brought in the late 90s by the discovery of specific potassium metal ions in the core of a group I intron. Their importance in nucleic acid folding and catalytic activity is now well established. However, detection of K(+) and Na(+) ions is notoriously problematic and the question about their specificity is recurrent. Here we review the different methods that can be used to detect K(+) and Na(+) ions in nucleic acid structures such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance or molecular dynamics simulations. We also discuss specific versus non-specific binding to different structures through various examples. PMID:26860302

  9. Molecular Structures, Acid-Base Properties, and Formation of Group 6 Transition Metal Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shenggang; Guenther, Courtney L.; Kelley, Matthew S.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)) were used to study the group 6 metal (M = Cr, Mo, W) hydroxides: MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3), M2O6-m(OH)2m (m = 1-5), M3O9-m(OH)2m (m = 1, 2), and M4O11(OH)2. The calculations were done up to the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the CCSD(T) method. Molecular structures of many low-energy conformers/isomers were located. Brønsted acidities in the gas phase and pKa values in aqueous solution were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) and MnO3n-1(OH)2 (n = 2-4). In addition, Brønsted basicities and Lewis acidities (fluoride affinities) were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) as well as the metal oxide clusters MnO3n (n = 1-3). The metal hydroxides were predicted to be strong Brønsted acids and weak to modest Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. The pKa values can have values as negative as -31. Potential energy surfaces for the hydrolysis of the MnO3n (n = 1-4) clusters were calculated. Heats of formation of the metal hydroxides were predicted from the calculated reaction energies, and the agreement with the limited available experimental data is good. The first hydrolysis step leading to the formation of MnO3n-1(OH)2 was predicted to be exothermic, with the exothermicity becoming less negative as n increases and essentially converged at n = 3. Reaction rate constants for the hydrogen transfer steps were calculated using transition state theory and RRKM theory. Further hydrolysis of MnO3n-1(OH)2 tends to be endothermic especially for M = Cr. Fifty-five DFT exchange-correlation functionals were benchmarked for the calculations of the reaction energies, complexation energies, and reaction barriers by comparing to our CCSD(T) results. Overall, the DFT results for the potential energy surfaces are semiquantitatively correct, but no single functional works for all processes and all three metals. Among the functionals benchmarked, the wB97, wB97X, B1B95, B97-1, mPW1LYP, and X3LYP functionals have the best

  10. Effects of soluble ferri-hydroxide complexes on microbial neutralization of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, A Azra; Silverstein, JoAnn; Hernandez, Mark

    2005-10-15

    Heterotrophic respiration of ferric iron by Acidiphilium cryptum was investigated in anoxic microcosms with initial media pH values from 1.5 to 3.5. No organic carbon consumption or iron reduction was observed with an initial pH of 1.5, indicating that A. cryptum may not be capable of iron respiration at this pH. Significant iron reduction was observed at pH 2.5 and 3.5, with different effects. When the initial pH was 3.5, pH increased to 4.7-5.5 over 60 days of incubation with simultaneous production of 0.4 g L(-1) Fe2+. However, at an initial pH of 2.5, no significant change in pH was observed during iron respiration, although the accumulation of soluble ferrous iron was significantly higher, averaging 1.1 g L(-1) Fe2+. The speciation of the ferric iron electron acceptor may explain these results. At pH values of 3.5 and higher, precipitated ferric hydroxide Fe- (OH)3 would have been the primary source of ferric iron, with reduction resulting in net production of OH- ions and the significant increases in media pH observed. However at pH 2.5, soluble complexes, FeOH2+ and Fe(OH)2+, may have been the more prevalent electron acceptors, and the alkalinity generated by reduction of complexed iron was low. The existence of charged ferri-hydroxide complexes at pH 2.5 was verified by voltammetry. Results suggest that initiation of bacterial iron reduction may result in neutralization of acid mine drainage. However, this effect is extremely sensitive to iron speciation within a relatively small and critical pH range. PMID:16295843

  11. 77 FR 21676 - Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...This regulation establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl alcohol, reaction with poly(oxypropylene)-poly(oxyethylene) glycol; when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation. Dow Corning Corporation submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food,......

  12. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Sodium Hydroxide Using Alkylphenols and Fluorinated Alcohols: Understanding the Extraction Mechanism by Equilibrium Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun-Ah; Engle, Nancy L.; Bonnesen Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In the present work, it has been the aim to examine extraction efficiencies of nine proton-ionizable alcohols (HAs) in 1-octanol and to identify both the controlling equilibria and predominant species involved in the extraction process within a thermochemical model. Distribution ratios for sodium (DNa) extraction were measured as a function of organic-phase HA and aqueous-phase NaOH molarity at 25 °C. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the HAs, 4-(tert-octyl) phenol (HA 1a) and 4-noctyl- a,a-bis-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol (HA 2a) being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. By use of the equilibrium-modeling program SXLSQI, a model for the extraction of NaOH has been advanced based on an ion-pair extraction by the diluent to give organic-phase Na+OH- and corresponding free ions and cation exchange by the weak acids to form monomeric organic-phase Na+A- and corresponding free organic-phase ions.

  14. Examination of fatty acid exchanged layered double hydroxides as supports for photochemical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, D.S.; Dutta, P.K.

    1996-01-24

    The incorporation of titanium oxide into the interlayers of a myristic acid exchanged lithium aluminum layered double hydroxide was done by partitioning of titanium butoxide into the interlayer, followed by hydrolysis under ambient conditions. Upon excitation with near-ultraviolet radiation in the presence of viologens and thiocyanate ion, viologen radical is formed. Cationic viologen radicals were held onto the solid surface, indicating that the titanium oxide is negatively charged. [Tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrinato]zinc(II)(ZnTPPC) was ion exchanged into the interlayers. Electronic spectral changes upon incorporation suggest that the ZnTPPC is in the monomeric form. In the presence of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a sacrificial electron donor, the interlayer ZnTPPC was capable of reducing viologen molecules in solution upon visible radiation. Yields of viologen radical were higher for neutral viologens than cationic viologens, presumably due to the restricted access of cations into the interlayer space. The sensitization of the titanium oxide by ZnTPPC was also possible, resulting in viologen radicals upon visible light excitation. The anionic nature of the titanium oxide was exploited to confirm that sensitization was indeed taking place. 27 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Efficient Sorption and Removal of Perfluoroalkyl Acids (PFAAs) from Aqueous Solution by Metal Hydroxides Generated in Situ by Electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Yujuan; Niu, Junfeng; Yue, Zhihan; Huang, Qingguo

    2015-09-01

    Removal of environmentally persistent perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), that is, perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs, C4 ∼ C10) were investigated through sorption on four metal hydroxide flocs generated in situ by electrocoagulation in deionized water with 10 mM NaCl as supporting electrolyte. The results indicated that the zinc hydroxide flocs yielded the highest removal efficiency with a wide range concentration of PFOA/PFOS (1.5 μM ∼ 0.5 mM) at the zinc dosage <150 mg L(-1) with the energy consumption <0.18 Wh L(-1). The sorption kinetics indicated that the zinc hydroxide flocs had an equilibrium adsorbed amount (qe) up to 5.74/7.69 mmol g(-1) (Zn) for PFOA/PFOS at the initial concentration of 0.5 mM with an initial sorption rate (v0) of 1.01 × 10(3)/1.81 × 10(3) mmol g(-1) h(-1). The sorption of PFOA/PFOS reached equilibrium within <10 min. The sorption mechanisms of PFAAs on the zinc hydroxide flocs were proposed based on the investigation of various driving forces. The results indicated that the hydrophobic interaction was primarily responsible for the PFAAs sorption. The electrocoagulation process with zinc anode may have a great potential for removing PFAAs from industrial wastewater as well as contaminated environmental waterbody. PMID:26244813

  16. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or...

  17. [Biocompatibility analysis of hyaluronic acid sodium gels for medical application].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaning; Yuan, Tun; Jia, Lifang; Zou, Wen; Liang, Jie

    2012-08-01

    Hyaluronan acid sodium gels are used in ophthalmic surgery, orthopedic treatment and cosmetic surgery. In 2009,there were 12 domestic manufacturers in China producing 33 kinds of products. 23 kinds of imported products were allowed by SFDA to sale in the meantime. Since manufacturers use different production processes, product performances are quite different. According to the GB/T 16886. 1-2001, we designed a pilot program to evaluate the sodium hyaluronate gel products comprehensively in this paper. The results showed that, except chromosome aberration test of gel A and subchronic systemic toxicity of gel C appeared positive, the remaining samples of the test results were negative. This article provides a reference to write standard of cross-linked hyaluronic sodium gel and the revision of standard YY0308-2004. PMID:23016423

  18. Sodium mefenamate as a solution for the formulation and dissolution problems of mefenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Bani-Jaber, Ahmad; Hamdan, Imad; Al-Khalidi, Bashar

    2007-08-01

    Sodium salt formation of mefenamic acid (MA) was studied as a way to solve the formulation and dissolution problems of MA. For this purpose, sodium salt of mefenamic acid (Na-MA) was prepared by reacting MA powder with equimolar sodium hydroxide in an aqueous phase, and consequently, Na-MA solution was obtained. The resultant solution was lyophilized and Na-MA powder was collected. The salt formation was confirmed by the results of fourier transformation-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies on Na-MA powder in comparison to MA powder. Na-MA powder was assessed for direct compressibility, in comparison to MA powder, when formulated as a mixture with minimum amount of Avicel((R)) pH 101 and then compressed into tablets using a hydraulic tablet press. Na-MA tablets exhibited satisfactory hardness and friability, and did not show capping or lamination. On the other hand, some MA tablets showed capping or lamination upon compression and all the tested MA tablets for friability capped. Na-MA tablets were also studied for drug dissolution, in comparison to MA tablets, in water, a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer, and a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer after soaking in 0.1 m HCl. Under these different dissolution conditions, Na-MA tablets showed much higher dissolution rate and extent than MA tablets. The results of the study suggested that Na-MA can be considered as a solution form for the formulation and dissolution problems of MA. PMID:17666833

  19. Layered double hydroxides as supports for the slow release of acid herbicides.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lucelena P; Celis, Rafael; Cornejo, Juan; Valim, João B

    2006-08-01

    A Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was intercalated with the anionic herbicides 2,4-D, MCPA, and picloram by using three different methodologies: (i) direct synthesis (DS), (ii) regeneration (RE), and (iii) ion exchange (IE). The resulting complexes were characterized and assayed by batch release and column leaching tests, aiming at the controlled release of these herbicides. All the tested LDH-herbicide complexes displayed similar slow herbicide release properties in water, although the IE method seemed to result in complexes with a greater fraction of herbicide in a readily available form. Apparently, the LDH-herbicide complexes released most of the active ingredient present in the complexes at the end of the batch release experiment. This was attributed to the replacement of the intercalated herbicide by carbonate and hydroxyl anions from the aqueous solution. Compared to the free herbicides, the application of the three LDH-herbicide complexes (RE) to soil columns resulted in reduction in the maximum herbicide concentration in leachates and led to the retardation of herbicide leaching through the soil. All LDH-herbicide complexes presented an herbicidal efficacy similar to that of the free (technical) herbicides. Our results indicated the potential applicability of LDHs as supports for the preparation of slow release formulations of acid herbicides such as 2,4-D, MCPA, or picloram. PMID:16881703

  20. Dual nutraceutical nanohybrids of folic acid and calcium containing layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Oh, Jae-Min

    2016-01-01

    Dual nutraceutical nanohybrids consisting of organic nutrient, folic acid (FA), and mineral nutrient, calcium, were prepared based on layered double hydroxide (LDH) structure. Among various hybridization methods such as coprecipitation, ion exchange, solid phase reaction and exfoliation-reassembly, it was found that exfoliation-reassembly was the most effective in terms of intercalation of FA moiety between Ca-containing LDH layers. X-ray diffraction patterns and infrared spectra indicated that FA molecules were well stabilized in the interlayer space of LDHs through electrostatic interaction. From the atomic force and scanning electron microscopic studies, particle thickness of LDH was determined to be varied with tens, a few and again tens of nanometers in pristine, exfoliated and reassembled state, respectively, while preserving particle diameter. The result confirmed layer-by-layer hybrid structure of FA and LDHs was obtained by exfoliation-reassembly. Solid UV-vis spectra showed 2-dimensional molecular arrangement of FA moiety in hybrid, exhibiting slight red shift in n→π* and π→π* transition. The chemical formulae of FA intercalated Ca-containing LDH were determined to Ca1.30Al(OH)4.6FA0.74·3.33H2O and Ca1.53Fe(OH)5.06FA2.24·9.94H2O by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography and thermogravimetry, showing high nutraceutical content of FA and Ca.

  1. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  6. Effect of boric acid on intergranular corrosion and on hideout return efficiency of sodium in the tube support plate crevices

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.; Campan, J.L.; Brunet, J.P.; Schindler, P.; Stutzmann, A.

    1995-12-31

    Sodium hydroxide is one of the main causes of intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) of alloy 600 steam generator (S.G.) tubes. Boric acid appears to be one of the possible remedies for intergranular corrosion process inhibition. In order to obtain data on boric acid injection efficiency, an experimental program was performed on previously corroded tubes. To prevent premature tube wall cracking, samples were sleeved on alloy 690 tubes. The objective of the tests was to evaluate, on a statistically valid number of samples, the effectiveness of boric acid and tube sleeving as possible remedies for IGA/SCC extension. Another independent experimental program was initiated to determine the hideout return efficiency in the tube support plate (TSP) and tubesheet (TS) crevices after a significant duration ({<=} 180 hours) of sodium hideout. The main objective of the first tests being a statistical evaluation of the efficiency of boric acid treatment, was not achieved. The tests did demonstrate that sleeving effectively reduces IGA/SCC growth. In an additional program, cracks were obtained on highly susceptible tubes when specimens were not sleeved. The companion tests performed in the same conditions but with an addition of boric acid did not show any IGA or cracks. These results seem to demonstrate the possible effect of boric acid in preventing the corrosion process. Results of the second tests did not demonstrate any difference in the amount of sodium piled up in the crevices before and after boric acid injection. They however showed an increase of the hideout return efficiency at the tube support plate level from 78 % without boric acid to 95 % when boric acid is present in the feed water.

  7. Lactic acid conversion to 2,3-pentanedione and acrylic acid over silica-supported sodium nitrate: Reaction optimization and identification of sodium lactate as the active catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wadley, D.C.; Tam, M.S.; Miller, D.J.

    1997-01-15

    Lactic acid is converted to 2,3-pentanedione, acrylic acid, and other products in vapor-phase reactions over silica-supported sodium lactate formed from sodium nitrate. Multiparameter optimization of reaction conditions using a Box-Benkhen experimental design shows that the highest yield and selectivity to 2,3-pentanedione are achieved at low temperature, elevated pressure, and long contact time, while yield and selectivity to acrylic acid are most favorable at high temperature, low pressure, and short contact time. Post-reaction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses of the catalyst indicate that sodium nitrate as the initial catalyst material is transformed to sodium lactate at the onset of reaction via proton transfer from lactic acid to nitrate. The resultant nitric acid vaporizes as it is formed, leaving sodium lactate as the sole sodium-bearing species on the catalyst during reaction. 19 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-03-01

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to save the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tens of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass.

  9. Synthesis and selective IR absorption properties of iminodiacetic-acid intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lijing; Xu Xiangyu; Evans, David G.; Duan Xue; Li Dianqing

    2010-05-15

    An MgAl-NO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor has been prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Reaction with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) under weakly acidic conditions led to the replacement of the interlayer nitrate anions by iminodiacetic acid anions. The product was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, TG-DTA, ICP, elemental analysis and SEM. The results show that the original interlayer nitrate anions of LDHs precursor were replaced by iminodiacetic acid anions and that the resulting intercalation product MgAl-IDA-LDH has an ordered crystalline structure. MgAl-IDA-LDH was mixed with low density polyethylene (LDPE) using a masterbatch method. LDPE films filled with MgAl-IDA-LDH showed a higher mid to far infrared absorption than films filled with MgAl-CO{sub 3}-LDH in the 7-25 {mu}m range, particularly in the key 9-11 {mu}m range required for application in agricultural plastic films. - Graphical abstract: Intercalation of iminodiacetic acid (IDA) anions in a MgAl-NO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide host leads to an enhancement of its infrared absorbing ability for application in agricultural plastic films.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  11. Leaching of spent lead acid battery paste components by sodium citrate and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinfeng; He, Xiong; Yang, Jiakuan; Gao, Linxia; Liu, Jianwen; Yang, Danni; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qin; Kumar, R Vasant

    2013-04-15

    A sustainable method, with minimal pollution and low energy cost in comparison with the conventional smelting methods, is proposed for treating components of spent lead-acid battery pastes in aqueous organic acid(s). In this study, PbO, PbO2, and PbSO4, the three major components in a spent lead paste, were individually reacted with a mixture of aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid solution. Pure lead citrate precursor of Pb3(C6H5O7)2 · 3H2O is the only product crystallized in each leaching experiment. Conditions were optimized for individual lead compounds which were then used as the basis for leaching real industrial spent paste. In this work, efficient leaching process is achieved and raw material cost is reduced by using aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid, instead of aqueous sodium citrate and citric acid as reported in a pioneering hydrometallurgical method earlier. Acetic acid is not only cheaper than citric acid but is also more effective in aiding dissolution of the lead compounds thus speeding up the leaching process in comparison with citric acid. Lead citrate is readily crystallized from the aqueous solution due to its low solubility and can be combusted to directly produce leady oxide as a precursor for making new battery pastes. PMID:23500418

  12. Periodicity in the Acid-Base Behavior of Oxides and Hydroxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ronald L.

    1985-01-01

    Aqueous solubilities of many important hydrous oxides and hydroxides are displayed, for the various elements, as functions primarily of pH. These graphs are then arranged in groups to facilitate studies of the effects of oxidation state, electron structure, and position in the periodic table, along with size and coordination number. (JN)

  13. Sodium bicarbonate treatment extends life of formerly acid lake

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    For the second time, researchers have used a familiar home remedy to restore the balance of a once acid lake. On September 29, Wolf Pond, in New York's Adirondack State Park, was treated with sodium bicarbonate to adjust alkalinity and keep pH at normal levels at least into the 1990's. Since it was first treated with bicarbonate in 1984, Wolf Pond has recovered and stabilized enough to sustain fish life once again. Repeated dosing is necessary because acid rain and runoff gradually deplete alkalinity in the lake over a period of years. Wolf Pond was selected for study because it has very little outflow and its major source of replenishment is rain. As the 1986 study explained, sodium bicarbonate was chosen for this application because it provides four advantages: (1) it is very soluble; (2) it cannot raise pH above 8.5; (3) it is easy to handle and apply; and (4) it is safe enough to be a common ingredient of many pharmaceuticals and foods.

  14. Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  15. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  16. Structure and polymer form of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates produced by Pseudomonas oleovorans grown with mixture of sodium octanoate/undecylenic acid and sodium octanoate/5-phenylvaleric acid.

    PubMed

    Ho, I-Ching; Yang, Sheng-Pin; Chiu, Wen-Yen; Huang, Shih-Yow

    2007-01-30

    PHAs (poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates) obtained by Pseudomonas oleovorans grown with mixed carbon sources were investigated. Mixed carbon sources were sodium octanoate/undecylenic acid and sodium octanoate/5-phenylvaleric acid. Effect of carbon source in pre-culture on PHAs structure was investigated. Main fermentation was conducted with mixture of sodium octanoate/undecylenic acid, and PHA contained both saturated and unsaturated units. When more undecylenic acid was used in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated unit increased and the T(g) of the products also changed. The PHA grown with mixture of sodium octanoate and undecylenic acid was a random copolymer, which was determined by DSC analysis. Using mixed carbon sources of sodium octanoate and 5-phenylvaleric acid, highest dry cell weight and PHA concentration were obtained when 0.02g or 0.04g of 5-phenylvaleric acid were added in 50mL medium. Cultured with sodium octanoate and 5-phenylvaleric acid, PHA containing HO (3-hydroxyoctanoate) unit and HPV (3-hydroxy-5-phenylvalerate) unit was produced. T(g) of the products fell between those of pure PHO and pure PHPV. By means of DSC analysis and fractionation method, the PHA obtained was regarded as a random copolymer. PMID:16919325

  17. Using Riverine Natural Organic Matter to Test the Hypothesis that Soil Organic Matter is Modified by Contact with Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdue, E. Michael; Driver, Shamus; Hertkorn, Norbert; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated by some scientists that soil humic acids and fulvic acids are an artifact of alkaline extractions of soil. Riverine natural organic matter (NOM) is obtained in part by dissolution and transport of organic matter from soils by meteoric waters at acidic to circumneutral pH. The NOM may be fractionated into humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and hydrophilic NOM by adsorption of HA and FA onto XAD-8 resin at pH < 2, followed by their desorption with NaOH at pH 13. Alternatively, riverine NOM may be concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) and desalted by cation exchange. Several properties of Suwannee River NOM prior to its isolation, after concentration by RO, and after the XAD-8 process are compared to detect modifications that might have resulted from exposure of the sample to low and high pH.

  18. SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2011-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the

  19. In vitro antioxidant activity and in vivo antifatigue effect of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for folic acid

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lili; Wang, Wenrui; You, Songhui; Dong, Jingmei; Zhou, Yunhe; Wang, Jibing

    2014-01-01

    Folic acid antioxidants were successfully intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanoparticles according to a previous method with minor modification. The resultant folic acid-LDH constructs were then characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity effect, and in vivo antifatigue were examined by a series of assays. The results showed that folic acid-LDH antioxidant system can scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and hydroxyl free radicals and chelate pro-oxidative Cu2+. The in vitro cytotoxicity assays indicated that folic acid-LDH antioxidant system had no significant cytotoxic effect or obvious toxicity to normal cells. It also prolonged the forced swimming time of the mice by 32% and 51% compared to folic acid and control groups, respectively. It had an obvious effect on decreasing the blood urea nitrogen and blood lactic acid, while increasing muscle and hepatic glycogen levels. Therefore, folic acid-LDH might be used as a novel antioxidant and antifatigue nutritional supplement. PMID:25506219

  20. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Different Molecular Mechanisms of Bacillus coagulans 2-6 Response to Sodium Lactate and Calcium Lactate during Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Landong; Zhu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yao, Qingshou; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lactate production is enhanced by adding calcium carbonate or sodium hydroxide during fermentation. However, Bacillus coagulans 2-6 can produce more than 180 g/L L-lactic acid when calcium lactate is accumulated, but less than 120 g/L L-lactic acid when sodium lactate is formed. The molecular mechanisms by which B. coagulans responds to calcium lactate and sodium lactate remain unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic methods based on high-throughput RNA sequencing were applied to study gene expression changes in B. coagulans 2-6 cultured in non-stress, sodium lactate stress and calcium lactate stress conditions. Gene expression profiling identified 712 and 1213 significantly regulated genes in response to calcium lactate stress and sodium lactate stress, respectively. Gene ontology assignments of the differentially expressed genes were performed. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that ‘ATP-binding cassette transporters’ were significantly affected by calcium lactate stress, and ‘amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism’ was significantly affected by sodium lactate stress. It was also found that lactate fermentation was less affected by calcium lactate stress than by sodium lactate stress. Sodium lactate stress had negative effect on the expression of ‘glycolysis/gluconeogenesis’ genes but positive effect on the expression of ‘citrate cycle (TCA cycle)’ genes. However, calcium lactate stress had positive influence on the expression of ‘glycolysis/gluconeogenesis’ genes and had minor influence on ‘citrate cycle (TCA cycle)’ genes. Thus, our findings offer new insights into the responses of B. coagulans to different lactate stresses. Notably, our RNA-seq dataset constitute a robust database for investigating the functions of genes induced by lactate stress in the future and identify potential targets for genetic engineering to further improve L-lactic acid production by B. coagulans. PMID:25875592

  1. An evaluation of the residual toxicity and chemistry of a sodium hydroxide-based ballast water treatment system for freshwater ships.

    PubMed

    Elskus, Adria A; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Kemble, Nile E; Echols, Kathy R; Brumbaugh, William G; Henquinet, Jeffrey W; Watten, Barnaby J

    2015-06-01

    Nonnative organisms in the ballast water of freshwater ships must be killed to prevent the spread of invasive species. The ideal ballast water treatment system (BWTS) would kill 100% of ballast water organisms with minimal residual toxicity to organisms in receiving waters. In the present study, the residual toxicity and chemistry of a BWTS was evaluated. Sodium hydroxide was added to elevate pH to >11.5 to kill ballast water organisms, then reduced to pH <9 by sparging with wet-scrubbed diesel exhaust (the source of CO2 ). Cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 2 d to BWTS water under an air atmosphere (pH drifted to ≥9) or a 2.5% CO2 atmosphere (pH 7.5-8.2), then transferred to control water for 5 d to assess potential delayed toxicity. Chemical concentrations in the BWTS water met vessel discharge guidelines with the exception of concentrations of copper. There was little to no residual toxicity to cladocerans or fish, but the BWTS water was toxic to amphipods. Maintaining a neutral pH and diluting BWTS water by 50% eliminated toxicity to the amphipods. The toxicity of BWTS water would likely be minimal because of rapid dilution in the receiving water, with subsurface release likely preventing pH rise. This BWTS has the potential to become a viable method for treating ballast water released into freshwater systems. PMID:25693486

  2. Hydrothermal treatment of naturally contaminated maize in the presence of sodium metabisulfite, methylamine and calcium hydroxide; effects on the concentration of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Inga; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium toxin-contaminated ground maize was hydrothermally treated in the presence of different combinations of chemicals in order to simultaneously reduce zearalenone (ZEA) and deoxynivalenol (DON) concentrations. Treatments were carried out in a laboratory conditioner at 80 °C and 17 % moisture. Six different treatments were performed, consisting of 3 doses of methylamine (MMA; 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg maize) at a constant dose of 5 g sodium metabisulfite (SBS)/kg, either with or without the addition of 20 g calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)/kg. The used maize was contaminated with approximately 45.99 mg DON/kg and 3.46 mg ZEA/kg. Without the addition of Ca(OH)2, DON reductions reached approximately 82% after 1-min treatment and the toxin disappeared nearly completely after 10 min when 2.5 or 5 g MMA were applied. ZEA concentrations were only marginally affected. In the presence of Ca(OH)2, reductions in DON concentrations were lower, but were enhanced by increasing doses of MMA. ZEA concentrations were reduced by 72, 85 and 95% within the first 5 min of the treatment at MMA dosages of 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg maize, respectively. The application of SBS in combination with a strong alkaline during hydrothermal treatment seems to be a promising approach to simultaneously decontaminate even high amounts of DON and ZEA in ground maize and may contribute to reduce the toxin load of diets. PMID:23536360

  3. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  4. Method and system for producing hydrogen using sodium ion separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Frost, Lyman

    2013-05-21

    A method of producing hydrogen from sodium hydroxide and water is disclosed. The method comprises separating sodium from a first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream in a sodium ion separator, feeding the sodium produced in the sodium ion separator to a sodium reactor, reacting the sodium in the sodium reactor with water, and producing a second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream and hydrogen. The method may also comprise reusing the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream by combining the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream with the first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream. A system of producing hydrogen is also disclosed.

  5. Laser-luminescent determination of uranium in natural waters with concentration of titanium hydroxide and using sodium polysilicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitina, S.A.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1987-05-01

    Two methods for determining uranium in samples with a high content of quenching agents are compared, taking as an example the analysis of waters from the Vuoksa River, Baltic Sea and Finnish Bay. The first of these methods was developed by the authors and consists in concentrating uranium on TiO/sub 2/ x nH/sub 2/O under dynamic conditions, followed by laser luminescent determination at 77/sup 0/K in 0.1 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The second method consists in direct recording of the luminescence of uranium in a 0.7% solution of sodium polysilicate at room temperature. The detection limit of the second method is estimated by the authors as 2 x 10/sup -11/ g/ml, while the detection limit of the first method is lower because concentration is used. The method is especially suitable for analysis of natural waters with a high concentration of hydrolyzable elements. Quenching rate constants of uranyl were measured for a large number of ions in a polysilicate medium.

  6. Hydrogelation and Crystallization of Sodium Deoxycholate Controlled by Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Guihua; Hu, Yuanyuan; Sui, Jianfei; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-02-16

    The gelation and crystallization behavior of a biological surfactant, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), mixed with l-taric acid (L-TA) in water is described in detail. With the variation of molar ratio of L-TA to NaDC (r = nL-TA/nNaDC) and total concentration of the mixtures, the transition from sol to gel was observed. SEM images showed that the density of nanofibers gradually increases over the sol-gel transition. The microstructures of the hydrogels are three-dimensional networks of densely packed nanofibers with lengths extending to several micrometers. One week after preparation, regular crystallized nanospheres formed along the length of the nanofibers, and it was typical among the transparent hydrogels induced by organic acids with pKa1 value <3.4. Small-angle X-ray diffraction demonstrated differences in the molecular packing between transparent and turbid gels, indicating a variable hydrogen bond mode between NaDC molecules. PMID:26783993

  7. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce2O3 and CeO2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  8. Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide as a responsive fluorescent material and its interaction with glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yufeng; Li, Fei; Yu, Gensheng; Wei, Junchao

    2012-10-01

    The paper describes a study on the fluorescence of a Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Eu-doped LDH) response to glutamic acid (Glu). Various characterizations (UV-Vis transmittance, TG-DTA and IR-spectrum) indicated that there is an interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu. Fluorescent study was found that the red emissions resulted from 5D0-7FJ transition (J = 1, 2) of Eu3+ markedly decreased, while the blue emission at 440 nm contributed to Glu shifted to low energy after the addition of Glu to the Eu-doped LDH. The fluorescent changes may be relevant to the hydrogen-bond interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu, and the mechanism of the interaction between Eu-doped LDH and Glu was discussed.

  9. Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration on the photocatalytic activity and dielectric properties of intercalated sodium dodecyl sulfate into Zn–Cd–Al layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Abdullah Ahmed Ali; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS were synthesized with different SDS concentrations. • Photocatalytic activity of samples was improved by increasing SDS concentration. • Dielectric response of LDH can be described by anomalous low frequency dispersion. • The dc conductivity values were calculated for Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS samples. • ESR spectra exhibited the successful intercalation of DS molecule into LDH gallery. - Abstract: Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been successfully intercalated into Zn–Cd–Al–LDH precursor with different SDS concentrations (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 1 mol L{sup −1}) using the coprecipitation method at (Zn{sup 2+} + Cd{sup 2+})/Al{sup 3+} molar ratio of 13 and pH 8. The structural, morphological, texture and composition properties of the synthesized (Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS) nanostructure were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), respectively. The photocatalytic activity of these materials was developed by increasing the concentration of intercalated SDS. The absorbance spectra have been used to detect an anion in the LDH interlayer before and after the intercalation process, which confirmed the presence of the dodecyl sulfate (DS{sup −}) anion into LDH gallery after intercalation. The anomalous low frequency dispersion (ALFD) has been used to describe the dielectric response of Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS nanostructure using the second type of universal power law. At low frequency, the polarization effect of electrodes caused the rising in dielectric constant and loss values. An important result of the dielectric measurements is the calculated dc conductivity values, which are new in dielectric spectroscopy of LDH materials. An important result of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra exhibited the successful intercalation of DS molecule into LDH gallery. The g-factor value was affected by

  10. Synthesis and selective IR absorption properties of iminodiacetic-acid intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; Xu, Xiangyu; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue; Li, Dianqing

    2010-05-01

    An MgAl-NO 3-layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor has been prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Reaction with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) under weakly acidic conditions led to the replacement of the interlayer nitrate anions by iminodiacetic acid anions. The product was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, TG-DTA, ICP, elemental analysis and SEM. The results show that the original interlayer nitrate anions of LDHs precursor were replaced by iminodiacetic acid anions and that the resulting intercalation product MgAl-IDA-LDH has an ordered crystalline structure. MgAl-IDA-LDH was mixed with low density polyethylene (LDPE) using a masterbatch method. LDPE films filled with MgAl-IDA-LDH showed a higher mid to far infrared absorption than films filled with MgAl-CO 3-LDH in the 7-25 μm range, particularly in the key 9-11 μm range required for application in agricultural plastic films.

  11. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  12. Nanohybrids of Mg/Al layered double hydroxide and long-chain (C18) unsaturated fatty acid anions: Structure and sorptive properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-chain (C18) unsaturated fatty acid anions, elaidate (ELA), oleate (OLE), linoleate (LINO), and linolenate (LINOLEN), were intercalated into Mg/Al (3:1) layered double hydroxide (LDH) and the resultant organo-LDH nanohybrid materials were characterized and subsequently evaluated as sorbents of s...

  13. Bacteria recovered from whole-carcass rinsates of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of spray washing carcasses with lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) on bacteria recovered from whole-carcass-rinsates (WCR) was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Camp...

  14. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  15. Swelling assisted photografting of itaconic acid onto sodium alginate membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşkın, Gülşen; Şanlı, Oya; Asman, Gülsen

    2011-09-01

    Grafting of itaconic acid (IA) was achieved onto sodium alginate (NaAlg) membranes by using UV-radiation. Process was performed under nitrogen atmosphere and benzophenone (BP) was used as a photoinitiator. Membranes were preswelled before the polymerization process and ethanol was determined as the best swelling agent among the studied solvents. The effect of polymerization time, initiator and monomer concentrations on the grafting efficiency were investigated. The best conditions for optimum grafting were obtained with IA concentration of 1.0 M, a BP concentration of 0.1 M and a reaction time of 4 h at 25 °C. Under these conditions grafting efficiency for NaAlg-g-IA membranes was found to be 14% (w/w). To obtain further increase in grafting efficiency membranes were also preswelled in IA and BP solutions and polymerization was carried out at different temperatures after UV polymerization. Grafted membranes were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Effect of grafting on membrane properties such as intrinsic viscosity and swelling percentage were also determined.

  16. [Molluscacide activity of a mixture of 6-n-alkyl salicylic acids (anacardic acid) and 2 of its complexes with copper (II) and lead (II)].

    PubMed

    Mendes, N M; de Oliveira, A B; Guimarães, J E; Pereira, J P; Katz, N

    1990-01-01

    The molluscicide activity of hexanic extract from Anacardium occidentale L. (cashew) nut shell, of copper (II) complex, of lead (II) complex and anacardic acid has been compared in the laboratory in an attempt to obtain better stability than anacardic acid. This was obtained from the hexanic extract of the cashew nut shell by precipitation with lead (II) hydroxide or cupric sulfate plus sodium hydroxide or (II) cupric hydroxide followed by treatment of lead (II) complex with a diluted solution of sulfuric acid. Ten products of the mixture obtained were tested on adults snails of Biomphalaria glabrata at 1 to 10 ppm. The most active products were copper (II) complex, obtained by cupric sulfate plus sodium hydroxide, and anacardic acid (sodium hydroxide) which presented activity at 4 ppm. The anacardic acid's lead content was above the limits accepted by the United States standards. PMID:2133588

  17. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  18. Acid and redox properties of mixed oxides prepared by calcination of chromate-containing layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Arco, M. del; Carriazo, D.; Martin, C.; Perez-Grueso, A.M.; Rives, V. . E-mail: vrives@usal.es

    2005-11-15

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with Mg and Al in the layers and carbonate, nitrate or chloride in the interlayer, or with Zn and Al in the layers and chloride in the interlayer, have been prepared by coprecipitation, and have been used as precursors to prepare chromate-containing LDHs. All these systems, as well as those obtained upon their calcination up to 800 deg. C, have been characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and vis-UV spectroscopies, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), nitrogen adsorption at -196 deg. C for surface texture and porosity assessment, and FT-IR monitoring of pyridine adsorption for surface acidity determination. The results obtained show that the crystallinity of the chromate-containing LDH depends on the precursor used. The layered structure of the Mg, Al systems is stabilised up to 400 deg. C upon incorporation of chromate; however, the Zn,Al-chromate samples collapse between 200 and 300 deg. C, with simultaneous formation of ZnO. Calcination of the samples above 400 deg. C gives rise to a reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), as concluded from vis-UV spectroscopic studies. The TPR profiles show that chromate in ZnAl hydrotalcite is more easily reduced than that incorporated in the magnesium ones. Moderately strong surface Lewis acid sites exist in all samples calcined below 500 deg. C.

