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Sample records for acid spin probes

  1. Computer simulations of the electron spin resonance spectra of steroid and fatty acid nitroxide probes in bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eviatar, Hadass; van der Heide, Uulke A.; Levine, Yehudi K.

    1995-02-01

    Monte Carlo dynamics (MCD) techniques are used to simulate the orientational behavior and rotational motion of probe molecules in lipid bilayers. The trajectories of molecular orientations generated from the simulations are then used to calculate the order parameters and the orientational time correlation functions. The behavior of the time correlation functions is compared with the predictions of the rotational diffusion (RDM) and the compound motion (CM) models. The MCD trajectories are also used to produce electron-spin resonance (ESR) spectra, employing a recently developed time-domain algorithm. Two questions which have been the subject of debate in the literature are addressed. The first question concerns the discrepancy between the ability of motional models to describe ESR spectra and fluorescence depolarization measurements on rigid molecules in vesicles—while the RDM does an excellent job of fitting the former, the latter require the CM to describe them properly. It is argued that the key to resolving this lies in the fact that the ESR line shapes are sensitive to the tumbling motions of the long molecular axes as well as to rotational motions about them, while fluorescence anisotropy is blind for the latter. The rotation about the long molecular axis introduces a fast decay into the correlation functions in a way independent of the tumbling motion of the axis. The second question concerns the fidelity of reporting by fatty acid spin probes in lipid bilayers. It is shown that the motion of the bulky hydrophillic doxyl group does not, in fact, reflect the motion of the chains about it and consequently these spin probes cannot be considered good reporters for these applications.

  2. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  3. Electric probe for spin transition and fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N'diaye, Alpha T.; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Sato, Koji; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslov; Qiu, Z. Q.; Saitoh, Eiji

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of central topics of magnetism and condense matter science. To probe them, neutron scatterings have been used as powerful tools. A part of neutrons injected into a sample is scattered by spin fluctuation inside the sample. This process transcribes the spin fluctuation onto scattering intensity, which is commonly represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility of the sample and is maximized at magnetic phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and it thus can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy: an advantage of neutrons, although large facilities such as a nuclear reactor is necessary. Here we show that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop micro probe for spin fluctuation and transition; not only a neutron beam, spin current is also a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin fluctuation in a sample. We demonstrate detection of anti-ferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency dependent spin-current transmission measurements.

  4. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Sato, Koji; Okamoto, Satoshi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Qiu, Z Q; Saitoh, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we show that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. We demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices. PMID:27573443

  5. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N’Diaye, Alpha T.; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Sato, Koji; Okamoto, Satoshi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; et al

    2016-08-30

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we present that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is amore » flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. Additionally, we demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices.« less

  6. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  7. Probing spin flip scattering in ballistic nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. M.; Feng, J. F.; Wang, Y.; Han, Prof. X. F.; Zhan, W. S.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Because spin-flip scattering length is longer than the electron mean-free-path in a metal, past studies of spin-flip scattering are limited to the diffusive regime. Spin accumulation in the nanometer sized spacer layer of a magnetic double barrier tunnel junction allows the study of spin flip scattering near ballistic limit. We extract the spin-flip conductance $G_s$ of the spacer layer from magnetoresistance measurements. A linear temperature dependence of $G_s$ is found. The bias voltage dependence shows a quantum well resonance which explains the sharp reduction of the magnetoresistance. At 4.2K $G_s$ yields the mean-free-path (70nm) and the spin-flip length ($1.0$-$2.6\\mu$m).

  8. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  9. Probing ultrafast spin dynamics with optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shoji; Aizawa, Yuta; Wang, Zi-han; Oshima, Ryuji; Mera, Yutaka; Matsuyama, Eiji; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Studies of spin dynamics in low-dimensional systems are important from both fundamental and practical points of view. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy allows localized spin dynamics to be characterized and plays important roles in nanoscale science and technology. However, nanoscale analysis of the ultrafast dynamics of itinerant magnetism, as well as its localized characteristics, should be pursued to advance further the investigation of quantum dynamics in functional structures of small systems. Here, we demonstrate the optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy technique, which enables the nanoscale probing of spin dynamics with the temporal resolution corresponding, in principle, to the optical pulse width. Spins are optically oriented using circularly polarized light, and their dynamics are probed by scanning tunnelling microscopy based on the optical pump-probe method. Spin relaxation in a single quantum well with a width of 6 nm was observed with a spatial resolution of ∼ 1 nm. In addition to spin relaxation dynamics, spin precession, which provides an estimation of the Landé g factor, was observed successfully. PMID:24974938

  10. Probing ultrafast spin dynamics with optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shoji; Aizawa, Yuta; Wang, Zi-Han; Oshima, Ryuji; Mera, Yutaka; Matsuyama, Eiji; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Studies of spin dynamics in low-dimensional systems are important from both fundamental and practical points of view. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy allows localized spin dynamics to be characterized and plays important roles in nanoscale science and technology. However, nanoscale analysis of the ultrafast dynamics of itinerant magnetism, as well as its localized characteristics, should be pursued to advance further the investigation of quantum dynamics in functional structures of small systems. Here, we demonstrate the optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy technique, which enables the nanoscale probing of spin dynamics with the temporal resolution corresponding, in principle, to the optical pulse width. Spins are optically oriented using circularly polarized light, and their dynamics are probed by scanning tunnelling microscopy based on the optical pump-probe method. Spin relaxation in a single quantum well with a width of 6 nm was observed with a spatial resolution of ~1 nm. In addition to spin relaxation dynamics, spin precession, which provides an estimation of the Landé g factor, was observed successfully.

  11. Microscopic understanding of spin current probed by shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Tomonori

    much longer than the spin relaxation length. In other words, the spin currents in such a semiconducting material can be strongly out of equilibrium. In this invited talk, I will present a series of experimental work on the spin current in a (Ga,Mn)As/tunnel barrier/n-GaAs based lateral spin valve device, mainly probed by the current noise measurement. Finally I hope I will mention about our future plan to cool down the effective temperature of the spin current by using superconductivity. This work was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26220711, 25887037, 25103003, and 15K17680.

  12. EPR spin probe study of polymer associative systems.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, A M; Yasina, L L; Motyakin, M V; Aliev, I I; Churochkina, N A; Rogovina, L Z; Lysenko, E A; Baranovsky, V Yu

    2008-05-01

    Molecular dynamics of polyacrylamide gels, polymeric micelles and hydrogel of polyacrylic acid and macrodiisocyanate was investigated by the ESR spectroscopy of spin probes. The local mobility in network junction of polyacrylamide gels is found to be essentially slower than that in the micelles created by the low molecular weight detergents and does not depend on the amount and length of hydrophobic groups (C9 or C12) in the polymer chain. The immersion of 10-30 mol.% of ionic monomers into the polymer chain (sodium acrylate) influences insufficiently on the local mobility of network junctions. In aqueous solutions, polystyrene-block-poly-(N-ethyl-4-vinylpyridinium bromide) block copolymers create polymeric micelles. The local mobility in the polystyrene core of the micelles is about twice as much as that in the solid polystyrene. Partially swellable polymer network in aqueous solutions was synthesized from polyacrylic acid and macrodiisocyanate. The local mobility in hydrophobic regions of the gel is substantially lower than that in the hydrophilic regions. It was concluded that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions and the local dynamics of them dictate practical application of the polymer associative systems. PMID:17988940

  13. EPR spin probe study of polymer associative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Yasina, L. L.; Motyakin, M. V.; Aliev, I. I.; Churochkina, N. A.; Rogovina, L. Z.; Lysenko, E. A.; Baranovsky, V. Yu.

    2008-05-01

    Molecular dynamics of polyacrilamide gels, polymeric micelles and hydrogel of polyacrylic acid and macrodiisocyanate was investigated by the ESR spectroscopy of spin probes. The local mobility in network junction of polyacrylamide gels is found to be essentially slower than that in the micelles created by the low molecular weight detergents and does not depend on the amount and length of hydrophobic groups (C9 or C12) in the polymer chain. The immersion of 10-30 mol.% of ionic monomers into the polymer chain (sodium acrylate) influences insufficiently on the local mobility of network junctions. In aqueous solutions, polystyrene-block-poly-( N-ethyl-4-vinylpyridinium bromide) block copolymers create polymeric micelles. The local mobility in the polystyrene core of the micelles is about twice as much as that in the solid polystyrene. Partially swellable polymer network in aqueous solutions was synthesized from polyacrylic acid and macrodiisocyanate. The local mobility in hydrophobic regions of the gel is substantially lower than that in the hydrophilic regions. It was concluded that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions and the local dynamics of them dictate practical application of the polymer associative systems.

  14. A new membrane probing steroidal spin label: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Katoch, R; Trivedi, G K; Phadke, R S

    2000-02-01

    The applicability of a new steroidal spin label, 3-oxo-androstan-17 beta-yl-(2",2",6",6"-tetramethyl-N-oxyl) piperidyl butan-1',4'-dioate, in studying the phase transition properties of model membrane L-alpha-dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) in the presence and absence of drugs has been explored. Its synthesis and characterization has been described herein. Besides, the localization of this spin label in lipid liposomes has been studied using electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopic techniques. The label has also been used to study the permeability of epinephrine into membrane. The results show that the spin label has a good potential as a spin probe in the study of biomembranes. PMID:10983412

  15. Detection and Imaging of Superoxide in Roots by an Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Probe Method

    PubMed Central

    Warwar, Nasim; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Blank, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    The detection, quantification, and imaging of short-lived reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide, in live biological specimens have always been challenging and controversial. Fluorescence-based methods are nonspecific, and electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping methods require high probe concentrations and lack the capability for sufficient image resolution. In this work, a novel (to our knowledge), sensitive, small ESR imaging resonator was used together with a stable spin probe that specifically reacts with superoxide with a high reaction rate constant. This ESR spin-probe-based methodology was used to examine superoxide generated in a plant root as a result of an apical leaf injury. The results show that the spin probe rapidly permeated the plant's extracellular space. Upon injury of the plant tissue, superoxide was produced and the ESR signal decreased rapidly in the injured parts as well as in the distal part of the root. This is attributed to superoxide production and thus provides a means of quantifying the level of superoxide in the plant. The spin probe's narrow single-line ESR spectrum, together with the sensitive imaging resonator, facilitates the quantitative measurement of superoxide in small biological samples, such as the plant's root, as well as one-dimensional imaging along the length of the root. This type of methodology can be used to resolve many questions involving the production of apoplastic superoxide in plant biology. PMID:21943435

  16. Spin-dependent recombination probed through the dielectric polarizability

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Sam L.; Greenham, Neil C.; Friend, Richard H.; Bouchiat, Hélène; Chepelianskii, Alexei D

    2015-01-01

    Despite residing in an energetically and structurally disordered landscape, the spin degree of freedom remains a robust quantity in organic semiconductor materials due to the weak coupling of spin and orbital states. This enforces spin-selectivity in recombination processes which plays a crucial role in optoelectronic devices, for example, in the spin-dependent recombination of weakly bound electron-hole pairs, or charge-transfer states, which form in a photovoltaic blend. Here, we implement a detection scheme to probe the spin-selective recombination of these states through changes in their dielectric polarizability under magnetic resonance. Using this technique, we access a regime in which the usual mixing of spin-singlet and spin-triplet states due to hyperfine fields is suppressed by microwave driving. We present a quantitative model for this behaviour which allows us to estimate the spin-dependent recombination rate, and draw parallels with the Majorana–Brossel resonances observed in atomic physics experiments. PMID:26439933

  17. Spin-dependent recombination probed through the dielectric polarizability.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Sam L; Greenham, Neil C; Friend, Richard H; Bouchiat, Hélène; Chepelianskii, Alexei D

    2015-01-01

    Despite residing in an energetically and structurally disordered landscape, the spin degree of freedom remains a robust quantity in organic semiconductor materials due to the weak coupling of spin and orbital states. This enforces spin-selectivity in recombination processes which plays a crucial role in optoelectronic devices, for example, in the spin-dependent recombination of weakly bound electron-hole pairs, or charge-transfer states, which form in a photovoltaic blend. Here, we implement a detection scheme to probe the spin-selective recombination of these states through changes in their dielectric polarizability under magnetic resonance. Using this technique, we access a regime in which the usual mixing of spin-singlet and spin-triplet states due to hyperfine fields is suppressed by microwave driving. We present a quantitative model for this behaviour which allows us to estimate the spin-dependent recombination rate, and draw parallels with the Majorana-Brossel resonances observed in atomic physics experiments. PMID:26439933

  18. Nanometer-scale probing of spin waves using single electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sar, Toeno; Casola, Francesco; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a new approach to exploring magnetic excitations in correlated-electron systems, based on single electronic spins in atom-like defects diamond known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers. We demonstrate the power of this approach by detecting spin-wave excitations in a ferromagnetic microdisc with nanoscale spatial sensitivity over a broad range of frequencies and magnetic fields. We show how spin-wave resonances can be exploited for on-chip amplification of microwave magnetic fields, allowing strongly increased spin manipulation rates and single-spin magnetometry with enhanced sensitivity. Finally, we show the possibility to detect the magnetic spin noise produced by a thin (~ 30 nm) layer of a patterned ferromagnet. For the interpretation of our results, we develop a general framework describing single-spin stray field detection in terms of a filter function sensitive mostly to spin fluctuations with wavevector ~ 1 / d , where d is the NV-ferromagnet distance. Our results pave the way towards quantitative and non-perturbative detection of spectral properties in nanomagnets, establishing NV center magnetometry as an emergent probe of collective spin dynamics in condensed matter.

  19. A capacitive probe for Electron Spin Resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Giovanni; Dolci, David; Carlà, Marcello; Mannini, Matteo; Piuzzi, Barbara; Caneschi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    The use of the magnetic field associated with Maxwell displacement current in a capacitor is proposed for the detection of Electron Spin Resonance. A probe based on this concept is realized and successfully tested with CW radio-frequency in the band going from 200 MHz to 1 GHz with a DPPH sample. A significant increase of Signal to Noise Ratio is observed while increasing the frequency.

  20. Nanometre-scale probing of spin waves using single-electron spins

    PubMed Central

    van der Sar, Toeno; Casola, Francesco; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of condensed-matter magnetism requires the development of tools that provide real-space, few-nanometre-scale probing of correlated-electron magnetic excitations under ambient conditions. Here we present a practical approach to meet this challenge, using magnetometry based on single nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond. We focus on spin-wave excitations in a ferromagnetic microdisc, and demonstrate local, quantitative and phase-sensitive detection of the spin-wave magnetic field at ∼50 nm from the disc. We map the magnetic-field dependence of spin-wave excitations by detecting the associated local reduction in the disc's longitudinal magnetization. In addition, we characterize the spin–noise spectrum by nitrogen-vacancy spin relaxometry, finding excellent agreement with a general analytical description of the stray fields produced by spin–spin correlations in a 2D magnetic system. These complementary measurement modalities pave the way towards imaging the local excitations of systems such as ferromagnets and antiferromagnets, skyrmions, atomically assembled quantum magnets, and spin ice. PMID:26249673

  1. Properties of polyethylene glycol/cyclodextrin hydrogels revealed by spin probes and spin labelling methods.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Gabriela; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Turcu, Ioana Maria; Chechik, Victor

    2014-03-21

    The properties of a gel consisting of a covalent network formed by the reaction of isocyanate end-capped polyethylene glycol (PEG) with β-cyclodextrin, were investigated by EPR spectroscopy. Spin-labelled cyclodextrin was incorporated into the cross-link points of the gel and at the chain ends. The dynamics of the gel fibres as reported by the spin label, was found to be sensitive to the H-bonding ability of the solvent, density of cross-links and temperature. Addition of spin probes (e.g., TEMPO and adamantane-TEMPO) to the unlabelled gel made it possible to characterise the solvent pools in the gel. While TEMPO was uniformly distributed throughout the solvent pools, the adamantane derivative was located at the gel fibre-solvent pool interface; these two probes thus reported on the different locations in the solvent pools. At low temperature, the gels were shown to prevent ice crystallisation in the solvent pools resulting in the formation of supercooled water. Both probes showed that the water froze at ca. 250 K, thus suggesting that the properties of the supercooled water are uniform across the solvent pools. PMID:24651650

  2. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  3. Probing Spin Excitations Using Magneto-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukkuarasu, K.; Lu, Z.; Simpson, J.; Walker, A.; Sears, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Burch, K.; Smirnov, D.

    The presence of a 2D quantum spin liquid state was recently suggested for the spin-orbit coupled Mott insulator α-RuCl3 with a honeycomb lattice.[Phys. Rev. 90, 041112 (2014)] Optical spectroscopy, Raman scattering, specific heat as well as magnetic susceptibility measurements on α-RuCl3 identified elementary excitations due to electronic correlations and spin-orbit coupling.[arXiv:1503.07593, Phys. Rev. Letters 114, 147201 (2015), and Phys. Rev. 91, 144420 (2015)] These observations appear to be consistent with theoretical expectations for Heisenberg-Kitaev model for QSL.[Phys. Rev. 91, 241110 (2015)] The underlying mechanism for the unconventional magnetism in α-RuCl3 was further investigated by probing the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman spectroscopic signatures. Raman scattering experiments were performed at temperatures down to 5 K and magnetic fields up to 10 T. The intensity of strongest A1g phonon was found to decrease with increasing magnetic field strength suggesting the presence of strong magnetic interactions. The experimental observations and its implications will be presented. Current Affiliation: Florida A and M University.

  4. Probing framework-guest interactions in phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica using spin-probe EPR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Meng, Xiangyan; Mertens, Myrjam; Cool, Pegie; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    The pore walls of phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (B-PMOs) can be crystal-like or amorphous depending on the synthesis conditions. Here, spin-probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to monitor the adsorption of nitroxide radicals on three types of B-PMO with varying pore size and wall characteristics. Nitroxide radicals with varying polarity are chosen as probes to mimic guest molecules with different properties. The study shows that the B-PMO materials with amorphous walls allow an overall better adsorption of the spin probes than the one with crystalline walls, independent of the nature of the spin probe. The effect of hydration of the guest-host system on the mobility of the spin probe molecule depends more on the nature of the spin probe than on the B-PMO material. Comparison of the spin-probe adsorption on B-PMOs and ethylene-bridged PMO materials shows the sensitivity of the mobility of the guest molecule to the nature of the organic group. PMID:25231242

  5. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  6. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  7. Spin probe dynamics of n-hexadecane in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukešová, Miroslava; Švajdlenková, Helena; Sippel, Pit; Macová, Eva; Berek, Dušan; Loidl, Alois; Bartoš, Josef

    2015-02-01

    A combined study of the rotational dynamics of the stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and the phase behavior of n-hexadecane (n-HXD) in the bulk and the confined states in a series of silica gels (SG) by means of ESR and DSC is presented. A slow to fast motion transition of the spin probe TEMPO in the bulk n-HXD occurs at T50 G,bulk ≪ Tm,bulk, i.e., well below the melting temperature due to its trapping and localized mobility in the interlamellar gap of the crystallites [J. Bartoš, H. Švajdlenková, M. Zaleski, M. Edelmann, M. Lukešová, Physica B 430, 99 (2013)]. On the other hand, the dynamics of the TEMPO in the confined systems is strongly slowing down with T50 G (Dpore) >Tm(Dpore) and slightly increases with the pore size Dpore = 60, 100 and 300 Å of the SG's. At the same time, both the corresponding melting temperature, Tm (Dpore), and melting enthalpy, ΔHm (Dpore), decrease with Dpore together with the mutual anti-correlation between T50 G and Tm as a function of the inverse of pore diameter, 1/Dpore. Moreover, the dynamic heterogeneity of the TEMPO in the confined state below T50 G (Dpore) is closely related to the phase transformation. The strong slowing down of the spin probe motion likely results from its preferential localization at the interface layer of the matrix pore due to specific interaction of TEMPO molecules with the polar silanol groups of the SG matrix. This is supported by special study on a series of the variously filled n-HXD/SG systems, other similar experimental findings as well as by theoretical spectral argument.

  8. Probing Spatial Spin Correlations of Ultracold Gases by Quantum Noise Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bruun, G. M.; Andersen, Brian M.; Demler, Eugene; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2009-01-23

    Spin noise spectroscopy with a single laser beam is demonstrated theoretically to provide a direct probe of the spatial correlations of cold fermionic gases. We show how the generic many-body phenomena of antibunching, pairing, antiferromagnetic, and algebraic spin liquid correlations can be revealed by measuring the spin noise as a function of laser width, temperature, and frequency.

  9. Electronic Structure, NMR, Spin-Spin Coupling, and Noncovalent Interactions in Aromatic Amino Acid Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Rao, Soniya S; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2016-07-21

    Noncovalent interactions accompanying phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), and tyrosine (Tyr) amino acids based ionic liquids (AAILs) composed of 1-methyl-3-butyl-imidazole and its methyl-substituted derivative as cations have been analyzed employing the dispersion corrected density functional theory. It has been shown that cation-anion binding in these bioionic ILs is primarily facilitated through hydrogen bonding in addition to lp---π and CH---π interactions those arising from aromatic moieties which can be probed through (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra calculated from the gauge independent atomic orbital method. Characteristic NMR spin-spin coupling constants across hydrogen bonds of ion pair structures viz., Fermi contact, spin-orbit and spin-dipole terms show strong dependence on mutual orientation of cation with the amino acid anion. The spin-spin coupling mechanism transmits spin polarization via electric field effect originating from lp---π interactions whereas the electron delocalization from lone pair on the carbonyl oxygen to antibonding C-H orbital is facilitated by hydrogen bonding. It has been demonstrated that indirect spin-spin coupling constants across the hydrogen bonds correlate linearly with hydrogen bond distances. The binding energies and dissected nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) document mutual reduction of aromaticity of hydrogen bonded ion pairs consequent to localization of π-character. Moreover the nature and type of such noncovalent interactions governing the in-plane and out-of-plane NICS components provide a measure of diatropic and paratropic currents for the aromatic rings of varying size in AAILs. Besides the direction of frequency shifts of characteristic C═O and NH stretching vibrations in the calculated vibrational spectra has been rationalized. PMID:27336283

  10. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  11. Probing long-range carrier-pair spin-spin interactions in a conjugated polymer by detuning of electrically detected spin beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schooten, Kipp J.; Baird, Douglas L.; Limes, Mark E.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Weakly coupled electron spin pairs that experience weak spin-orbit interaction can control electronic transitions in molecular and solid-state systems. Known to determine radical pair reactions, they have been invoked to explain phenomena ranging from avian magnetoreception to spin-dependent charge-carrier recombination and transport. Spin pairs exhibit persistent spin coherence, allowing minute magnetic fields to perturb spin precession and thus recombination rates and photoreaction yields, giving rise to a range of magneto-optoelectronic effects in devices. Little is known, however, about interparticle magnetic interactions within such pairs. Here we present pulsed electrically detected electron spin resonance experiments on poly(styrene-sulfonate)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:PSS) devices, which show how interparticle spin-spin interactions (magnetic-dipolar and spin-exchange) between charge-carrier spin pairs can be probed through the detuning of spin-Rabi oscillations. The deviation from uncoupled precession frequencies quantifies both the exchange (<30 neV) and dipolar (23.5+/-1.5 neV) interaction energies responsible for the pair's zero-field splitting, implying quantum mechanical entanglement of charge-carrier spins over distances of 2.1+/-0.1 nm.