  19. Impact of size, secondary structure, and counterions on the binding of small ribonucleic acids to layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Pescador, Jorge; Pollok, Nicole; Beall, Gary W; Maeder, Corina; Lewis, L Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Use of ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference to regulate protein expression has become an important research topic and gene therapy tool, and therefore, finding suitable vehicles for delivery of small RNAs into cells is of crucial importance. Layered double metal hydroxides such as hydrotalcite (HT) have shown great promise as nonviral vectors for transport of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA), proteins, and drugs into cells, but the adsorption of RNAs to these materials has been little explored. In this study, the binding of small RNAs with different lengths and levels of secondary structure to HT nanoparticles has been analyzed and compared to results obtained with small DNAs in concurrent experiments. Initial experiments established the spectrophotometric properties of HT in aqueous solutions and determined that HT particles could be readily sedimented with near 100% efficiencies. Use of RNA+HT cosedimentation experiments as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated strong adsorption of RNA 25mers to HT, with twofold greater binding of single-stranded RNAs relative to double-stranded molecules. Strong affinities were also observed with ssRNA and dsRNA 54mers and with more complex transfer RNA molecules. Competition binding and RNA displacement experiments indicated that RNA-HT associations were strong and were only modestly affected by the presence of high concentrations of inorganic anions. PMID:26620852

  20. Preparation and controlled-release studies of a protocatechuic acid-magnesium/aluminum-layered double hydroxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2013-01-01

    In the study reported here, magnesium/aluminum (Mg/Al)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) was intercalated with an anticancer drug, protocatechuic acid, using ion-exchange and direct coprecipitation methods, with the resultant products labeled according to the method used to produce them: “PANE” (ie, protocatechuic acid-Mg/Al nanocomposite synthesized using the ion-exchange method) and “PAND” (ie, protocatechuic acid-Mg/Al nanocomposite synthesized using the direct method), respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the intercalation of protocatechuic acid into the inter-galleries of Mg/Al-LDH. The protocatechuic acid between the interlayers of PANE and PAND was found to be a monolayer, with an angle from the z-axis of 8° for PANE and 15° for PAND. Thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis results revealed that the thermal stability of protocatechuic acid was markedly enhanced upon intercalation. The loading of protocatechuic acid in PANE and PAND was estimated to be about 24.5% and 27.5% (w/w), respectively. The in vitro release study of protocatechuic acid from PANE and PAND in phosphate-buffered saline at pH 7.4, 5.3, and 4.8 revealed that the nanocomposites had a sustained release property. After 72 hours incubation of PANE and PAND with MCF-7 human breast cancer and HeLa human cervical cancer cell lines, it was found that the nanocomposites had suppressed the growth of these cancer cells, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 35.6 μg/mL for PANE and 36.0 μg/mL for PAND for MCF-7 cells, and 19.8 μg/mL for PANE and 30.3 μg/mL for PAND for HeLa cells. No half maximal inhibitory concentration for either nanocomposite was found for 3T3 cells. PMID:23737666

  1. 40 CFR 721.10437 - Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10437 Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono... chemical substances identified generically as sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10437 - Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10437 Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono... chemical substances identified generically as sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium...

  3. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    ... penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), products containing iron, tetracycline (Sumycin, Tetracap, and others), ticlopidine (Ticlid), and vitamins.be aware that aluminum hydroxide may interfere with other medicines, making them less effective. Take your other medications 1 ...

  4. Reduction of sodium deoxycholic acid-induced scratching behaviour by bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Izumi; Majima, Masataka

    1999-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of sodium deoxycholic acid into the anterior of the back of male ddY mice elicited dose-dependent scratching of the injected site with the forepaws and hindpaws.Up to 100 μg of sodium deoxycholic acid induced no significant increase in vascular permeability at the injection site as assessed by a dye leakage method.Bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor antagonists, FR173657 and Hoe140, significantly decreased the frequency of scratching induced by sodium deoxycholic acid.Treatment with aprotinin to inhibit tissue kallikrein reduced the scratching behaviour induced by sodium deoxycholic acid, whereas treatment with soybean trypsin inhibitor to inhibit plasma kallikrein did not.Although injection of kininase II inhibitor, lisinopril together with sodium deoxycholic acid did not alter the scratching behaviour, phosphoramidon, a neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, significantly increased the frequency of scratching.Homogenates of the skin excised from the backs of mice were subjected to gel-filtration column chromatography followed by an assay of kinin release by trypsin from each fraction separated. Less kinin release from the fractions containing kininogen of low molecular weight was observed in the skin injected with sodium deoxycholic acid than in normal skin.The frequency of scratching after the injection of sodium deoxycholic acid in plasma kininogen-deficient Brown Norway Katholiek rats was significantly lower than that in normal rats of the same strain, Brown Norway Kitasato rats.These results indicate that BK released from low-molecular-weight kininogen by tissue kallikrein, but not from high-molecular-weight kininogen by plasma kallikrein, may be involved in the scratching behaviour induced by the injection of sodium deoxycholic acid in the rodent. PMID:10051136

  5. NICKEL HYDROXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    MCBREEN,J.

    1997-11-01

    Nickel hydroxides have been used as the active material in the positive electrodes of several alkaline batteries for over a century. These materials continue to attract a lot of attention because of the commercial importance of nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries. This review gives a brief overview of the structure of nickel hydroxide battery electrodes and a more detailed review of the solid state chemistry and electrochemistry of the electrode materials. Emphasis is on work done since 1989.

  6. Sodium-coupled sugar and amino acid transport in an acidic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, G A; Clay, L P

    1988-01-01

    1. Nutrient transport mechanisms of lobster hepatopancreatic epithelial brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) are strongly influenced by the acidic nature of the tubular lumen. 2. Sodium-dependent glucose uptake by BBMV was electrogenic and was stimulated at low pH by reducing sugar transport Ki, without affecting JM. 3. Glutamate was largely transported in zwitterionic form at pH 4.0 by an electrically silent cotransport mechanism with both Na and Cl. 4. Increased H+ concentration tripled the apparent membrane permeability to glutamate as well as the amino acid transport JM. 5. At pH 4.0 leucine was transported as a cation by two dissimilar carrier systems: a Na-independent process shared by polar amino acids, and an electroneutral Na-2Cl-dependent mechanism shared with non-polar amino acids. 6. A model is proposed for hepatopancreatic BBMV at acidic pH which employs ionic chemical gradients and membrane potential as nutrient transport driving forces. PMID:2902970

  7. Leachability of retorted oil shale by strong complexometric agents. [Sodium citrates, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, E.; Carroll, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Extraction of solid waste materials with complexometric agents may offer a quick and effective method for assessing the potential long-term release of hazardous chemical constituents. Complexometric agent extraction may establish the maximum amount of elements of environmental concern that can be released to the environment and the capability of waste materials to release them. In this study, four samples of directly (DH) and indirectly (IH) retorted oil shales were extracted with deionized-distilled water and strong complexometric agents. The complexometric agent solutions were composed of 0.5M sodium citrate (citrate), 0.05M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 0.05M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The water extracts were very alkaline with pH values ranging from 11.0 to 11.8 for IH extracts and 12.2 to 12.8 for DH extracts. Sodium, chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were the predominant dissolved species in the IH water extracts. The DH water extracts contained mainly sodium, calcium, chloride, potassium, and sulfate. Water-extractable minor and trace elements were aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, lithium, magnesium, molybdenum, silicon, and strontium. Complexometric extraction released detectable amounts of arsenic, antimony, selenium, lead, vanadium, and zinc. Other elements of environmental concern, including silver, cobalt, chromium, and nickel, were not detected in excess of the limits of quantitation in complexometric extracts. Based upon the analytical results, it was found that the retorted oil shale mineralogy influenced the extracting solution composition, i.e., when comparing the leachates from the IH and DH samples. Also, the complexometric agents hastened the release of certain constituents into solution compared to water extracts. 17 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  8. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined. PMID:27482644

  9. The effect of low solublility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-02-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be performed in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide submicrometer particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion: whereas the organic covering has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles change their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  10. The effect of low solubility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be investigated in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide sub-micrometre particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion, whereas the organic surfactant has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles experience appreciable shifts in their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  11. Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

    2012-09-18

    An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

  12. Evaluation of xylitol production using corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate by combining tetrabutylammonium hydroxide extraction with dilute acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Honghua; Shao, Tingting; Zhong, Chao; Li, Hengxiang; Jiang, Min; Zhou, Hua; Wei, Ping

    2016-10-20

    In this paper, we produced hemicellulosic hydrolysate from corncob by tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) extraction and dilute acid hydrolysis combined, further evaluating the feasibility of the resultant corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate used in xylitol production by Candida tropicalis. Optimized conditions for corncob hemicellulose extraction by TBAH was obtained via response surface methodology: time of 90min, temperature of 60°C, liquid/solid ratio of 12 (v/w), and TBAH concentration of 55%, resulting in a hemicellulose extraction of 80.07% under these conditions. The FT-IR spectrum of the extracted corncob hemicellulose is consistent with that of birchwood hemicellulose and exhibits specific absorbance of hemicelluloses at 1380, 1168, 1050, and 900cm(-1). In addition, we found that C. tropicalis can ferment the resulting corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate with pH adjustment and activated charcoal treatment leading to a high xylitol yield and productivity of 0.77g/g and 2.45g/(Lh), respectively. PMID:27474613

  13. Adsorption and photodegradation kinetics of herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid with MgFeTi layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong; Beak, Min-wook; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-01

    The calcined layered double hydroxides (cLDHs) Ti-doped and undoped MgFe for this study were prepared by co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) techniques and tested for adsorption and photodegradation (including photocatalytic and photo-Fenton-like) of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation. In the range of studied operating conditions, the as-prepared samples exhibited excellent photo-Fenton-like activity, leading to more than 80-95% degradation of 2,4,5-T at initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) with 4 g calcined LDHs per liter, was accomplished in 360 min, while 2,4,5-T half-life time was as short as 99-182 min. The kinetics of adsorption and photodegradation of 2,4,5-T were also discussed. These results offered a green, low cost and high efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation. PMID:26706931

  14. Corrosion resistance of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide/poly(lactic acid) composite coating on magnesium alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Liu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Fen; Li, Shuo-Qi; Cui, Hong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (ZnAl-LDH) coating consisted of uniform hexagonal nano-plates was firstly synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal treatment on the AZ31 alloy, and then a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) coating was sealed on the top layer of the ZnAl-LDH coating using vacuum freeze-drying. The characteristics of the ZnAl-LDH/PLA composite coatings were investigated by means of XRD, SEM, FTIR and EDS. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was assessed by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that the ZnAl-LDH coating contained a compact inner layer and a porous outer layer, and the PLA coating with a strong adhesion to the porous outer layer can prolong the service life of the ZnAl-LDH coating. The excellent corrosion resistance of this composite coating can be attributable to its barrier function, ion-exchange and self-healing ability.

  15. Intercalation of amino acids and oligopeptides into Zn Al layered double hydroxide by coprecipitation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisawa, Sumio; Sasaki, Shuji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Nakayama, Hirokazu; Narita, Eiichi

    2006-05-01

    The coprecipitation of amino acids and oligopeptides with the Zn Al LDH was investigated using phenylalanine (Phe), phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (Phe-Phe), glycyl-phenylalanine (Gly Phe), glycine (Gly), glycyl-glycine (Gly Gly), glycyl-glycyl-glycine (Gly Gly Gly) and N-(N-γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl)-glycine (GSH) as guest species. The coprecipitation behavior of amino acids and oligopeptides was found to be influenced by the solution pH and the kind of their side chain groups, and reached the maximum at pH 8 or 9. The basal spacing, d003, of the Phe, Phe-Phe and GSH/LDH was 1.81, 2.41 and 1.64 nm, supporting that guests were arranged vertical to the LDH basal layer. Acceding to the basal spacing of the Gly, Gly Gly and Gly Gly Gly/LDH (d003=0.84 0.88 nm), these guests were oriented horizontal to the LDH basal layer with the co-intercalated NO3-. Moreover, the amount of Phe-Phe, Gly Gly and Gly Gly Gly intercalated was almost the same as that of Phe and Gly despite increasing the number peptide bond and the molecular size. GSH was intercalated into the LDH interlayer space as GSH oxidized form with bridged LDH layers by their carboxylate groups.

  16. Dissolvable layered double hydroxide coated magnetic nanoparticles for extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of phenolic acids in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Ghani, Milad

    2014-10-31

    A magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxide coated on magnetic nanoparticles was synthesized and used as a sorbent to extract some phenolic acids including p-hydroxy benzoic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid from fruit juices. After extraction, the elution step was performed through dissolving double hydroxide layers containing the analytes by changing the solution pH. The extracted phenolic acids were separated and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection. Experimental parameters such as sorbent amount, solution pH, desorption solvent volume and extraction time were studied and optimized. The linearity range of the method was between 2 and 500μgL(-1) with the determination coefficient (r(2)) higher than 0.991. Relative standard deviations for intra- and inter-day precision for the analytes at 100μgL(-1) were in the range of 4.3-9.2% and 4.9-8.6%, respectively. Batch-to-batch reproducibility at 100μgL(-1) concentration level was in the range of 7.8-11% (n=3). The limits of detection were between 0.44 and 1.3μgL(-1). Relative recoveries higher than 81% with RSDs in the range of 4.2-9.7% were obtained in the analysis of fruit juice samples. PMID:25260344

  17. The Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation with Trifluoroacetic Acid and Household Sodium Percarbonate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Clemons, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    A method for carrying out the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cyclopentanone to [delta]-valerolactone in a large-section introductory organic chemistry laboratory course is reported. The oxidizing agent is trifluoroperoxyacetic acid generated in situ from trifluoroacetic acid and household sodium percarbonate such as OxiClean, Oxi Magic, or…

  18. 21 CFR 173.45 - Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... method entitled “Determination of Molecular Weight Distribution of Poly(Maleic) Acid,” March 17, 1992... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Office of Food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt....

  19. Hydrogen generation by tin corrosion in lactic acid solution promoted by sodium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    A method to produce high purity hydrogen using the corrosion of tin metal in lactic acid solutions is studied. The addition of sodium perchlorate has been also investigated for promoting the tin-lactic acid reaction. The data reveal that the rate of hydrogen production increases with increasing lactic acid concentration. The presence of perchlorate ions in lactic acid solution enhances the active dissolution of tin metal and tends to breakdown the passive film and promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Polarization measurements show that the breakdown potential (Epit) decreases with increase in sodium perchlorate concentration. An increase in temperature accelerates the rate of solubility of passive layer on the tin surface. Moreover, a synergistic effect of sodium perchlorate in combination with increasing the solution temperature is key in promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Results obtained from hydrogen and polarization measurements are in good agreement. These measurements are complemented with SEM, EDX and XRD examinations of the electrode surface.

  20. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, ... oxide and anhydrous citric acid combine when the powder is mixed with water to form a medication ...

  1. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours. PMID:22841594

  2. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  3. Comparison of the kinetic laws of the dissolution of bauxite and aluminum and iron(III) oxides and hydroxides in hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gololobova, E. G.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Kozlov, K. V.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the temperature and concentration of a hydrochloric acid solution on the dissolution kinetics of aluminum and iron(III) oxides and hydroxides and a natural sample of aluminum-containing raw materials, bauxite, is studied. The rate W of the transition of iron(III) ions from bauxite is higher than the rate of aluminum ion transition. The dependence of the fraction of a dissolved solid phase on time τ of dissolution of the oxides and hydroxides is determined, α = 1 — exp(- Asinh( Wτ)). The solubility of iron(III) chloride increases and that of aluminum chloride decreases as the HCl concentration increases. An empirical equation is proposed for the description of the dependence of the process rate on a series of parameters,.

  4. Production of biodiesel and lactic acid from rapeseed oil using sodium silicate as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun-Duo; Guo, Feng; Fang, Zhen; Tian, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Li-Qun; Zhang, Fan

    2011-07-01

    Biodiesel and lactic acid from rapeseed oil was produced using sodium silicate as catalyst. The transesterification in the presence of the catalyst proceeded with a maximum yield of 99.6% under optimized conditions [3% (w/w) sodium silicate, methanol/oil molar ratio 9/1, reaction time 60 min, reaction temperature 60°C, and stirring rate 250 rpm]. After six consecutive transesterification reactions, the catalyst was collected and used for catalysis of the conversion of glycerol to lactic acid. A maximum yield of 80.5% was achieved when the reaction was carried out at a temperature of 300°C for 90 min. Thus, sodium silicate is an effective catalyst for transesterification and lactic acid production from the biodiesel by-product, glycerol. PMID:21530245

  5. Influence of Sodium Carbonate on Decomposition of Formic Acid by Discharge inside Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2015-09-01

    An influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubble in water was investigated. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of addition of sodium carbonate, the pH value increased with decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the increase of pH value contributed to improve an efficiency of the formic acid decomposition because the reaction rate of ozone and formic acid increased with increasing pH value. In the case of argon injection, the decomposition rate was not affected by the pH value owing to the high rate constants for loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  6. Effects of meconic and comenic acids on slow sodium channels of secondary neurons.

    PubMed

    Derbenev, A V; Krylov, B V; Shurygin AYa

    2000-01-01

    Effects of comenic and meconic acids on cultured dorsal root ganglion cells were investigated by the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The acids, having a well-known antiinflammatory and antibacterial action, decreased effective charge transfer in the activation gating system of TTX-resistant (slow) sodium channels in a dose-dependent manner. The effects were described by Hill's equation. The dissociation constant and Hill coefficient values were K(D) = 100 nM and X = 0.5 (for comenic acid) and K(D) = 10 nM and X = 0.34 (for meconic acid). The nonspecific antagonist of opioid receptors naltrexone totally blocked the effects. We suggest that the acids studied activate a subpopulation of opioid receptors negatively coupled to TTXr sodium channels. PMID:10768488

  7. Efficient hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis using silica sulfuric acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Joydev; Roy, Binayak; Sharma, Pratibha

    2015-02-01

    A heterogeneous acid catalyst, silica sulfuric acid, was prepared from silica gel (SiO2) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Addition of SO3H functional group to SiO2 has been confirmed through various characterization techniques. The effect of this heterogeneous acid catalyst on hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction was studied for different ratios of catalyst to NaBH4 and at different temperatures. The catalyst exhibited high catalytic activity towards sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction. The activation energy of the NaBH4 hydrolysis reaction in the presence of silica sulfuric acid was calculated to be the lowest (17 kJ mol-1) among reported heterogeneous catalysts till date.

  8. An evaluation of foaming potential in the IDMS melter. [Neutralization of waste sludge base components (hydroxides and carbonates) with nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.

    1992-10-22

    The present DWPF flowsheet calls for the chemical treatment of waste sludge with 90 wt% formic acid prior to the addition of the Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) product. An alternative processing methodology, denoted the Nitric Acid Flowsheet'', has been proposed. In the application of this flowsheet, nitric acid would be used to neutralize sludge base components (hydroxides and carbonates) prior to the addition of late wash PHA. The late wash PHA will contain sufficient quantities of formic acid to adequately complete necessary reduction-oxidation (REDOX) reactions. The use of this flowsheet may result in a change in the nominal concentrations of two of the major REDOX reaction participants: formate (HCOO[sup minus]) and nitrate (NO[sub 3][sup minus]).

  9. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial ins...

  10. Influence of UV rays on Feulgen-type staining with azure A-SO2 prepared with normal hydrochloric acid and sodium thiosulphate.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M K

    1981-07-01

    This communication presents a new method for the preparation of azure A-SO2 for use in Feulgen procedure. The salient feature of this method lies in the fact that azure A-SO2 can be decolourised with normal hydrochloric acid and sodium thiosulphate. The pH of this dye reagent is 2.3 and it is of water colour after filtration. The pH of this dye-reagent is raised to 4.0 with an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide. Nuclear colouration with this newly developed dye-reagent on acid-hydrolysed DNA of tissue sections becomes fairly satisfactory under the usual laboratory conditions. Staining with this dye-reagent under exposure to UV ray is, however, vastly improved within 5 minutes as compared with the control. Stained sections do withstand treatment in SO2 water without exhibiting any leaching of the dye from the nuclei. Possible mode of action of UV rays in increasing the intensity of staining as well as the speed of reaction has been suggested. PMID:6167839

  11. Final report on the safety assessment of Malic Acid and Sodium Malate.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Z

    2001-01-01

    Malic Acid functions in cosmetic formulations as a pH adjuster, and Sodium Malate functions as a skin conditioning agent-humectant. Malic Acid is reportedly used in almost 50 cosmetic formulations across a range of product types at low concentrations, whereas Sodium Malate is used in only one. As a pH adjuster, Malic Acid is used at low concentrations. One commercial method of preparing Malic Acid is hydration of fumaric acid or maleic acid, and then purified to limit the amount of the starting material present. Because Malic Acid is a component of the Kreb's cycle, another method is fermentation. Malic Acid was relatively nontoxic in acute toxicity studies using animals. In a chronic oral study, feeding Malic Acid to rats resulted only in weight gain changes and changes in feed consumption. Malic Acid did not cause reproductive toxicity in mice, rats, or rabbits. Malic Acid was a moderate to strong skin irritatant in animal tests, and was a strong ocular irritant. Malic Acid was not mutagenic across a range of genotoxicity tests. Malic Acid was irritating in clinical tests, with less irritation seen as pH of the applied material increased. Patients patch tested with Malic Acid, placed on a diet that avoided foods containing Malic or citric acid, and then challenged with a diet high in Malic and citric acid had both immediate urticarial and delayed contact dermatitis reactions. These data were considered sufficient to determine that Malic Acid and Sodium Malate would be safe at the low concentrations at which these ingredients would be used to adjust pH (even though Sodium Malate is not currently used for that purpose). The data, however, were insufficient to determine the safety of these ingredients when used in cosmetics as other than pH adjusters and specifically, the data are insufficient to determine the safety of Sodium Malate when used as a skin conditioning agent-humectant. The types of data required for the Expert Panel to determine the safety of Sodium

  12. Copper-mediated ortho C-H sulfonylation of benzoic acid derivatives with sodium sulfinates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jidan; Yu, Lin; Zhuang, Shaobo; Gui, Qingwen; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Wenduo; Tan, Ze

    2015-04-14

    Copper-mediated direct ortho C-H bond sulfonylation of benzoic acid derivatives with sodium sulfinates was achieved by employing an 8-aminoquinoline moiety as the bidentate directing group. Various aryl sulfones were synthesized in good yields with excellent regioselectivity. PMID:25766975

  13. 21 CFR 173.45 - Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt. 173.45 Section 173.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and...

  14. 21 CFR 173.45 - Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt. 173.45 Section 173.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and...

  15. 21 CFR 173.45 - Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polymaleic acid and its sodium salt. 173.45 Section 173.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and...

  16. Coordination nature of aluminum (oxy)hydroxides formed under the influence of low molecular weight organic acids and a soil humic acid studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, R. K.; Hu, Y. F.; Dynes, J. J.; Zhao, A. Z.; Blyth, R. I. R.; Kozak, L. M.; Huang, P. M.

    2010-11-01

    Organic ligands in the environment hinder the formation of crystalline Al precipitation products by perturbing the hydrolytic and polymeric reactions of Al resulting in the formation of short-range ordered (SRO) mineral colloids with varying degrees of crystallinity. However, the effect of these ligands on the mechanisms of their formation and nature of the transformation products of Al (oxy)hydroxides at the atomic and molecular levels is not well understood. In this study, the coordination structure of Al in Al (oxy)hydroxides formed under the influence of varying concentrations of low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids such as citric, malic, salicylic and acetic acids and a humic acid (HA) was investigated with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The Al K- and L-edge XANES spectra showed that with increasing LMW organic acid concentration the coordination number of Al changed from 6-fold to a mixture of 4- and 6-fold, except for acetate as acetate was unable to perturb the formation of Al (oxy)hydroxides at the acetate/Al molar ratio (MR) = 0.1. The proportion of 4-fold to 6-fold coordinated Al in the Al precipitation products depended on the structure and functionality of the LMW organic acids. The incorporation of the LMW organic acid into the network structure of Al (oxy)hydroxides prevented the formation of sheets/inter-layer H-bonding that was required for the formation of crystalline Al (oxy)hydroxides. The HA used in this study only slightly perturbed the crystallization of the Al (oxy)hydroxides at the concentrations used. The Al K-edge data showed that Al coordination number had not been altered in the presence of HA. The findings obtained in the present study are of fundamental significance in understanding the physicochemical behavior of soils and sediments, and their relation to the accumulation and transport of nutrients and pollutants in the

  17. Reaction Products of Unsaturated Polycarboxylic Acids and Sodium Hypophosphite for Improved Flame Resistance of Cotton-Containing Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reaction products of unsaturated polycarboxylic acids and sodium hypophosite were found to improve flame resistance of cellulosic materials as determined by the 45 degree flammability test for apparel textiles. The most effective product was that from the reaction of maleic acid with sodium hypopho...

  18. Gymnemic acids inhibit sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Dawid, Corinna; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-06-25

    To evaluate the activity of botanicals used in Chinese Traditional Medicine as hypoglycemic agents for diabetes type II prevention and/or treatment, extracts prepared from 26 medicinal herbs were screened for their inhibitory activity on sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) by using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording of glucose uptake in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with cRNA for SGLT1. Showing by far the strongest SGLT1 inhibitory effect, the phytochemicals extracted from Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult were located by means of activity-guided fractionation and identified as 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-tigloyl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (1) and 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-methylbutyryl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (2) by means of LC-MS/MS, UPLC-TOF/MS, and 1D/2D-NMR experiments. Both saponins exhibited low IC50 values of 5.97 (1) and 0.17 μM (2), the latter of which was in the same range as found for the high-affinity inhibitor phlorizin (0.21 μM). As SGLT1 is found in high levels in brush-border membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, these findings demonstrate for the first time the potential of these saponins for inhibiting electrogenic glucose uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24856809

  19. Effects of ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate on cyclic nucleotide metabolism in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J P; Weiss, A; Ito, M; Kelly, J; Parker, C W

    1979-01-01

    L-ascorbic acid (LAA) augmented cGMP many-fold in highly purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The cGMP response occurred within 10 sec and persisted for at least 60 min. D-ascorbic acid (DAA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) were also equally active in enhancing cGMP concentrations but metabolic precursors of ascorbic acid and other inorganic acids did not increase cGMP levels. Determination of the amount of DHAA contaminating the LAA precluded the possibility that it was solely responsible for the enhanced cGMP levels. The sodium or calcium salts of ascorbic acid did not increase cGMP concentrations. If these neutralized preparations were acidified, increased cGMP concentrations were then noted. In broken cell preparations, LAA, DAA, and DHAA and to a lesser extent sodium ascorbate (NaA) enhanced guanylate cyclase activity while neither inhibited cAMP or cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The possible role of H2O2, fatty acid liberation, prostaglandin production, oxidizing-reducing agents, and free radical formation in mediating the effects of ascorbic acid on cGMP levels were evaluated, but none of these potential mechanisms were definitively proven to be a required intermediary for the cGMP enhancing activity of ascorbic acid. LAA, DHAA or NaA did not induce lymphocyte transformation or modulate lectin-induced mitogenesis. PMID:36416

  20. Is the habitation of acidic-water sanctuaries by galaxiid fish facilitated by natural organic matter modification of sodium metabolism?

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Donovan, Katherine A; Hill, Jonathan V

    2012-01-01

    Acidic waters of New Zealand's West Coast are hypothesized to be a refuge for native galaxiid fish, allowing them to escape predation from acid-sensitive invasive salmonid species. To determine the mechanisms by which galaxiids tolerate low pH, we investigated sodium metabolism in inanga Galaxias maculatus in response to water pH, short-term acclimation to acidic waters, the presence and source of natural organic matter (NOM), and fish life history. Contrary to expectation, inanga were physiologically sensitive to acid exposure, displaying inhibited sodium influx and exacerbated sodium efflux. Short-term (144 h) acclimation to acid did not modify this effect, and NOM did not exert a protective effect on sodium metabolism at low pH. Inanga sourced from naturally acidic West Coast waters did, however, display a sodium influx capacity (J(max)) that was significantly elevated when compared with that of fish collected from neutral waters. All inanga, independent of source, exhibited exceptionally high sodium uptake affinities (18-40 μM) relative to previously studied freshwater teleosts. Although inanga displayed relatively poor physiological tolerance to acidic waters, their high sodium influx affinity coupled with their occupation of near-coastal waters with elevated sodium levels may permit habitation of low-pH freshwaters. PMID:22902374

  1. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Citric Acid and Sodium Carbonate with Deicers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at −20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at −20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  2. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  3. Application of dissolvable layered double hydroxides as sorbent in dispersive solid-phase extraction and extraction by co-precipitation for the determination of aromatic acid anions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2013-08-01

    Three types of magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides were synthesized and employed as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents to extract several aromatic acids (protocatechuic acid, mandelic acid, phthalic acid, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid) from aqueous samples. An interesting feature of these sorbents is that they dissolve when the pH of the solution is lower than 4. Thus, the analyte elution step, as needed in conventional sorbent-based extraction, was obviated by dissolving the sorbent in acid after extraction and separation from the sample solution. The extract was then directly injected into a high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection system for analysis. In the key adsorption process, both dispersive SPE and co-precipitation extraction with the sorbents were conducted and experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The results showed that both extraction methods provided low limits of detection (0.03-1.47 μg/L) and good linearity (r(2) > 0.9903). The optimized extraction conditions were applied to human urine and sports drink samples. This new and interesting extraction approach was demonstrated to be a fast and efficient procedure for the extraction of organic anions from aqueous samples. PMID:23855757

  4. Effect of single flame retardant aluminum tri-hydroxide and boric acid against inflammability and biodegradability of recycled PP/KF composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suharty, Neng Sri; Dihardjo, Kuncoro; Handayani, Desi Suci; Firdaus, Maulidan

    2016-03-01

    Composites rPP/DVB/AA/KF had been reactively synthesized in melt using starting material: recycled polypropylene (rPP), kenaf fiber (KF), multifunctional compound acrylic acid (AA), compatibilizer divinyl benzene (DVB). To improve the inflammability of composites, single flame retardant aluminum tri-hydroxide (ATH) and boric acid (BA) as an additive was added. The inflammability of the composites was tested according to ASTM D635. By using 20% ATH and 5% BA additive in the composites it is effectively inhibiting its time to ignition (TTI). Its burning rate (BR) can be reduced and its heat realease (%HR) decreases. The biodegradability of composites was quantified by its losing weight (LW) of composites after buried for 4 months in the media with rich cellulolytic bacteria. The result shows that the LW of composites in the presence 20% ATH and 5% BA is 6.3%.

  5. Hydroxamic acid interactions with solvated cerium hydroxides in the flotation of monazite and bastnäsite-Experiments and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvaramini, A.; Azizi, D.; Larachi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments were performed to clarify the interaction mechanisms between hydroxamic acid collectors and cerium hydroxides during the flotation of bastnäsite and monazite minerals. These minerals showed considerable floatability at moderately alkaline pH which was related to the adsorption of hydroxamic acids on their surfaces as confirmed by vibrational spectroscopic and zeta potential measurements. DFT simulations showed that at moderately alkaline pH, the interactions between solvated Ce(OH)2+ and Ce(OH)2+ and heptyl-hydroxamic acid (HHA) anions resulted in the formation of, respectively, [Ce(OH)(HHA)x(H2O)y]2-x (x[y = ] = 1[6],2[3],3[1]) and [Ce(OH)2(HHA)x(H2O)y]1-x (x[y = ] = 1[5],2[1],3[0]) complexes. The collector anions were found to interact directly through formation of two covalent bonds between their two polar-head oxygen atoms and cerium in the hydroxide complexes. However, formation of such new bonds resulted in breakage of a few covalent/electrostatic bonds between cerium and water molecules initially present in the first hydration shell of the rare-earth metal cation. Building up in the electric double layer of the semi-soluble minerals, these complexes, and by extension, those from other rare-earth elements belonging to monazite and bastnäsite, are speculated to play a role in the interactions between rare-earth minerals and hydroxamic acid collectors.

  6. Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

  7. A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid surfactant using silkworm pupae as stock material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min-Hui; Wan, Liang-Ze; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2014-03-01

    A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid (SFAAA) surfactant was synthesized using pupa oil and pupa protein hydrolysates (PPH) from a waste product of the silk industry. The aliphatic acids from pupa oil were modified into N-fatty acyl chlorides by thionyl chloride (SOCl2). SFAAA was synthesized using acyl chlorides and PPH. GC-MS analysis showed fatty acids from pupa oil consist mainly of unsaturated linolenic and linoleic acids and saturated palmitic and stearic acids. SFAAA had a low critical micelle concentration, great efficiency in lowering surface tension and strong adsorption at an air/water interface. SFAAA had a high emulsifying power, as well as a high foaming power. The emulsifying power of PPH and SFAAA in an oil/water emulsion was better with ethyl acetate as the oil phase compared to n-hexane. The environment-friendly surfactant made entirely from silkworm pupae could promote sustainable development of the silk industry.

  8. Final report on the safety assessment of Benzyl Alcohol, Benzoic Acid, and Sodium Benzoate.

    PubMed

    Nair, B

    2001-01-01

    Benzyl Alcohol is an aromatic alcohol used in a wide variety of cosmetic formulations as a fragrance component, preservative, solvent, and viscosity-decreasing agent. Benzoic Acid is an aromatic acid used in a wide variety of cosmetics as a pH adjuster and preservative. Sodium Benzoate is the sodium salt of Benzoic Acid used as a preservative, also in a wide range of cosmetic product types. Benzyl Alcohol is metabolized to Benzoic Acid, which reacts with glycine and excreted as hippuric acid in the human body. Acceptable daily intakes were established by the World Health Organization at 5 mg/kg for Benzyl Alcohol, Benzoic Acid, and Sodium Benzoate. Benzoic Acid and Sodium Benzoate are generally recognized as safe in foods according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. No adverse effects of Benzyl Alcohol were seen in chronic exposure animal studies using rats and mice. Effects of Benzoic Acid and Sodium Benzoate in chronic exposure animal studies were limited to reduced feed intake and reduced growth. Some differences between control and Benzyl Alcohol-treated populations were noted in one reproductive toxicity study using mice, but these were limited to lower maternal body weights and decreased mean litter weights. Another study also noted that fetal weight was decreased compared to controls, but a third study showed no differences between control and Benzyl Alcohol-treated groups. Benzoic Acid was associated with an increased number of resorptions and malformations in hamsters, but there were no reproductive or developmental toxicty findings in studies using mice and rats exposed to Sodium Benzoate, and, likewise, Benzoic Acid was negative in two rat studies. Genotoxicity tests for these ingredients were mostly negative, but there were some assays that were positive. Carcinogenicity studies, however, were negative. Clinical data indicated that these ingredients can produce nonimmunologic contact urticaria and nonimmunologic immediate contact reactions

  9. Increased cell loss in the human jejunum induced by laxatives (ricinoleic acid, dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate, magnesium sulphate, bile salts).

    PubMed Central

    Bretagne, J F; Vidon, N; L'Hirondel, C; Bernier, J J

    1981-01-01

    Two conjugated bile salts (10 mmol/l sodium glycocholate, 10 mmol/l sodium taurodeoxycholate) and three laxatives (30 mmol/l magnesium sulphate, 10 mmol/l ricinoleic acid, 2 mmol/l dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate) were tested on seven subjects with no intestinal lesions in 14 experiments by intestinal perfusion of the jejunum. A 25 cm segment was studied. Each solution was perfused at the rate of 10 ml/min. Water and electrolyte fluxes, losses of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and intestinal cell enzyme activity were measured in the fluids collected. All the laxatives and bile salts tested (except sodium glycocholate) induced water and electrolyte secretion, a rise in intraluminal DNA loss, and enzyme activity. It was possible to establish a significant correlation (p less than 0.001) between the amounts of water fluxes and DNA loss under the effect of dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate and ricinoleic acid. PMID:6165655

  10. Structural mechanisms underlying the function of epithelial sodium channel/acid-sensing ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Carattino, Marcelo D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family encompasses a group of cation-selective ion channels that are activated or modulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. This review describes findings that provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the function of these channels. Recent findings Epithelial sodium channels facilitate Na+ reabsorption in the distal nephron and hence have a role in fluid volume homeostasis and arterial blood pressure regulation. Acid-sensing ion channels are broadly distributed in the nervous system where they contribute to the sensory processes. The atomic structure of acid-sensing ion channel 1 illustrates the complex trimeric architecture of these proteins. Each subunit has two transmembrane spanning helices, a highly organized ectodomain and intracellular N-terminus and C-terminus. Recent findings have begun to elucidate the structural elements that allow these channels to sense and respond to extracellular factors. This review emphasizes the roles of the extracellular domain in sensing changes in the extracellular milieu and of the residues in the extracellular–transmembrane domains interface in coupling extracellular changes to the pore of the channel. Summary Epithelial sodium channels and acid-sensing ion channels have evolved to sense extracellular cues. Future research should be directed toward elucidating how changes triggered by extracellular factors translate into pore opening and closing events. PMID:21709553

  11. Sorption of nonpolar neutral organic compounds to low-surface-area metal (hydr)oxide- and humic acid- coated model aquifer sands.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jin Chul; Song, Myung-Shin; Kim, Jong-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    The roles of mineral-bound humic acid (HA) and mineral surfaces in the sorption of six nonpolar neutral organic compounds with relatively high aqueous solubility, S(w), (1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, chlorobenzene, m-xylene, toluene, and benzene) to low-surface-area (i.e., ≤ 1.2 m(2)/g) metal (hydr)oxide- and HA-coated sands with low organic carbon fractions (i.e., 0.006% ≤ f(oc) ≤ 0.044%) were investigated using well-characterized mineral surfaces [i.e., α-FeO(OH)- or Al(2)O(3)- coated sands], terrestrial HA, and solutions with relatively constant pH and ionic strength. Sorption isotherms of all six compounds to low-surface-area metal (hydr)oxide-and HA-coated sands were practically linear (i.e., 0.898 ≤ n ≤ 1.06), and resulted from a combination of sorption to both mineral-bound HA and mineral surfaces, with the dominance of either contribution depending on the properties of the sorbents (e.g., f(oc)) and organic compounds (e.g., S(w) and K(ow)). Compared to HA-associated high-surface-area, pure metal (hydr)oxides or clay minerals illustrating that loading levels of HA significantly impacted sorption affinity (i.e., K(oc)) and linearity (i.e., n) for particularly hydrophobic compounds (i.e., phenanthrene, anthracene and pyrene) due to the changes in fractionation, and structural and chemical properties of mineral-bound HA, the subsequent changes of sorption affinity and linearity appeared to be insignificant for the sorption of organic compounds with relatively high S(w) to low-surface-area metal (hydr)oxide- and HA-coated sands with low f(oc) values. Thus, the predictive models for the sorption of organic compounds with relatively high S(w) to low-surface-area metal (hydr)oxide- and HA-coated sands may not be remarkably improved by incorporating the complex changes of sorption affinity and linearity caused by the changes in fractionation, and structural and chemical properties of mineral-bound HA, although the mineral surfaces

  12. Evaluation of Controlled-Release Property and Phytotoxicity Effect of Insect Pheromone Zinc-Layered Hydroxide Nanohybrid Intercalated with Hexenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rozita; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Kadir, Wan Rasidah Wan Abdul; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Hin, Taufiq-Yap Yun

    2015-12-30

    A controlled release formulation for the insect pheromone hexenoic acid (HE) was successfully developed using zinc-layered hydroxide (ZLH) as host material through a simple coprecipitation technique, resulting in the formation of inorganic-organic nanolayered material with sustained release properties. The release of HE from its nanohybrid was found to occur in a controlled manner, governed by a pseudo-second order kinetics model. The maximum amount of HE released from the nanocomposite into solutions at pH 4, 6.5, and 8 was found to be 84, 73, and 83% for 1100 min, respectively. The hexenoate zinc-layered hydroxide nanomaterial (HEN) was found to be nontoxic for plants when green beans and wheat seeds were successfully germinated in all HEN concentrations tested in the experiment, with higher percentage of seed germination and higher radical seed growth as compared to its counter anion, HE. ZLH can be a promising carrier for insect pheromone toward a new generation of environmentally safe pesticide nanomaterial for crop protection. PMID:26501358

  13. Structural changes of polyacids initiated by their neutralization with various alkali metal hydroxides. Diffusion studies in poly(acrylic acid)s.

    PubMed

    Masiak, Michal; Hyk, Wojciech; Stojek, Zbigniew; Ciszkowska, Malgorzata

    2007-09-27

    The changes in the three-dimensional structure of the poly(acrylic acid), PAA, induced by incorporation of various alkali-metal counterions have been evaluated by studying diffusion of an uncharged probe (1,1'-ferrocenedimethanol) in the polymeric media. The studies are supported by the measurements of conductivity and viscosity of the polymeric media. Solutions of linear PAA of four different sizes (molecular weights: 450,000, 750,000, 1,250,000, 4,000,000) were neutralized with hydroxides of alkali metals of group 1 of the periodic table (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) to the desired neutralization degree. The transport properties of the obtained polyacrylates were monitored by measuring the changes in the probe diffusion coefficient during the titration of the polyacids. The probe diffusivity was determined from the steady-state current of the probe voltammetric oxidation at disk microelectrodes. Diffusivity of the probe increases with the increase in the degree of neutralization and with the increase in viscosity. It reaches the maximum value at about 60-80% of the polyacid neutralization. The way the probe diffusion coefficients change is similar in all polyacid solutions and gels. The increase in the size of a metal cation causes, in general, an enhancement in the transport of probe molecules. The biggest differences in the probe diffusivities are between lithium and cesium polyacrylates. The differences between the results obtained for cesium and rubidium are not statistically significant due to lack of good precision of the voltammetric measurements. The measurements of the electric conductivity of polyacrylates and the theoretical predictions supplemented the picture of electrostatic interactions between the polyanionic chains and the metal cations of increasing size. In all instances of the PAAs, the viscosity of the solutions rapidly increases in the 0-60% range of neutralization and then becomes constant in the 60-100% region. With the exception of the shortest

  14. Effect of A Long Chain Carboxylate Acid on Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle Structure: A SANS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriati, Arum; Giri Rachman Putra, Edy; Seok Seong, Baek

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a different hydrocarbon chain length of carboxylate acid, i.e. dodecanoic acid, CH3(CH)10COOH or lauric acid and hexadecanoic acid, CH3(CH2)14COOH or palmitic acid as a co-surfactant in the 0.3 M sodium dedecyl sulfate, SDS micellar solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The present of lauric acid has induced the SDS structural micelles. The ellipsoid micelles structures changed significantly in length (major axis) from 22.6 Å to 37.1 Å at a fixed minor axis of 16.7 Å in the present of 0.005 M to 0.1 M lauric acid. Nevertheless, this effect did not occur in the present of palmitic acid with the same concentration range. The present of palmitic acid molecules performed insignificant effect on the SDS micelles growth where the major axis of the micelle was elongated from 22.9 Å to 25.3 Å only. It showed that the appropriate hydrocarbon chain length between surfactant and co-surfactant molecules emerged as one of the determining factors in forming a mixed micelles structure.

  15. Direct coating for layered double hydroxide/4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid nanocomposite with silica by seeded polymerization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2004-09-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) ray absorbents have been used as sunscreen materials, but may pose a safety problem when used at high concentration. In order to prevent direct contact of organic UV rays absorbent by the human skin, an organic UV absorbent such as 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DASDSA) was intercalated into Zn 2Al-layered double hydroxide (Zn 2Al-LDHs) by coprecipiation reaction. The problem of deintercalation of organic molecules from LDHs by the anion exchange reaction with carbonate ion could be greatly depressed by forming a protection film of silica on the surface. Zn 2Al-LDH/DASDSA was directly coated with silica by means of a polymerization technique based on the Stöber method. The deintercalation behavior as well as UV-shielding properties were investigated for coated particles.

  16. High specificity in response of the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter to derivatives of pantothenic acid.

    PubMed

    Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Rotter, Charles J; Miller, Emily L; Varma, Manthena V; Dow, Robert L; Finn, M G

    2013-01-01

    Essential nutrients are attractive targets for the transport of biologically active agents across cell membranes, since many are substrates for active cellular importation pathways. The sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) is among the best characterized of these, and biotin derivatives have been its most popular targets. We have surveyed 45 derivatives of pantothenic acid, another substrate of SMVT, long known as a competitive inhibitor of biotin transport. Variations of the β-alanyl fragment of pantothenate were uniformly rejected by the transporter, including derivatives with very similar steric and acidic characteristics to the natural substrate. The secondary hydroxyl of the 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (pantoyl) fragment was the only position at which potential linkers could be attached while retaining activity as an inhibitor of biotin uptake and a substrate for sodium-dependent transport. However, triazole conjugates to several drug-like cargo motifs were not accepted as substrates by human SMVT in cell culture. Two compounds were observed which did not inhibit biotin uptake but were themselves transported in a sodium-dependent fashion, suggesting more complex behavior than expected. These studies represent the most extensive examination to date of pantothenate as an anchor for SMVT-mediated drug delivery, showing that this route requires further investigation before being judged promising. PMID:23578027

  17. Sodium-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by whole cells and membrane vesicles of Streptococcus bovis, a ruminal bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Strobel, H J; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1 cells were able to transport serine, threonine, or alanine, but only when they were incubated in sodium buffers. If glucose-energized cells were washed in potassium phosphate and suspended in potassium phosphate buffer, there was no detectable uptake. Cells deenergized with 2-deoxyglucose and incubated in sodium phosphate buffer were still able to transport serine, and this result indicated that the chemical sodium gradient was capable of driving transport. However, when the deenergized cells were treated with valinomycin and diluted into sodium phosphate to create both an artificial membrane potential and a chemical sodium gradient, rates of serine uptake were fivefold greater than in cells having only a sodium gradient. If deenergized cells were preloaded with sodium (no membrane potential or sodium gradient), there was little serine transport. Nigericin and monensin, ionophores capable of reversing sodium gradients across membranes, strongly inhibited sodium-dependent uptake of the three amino acids. Membrane vesicles loaded with potassium and diluted into either lithium or choline chloride were unable to transport serine, but rapid uptake was evident if sodium chloride was added to the assay mixture. Serine transport had an extremely poor affinity for sodium, and more than 30 mM was needed for half-maximal rates of uptake. Serine transport was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but an excess of alanine had little effect. Results indicated that S. bovis had separate sodium symport systems for serine or threonine and alanine, and either the membrane potential or chemical sodium gradient could drive uptake. PMID:3136141

  18. Synergistic effects of sodium lauroyl sarcosinate and glutamic acid in inhibition assembly against copper corrosion in acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinzhe; Zhang, Daquan; Zeng, Huijing; Xie, Bin; Gao, Lixin; Lin, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A self-assembled multilayer (SAM) from sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS) and glutamic acid (GLU) is formed on copper surface. Its inhibition ability against copper corrosion is examined by electrochemical analysis and weight loss test. In comparison to SAM formed by just SLS or GLU, a synergistic effect is observed when the coexistence of SLS and GLU in SAM. The SLS/GLU SAM has an acicular multilayer structure, and SAM prepared under the condition of 5 mM SLS and 1 mM GLU shows the best protection efficiency. PM6 calculation reveals that the synergistic effect stems from interactions between SLS, GLU and cupric ions.

  19. Absorption, fluorescence, and acid-base equilibria of rhodamines in micellar media of sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Obukhova, Elena N; Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A; Patsenker, Leonid D; Doroshenko, Andrey O; Marynin, Andriy I; Krasovitskii, Boris M

    2017-01-01

    Rhodamine dyes are widely used as molecular probes in different fields of science. The aim of this paper was to ascertain to what extent the structural peculiarities of the compounds influence their absorption, emission, and acid-base properties under unified conditions. The acid-base dissociation (HR(+)⇄R+H(+)) of a series of rhodamine dyes was studied in sodium n-dodecylsulfate micellar solutions. In this media, the form R exists as a zwitterion R(±). The indices of apparent ionization constants of fifteen rhodamine cations HR(+) with different substituents in the xanthene moiety vary within the range of pKa(app)=5.04 to 5.53. The distinct dependence of emission of rhodamines bound to micelles on pH of bulk water opens the possibility of using them as fluorescent interfacial acid-base indicators. PMID:27423469

  20. Comparative plasma pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur sodium and ceftiofur crystalline-free acid in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, J S; Caldwell, M; Cox, S; Hines, M; Credille, B C

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the plasma pharmacokinetic profile of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) and ceftiofur sodium in neonatal calves between 4 and 6 days of age. In one group (n = 7), a single dose of CCFA was administered subcutaneously (SQ) at the base of the ear at a dose of 6.6 mg/kg of body weight. In a second group (n = 7), a single dose of ceftiofur sodium was administered SQ in the neck at a dose of 2.2 mg/kg of body weight. Concentrations of desfuroylceftiofur acetamide (DCA) in plasma were determined by HPLC. Median time to maximum DCA concentration was 12 h (range 12-48 h) for CCFA and 1 h (range 1-2 h) for ceftiofur sodium. Median maximum plasma DCA concentration was significantly higher for calves given ceftiofur sodium (5.62 μg/mL; range 4.10-6.91 μg/mL) than for calves given CCFA (3.23 μg/mL; range 2.15-4.13 μg/mL). AUC0-∞ and Vd/F were significantly greater for calves given CCFA than for calves given ceftiofur sodium. The median terminal half-life of DCA in plasma was significantly longer for calves given CCFA (60.6 h; range 43.5-83.4 h) than for calves given ceftiofur sodium (18.1 h; range 16.7-39.7 h). Cl/F was not significantly different between groups. The duration of time median plasma DCA concentrations remained above 2.0 μg/mL was significantly longer in calves that received CCFA (84.6 h; range 48-103 h) as compared to calves that received ceftiofur sodium (21.7 h; range 12.6-33.6 h). Based on the results of this study, CCFA administered SQ at a dose of 6.6 mg/kg in neonatal calves provided plasma concentrations above the therapeutic target of 2 μg/mL for at least 3 days following a single dose. It is important to note that the use of ceftiofur-containing products is restricted by the FDA and the use of CCFA in veal calves is strictly prohibited. PMID:26542633

  1. Selective extraction by dissolvable (nitriloacetic acid-nickel)-layered double hydroxide coupled with reaction with potassium thiocyanate for sensitive detection of iron(III).

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Chang, Yuepeng; Shen, Wei; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-07-01

    A highly selective method has been proposed for the determination of iron cation (Fe(3+)). (Nitriloacetic acid-nickel)-layered double hydroxide ((NTA-Ni)-LDH) was successfully synthesized and used as dissolvable sorbent in dispersive solid-phase extraction to pre-concentrate and separate Fe(3+) from aqueous phase. Since Fe(3+) has a larger formation constant with NTA compared to Ni(2+), subsequently ion exchange occurred when (NTA-Ni)-LDH was added to the sample solution. The resultant (NTA-Fe)-LDH sol was isolated and transferred in an acidic medium containing potassium thiocyanate (KSCN). Since (NTA-Fe)-LDH could be dissolved in acidic conditions, Fe(3+)was released and reacted with SCN(-) to form an Fe-SCN complex. The resulting product was measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrometry for quantitative detection of Fe(3+). Extraction factors, including sample pH, reaction pH, extraction temperature, extraction time, reaction time and concentration of KSCN were optimized. This method achieved a low limit of detection of 15.2nM and a good linear range from 0.05 to 50μM (r(2)=0.9937). A nearly 18-fold enhancement of signal intensity was achieved after selective extraction. The optimized conditions were validated by applying the method to determine Fe(3+) in seawater samples. PMID:27154694

  2. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing. PMID:25047093

  3. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-04-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  4. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-08-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  5. Phase diagram involving the mesomorphic behavior of binary mixture of sodium oleate and orthophosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaiah, T. N.; Sreepad, H. R.

    2015-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the binary mixture of two non-mesogenic compounds, viz. sodium oleate (Naol) and orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) which exhibits very interesting liquid crystalline smectic phases at large range of concentrations and temperature. The mixtures with concentrations ranging from 10% to 90% Naol in H3PO4 exhibit SmA, SmC, SmE and SmB phases, sequentially when the specimen is cooled from its isotropic phase. Physical properties, such as ultrasonic velocity, adiabatic compressibility and molar compressibility, show anomalous behavior at the isotropic to mesosphase transition.

  6. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  7. Dissolving Carboxylic Acids and Primary Amines on the Overhead Projector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Sally D.; Rutkowsky, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid carboxylic acids (or primary amines) with limited solubility in water are dissolved by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide (or hydrochloric acid) on the stage of an overhead projector using simple glassware and very small quantities of chemicals. This effective and colorful demonstration can be used to accompany discussions of the…

  8. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  13. Phosphonate ester hydrolysis catalyzed by two lanthanum ions. Intramolecular nucleophilic attack of coordinated hydroxide and lewis acid activation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, A.; Bruice, T.C.

    1995-07-19

    (8-Hydroxy-2-quinolyl)methyl (8-hydroxy-2-quinolyl)methyl phosphonate (I) has been synthesized as a model compound and investigated in terms of catalysis of hydrolysis by two metal ions in concert. Removal of one of two 8-hydroxyquinoline ligands of I to provide (8-hydroxy-2-quinolyl)methylmethylphosphonate (II) leads to the formation of the 1:1 complex (II)La, which is hydrolytically inert but subject to catalysis by free La{sup 3+}. From thermodynamic studies of metal ion complexation and comparison of the kinetics of hydrolysis of I and II in the presence of metal ions, we conclude the following. The phosphonate ester I forms a hydrolytically active 1:2 complex (I)La{sub 2} with La{sup 3+} but inert 1:1 complexes with Zn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Al{sup 3+}. The La{sup 3+} in the (I)La{sub 2} complex serve to (i) facilitate the formation of metal ligated hydroxide as an intramolecule nucleophile; (ii) stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis by neutralization of the phosphonate negative charge; and (iii) interact with an incipient oxyanion of the leaving alcohol. The two La{sup 3+} functions operate in concert and provide nearly 10{sup 13} rate enhancement. Consequently the 1:2 complex (I)La{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub n-1}(OH) may serve as a model for the 3`-5` exonuclease reaction of E. coli DNA polymerase I. 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Stimulation of water injection wells in the Los Angeles basin using sodium hypochlorite and mineral acids

    SciTech Connect

    Clementz, D.M.; Patterson, D.E.; Aseltine, R.J.; Young, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive stimulation program was developed to improve the injectivity and vertical coverage of water injection wells in the East Beverly Hills Hills and San Vicente Fields. In recent years the wells had low to zero injectivity and very limited vertical distribution of injected water as a result of formation damage, sand face plugging, and perforation blockage. A stimulaiton strategy was developed which sequentially removed this damage. It began with redesigning the central water plant to provide clean injection brine. The casing was mechanically cleaned. Near-wellbore solids were dissolved or loosened using hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hypochlorite (bleach); then, removed from the well by reverse circulating and suction washing. Remaining damage was treated with hydrochloric/hydrofluoric acid and bleach using circulation wash and selective squeeze techniques. Two- to three-fold improvements in injectivity after stimulation were common. Vertical distribution was typically improved from an initial 0-30% coverage to 85-95% after stimulation. 10 refs.

  15. Interactions in the solid state. I: Interactions of sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid under compressed conditions.

    PubMed

    Usui, F; Carstensen, J T

    1985-12-01

    The interaction of NaHCO3 and tartaric acid in powder mixtures and compressed tablets has been studied. It has been found that in an open system the reaction is simply a decarboxylation of NaHCO3 and that the effect of compression on the reaction rate can be attributed to the brittle fracture (and subsequent surface area increase) that occurs on compaction. In a closed system the decomposition of the mixture is an interaction between the acid and the base, and it is mediated by the amount of moisture in the system. This latter is a product of reaction, and a suitable kinetic scheme is described for this. It is shown that "curing" the sodium bicarbonate by heating it to, e.g., 90 degrees C stabilizes the system by virtue of the formation of surface Na2CO3, which acts as a moisture scavenger. PMID:3003337

  16. Synthesis of Saturated Long Chain Fatty Acids from Sodium Acetate-1-C14 by Mycoplasma1

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, J. D.; Tourtellotte, M. E.

    1967-01-01

    Three strains of Mycoplasma, M. laidlawii A and B, and Mycoplasma sp. A60549, were grown in broth containing sodium acetate-1-C14. The methyl esters of the phospholipid fatty acids of harvested radioactive cells were prepared and identified by comparison of their mobilities to known radioactive fatty acid methyl esters by use of a modified reversed-phase partition-thin layer chromatographic technique. No radioactive methyl oleate or methyl linoleate was detected. Compounds migrating as radioactive methyl myristate, stearate, palmitate, and, with less certainty, laurate and octanoate were detected. The qualitative findings for all three organisms appeared similar. M. laidlawii B synthesized a radioactive substance, presumably a saturated fatty acid detected as the methyl ester derivative, which migrated in a position intermediate to methyl myristate-1-C14 and methyl palmitate-1-C14. This work indicates that M. laidlawii A and B and Mycoplasma sp. A60549 are capable, in a complex medium containing fatty acids, of synthesizing saturated but not unsaturated fatty acids entirely or in part from acetate. Images PMID:6020566

  17. Evaluation of experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid by excised teat assay.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A L; Oliver, S P; Fydenkevez, M E

    1984-12-01

    An experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid, diluted in water, was evaluated by excised teat protocol. The teat dip was tested against 21 microorganisms. Included were: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Numerous strains were tested for strain differences. Environmental bacteria were included because of their increasing importance as a cause of bovine mastitis. All excised teats were dipped in a bacterial suspension containing about 1 X 10(8) cfu/ml. Negative control teats were not dipped in a germicidal compound. Positive controls were dipped in 1% iodophor. Effectiveness of the experimental teat dip was expressed as the percent reduction in mean log of bacteria recovered from dipped teats as compared to numbers recovered from control teats. The sodium chlorite - lactic acid dip caused a greater percent log reduction than iodophor for 14 of 21 strains tested. However, differences were generally slight. The experimental teat dip appeared effective against Gram-negative bacteria. Some differences in percent log reduction were observed between strains of the same species. Lowest effectiveness and greatest strain variation were observed with Staphylococcus aureus for both dips tested. PMID:6530497

  18. Thermodynamics of aqueous sodium sulfate from the temperatures 273 K to 373 K and mixtures of aqueous sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hovey, J.K.; Pitzer, K.S. ); Rard, J.A. )

    1991-07-01

    New isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements on the aqueous system {l brace}(1{minus}y)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+yNA{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r brace} along with earlier experimental investigations that span the range from y=0 to y=1 and infinitely dilute to supersaturated molalities have been analyzed in terms of the Pitzer ion-interaction model. Refined ion-interaction parameters for aqueous sodium sulfate valid over the temperature range 273 K to 373 K have been calculated and used for analyzing results for mixtures containing sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate at 298.15 K. Analysis of experimental results for these aqueous mixtures required explicit consideration of the dissociation reaction of bisulfate ion. Previous treatments of aqueous sulfuric acid and subsequently the bisulfate dissociation equilibrium valid in the range 273 K to 343 K were employed as a first approximation in representing the mixed solutions. Two sets of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters are presented for (sodium sulfate + sulfuric acid). The validity of the first set is limited in ionic strength and molality to saturated solutions of pure aqueous sodium sulfate (4 mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). The second set of parameters corresponds to a slightly less precise representation but is valid over the entire range of experimental results considered. Both sets of parameters provide a more complete description of pure sulfuric acid solutions because of the removal of various redundancies of ion-interaction parameters. The specific ion-interaction terms used and the overall fitting procedure are described as well as selected examples of relevant thermodynamic calculations in the mixed system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Thermodynamics of aqueous sodium sulfate from the temperatures 273 K to 373 K and mixtures of aqueous sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hovey, J.K.; Pitzer, K.S.; Rard, J.A.

    1991-07-01

    New isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements on the aqueous system {l_brace}(1{minus}y)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+yNA{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace} along with earlier experimental investigations that span the range from y=0 to y=1 and infinitely dilute to supersaturated molalities have been analyzed in terms of the Pitzer ion-interaction model. Refined ion-interaction parameters for aqueous sodium sulfate valid over the temperature range 273 K to 373 K have been calculated and used for analyzing results for mixtures containing sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate at 298.15 K. Analysis of experimental results for these aqueous mixtures required explicit consideration of the dissociation reaction of bisulfate ion. Previous treatments of aqueous sulfuric acid and subsequently the bisulfate dissociation equilibrium valid in the range 273 K to 343 K were employed as a first approximation in representing the mixed solutions. Two sets of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters are presented for (sodium sulfate + sulfuric acid). The validity of the first set is limited in ionic strength and molality to saturated solutions of pure aqueous sodium sulfate (4 mol{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). The second set of parameters corresponds to a slightly less precise representation but is valid over the entire range of experimental results considered. Both sets of parameters provide a more complete description of pure sulfuric acid solutions because of the removal of various redundancies of ion-interaction parameters. The specific ion-interaction terms used and the overall fitting procedure are described as well as selected examples of relevant thermodynamic calculations in the mixed system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Treatment of renal uric acid stone by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy combined with sodium bicarbonate: 2 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao-Yong; Lian, Pei-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Song, Peng; Yan, Yi; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid stone is the most comment radiolucent renal stone with high recurrence rate, which would further cause acute upper urinary tract obstruction and kidney failure. Here we report two cases of renal uric acid stone from December 2012 to April 2013. One 43-year-old male patient suffered from chronic uric acid nephrolithiasis caused by the long-term indwelling of bilateral double-J stent. Another 69-year-old patient was also diagnosed with uric acid nephrolithiasis at the right kidney. Both patients were first treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), followed by 1.5% sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy. After a week of the treatment, the uric acid stones in both patients were completely dissolved without retrograde infection. In summary, the use of ESWL and sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy as a combined modality is a safe, effective, inexpensive treatment for uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:26550383

  1. Amino acid depletion activates TonEBP and sodium-coupled inositol transport.

    PubMed

    Franchi-Gazzola, R; Visigalli, R; Dall'Asta, V; Sala, R; Woo, S K; Kwon, H M; Gazzola, G C; Bussolati, O

    2001-06-01

    The expression of the osmosensitive sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT) is regulated by multiple tonicity-responsive enhancers (TonEs) in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. In response to hypertonicity, the nuclear abundance of the transcription factor TonE-binding protein (TonEBP) is increased, and the transcription of the SMIT gene is induced. Transport system A for neutral amino acids, another osmosensitive mechanism, is progressively stimulated if amino acid substrates are not present in the extracellular compartment. Under this condition, as in hypertonicity, cells shrink and mitogen-activated protein kinases are activated. We demonstrate here that a clear-cut nuclear redistribution of TonEBP, followed by SMIT expression increase and inositol transport activation, is observed after incubation of cultured human fibroblasts in Earle's balanced salts (EBSS), an isotonic, amino acid-free saline. EBSS-induced SMIT stimulation is prevented by substrates of system A, although these compounds do not compete with inositol for transport through SMIT. We conclude that the incubation in isotonic, amino acid-free saline triggers an osmotic stimulus and elicits TonEBP-dependent responses like hypertonic treatment. PMID:11350742

  2. Development and validation of dissolution testings in acidic media for rabeprazole sodium delayed-release capsules.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinhe; Si, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Lulu; Feng, Xin; Yang, Xinmin; Huang, Min; Wu, Chuanbin

    2016-10-01

    Rabeprazole sodium (RAB) dissolved in acidic media is accompanied by its degradation in the course of dissolution testing. To develop and establish the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle (RAB) delayed-release capsules (ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle) in acidic media using USP apparatus 2 (paddle apparatus) as a dissolution tester, the issues of determination of accumulative release amount of RAB in these acidic media and interference of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose phthalate were solved by adding appropriate hydrochloric acid (HCl) into dissolution samples coupled with centrifugation so as to remove the interference and form a solution of degradation products of RAB, which is of a considerably stable ultraviolet (UV) absorbance at the wavelength of 298 nm within 2.0 h. Therefore, the accumulative release amount of RAB in dissolution samples at each sample time points could be determined by UV-spectrophotometry, and the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle in the media of pH 1.0, pH 6.0, and pH 6.8 could be established. The method was validated per as the ICH Q2 (R1) guidelines and demonstrated to be adequate for quality control of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle and the accumulative release profiles can be used as a tool to guide the formulation development and quality control of a generic drug for ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle. PMID:27066697

  3. Quantitative analysis of citric acid/sodium hypophosphite modified cotton by HPLC and conductometric titration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Wang, Bijia; Liu, Jian; Chen, Jiangang; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-05-01

    Isocratic HPLC was used in conjunction with conductometric titration to quantitatively examine the modification of cotton cellulose by citric acid (CA)/sodium hypophosphite (SHP). CA/SHP had been extensively used as a green crosslinking agent for enhancement of cellulose and other carbohydrate polymers without in-depth understanding of the mechanisms. The current study investigated all identifiable secondary polycarboxylic acids from CA decomposition in the CA/SHP-cellulose system under various curing conditions. It was found that CA decomposition was more sensitive to temperature compared with the desirable esterification reaction. Two crosslinking mechanisms, namely ester crosslinking and SHP crosslinking were responsible for the observed improvement in crease resistance of CA/SHP treated cotton fabrics. An oligomer of citraconic acid (CCA) and/or itaconic acid (IA) was identified as a possible contributor to fabric yellowing. Finally, the crease resistance of fabrics correlated strongly with CA preservation in polyol-added CA/SHP crosslinking systems. The dosage of polyol should be held below an inflexion point to keep the undesirable competition against cellulose minimum. The combination of HPLC and conductometric titration was demonstrated to be useful in studying the CA/SHP-cellulose crosslinking system. The findings have implications for better application of CA/SHP in polysaccharide modifications in general. PMID:25659676

  4. Development and validation of dissolution testings in acidic media for rabeprazole sodium delayed-release capsules

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yinhe; Si, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Lulu; Feng, Xin; Yang, Xinmin; Huang, Min; Wu, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rabeprazole sodium (RAB) dissolved in acidic media is accompanied by its degradation in the course of dissolution testing. To develop and establish the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX® Sprinkle (RAB) delayed-release capsules (ACIPHEX® Sprinkle) in acidic media using USP apparatus 2 (paddle apparatus) as a dissolution tester, the issues of determination of accumulative release amount of RAB in these acidic media and interference of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose phthalate were solved by adding appropriate hydrochloric acid (HCl) into dissolution samples coupled with centrifugation so as to remove the interference and form a solution of degradation products of RAB, which is of a considerably stable ultraviolet (UV) absorbance at the wavelength of 298 nm within 2.0 h. Therefore, the accumulative release amount of RAB in dissolution samples at each sample time points could be determined by UV-spectrophotometry, and the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX® Sprinkle in the media of pH 1.0, pH 6.0, and pH 6.8 could be established. The method was validated per as the ICH Q2 (R1) guidelines and demonstrated to be adequate for quality control of ACIPHEX® Sprinkle and the accumulative release profiles can be used as a tool to guide the formulation development and quality control of a generic drug for ACIPHEX® Sprinkle. PMID:27066697

  5. Amino acids suppress apoptosis induced by sodium laurate, an absorption enhancer.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Chie; Mukaizawa, Fuyuki; Fujita, Takuya; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2009-12-01

    The formulation containing sodium laurate (C12), an absorption enhancer, and several amino acids such as taurine (Tau) and L-glutamine (L-Gln) is a promising preparation that can safely improve the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs. The safety for intestinal mucosa is achieved because the amino acids prevent C12 from causing mucosal damages via several mechanisms. In the present study, the possible involvement of apoptosis, programmed cell death, in mucosal damages caused by C12 and cytoprotection by amino acids was examined. C12 induced DNA fragmentation, a typical phenomenon of apoptosis, in rat large-intestinal epithelial cells while the addition of amino acids significantly attenuated it. C12 alone significantly increased the release of cytochrome C, an apoptosis-inducing factor, from mitochondria, which could be via the decrease in the level of Bcl-2, an inhibiting factor of cytochrome C release. The enhancement of cytochrome C release by C12 led to the activation of caspase 9, an initiator enzyme, and the subsequent activation of caspase 3, an effector enzyme. On the other hand, Tau or L-Gln significantly suppressed the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and attenuated the activities of both caspases, which could be attributed to the maintenance of Bcl-2 expression. PMID:19630065

  6. Effects of sodium bicarbonate and sodium sesquicarbonate on animal performance, ruminal metabolism, and systemic acid-base status.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, G R; Jackson, J A; Hemken, R W

    1989-08-01

    Six rumen-fistulated lactating Holstein cows were arranged in a replicated 3 x 3 latin square design with 3-wk periods and offered diets containing concentrate and corn silage in a 60:40 ratio (DM basis). Treatments were: 1) basal diet, 2) basal diet with 1% NaHCO3, and 3) basal diet with 1% sodium sesquicarbonate. There were no differences among treatments in milk production, milk protein, or 3.5% FCM, but sodium sesquicarbonate increased milk fat percentage (3.89, 3.94, 4.06%) compared with that of the control. Rumen pH was higher for cows fed buffered diets than for control cows. Urine pH was higher for cows fed NaHCO3 diet than for those fed sodium sesquicarbonate and control diets. No differences were detected among treatment means for molar percentage of isobutyrate, isovalerate, or total VFA, Dietary sesquicarbonate addition increased molar percentage of acetate, decreased propionate, and resulted in a higher acetate:propionate ratio compared with the cows fed NaHCO3. However, molar percentage of butyrate and valerate decreased in cows fed sodium sesquicarbonate when compared with those fed the control diet. No differences among treatment means were detected for blood pH, pCO2, or HCO3. PMID:2551941

  7. Characterization of non-discriminating tetramethylammonium hydroxide-induced thermochemolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as a method for profiling fatty acids in bacterial biomasses.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Parsi, Ziba; Górecki, Tadeusz; Augustin, Juergen

    2005-04-15

    Thermochemolysis using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) as a method for profiling fatty acids (FAs) as methyl esters (FAMEs) was studied with respect to discrimination of bacterial fatty acid patterns in Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida in comparison with patterns obtained by classical preparation schemes (pressurized solvent extraction, alkaline saponification). A new, non-discriminating pyrolysis approach was used in these experiments. In this method, pyrolysis is carried out inside a deactivated stainless steel capillary constituting a part of the column train. This approach made it possible to distinguish analyte discrimination brought about by (i) the pyrolyzer set-up in conventional pyrolysis and (ii) chemical thermochemolysis reaction itself. Our results showed no significant discrimination for saturated, monounsaturated and cyclopropane FAs when using thermochemolysis temperatures up to 550 degrees C with the non-discriminating, capacitive-discharged based approach. Likewise, the cis/trans ratio of monounsaturated FAs was preserved. This is in sharp contrast to conventional pyrolysis systems (both Curie-point or flash pyrolyzers) using much longer thermochemolysis times. When using these systems, artificial monounsaturated FAMEs were formed during heat treatment resulting in biased species identification/classification. Hydroxy-FAs, chiefly bound covalently in lipopolysaccharides, could be almost quantitatively liberated by TMAH using non-discriminating pyrolysis (beyond 90%), whereas the recoveries were lower with conventional approaches. The new method makes it possible to profile fatty acids in very small amounts of both solid and liquid samples without significant sample preparation. This was exemplified by the results of TMAH-thermochemolysis of a fermentation broth taken from an in situ bioremediation reactor to monitor enhanced natural attenuation processes, and tomato roots which were subjected to cellulolytic bacteria attacks (Streptomyces

  8. Synthesis of high capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries by morphology-tailored hydroxide co-precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Belharouak, Ilias; Ortega, Luis H.; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Rui; Zhou, Dehua; Zhou, Guangwen; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Nickel manganese hydroxide co-precipitation inside a continuous stirred tank reactor was studied with sodium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide as the precipitation agents. The ammonium hydroxide concentration had an effect on the primary and secondary particle evolution. The two-step precipitation mechanism proposed earlier was experimentally confirmed. In cell tests, Li- and Mn-rich composite cathode materials based on the hydroxide precursors demonstrated good electrochemical performance in terms of cycle life over a wide range of lithium content.

  9. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of wheat straw: influence of feedwater pH prepared by acetic acid and potassium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Reza, M Toufiq; Rottler, Erwin; Herklotz, Laureen; Wirth, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, influence of feedwater pH (2-12) was studied for hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of wheat straw at 200 and 260°C. Acetic acid and KOH were used as acidic and basic medium, respectively. Hydrochars were characterized by elemental and fiber analyses, SEM, surface area, pore volume and size, and ATR-FTIR, while HTC process liquids were analyzed by HPLC and GC. Both hydrochar and HTC process liquid qualities vary with feedwater pH. At acidic pH, cellulose and elemental carbon increase in hydrochar, while hemicellulose and pseudo-lignin decrease. Hydrochars produced at pH 2 feedwater has 2.7 times larger surface area than that produced at pH 12. It also has the largest pore volume (1.1 × 10(-1) ml g(-1)) and pore size (20.2 nm). Organic acids were increasing, while sugars were decreasing in case of basic feedwater, however, phenolic compounds were present only at 260°C and their concentrations were increasing in basic feedwater. PMID:25710573

  10. A defect in sodium-dependent amino acid uptake in diabetic rabbit peripheral nerve. Correction by an aldose reductase inhibitor or myo-inositol administration.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, D A; Lattimer, S A; Carroll, P B; Fernstrom, J D; Finegold, D N

    1990-01-01

    A myo-inositol-related defect in nerve sodium-potassium ATPase activity in experimental diabetes has been suggested as a possible pathogenetic factor in diabetic neuropathy. Because the sodium-potassium ATPase is essential for other sodium-cotransport systems, and because myo-inositol-derived phosphoinositide metabolites regulate multiple membrane transport processes, sodium gradient-dependent amino acid uptake was examined in vitro in endoneurial preparations derived from nondiabetic and 14-d alloxan diabetic rabbits. Untreated alloxan diabetes reduced endoneurial sodium-gradient dependent uptake of the nonmetabolized amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid by greater than 50%. Administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor prevented reductions in both nerve myo-inositol content and endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Myo-inositol supplementation that produced a transient pharmacological elevation in plasma myo-inositol concentration, but did not raise nerve myo-inositol content, reproduced the effect of the aldose reductase inhibitor on endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Phorbol myristate acetate, which acutely normalizes sodium-potassium ATPase activity in diabetic nerve, did not acutely correct 2-aminoisobutyric uptake when added in vitro. These data suggest that depletion of a small myo-inositol pool may be implicated in the pathogenesis of defects in amino acid uptake in diabetic nerve and that rapid correction of sodium-potassium ATPase activity with protein kinase C agonists in vitro does not acutely normalize sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. PMID:2185278

  11. Effect of high sodium intake during 14 days of bed-rest on acid-base balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; Baecker, N.; Heer, M.

    Lowering mechanical load like in microgravity is the dominant stimulus leading to bone loss However high dietary sodium intake is also considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis and thereby might exacerbate the microgravity induced bone loss In a metabolic balance non bed-rest study we have recently shown that a very high sodium intake leads to an increased bone resorption most likely because of a mild metabolic acidosis Frings et al FASEB J 19 5 A1345 2005 To test if mild metabolic acidosis also occurs during immobilization we examined the effect of increased dietary sodium on bone metabolism and acid-base balance in eight healthy male test subjects mean age 26 25 pm 3 49 years body weight 77 98 pm 4 34 kg in our metabolic ward during a 14-day head-down tilt HDT bed-rest study The study was designed as a randomized crossover study with two study periods Each period was divided into three parts 4 ambulatory days with 200 mmol sodium intake 14 days of bed-rest with either 550 mmol or 50 mmol sodium intake and 3 recovery days with 200 mmol sodium intake The sodium intake was altered by variations in dietary sodium chloride content Blood pH P CO2 and P O2 were analyzed in fasting morning fingertip blood samples several times during the entire study Bicarbonate HCO 3 - and base excess BE were calculated according to the Henderson-Hasselbach equation Preliminary results in the acid-base balance from the first study period 4 subjects with 550 mmol and 4 subjects with 50 mmol sodium intake strongly

  12. Molecular Switch Controlling the Binding of Anionic Bile Acid Conjugates to Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; Tririya, Gasirat; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) may serve as a prodrug target for oral drug absorption. Synthetic, biological, NMR and computational approaches identified the structure-activity relationships of mono- and dianionic bile acid conjugates for hASBT binding. Experimental data combined with a conformationally-sampled pharmacophore/QSAR modeling approach (CSP-SAR) predicted that dianionic substituents with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between hydroxyls on the cholane skeleton and the acid group on the conjugate's aromatic ring increased conjugate hydrophobicity and improved binding affinity. Notably, the model predicted the presence of a conformational molecular switch, where shifting the carboxylate substituent on an aromatic ring by a single position controlled binding affinity. Model validation was performed by effectively shifting the spatial location of the carboxylate by inserting a methylene adjacent to the aromatic ring, resulting in the predicted alteration in binding affinity. This work illustrates conformation as a determinant of ligand binding affinity to a biological transporter. PMID:20504026

  13. Effects of sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives on the quality and sensory characteristics of hot-boned pork sausage patties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives were evaluated for their effects on color retention, microbial growth, and sensory attributes of hot-boned pork sausage patties. Treatments included: (a) sodium lactate (L), (b) buffered vinegar (V), (c) sodium lactate and vinegar mixture (LV), (d) control ...