  12. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Shelford, L R; Shafer, P; Tan, A; Deng, J X; Keatley, P S; Hwang, C; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Hicken, R J; Qiu, Z Q

    2016-08-12

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni_{81}Fe_{19}) layer in a Py/Cu/Cu_{75}Mn_{25}/Cu/Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer. PMID:27563981

  13. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Shelford, L. R.; Shafer, P.; Tan, A.; Deng, J. X.; Keatley, P. S.; Hwang, C.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni81Fe19 ) layer in a Py /Cu /Cu75Mn25/Cu /Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu75Mn25 and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu75Mn25 layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu75Mn25 layer.

  14. Probing for compositeness, discrete time effects and Markov enviromental influences using spin polarization precession.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Carl

    By considering a spin-one particle precession in a magnetic field, we demonstrate that if very refined measurements were made of both the precession frequency and the amplitude of spin polarization, these measurements could be used to probe for compositeness of gauge bosons, discrete time effects and possible Markov environmental effects.

  15. Reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes used in Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: An ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Jawahar, A.; Premkumar, S.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM 14N- labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters, such as line width, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, signal intensity ratio and rotational correlation time were estimated. The 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL radical has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with 3-carboxy-PROXYL, 4-methoxy-TEMPO, and 4-acetamido-TEMPO radicals. The half life time and decay rate were estimated for 1mM concentration of 14N- labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. From the results, the 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL has long half life time and high stability compared with 3-carboxy-PROXYL, 4-methoxy-TEMPO and 4-acetamido-TEMPO radicals. Therefore, this study reveals that the 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  16. Spin pumping through a topological insulator probed by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Baker, A. A.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Hesjedal, T.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the field of spintronics, the generation of a pure spin current (without macroscopic charge flow) through spin pumping of a ferromagnetic (FM) layer opens up the perspective of a new generation of dissipation-less devices. Microwave driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) can generate a pure spin current that enters adjacent layers, allowing for both magnetization reversal (through spin-transfer torque) and to probe spin coherence in non-magnetic materials. However, standard FMR is unable to probe multilayer dynamics directly, since the measurement averages over the contributions from the whole system. The synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected FMR (XFMR) offers an elegant solution to this drawback, giving access to element-, site-, and layer-specific dynamical measurements in heterostructures. In this work, we show how XFMR has provided unique information to understand spin pumping and spin transfer torque effects through a topological insulator (TI) layer in a pseudo-spin valve heterostructure. We demonstrate that TIs function as efficient spin sinks, while also allowing a limited dynamic coupling between ferromagnetic layers. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel class of materials, and suggest future directions for the development of room temperature TI-based spintronics.

  17. Frequency-domain optical probing of coherent spins in nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Frey, J A; Berezovsky, J

    2012-08-27

    Spin-photon interactions such as the Faraday effect provide techniques for measuring coherent spin dynamics in semiconductors. In contrast to typical ultrafast pulsed laser techniques, which measure spin dynamics in the time domain with an intense, spectrally broad probe pulse, we demonstrate a frequency-domain spin-photon resonance effect using modulated continuous-wave lasers which enables measurement of GHz-scale coherent spin dynamics in semiconductors with minimal spectral linewidth. This technique permits high-resolution spectroscopic measurements not possible with ultrafast methods. We have employed this effect to observe coherent spin dynamics in CdSe nanocrystals using standard diode lasers. By fitting the results to the expected model, we extract electron g-factors, and spin coherence and dephasing times in agreement with time-domain measurements. PMID:23037054

  18. Detection of nanoscale electron spin resonance spectra demonstrated using nitrogen-vacancy centre probes in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, L. T.; Kehayias, P.; Simpson, D. A.; Jarmola, A.; Stacey, A.; Budker, D.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) describes a suite of techniques for characterizing electronic systems with applications in physics, chemistry, and biology. However, the requirement for large electron spin ensembles in conventional ESR techniques limits their spatial resolution. Here we present a method for measuring ESR spectra of nanoscale electronic environments by measuring the longitudinal relaxation time of a single-spin probe as it is systematically tuned into resonance with the target electronic system. As a proof of concept, we extracted the spectral distribution for the P1 electronic spin bath in diamond by using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres, and demonstrated excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. As the response of each nitrogen-vacancy spin in this experiment is dominated by a single P1 spin at a mean distance of 2.7 nm, the application of this technique to the single nitrogen-vacancy case will enable nanoscale ESR spectroscopy of atomic and molecular spin systems.

  19. SPIN POLARIZED PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY AS A PROBE OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, P.D.; GUNTHERODT, G.

    2006-11-01

    Spin-polarized photoelectron spectroscopy has developed into a versatile tool for the study of surface and thin film magnetism. In this chapter, we examine the methodology of the technique and its recent application to a number of different problems. We first examine the photoemission process itself followed by a detailed review of spin-polarization measurement techniques and the related experimental requirements. We review studies of spin polarized surface states, interface states and quantum well states followed by studies of the technologically important oxide systems including half-metallic transition metal oxides, ferromagnet/oxide interfaces and the antiferromagnetic cuprates that exhibit high Tc Superconductivity. We also discuss the application of high-resolution photoemission with spin resolving capabilities to the study of spin dependent self energy effects.

  20. Electrical Probing of Inherent Spin Polarization in a Topological Insulator with Electrical Gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Richardella, Anthony; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-03-01

    The hallmark of a time-reversal symmetry protected three-dimensional topological insulator is the helically spin-textured surface state. Although electrical detection of spin polarization in topological insulators has been demonstrated very recently, there have not been any electrical measurements to demonstrate the entire mapping of the spin polarization throughout the surface state. We report the electrical probing of the spin-polarized surface state using a magnetic tunnel junction as a spin detector while the chemical potential of a topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2Te3 is tuned by back gating. Hysteretic spin signals were observed as the magnetization of the detector ferromagnet (permalloy) switches with in-plane magnetic field. Changing the direction of bias current through the topological insulator channel flips the direction of the spin polarization, resulting in the reverse of sign of the detected spin signals. We demonstrate the control of the Fermi energy, which has importance not only in further understanding of the spin-momentum locking in the surface state but also in possible electrical tuning of the spin polarization for potential spin-based devices. Supported by C-SPIN & DARPA/SRC.

  1. Optical pump-probe measurements of local nuclear spin coherence in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Sanada, H; Kondo, Y; Matsuzaka, S; Morita, K; Hu, C Y; Ohno, Y; Ohno, H

    2006-02-17

    We demonstrate local manipulation and detection of nuclear spin coherence in semiconductor quantum wells by an optical pump-probe technique combined with pulse rf NMR. The Larmor precession of photoexcited electron spins is monitored by time-resolved Kerr rotation (TRKR) as a measure of nuclear magnetic field. Under the irradiation of resonant pulsed rf magnetic fields, Rabi oscillations of nuclear spins are traced by TRKR signals. The intrinsic coherence time evaluated by a spin-echo technique reveals the dependence on the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the crystalline axis as expected by the nearest neighbor dipole-dipole interaction. PMID:16606048

  2. Site-specific incorporation of probes into RNA polymerase by unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis and Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Mazumder, Abhishek; Lin, Miaoxin; Hasemeyer, Adam; Xu, Qumiao; Wang, Dongye; Ebright, Yon W.; Ebright, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A three-step procedure comprising (i) unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis with 4-azido-phenylalanine, (ii) Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation with a probe-phosphine derivative, and (iii) in vitro reconstitution of RNA polymerase (RNAP) enables the efficient site-specific incorporation of a fluorescent probe, a spin label, a crosslinking agent, a cleaving agent, an affinity tag, or any other biochemical or biophysical probe, at any site of interest in RNAP. Straightforward extensions of the procedure enable the efficient site-specific incorporation of two or more different probes in two or more different subunits of RNAP. We present protocols for synthesis of probe-phosphine derivatives, preparation of RNAP subunits and the transcription initiation factor σ, unnatural amino acid mutagenesis of RNAP subunits and σ, Staudinger ligation with unnatural-amino-acid-containing RNAP subunits and σ, quantitation of labelling efficiency and labelling specificity, and reconstitution of RNAP. PMID:25665560

  3. Electron spin resonance scanning probe spectroscopy for ultrasensitive biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jason P; Ryan, Jason T; Shrestha, Pragya R; Liu, Zhanglong; Vaz, Canute; Kim, Ji-Hong; Georgiou, Vasileia; Cheung, Kin P

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy's affinity for detecting paramagnetic free radicals, or spins, has been increasingly employed to examine a large variety of biochemical interactions. Such paramagnetic species are broadly found in nature and can be intrinsic (defects in solid-state materials systems, electron/hole pairs, stable radicals in proteins) or, more often, purposefully introduced into the material of interest (doping/attachment of paramagnetic spin labels to biomolecules of interest). Using ESR to trace the reactionary path of paramagnetic spins or spin-active proxy molecules provides detailed information about the reaction's transient species and the label's local environment. For many biochemical systems, like those involving membrane proteins, synthesizing the necessary quantity of spin-labeled biomolecules (typically 50 pmol to 100 pmol) is quite challenging and often limits the possible biochemical reactions available for investigation. Quite simply, ESR is too insensitive. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach that greatly enhances ESR's sensitivity (>20000× improvement) by developing a near-field, nonresonant, X-band ESR spectrometric method. Sensitivity improvement is confirmed via measurement of 140 amol of the most common nitroxide spin label in a ≈593 fL liquid cell at ambient temperature and pressure. This experimental approach eliminates many of the typical ESR sample restrictions imposed by conventional resonator-based ESR detection and renders the technique feasible for spatially resolved measurements on a wider variety of biochemical samples. Thus, our approach broadens the pool of possible biochemical and structural biology studies, as well as greatly enhances the analytical power of existing ESR applications. PMID:25867553

  4. Conformational dynamics of nucleic acid molecules studied by PELDOR spectroscopy with rigid spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisner, T. F.; Marko, A.; Sigurdsson, S. Th.

    2015-03-01

    Nucleic acid molecules can adopt a variety of structures and exhibit a large degree of conformational flexibility to fulfill their various functions in cells. Here we describe the use of Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) to investigate nucleic acid molecules where two cytosine analogs have been incorporated as spin probes. Because these new types of spin labels are rigid and incorporated into double stranded DNA and RNA molecules, there is no additional flexibility of the spin label itself present. Therefore the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between both spin labels encodes for the distance as well as for the mutual orientation between the spin labels. All of this information can be extracted by multi-frequency/multi-field PELDOR experiments, which gives very precise and valuable information about the structure and conformational flexibility of the nucleic acid molecules. We describe in detail our procedure to obtain the conformational ensembles and show the accuracy and limitations with test examples and application to double-stranded DNA.

  5. Determination of partition coefficient of spin probe between different lipid membrane phases.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Strancar, Janez

    2005-01-01

    Model lipid membranes made from binary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC/DPPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (DMPC/Chol) exhibit coexistence of diverse lipid phases at appropriate temperature and composition. Since lipids in different phases show different structural and motional properties, it is expected that the corresponding spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra will be superposition of several spectral components. From comparison of proportions of spectral components of the EPR spectrum with the fractions of the corresponding lipid phases obtained from known phase diagrams the partition coefficient of spin probe methyl ester of 5-doxyl palmitate between different lipid phases was determined. The results indicate that the used spin probe partitions approximately equally between different phases. PMID:16309270

  6. The Spin-Plane Double Probe Electric Field Instrument for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, P.-A.; Olsson, G.; Torbert, R. B.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Rau, D.; Needell, G.; Turco, S.; Dors, I.; Beckman, P.; Macri, J.; Frost, C.; Salwen, J.; Eriksson, A.; Åhlén, L.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Porter, J.; Lappalainen, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Wermeer, W.; Tucker, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Spin-plane double probe instrument (SDP) is part of the FIELDS instrument suite of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS). Together with the Axial double probe instrument (ADP) and the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI), SDP will measure the 3-D electric field with an accuracy of 0.5 mV/m over the frequency range from DC to 100 kHz. SDP consists of 4 biased spherical probes extended on 60 m long wire booms 90∘ apart in the spin plane, giving a 120 m baseline for each of the two spin-plane electric field components. The mechanical and electrical design of SDP is described, together with results from ground tests and calibration of the instrument.

  7. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM {sup 14}N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments.

  8. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM 14N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments.

  9. Spin-noise spectroscopy under resonant optical probing conditions: Coherent and nonlinear effects

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, H.; Mueller, G. M.; Huebner, J.; Oestreich, M.; Rasel, E. M.; Santos, L.

    2011-10-15

    Highly sensitive Faraday rotation spectroscopy is used to measure the fluctuating magnetization noise of noninteracting rubidium atoms under resonant and nonresonant optical probing conditions. The spin-noise frequency spectra, in conjunction with the probe light detuning with respect to the D{sub 2} transition, reveal clear signatures of coherent coupling of the participating electronic levels. The results are explained by extended Bloch equations, including homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening mechanisms. Our measurements further indicate that spin noise originating from excited states is governed at high intensities by collective effects.

  10. Probing the Galactic Binary Black Hole Spin with Photon Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-01-01

    It is generally considered that the X-ray emission in AGN and Galactic Black Hole Candidates is produced by flares above the surface of a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk, which extends down to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) of the black hole. We consider the influence of the black hole geometry on the light curves of these flares. To this end we follow a large number of photon orbits emitted impulsively in a locally isotropic fashion, at any phase of the disk orbit and examine their arrival times at infinity by an observer near the plane of the disk. We find out that the presence of the black hole spin induces a certain delay in the photon arrivals, as prograde photon orbits reach the observer on shorter (on the average) times than the retrograde ones. We form a histogram of the differences in photon time arrivals and we find that it exhibits several well defined peaks depending on the flare position and the black hole spin separated by $\\Delta t \\simeq 30 M$, where M is the black hole mass. The peaks disappear as the spin parameter goes to zero, implying that one could in principle measure the value of the black hole spin with timing measurements of sufficiently high signal to noise ratio.

  11. Probing the Galactic Binary Black Hole Spin with Photon Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2007-01-01

    It is generally considered that the X-ray emission in AGN and Galactic Black Hole Candidates is produced by flares above the surface of a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk, which extends down to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) of the black hole. We consider the influence of the black hole geometry on the light curves of these flares. To this end we follow a large number of photon orbits emitted impulsively in a locally isotropic fashion, at any phase of the disk orbit and examine their arrival times at infinity by an observer near the plane of the disk. We find out that the presence of the black hole spin induces a certain delay in the photon arrivals, as prograde photon orbits reach the observer on shorter (on the average) times than the retrograde ones. We form a histogram of the differences in photon time arrivals and we find that it exhibits several well defined peaks depending on the flare position and the black hole spin separated by $\\Delta t\\slmeq 30 M$, where M is the black hole mass. The peaks disappear as the spin parameter goes to zero, implying that one could in principle measure the value of the black hole spin with timing measurements of sufficiently high signal to noise ratio.

  12. Probing Spin Accumulation induced Magnetocapacitance in a Single Electron Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Teik-Hui; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between spin and charge in solids is currently among the most discussed topics in condensed matter physics. Such interplay gives rise to magneto-electric coupling, which in the case of solids was named magneto-electric effect, as predicted by Curie on the basis of symmetry considerations. This effect enables the manipulation of magnetization using electrical field or, conversely, the manipulation of electrical polarization by magnetic field. The latter is known as the magnetocapacitance effect. Here, we show that non-equilibrium spin accumulation can induce tunnel magnetocapacitance through the formation of a tiny charge dipole. This dipole can effectively give rise to an additional serial capacitance, which represents an extra charging energy that the tunneling electrons would encounter. In the sequential tunneling regime, this extra energy can be understood as the energy required for a single spin to flip. A ferromagnetic single-electron-transistor with tunable magnetic configuration is utilized to demonstrate the proposed mechanism. It is found that the extra threshold energy is experienced only by electrons entering the islands, bringing about asymmetry in the measured Coulomb diamond. This asymmetry is an unambiguous evidence of spin accumulation induced tunnel magnetocapacitance, and the measured magnetocapacitance value is as high as 40%. PMID:26348794

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of EPR line shapes by the method of Polnaszek, Bruno, and Freed is made for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals. The use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals is shown to simplify the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Rotational correlation times tau and orientational ordering parameters S sub Z where slow tumbling effects are expected to be observed in vanadyl EPR spectra are indicated in a plot. Analysis of the inertial effects on the probe reorientation, which are induced by slowly fluctuating torque components of the local solvent structure, yield quantitative values for tau and S sub Z. The weakly ordered probe VOAA is in the slow tumbling region and displays these inertial effects throughout the nematic range of BEPC and Phase V. VOAA exhibits different reorientation behavior near the isotropic-nematic transition temperature than that displayed far below this transition temperature.

  14. Chemically modified nucleic acids as immunodetectable probes in hybridization experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tchen, P; Fuchs, R P; Sage, E; Leng, M

    1984-01-01

    Guanine residues in nucleic acids can be modified by treatment with N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene and its 7-iodo derivative in an in vitro nonenzymatic reaction. The modified nucleic acids (ribo or deoxyribo, single or double stranded) are recognized by specific antibodies. They can be immunoprecipitated or used as probes in hybridization experiments and detected by immunochemical techniques. Images PMID:6374657

  15. Probing dynamics of a spin ensemble of P1 centers in diamond using a superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Gijs; Ranjan, Vishal; Schutjens, Ron; Debelhoir, Thibault; Groen, Joost; Szombati, Daniel; Thoen, David; Klapwijk, Teun; Hanson, Ronald; Dicarlo, Leonardo

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state spin ensembles are promising candidates for realizing a quantum memory for superconducting circuits. Understanding the dynamics of such ensembles is a necessary step towards achieving this goal. Here, we investigate the dynamics of an ensemble of nitrogen impurities (P1 centers) in diamond using magnetic-field controlled coupling to the first two modes of a superconducting (NbTiN) coplanar waveguide resonator. Three hyperfine-split spin sub-ensembles are clearly resolved in the 0.25-1.2 K temperature range, with a collective coupling strength extrapolating to 23 MHz at full polarization. The coupling to multiple modes allows us to distinguish the contributions of dipolar broadening and magnetic field inhomogeneity to the spin linewidth. We find the spin polarization recovery rate to be temperature independent below 1 K and conclude that spin out-diffusion across the resonator mode volume provides the mechanism for spin relaxation of the ensemble. Furthermore, by pumping spins in one sub-ensemble and probing the spins in the other sub-ensembles, we observe fast steady-state cross-relaxation (compared to spin repolarization) across the hyperfine transitions. These observations have important implications for using the three sub-ensembles as independent quantum memories. Research supported by NWO, FOM, and EU Project SOLID

  16. Probing the spin states of a single acceptor atom.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joost; Salfi, Joe; Mol, Jan A; Verduijn, Jan; Tettamanzi, Giuseppe C; Hamilton, Alex R; Collaert, Nadine; Rogge, Sven

    2014-03-12

    We demonstrate a single-hole transistor using an individual acceptor dopant embedded in a silicon channel. Magneto-transport spectroscopy reveals that the ground state splits as a function of magnetic field into four states, which is unique for a single hole bound to an acceptor in a bulk semiconductor. The two lowest spin states are heavy (|m(j)| = 3/2) and light (|m(j)| = 1/2) hole-like, a two-level system that can be electrically driven and is characterized by a magnetic field dependent and long relaxation time, which are properties of interest for qubits. Although the bulklike spin splitting of a boron atom is preserved in our nanotransistor, the measured Landé g-factors, |g(hh)| = 0.81 ± 0.06 and |g(lh)| = 0.85 ± 0.21 for heavy and light holes respectively, are lower than the bulk value. PMID:24571637

  17. Spin diffusion in Pt as probed by optically generated spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottegoni, F.; Ferrari, A.; Rortais, F.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Isella, G.; Finazzi, M.; Jamet, M.; Ciccacci, F.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dependence of the photoinduced inverse spin-Hall effect (ISHE) signal in a set of Pt/Ge(001) junctions as a function of the Pt thickness tPt in the 1-20-nm range at room temperature. The spin-polarized electrons, photoexcited through optical orientation at the direct gap of bulk Ge, diffuse towards the Pt layer, where spin-dependent scattering yields a transverse electromotive field EISHE. We show that the experimental data can be properly interpreted in the frame of the spin diffusion model, provided that we consider a variation of the spin diffusion length Ls in platinum when the Pt film thickness is increased. Indeed, for tPt>10 nm we estimate Ls=8.2 ±3.5 nm, whereas for tPt<10 nm the spin diffusion length decreases to Ls=3.5 ±2.1 nm. Moreover, the experimental results clearly indicate that for tPt<10 nm the spin Hall angle γ is three times larger than the value corresponding to thick Pt layers, suggesting a drastic change of the spin-dependent scattering mechanism for very thin Pt films.

  18. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

  19. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonancemore » can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.« less

  20. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    PubMed Central

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. The method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems. PMID:26497777

  1. Probing quantum spin glass like system with a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, C. Y.; Kwek, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    We study the ground state properties of a 4-qubit spin glass like (SGL) chain with probes at the end of the chain and compare our results with the non-spin glass like (NSGL) case. The SGL is modeled as a spin chain with nearest-neighbor couplings, taking on normal variates with mean J and variance Δ2. The entanglement between the probes is used to detect any discontinuity in the ground state energy spectrum. For the NSGL case, it was found that the concurrence of the probes exhibits sharp transitions whenever there are abrupt changes in the energy spectrum. In particular, for the 4-qubit case, there is a sudden change in the ground state energy at an external magnetic field B of around 0.66 (resulting in a drop in concurrence of the probes) and 1.7 (manifest as a spike). The latter spike persists for finite temperature case. For the SGL sample with sufficiently large Δ, however, the spike is absent. Thus, an absence in the spike could act as a possible signature of the presence of SGL effects. Moreover, the sudden drop in concurrence at B ≈ 0.66 does not disappear but gets smeared with increasing Δ. However, this drop can be accentuated with a smaller probe coupling. The finite temperature case is also briefly discussed.

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    The purposes of this vanadyl spin probe study are threefold: (1) to establish when the breakdown of motionally narrowed formulas occurs; (2) to analyze the experimental vanadyl EPR line shapes by the stochastic Lioville method as developed by Polnaszek et al. (1973) for slow tumbling in an anisotropic liquid; and (3) to compare the vanadyl probe study results with those of Polnaszek and Freed (1975). Spectral EPR line shapes are simulated for experimental spectra of vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOAA) in nematic liquid crystal butyl p-(p-ethoxyphenoxycarbonyl) phenyl carbonate (BEPC) and Phase V of EM laboratories. It is shown that the use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals simplifies the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Guidelines for the breakdown of motionally narrowed formulas are established. Both the slow tumbling aspects and the effects of non-Brownian rotation should be resolved in order to extract quantitative information about molecular ordering and rotational mobility.

  3. Wet spinning of solid polyamic acid fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the production of solid aromatic polyamic acid and polyimide fibers from a wet gel or coagulation bath wet gel using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) solutions of the polyamic acid derived from aromatic dianhydrides such as 3,3',4,4' benzophenonetetra carboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and aromatic diamines such as 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA). By utilizing the relationship among coagulation medium and concentration, resin inherent viscosity, resin percent solids, filament diameter, and fiber void content, it is possible to make improved polyamic acid fibers. Solid polyimide fibers, obtained by the thermal cyclization of the polyamic acid precursor, have increased tensile properties compared to fibers containing macropores from the same resin system.

  4. Magnetic Spin Relaxation Probed with Sweep Speed Dependent Coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredig, Thomas; Byrne, Matthew

    The magnetic spin relaxation of finite-length iron chains has been investigated in iron phthalocyanine thin films by means of sweep speed dependence on magnetic coercivity. The Fe(II) ions are embedded in a carbon matrix and molecules self-assemble during vacuum sublimation, so that the Fe(II) cores form well-separated chains of 1.3 nm and tunable chain lengths within the polycrystalline thin film. The average length of the chains is controlled through deposition variables and ranges from 30 nm to 300 nm. The coercivity strongly increases with chain length in this regime. This may be an interesting experimental realization of a low-dimensional finite-sized Ising model. The coercivity dependence on chain length and sweep speed is described with an Ising model based on Glauber dynamics. Research support from NSF under Grant DMR 0847552.