  14. Application of electrodialysis to waste minimization: Simplified spent chloride salt treatment and reagent recycle flow sheet -- demonstrated controlled precipitation of Nd(III) and Fe(II) as hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wedman, D.E.; Smith, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    Electrodialysis is a widely used industrial technique for the removal of salts from aqueous solution. The process involves the conversion of salts into their corresponding acid and base components; e.g., sodium chloride becomes hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide. Many of the residues generated in plutonium recovery operations are in the form of chloride and nitrate salts. Using electrodialysis to convert these salts back into their corresponding acid and base components results in the production of a decreased amount of waste. Furthermore, with recycle of the acid and base generated, electrodialysis results in a decrease in the quantity of reagents necessary to recover and purify plutonium.

  15. Ascorbic Acid-Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous Sodium Vanadium Phosphate Nanoparticles with Highly sp(2) -Coordinated Carbon Coatings as Efficient Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tai-Feng; Cheng, Wei-Jen; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Yang, Chang-Chung; Shen, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Yu-Lin

    2016-07-18

    Herein, mesoporous sodium vanadium phosphate nanoparticles with highly sp(2) -coordinated carbon coatings (meso-Na3 V2 (PO4 )3 /C) were successfully synthesized as efficient cathode material for rechargeable sodium-ion batteries by using ascorbic acid as both the reductant and carbon source, followed by calcination at 750 °C in an argon atmosphere. Their crystalline structure, morphology, surface area, chemical composition, carbon nature and amount were systematically explored. Following electrochemical measurements, the resultant meso-Na3 V2 (PO4 )3 /C not only delivered good reversible capacity (98 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) ) and superior rate capability (63 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) ) but also exhibited comparable cycling performance (capacity retention: ≈74 % at 450 cycles at 0.4 A g(-1) ). Moreover, the symmetrical sodium-ion full cell with excellent reversibility and cycling stability was also achieved (capacity retention: 92.2 % at 0.1 A g(-1) with 99.5 % coulombic efficiency after 100 cycles). These attributes are ascribed to the distinctive mesostructure for facile sodium-ion insertion/extraction and their continuous sp(2) -coordinated carbon coatings, which facilitate electronic conduction. PMID:27346677

  16. Final report of the safety assessment of L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate function in cosmetic formulations primarily as antioxidants. Ascorbic Acid is commonly called Vitamin C. Ascorbic Acid is used as an antioxidant and pH adjuster in a large variety of cosmetic formulations, over 3/4 of which were hair dyes and colors at concentrations between 0.3% and 0.6%. For other uses, the reported concentrations were either very low (<0.01%) or in the 5% to 10% range. Calcium Ascorbate and Magnesium Ascorbate are described as antioxidants and skin conditioning agents--miscellaneous for use in cosmetics, but are not currently used. Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate functions as an antioxidant in cosmetic products and is used at concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 3%. Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate functions as an antioxidant in cosmetics and was reported being used at concentrations from 0.001% to 3%. Sodium Ascorbate also functions as an antioxidant in cosmetics at concentrations from 0.0003% to 0.3%. Related ingredients (Ascorbyl Palmitate, Ascorbyl Dipalmitate, Ascorbyl Stearate, Erythorbic Acid, and Sodium Erythorbate) have been previously reviewed by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel and found "to be safe for use as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of good use." Ascorbic Acid is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substance for use as a chemical preservative in foods and as a nutrient and/or dietary supplement. Calcium Ascorbate and Sodium Ascorbate are listed as GRAS substances for use as chemical preservatives. L-Ascorbic Acid is readily and reversibly oxidized to L-dehydroascorbic acid and both forms exist in equilibrium in the body. Permeation rates of Ascorbic Acid through whole and stripped mouse skin were 3.43 +/- 0.74 microg/cm(2)/h and 33.2 +/- 5.2 microg/cm(2)/h. Acute oral and parenteral studies in mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, and cats demonstrated little toxicity

  17. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  18. The influence of aliphatic amines, diamines, and amino acids on the polymorph of calcium carbonate precipitated by the introduction of carbon dioxide gas into calcium hydroxide aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuajiw, Wittaya; Takatori, Kazumasa; Igarashi, Teruki; Hara, Hiroki; Fukushima, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The influence of aliphatic organic additives including amines, diamines and amino acids, on the polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated from a calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) suspensions and carbon dioxide gas (CO2) was studied by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, aragonite and calcite were observed for the precipitated samples with organic additives. While the precipitation without organic additive, only the stable phase; calcite was obtained. The observed crystal phases were related with the alkyl chain length in the aliphatic part of additives. These results suggested that hydrophobic interactions due to the van der Waals force between organic additives and surface of inorganic precipitates could not be ignored. We concluded that covering or adsorbing of these organic additives on the precipitates surfaces retarded the successive dissolution/recrystallisation process in the aqueous systems. The results revealed that not only the polar interaction from the hydrophilic functional groups, as the former reports proposed, but also the van der Waals interactions from the hydrophobic alkyl groups played the important role in the phase transformation of CaCO3.

  19. An oral sodium citrate-citric acid non-particulate buffer in humans.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, J J; Payne, K A

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the effect on the pH of the gastric fluid of a single dose of sodium citrate 0.3 mol litre-1 (antacid) and a solution containing sodium citrate dehydrate (100 mg ml-1) with citric acid monohydrate (66 mg ml-1) (buffer). The dose for both solutions was 0.4 ml kg-1 via a nasogastric tube. Each group comprised 10 patients undergoing neurosurgical operations of 5-7 h duration. A control group of 10 patients received no gastric solution. The pH of the gastric aspirate was measured hourly using a Metrohm 632 digital pH meter (Synectics Medical, Sweden). Mean baseline gastric pH was 2.64 (SD 1.71). In the control group, pH increased to 4.4 (1.51) at 5 h, returning to baseline at 7 h. In the antacid group, pH increased to 6.11 (0.47) at 15 min and decreased to 3.70 (1.94) at 7 h (P < 0.01). In the buffer group, pH was stable at 3.80-3.95 (0.22) over 7 h (P > 0.01). Total mean gastric aspirate was 0.5 ml kg-1. PMID:8957982

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of norepinephrine with sodium iodate and determination of its acidity constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, E. Y.; Youssef, A. K.

    2013-05-01

    A spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of norepinephrine (NE) and its bitartrate salts. The method was based on the development of a red color (λmax = 495 nm) with sodium iodate in aqueous alcoholic medium at pH 5. The color was stable for at least 4 hrs. The molar reacting ratio of NE to sodium iodate was 1:4. A linear relationship was obtained between the absorption intensity and NE concentration in the range of 3.384-37.224 μg/ml with detection limit of 0.067 μg/ml and correlation coefficient of 0.9972. The present work facilitated the determination of the three acidity constants, 7.564 ± 0.02, 9.036 ± 0.034, and 10.761 ± 0.023. The reaction mechanism was also described. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of NE in pharmaceutical formulations. Results for analysis of bulk drugs and injections agree with those of official methods.

  1. Sustained release formulation of an anti-tuberculosis drug based on para-amino salicylic acid-zinc layered hydroxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB), is caused by the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its a threat to humans since centuries. Depending on the type of TB, its treatment can last for 6–24 months which is a major cause for patients non-compliance and treatment failure. Many adverse effects are associated with the currently available TB medicines, and there has been no new anti-tuberculosis drug on the market for more than 50 year, as the drug development is very lengthy and budget consuming process. Development of the biocompatible nano drug delivery systems with the ability to minimize the side effects of the drugs, protection of the drug from enzymatic degradation. And most importantly the drug delivery systems which can deliver the drug at target site would increase the therapeutic efficacy. Nanovehicles with their tendency to release the drug in a sustained manner would result in the bioavalibilty of the drugs in the body for a longer period of time and this would reduce the dosing frequency in drug administration. The biocompatible nanovehicles with the properties like sustained release of drug of the target site, protection of the drug from physio-chemical degradation, reduction in dosing frequency, and prolong bioavailability of drug in the body would result in the shortening of the treatment duration. All of these factors would improve the patient compliance with chemotherapy of TB. Result An anti-tuberculosis drug, 4-amino salicylic acid (4-ASA) was successfully intercalated into the interlamellae of zinc layered hydroxide (ZLH) via direct reaction with zinc oxide suspension. The X-ray diffraction patterns and FTIR analyses indicate that the molecule was successfully intercalated into the ZLH interlayer space with an average basal spacing of 24 Å. Furthermore, TGA and DTG results show that the drug 4-ASA is stabilized in the interlayers by electrostatic interaction. The release of 4-ASA from the nanocomposite was found to be in a sustained manner. The

  2. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-08-31

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to significantly reduce the cost to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of treating the tank wastes by hundreds of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass. An electrochemical salt-splitting process, based on sodium-ion selective ceramic membranes, is being developed to recover and recycle sodium hydroxide from high-salt radioactive tank wastes in DOE’s complex. The ceramic membranes are from a family of materials known as sodium (Na)—super-ionic conductors (NaSICON)—and the diffusion of sodium ions (Na+) is allowed, while blocking other positively charged ions. A cost/benefit evaluation was based on a strategy that involves a separate caustic-recycle facility based on the NaSICON technology, which would be located adjacent to the WTP facility. A Monte Carlo approach was taken, and several thousand scenarios were analyzed to determine likely economic results. The cost/benefit evaluation indicates that 10,000–50,000 metric tons (MT) of sodium could be recycled, and would allow for the reduction of glass production by 60,000–300,000 MT. The cost of the facility construction and operation was scaled to the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification facility, showing cost would be

  3. Raman spectra of hydroxide-halide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiriyanova, I. D.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    The Raman spectra of molten binary mixtures based on sodium hydroxide and containing (mol %) 35 NaCl, 30 NaBr, and 30 NaI have been recorded at various temperatures. An increase in the vibrational frequency and the force constant of the O-H bond is detected under isothermal conditions upon a variation of the anionic composition of a melt in the series I → Br → Cl. Based on the experimental data, the viscosity of the hydroxide-halide melts is estimated.

  4. Preparation and characteristics of sodium alginate/Na(+)rectorite-g-itaconic acid/acrylamide hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lianli; Ma, Xiaoyan; Guo, Naini; Zhang, Yang

    2014-05-25

    Sodium alginate/Na(+)rectorite-graft-itaconic acid/acrylamide (SA/Na(+)REC-g-IA/AM) hydrogel film was prepared via solution polymerization. The effect of Na(+)REC, KPS, and NMBA content and the ratio of IA to AM on graft ratio, graft efficiency and absorption of liquids were investigated. The structure and morphology were analyzed by FTIR, XRD, TEM and SEM. Results revealed that the optimal Na(+)REC, KPS, and NMBA content and the ratio of IA to AM were 2wt%, 0.8wt%, 0.38wt% and 4, respectively. The hydrogel film was found to exhibit an intercalative structure and coarse surface. The mechanism of graft copolymerization was discussed. A slower and more continuous release of salicylic acid for SA/Na(+)REC-g-IA/AM composite hydrogel film was shown in vitro drug-controlled release studies, in comparison with SA film. The salicylic acid release mechanism of SA/Na(+)REC-g-IA/AM hydrogel film followed Fickian diffusion. PMID:24708990

  5. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    PubMed Central

    CAVASSIM, Rodrigo; LEITE, Fábio Renato Manzolli; ZANDIM, Daniela Leal; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; RACHED, Ricardo Samih Georges Abi; SAMPAIO, José Eduardo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. Material and Methods A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group). After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. Results Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. Conclusion Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning. PMID:22858707

  6. Renal clearance of uric acid is linked to insulin resistance and lower excretion of sodium in gout patients.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles; Herrero-Beites, Ana María; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Erauskin, Gorka Garcia; Merriman, Toni

    2015-09-01

    Inefficient renal excretion of uric acid is the main pathophysiological mechanism for hyperuricemia in gout patients. Polymorphisms of renal tubular transporters linked with sodium and monosaccharide transport have yet to be demonstrated. We intended to evaluate the impact of insulin resistance, evaluated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), through a transversal study of non-diabetic patients with gout, with normal renal function, not treated with any medication but colchicine as prophylaxis. One hundred and thirty-three patients were evaluated. Clearance of uric acid was inversely correlated with insulin resistance and directly correlated with fractional excretion of sodium. In multivariate analysis, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, in addition to insulin resistance and fractional excretion of sodium, were associated with renal clearance of uric acid. HOMA cutoff for efficient versus inefficient renal handling of uric acid was 2.72, close to that observed in studies of reference population. The impact of insulin resistance and renal handling of sodium on renal clearance of uric acid may help to explain why hyperuricemia is more commonly associated with diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25763991

  7. Corrosion of some chromium-nickel steels and alloys in sulfuric acid solutions of sodium sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, D.K.; Glagolenko, Yu.V.; Ermolinskii, S.P.

    1988-05-01

    Steels 12Kh18N1OT and 10Kh17N13M3T and alloys 06KhN28MDT and 46KhNM were studied in sulfuric acid solutions containing sodium sulfite and sulfur dioxide to determine the effects of different concentrations of the corrosive constituents on the anodic and cathodic active and passive corrosion behavior of the metals. Polarization curves were obtained with a P-5827 M potentiostat. Addition of sulfite facilitated both electrode processes and the region of the reactive state was broadened due to the shift of passivation potentials to more positive values. The activating effect of sulfite reduction products were confirmed by tests of alloys in spent solutions. This increased likelihood of activation and the decrease of the solutions's own corrosion potential were both attributed to retardation of the cathodic process by lower valence sulfur compounds.

  8. Synthesis, growth and characterization of a new nonlinear optical crystal sodium acid phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, R. Bairava; Kannan, V.; Meera, K.; Rajesh, N. P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2005-09-01

    Sodium acid phthalate (NaAP), a new semi-organic nonlinear optical material, has been synthesized and single crystals were grown from aqueous solution. The FTIR spectrum confirms the compound formation. Single crystals of NaAP have been grown by slow evaporation of solvent at room temperature up to dimensions of 10 mm×5 mm×3 mm. Powder X-ray diffraction study on grown crystals shows that they belong to an orthorhombic system. The UV-Vis-NIR transmission spectrum has been recorded in the range 200-1100 nm. The second harmonic generation conversion efficiency of NaAP was determined using Kurtz powder technique; it was observed that it has double the efficiency of KAP crystals. The laser damage threshold value was determined using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and with 65 ns pulses in single shot mode.

  9. Interactions in the solid state. II: Interaction of sodium bicarbonate with substituted benzoic acids in the presence of moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.L.; Carstensen, J.T.

    1986-06-01

    The interaction of an organic acid with sodium bicarbonate in water produces an effervescent reaction. The reaction products are carbon dioxide, water, and the sodium salt of the acid. The kinetic rate-determining step for this reaction is the dehydration of carbonic acid. The solid-solid interaction with known amounts of moisture was followed by quantitatively determining carbon dioxide evolution as a function of time. The aqueous solubilities, diffusion coefficients, dissociation constants, and solid-solid interaction rates of six different substituted benzoic acids were determined. Using a model based on diffusion of the organic acid through the aqueous layer coupled with chemical reaction, predicted rates and levels of carbon dioxide production were compared with experimental results. Included in the model were the effects of the reaction products on the solution properties of the reactants. It was found that high concentrations of substituted sodium benzoate were generated very quickly and affected the solubility of the reactants, diffusion coefficient of the acid, and the carbonic acid dehydration rate constant. Moisture content was found to have a profound influence on the interaction rate. Water provides a medium for diffusion of the reacting species as well as the reaction solvent.

  10. Assessing the survival of MRC5 and a549 cell lines upon exposure to pyruvic Acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Lewis, Veshell L; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cameron, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most prevalent and deadly cancers in United States. In general, cancer cells are known to exhibit higher rates of glycolysis in comparison to normal cells. In attempting to exploit this unique cancer-dependent ATP generation phenomenon, it was our hypothesis that upon exposure to organic inhibitors of glycolysis, cancer cells would not survive normally and that their growth and viability would be vastly decreased; essential glycolytic ATP production will be exhausted to the point of collapsing energy utilization. Furthermore, we hypothesize that no negative effect would be seen with exposures to organic inhibitors for normal lung cells. The human lung fibroblast MRC-5 and the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell lines were used as in vitro models of normal lung and lung cancers respectively. Using standard methods, both cell lines were maintained and exposed to pyruvic acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate reagents at concentration levels ranging from 31.3-2,000 µg/ml in 96 well plates in quadruplets and experiments repeated at least three times using MTT, and cell counting (T4 Cellometer) assays as well as phase-contrast photo-imaging for parallel morphological displays of any changes in the course of their vitality and metabolic activities. Our results indicate that exposure of both cell lines to these organics resulted in concentration dependent cell destruction/cell survival depending on the cell line exposed. Pyruvic acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate showed statistically significant (p<0.05) differential negative effects on the A549 cell line in comparison to its unexposed control as well as to their effects on the MRC-5 cell line, presenting a potential promise for their use as cancer biotherapeutics. PMID:23686189

  11. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in full- and low-sodium frankfurters at 4, 7, or 10°C using spray-dried mixtures of organic acid salts.

    PubMed

    Sansawat, Thanikarn; Zhang, Lei; Jeong, Jong Y; Xu, Yanyang; Hessell, Gerald W; Ryser, Elliot T; Harte, Janice B; Tempelman, Robert; Kang, Iksoon

    2013-09-01

    In meat processing, powdered ingredients are preferred to liquids because of ease of handling, mixing, and storing. This study was conducted to assess Listeria monocytogenes inhibition and the physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics of frankfurters that were prepared with organic acid salts as spray-dried powders (sodium lactate-sodium acetate, sodium lactate-sodium acetate-sodium diacetate, and potassium acetate-potassium diacetate) or liquids (sodium lactate, sodium lactate-sodium diacetate, potassium lactate, and potassium lactate-sodium diacetate). Full-sodium (1.8% salt) and low-sodium (1.0% salt) frankfurters were prepared according to 10 and 5 different formulations (n = 3), respectively, and were dip inoculated with a six-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (∼4 log CFU/g). Populations of Listeria and mesophilic aerobic bacteria were quantified during storage at 4, 7, and 10°C for up to 90 days. Four powder and two liquid full-sodium formulations and one powder low-sodium formulation, all of which contained diacetate except for 1% sodium lactate-sodium acetate powder, completely inhibited Listeria growth at 4°C. However, Listeria grew in full-sodium formulations at 10°C and in low-sodium formulations at 7 and 10°C except for the formulation containing 0.8% potassium acetate-0.2% potassium diacetate powder. All formulations were similar in terms of water activity, cooking yield, moisture, and protein content. Sodium content and pH were affected by the concentrations of sodium and diacetate, respectively. Frankfurter appearance, texture, flavor, and overall acceptability were similar (P > 0.05) regardless of the formulation, except for flavor and overall acceptability of the low-sodium formulation containing potassium acetate-potassium diacetate. Based on these findings, cosprayed powders appear to be a viable alternative to current liquid inhibitors for control of Listeria in processed meats. PMID:23992500

  12. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  13. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  14. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  15. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium polyacrylate (CAS Reg. No. 9003-04-7) may be... aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method entitled “Determination of Weight Average...

  16. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2) exists as... solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels from 125 to...

  17. Altered expression level of Escherichia coli proteins in response to treatment with the antifouling agent zosteric acid sodium salt.

    PubMed

    Villa, Federica; Remelli, William; Forlani, Fabio; Vitali, Alberto; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    Zosteric acid sodium salt is a powerful antifouling agent. However, the mode of its antifouling action has not yet been fully elucidated. Whole cell proteome of Escherichia coli was analysed to study the different protein patterns expressed by the surface-exposed planktonic cells without and with sublethal concentrations of the zosteric acid sodium salt. Proteomic analysis revealed that at least 27 proteins showed a significant (19 upregulated and 8 downregulated, P < 0.001) altered expression level in response to the antifoulant. The proteomic signatures of zosteric acid sodium salt-treated cells are characterized by stress-associated (e.g. AhpC, OsmC, SodB, GroES, IscU, DnaK), motility-related (FliC), quorum-sensing-associated (LuxS) and metabolism/biosynthesis-related (e.g. PptA, AroA, FabD, FabB, GapA) proteins. Consistent with the overexpression of LuxS enzyme, the antifouling agent increased autoinducer-2 (AI-2) concentration by twofold. Moreover, treated cells experienced a statistically significant but modest increase of reactive oxygen species (+ 23%), tryptophanase (1.2-fold) and indole (1.2-fold) synthesis. Overall, our data suggest that zosteric acid sodium salt acts as environmental cue leading to global stress on E. coli cells, which favours the expression of various protective proteins, the AI-2 production and the synthesis of flagella, to escape from adverse conditions. PMID:22176949

  18. Sodium phenylbutyrate decreases plasma branched-chain amino acids in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Jain, Mahim; Gandolfo, Laura; Lee, Brendan H; Nagamani, Sandesh C S

    2014-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) is a commonly used medication for the treatment of patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Previous reports involving small numbers of patients with UCDs have shown that NaPBA treatment can result in lower plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) but this has not been studied systematically. From a large cohort of patients (n=553) with UCDs enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Urea Cycle Disorders, a collaborative multicenter study of the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium, we evaluated whether treatment with NaPBA leads to a decrease in plasma BCAA levels. Our analysis shows that NaPBA use independently affects the plasma BCAA levels even after accounting for multiple confounding covariates. Moreover, NaPBA use increases the risk for BCAA deficiency. This effect of NaPBA seems specific to plasma BCAA levels, as levels of other essential amino acids are not altered by its use. Our study, in an unselected population of UCD subjects, is the largest to analyze the effects of NaPBA on BCAA metabolism and potentially has significant clinical implications. Our results indicate that plasma BCAA levels should to be monitored in patients treated with NaPBA since patients taking the medication are at increased risk for BCAA deficiency. On a broader scale, these findings could open avenues to explore NaPBA as a therapy in maple syrup urine disease and other common complex disorders with dysregulation of BCAA metabolism. PMID:25042691

  19. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Ting; Yin, Guo-Jian; Xiao, Wen-Qin; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Hu, Yan-Ling; Xing, Miao; Wu, De-Qing; Cang, Xiao-Feng; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xing-Peng; Hu, Guo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinic Acid (RA), a caffeic acid ester, has been shown to exert anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and antiallergic effects. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of RA in sodium taurocholate ( NaTC )-induced acute pancreatitis, both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, RA (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 2 h before sodium taurocholate injection. Rats were sacrificed 12 h, 24 h or 48 h after sodium taurocholate injection. Pretreatment with RA significantly ameliorated pancreas histopathological changes, decreased amylase and lipase activities in serum, lowered myeloperoxidase activity in the pancreas, reduced systematic and pancreatic interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and inhibited NF-κB translocation in pancreas. In vitro, pretreating the fresh rat pancreatic acinar cells with 80 μ mol/L RA 2 h before 3750 nmol/L sodium taurocholate or 10 ng/L TNF-α administration significantly attenuated the reduction of isolated pancreatic acinar cell viability and inhibited the nuclear activation and translocation of NF-κB. Based on our findings, RA appears to attenuate damage in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and reduce the release of inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. These findings might provide a basis for investigating the therapeutic role of RA in managing acute pancreatits. PMID:26364660

  20. Intercalation of p-methycinnamic acid anion into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide to improve UV aging resistance of asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A UV absorber, p-methycinnamic acid (PMCA), was intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) by calcination recovery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the PMCA anions completely replaced the CO32- anions in the interlayer galleries of Zn-Al-LDH containing PMCA anions (Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH). X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the interlayer distance increased from 0.78 nm to 1.82 nm after the substitution of PMCA anions for CO32- anions. The similar diffraction angles of the CO32- anion-containing Zn-Al-LDH (Zn-Al-CO32--LDH) and the Zn-Al-CO32--LDH/styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt implied that the asphalt molecules do not enter into the LDH interlayer galleries to form separated-phase structures. The different diffraction angles of Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt indicated that the asphalt molecules penetrated into the LDH interlayer galleries to form an expanded-phase structure. UV-Vis absorbance analyses showed that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH was better able to block UV light due to the synergistic effects of PMCA and Zn-Al-LDH. Conventional physical tests and atomic force microscopy images of the SBS modified asphalt, Zn-Al-CO32--LDH/SBS modified asphalt and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt before and after UV aging indicated that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH improved the UV aging resistance of SBS modified asphalts.

  1. Selective oxidation catalysts obtained by immobilization of iron(III) porphyrins on thiosalicylic acid-modified Mg-Al layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Castro, Kelly Aparecida Dias; Wypych, Fernando; Antonangelo, Ariana; Mantovani, Karen Mary; Bail, Alesandro; Ucoski, Geani Maria; Ciuffi, Kátia Jorge; Cintra, Thais Elita; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2016-09-15

    Nitrate-intercalated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized and exfoliated in formamide. Reaction of the single layer suspension with thiosalicylic acid under different conditions afforded two types of solids: LDHA1, in which the outer surface was modified with the anion thiosalicylate, and LDHA2, which contained the anion thiosalicylate intercalated between the LDH layers. LDHA1 and LDHA2 were used as supports to immobilize neutral (FeP1 and FeP2) and anionic (FeP3) iron(III) porphyrins. For comparison purposes, the iron(III) porphyrins (FePs) were also immobilized on LDH intercalated with nitrate anions obtained by the co-precipitation method. Chemical modification of LDH facilitated immobilization of the FePs through interaction of the functionalizing groups in LDH with the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring. The resulting FePx-LDHAy solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (powder) and UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopies and were investigated as catalysts in the oxidation of cyclooctene and cyclohexane. The immobilized neutral FePs and their homogeneous counterparts gave similar product yields in the oxidation of cyclooctene, suggesting that immobilization of the FePs on the thiosalicylate-modified LDHs only supported the catalyst species without interfering in the catalytic outcome. On the other hand, in the oxidation of cyclohexane, the thiosalicylate anions on the outer surface of LDHA1 or intercalated between the LDHA2 layers influenced the catalytic activity of FePx-LDHAy, leading to different efficiency and selectivity results. FeP1-LDHA2 performed the best (29.6% alcohol yield) due to changes in the polarity of the surface of the support and the presence of FeP1. Interestingly, FeP1 also performed better in solution as compared to the other FePs. Finally, it was possible to recycle FeP1-LDHA2 at least three times. PMID:27322950

  2. Intercalation of p-methycinnamic acid anion into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide to improve UV aging resistance of asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-02-15

    A UV absorber, p-methycinnamic acid (PMCA), was intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) by calcination recovery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the PMCA anions completely replaced the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anions in the interlayer galleries of Zn-Al-LDH containing PMCA anions (Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH). X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the interlayer distance increased from 0.78 nm to 1.82 nm after the substitution of PMCA anions for CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anions. The similar diffraction angles of the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anion-containing Zn-Al-LDH (Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH) and the Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH/styrene–butadiene–styrene (SBS) modified asphalt implied that the asphalt molecules do not enter into the LDH interlayer galleries to form separated-phase structures. The different diffraction angles of Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt indicated that the asphalt molecules penetrated into the LDH interlayer galleries to form an expanded-phase structure. UV-Vis absorbance analyses showed that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH was better able to block UV light due to the synergistic effects of PMCA and Zn-Al-LDH. Conventional physical tests and atomic force microscopy images of the SBS modified asphalt, Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH/SBS modified asphalt and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt before and after UV aging indicated that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH improved the UV aging resistance of SBS modified asphalts.

  3. Effect of sodium vanadate on deoxyribonucleic acid and protein syntheses in cultured rat calvariae.

    PubMed

    Canalis, E

    1985-03-01

    Sodium vanadate, an agent known to have multiple cellular actions, was studied for its effects on aspects of bone formation in cultures of 21-day-old fetal rat calvariae. Vanadate (0.1-10 microM) stimulated the incorporation of [3H] thymidine into acid-insoluble residues (DNA); the effect appeared after 3 h and was sustained for 96 h. Vanadate increased the bone DNA content and mitotic index. Treatment with vanadate at 10 microM for 24 h or at 0.3-1 microM for 96 h increased the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP), but the effect was not specific for collagen; vanadate also increased the labeling of noncollagen protein (NCP). Vanadate increased the incorporation of [3H]proline into type I collagen without affecting other collagen types. Vanadate (100 microM) caused a marked and irreversible inhibitory effect on the labeling of DNA, CDP, and NCP. Treatment with vanadate at multiple doses for 3-96 h did not stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity, but this enzyme was inhibited in bones exposed to 1 mM vanadate for 24 h or 10 microM vanadate for 96 h. The stimulatory effect on DNA labeling was primarily observed in the periosteum, while that on CDP labeling was seen only in the periosteum-free bone. These studies indicate that sodium vanadate stimulates bone DNA, collagen, and NCP syntheses in vitro, although high doses of vanadate have an irreversible inhibitory effect. PMID:2578950

  4. Multi-stage absorption of rendering plant odours using sodium hypochlorite and other reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, D.; Davis, B. J.; Moss, R. L.

    Conditions for using sodium hypochlorite solution as the main component of a multi-stage absorption system for the treatment of malodorous process emissions were studied, together with the additional reagents needed for effective odour control. In laboratory experiments, mixtures containing vpm levels in air of trimethylamine, hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl disulphide, n-butanal and sometimes ammonia were passed through three bubble-plate columns containing some of the following: water, dilute sulphuric acid, sodium hypochlorite solutions (varying in pH and available chlorine content) sodium hydroxide and sodium hydrogen sulphite. Odour removal was monitored by Chromatographic and sensory methods. Conclusions from laboratory experiments were supported by field-tests at four rendering plants in the U.K., treating both ventilation and process gases. Alkaline hypochlorite with considerable excess available chlorine removes many sulphur-compounds and aldehydes but effective odour control requires an acid pre-wash to prevent the generation of odorous chlorinated compounds from ammonia and amines. Acidic hypochlorite solution followed by sodium hydrogen sulphite (to remove aldehyde) and sodium hydroxide was a most effective combination in both laboratory and field tests. Odour generated in chlorination reactions involving acidic hypochlorite solution was analysed by GC-MS and GC-MPD-odour-port and the odour key compounds identified.

  5. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  6. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli inhibits ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter ASBT.

    PubMed

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Gill, Ravinder K; Ghosh, Amit; Saksena, Seema; Borthakur, Alip; Hecht, Gail A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Alrefai, Waddah A

    2012-05-15

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) is responsible for the absorption of bile acids from the intestine. A decrease in ASBT function and expression has been implicated in diarrhea associated with intestinal inflammation. Whether infection with pathogenic microorganisms such as the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) affect ASBT activity is not known. EPEC is a food-borne enteric pathogen that translocates bacterial effector molecules via type three secretion system (TTSS) into host cells and is a major cause of infantile diarrhea. We investigated the effects of EPEC infection on ileal ASBT function utilizing human intestinal Caco2 cells and HEK-293 cells stably transfected with ASBT-V5 fusion protein (2BT cells). ASBT activity was significantly inhibited following 60 min infection with EPEC but not with nonpathogenic E. coli. Mutations in bacterial escN, espA, espB, and espD, the genes encoding for the elements of bacterial TTSS, ablated EPEC inhibitory effect on ASBT function. Furthermore, mutation in the bacterial BFP gene encoding for bundle-forming pili abrogated the inhibition of ASBT by EPEC, indicating the essential role for bacterial aggregation and the early attachment. The inhibition by EPEC was associated with a significant decrease in the V(max) of the transporter and a reduction in the level of ASBT on the plasma membrane. The inhibition of ASBT by EPEC was blocked in the presence of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. Our studies provide novel evidence for the alterations in the activity of ASBT by EPEC infection and suggest a possible effect for EPEC in influencing intestinal bile acid homeostasis. PMID:22403793

  7. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  8. Effects of sodium arsenate exposure on liver fatty acid profiles and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Wafa; Dhibi, Madiha; Haouas, Zohra; Chreif, Imed; Neffati, Fadoua; Hammami, Mohamed; Sakly, Rachid

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of arsenic on liver fatty acids (FA) composition, hepatotoxicity and oxidative status markers in rats. Male rats were randomly devised to six groups (n=10 per group) and exposed to sodium arsenate at a dose of 1 and 10 mg/l for 45 and 90 days. Arsenate exposure is associated with significant changes in the FA composition in liver. A significant increase of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in all treated groups (p<0.01) and trans unsaturated fatty acids (trans UFA) in rats exposed both for short term for 10 mg/l (p<0.05) and long term for 1 and 10 mg/l (p<0.001) was observed. However, the cis UFA were significantly decreased in these groups (p<0.05). A markedly increase of indicator in cell membrane viscosity expressed as SFA/UFA was reported in the treated groups (p<0.001). A significant increase in the level of malondialdehyde by 38.3 % after 90 days of exposure at 10 mg/l was observed. Compared to control rats, significant liver damage was observed at 10 mg/l of arsenate by increasing plasma marker enzymes after 90 days. It is through the histological investigations in hepatic tissues of exposed rats that these damage effects of arsenate were confirmed. The antioxidant perturbations were observed to be more important at groups treated by the high dose (p<0.05). An increase in the level of protein carbonyls was observed in all treated groups (p<0.05). The present study provides evidence for a direct effect of arsenite on FA composition disturbance causing an increase of SFA and TFAs isomers, liver dysfunction and oxidative stress. Therefore, arsenate can lead to hepatic damage and propensity towards liver cancer. PMID:23949113

  9. Anion Effects on Sodium Ion and Acid Molecule Adduction to Protein Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-01-01

    Gaseous protein–metal ion and protein–molecule complexes can be readily formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions containing proteins and millimolar concentrations of sodium salts of various anions. The extent of sodium and acid molecule adduction to multiply charged protein ions is inversely related and depends strongly on the proton affinity (PA) of the anion, with extensive sodium adduction occurring for anions with PA values greater than ~300 kcal·mol−1 and extensive acid molecule adduction occurring for anions with PA values less than 315 kcal·mol−1. The role of the anion on the extent of sodium and acid molecule adduction does not directly follow the Hofmeister series, suggesting that direct protein–ion interactions may not play a significant role in the observed effect of anions on protein structure in solution. These results indicate that salts with anions that have low PA values may be useful solution-phase additives to minimize nonspecific metal ion adduction in ESI experiments designed to identify specific protein-metal ion interactions. PMID:21952761

  10. Sodium arsenate induce changes in fatty acids profiles and oxidative damage in kidney of rats.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Wafa; Dhibi, Madiha; Mekni, Manel; Haouas, Zohra; Chreif, Imed; Neffati, Fadoua; Hammami, Mohamed; Sakly, Rachid

    2014-10-01

    Six groups of rats (n = 10 per group) were exposed to 1 and 10 mg/l of sodium arsenate for 45 and 90 days. Kidneys from treated groups exposed to arsenic showed higher levels of trans isomers of oleic and linoleic acids as trans C181n-9, trans C18:1n-11, and trans C18:2n-6 isomers. However, a significant decrease in eicosenoic (C20:1n-9) and arachidonic (C20:4n-6) acids were observed in treated rats. Moreover, the "Δ5 desaturase index" and the saturated/polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio were increased. There was a significant increase in the level of malondialdehyde at 10 mg/l of treatment and in the amount of conjugated dienes after 90 days (p < 0.05). Significant kidney damage was observed at 10 mg/l by increase of plasma marker enzymes. Histological studies on the ultrastructure changes of kidney supported the toxic effect of arsenate exposure. Arsenate intoxication activates significantly the superoxide dismutase at 10 mg/l for 90 days, whereas the catalase activity was markedly inhibited in all treated groups (p < 0.05). In addition, glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly increased at 45 days and dramatically declined after 90 days at 10 mg/l (p < 0.05). A significant increase in the level of glutathione was marked for the groups treated for 45 and 90 days at 1 mg/l followed by a significant decrease for rats exposed to 10 mg/l for 90 days. An increase in the level of protein carbonyl was observed in all treated groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for a direct effect of arsenate on fatty acid (FA) metabolism which concerns the synthesis pathway of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and leads to an increase in the trans FAs isomers. Therefore, FA-induced arsenate kidney damage could contribute to trigger kidney cancer. PMID:24920263

  11. Suppression of asymmetric acid efflux and gravitropism in maize roots treated with auxin transport inhibitors of sodium orthovanadate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    In gravitropically stimulated roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid WF9 x 38MS), there is more acid efflux on the rapidly growing upper side than on the slowly growing lower side. In light of the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism which states that gravitropic curvature results from lateral redistribution of auxin, the effects of auxin transport inhibitors on the development of acid efflux asymmetry and curvature in gravistimulated roots were examined. All the transport inhibitors tested prevented both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots. The results indicate that auxin redistribution may cause the asymmetry of acid efflux, a finding consistent with the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism. As further evidence that auxin-induced acid efflux asymmetry may mediate gravitropic curvature, sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of auxin-induced H+ efflux was found to prevent both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots.

  12. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination. PMID:26005789

  13. Gallic acid attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Mohebali, Nooshin; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound that has been detected in various natural products, such as green tea, strawberries, grapes, bananas, and many other fruits. In inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation is promoted by oxidative stress. GA is a strong antioxidant; thus, we evaluated the cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory role of GA in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse colitis model. Experimental acute colitis was induced in male BALB/c mice by administering 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days. The disease activity index; colon weight/length ratio; histopathological analysis; mRNA expressions of IL-21 and IL-23; and protein expression of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were compared between the control and experimental mice. The colonic content of malondialdehyde and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activity were examined as parameters of the redox state. We determined that GA significantly attenuated the disease activity index and colon shortening, and reduced the histopathological evidence of injury. GA also significantly (P<0.05) reduced the expressions of IL-21 and IL-23. Furthermore, GA activates/upregulates the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream targets, including UDP-GT and NQO1, in DSS-induced mice. The findings of this study demonstrate the protective effect of GA on experimental colitis, which is probably due to an antioxidant nature of GA. PMID:26251571

  14. Stereological studies of the effects of sodium benzoate or ascorbic acid on rats’ cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Noorafshan, Ali; Erfanizadeh, Mahboobeh; Karbalay-Doust, Saied

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the cerebellar structure in sodium benzoate (NaB) or ascorbic acid (AA) treated rats. Methods: This experimental study was conducted between May and September 2013 in the Laboratory Animal Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The rats received distilled either water, NaB (200mg/kg/day), AA (100mg/kg/day), or NaB+AA. The hemispheres were removed after 28 days and underwent quantitative study. Results: The total volume of the cerebellar hemisphere, its cortex, intracerebellar nuclei; the total number of the Purkinje, Bergman, granule, neurons, and glial cells of the molecular layer; and neurons and glial cells of the intracerebellar nuclei reduced by 21-52% in the NaB-treated rats compared with the distilled water group (p=0.004). The total number of the Purkinje, Bergman, Golgi, and granule cells was 29-45% higher in the AA-treated rats compared with the distilled water group (p=0.05). However, these measures reduced by 17-50% in the NaB+AA-treated rats compared with the distilled water group (p=0.004). The NaB+AA group did not induce any significant structural changes in comparison with the NaB group (p>0.05). Conclusions: The NaB exposure with or without AA treatment could alter the cerebellum. Yet, AA could prevent the loss of some cells in the cerebellum. PMID:25491215

  15. Molecular Modeling of Ammonium, Calcium, Sulfur, and Sodium Lignosulphonates in Acid and Basic Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Valencia, P. J.; Bolívar Marinez, L. E.; Pérez Merchancano, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Lignosulphonates (LS), also known as lignin sulfonates or sulfite lignin, are lignins in sulfonated forms, obtained from the "sulfite liquors," a residue of the wood pulp extraction process. Their main utility lies in its wide range of properties, they can be used as additives, dispersants, binders, fluxing, binder agents, etc. in fields ranging from food to fertilizer manufacture and even as agents in the preparation of ion exchange membranes. Since they can be manufactured relatively easy and quickly, and that its molecular size can be manipulated to obtain fragments of very low molecular weight, they are used as transport agents in the food industry, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and drug development, and as molecular elements for the treatment of health problems. In this paper, we study the electronic structural and optical characteristics of LS incorporating ammonium, sulfur, calcium, and sodium ions in acidic and basic aqueous media in order to gain a better understanding of their behavior and the very interesting properties exhibit. The studies were performed using the molecular modeling program HyperChem 5 using the semiempirical method PM3 of the NDO Family (neglect of differential overlap), to calculate the structural properties. We calculated the electronic and optical properties using the semiempirical method ZINDO / CI.

  16. Flow-injection determination of isoniazid using sodium dichloroisocyanurate- and trichloroisocyanuric acid-luminol chemiluminescence systems.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Karimi, M A; Hormozi Nezhad, M R

    2004-06-01

    A chemiluminescent (CL) method for the determination of isoniazid is described. The method is based on the CL generated during the oxidation of luminol by sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDCC) and trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) in alkaline medium. It was found that isoniazid greatly enhances this CL intensity when present in the luminol solution. Based on this observation, a new flow-injection CL method for the determination of isoniazid has been proposed in this paper. The detection limits were 2 and 3 ng ml(-1) isoniazid for the SDCC-luminol and TCCA-luminol CL systems, respectively. The relative CL intensity was linear with the isoniazid concentration in the range of 4-100 and 100-200 ng ml(-1) for the SDCC-luminol CL system, and 6-200 and 200-1000 ng ml(-1) for the TCCA-luminol CL system. The results obtained for the assay of pharmaceutical preparations compared well with those obtained by the official methods and demonstrated good accuracy and precision. PMID:15178311

  17. Voluntary feed intake, acid-base balance and partitioning of urinary nitrogen in lambs fed corn silage with added sodium bicarbonate or sodium sesquicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Phillip, L E; Hidalgo, V

    1989-08-01

    An experiment with growing lambs was designed to test the hypothesis that alterations in blood acid-base status would influence intake of corn silage. Six wethers (29 kg) were fed a diet of corn silage (36% DM, 8% CP) supplemented with 1.25% urea and .2% sulfur. At feeding time, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and sodium sesquicarbonate (NaSC) were added to the silage at levels of 0, 2% or 4% of diet DM. The treatments were arranged as a 2 x 3 factorial, and the study was conducted as a 6 x 4 incomplete latin square with four 17-d periods. Voluntary intake of OM was not different (P greater than .05) between NaHCO3 (1,008 g/d) and NaSC (1,041 g/d). There was no significant interaction between type of buffer (NaHCO3 or NaSC) and level of buffer on any of the variables measured. The progressive increase in buffer load did not alter feed intake (P greater than .05), although there was a quadratic response (P less than .05) in urine pH and a linear increase (P less than .01) in blood HCO3- 2 h after feeding. There was no evidence that lambs fed corn silage experienced metabolic acid stress. Urinary excretion of ammonia and urea were indicative of changes, although not pronounced, in ammoniuria and ureapoiesis in response to bicarbonate loading. This study implies that corn silage imposes no "acid stress" on lambs and, consequently, that there is no nutritional benefit in adding buffers to corn silage for sheep. PMID:2551870

  18. Comparison Between Sodium Nitrite & Sodium Hydroxide Spray Accident

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.; HEY, B.E.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to compare the consequences of an 8 molar NaNO2 spray leak to the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) evaluation of sprays of up to 19 molar (50%) NaOH. Four conditions were evaluated. These are: a spray during transfers from a one-inch pipe, a spray resulting from a truck tank Crack, a spray resulting from a truck tank rupture, and a spray in the 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility.

  19. Enterobacteria modulate intestinal bile acid transport and homeostasis through apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) expression.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hamatsu, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    In our study, ampicillin (AMP)-mediated decrease of enterobacteria caused increases in hepatic bile acid concentration through (at least in part) elevation of bile acid synthesis in C57BL/6N mice. We investigated the involvement of enterobacteria on intestinal bile acid absorption in AMP-treated mice in the present study. Fecal enterobacterial levels and fecal bile acid excretion rates were markedly decreased in mice treated with AMP (100 mg/kg) for 3 days, whereas bile acid concentrations in portal blood were significantly increased compared with those in mice treated with a vehicle. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) mRNA levels and ileal SLC10A2 protein levels in brush-border membranes were significantly increased compared with those in mice treated with the vehicle. In AMP-treated mice, total bile acid levels were increased, whereas levels of enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and cholic acid were decreased in intestinal lumen. These phenomena were also observed in farnesoid X receptor-null mice treated with AMP for 3 days. Discontinuation of AMP administration after 3 days (vehicle administration for 4 days) increased levels of fecal enterobacteria, fecal bile acid excretion, and taurodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid in the intestinal lumen, whereas the discontinuation decreased ileal SLC10A2 expression and bile acid concentrations in the portal blood. Coadministration of taurodeoxycholic acid or cholic acid decreased ileal SLC10A2 expression in mice treated with AMP. These results suggest that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid biotransformation modulates intestinal bile acid transport and homeostasis through down-regulation of ileal SLC10A2 expression. PMID:20884752

  20. Antibrowning and antimicrobial properties of sodium acid sulfate in apple slices.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Liao, Ching-Hsing; Cooke, Peter; Zhang, Howard Q

    2009-01-01

    There are few available compounds that can both control browning and enhance microbial safety of fresh-cut fruits. In the present study, the antibrowning ability of sodium acid sulfate (SAS) on "Granny Smith" apple slices was first investigated in terms of optimum concentration and treatment time. In a separate experiment, the apple slices were treated with water or 3% of SAS, calcium ascorbate, citric acid, or acidified calcium sulfate for 5 min. Total plate count, color, firmness, and tissue damage were assessed during a 21-d storage at 4 degrees C. Results showed that the efficacy of SAS in inhibiting browning of apple slices increased with increasing concentration. A minimum 3% of SAS was needed to achieve 14 d of shelf life. Firmness was not significantly affected by SAS at 3% or lower concentrations. Antibrowning potential of SAS was similar for all treatment times ranging from 2 to 10 min. However, SAS caused some skin discoloration of apple slices. When cut surface of apple slices were stained with a fluorescein diacetate solution, tissue damage could be observed under a microscope even though visual damage was not evident. Among the antibrowning agents tested, SAS was the most effective in inhibiting browning and microbial growth for the first 14 d. Total plate count of samples treated with 3% SAS was significantly lower than those treated with calcium ascorbate, a commonly used antibrowning agent. Our results suggested that it is possible to use SAS to control browning while inhibiting the growth of microorganisms on the apple slices if the skin damage can be minimized. Practical Application: Fresh-cut apples have emerged as one of the popular products in restaurants, schools, and food service establishments as more consumers demand fresh, convenient, and nutritious foods. Processing of fresh-cut apples induces mechanical damage to the fruit and exposes apple tissue to air, resulting in the development of undesirable tissue browning. The fresh

  1. Asymmetric synthesis of crambescin A-C carboxylic acids and their inhibitory activity on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Atsuo; Nakane, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Yuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2016-06-21

    Synthesis of both enantiomers of crambescin B carboxylic acid is described. A cis-enyne starting material was epoxidized under the conditions of Katsuki asymmetric epoxidation to give 95% ee of the epoxide, which was transformed to crambescin B carboxylic acid via bromocation-triggered cascade cyclization as the key step. Enantiomerically pure crambescin A and C carboxylic acids were also synthesized from the product of the cascade reaction. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies against voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) inhibition using those synthetic compounds revealed that the natural enantiomer of crambescin B carboxylic acid was most active and comparable to tetrodotoxin, and the unalkylated cyclic guanidinium structure is indispensible, while the carboxylate moiety is not important. The absolute stereochemistry of crambescin A was determined by a comparison of the methyl ester derived from natural crambescin A with that derived from the stereochemically defined crambescin A carboxylic acid synthesized in this study. PMID:27215973

  2. Potassium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms from swallowing potassium hydroxide include: Abdominal pain - severe Burns in the mouth and throat Chest pain Collapse Diarrhea Drooling Mouth pain - severe Rapid drop in blood pressure (shock) Throat pain - severe Throat ...

  3. Inhibition of boric acid and sodium borate on the biological activity of microorganisms in an aerobic biofilter.

    PubMed

    Güneş, Y

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the inhibition effect of boric acid and sodium borate on the treatment of boron containing synthetic wastewater by a down flow aerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor at various chemical oxygen demand (COD)/boron ratios (0.47-20.54). The inhibitory effect of boron on activated sludge was evaluated on the basis of COD removal during the experimental period. The biofilter (effective volume = 2.5 L) was filled with a ring of plastic material inoculated with acclimated activated sludge. The synthetic wastewater composed of glucose, urea, KH2PO4, MgSO4, Fe2 SO4, ZnSO4 x 7H20, KCl, CaCl2, and di-sodium tetraborate decahydrate or boric acid (B = 100-2000 mg L(-1)). The biological treatment of boron containing wastewater resulted in a low treatment removal rate due to the reduced microbial activity as a result of toxic effects of high boron concentrations. The decrease in the COD removal rate by the presence of either boric acid or sodium borate was practically indistinguishable. It was observed from the experiments that about 90-95% of COD removal was possible at high COD/boron ratios. PMID:24191443

  4. Affinity purification of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from electroplax with resins selective for sialic acid

    SciTech Connect

    James, W.M.; Emerick, M.C.; Agnew, W.S. )

    1989-07-11

    The voltage-sensitive sodium channel present in the eel (Electrophorus electricus) has an unusually high content of sialic acid, including {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-linked polysialic acid, not found in other electroplax membrane glycopeptides. Lectins from Limax flavus (LFA) and wheat germ (WGA) proved the most effective of 11 lectin resins tried. The most selective resin was prepared from IgM antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-polysialic acid which were affinity purified and coupled to Sepharose 4B. The sodium channel was found to bind to WGA, LFA, and IgM resins and was readily eluted with the appropriate soluble carbohydrates. Experiments with LFA and IgM resins demonstrated binding and unbinding rates and displacement kinetics, which suggest highly specific binding at multiple sites on the sodium channel protein. In preparative-scale purification of protein previously fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, without stabilizing TTX, high yields were reproducibly obtained. Further, when detergent extracts were prepared from electroplax membranes fractionated by low-speed sedimentation, a single step over the IgM resin provided a 70-fold purification, yielding specific activities of 3,200 pmol of ({sup 3}H)TTX-binding sites/mg of protein and a single polypeptide of {approximately}285,000 Da on SDS-acrylamide gels. No small peptides were observed after this 5-h isolation. The authors describe a cation-dependent stabilization with millimolar levels of monovalent and micromolar levels of divalent species.

  5. The impact of sodium aescinate on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tian; Tong, Wang; Wen-ping, Sun; Xiao-hui, Deng; Qiang, Xue; Tian-shui, Li; Zhi-fang, Chen; Hong-fang, Jin; Li, Ni; Bin, Zhao; Jun-bao, Du; Bao-ming, Ge

    2011-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Currently, several surfactant or anti-inflammatory drugs are under test as treatments for ALI. Sodium aescinate (SA) has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and antiedematous effects. In the present work, the authors explored the effects of SA and the possible mechanisms of SA action in rats with ALI induced by oleic acid (OA) administration. Eight groups of rats received infusions of normal saline (NS) or OA. Rats exposed to OA were pretreated with 1 mg/kg of SA, or posttreated with SA at low (1 mg/kg), medium (2 mg/kg), or high (6 mg/kg) dose; a positive-control group received methylprednisolone. The pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (P(O(2))) levels, the pulmonary wet/dry weight (W/D) ratios, and indices of quantitative assessment (IQA) of histological lung injury were obtained 2 or 6 hours after OA injection (0.1 mL/kg, intravenously). The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), matrix metalloproteinase gelatinase B (MMP-9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) in both plasma and lung tissue were also determined. Both pre- and posttreatment with SA improved OA-induced pulmonary injury, increased P(O(2)) and SOD values, lowered IQA scores, and decreased the lung W/D ratio and MDA and MMP-9 levels in plasma and lung tissue. SA appeared to abrogate OA-induced ALI by modulating the levels of SOD, MDA, and MMP-9 in plasma and lung tissue. PMID:22087513

  6. Iodoacetic acid, but not sodium iodate, creates an inducible swine model of photoreceptor damage.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jennifer M; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Demarco, Paul J; Franco, Luisa M; Wang, Wei; Vukmanic, Eric V; Peng, Xiaoyan; Sandell, Julie H; Scott, Patrick A; Kaplan, Henry J; McCall, Maureen A

    2012-04-01

    Our purpose was to find a method to create a large animal model of inducible photoreceptor damage. To this end, we tested in domestic swine the efficacy of two chemical toxins, known to create photoreceptor damage in other species: Iodoacetic Acid (IAA) and Sodium Iodate (NaIO(3)). Intravenous (IV) administration of NaIO(3) up to 90 mg/kg had no effect on retinal function and 110 mg/kg was lethal. IV administration of IAA (5-20 mg/kg) produced concentration-dependent changes in visual function as measured by full-field and multi-focal electroretinograms (ffERG and mfERG), and 30 mg/kg IAA was lethal. The IAA-induced effects measured at two weeks were stable through eight weeks post-injection, the last time point investigated. IAA at 7.5, 10, and 12 mg/kg produce a concentration-dependent reduction in both ffERG b-wave and mfERG N1-P1 amplitudes compared to baseline at all post-injection times. Comparisons of dark- and light-adapted ffERG b-wave amplitudes show a more significant loss of rod relative to cone function. The fundus of swine treated with ≥10 mg/kg IAA was abnormal with thinner retinal vessels and pale optic discs, and we found no evidence of bone spicule formation. Histological evaluations show concentration-dependent outer retinal damage that correlates with functional changes. We conclude that NaIO(3,) is not an effective toxin in swine. In contrast, IAA can be used to create a rapidly inducible, selective, stable and concentration-dependent model of photoreceptor damage in swine retina. Because of these attributes this large animal model of controlled photoreceptor damage should be useful in the investigation of treatments to replace damaged photoreceptors. PMID:22251455

  7. Synthesis of hollow silver spheres using poly-(styrene-methyl acrylic acid) as templates in the presence of sodium polyacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aili; Yin, Hengbo; Ge, Chen; Ren, Min; Liu, Yumin; Jiang, Tingshun

    2010-02-01

    Hollow silver spheres were successfully prepared by reducing AgNO 3 with ascorbic acid and using negatively charged poly-(styrene-methyl acrylic acid) (PSA) spheres as templates in the presence of sodium polyacrylate as a stabilizer. Firstly, silver cations adsorbed on the surface of PSA spheres via electrostatic attraction between the carboxyl groups and silver cations were reduced in situ by ascorbic acid. The silver nanoparticles deposited on the surface of PSA spheres served as seeds for the further growth of silver shells. After that, extra amount of AgNO 3 and ascorbic acid solutions were added to form PSA/Ag composites with thick silver shells. In order to obtain compact silver shells, the as-prepared PSA/Ag composites were heated at 150 °C for 3 h. Then hollow silver spheres were prepared by dissolving PSA templates with tetrahydrofuran.

  8. Acids in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate caused quality deterioration of fresh-cut iceburg lettuce during storage in modified atmosphere package

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies showed that levulinic acid (LA) and sodium acid sulfate (SAS) were effective in inactivating human pathogens on fresh produce. The present study investigated the effects of LA and SAS in comparison with citric acid and chlorine on the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and the sensory qu...

  9. Single sodium pyruvate ingestion modifies blood acid-base status and post-exercise lactate concentration in humans.

    PubMed

    Olek, Robert A; Kujach, Sylwester; Wnuk, Damian; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg(-1) of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% VO2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM) than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05) and remained elevated (nonsignificant) after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise. PMID:24841105

  10. Single Sodium Pyruvate Ingestion Modifies Blood Acid-Base Status and Post-Exercise Lactate Concentration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Robert A.; Kujach, Sylwester; Wnuk, Damian; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg−1 of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% O2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM) than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05) and remained elevated (nonsignificant) after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise. PMID:24841105

  11. Interaction between 2-ethoxybenzoic acid (EBA) and eugenol, and related changes in cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Atsumi, T; Satoh, K; Sakagami, H

    2003-01-01

    The liquid of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid cements is composed of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid and eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol). Recently, eugenol was reported to produce radicals at a higher pH, which consequently directly damages cells. We examined here whether eugenol radicals are generated from the mixture of eugenol/calcium hydroxide, and also whether 2-ethoxybenzoic acid or acetylsalicylic acid scavenges radicals, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Radicals were generated from the mixture of eugenol/calcium hydroxide in 50% dimethylsulfoxide solution. The radical intensity of eugenol in 50% dimethylsulfoxide with 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate buffer (pH 9.5) was dose-dependently reduced by 2-ethoxybenzoic acid, whereas it was enhanced by acetylsalicylic acid. Next, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of eugenol on 2-ethoxybenzoic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, or calcium hydroxide on human pulp fibroblasts or a human submandibular gland cancer cell line. The cytotoxicity of EBA was decreased, whereas that of acetylsalicylic acid was increased by eugenol. In contrast, that of calcium hydroxide was not affected by eugenol. Human pulp fibroblast but not human submandibular gland cells showed a high resistance against calcium hydroxide. The generation of eugenol radicals in the liquid of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid cements caused by oxidation may be suppressed by 2-ethoxybenzoic acid. PMID:12508044

  12. Geophysical mapping and subsurface injection for treatment of post-reclamation acid drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Plocus, V.G.; Rastogi, V.

    1997-12-31

    Post-reclamation acid discharge has haunted abandoned mine lands reclamation programs and the mining industry reclamation efforts. Many mine sites have been reclaimed, as mandated by regulations, but continue to generate acid. Such sites represent perpetual treatment problems for operators and, in the case of bond forfeitures or abandoned mine reclamation projects, they represent sources of perpetual surface and groundwater degradation. Post-reclamation discharge occurs when the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria, not destroyed prior to soil cover in the reclamation process, continue to thrive, even in a supposedly anaerobic environment. A post-reclamation remediation system utilizing subsurface injection of sodium hydroxide and an anionic surfactant offers a two phase integrated technologies approach. In Phase 1, the site is characterized by geophysical mapping with (1) electromagnetic terrain conductivity meters to determine locations of subsurface aquifers, and (2) proton processing magnetometers to delineate zones of pyritic oxidation in the subsurface environment. Infiltrometers are also used to determine permeability which influences pressure requirements and distance between wells. Site conditions and water analyses help quantify requirements for injection of sodium hydroxide and bactericide. Phase 2 involves drilling two sets of injection wells; the first into the acidified water table for injection of 20% sodium hydroxide solution to neutralize existing acid water, and the second into the acid producing material for injection of a 20% sodium hydroxide solution to neutralize existing acid salts, followed by a 2% solution of bactericide. The sodium hydroxide is injected to neutralize existing acid which prevents future acid generation. Results from a site in Pennsylvania, USA, which was treated in this manner are reported.

  13. Thermodynamics of aqueous borate solutions I. Mixture of boric acid with sodium or potassium borate and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Roy, R.N.; Roy, L.N.; Johnson, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Potentials for the cell without liquid junction H/sub 2/, Ptlt. slashB(OH)/sub 3/(m/sub 1/),MB(OH)/sub 4/(m/sub 2/),MCl(m/sub 3/)lt. slashAgCl,Ag where M is sodium or potassium are reported over a range of ionic strength to I = 3 mol-kg/sup -1/ at 5 to 55/sup 0/C. Total boron concentration in the solutions was restricted to low levels to minimize formation of polynuclear boron species. Cell potentials are treated with the Pitzer ion interaction treatment for mixed electrolytes, with linear ionic strength dependence assumed for the activity coefficient of undissociated boric acid. Trace activity coefficients of sodium and potassium borates in chloride media are calculated at various temperatures.

  14. Modelling the effect of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and sodium chloride on the kinetic responses of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in table olive storage using a specifically implemented Quasi-chemical primary model.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, R; Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2010-04-15

    The goal of this work was to apply the Quasi-chemical primary model (a system of four ordinary differential equations that derives from a hypothetical four-step chemical mechanism involving an antagonistic metabolite) in the study of the evolution of yeast and lactic acid bacteria populations during the storage of Manzanilla-Aloreña table olives subjected to different mixtures of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and NaCl. Firstly, the Quasi-chemical model was applied to microbial count data to estimate the growth-decay biological parameters. The model accurately described the evolution of both populations during storage, providing detailed information on the microbial behaviour. Secondly, these parameters were used as responses and analysed according to a mixture design experiment (secondary model). The contour lines of the corresponding response surfaces clearly disclosed the relationships between growth and environmental conditions, showing the stimulating and inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid and sodium metabisulphite, respectively, on both populations of microorganisms. This work opens new possibilities for the potential use of the Quasi-chemical primary model in the study of table olive fermentations. PMID:20185187

  15. Cell proliferation on PVA/sodium alginate and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) electrospun fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen Ming; Yang, Jhe Hao; Tsou, Shu Chun; Ding, Chian Hua; Hsu, Chih Chin; Yang, Kai Chiang; Yang, Chun Chen; Chen, Ko Shao; Chen, Szi Wen; Wang, Jong Shyan

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the obstacles of easy dissolution of PVA nanofibers without crosslinking treatment and the poor electrospinnability of the PVA cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning process, the PVA based electrospun hydrogel nanofibers are prepared with post-crosslinking method. To expect the electrospun hydrogel fibers might be a promising scaffold for cell culture and tissue engineering applications, the evaluation of cell proliferation on the post-crosslinking electrospun fibers is conducted in this study. At beginning, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), PVA/sodium alginate (PVASA) and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PVAPGA) electrospun fibers were prepared by electrospinning method. The electrospun PVA, PVASA and PVAPGA nanofibers were treated with post-cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde (Glu) as crosslinking agent. These electrospun fibers were characterized with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and their morphologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). To support the evaluation and explanation of cell growth on the fiber, the study of 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell growth on the surface of pure PVA, SA, and PGA thin films is conducted. The proliferation of 3T3 on the electrospun fiber surface of PVA, PVASA, and PVAPGA was evaluated by seeding 3T3 fibroblast cells on these crosslinked electrospun fibers. The cell viability on electrospun fibers was conducted with water-soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay (Cell Proliferation Reagent WST-1). The morphology of the cells on the fibers was also observed with SEM. The results of WST-1 assay revealed that 3T3 cells cultured on different electrospun fibers had similar viability, and the cell viability increased with time for all electrospun fibers. From the morphology of the cells on electrospun fibers, it is found that 3T3 cells attached on all electrospun fiber after 1day seeded. Cell-cell communication was noticed on day 3 for all electrospun fibers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) productions were found and

  16. 21 CFR 184.1751 - Sodium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... hydroxide or sodium carbonate. The product occurs as colorless crystals or a white crystalline powder....

  17. Effect of L-Valine on the growth and characterization of Sodium Acid Phthalate (SAP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, L. Ruby; Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Undoped and amino acid doped good quality single crystals of Sodium Acid Phthalate crystals (SAP) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique which are semiorganic in nature. The effect of amino acid (L-Valine) dopant on the growth and the properties of SAP single crystal was investigated. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and FT-IR studies were carried out to identify the crystal structure and the presence of functional groups in undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals. The transparent nature of the grown crystal was observed using UV-Visible spectrum. The thermal decomposition of the doped SAP crystals was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The enhancement in the NLO property of the undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals using KDP crystal as a reference was studied using SHG measurements. Vickers micro hardness measurements are used for the study of mechanical strength of the grown crystals.

  18. Prevention of acid drainage from stored coal. [Inhibition of bacterial action by treatment with a solution of sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H.; Bell, T.L.; Longaker, J.J.

    1983-06-01

    A method has been identified for controlling acid production and subsequent dissolution of toxic pollutants in drainage from coal storage piles. Results of laboratory and field experiments indicate that it may be possible to prevent, rather than treat, acid drainage by periodically applying an environmentally safe detergent formulation to the coal. These experiments showed that a mild solution of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) effectively blocks the activity of the bacteria that promote acid formation and chemical leaching. Drainage from coal treated once with 50 mg/L of SLS remained neutral for 60 days, about three times longer than the untreated control sample. An extrapolation of results to an industrial-scale application revealed that the cost of the SLS needed for a single application would likely be no more than $200 per acre of coal storage area ($500 per hectare ) or, expressed per unit weight of coal, $4,000 per million metric tons.

  19. General Chemistry Students' Conceptual Understanding and Language Fluency: Acid-Base Neutralization and Conductometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyachwaya, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine college general chemistry students' conceptual understanding and language fluency in the context of the topic of acids and bases. 115 students worked in groups of 2-4 to complete an activity on conductometry, where they were given a scenario in which a titration of sodium hydroxide solution and dilute…

  20. Solvent and process for recovery of hydroxide from aqueous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Keever, Tamara J.

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxide values and associated alkali metal may be recovered from alkaline aqueous solutions using classes of fluorinated alcohols in a water immiscible solvent. The alcohols are characterized by fluorine substituents which are proximal to the acidic alcohol protons and are located to adjust the acidity of the extractant and the solubility of the extractant in the solvent. A method for stripping the extractant and solvent to regenerate the extractant and purified aqueous hydroxide solution is described.

  1. Acceleration of Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis in a Biphasic System by Sodium Tetracyanocyclopentadienides.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takeo; Bito, Mariko; Itakura, Makoto; Sato, Honami; Mori, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolysis of tert-butyldimethylsilyl L-menthyl ether (3) in a CH2Cl2-1 M HCl biphasic solvent system was accelerated by the addition of sodium tetracyanocyclopentadienides 1. Particularly, the reaction rate was enhanced using sodium salt 1a-c with a lipophilic substituent on the cyclopentadienide ring. From the results obtained by a triphasic experiment, hydrolysis proceeds via the formation of hydronium ion 2 in the aqueous phase by ion exchange, followed by the transfer of 2 to the CH2Cl2 phase. PMID:27373648

  2. Management of traveller's diarrhoea with a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Wejman-Matela, Anna; Krokowicz, Piotr; Drews, Michal; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Traveller's diarrhoea (TD), defined by UNICEF/WHO as three or more unformed stools with or without other symptoms, imposes a considerable burden on travellers from developed countries. Various efforts have focused on decreasing the prevalence and severity of this condition. Aim To assess the efficacy of a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide in treatment providing symptomatic relief of TD. Material and methods The study was conducted in accordance with a protocol presented to the Bioethical committee of Poznan University of Medical Sciences. A total of 278 patients travelling to countries with higher risk of diarrhoea for at least 10 days were divided into a study arm being administered, in case of TD, a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide (n = 139) and a placebo arm (n = 139) with placebo administration. Results Forty-seven patients completed the study (22 in the study arm and 25 in the placebo arm). The diarrhoea occurrence after initiation of treatment at first symptoms was significantly lower in the study arm as compared to the placebo arm (9% vs. 36%, p = 0.041). Also, subjects from the study arm more frequently reported that the regimen administered had been efficient for their symptoms in comparison to the placebo arm (72.7% vs. 32%, p = 0.008). No adverse effects of the administered medication were noted during the study. Conclusions Sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide can be successful in decreasing symptoms of TD. Because of its efficacy and lack of observed side effects it has a strong potential in the treatment of patients with TD. PMID:25396003

  3. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  4. Investigations on the SR method growth, etching, birefringence, laser damage threshold and dielectric characterization of sodium acid phthalate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, A.; Ramasamy, P.; Verma, Sunil

    2011-03-01

    Optically good quality semi-organic single crystal of sodium acid phthalate (NaAP) was successfully grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. Transparent, colourless <0 0 1> oriented unidirectional bulk single crystals of diameters 10 and 20 mm and length maximum up to 75 mm were grown by the SR method. The grown crystals were subjected to various characterization studies such as etching, birefringence, laser damage threshold, UV-vis spectrum and dielectric measurement. The value of birefringence and quality were ascertained by birefringence studies.

  5. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid).

    PubMed

    Costa, M I C F; Steter, J R; Purgato, F L S; Romero, J R

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H(+) with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H(+) was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  6. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M. I. C. F.; Steter, J. R.; Purgato, F. L. S.; Romero, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H+ with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H+ was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  7. Conductometric and fluorometric studies of sodium dodecyl sulphate in aqueous solution and in the presence of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Anwar; Malik, Nisar Ahmad; Uzair, Sahar; Ali, Maroof

    2014-10-01

    The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) in pure water and in the presence of amino acids (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03 mol kg-1), L-valine (Val) and L-leucine (Leu) was determined from conductometric and fluorometric methods using pyrene as luminescence probe. Depression in the CMC at low concentration of amino acids is attributed to the increased hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction between the non-polar groups of the surfactant, while, at high concentration, amino acids bind strongly with the anion, DS-, head groups of SDS, thereby, delaying the micelle formation, resulting in increased CMC. A pronounced decrease in the CMC, while a marked increase in λ0+, with decrease in the solvated radius (rather than crystal radius) of the counterions is observed. Negative values of ΔG0m and ΔH0m indicate that micellisation of SDS in the presence of amino acids is thermodynamically spontaneous and exothermic. Highest negative value of ΔH0m in 0.01 m Val, with lowest CMC value, shows that 0.01 m aqueous Val is the most suitable medium favouring the micellisation of SDS. Decrease in I1/I3 from Val to Leu confirms the relative hydrophobicity of two amino acids. The observed values of the packing parameter, P, of SDS in water and in aqueous amino acids suggest that micelles formed are spherical in nature.

  8. Thermodynamics of sodium dodecyl sulphate-salicylic acid based micellar systems and their potential use in fruits postharvest.

    PubMed

    Cid, A; Morales, J; Mejuto, J C; Briz-Cid, N; Rial-Otero, R; Simal-Gándara, J

    2014-05-15

    Micellar systems have excellent food applications due to their capability to solubilise a large range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances. In this work, the mixed micelle formation between the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and the phenolic acid salicylic acid have been studied at several temperatures in aqueous solution. The critical micelle concentration and the micellization degree were determined by conductometric techniques and the experimental data used to calculate several useful thermodynamic parameters, like standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy of micelle formation. Salicylic acid helps the micellization of SDS, both by increasing the additive concentration at a constant temperature and by increasing temperature at a constant concentration of additive. The formation of micelles of SDS in the presence of salicylic acid was a thermodynamically spontaneous process, and is also entropically controlled. Salicylic acid plays the role of a stabilizer, and gives a pathway to control the three-dimensional water matrix structure. The driving force of the micellization process is provided by the hydrophobic interactions. The isostructural temperature was found to be 307.5 K for the mixed micellar system. This article explores the use of SDS-salicylic acid based micellar systems for their potential use in fruits postharvest. PMID:24423544

  9. 21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...'s mouth to improve denture retention and comfort. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be... carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...'s mouth to improve denture retention and comfort. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be... carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in...

  11. Comparing Peracetic Acid with Sodium Hypochlorite for Disinfection of Combined Sewer Overflows

    EPA Science Inventory

    This cooperative research and development agreement between U.S. EPA, Solvay, MSDGC, and CB&I is evaluating the potential of PAA for disinfection of Muddy Creek CSO wastewater and comparing that with sodium hypochlorite disinfection. This presentation will document the effective...

  12. Molecular structure of the 2:2 complex of cyclic oxaalkyl diamide of o-phthalic acid with sodium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczyński, Adam; Ratajczak-Sitarz, Małgorzata; Katrusiak, Andrzej; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2010-04-01

    Structure of the 2:2 complex of cyclic oxaalkyl diamide of o-phthalic acid (CPhDA) with sodium perchlorate is studied by X-ray diffraction, ESI-MS, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR as well as PM5 semiempirical methods. The crystal space group is P21/n with a = 8.599(1) Å, b = 14.802(2) Å, c = 13.988(2) Å, β = 93.37(1)° and Z = 4. In the dimeric crystal structure each sodium cation is coordinated by oxygen atoms of two CPhDA molecules. The ESI-MS measurements have proved that in the gas phase the 2:2 (or 1:1) as well as 2:1 complexes are formed. In the acetonitrile solution the equilibrium between the 2:2 and 1:1 complexes is found. The structures of the 2:2, 1:1 and 2:1 complexes of CPhDA with sodium cation are visualized using the PM5 method and discussed in detail.

  13. Efficacy of levulinic acid-sodium dodecyl sulfate against Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ynes R; Torres, Maria P; Tatum, Jessica M

    2011-01-01

    Foodborne parasites are characterized as being highly resistant to sanitizers used by the food industry. In 2009, a study reported the effectiveness of levulinic acid in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in killing foodborne bacteria. Because of their innocuous properties, we studied the effects of levulinic acid and SDS at various concentrations appropriate for use in foods, on the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum and Encephalitozoon intestinalis. The viability of Cryptosporidium and E. intestinalis was determined by in vitro cultivation using the HCT-8 and RK-13 cell lines, respectively. Two Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates were also used in the present study: strain 932 (a human isolate from a 1992 Oregon meat outbreak) and strain E 0018 (isolated from calf feces). Different concentrations and combinations of levulinic acid and SDS were tested for their ability to reduce infectivity of C. parvum oocysts (10(5)), E. intestinalis spores (10(6)), and E. coli O157:H7 (10(7)/ml) when in suspension. Microsporidian spores were treated for 30 and 60 min at 20 ± 2°C. None of the combinations of levulinic acid and SDS were effective at inactivating the spores or oocysts. When Cryptosporidium oocysts were treated with higher concentrations (3% levulinic acid-2% SDS and 2% levulinic acid-1% SDS) for 30, 60, and 120 min, viability was unaffected. E. coli O157:H7, used as a control, was highly sensitive to the various concentrations and exposure times tested. SDS and levulinic acid alone had very limited effect on E. coli O157:H7 viability, but in combination they were highly effective at 30 and 60 min of incubation. In conclusion, Cryptosporidium and microsporidia are not inactivated when treated for various periods of time with 2% levulinic acid-1% SDS or 3% levulinic acid-2% SDS at 20°C, suggesting that this novel sanitizer cannot be used to eliminate parasitic contaminants in foods. PMID:21219777

  14. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This…

  15. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2... into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels...

  16. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping. PMID:23485244

  17. Investigation of low levels of plasma valproic acid concentration following simultaneous administration of sodium valproate and rizatriptan benzoate.