  5. Probing the thiol-gold planar interface by spin polarized tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaohang; McGill, Stephen A.; Xiong, Peng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Jianhua

    2014-04-14

    Reports of induced magnetism at thiol-gold interface have generated considerable recent interest. In these studies, the sample magnetization was generally measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry which has limitation in determining surface and interface magnetism. In this work, we have fabricated planar tunnel junctions incorporating a thiol-gold interface. An observed room temperature humidity effect together with low temperature inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy confirmed the existence of a thiol-gold interface in the organic-inorganic hybrid heterostructure. Spin polarized tunneling measurements were performed to probe the spin polarization at the thiol-gold interface; however, the obtained spin polarized tunneling spectra indicate no measurable spin polarization at the thiol-gold interface.

  6. Probing an NV Center's Nuclear Spin Environment with Coherent Population Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levonian, David; Goldman, Michael; Singh, Swati; Markham, Matthew; Twitchen, Daniel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged as a versatile atom-like system, finding diverse applications in metrology and quantum information science, but interaction between the NV center's electronic spin and its nuclear spin environment represent a major source of decoherence. We use optical techniques to monitor and control the nuclear bath surrounding an NV center. Specifically, we create an optical Λ-system using the | +/- 1 > components of the NV center's spin-triplet ground state. When the Zeeman splitting between the two states is equal to the two-photon detuning between the lasers, population is trapped in the resulting dark state. Measuring the rate at which the NV center escapes from the dark state therefore gives information on how spin bath dynamics change the effective magnetic field experienced by the NV center. By monitoring statistics of the emitted photons, we plan to probe non-equilibrium dynamics of the bath.

  7. Wave-vector-dependent spin pumping as a probe of exchange-coupled magnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Masaya; Tateno, Yuma; Sekiguchi, Koji; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that short-wavelength exchange-coupled magnons can be identified electrically through the combination of their spin-pumping and damping properties in a metal/magnetic insulator heterostructure. We present clear wave-vector dependence of the spin pumping from parametrically excited exchange-coupled magnons in the heterostructure. The efficiency of spin pumping by dipole-exchange magnons was measured to be sensitive to their wave numbers and propagation angles, while the efficiency was found to be almost constant in the exchange limit. This dependence enabled us to uncover nontrivial dual bistability in the system originating from drastic change in dominant nonequilibrium magnon modes. These findings pave a path for direct electric access to short-wavelength spin dynamics that cannot be probed by optical techniques.

  8. Fatty Acid Desaturase Mutants of Yeast: Growth Requirements and Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Label Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Wisnieski, Bernadine J.; Kiyomoto, Richard K.

    1972-01-01

    Two respiratory-sufficient and one respiratory-deficient (nuclear petite) strains of yeast Δ9-desaturase mutants were analyzed to determine which fatty acids would serve as replacements for the naturally occurring fatty acids, 16:1 Δ9cis and 18:1 Δ9cis. The requirement can be satisfied by several fatty acids differing in double-bond position, steric configuration, chain length, and degree of unsaturation. The features common to growth-supporting fatty acids are presented and the effects of varying the carbon source and temperature are considered. In addition, we illustrate several pitfalls encountered in membrane studies which exploit lipid-requiring organisms. Since the membrane fatty acid composition of these mutants can be modified readily, electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to compare membranes of mutant strains enriched for different fatty acids. The lipid distribution pattern of the most commonly employed electron spin resonance spin-label, 12-nitroxide stearate, was ascertained and compared to that of 18:1 Δ9cis. PMID:4333377

  9. Detection of nanoscale electron spin resonance spectra demonstrated using nitrogen-vacancy centre probes in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L. T.; Kehayias, P.; Simpson, D. A.; Jarmola, A.; Stacey, A.; Budker, D.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) describes a suite of techniques for characterizing electronic systems with applications in physics, chemistry, and biology. However, the requirement for large electron spin ensembles in conventional ESR techniques limits their spatial resolution. Here we present a method for measuring ESR spectra of nanoscale electronic environments by measuring the longitudinal relaxation time of a single-spin probe as it is systematically tuned into resonance with the target electronic system. As a proof of concept, we extracted the spectral distribution for the P1 electronic spin bath in diamond by using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres, and demonstrated excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. As the response of each nitrogen-vacancy spin in this experiment is dominated by a single P1 spin at a mean distance of 2.7 nm, the application of this technique to the single nitrogen-vacancy case will enable nanoscale ESR spectroscopy of atomic and molecular spin systems. PMID:26728001

  10. Nanoscale thermal imaging using a scanning spin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos

    We use a 30-nm diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center attached to the apex of a silicon tip as a local temperature sensor. First, we apply an electrical current to heat up the tip to a predefined operating temperature and rely on the NV to monitor the small thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. With the aid of a combined AFM/confocal setup, we image engineered microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. Given the small mass of the NV-hosting diamond nanoparticle, our technique shows a fast time response of order hundred microseconds, limited by the heat dissipation time of the tip. In a second approach, we heat nanostructured gold deposited on glass substrate by injecting a direct current. By monitoring the frequency shift of NV spin transitions upon scanning the AFM tip we reconstruct nanometer-resolved temperature maps. Our technique promises multiple applications ranging from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions in various solid-state systems.

  11. Magnetic domain-wall motion twisted by nanoscale probe-induced spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, L. S.; Wang, C. S.; Zhang, H. Z.; Shu, L.; Bai, J.; Chai, Y. S.; Zhao, X.; Nie, J. C.; Cao, C. B.; Gu, C. Z.; Xiong, C. M.; Sun, Y.; Shi, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Xia, K.; Nan, C. W.; Zhang, J. X.

    2014-12-01

    A method for deterministic control of magnetism using an electrical stimulus is highly desired for the new generation of magnetoelectronic devices. Much effort has been focused on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion manipulated by a successive injection of spin-polarized current into a magnetic nanostructure. However, an integrant high-threshold current density of 1011˜1012A /m2 inhibits the integration with low-energy-cost technology. Here, we report an approach to manipulate a single magnetic domain wall with a perpendicular anisotropy in a manganite/dielectric/metal capacitor using a probe-induced spin displacement. A spin-transfer torque (STT) occurs in the strongly correlated manganite film during the spin injection into the capacitor from the nanoscale magnetized tip with an ultralow voltage of 0.1 V, where a lower bound of the estimated threshold spin-polarized current density is ˜108A /m2 at the tip/manganite interface. The dynamic of DW motions are analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert method. This probe-voltage-controlled DW motion, at an ambient condition, demonstrates a critical framework for the fundamental understanding of the manipulation of the nanomagnet systems with low-energy consumption.

  12. Selective Nucleic Acid Capture with Shielded Covalent Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid probes are used for diverse applications in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. In any setting, their power is limited by imperfect selectivity (binding of undesired targets) and incomplete affinity (binding is reversible, and not all desired targets bound). These difficulties are fundamental, stemming from reliance on base pairing to provide both selectivity and affinity. Shielded covalent (SC) probes eliminate the longstanding trade-off between selectivity and durable target capture, achieving selectivity via programmable base pairing and molecular conformation change, and durable target capture via activatable covalent cross-linking. In pure and mixed samples, SC probes covalently capture complementary DNA or RNA oligo targets and reject two-nucleotide mismatched targets with near-quantitative yields at room temperature, achieving discrimination ratios of 2–3 orders of magnitude. Semiquantitative studies with full-length mRNA targets demonstrate selective covalent capture comparable to that for RNA oligo targets. Single-nucleotide DNA or RNA mismatches, including nearly isoenergetic RNA wobble pairs, can be efficiently rejected with discrimination ratios of 1–2 orders of magnitude. Covalent capture yields appear consistent with the thermodynamics of probe/target hybridization, facilitating rational probe design. If desired, cross-links can be reversed to release the target after capture. In contrast to existing probe chemistries, SC probes achieve the high sequence selectivity of a structured probe, yet durably retain their targets even under denaturing conditions. This previously incompatible combination of properties suggests diverse applications based on selective and stable binding of nucleic acid targets under conditions where base-pairing is disrupted (e.g., by stringent washes in vitro or in situ, or by enzymes in vivo). PMID:23745667

  13. Spin waves in the second Landau level: Probing the spin-polarization enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, Ursula; Rhone, Trevor David; Pinczuk, Aron; West, Ken W.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    2012-02-01

    The physics in the second Landau level (SLL) is governed by competing phases resulting in striking phenomena. We use resonant inelastic light scattering experiments to explore collective excitation modes with the focus on low lying spin excitation modes in the SLL. The intensity of the small momentum spin-wave at the bare Zeeman energy (EZ) collapses for filling factors away from integer filling factor ν<3 and are dominated by a continuum of modes. We find that at the fractional filling factors 14/5, 8/3, 5/2, 7/3, 11/5 the continuum coexists with a weak but distinct signal at EZ, a long wavelength spin-wave that suggests a degree of spin polarization. In addition, at 5/2 an intriguing well developed sharp mode is observable below EZ, which is unique for the even-denominator filling factor. Modes at energies larger than EZ merge additionally at odd-denominator states in ILS spectra, most pronounced for 7/3, in a manner that is similar to that of the 1/3 state. This observation could be evidence that the CF framework could be applicable to these states.

  14. NMR probing of spin and charge order near odd-integer filling in the second Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhone, T. D.; Tiemann, L.; Muraki, K.

    2015-07-01

    Studies of spin degrees of freedom near odd-integer filling ν =3 in the second Landau level have engendered conflicting accounts of the spin properties in this regime. Using resistively detected NMR as a probe of local spin density, we explore the nature of the ground state in the quantum Hall regime near ν =3 . Our Knight shift measurements reveal anomalies in NMR spectral line shapes near ν =3 , which demonstrate the presence of solid phases formed from charged quasiparticles, with maximal spin polarization (i.e., no additional spin flips) at each ν . The long nuclear spin relaxation times demonstrate the absence of Skyrmions, or spin textures, in this phase. On the basis of these observations, we attempt to reconcile conflicting reports on the quasiparticle properties and spin wave excitations at ν ˜3 , which may engender new paradigms for the understanding of spin excitations in a collinear ferromagnet with broken translational symmetry.

  15. Swelling behavior of O-alkylated APCS coals as examined by the EPR spin probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ruisong; Tucker, D.; Kispert, L.D.

    1995-12-31

    Known O-alkylation procedures have been used to derivatize the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups in the APCS coals Lewiston-Stockton, Wyodak-Anderson, Beulah-Zap, Illinois {number_sign}6, Upper Freeport, and Pittsburgh {number_sign}8. In general the resulting decrease in hydrogen bonding reduced the cyclical variation in nitroxide spin probe retention observed for nonalkylated coals when small amounts (<1%) of pyridine are present in the toluene swelling solvent. An increase in spin probe retention by the O-alkylated coals relative to the underivatized coals indicates a more open arrangement in the coal due to a decrease in attractive forces, confirming that microporosity increases with increasing rank.

  16. Rotational Doppler velocimetry to probe the angular velocity of spinning microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. B.; Lee, M. P.; Speirits, F. C.; Barnett, S. M.; Simpson, S. H.; Lavery, M. P. J.; Padgett, M. J.; Gibson, G. M.

    2014-07-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is a technique used to measure linear velocity, ranging from that of exhaust gases to blood flow. A rotational analog of laser Doppler velocimetry was recently demonstrated, using a rotationally symmetric interference pattern to probe the angular velocity of a spinning object. In this work, we demonstrate the use of a diffraction-limited structured illumination pattern to measure the angular velocity of a micron-sized particle trapped and spinning at tens of Hz in an optical trap. The technique requires no detailed knowledge of the shape of the particle, or the distribution of scatterers within it, and is independent of the particle's chirality, transparency, and birefringence. The particle is also subjected to Brownian motion, which complicates the signal by affecting the rotation rate and the rotation axis. By careful consideration of these influences, we show how the measurement is robust to both, representing a technique with which to probe the rotational motion of microscale particles.

  17. Accurate prediction of electron-paramagnetic-resonance tensors for spin probes dissolved in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Benzi, Caterina; Cossi, Maurizio; Barone, Vincenzo

    2005-11-15

    High-level ab initio g and A tensor components have been calculated for PD-tempone and tempo-palmitate (TP) radical spin probes dissolved in n-pentyl and n-hexyl cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals. Solvent effects have been included in the proposed approach by means of the polarizable continuum model, allowing for solvent anisotropy. An in-depth analysis of the electronic structure of probes was performed to choose a suitable model for TP and make the calculations more accessible. Computed magnetic tensor components have been compared with corresponding values measured in the rigid limit. The quality of the results suggests the use of quantum-mechanical data to determine the order parameter of the nematic from experimental electron-spin resonance measurements. PMID:16321115

  18. An EPR spin probe method for characterizing changes in the accessible regions of coal upon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Sady, W.; Kispert, L.D.; Spears, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) were weathered in air and the structural and chemical changes that upon swelling with toluene and pyridine were, examined by an EPR spin probe method developed in this laboratory. Under mild oxidation conditions and swelling with toluene large structural changes were observed for lignite (Beulah-Zap) which suggested the collapse of the coal structure. This did not occur for higher rank coal. Upon oxidation and swelling with toluene and pyridine an increase occurred in the amino substituted spin probe concentration for coals with the carbon percent above 80%. A maximum was found for the creation of 5 {Angstrom} diameter pores upon swelling with pyridine at 85% C.

  19. Spin dynamics and relaxation in graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance probing.

    PubMed

    Rao, Singamaneni S; Stesmans, Andre; van Tol, Johan; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Higginbotham-Duque, A; Lu, Wei; Sinitskii, Alexander; Tour, James M

    2012-09-25

    Here we report the results of a multifrequency (~9, 20, 34, 239.2, and 336 GHz) variable-temperature continuous wave (cw) and X-band (~9 GHz) pulse electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement performed at cryogenic temperatures on potassium split graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Important experimental findings include the following: (a) The multifrequency cw ESR data infer the presence of only carbon-related paramagnetic nonbonding states, at any measured temperature, with the g value independent of microwave frequency and temperature. (b) A linear broadening of the ESR signal as a function of microwave frequency is noticed. The observed linear frequency dependence of ESR signal width points to a distribution of g factors causing the non-Lorentzian line shape, and the g broadening contribution is found to be very small. (c) The ESR process is found to be characterized by slow and fast components, whose temperature dependences could be well described by a tunneling level state model. This work not only could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge spin (or magnetic)-based properties of GNRs but also pave the way to GNR-based spin devices. PMID:22901098

  20. ESR studies of the slow tumbling of vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Lawson, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    ESR line shapes that are appropriate for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals were calculated by the stochastic Liouville method. Because of the symmetry possessed by vanadyl, the analysis and interpretation of these line shapes was simplified considerably. Spectral line shapes agreed well with experimental spectra of VOAcAc in the nematic liquid crystal Phase V and BEPC. Deviations from Brownian rotational diffusion were noted. A slowly fluctuating torque analysis yielded good agreement with the experimental spectra.

  1. Triplet excitons as sensitive spin probes for structure analysis of extended defects in microcrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Christoph; Teutloff, Christian; Behrends, Jan; Bittl, Robert; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Lips, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) spectroscopy is employed to study the influence of triplet excitons on the photocurrent in state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells. These triplet excitons are used as sensitive spin probes for the investigation of their electronic and nuclear environment in this mixed-phase material. According to low-temperature EDMR results obtained from solar cells with different spins in conduction band tail states nearby, and take part in a spin-dependent recombination process. Our study shows that extended defects such as grain boundaries or stacking faults in the crystalline part of the material act as charge carrier traps that can influence the material conductivity.

  2. Interaction of poly(ethylene oxide) with the sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle interface studied with nitroxide spin probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.S.; Kevan, L. )

    1994-08-04

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) line widths of 5-, 7-, 12-, and 16-doxylstearic acid (x-DSA) and tempo nitroxides versus the concentration of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles show different trends. The ESR line widths of 5-, 7-, and 16-DSA increase with increasing concentration of PEO, which is interpreted as due to increasing viscosity in the environment of the nitroxide spin probe. The tempo and 12-DSA line widths were independent of the concentration of PEO. The line width showed the highest value for 5-DSA and the lowest value of tempo. The line width of x-DSA decreases from 5-DSA to a minimum value for 12-DSA and then increases somewhat for 16-DSA. This is interpreted as bending of the alkyl chain to provide different locations for the nitroxide moiety relative to the micelle interface. The relative distances of the nitroxide moiety of [chi]-DSA from deuterated water at the SDS micelle interface was measured by deuterium electron spin echo modulation. The distances increased from 5-DSA to 12-DSA and then decreased for 16-DSA. The interpretation of the DSR line width trend is supported by the deuterium modulation depth trend. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Luminescent Probes for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Marras, Salvatore A.E.; Kozlov, Maxim; Wirpsza, Laura; Mustaev, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    Novel amino-reactive derivatives of lanthanide-based luminescent labels of enhanced brightness and metal retention were synthesized and used for the detection of complementary DNA oligonucleotides by molecular beacons. Time-resolved acquisition of the luminescent signal that occurs upon hybridization of the probe to the target enabled the avoidance of short-lived background fluorescence, markedly enhancing the sensitivity of detection, which was less than 1 pM. This value is about 50 to 100 times more sensitive than the level achieved with conventional fluorescence-based molecular beacons, and is 10 to 60 times more sensitive than previously reported for other lanthanide-based hybridization probes. These novel luminescent labels should significantly enhance the sensitivity of all type of nucleic acid hybridization probes, and could dramatically improve the detection limit of other biopolymers and small compounds that are used in a variety of biological applications. PMID:20085336

  4. A LOW-E MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING PROBE FOR BIOLOGICAL SOLID STATE NMR AT 750 MHz

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Seth A.; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Shetty, Kiran; Brey, William W.; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    Crossed-coil NMR probes are a useful tool for reducing sample heating for biological solid state NMR. In a crossed-coil probe, the higher frequency 1H field, which is the primary source of sample heating in conventional probes, is produced by a separate low-inductance resonator. Because a smaller driving voltage is required, the electric field across the sample and the resultant heating is reduced. In this work we describe the development of a magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR probe utilizing a dual resonator. This dual resonator approach, referred to as “Low-E,” was originally developed to reduce heating in samples of mechanically aligned membranes. The study of inherently dilute systems, such as proteins in lipid bilayers, via MAS techniques requires large sample volumes at high field to obtain spectra with adequate signal-to-noise ratio under physiologically relevant conditions. With the Low-E approach, we are able to obtain homogeneous and sufficiently strong radiofrequency fields for both 1H and 13C frequencies in a 4 mm probe with a 1H frequency of 750 MHz. The performance of the probe using windowless dipolar recoupling sequences is demonstrated on model compounds as well as membrane embedded peptides. PMID:19138870

  5. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Ilya M; Espinosa, Catalina A; Shapiro, Rebecca A; Oldham, Andrew N; Duong, Vincent V; Martin, Rachel W

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds. PMID:20673643

  6. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Ilya M.; Espinosa, Catalina A.; Shapiro, Rebecca A.; Oldham, Andrew N.; Duong, Vincent V.; Martin, Rachel W.

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds.

  7. Localized spin-wave excitation by the evanescent microwave scanning probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakran, F.; Golosovsky, M.; Davidov, D.; Monod, P.

    2006-02-15

    We report a technique for the local contactless spin-wave excitation using the evanescent microwave scanning probe. Our probe is based on a dielectric resonator with the thin slit aperture. It operates at 8.8 GHz, has a spatial resolution of 10-100 {mu}m, and may be operated in the parallel and in the perpendicular magnetic field. The measurements can be performed in contact mode or by scanning the sample at constant probe-sample separation. Using 120-150 nm thick Permalloy films on a glass substrate as test samples, we show how our technique can be used for thickness measurements of thin magnetic films and for the mapping of their magnetic properties, such as magnetization and surface anisotropy.

  8. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César De La; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths.

  9. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  10. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; de la Fuente, César; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  11. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  12. The Utilization of Spin Polarized Photoelectron Spectroscopy as a Probe of Electron Correlation with an Ultimate Goal of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung; Chung, Brandon; Morton, Simon; Komesu, Takashi; Waddill, George

    2008-02-11

    We are developing the technique of spin-polarized photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of electron correlation with the ultimate goal of resolving the Pu electronic structure controversy. Over the last several years, we have demonstrated the utility of spin polarized photoelectron spectroscopy for determining the fine details of the electronic structure in complex systems such as those shown in the paper.

  13. Probing iron spin state by optical absorption in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Lin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in iron-bearing minerals have been in the focus of geophysical studies1. Modern consensus is that iron spin state in the lower mantle is a complex function of crystal structure, composition, pressure, and temperature. Discontinuities in physical properties of lower mantle minerals have been revealed over the spin transition pressure range, but at room temperature. In this work, we have used a supercontinuum laser source and an intensified CCD camera to probe optical properties of siderite, FeCO3, and post-perovskite, Mg0.9Fe0.1SiO3, across the spin transition in laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Synchronously gating the CCD with the supercontinuum pulses (Fig. 1A) allowed diminishing thermal background to ~8.3*10-4. Utilizing the experimental setup we infer the spin state of ferrous iron in siderite at high pressure and temperature conditions (Fig. 1B). Similar behavior is observed for low spin ferric iron in post-perovskite at 130 GPa indicating that all iron in post-perovskite is high spin at lower mantle conditions. Also, our experimental setup holds promise for measuring radiative thermal conductivity of mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions. Figure 1. (A) Timing of the optical absorption measurements at high temperature. (B) High temperature siderite absorption spectra at 45 GPa. Before heating and quenched after 1300 K spectra are shown in light and dark blue, respectively. Green and red curves are absorption spectra at 1200 K and 1300 K, respectively. Spectra shown in black represent room temperature absorption data on HS (43 GPa) and LS (45.5 GPa) siderite after Lobanov et al., 2015, shown for comparison.

  14. Probing long-range carrier-pair spin–spin interactions in a conjugated polymer by detuning of electrically detected spin beating

    PubMed Central

    van Schooten, Kipp J.; Baird, Douglas L.; Limes, Mark E.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Weakly coupled electron spin pairs that experience weak spin–orbit interaction can control electronic transitions in molecular and solid-state systems. Known to determine radical pair reactions, they have been invoked to explain phenomena ranging from avian magnetoreception to spin-dependent charge-carrier recombination and transport. Spin pairs exhibit persistent spin coherence, allowing minute magnetic fields to perturb spin precession and thus recombination rates and photoreaction yields, giving rise to a range of magneto-optoelectronic effects in devices. Little is known, however, about interparticle magnetic interactions within such pairs. Here we present pulsed electrically detected electron spin resonance experiments on poly(styrene-sulfonate)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:PSS) devices, which show how interparticle spin–spin interactions (magnetic-dipolar and spin-exchange) between charge-carrier spin pairs can be probed through the detuning of spin-Rabi oscillations. The deviation from uncoupled precession frequencies quantifies both the exchange (<30 neV) and dipolar (23.5±1.5 neV) interaction energies responsible for the pair's zero-field splitting, implying quantum mechanical entanglement of charge-carrier spins over distances of 2.1±0.1 nm. PMID:25868686

  15. Localized excitation of magnetostatic surface spin waves in yttrium iron garnet by shorted coaxial probe detected via spin pumping and rectification effect

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Wee Tee Ong, C. K.; Peng, Bin

    2015-04-21

    We demonstrate the localized excitation and dc electrical detection of magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) by a shorted coaxial probe. Thin films of NiFe and Pt are patterned at different regions onto a common bulk YIG substrate. A shorted coaxial probe is used to excite spin precession locally near various patterned regions. The dc voltages across the corresponding regions are recorded. For excitation of the Pt regions, the dc voltage spectra are dominated by the spin pumping of MSSWs from YIG, where various modes can be clearly distinguished. For the NiFe region, it is also found that spin pumping from MSSWs generated in YIG dominated the spectra, indicating that the spin pumped currents are dissipated into charge currents via the inverse Spin Hall effect (ISHE) in NiFe. For all regions, dc signals from YIG MSSWs are observed to be much stronger than the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) uniform mode, likely due to the nature of the microwave excitation. The results indicate the potential of this probe for microwave imaging via dc detection of spin dynamics in continuous and patterned films.