    PubMed

    Hokama, Nobuo; Hobara, Norio; Kameya, Hiromasa; Ohshiro, Susumu; Hobara, Narumi; Sakanashi, Matao

    2007-03-01

    Drug interaction between rizatriptan benzoate, an anti-migraine agent, and sodium valproate (VPA-Na), an anticonvulsant, was studied in rats. When rizatriptan benzoate was administered orally immediately after VPA-Na oral administration, the pharmacokinetic parameters, such as plasma valproic acid (VPA) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve up to 3 h (AUC(0-3)), were significantly decreased compared with those in the control group. However, when rizatriptan benzoate was administered intraperitoneally immediately after VPA-Na orally, these parameters were not changed. In addition, when benzoic acid was administered orally immediately after VPA-Na orally, these were significantly lower compared with the control values. Therefore, it might be possible that VPA transport by monocarboxylate transporter was competitively inhibited by rizatriptan benzoate and thus absorption of VPA was decreased. PMID:17331341

  18. Ascorbic acid ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haiyan; Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) has been shown to exert beneficial effects, including mitigating oxidative stress and inhibiting inflammation. However, the preventative effect of vitamin C in chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. In our study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of AA and possible mechanism involved in inhibiting dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided to three groups: control group, DSS group, and DSS plus ascorbic acid treated group. Several clinical and inflammatory parameters as well as oxidative stress were evaluated. The results demonstrated that ascorbic acid significantly reduced clinical signs, inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malonaldehyde (MDA) activities, whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were increased in DSS-induced mice. In addition, ascorbic acid was capable of inhibiting NF-κB, COX-2 and iNOS expression in the colonic. Taken together, these findings suggest that ascorbic acid contributes to the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in DSS-induced colitis and exerts the potential to prevent and clinical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26884937

  19. Enantioselective Crystallization of Sodium Chlorate in the Presence of Racemic Hydrophobic Amino Acids and Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzano, María-Paz; Osuna-Esteban, Susana; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Menor-Salván, Cesar; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2014-06-01

    We study the bias induced by a weak (200 mT) external magnetic field on the preferred handedness of sodium chlorate crystals obtained by slow evaporation at ambient conditions of its saturated saline solution with 20 ppm of added racemic (dl) hydrophobic amino acids. By applying the Fisher test to pairs of experiments with opposing magnetic field orientation we conclude, with a confidence level of 99.7%, that at the water-air interface of this saline solution there is an enantioselective magnetic interaction that acts upon racemic mixtures of hydrophobic chiral amino acids. This interaction has been observed with the three tested racemic hydrophobic amino acids: dl-Phe, dl-Try and dl-Trp, at ambient conditions and in spite of the ubiquitous chiral organic contamination. This enantioselective magnetic dependence is not observed when there is only one handedness of added chiral amino-acid, if the added amino acid is not chiral or if there is no additive. This effect has been confirmed with a double blind test. This novel experimental observation may have implications for our view of plausible initial prebiotic scenarios and of the roles of the geomagnetic field in homochirality in the biosphere.

  20. Ascorbic acid ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haiyan; Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) has been shown to exert beneficial effects, including mitigating oxidative stress and inhibiting inflammation. However, the preventative effect of vitamin C in chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. In our study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of AA and possible mechanism involved in inhibiting dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided to three groups: control group, DSS group, and DSS plus ascorbic acid treated group. Several clinical and inflammatory parameters as well as oxidative stress were evaluated. The results demonstrated that ascorbic acid significantly reduced clinical signs, inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malonaldehyde (MDA) activities, whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were increased in DSS-induced mice. In addition, ascorbic acid was capable of inhibiting NF-κB, COX-2 and iNOS expression in the colonic. Taken together, these findings suggest that ascorbic acid contributes to the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in DSS-induced colitis and exerts the potential to prevent and clinical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26884937

  1. Efficacy of a levulinic acid plus sodium dodecyl sulfate-based sanitizer on inactivation of human norovirus surrogates.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jennifer L; Aydin, Ali; Mann, Amy N; Bolton, Stephanie L; Zhao, Tong; Doyle, Michael P

    2012-08-01

    Human noroviruses are the most common etiologic agent of foodborne illness in the United States. The inability to culture human noroviruses in the laboratory necessitates the use of surrogate viruses such as murine norovirus (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV) for inactivation studies. In this study, a novel sanitizer of organic acid (levulinic acid) plus the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was evaluated. Viruses were treated with levulinic acid (0.5 to 5%), SDS (0.05 to 2%), or combinations of levulinic acid plus SDS (1:10 solution of virus to sanitizer). MNV-1 inoculated onto stainless steel also was treated with a 5% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS liquid or foaming solution. Log reductions of viruses were determined with a plaque assay. Neither levulinic acid nor SDS alone were capable of inactivating MNV-1 or FCV, resulting in a ≤0.51-log reduction of the infectious virus titer. However, the combination of 0.5% levulinic acid plus 0.5% SDS inactivated both surrogates by 3 to 4.21 log PFU/ml after 1 min of exposure. Similarly, MNV-1 inoculated onto stainless steel was reduced by >1.50 log PFU/ml after 1 min and by >3.3 log PFU/ml after 5 min of exposure to a liquid or foaming solution of 5% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS. The presence of organic matter (up to 10%) in the virus inoculum did not significantly affect sanitizer efficacy. The fact that both of the active sanitizer ingredients are generally recognized as safe to use as food additives by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration further extends its potential in mitigating foodborne disease. PMID:22856583

  2. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  3. Control of pathogens in biofilms on the surface of stainless steel by levulinic acid plus sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Zhao, Tong; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-08-17

    The efficacy of levulinic acid (LVA) plus sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to remove or inactivate Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in biofilms on the surface of stainless steel coupons was evaluated. Five- or six-strain mixtures (ca. 9.0 log CFU/ml) of the three pathogens were separately inoculated on stainless steel coupons. After incubation at 21 °C for 72 h, the coupons were treated for 10 min by different concentrations of LVA plus SDS (0.5% LVA+0.05% SDS, 1% LVA+0.1% SDS, and 3% LVA+2% SDS) and other commonly used sanitizers, including a commercial quaternary ammonium-based sanitizer (150 ppm), lactic acid (3%), sodium hypochlorite (100 ppm), and hydrogen peroxide (2%). The pathogens grew in the biofilms to ca. 8.6 to 9.3 log CFU/coupon after 72 h of incubation. The combined activity of LVA with SDS was bactericidal in biofilms for cells of the three pathogens evaluated, with the highest concentrations (3% LVA+2% SDS) providing the greatest log reduction. Microscopic images indicated that the cells were detached from the biofilm matrix and the integrity of cell envelopes were decreased after the treatment of LVA plus SDS. This study is conducive to better understanding the antimicrobial behavior of LVA plus SDS to the foodborne pathogens within biofilms. PMID:25950851

  4. Chemical Speciation Analysis of Sports Drinks by Acid-Base Titrimetry and Ion Chromatography: A Challenging Beverage Formulation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossman, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Students have standardized a sodium hydroxide solution and analyzed commercially available sports drinks by titrimetric analysis of the triprotic citric acid, dihydrogen phosphate, and dihydrogen citrate and by ion chromatography for chloride, total phosphate and citrate. These experiments are interesting examples of analyzing real-world food and…

  5. Bioinorganic magnetic core-shell nanocomposites carrying antiarthritic agents: intercalation of ibuprofen and glucuronic acid into Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides supported on magnesium ferrite.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ahmet Nedim; Zümreoglu-Karan, Birgül; Temel, Abidin; Rives, Vicente

    2009-09-21

    This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of a composite constituted by an antiarthritic agent (AA) intercalated into a layered double hydroxide (LDH) supported on magnesium ferrite. Core-shell nanocomposites were prepared by depositing Mg-Al-NO(3)-LDH on a MgFe(2)O(4) core prepared by calcination of a nonstoichiometric Mg-Fe-CO(3)-LDH. Intercalation of ibuprofen and glucuronate anions was performed by ion-exchange with nitrate ions. The structural characteristics of the obtained products were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, element chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphologies of the nanocomposite particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The products were shown to intercalate substantial amounts of AA with enhanced thermal stabilities. Room-temperature magnetic measurements by vibrating sample magnetometry revealed that the products show soft ferromagnetic properties suitable for potential utilization in magnetic arthritis therapy. PMID:19691269

  6. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  7. Resistance of geopolymer materials to acid attack

    SciTech Connect

    Bakharev, T

    2005-04-01

    This article presents an investigation into durability of geopolymer materials manufactured using a class F fly ash (FA) and alkaline activators when exposed to 5% solutions of acetic and sulfuric acids. The main parameters studied were the evolution of weight, compressive strength, products of degradation and microstructural changes. The degradation was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The performance of geopolymer materials when exposed to acid solutions was superior to ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste. However, significant degradation of strength was observed in some geopolymer materials prepared with sodium silicate and with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide as activators. The deterioration observed was connected to depolymerisation of the aluminosilicate polymers in acidic media and formation of zeolites, which in some cases lead to a significant loss of strength. The best performance was observed in the geopolymer material prepared with sodium hydroxide and cured at elevated temperature, which was attributed to a more stable cross-linked aluminosilicate polymer structure formed in this material.

  8. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  9. Salicylic Acid and Sodium Salicylate Alleviate Cadmium Toxicity to Different Extents in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gondor, Orsolya Kinga; Pál, Magda; Darkó, Éva; Janda, Tibor; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The role of salicylic acid in Cd tolerance has attracted more attention recently but no information is available on the efficiency of different forms of salicylic acid. The aim was thus to investigate whether both the acid and salt forms of salicylic acid provide protection against Cd stress and to compare their mode of action. Young maize plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions. One group of 10-day-old seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM SA or NaSA for 1 day then half of the pants were treated with 0.5 mM Cd for 1 day. Another group of seedlings was treated with 0.5 mM CdSO4 for 1 day without pre-treatment with SA or NaSA, while a third group was treated simultaneously with Cd and either SA or NaSA. Both salicylic acid forms reduced the Cd accumulation in the roots. Treatment with the acidic form meliorated the Cd accumulation in the leaves, while Na-salicylate increased the phytochelatin level in the roots and the amount of salicylic acid in the leaves. Furthermore, increased antioxidant enzyme activity was mainly induced by the acid form, while glutathione-related redox changes were influenced mostly by the salt form. The acidic and salt forms of salicylic acid affected the two antioxidant systems in different ways, and the influence of these two forms on the distribution and detoxification of Cd also differed. The present results also draw attention to the fact that generalisations about the stress protective mechanisms induced by salicylic acid are misleading since different forms of SA may exert different effects on the plants via separate mechanisms. PMID:27490102

  10. Salicylic Acid and Sodium Salicylate Alleviate Cadmium Toxicity to Different Extents in Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Gondor, Orsolya Kinga; Pál, Magda; Darkó, Éva; Janda, Tibor; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The role of salicylic acid in Cd tolerance has attracted more attention recently but no information is available on the efficiency of different forms of salicylic acid. The aim was thus to investigate whether both the acid and salt forms of salicylic acid provide protection against Cd stress and to compare their mode of action. Young maize plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions. One group of 10-day-old seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM SA or NaSA for 1 day then half of the pants were treated with 0.5 mM Cd for 1 day. Another group of seedlings was treated with 0.5 mM CdSO4 for 1 day without pre-treatment with SA or NaSA, while a third group was treated simultaneously with Cd and either SA or NaSA. Both salicylic acid forms reduced the Cd accumulation in the roots. Treatment with the acidic form meliorated the Cd accumulation in the leaves, while Na-salicylate increased the phytochelatin level in the roots and the amount of salicylic acid in the leaves. Furthermore, increased antioxidant enzyme activity was mainly induced by the acid form, while glutathione-related redox changes were influenced mostly by the salt form. The acidic and salt forms of salicylic acid affected the two antioxidant systems in different ways, and the influence of these two forms on the distribution and detoxification of Cd also differed. The present results also draw attention to the fact that generalisations about the stress protective mechanisms induced by salicylic acid are misleading since different forms of SA may exert different effects on the plants via separate mechanisms. PMID:27490102

  11. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2015-06-02

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with sodium ethoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxybutenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with aqueous sodium hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  12. Mechanism of Alcohol-Water Dehydrogenative Coupling into Carboxylic Acid Using Milstein's Catalyst: A Detailed Investigation of the Outer-Sphere PES in the Reaction of Aldehydes with an Octahedral Ruthenium Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Hasanayn, Faraj; Al-Assi, Lara M; Moussawi, Rasha N; Omar, Boushra Srour

    2016-08-15

    In aqueous basic media, the square-pyramidal complex [Ru(PNN)(CO)(H)] (1-Ru, where PNN is a dearomatized bipyridyl-CH-P(t)Bu2 pincer ligand) catalyzes the transformation of alcohols and water into carboxylates and H2. A previous theoretical investigation reported the following mechanism for the reaction: (i) metal-catalyzed dehydrogenation of the alcohol into an aldehyde, (ii) metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) addition of water to 1-Ru to give an octahedral ruthenium hydroxide (2-Ru-OH), (iii) concerted MLC hydration of the aldehyde by 2-Ru-OH to give separated 1-Ru and a gem-diol, and (iv) concerted MLC dehydrogenation of the gem-diol by 1-Ru into an octahedral ruthenium dihydride (2-Ru-H) and a carboxylic acid. We calculate the outer-sphere PES in the reaction between the aldehyde and 2-Ru-OH to start with a localized coupling step yielding an ion-pair minimum (7-ip-OH) in which the hydroxyl group of an α-hydroxyl-alkoxide (gem-diolate) is coordinated to the metal of a cationic square-pyramidal complex. From 7-ip-OH, we identify a route to carboxylic acid that circumvents ligand deprotonation involving (i) 1,1-rearrangement of the gem-diolate within the contact ion pair through an α-OH/O(-) slippage TS into the octahedral 2-Ru-OCH(OH)R and (ii) a second 1,1-rearrangement through an α-O(-)/H slippage TS that gives a new ion-pair minimum in which the α-hydrogen of the anion is coordinated to the metal, followed by a localized hydride-transfer TS that gives a carboxylic acid and the octahedral hydride complex (2-Ru-H). The net transformation from 2-Ru-OH and the aldehyde to the carboxylic acid and 2-Ru-H can be viewed as a H/OH metathesis in which a hydride and a hydroxide are exchanged between the acyl group of the aldehyde and the metal center of 2-Ru-OH. The MLC mechanism gives the same metathesis products through the intermediacy of a gem-diol. When the SMD solvent continuum model is applied during geometry optimization with water as the solvent, the Gibbs free

  13. The effect of oral sodium acetate administration on plasma acetate concentration and acid-base state in horses

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Amanda; Lindinger, Michael I

    2007-01-01

    Aim Sodium acetate (NaAcetate) has received some attention as an alkalinizing agent and possible alternative energy source for the horse, however the effects of oral administration remain largely unknown. The present study used the physicochemical approach to characterize the changes in acid-base status occurring after oral NaAcetate/acetic acid (NAA) administration in horses. Methods Jugular venous blood was sampled from 9 exercise-conditioned horses on 2 separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competition exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of 3-day event. Immediately after the CETs horses were allowed water ad libitum and either: 1) 8 L of a hypertonic NaAcetate/acetic acid solution via nasogastric tube followed by a typical hay/grain meal (NAA trial); or 2) a hay/grain meal alone (Control trial). Results Oral NAA resulted in a profound plasma alkalosis marked by decreased plasma [H+] and increased plasma [TCO2] and [HCO3-] compared to Control. The primary contributor to the plasma alkalosis was an increased [SID], as a result of increased plasma [Na+] and decreased plasma [Cl-]. An increased [Atot], due to increased [PP] and a sustained increase in plasma [acetate], contributed a minor acidifying effect. Conclusion It is concluded that oral NaAcetate could be used as both an alkalinizing agent and an alternative energy source in the horse. PMID:18096070

  14. Inactivation of salmonella in biofilms and on chicken cages and preharvest poultry by levulinic Acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Ping; Cannon, Jennifer L; Doyle, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    Surface contamination (skin and feathers) of broilers with Salmonella occurs primarily during growth and transportation. Immediately after transporting chickens, chicken cage doors were sprayed with a foam containing 3% levulinic acid plus 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Samples were collected for Salmonella assay after 45 min. Salmonella on cage doors was reduced from 19% (19 of 100 doors) before treatment to 1% (1 of 100 doors) after treatment, coliform counts were reduced from 6 to 8 to 2 to 4 log CFU/9 cm(2), and aerobic plate counts were reduced from 7 to 9 to 4 to 6 log CFU/9 cm(2). Whole chicken carcasses with feathers were inoculated with 10(8) CFU of Salmonella Enteritidis, soaked for 5 min at 21°C in 72 liters of a treatment or control solution, and assayed for Salmonella. Salmonella counts on chickens treated with water were 6.8 to 8.5 log CFU/9 cm(2), those treated with 50 ppm of calcium hypochlorite were 7.6 to 8.9 log CFU/9 cm(2), and those treated with 3% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS were <1.7 to 2.8 CFU/9 cm(2) (>4-log reduction). Results of biofilm studies on surfaces of various materials revealed that a 3% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS treatment used as either a foam or liquid for 10 min effectively reduced Salmonella populations by 5 and >6 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. PMID:22186041

  15. Unidirectional growth of <0 0 1> sodium acid phthalate single crystal by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, A.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-12-01

    A transparent uniaxial semi-organic sodium acid phthalate (NaAP) single crystal having dimension of 36 mm length and 20 mm diameter was successfully grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method for the first time in the literature. The solubility and the nucleation of the material for different temperatures have been studied. The metastable zone width for NaAP has been investigated. The grown crystals were characterized by UV-vis and microhardness studies. The structural perfection of the grown crystal has been analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve measurements. The range and percentage of optical transmission are ascertained by recording UV-vis spectrum. Microhardness measurements reveal the mechanical strength of the grown ingot.

  16. Molecular structure and spectroscopic analysis of homovanillic acid and its sodium salt - NMR, FT-IR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Kowczyk-Sadowy, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of the electronic charge distribution in metal complex or salt allows to predict what kind of deformation of the electronic system of ligand would undergo during complexation. It also permits to make more precise interpretation of mechanism by which metals affect the biochemical properties of ligands. The influence of sodium cation on the electronic system of homovanillic acid was studied in this paper. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G** method. Mulliken, MK and ChelpG atomic charges were analyzed. The theoretical NMR and IR spectra were obtained. 1H and 13C NMR as well as FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of studied compounds were also recorded and analyzed. The calculated parameters are compared with experimental characteristics of these molecules.

  17. EPR investigation of thermal decay of radiation-induced species of benzoic acid and its sodium and potassium salts.

    PubMed

    Tuner, Hasan; Kayıkçı, Mehmet Ali

    2015-05-01

    The structural and kinetic features of the radiation-induced radicals of benzoic acid and its sodium and potassium salts were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Two main different radicals were found to be responsible for the measured spectra of the irradiated samples. It is concluded that these two radicals have a structure similar to that of cyclohexadienyl-type (CHD) and benzyl-type (BNZ) radicals. The relative contributions of the CHD and BNZ radicals to the measured peak-to-peak amplitude and to the total spectra were calculated. The room-temperature stability of the EPR signals and the decay kinetic features of the radiation-induced radicals derived from annealing at high temperatures were determined. PMID:25744174

  18. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods. PMID:25577894

  19. Conversion of Saccharides into Formic Acid using Hydrogen Peroxide and a Recyclable Palladium(II) Catalyst in Aqueous Alkaline Media at Ambient Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zargari, N.; Kim, Y.; Jung, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an effective method that converts a variety of mono- and disaccharides into formic acid predominantly. Our recyclable NHC-amidate palladium(II) catalyst facilitated oxidative degradation of carbohydrates without using excess oxidant. Stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hydroxide were employed at ambient temperatures. PMID:26421000

  20. Regulation of amino acid transporters in pluripotent cell populations in the embryo and in culture; novel roles for sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boon Siang Nicholas; Rathjen, Peter D; Harvey, Alexandra J; Gardner, David K; Rathjen, Joy

    2016-08-01

    The developmental outcomes of preimplantation mammalian embryos are regulated directly by the surrounding microenvironment, and inappropriate concentrations of amino acids, or the loss of amino acid-sensing mechanisms, can be detrimental and impact further development. A specific role for l-proline in the differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells, a cell population derived from the blastocyst, has been shown in culture. l-proline acts as a signalling molecule, exerting its effects through cell uptake and subsequent metabolism. Uptake in ES cells occurs predominantly through the sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2, Slc38a2 (SNAT2). Dynamic expression of amino acid transporters has been shown in the early mammalian embryo, reflecting functional roles for amino acids in embryogenesis. The expression of SNAT2 and family member Slc38a1 (SNAT1) was determined in mouse embryos from the 2-cell stage through to the early post-implantation pre-gastrulation embryo. Key changes in expression were validated in cell culture models of development. Both transporters showed temporal dynamic expression patterns and changes in intracellular localisation as differentiation progressed. Changes in transporter expression likely reflect different amino acid requirements during development. Findings include the differential expression of SNAT1 in the inner and outer cells of the compacted morula and nuclear localisation of SNAT2 in the trophectoderm and placental lineages. Furthermore, SNAT2 expression was up-regulated in the epiblast prior to primitive ectoderm formation, an expression pattern consistent with a role for the transporter in later developmental decisions within the pluripotent lineage. We propose that the differential expression of SNAT2 in the epiblast provides evidence for an l-proline-mediated mechanism contributing to the regulation of embryonic development. PMID:27373508

  1. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Rhee, Min Suk

    2016-02-01

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P < 0.05). Combining PA and NaCl under conditions that yielded negligible effects when each was used alone led to marked synergistic effects. For example, whereas 0.4% PA or 3 or 4% NaCl alone had little or no effect on cell viability, combining the two completely inactivated both nonadapted and acid-adapted cells, reducing their numbers to unrecoverable levels (>7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA. PMID:26637600

  2. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee

    2015-01-01

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P < 0.05). Combining PA and NaCl under conditions that yielded negligible effects when each was used alone led to marked synergistic effects. For example, whereas 0.4% PA or 3 or 4% NaCl alone had little or no effect on cell viability, combining the two completely inactivated both nonadapted and acid-adapted cells, reducing their numbers to unrecoverable levels (>7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA. PMID:26637600

  3. Flow injection determination of diclofenac sodium based on its sensitizing effect on the chemiluminescent reaction of acidic potassium permanganate-formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingjing; Sun, Pulv; Ji, Zhongling; Li, Jianguo

    2015-02-01

    A sensitive and simple chemiluminescent (CL) method for the determination of diclofenac sodium has been developed by combining the flow injection technique and its sensitizing effect on the weak CL reaction between formaldehyde and acidic potassium permanganate. A calibration curve is constructed for diclofenac sodium under optimized experimental parameters over the range 0.040-5.0 µg/mL and the limit of detection is 0.020 µg/mL (3σ). The inter-assay relative standard deviation for 0.040 µg/mL diclofenac sodium (n = 11) is 2.0%. This method is rapid, sensitive, simple, and shows good selectivity and reproducibility. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of the studied diclofenac sodium in pharmaceutical preparations with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the possible mechanism for the CL reaction has been discussed in detail on the basis of UV and CL spectra. PMID:24802238

  4. 21 CFR 184.1733 - Sodium benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1733 Sodium benzoate. (a) Sodium benzoate is the chemical benzoate of soda (C7H5NaO2), produced by the neutralization of benzoic acid with sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, or sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium benzoate. 184.1733 Section 184.1733...

  5. Determination of benzoic acid, chlorobenzoic acids and chlorendic acid in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, E.A.; Cortellucci, N.J.; Singley, K.F. )

    1993-01-01

    To characterize and conduct treatment studies of a landfill leachate an analysis procedure was required to determine concentrations of benzoic acid, the three isomers of chlorobenzoic acid and chlorendic acid. The title compounds were isolated from acidified (pH 1) water by extraction with methyl t-butyl ether. Analytes were concentrated by back-extracting the ether with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide which was separated and acidified. This solution was analyzed by C[sub 18] reversed-phase HPLC with water/acetonitrile/acetic acid eluent and UV detection at 222 nm. The method has detection limits of 200 [mu]g/L for chlorendic acid and 100 [mu]g/L for benzoic acid and each isomer of chlorobenzoic acid. Validation studies with water which was fortified with the analytes at concentrations ranging from one to ten times detection limits resulted in average recoveries of >95%.

  6. Further work on sodium montmorillonite as catalyst for the polymerization of activated amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eirich, F. R.; Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1986-01-01

    When the polycondensation of amino acid acylates was catalyzed with Na-montmorillonite, the polypeptides were consistently found to exhibit a distribution of discrete molecular weights, for as yet undiscovered reasons. One possible explanation was connected to the stepwise mode of monomer addition. New experiments have eliminated this possibility, so that there is the general assumption that this discreteness is the result of a preference of shorter oligomers to add to others of the same length, a feature that could be attributed to some structure of the platelet aggregates of the montmorillonite. The production of optical stereoisomers is anticipated when D,L-amino acids are polymerized on montmorillonite. Having used an optically active surface, the essence of the results lies not only in the occurrence of optically active oligomers and polymers, but also in the fact that the latter exhibit the same molecular weight characteristics as the D,L-polymers. Preparatory to work contemplated on a parallel synthesis of amino acid and nucleotide oligomers, studies were continued on the co-adsorption of amino acids, nucleotides, and amino acid-nucleotides on montmorillonite.

  7. The polymerization of amino acid adenylates on sodium-montmorillonite with preadsorbed polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, Mella; Eirich, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of amino acid adenylates on Na-montmorillonite in dilute, neutral suspension, after polypeptides were adsorbed on the clay, is studied. It is found that the degrees of polymerization of the oligopeptides and polypeptides obtained is dependent on the amounts of polypeptides that were preadsorbed. It is concluded that a catalytic activity may derive from c-spacings that offer adsorption sites for the reagent amino acid adenylate within the peripheral recesses of irregularly stacked clay platelets by bringing the anhydride bonds and neutral amino groups into favorable reaction distances.

  8. Layered double hydroxide formation in Bayer liquor and its promotional effect on oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Perrotta, A.J.; Williams, F.

    1996-10-01

    Enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer process liquor to improve the quality of alumina product remains an important objective for Bayer refining. The formation of layered double hydroxides by the reaction of alkaline earth oxides, such as lime and magnesia, with Bayer liquor gives a crystal structure which is capable of intercalating anions, both inorganic and organic, within its structure. Both lime and magnesia, with long contact times in Bayer liquor, show layered double hydroxide formation. This layered double hydroxide formation is accompanied with a decrease in the sodium oxalate content in the liquor from about 3 g/L to below 1 g/L. Short contact times lead to a destabilization of the liquor which facilitates sodium oxalate precipitation. Additional work on magnesium hydroxide shows, in comparison to lime and magnesia, much less layered double hydroxide formation with equivalent residence time in the liquor. Destabilization of the liquor also occurs, giving enhanced oxalate precipitation with less alumina being consumed in agreement with lower layered double hydroxide formation. Thermal regeneration of these structures, followed by in-situ recrystallization in Bayer liquor, also gives enhanced oxalate precipitation, suggesting that there is an opportunity for a regenerable oxalate reduction system. The implementation of these experiments and other related technology into the plant has resulted in the Purox Process for enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer liquor.

  9. Intercalation of ethylene glycol into yttrium hydroxide layered materials.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yuanzhou; Davis, Robert J

    2010-04-19

    Intercalation of ethylene glycol into layered yttrium hydroxide containing nitrate counterions was accomplished by heating the reagents in a methanol solution of sodium methoxide under autogenous pressure at 413 K for 20 h. The resulting crystalline material had an expanded interlayer distance of 10.96 A, confirming the intercalation of an ethylene glycol derived species. Characterization of the material by FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and the catalytic transesterification of tributyrin with methanol was consistent with direct bonding of ethylene glycolate anions (O(2)C(2)H(5)(-)) to the yttrium hydroxide layers, forming Y-O-C bonds. The layers of the material are proposed to be held together by H-bonding between the hydroxyls of grafted ethylene glycol molecules attached to adjacent layers. Glycerol can also be intercalated into yttrium hydroxide layered materials by a similar method. PMID:20302308

  10. Standard enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Burylev, B.P.

    1995-03-01

    Available experimental data on standard enthalpies of formation of alkali metal hydroxide hydrates have been summarized. Using equations derived, the authors have calculated previously unknown enthalpies of formation of some lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium hydroxide hydrates. Taking into account the contribution of water to the enthalpies of formation of monohydrates, the authors have estimated the enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates FrOH{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, FrOH{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and FrOH{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (-745.8, -1085.8, and -1515.8 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively).

  11. [The use of hydroxamic acids and sodium nitrate to enhance the antitumor effect of cyclophosphamide].

    PubMed

    Bogatyrenko, T N; Kuropteva, Z V; Sashenkova, T E; Baĭder, L M; Konovalova, N P

    2013-01-01

    It has been showed that the introduction of nitrocompounds (as nitic oxide donors) in to the compositions of cyclophosphamide and hydroxamic acids for curing animals having leukemia P-388 increased duration of life by 290%. Thereby 40% of animals have recovered. The therapeutic dose cyclophosphamide have been reduced by 6 times. PMID:23814833

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester: Inhibition of metastatic cell behaviours via voltage-gated sodium channel in human breast cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott P; Hemsley, Faye; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-02-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, derived from natural propolis, has been reported to have anti-cancer properties. Voltage-gated sodium channels are upregulated in many cancers where they promote metastatic cell behaviours, including invasiveness. We found that micromolar concentrations of caffeic acid phenethyl ester blocked voltage-gated sodium channel activity in several invasive cell lines from different cancers, including breast (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468), colon (SW620) and non-small cell lung cancer (H460). In the MDA-MB-231 cell line, which was adopted as a 'model', long-term (48 h) treatment with 18 μM caffeic acid phenethyl ester reduced the peak current density by 91% and shifted steady-state inactivation to more hyperpolarized potentials and slowed recovery from inactivation. The effects of long-term treatment were also dose-dependent, 1 μM caffeic acid phenethyl ester reducing current density by only 65%. The effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on metastatic cell behaviours were tested on the MDA-MB-231 cell line at a working concentration (1 μM) that did not affect proliferative activity. Lateral motility and Matrigel invasion were reduced by up to 14% and 51%, respectively. Co-treatment of caffeic acid phenethyl ester with tetrodotoxin suggested that the voltage-gated sodium channel inhibition played a significant intermediary role in these effects. We conclude, first, that caffeic acid phenethyl ester does possess anti-metastatic properties. Second, the voltage-gated sodium channels, commonly expressed in strongly metastatic cancers, are a novel target for caffeic acid phenethyl ester. Third, more generally, ion channel inhibition can be a significant mode of action of nutraceutical compounds. PMID:26724521

  13. Sodium Chloride Diffusion in Low-Acid Foods during Thermal Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Ellen R; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at modeling sodium chloride (NaCl) diffusion in foods during thermal processing using analytical and numerical solutions and at investigating the changes in NaCl concentrations during storage after processing. Potato, radish, and salmon samples in 1% or 3% NaCl solutions were heated at 90, 105, or 121 °C for 5 to 240 min to simulate pasteurization and sterilization. Selected samples were stored at 4 or 22 °C for up to 28 d. Radish had the largest equilibrium NaCl concentrations and equilibrium distribution coefficients, but smallest effective diffusion coefficients, indicating that a greater amount of NaCl diffused into the radish at a slower rate. Effective diffusion coefficients determined using the analytical solution ranged from 0.2 × 10(-8) to 2.6 × 10(-8) m²/s. Numerical and analytical solutions showed good agreement with experimental data, with average coefficients of determination for samples in 1% NaCl at 121 °C of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. During storage, food samples equilibrated to a similar NaCl concentration regardless of the thermal processing severity. The results suggest that sensory evaluation of multiphase (solid and liquid) products should occur at least 14 d after processing to allow enough time for the salt to equilibrate within the product. PMID:27060992

  14. Inhibitory effects of sodium salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid on UVB-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bair, Warner B; Hart, Nancy; Einspahr, Janine; Liu, Guangming; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Tim

    2002-12-01

    We conducted an in vivo carcinogenesis experiment to determine the efficacy of topical aspirin and sodium salicylate (NAS) in preventing UVB-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Hairless SKH-1 mice were randomly divided into eight treatment groups. They were treated topically with either 40 or 10 micromol aspirin or NAS three times weekly before 9 kJ/m(2) UVB irradiation. The experiment was carried out over 25 weeks. Both dose levels of NAS significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) the rate of tumor formation when compared with vehicle control. The 40 micromol dose of aspirin significantly inhibited the rate of tumor formation (P < 0.05), whereas the 10 micromol dose had no inhibitory effect when compared with the vehicle control. To investigate the mechanism of this inhibition, we studied UVB-induced thymine dimer formation in the epidermis of the mouse skin. We found that NAS inhibited UVB-induced thymine dimer formation (P = 0.0001), whereas aspirin did not. Therefore, we conclude that NAS prevents UVB-induced tumor growth and formation through a sunscreen effect; whereas, the moderate inhibition of aspirin may be because of a molecular event, such as the inhibition of various UVB signaling pathways. PMID:12496056

  15. Poly (acrylic acid sodium) grafted carboxymethyl cellulose as a high performance polymer binder for silicon anode in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liangming; Chen, Changxin; Hou, Zhongyu; Wei, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The design of novel binder systems is required for the high capacity silicon (Si) anodes which usually undergo huge volume change during the charge/discharge cycling. Here, we introduce a poly (acrylic acid sodium)-grafted-carboxymethyl cellulose (NaPAA-g-CMC) copolymer as an excellent binder for Si anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The NaPAA-g-CMC copolymer was prepared via a free radical graft polymerization method by using CMC and acrylic acid as precursors. Unlike the linear, one-dimensional binders, the NaPAA-g-CMC copolymer binder is expected to present multi-point interaction with Si surface, resulting in enhanced binding ability with Si particles as well as with the copper (Cu) current collectors, and building a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the Si surface. The NaPAA-g-CMC based Si anode shows much better cycle stability and higher coulombic efficiency than those made with the well-known linear polymeric binders such as CMC and NaPPA.

  16. Poly (acrylic acid sodium) grafted carboxymethyl cellulose as a high performance polymer binder for silicon anode in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangming; Chen, Changxin; Hou, Zhongyu; Wei, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The design of novel binder systems is required for the high capacity silicon (Si) anodes which usually undergo huge volume change during the charge/discharge cycling. Here, we introduce a poly (acrylic acid sodium)-grafted-carboxymethyl cellulose (NaPAA-g-CMC) copolymer as an excellent binder for Si anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The NaPAA-g-CMC copolymer was prepared via a free radical graft polymerization method by using CMC and acrylic acid as precursors. Unlike the linear, one-dimensional binders, the NaPAA-g-CMC copolymer binder is expected to present multi-point interaction with Si surface, resulting in enhanced binding ability with Si particles as well as with the copper (Cu) current collectors, and building a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the Si surface. The NaPAA-g-CMC based Si anode shows much better cycle stability and higher coulombic efficiency than those made with the well-known linear polymeric binders such as CMC and NaPPA. PMID:26786315

  17. Extraction and solubilization of crude oil and volatile petroleum hydrocarbons by purified humic and fulvic acids and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Eljack, Mahmoud D; Hussam, Abul

    2014-01-01

    Solubilization of crude oil (Fula, Sudan) in water demonstrates humic acid (HA), completely dissolves oil with a solubilization efficiency of 1600 g oil /g HA. The order of solubilization increases: HA > HA+ FA (fulvic acid) > FA > SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate). Synthetic surfactant like, SDBS, exhibits the lowest efficiency even with 23 times the concentration of FA or HA. Extraction of diesel contaminated sand and GC-MS analysis show that HA and FA exhibit 50-90% extraction efficiency for C10-C22 at pH 11.9 with just one extraction. SDBS exhibits the least removal efficiency (<1%) for normal hydrocarbons. The effect of pH on extraction with HA by its micelles such as the surface active property was found to be greater than that for FA. On the basis of critical concentration, the extraction efficiencies with FA and HA are 1287 and 11453 times compared to SDBS, respectively, for the least extracted hydrocarbon at pH 10.8. The HSGC experiments showed that the solubilization efficiency of alkylbenzenes in gasoline (Shell 87) increases almost linearly with FA concentration with a slight deviation at 5-6 μM FA. About 35-60% of alkylbenzenes in gasoline were solubilized and partitioned at the highest FA concentration (15 μM) studied. Both studies with gasoline and diesel show similar extraction efficiencies even at 227-fold increased FA with diesel. PMID:25320849

  18. Poly (acrylic acid sodium) grafted carboxymethyl cellulose as a high performance polymer binder for silicon anode in lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liangming; Chen, Changxin; Hou, Zhongyu; Wei, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The design of novel binder systems is required for the high capacity silicon (Si) anodes which usually undergo huge volume change during the charge/discharge cycling. Here, we introduce a poly (acrylic acid sodium)-grafted-carboxymethyl cellulose (NaPAA-g-CMC) copolymer as an excellent binder for Si anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The NaPAA-g-CMC copolymer was prepared via a free radical graft polymerization method by using CMC and acrylic acid as precursors. Unlike the linear, one-dimensional binders, the NaPAA-g-CMC copolymer binder is expected to present multi-point interaction with Si surface, resulting in enhanced binding ability with Si particles as well as with the copper (Cu) current collectors, and building a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the Si surface. The NaPAA-g-CMC based Si anode shows much better cycle stability and higher coulombic efficiency than those made with the well-known linear polymeric binders such as CMC and NaPPA. PMID:26786315

  19. Potassium hydroxide clay stabilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.

    1981-07-28

    An aqueous solution having potassium hydroxide dissolved therein is injected into a subterranean sandstone formation containing water-sensitive fine particles, including clays. Potassium hydroxide stabilizes the fine particles for a substantial period of time thereby substantially preventing formation permeability damage caused by encroachment of aqueous solutions having a distinct ionic makeup into the treated formation.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  3. Enhanced antitumour drug delivery to cholangiocarcinoma through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT).

    PubMed

    Lozano, Elisa; Monte, Maria J; Briz, Oscar; Hernández-Hernández, Angel; Banales, Jesus M; Marin, Jose J G; Macias, Rocio I R

    2015-10-28

    Novel antitumour drugs, such as cationic tyrosine kinase inhibitors, are useful in many types of cancer but not in others, such as cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), where their uptake through specific membrane transporters, such as OCT1, is very poor. Here we have investigated the usefulness of targeting cytostatic bile acid derivatives to enhance the delivery of chemotherapy to tumours expressing the bile acid transporter ASBT and whether this is the case for CCA. The analysis of paired samples of CCA and adjacent non-tumour tissue collected from human (n=15) and rat (n=29) CCA revealed that ASBT expression was preserved. Moreover, ASBT was expressed, although at different levels, in human and rat CCA cell lines. Both cells in vitro and rat tumours in vivo were able to carry out efficient uptake of bile acid derivatives. Using Bamet-UD2 (cisplatin-ursodeoxycholate conjugate) as a model ASBT-targeted drug, in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity was evaluated. ASBT expression enhanced the sensitivity to Bamet-UD2, but not to cisplatin, in vitro. In nude mice, Bamet-UD2 (more than cisplatin) inhibited the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma tumours with induced stable expression of ASBT. As compared with cisplatin, administration of Bamet-UD2 to rats with CCA resulted in an efficient liver and tumour uptake but low exposure of extrahepatic tissues to the drug. Consequently, signs of liver/renal toxicity were absent in animals treated with Bamet-UD2. In conclusion, endogenous or induced ASBT expression may be useful in pharmacological strategies to treat enterohepatic tumours based on the use of cytostatic bile acid derivatives. PMID:26278512

  4. Mechanical properties of the sodium montmorillonite interlayer intercalated with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Katti, Dinesh R; Ghosh, Pijush; Schmidt, Steven; Katti, Kalpana S

    2005-01-01

    Nanosized montmorillonite clay dispersed in small amounts in polymer results in polymer nanocomposites having superior engineering properties compared to those of the native polymer. These nanoinclusions are created by treating clay with an organic modifier which makes clay organophilic and results in intercalation or exfoliation of the montmorillonite. The modifiers used are usually long carbon chains with alkylammonium or alkylphosphonium cations. In this work, we have investigated the use of some alternative molecules which can act as modifiers for clay composites using clay for reinforcing a matrix of biopeptides or proteins. Such composites have potential applications in the fields of biomedical engineering and pharmaceutical science. In this work, the amino acids arginine and lysine are used as modifiers. The intercalation and mechanical behavior of the interlayer spacing with these amino acids as inclusions under compression and tension are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Significant differences in the responses are observed. This work also provides an insight into the orientation and interaction of amino acids in the interlayer under different stress paths. PMID:16283756

  5. A sodium-indpendent low affinity transport system for neutral amino acids in rabbit ileal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, J Y; Sepúlveda, F V; Smith, M W

    1980-01-01

    1. The kinetic parameters for serine, alanine and methionine uptake by rabbit ileal mucosa have been determined in the absence of Na. 2. Uptake of all three amino acids took place through a single mediated system. The apparent Km values of serine, alanine and methionine for this system were equal to their respective apparent K1 values (approximately 89, 75 and 23 mM respectively). 3. Autoradiography was used to measure the cellular location of alanine uptake by rabbit ileum. Approximately 80% of the total uptake took place in the upper third of each villus. This uptake was reduced by 75% either by removal of Na or addition of serine. The proportional distribution of Na-dependent and Na-independent alanine uptakes along the villus was found to be equal. 4. The kinetic properties of the low affinity uptake mechanism for neutral amino acids, seen in the absence of Na, were virtually identical with those of one of the uptake mechanisms seen previously in the presence of Na. 5. The low affinity uptake mechanism appears to be Na-independent. It is suggested that the Na-coupled uptake of amino acid takes place through the high affinity system. PMID:7359411

  6. Dissociation quotient of benzoic acid in aqueous sodium chloride media to 250{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kettler, R.M.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The dissociation quotient of benzoic acid was determined potentiometrically in a concentration cell fitted with hydrogen electrodes. The hydrogen ion molality of benzoic acid/benzoate solutions was measured relative to a standard aqueous HCl solution at seven temperatures from 5 to 250{degrees}C and at seven ionic strengths ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 molal (NaCl). The molal dissociation quotients and selected literature data were fitted in the isocoulombic (all anionic) form by a six-term equation. This treatment yielded the following thermodynamic quantities for the acid dissociation equilibrium at 25{degrees}C and 1 bar: logK{sub a} = -4.206{+-}0.006, {Delta}H{sub a}{sup 0} = 0.3{+-}0.3 kJ-mol{sup {minus}1}, {Delta}S{sub a}{sup 0} = -79.6{+-}1.0 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}, and {Delta}C{sub p;a}{sup 0} = -207{+-}5 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}. A five-term equation derived to describe the dependence of the dissociation constant on solvent density is accurate to 250{degrees}C and 200 MPa.

  7. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products. PMID:9749396

  8. Fast and highly-efficient removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by poly(styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid)-sodium-modified magnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Bei; Lv, Shao-Nan; Cheng, Chang-Jing; Ni, Guo-Li; Xie, Xiao-Wa; Huang, Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters (MCNCs) modified with different amounts of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium (PSSMA) have been prepared through simple one-step solvothermal method for removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. The prepared MCNCs are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption technique and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Moreover, effects of the solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, ionic strength and initial dye concentration on MB adsorption onto the MCNCs are systematically investigated. The PSSMA-modified MCNCs show fast and highly-efficient MB removal capacity, which dramatically depends on the immobilization amounts of PSSMA, solution pH and adsorbent dosage. Their adsorption kinetics and isotherms exhibit that the kinetics and equilibrium adsorptions can be well-described by pseudo-second-order kinetic and Langmuir model, respectively. These magnetic nanocomposites, with high separation efficiency, low production cost and recyclable property, are promising as functional adsorbents for efficient removal of cationic organic pollutants from aqueous solution.

  9. Combined Effect of Free Nitrous Acid Pretreatment and Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate on Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production from Waste Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianwei; Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Qilin; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Sun, Yingjie; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) serving as a pretreatment is an effective approach to accelerate sludge disintegration. Also, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), a type of surfactants, has been determined at significant levels in sewage sludge, which thereby affects the characteristics of sludge. Both FNA pretreatment and sludge SDBS levels can affect short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) generation from sludge anaerobic fermentation. To date, however, the combined effect of FNA pretreatment and SDBS presence on SCFA production as well as the corresponding mechanisms have never been documented. This work therefore aims to provide such support. Experimental results showed that the combination of FNA and SDBS treatment not only improved SCFA accumulation but also shortened the fermentation time. The maximal SCFA accumulation of 334.5 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L treatment and 0.02 g/g dry sludge, which was respectively 1.79-fold and 1.41-fold of that from FNA treatment and sludge containing SDBS alone. Mechanism investigations revealed that the combined FNA pretreatment and SDBS accelerated solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification steps but inhibited the methanogenesis. All those observations were in agreement with SCFA enhancement. PMID:26868898

  10. Combined Effect of Free Nitrous Acid Pretreatment and Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate on Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production from Waste Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Qilin; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Sun, Yingjie; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) serving as a pretreatment is an effective approach to accelerate sludge disintegration. Also, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), a type of surfactants, has been determined at significant levels in sewage sludge, which thereby affects the characteristics of sludge. Both FNA pretreatment and sludge SDBS levels can affect short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) generation from sludge anaerobic fermentation. To date, however, the combined effect of FNA pretreatment and SDBS presence on SCFA production as well as the corresponding mechanisms have never been documented. This work therefore aims to provide such support. Experimental results showed that the combination of FNA and SDBS treatment not only improved SCFA accumulation but also shortened the fermentation time. The maximal SCFA accumulation of 334.5 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L treatment and 0.02 g/g dry sludge, which was respectively 1.79-fold and 1.41-fold of that from FNA treatment and sludge containing SDBS alone. Mechanism investigations revealed that the combined FNA pretreatment and SDBS accelerated solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification steps but inhibited the methanogenesis. All those observations were in agreement with SCFA enhancement. PMID:26868898

  11. Copper Catalyzed Sodium Tetraphenylborate, Triphenylborane, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboronic Acid Decomposition Kinetic Studies in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    1999-03-15

    This work studied the kinetics of copper-catalyzed decomposition of tetraphenylborate, triphenylborane, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboronic acid (NaTPB, 3PB, 2PB and 1PB, respectively) in aqueous alkaline solution over the temperature range of 25 to 70 degrees C. The statistically designed test matrices added copper sulfate to maximum concentrations of 10 mg/L. The relative rates of decomposition increase in the order of NaTPB < 1PB {tilde} 3PB < 2PB. Dependence of decomposition on the amount of added copper increases in the order of 3PB {tilde} 2PB < 1PB {tilde} NaTPB. Activation energies ranged from 82 to 143 kJ/mole over the temperature range studied. Final decomposition products predominately involved benzene and phenol. All 3PB, 2PB and 1PB intermediate phenylborate species proved relatively stable (< 8 percent decomposition over {tilde} 500 h) towards thermal hydrolysis in 1.5 M NaOH when contained in carbon-steel vessels sealed under air at ambient temperature (23 - 25 degrees C) with no added copper. Measurable (> 10-7 Mh-1) thermal hydrolysis of the phenylborate species occurs at 55 to 70 degrees C in alkaline (0.6-2.3 M OH-, 2-4.7 M Na+) solution with no added copper. The experiments suggest an important role for oxygen in copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition. NaTPB decomposes promptly under anoxic conditions while 3PB, 2PB and 1PB decompose faster in aerobic solutions. Benzene and phenol form as the predominant end-products from alkaline copper catalysis in static systems sealed under air. Both 2PB and 1PB decompose with near equal rates and quantitatively produce phenol under flowing air-purge conditions at 25 to 60 degrees C. Mechanisms for copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition likely involve a redox process giving loss of a phenyl group from the phenylborate with reduction of cupric ion, or dephenylation by reduced cuprous ion involving a phenylated copper intermediate.

  12. Disinfective process of strongly acidic electrolyzed product of sodium chloride solution against Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoyo Matsushita; Nakano, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Shimizu, Mitsuhide; Wu, Hong; Aoki, Hiroaki; Ota, Rie; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Sano, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    Electrolyzed acid water (EAW) has been studied for its disinfective potential against pathogenic microbes; however, the bactericidal process against Mycobacteria has not been clearly presented. In this study, to clarify the disinfective process against Mycobacteria, EAW-treated bacteria were examined against laboratory strains of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and Mycobacterium terrae (M. terrae) by recovery culture and observation of morphology, enzymatic assay, and the detection of DNA. All experiments were performed with the use of EAW containing 30 ppm free chlorine that kills Mycobacteria, including three pathogenic clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and six isolates of other Mycobacteria, within 5 min. In morphology, the bacterial surface became rough, and a longitudinal concavity-like structure appeared. The intrabacterial enzyme of EAW-contacted bacteria was inactivated, but chromosomal DNA was not totally denatured. These results suggest that the bactericidal effect of EAW against Mycobacteria occurs by degradation of the cell wall, followed by denaturation of cytoplasmic proteins, but degeneration of the nucleic acid is not always necessary. PMID:23224598

  13. Enhancement of volatile fatty acids production from rice straw via anaerobic digestion with chemical pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwon Woo; Kim, Ilgook; Jung, Kwonsu; Seo, Charles; Han, Jong-In; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-08-01

    Rice straw is one of the most abundant renewable biomass sources and was selected as the feedstock for the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from which microbial biodiesel can be produced. Two kinds of chemical pretreatments involving nitric acid and sodium hydroxide were investigated at 150 °C with 20 min of reaction time. The nitric acid pretreatment generated the most hemicellulose hydrolyzate, while significant reduction of the lignin occurred with sodium hydroxide pretreatment. Anaerobic digestion of 20 g/L rice straw yielded 6.00 and 7.09 g VFAs/L with 0.5% HNO3 and 2% NaOH, respectively. The VFAs yield with 2% NaOH was 0.35 g/g. PMID:25764527

  14. Demineralizer operation with morpholine and boric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.

    1992-07-01

    The effect on condensate and blowdown deep bed demineralizer performance of morpholine and boric acid are examined. The high concentration of morpholine required to reduce corrosion product transport exhausts demineralizer cation resin too fast to allow hydrogen cycle demineralizer operation. Extremely efficient resin separation and high crosslinked cation resins will be required to minimize sodium leakage during demineralizer morpholine cyde operation. Organic anions formed by morpholine decomposition tend to leak through demineralizers during amine cycle operation. Concentrations of these species vary markedly between plants. The anion resin selectivity coefficient for borate is low, and only a fraction of hydroxide form anion resin is converted to the borate form. Borate has little effect on condensate demineralizer sodium, chloride and sulfate leakage during hydrogen/borate cycle operation. However, sodium leakage increases during amine/borate cycle resin operation. In addition, silica is not effectively removed by anion resin in the presence of boric acid.

  15. Adsorption of phosphonate antiscalant from reverse osmosis membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Boels, Luciaan; Keesman, Karel J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2012-09-01

    Adsorptive removal of antiscalants offers a promising way to improve current reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate treatment processes and enables the reuse of the antiscalant in the RO desalination process. This work investigates the adsorption and desorption of the phosphonate antiscalant nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from RO membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a material that consists predominantly of akaganéite. The kinetics of the adsorption of NTMP onto GFH was predicted fairly well with two models that consider either combined film-pore or combined film-surface diffusion as the main mechanism for mass transport. It is also demonstrated that NTMP is preferentially adsorbed over sulfate by GFH at pH 7.85. The presence of calcium causes a transformation in the equilibrium adsorption isotherm from a Langmuir type to a Freundlich type with much higher adsorption capacities. Furthermore, calcium also increases the rate of adsorption substantially. GFH is reusable after regeneration with sodium hydroxide solution, indicating that NTMP can be potentially recovered from the RO concentrate. This work shows that GFH is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of NTMP antiscalant from RO membrane concentrates. PMID:22873428

  16. Fast formation of supergene Mn oxides/hydroxides under acidic conditions in the oxic/anoxic transition zone of a shallow aquifer.

    PubMed

    Schäffner, F; Merten, D; Pollok, K; Wagner, S; Knoblauch, S; Langenhorst, F; Büchel, G

    2015-12-01

    Extensive uranium mining in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) in eastern Thuringia and Saxony took place during the period of 1946-1990. During mining activities, pelitic sediments rich in organic carbon and uranium were processed and exposed to oxygen. Subsequent pyrite oxidation and acidic leaching lead to partial contamination of the area with heavy metals and acid mine drainage (AMD) even few years after completion of remediation. One of those areas is the former heap Gessen (Ronneburg, Germany) were the residual contamination can be found 10 m under the base of the former heap containing partly permeable drainage channels. Actually, in such a system, a rapid but locally restricted mineralization of Mn oxides takes place under acidic conditions. This formation can be classified as a natural attenuation process as certain heavy metals, e.g., Cd (up to 6 μg/g), Ni (up to 311 μg/g), Co (up to 133 μg/g), and Zn (up to 104 μg/g) are bound to this phases. The secondary minerals occur as colored layers close to the shallow aquifer in glacial sediments and could be identified as birnessite and todorokite as Mn phase. The thermodynamic model shows that even small changes in the system are sufficient to shift either the pH or the Eh in the direction of stable Mn oxide phases in this acidic system. As a consequence of 9-15-year-long formation process (or even less), the supergene mineralization provides a cost-efficient contribution for remediation (natural attenuation) strategies of residual with heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Co, Ni, Zn) contaminated substrates. PMID:25822842

  17. Synthesis of Li-Al layered double hydroxide intercalated with amino tris(methylene phosphonic acid) and kinetic and equilibrium studies of the uptake of Nd3+ and Sr2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tomohito; Shinmyou, Tetsu; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2016-03-01

    A Li-Al layered double hydroxide intercalated with amino tris(methylene phosphonic acid) (AMP·Li-Al LDH) was synthesized by the drop-wise addition of an Al-containing solution to a Li-AMP solution at a constant pH of 8.0. The AMP·Li-Al LDH was found to take up Nd3+ and Sr2+ ions from aqueous solutions; this phenomenon was attributable to the metal-chelating functionality of the AMP ions in the interlayers of the AMP·Li-Al LDH. Further, the AMP·Li-Al LDH was found to take up Nd3+ ions preferentially than Sr2+ ions. This was attributable to the stability of the Nd-AMP complex being higher than that of the Sr-AMP complex. The mass-transfer-controlled shrinking-core model could describe the uptake behavior better than the surface-reaction-control model. The AMP ions in the AMP·Li-Al LDH interlayers rapidly formed chelate complexes with the Nd3+ or Sr2+ ions. As a result, the transfer of Nd3+ and Sr2+ ions through the product layer was the rate-limiting step. Furthermore, this reaction could be explained by a Langmuir-type adsorption mechanism, indicating that it involved chemical adsorption; this was consistent with the formation of chelate complexes between Nd3+ and Sr2+ ions and the AMP ions in the interlayers of the AMP·Li-Al LDH.

  18. Accumulation of Amino Acids in Rhizobium sp. Strain WR1001 in Response to Sodium Chloride Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Sui-Sheng T.; Tsai, Victor Y.; Lichens, Georgia M.; Noma, Amy T.

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001, isolated from the Sonoran Desert by Eskew and Ting, was found to be able to grow in defined medium containing NaCl up to 500 mM, a concentration approaching that of sea water. Therefore, it is a valuable strain for studying the biochemical basis of salt tolerance. Intracellular free glutamate was found to increase rapidly in response to osmotic stress by NaCl. It accounted for 88% of the amino acid pool when the bacterium was grown in 500 mM NaCl. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamate biosynthesis was examined in several Rhizobium strains. Both NADH- and NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities in various Rhizobium strains were observed. The range of activity differed considerably depending on the particular strain. KCl (500 mM) did not stimulate glutamate dehydrogenase activity, as reported in a number of bacterial strains by Measures. The low activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001 apparently cannot fulfill a biosynthetic function of glutamate formation in response to medium NaCl concentrations. PMID:16346049

  19. Antimicrobial Hyaluronic Acid-Cefoxitin Sodium Thin Films Produced by Electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Ahire, Jayesh J; Dicks, Leon M T

    2016-08-01

    The healing properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the recovery of wounds are well known. Cefoxitin (Cef), a cephalosporin antibiotic, is generally used to prevent and treat postoperative infections. In this study, we describe the incorporation of Cef in HA thin films (Cef-HAF) by using electrospraying. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that HA-containing thin films (HAF) were composed of numerous nanoparticles (255 ± 177 nm in diameter) with irregular surfaces, connected to each other with nanofibers of 50 ± 11 nm in diameter. Cef-HAF contained fewer, but larger, particles (551 ± 293 nm) with smooth surfaces and were interconnected with nanofibers of 61 ± 13 nm in diameter. Differences in surface morphology between HAF and Cef-HAF were confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that Cef was not modified when incorporated into Cef-HAF and remained active against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36 and Listeria monocytogenes EDGe. Nanofiber scaffolds of HA-containing Cef may be used in dressings to control postoperative infections. PMID:27146506

  20. Sodium and potassium-gated translocation of calcium by phosphatidic acid in multiphase systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reusch, R.

    1986-05-01

    The rate at which /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ is translocated from aqueous into hydrocarbon solvents by phosphatidic acid (PA) dispersed in the aqueous phase was examined as a function of concentration, pH, temperature, chain composition, nature of organic solvent, and presence of monovalent cations. Translocation required dianionic, diacyl PA in the liquid-crystalline state. Monovalent cations were also required with each manifesting unique effects. Rb/sup +/ and Cs/sup +/ increased translocation in proportion to the concentrations with Rb/sup +/ effecting higher rates. Na/sup +/, however, did not permit ionophore formation until a critical concentration was reached (0.325-0.40 M depending on the organic solvent) at which there was a very sharp pulse-like increase in rate. K/sup +/ exhibited a combination of effects. At low concentrations (<0.15 M) translocation increased in proportion to concentration; then, after a period of little change, there was a sharp increase similar to that observed with Na/sup +/ but at 1/15 the magnitude. These findings can be rationalized by considering the effects of these ions on the surface potential, surface tension, diffuse double layer and interfacial water structure. The results are inconsistent with an inverted micelle or hexagonal (HII) phase structure for the ionophoretic species, but are compatible with the dimer ionophore model previously proposed. These studies suggest a molecular mechanism by which the rapid entry of Ca/sup 2 +/ into stimulated cells may be mediated by PA.

  1. Surface modification of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as colloidal stabilize.

    PubMed

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Thongnopkoon, Thanu; Kewsuwan, Prartana

    2016-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) have been widely used as drug delivery systems for both small molecules and macromolecules. However, the colloidal stability problem remains unsolved. This study aims to investigate the possibility of using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC) as a stabilizing agent of PLGA NPs. In this study, PLGA NPs were fabricated using various concentrations of SCMC (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5% w/v) by solvent displacement method. SCMC coated NPs were characterized using DLS, FTIR, DSC, colorimetric method. Particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential values and SCMC adsorption increased with SCMC concentration. FTIR spectra, DSC thermograms and results of colorimetry suggested the interaction of SCMC and PLGA NPs. The stability of SCMC coated PLGA NPs was observed during the storage of three weeks in water. The stability of SCMC coated NPs in serum was also evaluated. Cell viability study revealed that there was no toxicity increased when SCMC was used as a stabilizing agent up to a concentration of 0.1% w/v. SCMC coated PLGA NPs bound A549 cells in a time dependent manner and with a greater extent than uncoated PLGA NPs. In conclusion, SCMC can be used to stabilize PLGA NPs by adsorbing on the surface of NPs. PMID:26338259

  2. Preparation and swelling behavior of a novel self-assembled β-cyclodextrin/acrylic acid/sodium alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhanhua; Liu, Shouxin; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Qinglin

    2014-11-26

    A novel biodegradable β-cyclodextrin/acrylic acid/sodium alginate (CSA) hydrogel with a three-dimensional network structure was self-assembled by inverse suspension copolymerization. The CSA resin was pH sensitive and had good water absorption properties in pH 6-8 buffer solutions. At a β-CD:AA:SA mass ratio of 1:9:3 the CSA water absorbency was found to be 1403 g/g and the CSA hydrogel strength was 4.968 N. In 0.005-0.1 mol/L chloride salt and sulfate salt solutions the CSA water absorbencies increased as follows: NaCl>KCl>MgCl2>CaCl2>FeCl3, and Na2SO4>K2SO4>FeSO4>Al2(SO4)3, respectively. The release of water from the CSA hydrogel occurred slowly over 120 h. The biodegradation efficiency of the resin reached 85.3% for Lentinula edodes. The super water absorbency, good salt resistance and excellent water retention properties of CSA make it suitable for application as an agricultural water retention agent in saline soils. PMID:25256504

  3. Use of pooled sodium acetate acetic acid formalin-preserved fecal specimens for the detection of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Gaafar, Maha R

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing detection of intestinal parasites from single unpreserved stool sample vs. sodium acetate acetic acid formalin (SAF)-preserved pooled samples, and stained with chlorazol black dye in routine practice. Unpreserved samples were collected from 120 patients and represented as Group I. Other three SAF-preserved samples were collected from the same patients over a 6-day period and represented as Groups IIa, IIb, and IIc. The latter groups were equally subdivided into two subgroups. The first subgroup of each of the three samples was examined individually, whereas the second subgroup of each were pooled and examined as a single specimen. All groups were examined by the routine diagnostic techniques; however, in group II when the diagnosis was uncertain, the chlorazol black dye staining procedure was carried out. Results demonstrated that out of 74 patients who continued the study, 12 cases (16%) were positive in group I, compared with 29 (39%) in the subgroups examined individually, and 27 (36%) in the pooled subgroups. Therefore, pooling of preserved fecal samples is an efficient and economical procedure for the detection of parasites. Furthermore, the chlorazol black dye was simple and effective in detecting the nuclear details of different parasites. PMID:21567472

  4. Synthesis and characterization of secondary nitrosamines from secondary amines using sodium nitrite and p-toluenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Miró Sabaté, Carles; Delalu, Henri

    2015-03-01

    We synthesized nitrosamines (R2N-NO) with R = iPr (1), nPr (2), nBu (3), and hydroxyethyl (4) from the amine using sodium nitrite/p-toluenesulfonic acid in CH2Cl2. The rate of formation of 1-4 increases in the direction iPr

  5. Optimizing application parameters for lactic acid and sodium metasilicate against pathogens on fresh beef, pork and deli meats.

    PubMed

    DeGeer, Staci L; Wang, Luxin; Hill, Gretchen N; Singh, Manpreet; Bilgili, Sacit F; Bratcher, Christy L

    2016-08-01

    Lactic acid (LA) and sodium metasilicate (SM) have been approved for use as antimicrobials on meat. The objectives were to determine optimum concentrations, temperatures and hot-water dips of LA and SM for reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on beef, pork and deli meats. LA was applied at 1, 2, 3, and 4% and SM was applied at 2, 3, 4, and 5%. SM4 and LA4 were the lowest concentrations most effective against all pathogens. LA4 and SM4, the combination of the two (LASM), and distilled water control were applied at 4, 25, and 60°C. Temperature of application had no effect on pathogens. LA or SM alone were more effective in reduction of pathogens than LASM. Regardless of anti-microbial used in post-packaging lethality treatments, there were no differences in L. monocytogenes. Treating deli meats with LA or SM did not reduce L. monocytogenes. Both LA and SM can be applied to fresh beef and pork to decrease pathogens. PMID:27050408

  6. Identification of a Disulfide Bridge in Sodium-Coupled Neutral Amino Acid Transporter 2(SNAT2) by Chemical Modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Jiahong; Cai, Ruiping; Yuan, Yanmeng; Guo, Zhanyun; Grewer, Christof; Zhang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) belongs to solute carrier 38 (SLC38) family of transporters, which is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and mediates transport of small, neutral amino acids, exemplified by alanine(Ala, A). Yet structural data on SNAT2, including the relevance of intrinsic cysteine residues on structure and function, is scarce, in spite of its essential roles in many tissues. To better define the potential of intrinsic cysteines to form disulfide bonds in SNAT2, mutagenesis experiments and thiol-specific chemical modifications by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and methoxy-polyethylene glycol maleimide (mPEG-Mal, MW 5000) were performed, with or without the reducing regent dithiothreitol (DTT) treatment. Seven single mutant transporters with various cysteine (Cys, C) to alanine (Ala, A) substitutions, and a C245,279A double mutant were introduced to SNAT2 with a hemagglutinin (HA) tag at the C-terminus. The results showed that the cells expressing C245A or C279A were labeled by one equivalent of mPEG-Mal in the presence of DTT, while wild-type or all the other single Cys to Ala mutants were modified by two equivalents of mPEG-Mal. Furthermore, the molecular weight of C245,279A was not changed in the presence or absence of DTT treatment. The results suggest a disulfide bond between Cys245 and Cys279 in SNAT2 which has no effect on cell surface trafficking, as well as transporter function. The proposed disulfide bond may be important to delineate proximity in the extracellular domain of SNAT2 and related proteins. PMID:27355203

  7. Enteric-coated tablet of risedronate sodium in combination with phytic acid, a natural chelating agent, for improved oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong S; Jang, Sun W; Son, Miwon; Kim, Byoung M; Kang, Myung J

    2016-01-20

    The oral bioavailability (BA) of risedronate sodium (RS), an antiresorptive agent, is less than 1% due to its low membrane permeability as well as the formation of non-absorbable complexes with multivalent cations such as calcium ion (Ca(2+)) in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, to increase oral BA of the bisphosphonate, a novel enteric-coated tablet (ECT) dosage form of RS in combination with phytic acid (IP6), a natural chelating agent recognized as safe, was formulated. The chelating behavior of IP6 against Ca(2+), including a stability constant for complex formulation was characterized using the continuous variation method. Subsequently, in vitro dissolution profile and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of the novel ECT were evaluated comparatively with that of the marketed product (Altevia, Sanofi, US), an ECT containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a chelating agent, in beagle dogs. The logarithm of stability constant for Ca(2+)-IP6 complex, an equilibrium constant approximating the strength of the interaction between two chemicals to form complex, was 19.05, which was 3.9-fold (p<0.05) and 1.7-fold (p<0.05) higher than those of Ca(2+)-RS and Ca(2+)-EDTA complexes. The release profile of RS from both enteric-coated dosage forms was equivalent, regardless of the type of chelating agent. An in vivo absorption study in beagle dogs revealed that the maximum plasma concentration and area under the curve of RS after oral administration of IP6-containing ECT were approximately 7.9- (p<0.05) and 5.0-fold (p<0.05) higher than those of the marketed product at the same dose (35mg as RS). Therefore, our study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the ECT system in combination with IP6 for an oral therapy with the bisphosphonate for improved BA. PMID:26594027

  8. Identification of a Disulfide Bridge in Sodium-Coupled Neutral Amino Acid Transporter 2(SNAT2) by Chemical Modification

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ruiping; Yuan, Yanmeng; Guo, Zhanyun; Grewer, Christof; Zhang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) belongs to solute carrier 38 (SLC38) family of transporters, which is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and mediates transport of small, neutral amino acids, exemplified by alanine(Ala, A). Yet structural data on SNAT2, including the relevance of intrinsic cysteine residues on structure and function, is scarce, in spite of its essential roles in many tissues. To better define the potential of intrinsic cysteines to form disulfide bonds in SNAT2, mutagenesis experiments and thiol-specific chemical modifications by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and methoxy-polyethylene glycol maleimide (mPEG-Mal, MW 5000) were performed, with or without the reducing regent dithiothreitol (DTT) treatment. Seven single mutant transporters with various cysteine (Cys, C) to alanine (Ala, A) substitutions, and a C245,279A double mutant were introduced to SNAT2 with a hemagglutinin (HA) tag at the C-terminus. The results showed that the cells expressing C245A or C279A were labeled by one equivalent of mPEG-Mal in the presence of DTT, while wild-type or all the other single Cys to Ala mutants were modified by two equivalents of mPEG-Mal. Furthermore, the molecular weight of C245,279A was not changed in the presence or absence of DTT treatment. The results suggest a disulfide bond between Cys245 and Cys279 in SNAT2 which has no effect on cell surface trafficking, as well as transporter function. The proposed disulfide bond may be important to delineate proximity in the extracellular domain of SNAT2 and related proteins. PMID:27355203

  9. Efficacy of two acidified chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid on prevention of contagious mastitis using an experimental challenge protocol.

    PubMed

    Oura, L Y; Fox, L K; Warf, C C; Kempt, G K

    2002-01-01

    Two acidified sodium chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants were evaluated for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae by using National Mastitis Council experimental challenge procedures. The effect of these teat dips on teat skin and teat end condition was also determined. Both dips contained 0.32% sodium chlorite, 1.32% lactic, and 2.5% glycerin. Dips differed in the amount of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (0.53 or 0.27%) added as a surfactant. Both dips significantly reduced new intramammary infection (IMI) rates compared with undipped controls. The dip containing 0.53% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 72% and Strep. agalactiae by 75%. The dip containing 0.27% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 100% and by Strep. agalactiae by 88%. Changes in teat skin and teat end condition for treatment and control groups varied in parallel over time. Teats treated with either teat dip had higher mean teat skin and teat end scores than control teats at some weeks. However, teat skin and teat end condition did not tend to change from the start to the completion of the trial. Application of the two new postmilking teat dips was effective in reducing new IMI from contagious mastitis pathogens. (Key words: teat dip, contagious mastitis, chlorous acid) PMID:11860118

  10. The comparison of the effects of ellagic acid and diclofenac sodium on intra-abdominal adhesion: an in vivo study in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Allahverdi, Tulay Diken; Allahverdi, Ertuğrul; Yayla, Sadık; Deprem, Turgay; Merhan, Oğuz; Vural, Sevil

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions are seen frequently after abdominal surgery and can cause serious complications. We aimed to evaluate the effects of the oral use of diclofenac sodium and ellagic acid on formation of postoperative adhesions in rats Studies have shown that agents with anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidant substances can prevent adhesion by decreasing oxidative stress. We compared and evaluated the effects of ellagic acid that has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory diclofenac sodium on peritoneal adhesion development in our experimental study. Laparotomy was performed with a midline incision under general anesthesia and an adhesion model was created on the antimesenteric side of the cecum in Groups I, II, and III. Group I received 85 mg/kg ellagic acid and Group II, 50 mg/kg diclofenac sodium through the nasogastric catheter while Group III received no medication. Only laparotomy was performed in Group IV. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the 14th day. Following macroscopic scoring, tissue samples were removed and subjected to biochemical and histopathologic evaluation. The degree of adhesion and the malondialdehyde level were decreased (P < 0.05), and glutathione level increased (P < 0.05) in Group I compared to Group II and Group III. The effects of ellagic acid on the prevention of peritoneal adhesion were found to be stronger than diclofenac sodium. This can be explained by the fact that ellagic acid is a strong antioxidant and decreases oxidative stress with anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects. PMID:25216418

  11. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide..., including pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide (KOH, CAS Reg... pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide..., including pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide (KOH, CAS Reg. No. 1310-58-3) is also... powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from the electrolysis of potassium chloride...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide..., including pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  16. Effects of cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Tengis S.; Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Levchenko, Vladislav; Mattson, David L.; Roman, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium reabsorption via the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron plays a central role in the regulation of body fluid volume. Previous studies have indicated that arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolite 11,12-EET but not other regioisomers of EETs inhibit ENaC activity in the collecting duct. The goal of this study was to investigate the endogenous metabolism of AA in cultured mpkCCDc14 principal cells and the effects of these metabolites on ENaC activity. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the mpkCCDc14 cells indicated that these cells produce prostaglandins, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, 14,15-EET, 5-HETE, 12/8-HETE, and 15-HETE, but not 20-HETE. Single-channel patch-clamp experiments revealed that 8,9-EET, 14,15-EET, and 11,12-EET all decrease ENaC activity. Neither 5-, 12-, nor 15-HETE had any effect on ENaC activity. Diclofenac and ibuprofen, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, decreased transepithelial Na+ transport in the mpkCCDc14 cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) with MS-PPOH activated ENaC-mediated sodium transport when cells were pretreated with AA and diclofenac. Coexpression of CYP2C8, but not CYP4A10, with ENaC in Chinese hamster ovary cells significantly decreased ENaC activity in whole-cell experiments, whereas 11,12-EET mimicked this effect. Thus both endogenously formed EETs and their exogenous application decrease ENaC activity. Downregulation of ENaC activity by overexpression of CYP2C8 was PKA dependent and was prevented by myristoylated PKI treatment. Biotinylation experiments and single-channel analysis revealed that long-term treatment with 11,12-EET and overexpression of CYP2C8 decreased the number of channels in the membrane. In contrast, the acute inhibitory effects are mediated by a decrease in the open probability of the ENaC. We conclude that 11,12-EET, 8,9-EET, and 14,15-EET are endogenously formed eicosanoids that modulate ENaC activity in the collecting duct. PMID:21697242

  17. Sodium vanadate combined with l-ascorbic acid delays disease progression, enhances motor performance, and ameliorates muscle atrophy and weakness in mice with spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disorder that causes infant mortality, has no effective treatment. Sodium vanadate has shown potential for the treatment of SMA; however, vanadate-induced toxicity in vivo remains an obstacle for its clinical application. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of sodium vanadate combined with a vanadium detoxification agent, L-ascorbic acid, in a SMA mouse model. Methods Sodium vanadate (200 μM), L-ascorbic acid (400 μM), or sodium vanadate combined with L-ascorbic acid (combined treatment) were applied to motor neuron-like NSC34 cells and fibroblasts derived from a healthy donor and a type II SMA patient to evaluate the cellular viability and the efficacy of each treatment in vitro. For the in vivo studies, sodium vanadate (20 mg/kg once daily) and L-ascorbic acid (40 mg/kg once daily) alone or in combination were orally administered daily on postnatal days 1 to 30. Motor performance, pathological studies, and the effects of each treatment (vehicle, L-ascorbic acid, sodium vanadate, and combined treatment) were assessed and compared on postnatal days (PNDs) 30 and 90. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to evaluate the survival rate, with P < 0.05 indicating significance. For other studies, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test for paired variables were used to measure significant differences (P < 0.05) between values. Results Combined treatment protected cells against vanadate-induced cell death with decreasing B cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax) levels. A month of combined treatment in mice with late-onset SMA beginning on postnatal day 1 delayed disease progression, improved motor performance in adulthood, enhanced survival motor neuron (SMN) levels and motor neuron numbers, reduced muscle atrophy, and decreased Bax levels in the spinal cord. Most importantly, combined treatment preserved hepatic and renal function and substantially decreased vanadium accumulation

  18. Sodium carbonate facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M.D.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-09-01

    The Sodium Carbonate Facility, located at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was designed and built as an addition to the existing Sodium Processing Facility. The Sodium Process and Sodium Carbonate Facilities will convert radioactive sodium into a product that is acceptable for land disposal in Idaho. The first part of the process occurs in the Sodium Process Facility where radioactive sodium is converted into sodium hydroxide (caustic). The second part of the process occurs in the Sodium Carbonate Facility where the caustic solution produced in the Sodium Process Facility is converted into a dry sodium carbonate waste suitable for land disposal. Due to the radioactivity in the sodium, shielding, containment, and HEPA filtered off-gas systems are required throughout both processes.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1733 - Sodium benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1733 Sodium benzoate. (a) Sodium benzoate is the chemical benzoate of soda (C7H5NaO2), produced by the neutralization of benzoic acid with sodium bicarbonate, sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium benzoate. 184.1733 Section 184.1733...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1733 - Sodium benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1733 Sodium benzoate. (a) Sodium benzoate is the chemical benzoate of soda (C7H5NaO2), produced by the neutralization of benzoic acid with sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, or... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium benzoate. 184.1733 Section 184.1733 Food...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1733 - Sodium benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1733 Sodium benzoate. (a) Sodium benzoate is the chemical benzoate of soda (C7H5NaO2), produced by the neutralization of benzoic acid with sodium bicarbonate, sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium benzoate. 184.1733 Section 184.1733...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Sodium alginate...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Sodium alginate is prepared by...