  16. Optical probe of spin-orbit fields in metallic magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, Mohammad; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Wong, Kin L.; Lang, Murong; Fan, Yabin; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Schwartz, Robert N.; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-03-01

    We report a novel self-consistent optical approach based on magneto-optical Kerr effect to directly and quantitatively probe the spin-orbit fields of magnetic devices with 1um diffraction limited spatial resolution. The optical probe is exemplified by investigating the spin-orbit fields in a magnetic stack of Ta(5 nm)/CoFeB(1.1 nm)/MgO(2.0 nm)/TaOx with enhanced perpendicular anisotropy. Both field-like and damping-like contributions were measured independently and their coefficients are quantified at 3 . 3 ×10-6 and - 2 . 0 ×10-6 Oe / A . cm-2 respectively. A detailed comparison with standard transport technique is presented in which a very good agreement were found. Our results establish the relevance of the optical methods for studying spin-orbit torque related physics. We acknowledge the support from the National Science Foundation (DMR-1411085) and the FAME Center, one of the six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  17. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  18. Probing the Migration Histories of Exoplanets Through Measurements of Their Spin-Orbit Alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, Brett Christopher; Tinney, Chris; Wright, Duncan; Bayliss, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of giant planets orbiting <0.1AU of their host star was one of the most unexpected results of early exoplanetary science. The widely accepted core-accretion model of planet formation predicts that giant planets should form several AU from their star (beyond the ice line) and on nearly coplanar orbits that are well aligned to the spin axis of their host star. However, a significant fraction of short period Jovian planets are found on substantially misaligned orbits, suggesting that the migration mechanisms producing Hot Jupiters are also misaligning their orbits.Therefore, to probe the processes involved in the formation and migration of exoplanets, we have measured the sky-projected spin-orbit angles (i.e., the angle, λ, between the spin angular momentum vector of a host star and the orbital angular momentum vector of its planet) of four Hot Jupiter systems using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Our Exoplanetary Science at UNSW group is utilizing the new CYCLOPS2 fibre feed on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to carry out high precision Doppler observations of southern hemisphere transiting systems, including spin-orbit alignment data for these systems.We have found that WASP-79b is in a significantly misaligned, nearly polar orbit. HATS-3b and two additional systems we studied are consistent with being on aligned orbits. I will discuss how these spin-orbit alignment measurements are set to become even more critical for exoplanetary science in the years ahead, as K2 and TESS discover much larger numbers of transiting systems bright enough for Rossiter-McLaughlin observations on current telescopes. I will highlight the importance for carrying out additional spin-orbit measurements of suitable systems that belong to the least explored parameter space, which includes sub-Jovian, long-period, and multi-planet systems, to help to elucidate the complex formation and evolution mechanisms of exoplanets.

  19. An Integrated Spin-Labeling/Computational-Modeling Approach for Mapping Global Structures of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Tangprasertchai, Narin S.; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ding, Yuan; Tham, Kenneth; Rohs, Remo; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    The technique of site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) provides unique information on biomolecules by monitoring the behavior of a stable radical tag (i.e., spin label) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this chapter, we describe an approach in which SDSL is integrated with computational modeling to map conformations of nucleic acids. This approach builds upon a SDSL tool kit previously developed and validated, which includes three components: (i) a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe, designated as R5, which can be efficiently attached at defined sites within arbitrary nucleic acid sequences; (ii) inter-R5 distances in the nanometer range, measured via pulsed EPR; and (iii) an efficient program, called NASNOX, that computes inter-R5 distances on given nucleic acid structures. Following a general framework of data mining, our approach uses multiple sets of measured inter-R5 distances to retrieve “correct” all-atom models from a large ensemble of models. The pool of models can be generated independently without relying on the inter-R5 distances, thus allowing a large degree of flexibility in integrating the SDSL-measured distances with a modeling approach best suited for the specific system under investigation. As such, the integrative experimental/computational approach described here represents a hybrid method for determining all-atom models based on experimentally-derived distance measurements. PMID:26477260

  20. An Integrated Spin-Labeling/Computational-Modeling Approach for Mapping Global Structures of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Tangprasertchai, Narin S; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ding, Yuan; Tham, Kenneth; Rohs, Remo; Haworth, Ian S; Qin, Peter Z

    2015-01-01

    The technique of site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) provides unique information on biomolecules by monitoring the behavior of a stable radical tag (i.e., spin label) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this chapter, we describe an approach in which SDSL is integrated with computational modeling to map conformations of nucleic acids. This approach builds upon a SDSL tool kit previously developed and validated, which includes three components: (i) a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe, designated as R5, which can be efficiently attached at defined sites within arbitrary nucleic acid sequences; (ii) inter-R5 distances in the nanometer range, measured via pulsed EPR; and (iii) an efficient program, called NASNOX, that computes inter-R5 distances on given nucleic acid structures. Following a general framework of data mining, our approach uses multiple sets of measured inter-R5 distances to retrieve "correct" all-atom models from a large ensemble of models. The pool of models can be generated independently without relying on the inter-R5 distances, thus allowing a large degree of flexibility in integrating the SDSL-measured distances with a modeling approach best suited for the specific system under investigation. As such, the integrative experimental/computational approach described here represents a hybrid method for determining all-atom models based on experimentally-derived distance measurements. PMID:26477260

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Investigated by N@C60 and N@C70 Spin Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzilius, B.; Gembus, A.; Dinse, K.-P.; Simon, F.; Kuzmany, H.

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen atoms encapsulated in C60 can be used to detect small deviations from spherical symmetry via deformation-induced non-vanishing Zero-Field-Splitting (ZFS). In this context, experiments were performed by using these electronic quartet spin probes to investigate single wall carbon nanotubes. Time-fluctuating ZFS interaction would be indicative for rotational and/or translational degrees of freedom. Using pulsed EPR techniques, spin relaxation rates of N@C60 and also of N@C70 molecules with inherent static ZFS were measured. The analysis of their temperature dependence gave information about the dynamics of N@C60 and N@C70 molecules confined to the inside of the tubes.

  2. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V.; Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K.; Dantelle, G.; Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S.

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  3. Probing dynamics of fusion reactions through cross-section and spin distribution measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Gulzar; Singh, Varinderjit; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Mohanto, G.; Mukul, Ish; Siwal, D.; Thakur, M.; Kapoor, K.; Sharma, P.; Banerjee, T.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Bala, Indu; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Stevenson, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Present work aims to explicate the effect of entrance channel mass asymmetry on fusion dynamics for the Compound Nucleus 80Sr populated through two different channels, 16O+64Zn and 32S+48Ti, using cross-section and spin distribution measurements as probes. The evaporation spectra studies for these systems, reported earlier indicate the presence of dynamical effects for mass symmetric 32S+48Ti system.The CCDEF and TDHF calculations have been performed for both the systems and an attempt has been made to explain the reported deviations in the α-particle spectrum for the mass symmetric system.

  4. Flux properties in Bi-2212 single crystals studied by spin-probe ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Akihiko; Taka, Chihiro; Yasuda, Takashi; Horai, Kazumi

    2000-07-01

    Flux properties in Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ x (Bi-2212) single crystals are studied by spin-probe method. ESR line widths of a very thin layer of DPPH free radical on the surface of the crystals begin to increase upon the superconducting transitions. At further low temperatures below irreversibility lines, distinct hysteresis is observed between ESR profiles for field increase and decrease. The resonance fields and intensities also indicate characteristic changes. Close correlations between ESR anomalies and vortex behaviors are discussed, comparing results of as-grown and optimally doped crystals.

  5. Evaluation of glucose-linked nitroxide radicals for use as an in vivo spin-label probe.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Nagai, Akio; Onuma, Ryo; Saito, Misaki; Sugawara, Rina; Shinohara, Sayaka; Okabe, Eriko; Ito, Tomohiro; Ogata, Tateaki

    2014-04-24

    In vivo incorporation and reduction abilities of 4-carboxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (4-carboxy-TEMPO) (1), 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrroline-1-oxyl (3-carboxy-dehydro-PROXYL, 3-carboxy-DPRO) (2), 4-hydroxy-TEMPO and 3-hydroxymethyl-DPRO O-β-D-glucosides (3 and 5), and newly designed forms of 6-O-(TEMPO-4-carbonyl and DPRO-3-carbonyl)-D-glucose (4 and 6) were evaluated using white radish sprouts. For each of these compounds, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry was used to measure two effects: the rate of in vitro reduction via the addition of ascorbic acid; and, the rate of successful incorporation into radish sprouts for a reduction to the corresponding hydroxyl amine. DPRO-radicals 2, 5, and 6 were detected significantly more than TEMPO-radicals 1, 3, and 4 in vitro and in vivo for both experiments. Four glucose-linked nitroxide radicals were reduced faster than the glucose-non-linked ones in the in vitro experiment, but were nonetheless detected more each time in radish sprouts due to the absorbability. Glucose ester-linked radicals 4 and 6 were detected more than glycosides 3 and 5, which suggests that glucose ester-linked DPRO-radical 6 is the best for use as a spin-label probe that a plant will incorporate. PMID:24508871

  6. Osmotically induced removal of water from fungal cells as determined by a spin probe technique.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1978-11-01

    Effects of physical environment on plasma membrane semipermeability and osmotic induction of changes in aqueous cytoplasmic volume were studied in vegetative and spore cells of a plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium sulphureum. A direct method, employing a spin probe molecule that partitioned between intracellular aqueous and hydrophobic phases, allowed measurement of reversible water movement out of macroconidial cells and chlamydospores exposed to solutions of high osmolarity. Equilibrium distribution of the spin probe between intracellular aqueous and lipid phases was more rapid than movement of water in and out of the cells. The extent of water removal was exponentially dependent on osmotic strength. Some cells became irreversibly permeable to divalent cations on treatment with sodium chloride above 1.5 osmolar but addition of sucrose to the suspension medium at equivalent osmolar concentrations caused water removal without adversely affecting the viability. Sucrose also protected the plasma membrane against damage during freeze-drying. Induction of plasma membrane damage by osmotic shock or freeze-drying permitted rapid permeation of nickel ions. Neither slow equilibration of intracellular components with divalent paramagnetic cations nor partial permeability of damaged plasma membranes to these ions was observed. PMID:16660597

  7. 1-[2-Hydroxy-3-octadecan-1'-oate]propyl-2'',2'',5'',5''-tetramethyl pyrolidine-N-oxyl-3''-carboxylate as a potential spin probe for membrane structure studies.

    PubMed

    Katoch, R; Trivedi, G K; Phadke, R S

    1999-12-01

    The synthesis of a new minimum steric perturbing proxyl nitroxide, which is a derivative of glycerol and contains a stearic acid moiety, has been carried out. Its localization in model membrane L-alpha-dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) was ascertained with the help of ESR, DSC, 1H and 31P NMR techniques. The nitroxide was used for detecting the changes in the phase transition temperature of the model membranes in the presence and absence of drugs. The permeation of the vasodilating drug epinephrine has also been studied using this spin label. The results prove the potential applicability of the new spin probe in the spin labeling of biomembranes. PMID:10658580

  8. EPR techniques to probe insertion and conformation of spin-labeled proteins in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bordignon, Enrica; Polyhach, Yevhen

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin-labeled membrane proteins is a valuable biophysical technique to study structural details and conformational transitions of proteins close to their physiological environment, e.g., in liposomes, membrane bilayers, and nanodiscs. Unlike in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, having only one or few specific side chains labeled at a time with paramagnetic probes makes the size of the object under investigation irrelevant in terms of technique sensitivity. As a drawback, extensive site-directed mutagenesis is required in order to analyze the properties of the protein under investigation. EPR can provide detailed information on side chain dynamics of large membrane proteins or protein complexes embedded in membranes with an exquisite sensitivity for flexible regions and on water accessibility profiles across the membrane bilayer. Moreover, distances between the two spin-labeled side chains in membrane proteins can be detected with high precision in the 1.5-6 nm range at cryogenic temperatures. The application of EPR to membrane proteins still presents some challenges in terms of sample preparation, sensitivity, and data interpretation; thus no ready-to-go methodological recipes can be given. However this chapter describes the state of the art in the application of nitroxide-based site-directed spin labeling EPR to membrane proteins, with specific focus on the different types of information which can be obtained with continuous wave and pulsed techniques and on the challenges in sample preparation and data analysis for functional and structural membrane protein studies. PMID:23404283

  9. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V.; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM {sup 14}N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments.

  10. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V.; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.; Utsumi, Hideo

    2014-04-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM 14N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments.

  11. Parametric Harmonic Generation as a Probe of Unconstrained Spin Magnetization Precession in the Shallow Barrier Limit.

    PubMed

    Capua, Amir; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-01-29

    We study the parametric excitation of high orders of magnetization precession in ultrathin films having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We observe that for a given driving field amplitude the harmonic generation can be increased by lowering the barrier with the application of an in-plane magnetic field in the manner of the Smit-Beljers effect. In this effect, the magnetic stiffness is reduced not by lowering the magnitude of the magnetic field upon which the spins precess, but rather by effectively releasing the field's "anchoring" point. This results in a shallow energy barrier where the electrons' spin is locally unconstrained. While the observation is unveiled in the form of nonlinear high harmonic generation, we believe that the physics whereby the barrier is suppressed by an external magnetic field may apply to other phenomena associated with ultrathin films. In these cases, such unconstrained motion may serve as a sensitive probe of the torques associated with proximate spin currents. Moreover, our approach may be used as a model system for the study of phase transitions in the field of nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26871356

  12. Probing the spin of the central black hole in the Galactic Centre with secondary images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jonas Helboe; Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores the possibility of determining the spin of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in Sgr A* by using secondary images of stars orbiting the SMBH. The photons propagate close to the SMBH and their trajectories probe the space-time in a region where the spin of the SMBH is important. We find the appearance of spikes in the secondary image, which depends on the angular momentum and spin axis of the SMBH and study the specific case of the star S2 in detail. The spikes have a magnitude of ˜29 in the K band and the required angular resolution is of the order of 15-20 μas. The combination of these two requirements poses an extreme observational challenge, but might be possible with interferometric observations in the sub-mm regime. The next possible time frame for observing this effect on the star S2 is in the late 2017 and then it repeats with the period of the star.

  13. Probing interactions between plant virus movement proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tzfira, Tzvi; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    Most plant viruses move between plant cells with the help of their movement proteins (MPs). MPs are multifunctional proteins, and one of their functions is almost invariably binding to nucleic acids. Presumably, the MP-nucleic acid interaction is directly involved in formation of nucleoprotein complexes that function as intermediates in the cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses. Thus, when studying a viral MP, it is important to determine whether or not it binds nucleic acids, and to characterize the hallmark parameters of such binding, i.e., preference for single- or double-stranded nucleic acids and binding cooperativity and sequence specificity. Here, we present two major experimental approaches, native gel mobility shift assay and ultra violet (UV) light cross-linking, for detection and characterization of MP binding to DNA and RNA molecules. We also describe protocols for purification of recombinant viral MPs over-expressed in bacteria and production of different DNA and RNA probes for these binding assays. PMID:18370264

  14. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-05-01

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 f T/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. We anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.

  15. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  16. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-03-22

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 fTmore » $$/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$$ for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. As a result, we anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.« less

  17. The interaction of fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase with liposome membranes: a spin probe technique study.

    PubMed

    Komorowska, M; Langner, M; Gomułkiewicz, J

    1989-12-01

    Thermotropic properties of liposome membranes prepared of bulk bovine erythrocyte membrane lipids, native, or aldolase-modified, were investigated by the ESR method. Breaks were observed in the log 2T parallel vs 1/T plots for two spin labels: tempopalmitate and 5-doxyl-palmitate methyl ester. These phenomena have been interpreted as reflecting structural changes near the lipid bilayer polar heads region. Upon modification with aldolase, the temperature at which the breaks occurred was decreased for both spin probes. PMID:2558946

  18. Toward single atom qubits on a surface: Pump-probe spectroscopy and electrically-driven spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William

    We will discuss the characterization of spin dynamics by pump-probe spectroscopy and the use of gigahertz-frequency electric fields to drive spin resonance of a Fe atom on a MgO/Ag(001) surface. In the spirit of this session, the technical challenges in applying a precise voltage to the tip sample junction across a wide radio-frequency bandwidth will be described. The energy relaxation time, T1, of single spins on surfaces can be measured by spin-polarized pump-probe STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). To date, the relaxation times reported for Fe-Cu dimers on Cu2N insulating films have been of the order ~100 ns. A three-order-of-magnitude enhancement of lifetime, to ~200 μs, was recently demonstrated for Co on a single-monolayer of MgO. Here, we report on the tailoring of the T1 lifetime of single Fe atoms on single- and multi- layer MgO films grown on Ag(001). Next, we demonstrate electron spin resonance of an individual single Fe atom, driven by a gigahertz-frequency electric field applied across the tip-sample junction, and detected by a spin-polarized tunneling current. The principle parameters of the spin resonance experiment, namely the phase coherence time T2 and the Rabi rate, are characterized for Fe atoms adsorbed to the monolayer MgO film.

  19. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  20. Intrinsic spin and momentum relaxation in organic single-crystalline semiconductors probed by ESR and Hall measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumi, Junto; Häusermann, Roger; Watanabe, Shun; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    Spin and charge momentum relaxation mechanism has been argued among organic semiconductors with various methods, devices, and materials. However, little is known in organic single-crystalline semiconductors because it has been hard to obtain an ideal organic crystal with an excellent crystallinity and controllability required for accurate measurements. By using more than 1-inch sized single crystals which are fabricated via contentious edge-casting method developed by our group, we have successfully demonstrated a simultaneous determination of spin and momentum relaxation time for gate-induced charges of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3- d:2',3'- d']benzo[1,2- b:4,5- b']dithiophene, by combining electron spin resonance (ESR) and Hall effect measurements. The obtained temperature dependences of spin and momentum relaxation times are in good agreement in terms of power law with a factor of approximately -2. It is concluded that Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism can be dominant at room temperature regime (200 - 300 K). Probing characteristic time scales such as spin-lattice, spin-spin, and momentum relaxation times, demonstrated in the present work, would be a powerful tool to elucidate fundamental spin and charge transport mechanisms. We acknowledge the New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization (NEDO) for financial support.

  1. Activity-Based Probe for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elisa; Ponzano, Stefano; Armirotti, Andrea; Summa, Maria; Bertozzi, Fabio; Garau, Gianpiero; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-09-18

    N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a lysosomal cysteine hydrolase involved in the degradation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), a family of endogenous lipid signaling molecules that includes oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Among the reported NAAA inhibitors, α-amino-β-lactone (3-aminooxetan-2-one) derivatives have been shown to prevent FAE hydrolysis in innate-immune and neural cells and to reduce reactions to inflammatory stimuli. Recently, we disclosed two potent and selective NAAA inhibitors, the compounds ARN077 (5-phenylpentyl-N-[(2S,3R)-2-methyl-4-oxo-oxetan-3-yl]carbamate) and ARN726 (4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]carbamate). The former is active in vivo by topical administration in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia, while the latter exerts systemic anti-inflammatory effects in mouse models of lung inflammation. In the present study, we designed and validated a derivative of ARN726 as the first activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe for the in vivo detection of NAAA. The newly synthesized molecule 1 is an effective in vitro and in vivo click-chemistry activity based probe (ABP), which is able to capture the catalytically active form of NAAA in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing human NAAA as well as in rat lung tissue. Competitive ABPP with 1 confirmed that ARN726 and ARN077 inhibit NAAA in vitro and in vivo. Compound 1 is a useful new tool to identify activated NAAA both in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the physiological and pathological roles of this enzyme. PMID:26102511

  2. Electron spin resonance probed competing states in NiMnInSi Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Lin, J. G.; Titov, I. S.; Granovsky, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Shape memory Heusler alloy Ni50Mn35In12Si3 is investigated with electron spin resonance (ESR) technique in a temperature range of 200-300 K. ESR is a dynamic probe allowing us to separate the responses from various magnetic phases, thus to study the complex phase transitions. The sample shows three transition temperatures: TcA (271 K), TM (247 K) and TcM (212 K), where TcA is the Curie temperature of austenitic phase, TM and TcM are the temperatures of magnetostructural martensitic transition and the Curie temperature of martensitic phase, respectively. Furthermore, ESR data reveals the coexistence of two magnetic modes in whole temperature range of 200-300 K. Particularly in martensitic phase, two magnetic modes are attributed to two different kinds of lattice deformation, the slip and twinning deformations.

  3. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanuelidu, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for high resolution magnetic imaging based on its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities afforded by long spin coherence times. Although the NV center has been successfully implemented as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at room temperature, it has remained an outstanding challenge to extend this capability to cryogenic temperatures, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. In this talk, we present NV magnetic imaging at T = 6 K, first benchmarking the technique with a magnetic hard disk sample, then utilizing the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with Tc = 30 K. In addition, we discuss other candidate solid-state systems that can benefit from the high spatial resolution and field sensitivity of the scanning NV magnetometer.

  4. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkowitz, S.; Safira, A.; High, A. A.; Devlin, R. C.; Choi, S.; Unterreithmeier, Q. P.; Patterson, D.; Zibrov, A. S.; Manucharyan, V. E.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm’s law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems.

  5. 57 Fe Mössbauer probe of spin crossover thin films on a bio-membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Anil D.; Garcia, Yann

    2012-03-01

    An illustrious complex [Fe(ptz)6](BF4)2 (ptz = 1-propyl-tetrazole) ( 1) which was produced in the form of submicron crystals and thin film on Allium cepa membrane was probed by 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy in order to follow its intrinsic spin crossover. In addition to a weak signal that corresponds to neat SCO compound significant amount of other iron compounds are found that could have morphed from 1 due to specific host-guest interaction on the lipid-bilayer of bio-membrane. Further complimentary information about biogenic role of membrane, was obtained from variable temperature Mossbauer spectroscopy on a ~5% enriched [57Fe(H2O)6](BF4)2 salt on this membrane.

  6. GDR as a Probe of the Collective Motion in Nuclei at High Spins, Temperatures or Isospins

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Adam

    2008-11-11

    The gamma-decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR), the high-frequency collective vibration of protons against neutrons, has been proven to be a basic probe for the shapes of hot nuclei, especially to study the effective shape evolution caused by the collective rotation of a nucleus. In this context an interesting question arises: what is the nuclear shape at extreme values of spin or temperatures, close to the limit impose by another collective motion--fission, and how evolves the giant dipole collective vibrations as a function of isospin. Short overview of the results from the experiments aimed to answer these questions are presented and possible perspectives of these type of studies for exotic nuclei to be obtained with the novel gamma-calorimeter PARIS and soon available intense radioactive beams are discussed.

  7. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  8. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  9. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  10. Spin Transport in Insulators Mediated by Magnetic Correlations Probed by Y3Fe5O12-based Spin Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunhui; Wang, Hailong; Hammel, P. Chris; Yang, Fengyuan

    2015-03-01

    Spin currents carried by mobile charges in ferromagnetic (FM) and nonmagnetic (NM) materials have been the central focus of spintronics, while spin transport in insulators is largely unexplored. FMR spin pumping has awakened intense interest in magnon-mediated spin currents in both conducting and insulating FMs and in antiferromagnets (AF). Building on the large spin pumping signals enabled by our Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films, we report a systematic study of spin transport in six series of Pt/insulator/YIG trilayers where the insulators include one diamagnet, one paramagnet and four AFs. We observe remarkably robust spin transport in the AFs and a distinct linear relationship between the spin decay length in the insulator and the damping enhancement in the YIG, suggesting the critical role of magnetic correlations in AF insulators for spin transport. Strikingly, the insertion of a thin NiO layer between YIG and Pt significantly enhances the spin currents driven into Pt, suggesting exceptionally high spin transfer efficiency in YIG/NiO/Pt structures.

  11. Probing Spin and Spin-Orbit Coupling effects in Narrow-gap Semiconductor Nano-structures by THz Magneto-photoresponse Spectroscopy and Magneto-transport Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi

    Using the spin degree of freedom in a emergent field Known as Spintronics has motivated scientist in different disciplines including physicist within last 10 years. Due to different interaction mechanisms which affects the physical behavior of spin (eg its state and transport properties) within solid medium (Semiconductors in our case), one needs to distinguish these mechanisms and their importance for making any practical spin based devices. For example the idea of making spin based transistors with electrons being transported within InGaAs and their spin state is being controlled by Rashba type field has been around for around 25 years but injection of spin polarized currents from a source into the channel has not been solved yet. Spin orbit coupling (SOC) is one of the mechanisms which changes the spin state of electrons and avoid the existence of pure spin state as a favorable one from device point of view. SOC could have a different origin depending on material type or structure of device. One method of measuring and quantifying this mechanisms within semiconductor nanostructures is through measuring the parameters known as Lande g-factor. This parameters turns out to be a promising one to probe different effects on electronic band structure including quantum confinement, strain, electric filed, etc. We probe a combination of these effects (SOC, Strain, band mixing, etc) by measuring different g-factor tensor components of narrow gap Zinc blend semiconductor nanostructures which we hope finally serve to the purpose of making reliable spin based devices* (Spintronics). To reach this goal we have developed and implemented THz magneto-Photoresponse spectroscopy in conjunction with magneto-transport measurements at cryogenic temperatures. The samples include InAs and HgTe based Quantum wells as well as InAs based quantum point contact. Our findings clarify the situation where the combination of SOC, Strain, quantum confinements as well as many body electron effect

  12. Spin current and inverse spin Hall effect in ferromagnetic metals probed by Y3Fe5O12-based spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Du, Chunhui; Chris Hammel, P.; Yang, Fengyuan

    2014-05-01

    Using ferromagnetic (FM) resonance spin pumping, we observe injection of spin currents from Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films to FM metals, including Ni81Fe19 (Py), Fe, Co, and Ni, and detection of spin currents by inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in the FM metals. We obtain a high effective spin mixing conductance of 6.3 × 1018 m-2 in a YIG/Cu/Py trilayer and a spin Hall angle of 0.020 for Py. The spin pumping signals in Fe, Co, and Ni confirm the mechanism of ISHE in FMs is the inverse process of the anomalous Hall effect.

  13. A diamond-based scanning probe spin sensor operating at low temperature in ultra-high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer-Nolte, E.; Reinhard, F.; Ternes, M.; Wrachtrup, J.; Kern, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) low temperature scanning probe microscope employing the nitrogen-vacancy color center in diamond as an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. Using this center as an atomic-size scanning probe has enabled imaging of nanoscale magnetic fields and single spins under ambient conditions. In this article we describe an experimental setup to operate this sensor in a cryogenic UHV environment. This will extend the applicability to a variety of molecular systems due to the enhanced target spin lifetimes at low temperature and the controlled sample preparation under UHV conditions. The instrument combines a tuning-fork based atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high numeric aperture confocal microscope and the facilities for application of radio-frequency (RF) fields for spin manipulation. We verify a sample temperature of <50 K even for strong laser and RF excitation and demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging with a magnetic AFM tip.

  14. A diamond-based scanning probe spin sensor operating at low temperature in ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer-Nolte, E.; Wrachtrup, J.; 3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart ; Reinhard, F.; Ternes, M.; Kern, K.; Institut de Physique de la Matière Condenseé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne

    2014-01-15

    We present the design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) low temperature scanning probe microscope employing the nitrogen-vacancy color center in diamond as an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. Using this center as an atomic-size scanning probe has enabled imaging of nanoscale magnetic fields and single spins under ambient conditions. In this article we describe an experimental setup to operate this sensor in a cryogenic UHV environment. This will extend the applicability to a variety of molecular systems due to the enhanced target spin lifetimes at low temperature and the controlled sample preparation under UHV conditions. The instrument combines a tuning-fork based atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high numeric aperture confocal microscope and the facilities for application of radio-frequency (RF) fields for spin manipulation. We verify a sample temperature of <50 K even for strong laser and RF excitation and demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging with a magnetic AFM tip.

  15. Spin polarization enhanced by spin-triplet pairing in Sr2RuO4 probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, K.; Manago, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Fukazawa, H.; Mao, Z. Q.; Maeno, Y.; Miyake, K.

    2015-09-01

    We report a phenomenon intimately related to the spin-triplet superconductivity. It is well known that the spin susceptibility decreases below the superconducting transition temperature in almost all superconductors because of spin-singlet pair formation, while it may remain unchanged in a handful of spin-triplet exceptions. Here we report the observation in Sr2RuO4 with nuclear magnetic resonance that the spin susceptibility originating from the Ru-4 d electron slightly i n c r e a s e s by ˜2 % of the total and becomes inhomogeneous in the superconducting state. These are reasonably explained if the electron pairs form the equal-spin pairing in the mixed state. A similar phenomenon was predicted for superfluid 3He40 years ago, but had never been demonstrated in any superconductor.

  16. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

    1998-08-18

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

  17. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Przetakiewicz, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  18. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  19. Simple and highly sensitive measurement method for detection of glass transition temperatures of polymers: application of ESR power saturation phenomenon with conventional spin-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Yohei; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro

    2012-08-01

    A combination of the microwave power saturation (MPS) method of electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin probing is proposed as a simple and practical technique for detecting the glass transition temperatures, T(g), of polymers with high sensitivity. Effects of the spin-probe size and concentration on the T(g) value of polystyrene (PS) determined by MPS, T(g,ESR), were first evaluated. Spin-probed PS with four types of nitroxides, namely, di-tert-butyl nitroxide (DBN), 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO), 4-benzoyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (BZONO), and 4',4'-dimethyl-spiro(5α-cholestane-3,2'-oxazolidin)-3'-yloxy free radical (CHOL), having molecular weights of 144, 156, 276, and 473, respectively, and spin-labeled PS with TEMPO were prepared. The T(g,ESR) values for the spin-probed PS with DBN, TEMPO, BZONO, and CHOL and spin-labeled PS were determined to 360, 363, 374, 374, and 375 K, respectively, within experimental uncertainties of 2 K, whereas the glass transition temperature determined by DSC, T(g,DSC), was 375 K for all samples. A significant decrease in T(g,ESR) for small spin probes was shown to be due to decoupling between the mobilities of small spin probes and PS segments. Concerning the concentration, a decrease in the saturation factor, S, induced by shortening of the spin-spin relaxation time was observed for the spin-probed PS with CHOL when the concentration of CHOL was more than 1.0 wt %. Furthermore, T(g,ESR) decreased slightly with increasing weight fraction of CHOL because of the "plasticizer effect" of CHOL. However, the T(g,ESR) and T(g,DSC) values corresponded for each concentration. Thus, large spin probes, such as CHOL and BZONO, are appropriate for the determination of T(g,ESR) values; the concentration of the spin probes does not affect the T(g,ESR) value unless the overall T(g) value is reduced by blending of excess spin probes. Finally, measurements of T(g,ESR) in PS/silica composites containing more than 95 wt

  20. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  1. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B(1S)) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B(1S) field is 13μT/W(1/2), where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5W the corresponding value is γ(S)B(1S)=0.84MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ϵ) vs. ω(1S)/(2π) for a sample of (13)C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. PMID:21382733

  2. Microwave Field Distribution in a Magic Angle Spinning Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B1S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B1S field is 13µT/W1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γ SB1S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ε) vs. ω1S/(2π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. PMID:21382733

  3. YTTRIUM-89 NMR: A POSSIBLE SPIN RELAXATION PROBE FOR STUDYING METAL ION INTERACTIONS WITH ORGANIC LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms for aqueous and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions of Y(NO3)3 have been found to be mainly spin-rotation and dipolar relaxation with solvent protons, unlike most heavy spin=1/2 metal ions which are relaxed mainly by spin-rotation and chemical shif...

  4. Probing the quantum ground state of a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate with cavity transmission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. M.; Cui, S.; Jing, H.; Zhou, D. L.; Liu, W. M.

    2009-10-15

    We propose to probe the quantum ground state of a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate with the transmission spectra of an optical cavity. By choosing a circularly polarized cavity mode with an appropriate frequency, we can realize coupling between the cavity mode and the magnetization of the condensate. The cavity transmission spectra then contain information of the magnetization statistics of the condensate and thus can be used to distinguish the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic quantum ground states. This technique may also be useful for continuous observation of the spin dynamics of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate.

  5. Spin current and inverse spin Hall effect in ferromagnetic metals probed by Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}-based spin pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Du, Chunhui; Chris Hammel, P. Yang, Fengyuan

    2014-05-19

    Using ferromagnetic (FM) resonance spin pumping, we observe injection of spin currents from Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) films to FM metals, including Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} (Py), Fe, Co, and Ni, and detection of spin currents by inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in the FM metals. We obtain a high effective spin mixing conductance of 6.3 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −2} in a YIG/Cu/Py trilayer and a spin Hall angle of 0.020 for Py. The spin pumping signals in Fe, Co, and Ni confirm the mechanism of ISHE in FMs is the inverse process of the anomalous Hall effect.

  6. Ground state and low-energy magnetic dynamics in the frustrated magnet CoAl2O4 as revealed by local spin probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovleva, M.; Vavilova, E.; Grafe, H.-J.; Zimmermann, S.; Alfonsov, A.; Luetkens, H.; Klauss, H.-H.; Maljuk, A.; Wurmehl, S.; Büchner, B.; Kataev, V.

    2015-04-01

    We report a combined experimental study of magnetic properties of a single crystal of the frustrated diamond lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4 with Co2+ electron spin resonance, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance, and muon spin rotation/relaxation techniques. With our local probes, we show that the frustration of spin interactions and the Co/Al site disorder strongly affect the spin dynamics. The experimental results evidence inhomogeneous and slow magnetic fluctuations and the occurrence of short-range electron spin correlations far above a characteristic temperature T*=8 K at which the spin system turns into in a quasistatic state. Our data indicate that this spin order is likely short range and unconventional with spin fluctuations persistent even at T ≪T* . The results of three spectroscopy techniques highlight a nontrivial role of structural disorder for the magnetism of a frustrated diamond spin lattice at the proximity to the critical point.

  7. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Junager, Nina P L; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  8. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  9. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  10. Spin and Time-Reversal Symmetries of Superconducting Electron Pairs Probed by the Muon Spin Rotation and Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Aoki, Yuji; MacLaughlin, Douglas E.

    2016-09-01

    Unconventional superconductivity based on the strong correlation of electrons is one of the central issues of solid-state physics. Although many experimental techniques are appropriate for investigating unconventional superconductivity, a complete perspective has not been established yet. The symmetries of electron pairs are crucial properties for understanding the essential state of unconventional superconductivity. In this review, we discuss the investigation of the time-reversal and spin symmetries of superconducting electron pairs using the muon spin rotation and relaxation technique. By detecting a spontaneous magnetic field under zero field and/or the temperature dependence of the muon Knight shift in the superconducting phase, the time-reversal symmetry and spin parity of electron pairs have been determined for several unconventional superconductors.

  11. Fluorescence probe for the convenient and sensitive detection of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yuta; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an important antioxidant that plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of numerous bioactive substances. The detection of ascorbic acid has traditionally been achieved using high-performance liquid chromatography and absorption spectrophotometry assays. However, the development of fluorescence probes for this purpose is highly desired because they provide a much more convenient and highly sensitive technique for the detection of this material. OFF-ON-type fluorescent probes have been developed for the detection of non-fluorescent compounds. Photo-induced electron transfer and fluorescence resonance energy transfer are the two main fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the detection of ascorbic acid, and several fluorescence probes have been reported based on redox-responsive metals and quantum dots. Profluorescent nitroxide compounds have also been developed as non-metal organic fluorescence probes for ascorbic acid. These nitroxide systems have a stable unpaired electron and can therefore react with ascorbic acid and a strong fluorescence quencher. Furthermore, recent synthetic advances have allowed for the synthesis of α-substituted nitroxides with varying levels of reactivity towards ascorbic acid. In this review, we have discussed the design strategies used for the preparation of fluorescent probes for ascorbic acid, with particular emphasis on profluorescent nitroxides, which are unique radical-based redox-active fluorescent probes. PMID:26798193

  12. Specific spin-labeling of transfer ribonucleic acid molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Caron, M; Dugas, H

    1976-01-01

    The spin labels anhydride (ASL), bromoacetamide (BSL) and carbodiimide (CSL) were used to label selectively tRNAGlu, tRNA fMet and tRNAPhe from E. coli. The preparation and characterization of the sites of labeling of eight new spin-labeled tRNAs are described. The sites of labeling are: s2U using ASL, BSL and CLS and tRNAGlu; s4U using ASL and BSL on tRNAfMet and tRNAPhe; U-37 with CSL on tRNfMet; U-33 with CSL on tRNAPhe. The rare base X at position 47 of tRNAPhe has been acylated with a spin-labeled N-hydroxysuccinimide (HSL). The 3'end of unfractionated tRNA molecules has been chemically modified to a morpholino spin-labeled analogue (MSL). Their respective e.s.r. spectra are reported and discussed. PMID:175353

  13. Flexibilities of isoindoline-derived spin labels for nucleic acids by orientation selective PELDOR.

    PubMed

    Erlenbach, N; Endeward, B; Schöps, P; Gophane, D B; Sigurdsson, S Th; Prisner, T F

    2016-06-28

    Pulsed electron electron double resonance experiments with rigid spin labels can reveal very detailed information about the structure and conformational flexibility of nucleic acid molecules. On the other hand, the analysis of such data is more involved the distance and orientation information encoded in the time domain data need to be extracted and separated. In this respect studies with different spin labels with variable internal mobility are interesting and can help to unambiguously interpret the EPR data. Here orientation selective multi-frequency/multi-field 4-pulse PELDOR/DEER experiments with three recently presented semi-rigid or conformationally unambiguous isoindoline-derived spin labels were performed and simulated quantitatively by taking the spin label dynamics into account. PELDOR measurements were performed for a 20-mer dsDNA with two spin labels attached to two defined uridine derivatives. Measurements were recorded for different spin label positions within the double helical strand and for different magnetic field strengths. The experimental data sets were compared with simulations, taking into account the previously described dsDNA dynamics and the internal motions of the spin label itself, which had shown distinct differences between the three spin labels used. The (ExIm)U spin label shows a free rotation around a single bond, which averages out orientation effects, without influencing the distance distribution as it can occur in other spin labels. The (Im)U and (Ox)U spin label, on the other hand, show distinct orientation behaviour with minimal intrinsic motion. We could quantitatively determine this internal motion and demonstrate that the conformational dynamics of the nucleic acid and the spin label can be well separated by this approach. PMID:27251584

  14. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  15. Development of a magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe with a cryogenic detection system for sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takashi; Hioka, Katsuya; Fujioka, Koji; Takegoshi, K.

    2008-04-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe for high-resolution solid-state NMR has been developed. In this probe, temperature of the detection coil is kept at cryogenic temperature (˜12K) for sensitivity enhancement, which is achieved not only by suppression of thermal noise but also by increment of a Q factor of the coil. A marked feature of this probe is that a sample rotating at magic angle is thermally isolated from the cryogenic system in order to realize high-resolution solid-state NMR measurement at various sample temperatures. We call this system as cryocoil magic-angle spinning (cryocoil MAS). H1 MAS NMR with the coil temperature of ˜20K was successfully observed for solid adamantane rotating at room temperature, and signal-to-noise increment due to this cryocoil approach was confirmed.

  16. Probing the Spin Transfer Efficiency at Topological Insulator/Ferromagnetic Insulator Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Kally, James; Lee, Joon Sue; Richardella, Anthony; Kempinger, Susan; Pan, Yu; Kamp, Eric; Samarth, Nitin; Liu, Tao; Chang, Houcheng; Wu, Mingzhong; Reifsnyder-Hickey, Danielle; Mkhoyan, Andre

    The development of next-generation spintronics devices has driven extensive studies of spin-charge conversion through measurement of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) driven spin pumping of pure spin currents in ferromagnet/non-magnet bilayers. Topological insulators (TIs) such as the Bi-chalcogenides are naturally relevant in this context because the inherent spin-momentum ``locking'' in their surface states promises very efficient spin-charge conversion, although the first experimental studies have involved ferromagnetic metals that provide a shunting current path [e.g. Nature, 511,449 (2014)]. To circumvent the current shunting problem, we are growing and characterizing bilayers of TIs and the ferrimagnetic insulator Y3Fe5O12 (YIG). Here, we report measurements of FMR-driven spin pumping in TI/YIG bilayers, showing robust spin pumping signals at room temperature. Analysis of the ISHE voltages and FMR linewidth broadening show that, as in other studies of spin pumping into TIs [Nano Lett., 15 (10) (2015)], the interface condition presents a critical challenge for enhancing the spin conversion efficiency in these devices. Funded by C-SPIN/SRC/DARPA and ONR.

  17. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  18. An unnatural amino acid based fluorescent probe for phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenlin; Zhu, Weiping; Xu, Yufang; Qian, Xuhong

    2014-08-21

    A fluorescent probe (2a-LP) based on an unnatural amino acid (UAA) is developed for the detection of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL). In the presence of PAL, 2a-LP is catalytically deaminated to ortho-amino-transcinnamic acid (o-a-CA), which shows a remarkable “off–on” fluorescence signal. Thus, the probe 2a-LP enables direct visualization of the PAL activity in tomato under UV illumination and has potential in vitro assays. PMID:24971756

  19. SPINNING DUST EMISSION: EFFECTS OF IRREGULAR GRAIN SHAPE, TRANSIENT HEATING, AND COMPARISON WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.; Draine, B. T.

    2011-11-10

    Planck is expected to answer crucial questions on the early universe, but it also provides further understanding on anomalous microwave emission. Electric dipole emission from spinning dust grains continues to be the favored interpretation of anomalous microwave emission. In this paper, we present a method to calculate the rotational emission from small grains of irregular shape with moments of inertia I{sub 1} {>=} I{sub 2} {>=} I{sub 3}. We show that a torque-free rotating irregular grain with a given angular momentum radiates at multiple frequency modes. The resulting spinning dust spectrum has peak frequency and emissivity increasing with the degree of grain shape irregularity, which is defined by I{sub 1}:I{sub 2}:I{sub 3}. We discuss how the orientation of the dipole moment {mu} in body coordinates affects the spinning dust spectrum for different regimes of internal thermal fluctuations. We show that the spinning dust emissivity for the case of strong thermal fluctuations is less sensitive to the orientation of {mu} than in the case of weak thermal fluctuations. We calculate spinning dust spectra for a range of gas density and dipole moment. The effect of compressible turbulence on spinning dust emission is investigated. We show that the emission in a turbulent medium increases by a factor from 1.2 to 1.4 relative to that in a uniform medium, as the sonic Mach number M{sub s} increases from 2 to 7. Finally, spinning dust parameters are constrained by fitting our improved model to five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cross-correlation foreground spectra, for both the H{alpha}-correlated and 100-{mu}m-correlated emission spectra.

  20. Electron spin density on the axial His ligand of high-spin and low-spin Nitrophorin 2 probed by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Zaballa, María-Eugenia; Berry, Robert E.; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F. Ann; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of heme proteins is exquisitely tuned by the interaction of the iron center with the axial ligands. NMR studies of paramagnetic heme systems have been focused on the heme signals, but signals from the axial ligands have been rather difficult to detect and assign. We report an extensive assignment of the 1H, 13C and 15N resonances of the axial His ligand in the NO-carrying protein nitrophorin 2 (NP2) in the paramagnetic high-spin and low-spin forms, as well as in the diamagnetic NO complex. We find that the high-spin protein has σ spin delocalization to all atoms in the axial His57, which decreases in size as the number of bonds between Fe(III) and the atom in question increase, except that within the His57 imidazole ring the contact shifts are a balance between positive σ and negative π contributions. In contrast, the low-spin protein has π spin delocalization to all atoms of the imidazole ring. Our strategy, adequately combined with a selective residue labeling scheme, represents a straightforward characterization of the electron spin density in heme axial ligands. PMID:23327568

  1. Coherent ultrafast spin-dynamics probed in three dimensional topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Mansurova, M; Mussler, G; Kampmeier, J; Grützmacher, D; Braun, L; Katmis, F; Moodera, J S; Dallera, C; Carpene, E; Franz, C; Czerner, M; Heiliger, C; Kampfrath, T; Münzenberg, M

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators are candidates to open up a novel route in spin based electronics. Different to traditional ferromagnetic materials, where the carrier spin-polarization and magnetization are based on the exchange interaction, the spin properties in topological insulators are based on the coupling of spin- and orbit interaction connected to its momentum. Specific ways to control the spin-polarization with light have been demonstrated: the energy momentum landscape of the Dirac cone provides spin-momentum locking of the charge current and its spin. We investigate a spin-related signal present only during the laser excitation studying real and imaginary part of the complex Kerr angle by disentangling spin and lattice contributions. This coherent signal is only present at the time of the pump-pulses' light field and can be described in terms of a Raman coherence time. The Raman transition involves states at the bottom edge of the conduction band. We demonstrate a coherent femtosecond control of spin-polarization for electronic states at around the Dirac cone. PMID:26510509

  2. Coherent ultrafast spin-dynamics probed in three dimensional topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Boschini, F.; Mansurova, M.; Mussler, G.; Kampmeier, J.; Grützmacher, D.; Braun, L.; Katmis, F.; Moodera, J. S.; Dallera, C.; Carpene, E.; Franz, C.; Czerner, M.; Heiliger, C.; Kampfrath, T.; Münzenberg, M.

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators are candidates to open up a novel route in spin based electronics. Different to traditional ferromagnetic materials, where the carrier spin-polarization and magnetization are based on the exchange interaction, the spin properties in topological insulators are based on the coupling of spin- and orbit interaction connected to its momentum. Specific ways to control the spin-polarization with light have been demonstrated: the energy momentum landscape of the Dirac cone provides spin-momentum locking of the charge current and its spin. We investigate a spin-related signal present only during the laser excitation studying real and imaginary part of the complex Kerr angle by disentangling spin and lattice contributions. This coherent signal is only present at the time of the pump-pulses’ light field and can be described in terms of a Raman coherence time. The Raman transition involves states at the bottom edge of the conduction band. We demonstrate a coherent femtosecond control of spin-polarization for electronic states at around the Dirac cone. PMID:26510509

  3. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms. PMID:26969040

  4. Cationic spin probe reporting on thermal denaturation and complexation-decomplexation of BSA with SDS. Potential applications in protein purification processes.