  4. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition to the side effects mentioned above by different channel blockers, these drugs can cause arterial wall damage, thereby contributing to vascular wall structure destabilization and promoting events facilitating rupture of plaques. Collagen synthesis is regulated by ascorbic acid, which is also essential for its optimum structure as a cofactor in lysine and proline hydroxylation, a precondition for optimum crosslinking of collagen and elastin. Therefore, the main objective in this study was to evaluate effects of various types of channel blockers on intracellular accumulation and cellular functions of ascorbate, specifically in relation to formation and extracellular deposition of major collagen types relevant for vascular function. Effects of select Na- and Ca- channel blockers on collagen synthesis and deposition were evaluated in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells by immunoassay. All channel blockers tested demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen type I deposition to the ECM by fibroblasts, each to a different degree. Ascorbic acid significantly increased collagen I ECM deposition. Nifedipine (50 µM), a representative of channel blockers tested, significantly reduced ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate-dependent ECM deposition of collagen type l and collagen type lV by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, nifedipine (50 µM) significantly reduced ascorbate-dependent collagen type l and type lV synthesis by cultured aortic smooth

  5. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition to the side effects mentioned above by different channel blockers, these drugs can cause arterial wall damage, thereby contributing to vascular wall structure destabilization and promoting events facilitating rupture of plaques. Collagen synthesis is regulated by ascorbic acid, which is also essential for its optimum structure as a cofactor in lysine and proline hydroxylation, a precondition for optimum crosslinking of collagen and elastin. Therefore, the main objective in this study was to evaluate effects of various types of channel blockers on intracellular accumulation and cellular functions of ascorbate, specifically in relation to formation and extracellular deposition of major collagen types relevant for vascular function. Effects of select Na- and Ca- channel blockers on collagen synthesis and deposition were evaluated in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells by immunoassay. All channel blockers tested demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen type I deposition to the ECM by fibroblasts, each to a different degree. Ascorbic acid significantly increased collagen I ECM deposition. Nifedipine (50 µM), a representative of channel blockers tested, significantly reduced ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate-dependent ECM deposition of collagen type l and collagen type lV by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, nifedipine (50 µM) significantly reduced ascorbate-dependent collagen type l and type lV synthesis by cultured aortic smooth

  6. Host-pathogen interactions. XXIX. Oligogalacturonides released from sodium polypectate by endopolygalacturonic acid lyase are elicitors of phytoalexins in soybean. [Glycine max L

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K.R.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.; Dell, A.

    1986-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that an apparently homogeneous preparation of an ..cap alpha..-1,4-D-endopolygalacturonic acid lyase (EC 4.2,2.2) isolated from the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora induced phytoalexin accumulation in cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Wayne) and that this pectin-degrading enzyme released heat-stable elicitors of phytoalexins from soybean cell walls, citrus pectin, and sodium polypectate. The present paper reports the purification, by anion-exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex columns followed by gel-permeation chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-6 column, of the two fractions with highest specific elicitor activity present in a crude elicitor-preparation obtained by lyase treatment of sodium polypectate. Structural analysis of the fraction with highest specific elicitor activity indicated that the major, if not only, component was a decasaccharide of ..cap alpha..-1,4-D-galactosyluronic acid that contained the expected product of lyase cleavage, 4-deoxy-..beta..-L-5-threo-hexopyranos-4-enyluronic acid (4,5-unsaturated galactosyluronic acid), at the nonreducing terminus. This modified decagalacturonide fraction exhibited half-maximum and maximum elicitor activity at 1 microgram/cotyledon (6 micromolar) and 5 micrograms/cotyledon (32 micromolar) galactosyluronic acid equivalents, respectively. Reducing 90 to 95% of the carboxyl groups of the galactosyluronic acid residues abolished the elicitor activity of the decagalacturonide fraction. The second most elicitor-active fraction contained mostly undeca-..cap alpha..-1,4-D-galactosyluronic acid that contained 4,5-unsaturated galactosyluronic acid at the nonreducing termini. This fraction exhibited half-maximum and maximum elicitor activity at approximately 3 micrograms/cotyledon (17 micromolar) and 6 micrograms/cotyledon (34 micromolar) galactosyluronic acid equivalents, respectively.

  7. EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

  8. Effect of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate-Fumaric Acid Coupled Addition on the In Vitro Rumen Fermentation with Special Regard to Methanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdl-Rahman, M. A.; Sawiress, F. A. R.; Abd El-Aty, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of sodium lauryl sulfate-fumaric acid coupled addition on in vitro methangenesis and rumen fermentation. Evaluation was carried out using in vitro gas production technique. Ruminal contents were collected from five steers immediately after slaughtering and used for preparation of inoculums of mixed rumen microorganisms. Rumen fluid was then mixed with the basal diet of steers and used to generate four treatments, negative control (no additives), sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) treated, fumaric acid treated, and SLS-fumaric acid coupled addition treated. The results revealed that, relative to control, efficiency in reduction of methanogenesis was as follows: coupled addition > SLS-addition > fumaric acid addition. Both SLS-addition and SLS-fumaric acid coupled addition demonstrated a decremental effect on ammonia nitrogen (NH3–N), total short chain volatile fatty acids (SCVFAs) concentrations and the amount of substrate degraded, and an increment effect on microbial mass and microbial yield (YATP). Nevertheless, fumaric acid did not alter any of the previously mentioned parameters but induced a decremental effect on NH3–N. Furthermore, both fumaric acid and SLS-fumaric acid coupled addition increased propionate at the expense of acetate and butyrate, while, defaunation increased acetate at the expense of propionate and butyrate. The pH value was decreased by all treatments relative to control, while, cellulase activity did not differ by different treatments. The current study can be promising strategies for suppressing ruminal methane emissions and improving ruminants feed efficiency. PMID:20445794

  9. Prenatal exposure to sodium phenytoin in rats induces complex maze learning deficits comparable to those induced by exposure to phenytoin acid at half the dose.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, C V; Acuff-Smith, K D; Schilling, M A; Moran, M S

    1995-01-01

    Gravid Sprague-Dawley CD (VAF) rats were administered sodium phenytoin suspended in corn oil by gavage once per day on embryonic days 7-18 at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Controls were administered corn oil alone by gavage on E7-18. Litters were randomly culled to 10. Offspring were regularly weighted, mortality noted, and males checked for preputial separation. At approximately 50 days of age offspring were evaluated in a straight water-filled channel for swimming proficiency and motivation to escape. Following this, rats were tested in the Cincinnati multiple T-water maze and scored for errors, latency to find the goal, and presence of phenytoin-induced abnormal circling behavior while swimming. Sodium phenytoin-exposed dams gained weight normally and delivered normally. Offspring mortality in the sodium phenytoin group was not increased above controls. No treatment effects on preputial separation or offspring growth were observed. No differences between groups in swimming proficiency in straight channel performance were obtained. In the Cincinnati maze, phenytoin offspring committed significantly more errors and had longer latencies to find the goal than controls. Among the phenytoin offspring, those exhibiting abnormal circling committed more errors than noncircling animals. When compared to previous data using the same maze and test protocol, it was found that 100 mg/kg of sodium phenytoin induced performance deficits similar to those induced by a dose of 200 mg/kg of phenytoin acid. Accordingly, the present data help explain why other investigators have reported sodium phenytoin to be more developmentally neurotoxic than phenytoin acid. Because the prenatal neurotoxic effects seen with the salt of phenytoin occur at lower doses, it suggests that phenytoin is more developmentally neurotoxic than previously believed. PMID:8747744

  10. Co-administration of glycyrrhizic acid with the antileishmanial drug sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) cures SAG-resistant visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Amrita; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar; Roy, Syamal; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-03-01

    Since there are very few affordable antileishmanial drugs available, antimonial resistance has crippled antileishmanial therapy, thereby emphasising the need for development of novel therapeutic strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the antileishmanial role of combined therapy with sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) and the triterpenoid glycyrrhizic acid (GA) against infection with SAG-resistant Leishmania (GE1F8R). Combination therapy with GA and SAG successfully limited infection with SAG-resistant Leishmania in a synergistic manner (fractional inhibitory concentration index <1.0). At the same time, mice infected with SAG-resistant Leishmania and co-treated with GA and SAG exhibited a significant reduction in hepatic and splenic parasite burden. In probing the mechanism, it was observed that GA treatment suppressed the expression and efflux activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), two host ABC transporters responsible for antimony efflux from host cells infected with SAG-resistant parasites. This suppression correlated with greater intracellular antimony retention during SAG therapy both in vitro and in vivo, which was reflected in the reduced parasite load. Furthermore, co-administration of GA and SAG induced a shift in the cytokine balance towards a Th1 phenotype by augmenting pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-12, IFNγ and TNFα) and inducing nitric oxide generation in GE1F8R-infected macrophages as well as GE1F8R-infected mice. This study aims to provide an affordable leishmanicidal alternative to expensive antileishmanial drugs such as miltefosine and amphotericin B. Furthermore, this report explores the role of GA as a resistance modulator in MRP1- and P-gp-overexpressing conditions. PMID:25600891

  11. A Single Amino-Acid Substitution in the Sodium Transporter HKT1 Associated with Plant Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Raddatz, Natalia; Aman, Rashid; Kim, Songmi; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Jan, Masood; Baek, Dongwon; Khan, Irfan Ullah; Oh, Dong-Ha; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A; Lee, Keun Woo; Maggio, Albino; Pardo, Jose M; Bohnert, Hans J; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2016-07-01

    A crucial prerequisite for plant growth and survival is the maintenance of potassium uptake, especially when high sodium surrounds the root zone. The Arabidopsis HIGH-AFFINITY K(+) TRANSPORTER1 (HKT1), and its homologs in other salt-sensitive dicots, contributes to salinity tolerance by removing Na(+) from the transpiration stream. However, TsHKT1;2, one of three HKT1 copies in Thellungiella salsuginea, a halophytic Arabidopsis relative, acts as a K(+) transporter in the presence of Na(+) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Amino-acid sequence comparisons indicated differences between TsHKT1;2 and most other published HKT1 sequences with respect to an Asp residue (D207) in the second pore-loop domain. Two additional T salsuginea and most other HKT1 sequences contain Asn (n) in this position. Wild-type TsHKT1;2 and altered AtHKT1 (AtHKT1(N-D)) complemented K(+)-uptake deficiency of yeast cells. Mutant hkt1-1 plants complemented with both AtHKT1(N) (-) (D) and TsHKT1;2 showed higher tolerance to salt stress than lines complemented by the wild-type AtHKT1 Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed the functional properties of these transporters and the differential selectivity for Na(+) and K(+) based on the n/d variance in the pore region. This change also dictated inward-rectification for Na(+) transport. Thus, the introduction of Asp, replacing Asn, in HKT1-type transporters established altered cation selectivity and uptake dynamics. We describe one way, based on a single change in a crucial protein that enabled some crucifer species to acquire improved salt tolerance, which over evolutionary time may have resulted in further changes that ultimately facilitated colonization of saline habitats. PMID:27208305

  12. A Single Amino-Acid Substitution in the Sodium Transporter HKT1 Associated with Plant Salt Tolerance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akhtar; Aman, Rashid; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Jan, Masood; Baek, Dongwon; Khan, Irfan Ullah; Oh, Dong-Ha; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A.; Lee, Keun Woo; Maggio, Albino; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    A crucial prerequisite for plant growth and survival is the maintenance of potassium uptake, especially when high sodium surrounds the root zone. The Arabidopsis HIGH-AFFINITY K+ TRANSPORTER1 (HKT1), and its homologs in other salt-sensitive dicots, contributes to salinity tolerance by removing Na+ from the transpiration stream. However, TsHKT1;2, one of three HKT1 copies in Thellungiella salsuginea, a halophytic Arabidopsis relative, acts as a K+ transporter in the presence of Na+ in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Amino-acid sequence comparisons indicated differences between TsHKT1;2 and most other published HKT1 sequences with respect to an Asp residue (D207) in the second pore-loop domain. Two additional T. salsuginea and most other HKT1 sequences contain Asn (n) in this position. Wild-type TsHKT1;2 and altered AtHKT1 (AtHKT1N-D) complemented K+-uptake deficiency of yeast cells. Mutant hkt1-1 plants complemented with both AtHKT1N-D and TsHKT1;2 showed higher tolerance to salt stress than lines complemented by the wild-type AtHKT1. Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed the functional properties of these transporters and the differential selectivity for Na+ and K+ based on the n/d variance in the pore region. This change also dictated inward-rectification for Na+ transport. Thus, the introduction of Asp, replacing Asn, in HKT1-type transporters established altered cation selectivity and uptake dynamics. We describe one way, based on a single change in a crucial protein that enabled some crucifer species to acquire improved salt tolerance, which over evolutionary time may have resulted in further changes that ultimately facilitated colonization of saline habitats. PMID:27208305

  13. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10−4 mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  14. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10(-4) mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  15. Effects of arachidonic acid intake on inflammatory reactions in dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yukiko; Ji, Xu; Tachibana, Shigehiro; Aoki, Satoko; Furuya, Mami; Tazura, Yoshiyuki; Miyazawa, Daisuke; Harauma, Akiko; Moriguchi, Toru; Nagata, Tomoko; Iwai, Naoharu; Ohara, Naoki

    2015-09-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the administration of oral arachidonic acid (AA) in rats with or without dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease. Male Wistar rats were administered AA at 0, 5, 35 or 240 mg/kg daily by gavage for 8 weeks. Inflammatory bowel disease was induced by replacing drinking water with 3 % DSS solution during the last 7 d of the AA dosing period. These animals passed loose stools, diarrhoea and red-stained faeces. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity in the colonic tissue were significantly increased in the animals given AA at 240 mg/kg compared with the animals given AA at 0 mg/kg. Thromboxane B2 concentration in the medium of cultured colonic mucosae isolated from these groups was found to be dose-dependently increased by AA, and the increase was significant at 35 and 240 mg/kg. Leukotriene B4 concentration was also significantly increased and saturated at 5 mg/kg. In addition, AA at 240 mg/kg promoted DSS-induced colonic mucosal oedema with macrophage infiltration. In contrast, administration of AA for 8 weeks, even at 240 mg/kg, showed no effects on the normal rats. These results suggest that in rats with bowel disease AA metabolism is affected by oral AA, even at 5 mg/kg per d, and that excessive AA may aggravate inflammation, whereas AA shows no effects in rats without inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26234346

  16. Structural requirements of the human sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT): Role of 3- and 7-OH moieties on binding and translocation of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    González, Pablo M.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Ward, Weslyn C.; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are the end products of cholesterol metabolism. One of the critical steps in their biosynthesis involves the isomerization of the 3β-hydroxyl (-OH) group on the cholestane ring to the common 3α-configuration on BAs. BAs are actively recaptured from the small intestine by the human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter (hASBT) with high affinity and capacity. Previous studies have suggested that no particular hydroxyl group on BAs is critical for binding or transport by hASBT, even though 3β-hydroxylated BAs were not examined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the 3α-OH group on BAs binding and translocation by hASBT. Ten 3β-hydroxylated BAs (Iso-bile acids, iBAs) were synthesized, characterized, and subjected to hASBT inhibition and uptake studies. hASBT inhibition and uptake kinetics of iBAs were compared to that of native 3α-OH BAs. Glycine conjugates of native and isomeric BAs were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations in order to identify topological descriptors related to binding and translocation by hASBT. Iso-BAs bound to hASBT with lower affinity and exhibited reduced translocation than their respective 3α-epimers. Kinetic data suggests that, in contrast to native BAs where hASBT binding is the rate-limiting step, iBAs transport was rate-limited by translocation and not binding. Remarkably, 7-dehydroxylated iBAs were not hASBT substrates, highlighting the critical role of 7-OH group on BA translocation by hASBT, especially for iBAs. Conformational analysis of gly-iBAs and native BAs identified topological features for optimal binding as: concave steroidal nucleus, 3-OH “on-” or below-steroidal plane, 7-OH below-plane, and 12-OH moiety towards-plane. Our results emphasize the relevance of the 3α-OH group on BAs for proper hASBT binding and transport and revealed the critical role of 7-OH group on BA translocation, particularly in the absence of a 3α-OH group. Results have implications for BA

  17. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Sulfuric Acid and Sodium Sulfate Blend, Peroxyacetic Acid, and Cetylpyridinium Chloride against Salmonella on Inoculated Chicken Wings.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brittney R; Yang, Xiang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Delmore, Robert J; Woerner, Dale R; Reagan, James O; Morgan, J Brad; Belk, Keith E

    2015-11-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial blend of sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate (SSS) in reducing Salmonella on inoculated whole chilled chicken wings and to compare its efficacy to peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Wings were spot inoculated (5 to 6 log CFU/ml of sample rinsate) with a five-strain mixture of novobiocin- and nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella and then left untreated (control) or treated by immersing individual wings in 350 ml of antimicrobial solution. An initial study evaluated two treatment immersion times, 10 and 20 s, of SSS (pH 1.1) and compared cell recoveries following rinsing of treated samples with buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth. In a second study, inoculated wings were treated with SSS (pH 1.1; 20 s), PAA (700 ppm, 20 s), or CPC (4,000 ppm, 10 s) and analyzed for survivors immediately after treatment (0 h) and after 24 h of aerobic storage at 4°C. Color and pH analyses were also conducted in the latter study. Recovery of Salmonella survivors following treatment with SSS (10 or 20 s) was not (P ≥ 0.05) affected by the type of cell recovery rinse solution (buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth), but there was an effect (P < 0.05) of SSS treatment time. Immersion of samples for 10 or 20 s in SSS resulted in pathogen reductions of 0.8 to 0.9 and 1.1 to 1.2 log CFU/ml, respectively. Results of the second study showed that there was an interaction (P < 0.05) between antimicrobial type and storage time. Efficacy against Salmonella at 0 h increased in the order CPC , SSS , PAA; however, after 24 h of aerobic storage, pathogen counts of SSS- and PAA-treated wings did not differ (P ≥ 0.05). Overall, the results indicated that SSS applied at pH 1.1 for 20 s was an effective antimicrobial intervention to reduce Salmonella contamination on chicken wings. PMID:26555519

  18. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine (PMN...

  20. Sodium bisulfate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... in large amounts. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing sodium bisulfate. This article is for information only. ... Symptoms from swallowing more than a tablespoon of this acid may include: Burning pain in the mouth Chest pain from burns ...

  1. All-Trans Retinoic Acid and Sodium Butyrate Enhance Natriuretic Peptide Receptor A Gene Transcription: Role of Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Periyasamy, Ramu; Das, Subhankar; Neerukonda, Smitha; Mani, Indra

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to delineate the mechanisms of GC-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) expression in vivo. We used all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaBu) to examine the expression and function of Npr1 using gene-disrupted heterozygous (1-copy; +/−), wild-type (2-copy; +/+), and gene-duplicated heterozygous (3-copy; ++/+) mice. Npr1+/− mice exhibited increased renal HDAC and reduced histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity; on the contrary, Npr1++/+ mice showed decreased HDAC and enhanced HAT activity compared with Npr1+/+ mice. ATRA and NaBu promoted global acetylation of histones H3-K9/14 and H4-K12, reduced methylation of H3-K9 and H3-K27, and enriched accumulation of active chromatin marks at the Npr1 promoter. A combination of ATRA-NaBu promoted recruitment of activator-complex containing E26 transformation–specific 1, retinoic acid receptor α, and HATs (p300 and p300/cAMP response element–binding protein-binding protein–associated factor) at the Npr1 promoter, and significantly increased renal NPRA expression, GC activity, and cGMP levels. Untreated 1-copy mice showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure and renal expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) compared with 2- and 3-copy mice. Treatment with ATRA and NaBu synergistically attenuated the expression of α-SMA and PCNA and reduced systolic blood pressure in Npr1+/− mice. Our findings demonstrate that epigenetic upregulation of Npr1 gene transcription by ATRA and NaBu leads to attenuation of renal fibrotic markers and systolic blood pressure in mice with reduced Npr1 gene copy number, which will have important implications in prevention and treatment of hypertension-related renal pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24714214

  2. Synergistic interaction between nitrogen dioxide and respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid or sodium chloride on rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Warren, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    We examined interactions in rats between NO/sub 2/ gas and respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) or sodium chloride (NaCl). Rats were exposed for 1, 3, or 7 days to 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ gas, alone or in combination with 1 mg/m3 of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NaCl aerosols. The apparent rate of collagen synthesis by lung minces was measured after 7 days of exposure, and the protein content of whole lung lavage fluid was measured after 1 or 3 days of exposure. Responses from rats exposed to 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ alone were significantly different from controls by these assays. A synergistic interaction was demonstrated between 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ and 1 mg/m3 of either H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NaCl aerosol as evaluated by measurement of the rate of lung collagen synthesis. A synergistic interaction was also demonstrated by the criterion of increased protein content of lung lavage fluid in rats exposed to 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ and 1 mg/m3 of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosol after 1 day of exposure and between 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ and 1 mg/m3 of NaCl aerosol after 3 days of exposure. These observations with 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination with 1 mg/m3 of NaCl aerosol support the hypothesis that formation of nitrosyl chloride may contribute to a synergistic interaction between NO/sub 2/ gas and NaCl aerosol. These results suggest that, in general, combinations of oxidant gases with respirable acidic aerosols or with acidogenic gases will demonstrate interactive effects on rat lungs. Such a hypothesis is testable and makes specific predictions about effects of inhalation of pollutant mixtures.

  3. Production of concentrated caustic soda and hydrochloride acid solutions from sodium chloride by electrodialysis with the aid of bipolar ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Greben', V.P.; Pivovarov, N.Ya.; Latskov, V.L.

    1988-10-20

    This paper gives a comparative analysis of the action of electrodialyzers containing three and five compartments in the structural unit, and equipped with bipolar, cation-exchange, and anion-exchange membranes, used for production of hydrochloric acid and caustic soda from sodium chloride solutions. It was shown that an electrodialyzer with five compartments gives hydrochloric acid and caustic soda for 2.5-3 M concentration with 0.2-0.3 current efficiency, whereas an electrodialyzer with three compartments in the structural unit gives hydrochloric acid and caustic soda concentrations of about 1.2 M at the same current efficiency. The performance of the electrodialyzers was analyzed and equations were derived for calculating the current efficiencies for acid and alkali under conditions of acidification of the salt solution; this was based on determination of the transport numbers of ions passing through the membranes.

  4. EFFECTS OF ADDITION RATE AND ACID MATRIX ON THE DESTRUCTION OF AMMONIUM BY THE SEMI-CONTINUOUS ADDITION OF SODIUM NITRITE DURING EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2007-08-27

    The destruction of ammonium by the semi-continuous addition of sodium nitrite during acidic evaporation can be achieved with a wide range of waste compositions. The efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction was observed to vary from less than 20% to 60% depending on operating conditions. The effects of nitric acid concentration and nitrite addition rate are dominant factors that affect the efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction. Reducing the acid concentration by performing acid recovery via steam stripping prior to performing nitrite destruction of ammonium will require more nitrite due to the low destruction efficiency. The scale-up of the baseline rate nitrite addition rate from the 100 mL to the 1600 gallon batch size has significant uncertainty and poses the risk of lower efficiency at the plant scale. Experience with plant scale processing will improve confidence in the application of nitrite destruction of ammonium to different waste streams.

  5. Sodium chloride induces an NhaA/NhaR-independent acid sensitivity at neutral external pH in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rowbury, R J; Goodson, M; Humphrey, T J

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli previously grown in low-salt broth, pH 7.0, produced organisms which were markedly more acid sensitive when subsequently cultured in the same broth with 200 mM or more salt (NaCl) added. Induction of acid sensitivity occurred rapidly at both 37 and 30 degrees C, with a substantial effect within 15 min. Sensitization was partially inhibited by chloramphenicol and tetracycline and may depend on both protein synthesis-dependent and -independent physiological changes in the NaCl-induced organisms; sensitization did not result from osmotic shocking on transfer to challenge medium. Induction of acid sensitivity was affected by neither the sodium ion pore inhibitor amiloride nor the DNA synthesis inhibitor nalidixic acid; rifampin had a small effect, similar to that of chloramphenicol. Chlorides of other monovalent cations, especially Li+ and NH4+, also produced sensitization to acid, although CsCl was ineffective but did not interfere with sensitization by NaCl. Other sodium salts were also active as sensitizers, as were chlorides of divalent cations, but although sucrose (but not glycerol) was a good inducer, the results were not fully in accord with triggering of induction solely by the NaCl-associated increase in osmotic pressure. Sensitization was not prevented by deletion of the nhaA, nhaR, or nhaB gene. Acid sensitivity of NaCl-induced cells was slightly reduced after 90 min of growth at 37 degrees C in low-salt broth but was completely lost after 240 min. For NaCl-induced cells, acid killing in challenge media was not inhibited by amiloride. The NaCl-induced sensitization is distinct from the phenomenon of acid sensitivity induction in E. coli at alkaline external pH. PMID:8017942

  6. Rate equations for sodium catalyzed quartz dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimstidt, J. Donald

    2015-10-01

    Quartz dissolution rate data were fit to an equation that predicts the dissolution flux (J, mol/m2 sec) as a function of temperature (T, K), sodium concentration (mNa+, molal), and hydrogen ion activity (aH+). The same data fit equally well to an equation that expresses the rate as a function of temperature, sodium concentration, and hydroxide ion activity (aOH-) . These equations are more convenient to use than those given by Bickmore et al. (2008) because rates can be predicted without the implementation of a surface speciation model. They predict that at 25 °C quartz dissolves more than 200 times faster in seawater than in pure water. These two equations fit the data just as well as five other equations from Bickmore et al. (2008) that are based on surface species concentrations. All of these rate equations contain information about the reaction mechanism(s) for quartz dissolution but that information is ambiguous because the independent variables used to develop the equations are correlated. This means that rate equations alone cannot be used to infer the dissolution mechanism. Existing surface complexation, surface charge, terrace-ledge-kink, and Lewis acid-base models must be modified and amalgamated in order to develop a reliable model of the reaction mechanism(s).

  7. Chemical destruction of HMX-based explosives with ammonium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, C.; Dell`Orco, P.; Flesner, R.; Kramer, J.; Spontarelli, T.

    1995-09-01

    A series of experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory explored the efficacy of ammonium hydroxide solutions in converting HMX (cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine, or Octogen) and HMX-based explosives to nonenergetic, nonhazardous materials. When 80 g of explosive was converted in a reactor operating at 85 psig pressure at 140 C, the principal gaseous products were nitrous oxide (46% to 51%), nitrogen (22% to 32%), and ammonia (17% to 28%). Formate and hexamethylene-tetramine (hexamine) account for effectively 100% of the carbon-bearing aqueous species. Nitrate, nitrite, and acetate were present in the liquid in trace amounts. The process effectively treated molding powders of the plastic-bonded explosives PBX 9501 (2.5% estane), LX-04 (15% viton), and PBX 9404 (3% nitrocellulose). Results were compared with those achieved using sodium hydroxide solutions at 150 C in a pressurized reactor.

  8. Evaluation of sampling methods for measuring exposure to volatile inorganic acids in workplace air. Part 2: Sampling capacity and breakthrough tests for sodium carbonate-impregnated filters.

    PubMed

    Demange, Martine; Oury, Véronique; Rousset, Davy

    2011-11-01

    In France, the MétroPol 009 method used to measure workplace exposure to inorganic acids, such as HF, HCl, and HNO3, consists of a closed-face cassette fitted with a prefilter to collect particles, and two sodium carbonate-impregnated filters to collect acid vapor. This method was compared with other European methods during the development of a three-part standard (ISO 21438) on the determination of inorganic acids in workplace air by ion chromatography. Results of this work, presented in a companion paper, led to a need to go deeper into the performance of the MétroPol 009 method regarding evaluation of the breakthrough of the acids, both alone and in mixtures, interference from particulate salts, the amount of sodium carbonate required to impregnate the sampling filter, the influence of sampler components, and so on. Results enabled improvements to be made to the sampling device with respect to the required amount of sodium carbonate to sample high HCl or HNO3 concentrations (500 μL of 5% Na2CO3 on each of two impregnated filters). In addition, a PVC-A filter used as a prefilter in a sampling device showed a propensity to retain HNO3 vapor so a PTFE filter was considered more suitable for use as a prefilter. Neither the material of the sampling cassette (polystyrene or polypropylene) nor the sampling flowrate (1 L/min or 2 L/min) influenced the performance of the sampling device, as a recovery of about 100% was achieved in all experiments for HNO3, HCl, and HF, as well as HNO3+HF and HNO3+HCl mixtures, over a wide range of concentrations. However, this work points to the possibility of interference between an acid and salts of other acids. For instance, interference can occur through interaction of HNO3 with chloride salts: the stronger the acid, the greater the interference. Methods based on impregnated filters are reliable for quantitative recovery of inorganic volatile acids in workplace atmosphere but are valuable only in the absence of interferents. PMID

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and valproic acid delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Jennifer; Pielen, Amelie; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have neuroprotective effects under various neurodegenerative conditions, e.g., after optic nerve crush (ONC). HDACi-mediated protection of central neurons by increased histone acetylation has not previously been demonstrated in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), although epigenetic changes were shown to be associated with cell death after ONC. We investigated whether HDACi can delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat RGCs and analyzed concomitant histone acetylation levels. Methods RGCs were purified from newborn (postnatal day [P] 0–P2) rat retinas by immunopanning with antibodies against Thy-1.1 and culturing in serum-free medium for 2 days. RGCs were treated with HDACi, each at several different concentrations: 0.1–10 mM sodium butyrate (SB), 0.1–2 mM valproic acid (VPA), or 0.5–10 nM trichostatin A (TSA). Negative controls were incubated in media alone, while positive controls were incubated in 0.05–0.4 IU/µl erythropoietin. Survival was quantified by counting viable cells using phase-contrast microscopy. The expression of acetylated histone proteins (AcH) 3 and 4 was analyzed in RGCs by immunohistochemistry. Results SB and VPA enhanced RGC survival in culture, with both showing a maximum effect at 0.1 mM (increase in survival to 188% and 163%, respectively). Their neuroprotective effect was comparable to that of erythropoietin at 0.05 IU/µl. TSA 0.5–1.0 nM showed no effect on RGC survival, and concentrations ≥5 nM increased RGC death. AcH3 and AcH4 levels were only significantly increased in RGCs treated with 0.1 mM SB. VPA 0.1 mM produced only a slight effect on histone acetylation. Conclusions Millimolar concentrations of SB and VPA delayed spontaneous cell death in purified RGCs; however, significantly increased histone acetylation levels were only detectable in RGCs after SB treatment. As the potent HDACi TSA was not neuroprotective, mechanisms other than histone acetylation may be the

  10. Inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes and sodium/bile acid cotransporter exacerbates leflunomide-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei-lei; Wu, Zhi-tao; Wang, Le; Zhang, Xue-feng; Wang, Jing; Chen, Chen; Ni, Xuan; Lin, Yun-fei; Cao, Yi-yi; Luan, Yang; Pan, Guo-yu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Leflunomide is an immunosuppressive agent marketed as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug. But it causes severe side effects, including fatal hepatitis and liver failure. In this study we investigated the contributions of hepatic metabolism and transport of leflunomide and its major metabolite teriflunomide to leflunomide induced hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The metabolism and toxicity of leflunomide and teriflunomide were evaluated in primary rat hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mice were used to examine the PK profiling and hepatotoxicity of leflunomide in vivo. The expression and function of sodium/bile acid cotransporter (NTCP) were assessed in rat and human hepatocytes and NTCP-transfected HEK293 cells. After Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were administered teriflunomide (1,6, 12 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 4 weeks, their blood samples were analyzed. Results: A nonspecific CYPs inhibitor aminobenzotriazole (ABT, 1 mmol/L) decreased the IC50 value of leflunomide in rat hepatocytes from 409 to 216 μmol/L, whereas another nonspecific CYPs inhibitor proadifen (SKF, 30 μmol/L) increased the cellular accumulation of leflunomide to 3.68-fold at 4 h. After oral dosing (15 mg/kg), the plasma exposure (AUC0-t) of leflunomide increased to 3-fold in HRN mice compared with wild type mice. Administration of leflunomide (25 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 7 d significantly increased serum ALT and AST levels in HRN mice; when the dose was increased to 50 mg·kg−1·d−1, all HRN mice died on d 6. Teriflunomide significantly decreased the expression of NTCP in human hepatocytes, as well as the function of NTCP in rat hepatocytes and NTCP-transfected HEK293 cells. Four-week administration of teriflunomide significantly increased serum total bilirubin and direct bilirubin levels in female rats, but not in male rats. Conclusion: Hepatic CYPs play a critical role in detoxification process of leflunomide, whereas the major

  11. Adsorptive bubble separation of zinc and cadmium cations in presence of ferric and aluminum hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Kazimierz

    2005-06-15

    The adsorptive bubble separation of zinc and cadmium cations from solution in the presence of ferric and aluminum hydroxides was carried out by means of Tween 80 (nonionic surfactant), and sodium laurate and stearate (anionic surfactants). The mechanism of metal removal is different depending on the nature of the surfactant used. The removal of zinc cations by adsorbing colloid flotation is higher than that of cadmium cations. It increases with increases in the amount of hydroxide precipitate and the concentration of Tween 80. The removal of zinc cations by ion flotation is lower than that of cadmium cations. It does not change with increases in the hydroxide amount. It increases, however, with increased sodium laurate or stearate concentration. Both separation methods turned out to be helpful for studying both the solution's structure and the interactions at the solution-solid interface. PMID:15897071

  12. Chemical gardens without silica: the formation of pure metal hydroxide tubes.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruno C; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-08-21

    Contrary to common belief, hollow precipitation tubes form in the absence of silicate if sodium hydroxide solution is injected into solutions of various metal ions. In many cases, the growth speed has a power law dependence on the flow rate. For vanadyl, we observe damped oscillations in the tube height. PMID:26172246

  13. Convenient synthesis of alkyl amines via the reaction of organoboranes with ammonium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.; Sastry, K.A.R.; McCollum, G.W.; Yoshioka, H.

    1981-10-09

    A process for the preparation of alkyl amines in which the reagents are generated in situ under mild and convenient reaction conditions is described. An organoborane is prepared via hydroboration, aqueous ammonium hydroxide is added, and then aqueous sodium hypochlorite is added to the mixture. Two of the alkyl groups in the trialkylborane are converted to the corresponding amines in good yield. (BLM)

  14. Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment of Switchgrass for Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion is a promising technology to supplement corn-based ethanol production. However, the recalcitrant structure of lignocellulosic material is a major obstacle to the efficient conversion. To improve the enzymatic digestibility of switchgrass for the fermentable sugar...

  15. The Performance of Geopolymers Activated by Sodium Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeontaek; Kang, Seunggu

    2015-08-01

    Geopolymers, a group of promising environmentally friendly materials that can work as cement substitutes, should be fabricated from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO mixtures containing large amounts of amorphous phases to ensure optimal chemical and physical properties. In this study, it was shown that geopolymers with enhanced mechanical strengths, as high as 115 MPa, could be obtained from perfectly amorphous slag from spent catalyst (SSC) discharged during automobile catalyst recycling. Geopolymer processing involved alkali-activation using a 16 M NaOH solution of pH13. The varying SSC grain size was the main experimental factor of interest, in combination with curing temperature and aging time. Variations in the mechanical strengths of the resulting geopolymers are explained by the occurrence of 10-50 nm-sized crystals and the presence of voids and pores dozens to hundreds of micrometers in size. PMID:26369225

  16. Protons and Hydroxide Ions in Aqueous Systems.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Noam; Bakker, Huib J; Campen, R Kramer; Henchman, Richard H; Pohl, Peter; Roke, Sylvie; Thämer, Martin; Hassanali, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of water's constituent ions, proton and hydroxide, has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies over the last century. Besides their obvious importance in acid-base chemistry, these ions play an important role in numerous applications ranging from enzyme catalysis to environmental chemistry. Despite a long history of research, many fundamental issues regarding their properties continue to be an active area of research. Here, we provide a review of the experimental and theoretical advances made in the last several decades in understanding the structure, dynamics, and transport of the proton and hydroxide ions in different aqueous environments, ranging from water clusters to the bulk liquid and its interfaces with hydrophobic surfaces. The propensity of these ions to accumulate at hydrophobic surfaces has been a subject of intense debate, and we highlight the open issues and challenges in this area. Biological applications reviewed include proton transport along the hydration layer of various membranes and through channel proteins, problems that are at the core of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:27314430

  17. Improved Detection of Polygalacturonase Activity due to Mucor piriformis with a Modified Dinitrosalicylic Acid Reagent.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Michailides, T J; Bostock, R M

    1997-02-01

    ABSTRACT An assay for determination of galacturonic acid with 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid was developed that substantially extends the linear range of detection compared to a previously published method with this reagent. In the improved assay, galacturonic acid was detected with a reagent containing 44 mM 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, 4 mM sodium sulfite, and 375 mM sodium hydroxide. The absorbance of the solution after reaction with galacturonic acid was determined at 575 nm and was linear at concentrations of galacturonic acid up to 50 mumol, with a lower limit of detection at ~400 nmol. The assay with the improved reagent could be performed in wavelength ranges from 550 to 575 nm, with higher sensitivity at the shorter wavelengths. The new reagent was used in routine assays of polygalacturonase activity in culture filtrates of the important postharvest fungal pathogen Mucor piriformis. PMID:18945136

  18. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....