    PubMed

    Matei, Iulia; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Neacsu, Maria Victoria; Collauto, Alberto; Salifoglou, Athanasios; Ionita, Gabriela

    2014-09-25

    In this work, we present evidence on the suitability of spin probes to report on the thermal treatment of bovine serum albumin (BSA), in the temperature range 293-343 K, and indirectly monitor the release of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) from its complex with BSA using a covalent gel with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in the network. The spin probes used, 5- and 7-doxyl-stearic acids (5-DSA, 7-DSA) or 4-(N,N'-dimethyl-N-hexadecyl)ammonium-2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl iodide (CAT16), present similar, fatty acid-like structural features. Their continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) spectra, however, reflect different dynamics when complexed with BSA: a restricted motion for 5-DSA, almost nonsensitive to the heating/cooling cycle, and a faster temperature-dependent dynamic motion for CAT16. Molecular docking allows us to rationalize these results by revealing the different binding modes of 5-DSA and CAT16. The EPR data on the temperature effect on BSA are supported by circular dichroism results projecting recovery, upon cooling, of the initial binding ability of BSA for samples heated to 323 K. The interactions occurring in BSA/SDS/β-CD systems are investigated by CW-EPR and FT-ESEEM spectroscopies. It is found that the covalent gel containing β-CD can efficiently remove SDS from the BSA/SDS complex. The gel is not permeable to BSA but it can encapsulate SDS, thus yielding the free protein in solution and allowing recovery of the native protein conformation. Collectively, the accrued knowledge supports potential applications in protein purification biotechnological processes. PMID:25185116

  5. Absence of a spin-signature from a single Ho adatom as probed by spin-sensitive tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecher, M.; Sonntag, A.; Dias, M. Dos Santos; Bouhassoune, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.; Khajetoorians, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Whether rare-earth materials can be used as single-atom magnetic memory is an ongoing debate in recent literature. Here we show, by inelastic and spin-resolved scanning tunnelling-based methods, that we observe a strong magnetic signal and excitation from Fe atoms adsorbed on Pt(111), but see no signatures of magnetic excitation or spin-based telegraph noise for Ho atoms. Moreover, we observe that the indirect exchange field produced by a single Ho atom is negligible, as sensed by nearby Fe atoms. We demonstrate, using ab initio methods, that this stems from a comparatively weak coupling of the Ho 4f electrons with both tunnelling electrons and substrate-derived itinerant electrons, making both magnetic coupling and detection very difficult when compared to 3d elements. We discuss these results in the context of ongoing disputes and clarify important controversies.

  6. Absence of a spin-signature from a single Ho adatom as probed by spin-sensitive tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrecher, M.; Sonntag, A.; Dias, M. dos Santos; Bouhassoune, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.; Khajetoorians, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Whether rare-earth materials can be used as single-atom magnetic memory is an ongoing debate in recent literature. Here we show, by inelastic and spin-resolved scanning tunnelling-based methods, that we observe a strong magnetic signal and excitation from Fe atoms adsorbed on Pt(111), but see no signatures of magnetic excitation or spin-based telegraph noise for Ho atoms. Moreover, we observe that the indirect exchange field produced by a single Ho atom is negligible, as sensed by nearby Fe atoms. We demonstrate, using ab initio methods, that this stems from a comparatively weak coupling of the Ho 4f electrons with both tunnelling electrons and substrate-derived itinerant electrons, making both magnetic coupling and detection very difficult when compared to 3d elements. We discuss these results in the context of ongoing disputes and clarify important controversies. PMID:26838811

  7. Phthalic acid chemical probes synthesized for protein-protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Wei-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chou, Chi-Hsien; Wu, Chin-Jen; Wang, Hui-Min

    2013-01-01

    Plasticizers are additives that are used to increase the flexibility of plastic during manufacturing. However, in injection molding processes, plasticizers cannot be generated with monomers because they can peel off from the plastics into the surrounding environment, water, or food, or become attached to skin. Among the various plasticizers that are used, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (phthalic acid) is a typical precursor to generate phthalates. In addition, phthalic acid is a metabolite of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). According to Gene_Ontology gene/protein database, phthalates can cause genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, etc. In this study, a silanized linker (3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane, APTES) was deposited on silicon dioxides (SiO2) particles and phthalate chemical probes were manufactured from phthalic acid and APTES-SiO2. These probes could be used for detecting proteins that targeted phthalic acid and for protein-protein interactions. The phthalic acid chemical probes we produced were incubated with epithelioid cell lysates of normal rat kidney (NRK-52E cells) to detect the interactions between phthalic acid and NRK-52E extracted proteins. These chemical probes interacted with a number of chaperones such as protein disulfide-isomerase A6, heat shock proteins, and Serpin H1. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software showed that these chemical probes were a practical technique for protein-protein interaction analysis. PMID:23797655

  8. Spin excitations in ferromagnetic Ni: Electrons and neutrons as a probe

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jisang; Mills, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the contribution to the spin polarized electron energy loss spectrum of ferromagnetic Ni. We find, save for the wave-vector transfer near the center of the Brillouin zone, the spin-wave loss feature is obscured by low-lying Stoner excitations, in contrast to Fe. Our calculations, and earlier work, show that in inelastic neutron-scattering studies of spin waves in Ni, the spin-wave loss peak dominates. The physical reason for this difference is discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite fibrous membranes prepared by solution blow spinning.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliano E; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Medeiros, Eliton S

    2012-03-01

    Nanocomposite fibers based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were prepared by solution blow spinning (SBS). Fiber morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). Electrical, thermal, surface and crystalline properties of the spun fibers were evaluated, respectively, by conductivity measurements (4-point probe), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), contact angle and X-ray diffraction (XRD). OM analysis of the spun mats showed a poor dispersion of MWCNT in the matrix, however dispersion in solution was increased during spinning where droplets of PLA in solution loaded with MWCNT were pulled by the pressure drop at the nozzle, producing PLA fibers filled with MWCNT. Good electrical conductivity and hydrophobicity can be achieved at low carbon nanotube contents. When only 1 wt% MWCNT was added to low-crystalline PLA, surface conductivity of the composites increased from 5 x 10(-8) to 0.46 S/cm. Addition of MWCNT can slightly influence the degree of crystallinity of PLA fibers as studied by XRD and DSC. Thermogravimetric analyses showed that MWCNT loading can decrease the onset degradation temperature of the composites which was attributed to the catalytic effect of metallic residues in MWCNT. Moreover, it was demonstrated that hydrophilicity slightly increased with an increase in MWCNT content. These results show that solution blow spinning can also be used to produce nanocomposite fibers with many potential applications such as in sensors and biosensors. PMID:22755116

  10. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Permeability studies of redox-sensitive nitroxyl spin probes in corn oil using an L-band ESR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebaraj, D. David; Utsumi, Hideo; Asath, R. Mohamed; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM 14N labeled 2H enriched 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) and 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5,-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (carboxy-PROXYL) in pure water and various concentrations of corn oil. The ESR parameters, such as the line width, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, rotational correlation time, partition parameter and permeability were reported for the samples. The line width broadening was observed for both nitroxyl radicals in corn oil solutions. The partition parameter for permeable MC-PROXYL in corn oil increases with increasing concentration of corn oil, which reveals that the nitroxyl spin probe permeates into the oil phase. From the results, the corn oil concentration was optimized as 50 % for phantom studies. The rotational correlation time also increases with increasing concentration of corn oil. The permeable and impermeable nature of nitroxyl spin probes was demonstrated. These results will be useful for the development of ESR/OMR imaging modalities in in vivo and in vitro studies.

  12. Synthesis of nucleic acid probes on membrane supports: A procedure for the removal of unincorporated precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to small pieces of nylon membrane for the synthesis of radioactive probes. The DNA to be used for generating the probe(s) is first bound to nylon membranes and then introduced into the reaction mix. The labeling reaction takes place on the membrane and therefore allows easy removal of unincorporated precursors by simple washing for 1-2 min. The clean labeled probe is eluted from the membrane in formamide or in water and is ready for use. This DNA-membrane can be stored for reuse. Synthesis of probes on a solid support such as nylon membrane thus circumvents problems associated with chromatographic manipulations needed for the separation of labeled DNA from unicorporated precursors. Probes synthesized in this manner are as efficient in detecting nucleic acid sequences as those synthesized in solution.

  13. Synthesis of nucleic acid probes on membrane supports: a procedure for the removal of unincorporated precursors.

    PubMed

    Bhat, S P

    1990-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to small pieces of nylon membrane for the synthesis of radioactive probes. The DNA to be used for generating the probe(s) is first bound to nylon membranes and then introduced into the reaction mix. The labeling reaction takes place on the membrane and therefore allows easy removal of unincorporated precursors by simple washing for 1-2 min. The clean labeled probe is eluted from the membrane in formamide or in water and is ready for use. This DNA-membrane can be stored for reuse. Synthesis of probes on a solid support such as nylon membrane thus circumvents problems associated with chromatographic manipulations needed for the separation of labeled DNA from unicorporated precursors. Probes synthesized in this manner are as efficient in detecting nucleic acid sequences as those synthesized in solution. PMID:2321760

  14. Spin probe dynamics in relation to free volume in crystalline organics from ESR and PALS: N-tridecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukešová, M.; Zgardzinska, B.; Švajdlenková, H.; Zaleski, R.; Charmas, B.; Bartoš, J.

    2015-11-01

    A joint external probe ESR and PALS study on n-tridecane (n-TRD) using stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) or ortho-positronium (o-Ps), respectively, is presented. In contrast to n-hexadecane (n-HXD) [Physica B 430, 99 (2013)], five crossovers in the spin probe TEMPO mobility coinciding with those in the o-Ps probe annihilation parameters at the characteristic ESR and PALS temperatures in the solid phase were revealed: 1) acceleration within the slow regime at TX1slow in accordance with the changes in both o-Ps lifetime, τ3, and relative o-Ps intensity, I3, at Tb1 cr * in the rigid crystalline solid are related to very local end methyl group dynamics, 2) slow to fast regime transition at T50G<spin probe TEMPO dynamics in the expanding interlamellar gap due to the molecular probe deformation induced enhanced end-chain mobility close to the rigid to soft crystalline solid transition at Tb1cr being connected also with the starting dominance of electron detrapping over positron mobility, 3) the first change within the fast regime at TX1fast coinciding with reduction of I3 at Tb2 cr * * is related to strong electron detrapping due to longitudinal disordering and 4) the next one at TX2 fast * is related to the soft to plastic crystalline solid phase transition at Tb2 cr * =TssDSC =0.95TmDSC . Finally, similarly as for n-HXD the highest T crossover at TX2fast ≅TmPALS is related with the collective chain dynamics of the melting transition TmDSC . The underlying structural-dynamic processes behind the observed ESR and PALS crossover coincidencies are discussed in the light of the present thermodynamic DSC and reported dynamic NMR, QENS and IR data.

  15. Spin-distribution measurement: A sensitive probe for incomplete fusion dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, D.; Ansari, M. A.; Prasad, R.; Kumar, R.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2008-07-15

    Spin distributions of various reaction products populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm have been measured at projectile energy {approx_equal}5.6 MeV/nucleon. Particle (Z=1,2) {gamma}-coincidences have been employed to achieve the information about involved reaction modes on the basis of their entry state spin populations. The experimentally measured spin distributions for incomplete fusion products have been found to be distinctly different than those observed for complete fusion products. The driving input angular momenta associated with incomplete fusion products have been found to be relatively higher than complete fusion products, and increases with direct {alpha}-multiplicity. It has also been observed that incomplete fusion products are less fed and/or the population of lower spin states are strongly hindered, while complete fusion products indicating strong feeding over a broad spin range.

  16. GIAO-DFT isotropic magnetic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling of tartaric acid in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fideles, Bruna; Oliveira, Leonardo B. A.; Colherinhas, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear isotropic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling for oxygen and carbons atoms of isomers of tartaric acid in gas phase and in water solutions by Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations using the GIAO-B3LYP approach. Solute polarization effects are included iteratively and play an important role in the quantitative determination of shielding constants. Our MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ results show substantial increases of the dipole moment in solution as compared with the gas phase results (61-221%). The solvent effects on the σ(13O) values are in general small. More appreciable solvent effects can be seen on the σ(17O) and J(Csbnd O).

  17. Genetic Incorporation of the Unnatural Amino Acid p-Acetyl Phenylalanine into Proteins for Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Eric G.B.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful tool for the characterization of protein structure and dynamics; however, its application in many systems is hampered by the reliance on unique and benign cysteine substitutions for the site-specific attachment of the spin label. An elegant solution to this problem involves the use of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids (UAAs) containing reactive functional groups that are chemically orthogonal to those of the 20 amino acids found naturally in proteins. These unique functional groups can then be selectively reacted with an appropriately functionalized spin probe. In this chapter, we detail the genetic incorporation of the ketone-bearing amino acid p-acetyl phenylalanine (pAcPhe) into recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Incorporation of pAcPhe is followed by chemoselective reaction of the ketone side chain with a hydroxylamine-functionalized nitroxide to afford the spin-labeled side chain “K1,” and we present two protocols for successful K1 labeling of proteins bearing site-specific pAcPhe. We outline the basic requirements for pAcPhe incorporation and labeling, with an emphasis on practical aspects that must be considered by the researcher if high yields of UAA incorporation and efficient labeling reactions are to be achieved. To this end, we highlight recent advances that have led to increased yields of pAcPhe incorporation, and discuss the use of aniline-based catalysts allowing for facile conjugation of the hydroxylamine spin label under mild reaction conditions. To illustrate the utility of K1 labeling in proteins where traditional cysteine-based SDSL methods are problematic, we site-specifically K1 label the cellular prion protein at two positions in the C-terminal domain and determine the interspin distance using double electron–electron resonance EPR. Recent advances in UAA incorporation and ketone-based bioconjugation, in combination with the commercial availability of all requisite

  18. Facile Probe Design: Fluorescent Amphiphilic Nucleic Acid Probes without Quencher Providing Telomerase Activity Imaging Inside Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongmei; Gao, Pengcheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Miao, Mao; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-06-21

    Nowadays, the probe with fluorophore but no quencher is promising for its simple preparation, environmental friendliness, and wide application scope. This study designs a new amphiphilic nucleic acid probe (ANAP) based on aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect without any quencher. Upon binding with targets, the dispersion of hydrophobic part (conjugated fluorene, CF) in ANAP is enhanced as a signal-on model for proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules detection or the aggregation of CF is enhanced as a signal-off model for ion detection. Meanwhile, because of the high specificity of ANAP, a one-step method is developed powerfully for monitoring the telomerase activity not only from the cell extracts but also from 50 clinic urine samples (positive results from 45 patients with bladder cancer and negative results from 5 healthy people). ANAPs can also readily enter into cells and exhibit a good performance for distinguishing natural tumor cells from the tumor cells pretreated by telomerase-related drugs or normal cells. In contrast to our previous results ( Anal. Chem. 2015 , 87 , 3890 - 3894 ), the present CF is a monomer which is just the structure unit of the previous fluorescent polymer. Since the accurate molecular structure and high DNA/CF ratio of the present CF, these advanced experiments obtain an easier preparation of probes, an improved sensitivity and specificity, and broader detectable targets. PMID:27223599

  19. Probing spin dynamics from the Mott insulating to the superfluid regime in a dipolar lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paz, A.; Pedri, P.; Sharma, A.; Efremov, M.; Naylor, B.; Gorceix, O.; Maréchal, E.; Vernac, L.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the spin dynamics of an out-of-equilibrium large spin dipolar atomic Bose gas in an optical lattice. We observe a smooth crossover from a complex oscillatory behavior to an exponential behavior throughout the Mott-to-superfluid transition. While both of these regimes are well described by our theoretical models, we provide data in the intermediate regime where dipolar interactions, contact interactions, and superexchange mechanisms compete. In this strongly correlated regime, spin dynamics and transport are coupled, which challenges theoretical models for quantum magnetism.

  20. Probing molecular geometry of solids by nuclear magnetic resonance spin exchange at the n=0 rotational-resonance condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekely, Piotr; Gardiennet, Carole; Potrzebowski, Marek J.; Sebald, Angelika; Reichert, Detlef; Luz, Zeev

    2002-05-01

    Exploration of the molecular geometry in rotating powder solids on the basis of magnetization exchange between spins with identical isotropic chemical shifts but differing chemical shielding tensor orientations is demonstrated experimentally. For this we take advantage of the potential of the ODESSA (one-dimensional exchange spectroscopy by sidebands alternation) experiment for the accurate measurement of spin exchange rate constants. We also report the observation of oscillatory behavior of the rotor-driven magnetization exchange at this so-called n=0 rotational-resonance condition which, in contrast to n=1,2,3,… rotational-resonance conditions, takes place at nearly arbitrary magic-angle spinning frequencies. The sensitivity of the longitudinal exchange decays to the relevant physical parameters of the spin system under conditions of rotor-driven and proton-driven magnetization exchange is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. Several 13C and 31P spin-exchange measurements have been performed on a series of model compounds covering a broad range of internuclear distances between carboxyl carbon atoms, and on a series of phosphorylated amino acids with different internuclear distances between phosphorus sites. The capacity of the ODESSA experiment for an unambiguous recognition of distinct internuclear distances is demonstrated. Potential applications of such measurements involve the exploration of intermolecular distances and the determination of the mutual orientation of neighboring molecular fragments in polycrystalline and noncrystalline solids.

  1. Pauli spin blockade in CMOS silicon double dots probed by dual gate reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotekar Patil, Dharmraj; Crippa, Alessandro; Maurand, Romain; Corna, Andrea; Lavieville, Romain; Hutin, Louis; Barraud, Sylvain; Orlov, Alexei; de Franceschi, Silvano; Sanquer, Marc; Jehl, Xavier; team Team; Collaboration Collaboration; Collaboration Collaboration; team Team; Collaboration Collaboration

    Silicon quantum dots are attractive candidates for the development of scalable spin-based qubits. The Pauli spin blockade effect in double quantum dots can provide an efficient, temperature-independent mechanism for qubit readout. Here we report the observation of Pauli blockade in silicon double quantum dots defined in double-gate nanowire transistors fabricated using silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology. Each of the two gates is connected to an LC resonator to perform radio-frequency reflectometry. This powerful technique allows high-sensitivity detection of charge transitions in the double quantum dot down to the few-electron regime. We find evidence of Pauli spin blockade and study the magnetic-field dependence of the underlying singlet-triplet states. SIAM, SiSPIN.

  2. Design and synthesis of an activity-based protein profiling probe derived from cinnamic hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ai, Teng; Qiu, Li; Xie, Jiashu; Geraghty, Robert J; Chen, Liqiang

    2016-02-15

    In our continued effort to discover new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents, we validated the anti-replicon activity of compound 1, a potent and selective anti-HCV hydroxamic acid recently reported by us. Generally favorable physicochemical and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties exhibited by 1 made it an ideal parent compound from which activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe 3 was designed and synthesized. Evaluation of probe 3 revealed that it possessed necessary anti-HCV activity and selectivity. Therefore, we have successfully obtained compound 3 as a suitable ABPP probe to identify potential molecular targets of compound 1. Probe 3 and its improved analogs are expected to join a growing list of ABPP probes that have made important contributions to not only the studies of biochemical and cellular functions but also discovery of selective inhibitors of protein targets. PMID:26753813

  3. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; de Voogd, J. M.; Bossoni, L.; de Jong, T. A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D. J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous electron systems realized in oxide interfaces, topological insulators, and other strongly correlated electron systems such as high-Tc superconductors.

  4. The use of election paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in early preformulation experiments: the impact of different experimental formulations on the release of a lipophilic spin probe into gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Bittner, B; Isel, H; Mountfield, R J

    2001-03-01

    The lipophilic spin probe TEMPOL-benzoate was dissolved in different experimental formulations, including polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), Miglyol, glycerol monooleate (GMO), and Cremophor RH-40. Samples were measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy before and after addition to human gastric juice. The distance between the first and the third peak in the EPR spectrum (2a(N)) was measured to monitor the polarity of the spin probe's microenvironment. Moreover, the ratio between the signal amplitudes of the second and the third peak (a/b ratio) was used to monitor the mobility of the spin probe in a certain formulation. Thus, by calculating 2a(N) and the a/b ratio of the EPR spectra it was possible to determine a potential release of the spin probe from different formulations into gastric juice. It was found that oily and surface-active vehicles (Miglyol, Cremophor RH-40, and GMO) were more suitable to protect a lipophilic compound from being released within a gastric environment than PEG 400. Our results demonstrate that EPR spectroscopy seems to be a promising tool in early preformulation experiments to monitor the release of spin probes from formulations of different nature. This kind of experiment can be of value for the optimization of exploratory formulations. PMID:11226824

  5. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-22

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  6. Studies towards the development of chemically synthesized non-radioactive biotinylated nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, A H; Hull, R

    1986-01-01

    Non-radioactive nucleic acid hybridization probes have been constructed in which the reporter group is long chain biotin chemically linked to a basic macromolecule (histone H1, cytochrome C or polyethyleneimine). The modified basic macromolecule which carries many biotin residues can, in turn, be covalently linked to nucleic acids (DNA) via the bifunctional cross-linking reagents, glutaraldehyde, 1,2,7,8-diepoxyoctane, bis (succinimidyl) suberate or bis (sulfonosuccinimidyl) suberate. This provides a very sensitive probe by which as little as between 10-50fg of target DNA can be visualized using dot-blot hybridization procedures in conjunction with avidin or streptavidin enzyme conjugates. PMID:3027670

  7. Stearic acid spin labels in lipid bilayers: insight through atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Stimson, Lorna; Dong, Lei; Karttunen, Mikko; Wisniewska, Anna; Dutka, Małgorzata; Róg, Tomasz

    2007-11-01

    Spin-labeled stearic acid species are commonly used for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of cell membranes to investigate phase transitions, fluidity, and other physical properties. In this paper, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the position and behavior of nitroxide spin labels attached to stearic acid molecules in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. The results of these studies are potentially very important for the interpretation of EPR spectra, which rely on assumptions about the position of the label in the membrane. Additionally, we investigate the effect of chirality and ionization of the carboxyl group of the label. For a non-ionized species, we observe that spin-label molecules are even able to make flip-flop transitions between the leaflets of the bilayer. Such transitions have been previously observed only in very rare cases in molecular simulations. PMID:17929861

  8. Long-ranged magnetic proximity effects in noble metal-doped cobalt probed with spin-dependent tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabureac, M. S.; MacLaren, D. A.; Courtois, H.; Marrows, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    We inserted non-magnetic layers of Au and Cu into sputtered AlO_{x}-based magnetic tunnel junctions and Meservey-Tedrow junctions in order to study their effect on tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin polarization (TSP). When either Au or Cu are inserted into a Co/AlO_{x} interface, we find that TMR and TSP remain finite and measurable for thicknesses up to several nanometres. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that the Cu and Au interface layers are fully continuous when their thickness exceeds ~3nm, implying that spin-polarized carriers penetrate the interface noble metal to distances exceeding this value. A power law model based on exchange scattering is found to fit the data better than a phenomenological exponential decay. The discrepancy between these length scales and the much shorter ones reported from x-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of magnetic proximitization is ascribed to the fact that our tunnelling transport measurements selectively probe s-like electrons close to the Fermi level. When a 0.1 nm thick Cu or Au layer is inserted within the Co, we find that the suppression of TMR and TSP is restored on a length scale of lesssim1nm, indicating that this is a sufficient quantity of Co to form a fully spin-polarized band structure at the interface with the tunnel barrier.

  9. Probing buried magnetic interface structure with the quantum size effect in spin-dependent electron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang; Altman, M S

    2015-12-01

    The quantum size effect (QSE) in electron reflectivity from Fe thin films grown on a W(110) surface precovered with a two monolayer Cu film has been investigated using spin polarized low energy electron microscopy. Spin-dependent QSE-induced oscillations in the reflected intensity occur with energy and film thickness. The series of intensity peaks that is observed identifies spin-dependent quantum well resonances in the Fe film that are sensitive to electronic band structure and details of the buried interface. Information about the spin-dependent unoccupied bands of the Fe film in the ΓΝ direction normal to the film plane is obtained by analyzing the observed quantum well resonance conditions. The spin-split bands that are determined are uniformly shifted downward by 1.7 eV compared to bulk-like bands determined previously in Fe films on a bare W(110) substrate by the same method. Evidence is also obtained that the buried interface that defines the thin film quantum well boundary is located one layer above the W(110) surface. These results suggest that the Cu layer in direct contact with the substrate remains largely intact, but the weakly-bound second Cu layer mixes or segregates freely. PMID:25728296

  10. Spin-wave thermal population as temperature probe in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, A.; Nikitin, V.; Devolder, T.

    2016-07-01

    We study whether a direct measurement of the absolute temperature of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) can be performed using the high frequency electrical noise that it delivers under a finite voltage bias. Our method includes quasi-static hysteresis loop measurements of the MTJ, together with the field-dependence of its spin wave noise spectra. We rely on an analytical modeling of the spectra by assuming independent fluctuations of the different sub-systems of the tunnel junction that are described as macrospin fluctuators. We illustrate our method on perpendicularly magnetized MgO-based MTJs patterned in 50 × 100 nm2 nanopillars. We apply hard axis (in-plane) fields to let the magnetic thermal fluctuations yield finite conductance fluctuations of the MTJ. Instead of the free layer fluctuations that are observed to be affected by both spin-torque and temperature, we use the magnetization fluctuations of the sole reference layers. Their much stronger anisotropy and their much heavier damping render them essentially immune to spin-torque. We illustrate our method by determining current-induced heating of the perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction at voltages similar to those used in spin-torque memory applications. The absolute temperature can be deduced with a precision of ±60 K, and we can exclude any substantial heating at the spin-torque switching voltage.

  11. Probing the population of the spin-orbit split levels in the actinide 5f states

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Tobin, J; Chung, B; Wall, M; Schwartz, A

    2004-07-14

    Spin-orbit interaction in the 5f states is believed to strongly influence exotic behaviors observed in actinides metals and compounds. Understanding these interactions and how they relate to the actinide series is of considerable importance. To address this issue, the branching ratio of the white-line peaks of the N4,5 edges for the light actinide metals, {alpha}-Th, {alpha}-U, and {alpha}-Pu were recorded using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Using the spin-orbit sum rule and the branching ratios from both experimental spectra and many-electron atomic spectral calculations, accurate values of the spin-orbit interaction, and thus the relative occupation of the j = 5/2 and 7/2 levels, are determined for the actinide 5f states. Results show that the spin-orbit sum rule works very well with both EELS and XAS spectra, needing little or no correction. This is important, since the high spatial resolution of a TEM can be used to overcome the problems of single crystal growth often encountered with actinide metals, allowing acquisition of EELS spectra, and subsequent spin-orbit analysis, from nm-sized regions. The relative occupation numbers obtained by our method have been compared with recent theoretical results and show a good agreement in their trend.

  12. Terahertz probes of magnetic field induced spin reorientation in YFeO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Ma, Guohong; Jin, Zuanming; Wang, Dongyang; Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2015-03-02

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the spin reorientation of a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO{sub 3} single crystal, by evaluating the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resonant frequency and amplitude for the quasi-ferromagnetic (FM) and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes (AFM), a deeper insight into the dynamics of spin reorientation in rare-earth orthoferrites is established. Due to the absence of 4f-electrons in Y ion, the spin reorientation of Fe sublattices can only be induced by the applied magnetic field, rather than temperature. In agreement with the theoretical predication, the frequency of FM mode decreases with magnetic field. In addition, an obvious step of spin reorientation phase transition occurs with a relatively large applied magnetic field of 4 T. By comparison with the family members of RFeO{sub 3} (R = Y{sup 3+} or rare-earth ions), our results suggest that the chosen of R would tailor the dynamical rotation properties of Fe ions, leading to the designable spin switching in the orthoferrite antiferromagnetic systems.

  13. Collective nature of spin excitations in superconducting cuprates probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Minola, M; Dellea, G; Gretarsson, H; Peng, Y Y; Lu, Y; Porras, J; Loew, T; Yakhou, F; Brookes, N B; Huang, Y B; Pelliciari, J; Schmitt, T; Ghiringhelli, G; Keimer, B; Braicovich, L; Le Tacon, M

    2015-05-29

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with and without analysis of the scattered photon polarization, to study dispersive spin excitations in the high temperature superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{6+x} over a wide range of doping levels (0.1≤x≤1). The excitation profiles were carefully monitored as the incident photon energy was detuned from the resonant condition, and the spin excitation energy was found to be independent of detuning for all x. These findings demonstrate that the largest fraction of the spin-flip RIXS profiles in doped cuprates arises from magnetic collective modes, rather than from incoherent particle-hole excitations as recently suggested theoretically [Benjamin et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247002 (2014)]. Implications for the theoretical description of the electron system in the cuprates are discussed. PMID:26066453

  14. Measurement of the proton $A_1$ and $A_2$ spin asymmetries. Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Whitney

    2015-05-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) measured the proton spin structure function $g_2$ in a range of Bjorken x, 0.3 < x < 0.8, where extraction of the twist-3 matrix element $d_2^p$ (an integral of $g_2$ weighted by $x^2$) is most sensitive. The data was taken from $Q^2$ equal to 2.5 $GeV^2$ up to 6.5 $GeV^2$. In this polarized electron scattering off a polarized hydrogen target experiment, two double spin asymmetries, A∥ and A⊥ were measured using the BETA (Big Electron Telescope Array) Detector. BETA consisted of a scintillator hodoscope, gas Cerenkov counter, lucite hodoscope and a large lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter. With a unique open geometry, a threshold gas Cerenkov detector allowed BETA to cleanly identify electrons for this inclusive experiment. A measurement of $d_2^p$ is compared to lattice QCD calculations.

  15. Long-Lived Hole Spin/Valley Polarization Probed by Kerr Rotation in Monolayer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinlin; Xie, Saien; Kang, Kibum; Park, Jiwoong; Sih, Vanessa

    2016-08-10

    Time-resolved Kerr rotation and photoluminescence measurements are performed on MOCVD-grown monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2). We observe a surprisingly long-lived Kerr rotation signal (∼80 ns) at 10 K, which is attributed to spin/valley polarization of the resident holes. This polarization is robust to transverse magnetic field (up to 0.3 T). Wavelength-dependent measurements reveal that only excitation near the free exciton energy generates this long-lived spin/valley polarization. PMID:27466727

  16. Spin probe dynamics in relation to free volume in crystalline organics by means of ESR and PALS: n-Hexadecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoš, J.; Švajdlenková, H.; Zaleski, R.; Edelmann, M.; Lukešová, M.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a combined study of the guest dynamics and free volume in n-hexadecane (n-HXD) using two external microscopic probes: stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and ortho-positronium (o-Ps) by means of ESR or PALS, respectively. Dynamic behavior of the molecular TEMPO probe and annihilation properties of the atomistic o-Ps one as a function of temperature are compared. Two coincidencies between the crossover effects at the characteristic ESR and PALS temperatures T50 G and Tb1cr below and TX2fast and TmPALS at the melting point TmDSC of n-HXD from macroscopic DSC scan were found. First, the slow to fast regime transition is ascribed to the spin probe TEMPO localization in the expanding interlamellar gap due to the induced enhanced end-chain mobility. Second, the high-temperature crossover within the fast regime is directly connected to the collective chain movements at the melting which takes place under the similar free volume fluctuation condition as revealed recently for a series of amorphous small molecular and polymer glass-formers.

  17. Design and evaluation of peptide nucleic acid probes for specific identification of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2015-02-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  18. Design and Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Specific Identification of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  19. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5.

    PubMed

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gioiello, Antimo; Thomas, Charles; Pols, Thijs W H; Nuti, Roberto; Ferrari, Cristina; Giacchè, Nicola; De Franco, Francesca; Pruzanski, Mark; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2013-12-12

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure-activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists. PMID:24900622

  20. Full spin polarization of complex ferrimagnetic bismuth iron garnet probed by magneto-optical Faraday spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Marwan; Popova, Elena; Fouchet, Arnaud; Keller, Niels

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent electronic density of states near and above the Fermi level in bismuth iron garnet (BIG), Bi3Fe5O12, by magnetic circular dichroism and magneto-optical Faraday spectroscopy. BIG is a recently synthesized material, as its preparation requires special nonequilibrium conditions. Its scientific and applicative interest resides in huge specific Faraday rotation of the incident light, useful for magneto-optic applications. We show experimentally the presence of spin gaps in the conduction band as recently predicted theoretically by Oikawa [T. Oikawa, S. Suzuki, and K. Nakao, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn.JUPSAU0031-901510.1143/JPSJ.74.401 74, 401 (2005)]. In the range of photon energies, where full spin polarization is expected, completely asymmetric Faraday hysteresis loops were observed, similar to those observed in half-metals such as (Pr,La)0.7Ca0.3MnO3 and Fe3O4. These results were modeled using even and odd (with respect to magnetization) contributions into hysteresis loops. The odd contribution appears only in the energy ranges where the density of states is fully spin polarized and vanishes at the Curie temperature. These results open a new perspective for the use of bismuth iron garnet in optic spintronics at room temperature and above.

  1. Diradicals acting through diamagnetic phenylene vinylene bridges: Raman spectroscopy as a probe to characterize spin delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    González, Sandra Rodríguez; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; González Cano, Rafael C.; López Navarrete, Juan T. E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es Casado, Juan E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es; Novoa, Juan J.; Mota, Fernando; Corro, Elena del; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G.

    2014-04-28

    We present a complete Raman spectroscopic study in two structurally well-defined diradical species of different lengths incorporating oligo p-phenylene vinylene bridges between two polychlorinated triphenylmethyl radical units, a disposition that allows sizeable conjugation between the two radicals through and with the bridge. The spectroscopic data are interpreted and supported by quantum chemical calculations. We focus the attention on the Raman frequency changes, interpretable in terms of: (i) bridge length (conjugation length); (ii) bridge conformational structure; and (iii) electronic coupling between the terminal radical units with the bridge and through the bridge, which could delineate through-bond spin polarization, or spin delocalization. These items are addressed by using the “oligomer approach” in conjunction with pressure and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic data. In summary, we have attempted to translate the well-known strategy to study the electron (charge) structure of π−conjugated molecules by Raman spectroscopy to the case of electron (spin) interactions via the spin delocalization mechanism.

  2. Entanglement probe of two-impurity Kondo physics in a spin chain.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Abolfazl; Bose, Sougato; Sodano, Pasquale; Johannesson, Henrik

    2012-08-10

    We propose that real-space properties of the two-impurity Kondo model can be obtained from an effective spin model where two single-impurity Kondo spin chains are joined via an Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between the two impurity spins. We then use a density matrix renormalization group approach, valid in all ranges of parameters, to study its features using two complementary quantum-entanglement measures, the negativity and the von Neumann entropy. This nonperturbative approach enables us to uncover the precise dependence of the spatial extent ξ(K) of the Kondo screening cloud with the Kondo and RKKY couplings. Our results reveal an exponential suppression of the Kondo temperature T(K)~1/ξ(K) with the size of the effective impurity spin in the limit of large ferromagnetic RKKY coupling, a striking display of "Kondo resonance narrowing" in the two-impurity Kondo model. We also show how the antiferromagnetic RKKY interaction produces an effective decoupling of the impurities from the bulk already for intermediate strengths of this interaction, and, furthermore, exhibit how the non-Fermi liquid quantum critical point is signaled in the quantum entanglement between various parts of the system. PMID:23006288

  3. Probing Spin-Orbit Coupling and Interlayer Coupling in Atomically Thin Molybdenum Disulfide Using Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Jiang, Desheng; Fan, Xiaofeng; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-01-26

    In two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, both spin-orbit coupling and interlayer coupling play critical roles in the electronic band structure and are desirable for the potential applications in spin electronics. Here, we demonstrate the pressure characteristics of the exciton absorption peaks (so-called excitons A, B and C) in monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by studying the reflectance spectra under hydrostatic pressure and performing the electronic band structure calculations based on density functional theory to account for the experimental observations. We find that the valence band maximum splitting at the K point in monolayer MoS2, induced by spin-orbit coupling, remains almost unchanged with increasing pressure applied up to 3.98 GPa, indicating that the spin-orbit coupling is insensitive to the pressure. For bilayer and trilayer MoS2, however, the splitting shows an increase with increasing pressure due to the pressure-induced strengthening of the interlayer coupling. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. Moreover, the exciton C is identified to be the interband transition related to the van Hove singularity located at a special point which is approximately 1/4 of the total length of Γ-K away from the Γ point in the Brillouin zone. PMID:26745440

  4. Beyond Spin-Orbit: Probing Electron Correlation in the Pu 5f States

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2006-05-08

    Experiments planned to address the issue of electron correlation in the Pu 5f states are described herein. The key is the utilization of the Fano Effect, the observation of spin polarization in nonmagnetic systems, using chiral excitation such as circularly polarized X-rays.

  5. [Study on recovery and its influencing factors of ferulic acid and tetramethylpyrazine in cerebral microdialysis probe].

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-guo; Wang, Li-sheng; Fan, Wen-tao; Li, Zhou; Yu, Jian-ye; Liao, Feng-yun; Wu, Yin-ai; Ba, Wen-qiang; Wang, Ding

    2015-11-01

    To establish a method for detecting microdialysis recovery of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) and ferulic acid (FA) and investigating the influencing factors, providing the basis for further in vivo microdialysis experiments. The concentration of FA and TMP in dialysates were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography ( HPLC) and probe recovery were calculated respectively. The influence of the flow rates, medium concentration, temperature and in vivo probe stability on the recovery of FA and TMP were investigated by using concentration difference method (incremental method and decrement method). The recovery obtained by incremental method were similar to by decrement method. The in vitro recovery rate of FA and TMP decreased with the increase of 1-2.5 μL min(-1), and increased obviously with the temperature of 25-42 degrees C under the same conditions. The concentration of FA and TMP had no obvious effect on the probe recovery under the same flow rate. In addition, the recovery of TMP and FA remained stable and showed similar trends under the condition of four concentration cycles, indicating that the intra day reproducibility of the concentration difference method was good. The recovery of brain microdialysis probes in vivo 8 h maintained a relatively stable, but certain differences existed between different brain microdialysis probes, demonstrating that each probe was required for recovery correction in vivo experiment. Microdialysis sampling can be used for the local brain pharmacokinetic study of FA and TMP, and retrodialysis method can be used in probe recovery of FA and TMP in vivo. PMID:27071270

  6. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils – implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

  7. Nucleic acid probes as a diagnostic method for tick-borne hemoparasites of veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J V; Buening, G M

    1995-03-01

    An increased number of articles on the use of nucleic acid-based hybridization techniques for diagnostic purposes have been recently published. This article reviews nucleic acid-based hybridization as an assay to detect hemoparasite infections of economic relevance in veterinary medicine. By using recombinant DNA techniques, selected clones containing inserts of Anaplasma, Babesia, Cowdria or Theileria genomic DNA sequences have been obtained, and they are now available to be utilized as specific, highly sensitive DNA or RNA probes to detect the presence of the hemoparasite DNA in an infected animal. Either in an isotopic or non-isotopic detection system, probes have allowed scientists to test for--originally in samples collected from experimentally infected animals and later in samples collected in the field--the presence of hemoparasites during the prepatent, patent, convalescent, and chronic periods of the infection in the host. Nucleic acid probes have given researchers the opportunity to carry out genomic analysis of parasite DNA to differentiate hemoparasite species and to identify genetically distinct populations among and within isolates, strains and clonal populations. Prevalence of parasite infection in the tick vector can now be accomplished more specifically with the nucleic acid probes. Lately, with the advent of the polymerase chain reaction technique, small numbers of hemoparasites can be positively identified in the vertebrate host and tick vector. These techniques can be used to assess the veterinary epidemiological situation in a particular geographical region for the planning of control measures. PMID:7597795

  8. Error analyses for the delivery of a spinning probe to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintz, G. R.; Longuski, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The task of delivering the Galileo Probe to specified atmospheric entry conditions at Jupiter is especially challenging because tracking, trajectory corrections, and attitude adjustments are not possible after release of the Probe from the carrier vehicle. Statistical analysis of the spacecraft dynamics mapped into Probe dispersions in atmosphere-relative and relay-geometry parameters show that attitude stability, heating, and relay performance requirements can be satisfied. Reconstruction techniques are used to enhance estimates of the delivery parameters to permit correct interpretation of the scientific data for the Jovian atmosphere. A tradeoff which sacrifices some delivery accuracy and propellant is shown to guarantee satisfaction of a very tight reconstruction requirement for the trajectory considered in this report.

  9. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  10. Spin susceptibility of Ga-stabilized δ-Pu probed by 69Ga NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskunov, Yu.; Mikhalev, K.; Gerashenko, A.; Pogudin, A.; Ogloblichev, V.; Verkhovskii, S.; Tankeyev, A.; Arkhipov, V.; Zouev, Yu.; Lekomtsev, S.

    2005-05-01

    Spin susceptibility of stabilized δ phase in the Pu-Ga alloy is studied by measuring Ga69,71 NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-169 in the temperature range 5-350K . The shift (K69) of the Ga69,71 NMR line and T1-169 are controlled, correspondingly, by the static and fluctuating-in-time parts of the local magnetic field arisen at nonmagnetic gallium due to transferred hyperfine coupling with the nearest f -electron environment of more magnetic Pu. The nonmonotonic behavior of K69(T)∝χs,5f(T) with a maximum around 150K is related to the peculiarities in temperature dependence of the f -electron spin susceptibility χs,5f(T) in δ phase of plutonium. The observed reversibility in temperature of K69(T) provides strong evidence for the development with decreasing T of instability in f -electron bands near the Fermi energy. Such an electronic instability is accompanied with a pseudogap-like decrease of χs,5f(T) at T<150K , whereas a gradual increase in the width of central line with decreasing T shows the growth of the short-wave static contributions to spin susceptibility of stabilized δ-Pu down to the lowest temperature. However, no NMR evidence favoring the formation of the static magnetic order in δ-Pu was observed down to 5K . Below 200K , the product (T1T)-1 increases as temperature decreases down to 80K , which was considered as an indication that the growth of the intensity of the f -electron spin fluctuations near Larmor frequency with decreasing T is favored. At lower temperature, the growth of (T1T)-1 is saturated, and the temperature of the crossover between the two different regimes of spin fluctuations is close to the characteristic Kondo temperature of the order of 100K as estimated on the basis of the resistivity and specific heat data for stabilized δ-Pu .

  11. EPR line shifts and line shape changes due to spin exchange of nitroxide-free radicals in liquids 4. Test of a method to measure re-encounter rates in liquids employing 15N and 14N nitroxide spin probes.

    PubMed

    Bales, Barney L; Meyer, Michelle; Smith, Steve; Peric, Miroslav

    2008-03-20

    EPR line shifts due to spin exchange of perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (14N-PDT) in aqueous solutions and the same probe isotopically substituted with 15N (15N-PDT) were measured from 293 to 338 and 287 to 353 K, respectively. Nonlinear least-squares fits of the EPR spectra yielded the resonance fields of the nitrogen hyperfine lines to high precision from which the shifts were deduced. The shifts are described by two terms: one linear and the other quadratic in the electron spin-exchange frequency, omegae. The quadratic term is due to spin exchange that occurs when two spin probes diffuse together and collide. A linear term is predicted for spin exchanges that occur upon re-encounter of the same two probes while they occupy the same "cage" before diffusing apart. The quadratic term has no adjustable parameters, while the linear term has one: the mean time between re-encounters, tauRE. The theory is cast in terms of the spin-exchange-induced line broadening that can be measured from each spectrum independently of the line shifts, thereby removing the explicit dependence of omegae on the temperature and the spin-probe concentration. In this form, theoretically, the value of the linear term is about a factor of 2 larger for 15N-PDT than for 14N-PDT for all temperatures; however, tauRE must be the same. Experimentally, we find that both of these expectations are fulfilled, providing strong support that the linear term is indeed due to re-encounter collisions. Values of tauRE derived from 14N-PDT and 15N-PDT are of the same order of magnitude and show the same trend with temperature as a hydrodynamic estimate based on the Stokes-Einstein equation. PMID:18278887

  12. Negative spin polarization of Mn2VGa probed by tunnel magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Klewe, Christoph; Meinert, Markus; Schmalhorst, Jan; Reiss, Günter

    2013-02-20

    The ferrimagnetic Heusler compound Mn(2)VGa is predicted to have a pseudogap in the majority spin channel, which should lead to a negative tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). We synthesized epitaxial Mn(2)VGa thin films on MgO(001) substrates by dc and rf magnetron co-sputtering, resulting in nearly stoichiometric films. XRD analysis revealed a mostly B2 ordered structure for the films deposited at substrate temperatures of 350, 450, and 550 °C. Magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers and CoFe counter-electrodes were fabricated. After post-annealing at up to T(a) = 425 °C negative TMR was obtained around zero bias, providing evidence for inverted spin polarization. The band structures of both electrodes were computed within the coherent potential approximation and used to calculate the TMR(V) characteristics, which were in good agreement with our experimental findings. PMID:23327939

  13. Theoretical probing of inelastic spin-excitations in adatoms on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Samir; Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Bouhassoune, Mohammed; Muniz, Roberto B.; Costa, Antonio T.

    2014-12-01

    We review our recent work on the simulation, description and prediction of spin-excitations in adatoms and dimers deposited on metallic surfaces. This work done together with Douglas L. Mills, is an extension of his seminal contribution (with Pascal Lederer) published 50 years ago on the spin-dynamics of transition metal impurities embedded in transition metal hosts [Lederer et al. (1967)]. The main predictions of his model were verified experimentally with state of the art inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy on adatoms. Our formalism, presented in this review, is based on time-dependent density functional theory, combined with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method. Comparison to experiments is shown and discussed in detail. Our scheme enables the description and prediction of the main characteristics of these excitations, i.e. their resonance frequency, their lifetime and their behavior upon application of external perturbations such as a magnetic field.

  14. Shot Noise as a Probe of Spin-Polarized Transport through Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtzlaff, Andreas; Weismann, Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Berndt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Single atoms on Au(111) surfaces have been contacted with the Au tip of a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The shot noise of the current through these contacts has been measured up to frequencies of 120 kHz and Fano factors have been determined to characterize the transport channels. The noise at Fe and Co atoms, the latter displaying a Kondo effect, indicates spin-polarized transport through a single channel. Transport calculations reproduce this observation.

  15. Probing the antiferromagnetic long-range order with Glauber spin states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Guillermo G.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the ground state of low-dimensional antiferromagnets deviates from Neel states due to strong quantum fluctuations. Even in the presence of long-range order, those fluctuations produce a substantial reduction of the magnetic moment from its saturation value. Numerical simulations in anisotropic antiferromagnetic chains suggest that quantum fluctuations over Neel order appear in the form of localized reversal of pairs of neighboring spins. In this paper, we propose a coherent state representation for the ground state to describe the above situation. In the one-dimensional case, our wave function corresponds to a two-mode Glauber state, when the Neel state is used as a reference, while the boson fields are associated to coherent flip of spin pairs. The coherence manifests itself through the antiferromagnetic long-range order that survives the action of quantum fluctuations. The present representation is different from the standard zero-point spin wave state, and is asymptotically exact in the limit of strong anisotropy. The fermionic version of the theory, obtained through the Jordan-Wigner transformation, is also investigated.

  16. High-pressure magnetic state of MnP probed by means of muon-spin rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Bonfà, P.; Guguchia, Z.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; De Renzi, R.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report a detailed muon-spin rotation study of the pressure evolution of the magnetic order in the manganese-based pnictide MnP, which has been recently found to undergo a superconducting transition under pressure once the magnetic ground state is suppressed. Using the muon as a volume sensitive local magnetic probe, we identify a ferromagnetic state as well as two incommensurate helical states (with propagation vectors Q aligned along the crystallographic c and b directions, respectively) which transform into each other through first-order phase transitions as a function of pressure and temperature. Our data suggest that the magnetic state from which superconductivity develops at higher pressures is an incommensurate helical phase.

  17. Short-range, spin-dependent interactions of electrons: a sensitive probe for exotic pseudo-Goldstone bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrano, William; Adelberger, Eric; Lee, John; Heckel, Blayne

    2016-03-01

    We used a torsion pendulum and rotating attractor with 20-pole electron-spin distributions to probe dipole-dipole interactions mediated by exotic pseudo-Goldstone bosons with mbc2 <= 500 μ eV and coupling strengths up to 14 orders of magnitude weaker than electromagnetism. Our 95% confidence result indicates that any hidden global symmetry involving electrons must have a symmetry-breaking scale F >= 70 TeV, the highest reached in any laboratory experiment. We used an attractor with a 20-pole unpolarized mass distribution to improve laboratory bounds on CP -violating monopole-dipole forces with 1 . 5 μ eV

  18. Quantum electronics. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Kolkowitz, S; Safira, A; High, A A; Devlin, R C; Choi, S; Unterreithmeier, Q P; Patterson, D; Zibrov, A S; Manucharyan, V E; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm's law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems. PMID:25636797

  19. Short-Range, Spin-Dependent Interactions of Electrons: A Probe for Exotic Pseudo-Goldstone Bosons.

    PubMed

    Terrano, W A; Adelberger, E G; Lee, J G; Heckel, B R

    2015-11-13

    We used a torsion pendulum and rotating attractor with 20-pole electron-spin distributions to probe dipole-dipole interactions mediated by exotic pseudo-Goldstone bosons with m(b)c(2)≤500 μeV and coupling strengths up to 14 orders of magnitude weaker than electromagnetism. This corresponds to symmetry-breaking scales F≤70 TeV, the highest reached in any laboratory experiment. We used an attractor with a 20-pole unpolarized mass distribution to improve laboratory bounds on CP-violating monopole-dipole forces with 1.5 μeV

  20. Short-Range, Spin-Dependent Interactions of Electrons: A Probe for Exotic Pseudo-Goldstone Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrano, W. A.; Adelberger, E. G.; Lee, J. G.; Heckel, B. R.

    2015-11-01

    We used a torsion pendulum and rotating attractor with 20-pole electron-spin distributions to probe dipole-dipole interactions mediated by exotic pseudo-Goldstone bosons with mbc2≤500 μ eV and coupling strengths up to 14 orders of magnitude weaker than electromagnetism. This corresponds to symmetry-breaking scales F ≤70 TeV , the highest reached in any laboratory experiment. We used an attractor with a 20-pole unpolarized mass distribution to improve laboratory bounds on C P -violating monopole-dipole forces with 1.5 μ eV

  1. Modeling aqueous ozone/UV process using oxalic acid as probe chemical.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Gurol, Mirat D

    2005-10-15

    A kinetic model that describes the removal of organic pollutants by an ozone/UV process is described. Oxalic acid, which reacts with a very low rate constant with ozone and relatively high rate constant with hydroxyl radical (OH*), was used as the probe chemical to model the process. The model was verified by experimental data on concentrations of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H202) under various experimental conditions, i.e., ozone gas dosage, UV light intensity, and varying oxalic acid concentrations. PMID:16295862

  2. Emission wavelength-dependent decay of the 9-anthroyloxy-fatty acid membrane probes.

    PubMed Central

    Matayoshi, E D; Kleinfeld, A M

    1981-01-01

    Using the phase-modulation technique, we have measured the fluorescence decay of 2- and 12-(9-anthroyloxy)-stearic acid (2- and 12-AS) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy)-palmitic acid (16-AP) bound to egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles or dissolved in nonpolar solvents. Heterogeneity analysis demonstrates that the decay is generally not monoexponential and exhibits large component variations across it emission spectrum. The mean decay time increases (and in parallel, the steady-state polarization decreases) monotonically with increasing wavelength from values at the blue end. The decay at the red side of the emission spectrum contains an exponential term with a negative amplitude, indicating that emission occurs from intermediates created in the excited-state. This behavior is interpreted as arising from intramolecular fluorophore relaxation occurring on the time scale of the fluorescence lifetime. We believe this to be the first study of wavelength-dependent fluorescent emission which is dominated by an intramolecular relaxation process. Although the three probes exhibit qualitatively similar effects, the emission band variations are greatest for 2-AS and smallest for 16-AP. The differences among the probes are not entirely due to environmental factors as demonstrated, for example, by the emission polarization differences observed in the isotropic solvent paraffin oil. In summary, while these findings point out some of the complexities in the 9-anthroyloxy-fatty acids as membrane probes, they also indicate how these complexities might be used as a sensitive measure of lipid-probe interaction. PMID:7260317

  3. Insights into 6‐Methylsalicylic Acid Bio‐assembly by Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, James S.; Havemann, Judith; Potter, Helen K.; Huang, Fanglu; Riva, Elena; Connolly, Jack; Wilkening, Ina; Song, Lijiang; Leadlay, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chemical probes capable of reacting with KS (ketosynthase)‐bound biosynthetic intermediates were utilized for the investigation of the model type I iterative polyketide synthase 6‐methylsalicylic acid synthase (6‐MSAS) in vivo and in vitro. From the fermentation of fungal and bacterial 6‐MSAS hosts in the presence of chain termination probes, a full range of biosynthetic intermediates was isolated and characterized for the first time. Meanwhile, in vitro studies of recombinant 6‐MSA synthases with both nonhydrolyzable and hydrolyzable substrate mimics have provided additional insights into substrate recognition, providing the basis for further exploration of the enzyme catalytic activities.

  4. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    SciTech Connect

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-10-15

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  5. Probing the spin state of a single electron trap by random telegraph signal.

    PubMed

    Xiao, M; Martin, I; Jiang, H W

    2003-08-15

    We have studied the random telegraph signal (RTS) generated by a single paramagnetic spin center adjacent to a submicrometer silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. An in-plane magnetic field induces a substantial change in the statistics of the RTS. We show that a model using the grand partition theorem can qualitatively explain the change in statistics of the RTS as a function of the applied magnetic field. While the data at high temperatures can be well described by this simple model, quantitative discrepancy increases as the temperature is lowered. PMID:12935055

  6. Spin transport in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as a probe of in-medium spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yin; Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An; Shen, Wen-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The spin up-down splitting of collective flows in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as a result of the nuclear spin-orbit interaction is investigated within a spin- and isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model SIBUU12. Using a Skyrme-type spin-orbit coupling quadratic in momentum, we found that the spin splittings of the directed flow and elliptic flow are largest in peripheral Au+Au collisions at beam energies of about 100-200 MeV/nucleon, and the effect is considerable even in smaller systems especially for nucleons with high transverse momenta. The collective flows of light clusters of different spin states are also investigated using an improved dynamical coalescence model with spin. Our study can be important in understanding the properties of in-medium nuclear spin-orbit interactions once the spin-dependent observables proposed in this work can be measured.

  7. Few-second-long correlation times in a quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by frequency-comb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeber, A. M.; Hopkinson, M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Nilsson, J.; Stevenson, R. M.; Bennett, A. J.; Shields, A. J.; Burkard, G.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    One of the key challenges in spectroscopy is the inhomogeneous broadening that masks the homogeneous spectral lineshape and the underlying coherent dynamics. Techniques such as four-wave mixing and spectral hole-burning are used in optical spectroscopy, and spin-echo in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the high-power pulses used in spin-echo and other sequences often create spurious dynamics obscuring the subtle spin correlations important for quantum technologies. Here we develop NMR techniques to probe the correlation times of the fluctuations in a nuclear spin bath of individual quantum dots, using frequency-comb excitation, allowing for the homogeneous NMR lineshapes to be measured without high-power pulses. We find nuclear spin correlation times exceeding one second in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots--four orders of magnitude longer than in strain-free III-V semiconductors. This observed freezing of the nuclear spin fluctuations suggests ways of designing quantum dot spin qubits with a well-understood, highly stable nuclear spin bath.

  8. Unconventional superconductivity in Y5Rh6Sn18 probed by muon spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Adroja, Devashibhai; Kase, Naoki; Hillier, Adrian; Akimitsu, Jun; Strydom, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors are robust diamagnets that expel magnetic fields through the Meissner effect. It would therefore be unexpected if a superconducting ground state would support spontaneous magnetics fields. Such broken time-reversal symmetry states have been suggested for the high-temperature superconductors, but their identification remains experimentally controversial. We present magnetization, heat capacity, zero field and transverse field muon spin relaxation experiments on the recently discovered caged type superconductor Y5Rh6Sn18 ( TC= 3.0 K). The electronic heat capacity of Y5Rh6Sn18 shows a T(3) dependence below Tc indicating an anisotropic superconducting gap with a point node. This result is in sharp contrast to that observed in the isostructural Lu5Rh6Sn18 which is a strong coupling s-wave superconductor. The temperature dependence of the deduced superfluid in density Y5Rh6Sn18 is consistent with a BCS s-wave gap function, while the zero-field muon spin relaxation measurements strongly evidences unconventional superconductivity through a spontaneous appearance of an internal magnetic field below the superconducting transition temperature, signifying that the superconducting state is categorized by the broken time-reversal symmetry. PMID:26286229

  9. Unconventional superconductivity in Y5Rh6Sn18 probed by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Adroja, Devashibhai; Kase, Naoki; Hillier, Adrian; Akimitsu, Jun; Strydom, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Conventional superconductors are robust diamagnets that expel magnetic fields through the Meissner effect. It would therefore be unexpected if a superconducting ground state would support spontaneous magnetics fields. Such broken time-reversal symmetry states have been suggested for the high—temperature superconductors, but their identification remains experimentally controversial. We present magnetization, heat capacity, zero field and transverse field muon spin relaxation experiments on the recently discovered caged type superconductor Y5Rh6Sn18 ( TC= 3.0 K). The electronic heat capacity of Y5Rh6Sn18 shows a T3 dependence below Tc indicating an anisotropic superconducting gap with a point node. This result is in sharp contrast to that observed in the isostructural Lu5Rh6Sn18 which is a strong coupling s—wave superconductor. The temperature dependence of the deduced superfluid in density Y5Rh6Sn18 is consistent with a BCS s—wave gap function, while the zero-field muon spin relaxation measurements strongly evidences unconventional superconductivity through a spontaneous appearance of an internal magnetic field below the superconducting transition temperature, signifying that the superconducting state is categorized by the broken time-reversal symmetry.

  10. Unconventional superconductivity in Y5Rh6Sn18 probed by muon spin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Adroja, Devashibhai; Kase, Naoki; Hillier, Adrian; Akimitsu, Jun; Strydom, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors are robust diamagnets that expel magnetic fields through the Meissner effect. It would therefore be unexpected if a superconducting ground state would support spontaneous magnetics fields. Such broken time-reversal symmetry states have been suggested for the high—temperature superconductors, but their identification remains experimentally controversial. We present magnetization, heat capacity, zero field and transverse field muon spin relaxation experiments on the recently discovered caged type superconductor Y5Rh6Sn18 ( TC= 3.0 K). The electronic heat capacity of Y5Rh6Sn18 shows a T3 dependence below Tc indicating an anisotropic superconducting gap with a point node. This result is in sharp contrast to that observed in the isostructural Lu5Rh6Sn18 which is a strong coupling s—wave superconductor. The temperature dependence of the deduced superfluid in density Y5Rh6Sn18 is consistent with a BCS s—wave gap function, while the zero-field muon spin relaxation measurements strongly evidences unconventional superconductivity through a spontaneous appearance of an internal magnetic field below the superconducting transition temperature, signifying that the superconducting state is categorized by the broken time-reversal symmetry. PMID:26286229

  11. Resonant uv pump-probe spectroscopy of dipicolinic acid via impulsive excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, Robert K.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Sariyanni, Zoe-Elizabeth; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Backus, Sterling; Raymondson, Daisy; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2008-02-15

    We present experimental evidence of coherent wave packet motion in dipicolinic acid (C{sub 7}H{sub 5}NO{sub 4}) which is an important marker molecule for bacterial spores. Resonant impulsive excitation is achieved by applying a uv pump pulse (267 nm, 16 fs) which has a duration that is shorter than the vibrational period of the molecules. The resulting dynamics is then probed with a weaker pulse of the same width and frequency. Evidence of the important 'fingerprint' region for this molecule (between 1000 cm{sup -1} and 1500 cm{sup -1}) is found in the transient absorption of the probe. We present simulations of the pump-probe experiment, based on the Liouville equation for the density matrix, and predict the optimal pulse width and detuning.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid conjugated near infrared flourescence probe for in vivo early tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwen; Cao, Jie; Qin, Jingyi; Zhang, Xin; Achilefu, Samuel; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA) is an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid with six cis double bonds and as a constituent of membranes used as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical path ways. In this manuscript,we describe the synthesis of near-infrared(NIR) flourescence ICG-Der-01 labeled DHA for in vitro and vivo tumor targeting.The structure of the probe was intensively characterized by UV and MS. The in vitro and vivo tumor targeting abilities of the DHA-based NIR probes were investigeted in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 xenograft mice model differently by confocal microscopy and CCD camera. The cell cytotoxicity were tested in tumor cells MCF-7 .The results shows that the DHA-based NIR probes have high affinity with the tumor both in vitro and vivo.In addition ,we also found that the DHA-based NIR probes have the apparent cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells .which demonstrated that DHA was conjugated with other antitumor drug could increase the abilities of antirumor efficacy .So DHA-ICG-Der-01 is a promising optical agent for diagnosis of tumors especially in their early stage.

  13. Non-Gilbert-damping Mechanism in a Ferromagnetic Heusler Compound Probed by Nonlinear Spin Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pirro, P; Sebastian, T; Brächer, T; Serga, A A; Kubota, T; Naganuma, H; Oogane, M; Ando, Y; Hillebrands, B

    2014-11-28

    The nonlinear decay of propagating spin waves in the low-Gilbert-damping Heusler film Co_{2}Mn_{0.6}Fe_{0.4}Si is reported. Here, two initial magnons with frequency f_{0} scatter into two secondary magnons with frequencies f_{1} and f_{2}. The most remarkable observation is that f_{1} stays fixed if f_{0} is changed. This indicates, that the f_{1} magnon mode has the lowest instability threshold, which, however, cannot be understood if only Gilbert damping is present. We show that the observed behavior is caused by interaction of the magnon modes f_{1} and f_{2} with the thermal magnon bath. This evidences a significant contribution of the intrinsic magnon-magnon scattering mechanisms to the magnetic damping in high-quality Heusler compounds. PMID:25494091

  14. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Huizhe; Chen, Qiuchen; Zhao, Pengfei; Zhao, Haishan; Yao, Weifan; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A) from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature. PMID:26347880

  15. Reactivity, Selectivity, and Stability in Sulfenic Acid Detection: A Comparative Study of Nucleophilic and Electrophilic Probes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-18

    The comparative reaction efficiencies of currently used nucleophilic and electrophilic probes toward cysteine sulfenic acid have been thoroughly evaluated in two different settings-(i) a small molecule dipeptide based model and (ii) a recombinant protein model. We further evaluated the stability of corresponding thioether and sulfoxide adducts under reducing conditions which are commonly encountered during proteomic protocols and in cell analysis. Powered by the development of new cyclic and linear C-nucleophiles, the unsurpassed efficiency in the capture of sulfenic acid under competitive conditions is achieved and thus holds great promise as highly potent tools for activity-based sulfenome profiling. PMID:27123991

  16. Spin probe dynamics in relation to free volume in crystalline organics from ESR and PALS: Cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švajdlenková, H.; Zgardzinska, B.; Lukešová, M.; Bartoš, J.

    2016-01-01

    A joint external probe ESR and PALS study on cyclohexane (CHX) using stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) or ortho-positronium (o-Ps), respectively, is reported. The slow to fast transition of TEMPO occurs at the characteristic ESR temperature T50G coinciding with the solid to solid transition temperature, TSS. Moreover, o-Ps lifetime τ3(T50G) = 2.0 ns is close to an empirical rule τ3(T50G) = 2.17 ± 0.15 ns found for a series of amorphous glass-formers indicating that main transition of the TEMPO connected with the 'rigid' to plastic crystalline state transition in CHX occurs under the similar local free volume condition as in amorphous media.

  17. Magnetostatic spin wave modes in trilayer nanowire arrays probed using ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the spin wave modes in asymmetric trilayer [N i80F e20(10 nm ) /Cu (tCu) /N i80F e20(30 nm ) ] nanowire structures as a function of the Cu thickness (tCu) in the range from 0 to 20 nm using perpendicular ferromagnetic resonance (pFMR) spectroscopy. For tCu=0 nm , corresponding to the 40 nm thick single layer N i80F e20 nanowires, both the fundamental and first order modes are observed in the saturation region. However, for the trilayer structures, two additional modes, which are the fundamental and first order optical modes, are observed. We also found that the resonance fields of these modes are markedly sensitive to the Cu thickness due to the competing effects of interlayer exchange coupling and magnetostatic dipolar coupling. When the tCu≥10 nm , the fundamental optical mode is more pronounced. Our experimental results are in quantitative agreement with the dynamic micromagnetic simulations.

  18. Electronic Structure of Hydrogen Donors in Semiconductors and Insulators Probed by Muon Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Koichiro; Ito, Takashi U.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators plays a crucial role in their electric conductivity. Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts have been made to establish this hypothesis in the last decade, and the muon spin rotation technique has played a pioneering role. Positive muons implanted into such low-carrier systems often form a muonium (an analogue of hydrogen, the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Although its dynamical aspect may be different from the heavier hydrogen, the electronic structure of the muonium is expected to be identical to that of hydrogen after a small correction of the reduced mass (˜0.4%). Since the discovery of a shallow muonium in CdS, its properties have been intensively studied in many semiconductors and insulators, and then it was interpreted as a possible origin of n-type conductivity under the context of a classical shallow donor model. In this article, we will describe the principle of muonium experiments and survey recent achievements in this field.

  19. Ultrafast high harmonics for probing the fastest spin and charge dynamics in magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grychtol, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast light based on the high-harmonic up-conversion of femtosecond laser pulses have been successfully employed to access resonantly enhanced magnetic contrast at the Mabsorption edges of the 3d ferromagnets Fe, Co and Ni in a table-top setup. Thus, it has been possible to study element-specific dynamics in magnetic materials at femtosecond time scales in a laboratory environment, providing a wealth of opportunities for a greater fundamental understanding of correlated phenomena in solid-state matter. However, these investigations have so far been limited to linear polarized harmonics, since most techniques by which circular soft x-rays can be generated are highly inefficient reducing the photon flux to a level unfit for scientific applications. Besides presenting key findings of our ultrafast studies on charge and spin dynamics, we introduce a simple setup which allows for the efficient generation of circular harmonics bright enough for XMCD experiments. Our work thus represents a critical advance that enables element-specific imaging and spectroscopy of multiple elements simultaneously in magnetic and other chiral media with very high spatial and temporal resolution on the tabletop. In collboration with Ronny Knut, Emrah Turgut, Dmitriy Zusin, Christian Gentry, Henry Kapteyn, Margaret Murnane, JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder; Justin Shaw, Hans Nembach, Tom Silva, Electromagnetics Division, NIST, Boulder, CO; and Ofer Kfir, Avner Fleischer, Oren Cohen, Extreme Nonlinear Optics Group, Solid State Institute, Technion, Israel.

  20. Probing the holographic principle using dynamical gauge effects from open spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Dynamical gauge fields result from locally defined symmetries and an effective over-labeling of quantum states. Coupling atoms weakly to a reservoir of laser modes can create an effective dynamical gauge field purely due to the disregard of information in the optical states. Here we report measurements revealing effects of open spin-orbit coupling in a system where an effective model can be formed from a non-abelian SU(2) × U(1) field theory following the Yang-Mills construct. Forming a close analogy to dynamical gauge effects in quantum chromodynamics, we extract a measure of atomic motion which reveals the analog of a closing mass gap for the relevant gauge boson, shedding insight on long standing open problems in gauge-fixing scale anomalies. Using arguments following the holographic principle, we measure scaling relations which can be understood by quantifying information present in the local potential. New prospects using these techniques for developing fractionalization of multi-particle and macroscopic systems using dissipative and non-abelian gauge fields will also be discussed. We acknowledge support from NSF Award No. 1068570, and the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation.

  1. Nucleon transverse spin structure in the valence quark region: Probing color forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziani, Zein-Eddine

    2016-03-01

    The first direct observation that protons are not elementary objects and the discovery that their constituents, dubbed ``partons'', are point-like particles made use of elastic and deep inelastic (DIS) scattering of electrons off protons, respectively. With the advent of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of strong interactions, partons were identified as quarks and gluons and an intensive theoretical effort is still underway to grasp the full consequences of this theory. Recently scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab using a 6 GeV polarized electron beam and polarized targets at high luminosity have allowed us to delve deeper into the role of partons dynamics in the nucleon (proton and neutron). These studies of dynamics in the valence quark region are helping us unravel the rich but elusive structure of the confined building blocks of matter and impacting our understanding of the non-perturbative aspects of QCD through comparisons with lattice QCD and models. I will present recent results of measurements of the average color electric and magnetic forces acting on the struck quark in a proton, due to the remnant ``di-quark'' as it start its journey to emerge as a hadron. A flavor separation of the color force acting on the up and down quarks is carried out by combining measurements on polarized protons and neutrons. I will conclude by describing the planned measurements with the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab to complete our picture of nucleon transverse spin structure in the valence region.

  2. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe.

    PubMed

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems. PMID:26584676

  3. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2015-11-20

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems.

  4. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2015-11-20

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps.more » The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems.« less

  5. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanouilidou, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.

    2016-08-01

    High-spatial-resolution magnetic imaging has driven important developments in fields ranging from materials science to biology. However, to uncover finer details approaching the nanoscale with greater sensitivity requires the development of a radically new sensor technology. The nitrogen–vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for such a sensor on the basis of its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities. It has remained an outstanding challenge to implement the NV centre as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at cryogenic temperatures, however, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. Here, we present NV magnetic imaging down to 6 K with 3 μT Hz–1/2 field sensitivity, and use the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with critical temperature Tc = 30 K. The expansion of NV-based magnetic imaging to cryogenic temperatures will enable future studies of previously inaccessible nanoscale magnetism in condensed-matter systems.

  6. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor.

    PubMed

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanouilidou, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C

    2016-08-01

    High-spatial-resolution magnetic imaging has driven important developments in fields ranging from materials science to biology. However, to uncover finer details approaching the nanoscale with greater sensitivity requires the development of a radically new sensor technology. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for such a sensor on the basis of its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities. It has remained an outstanding challenge to implement the NV centre as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at cryogenic temperatures, however, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. Here, we present NV magnetic imaging down to 6 K with 3 μT Hz(-1/2) field sensitivity, and use the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with critical temperature Tc = 30 K. The expansion of NV-based magnetic imaging to cryogenic temperatures will enable future studies of previously inaccessible nanoscale magnetism in condensed-matter systems. PMID:27136130

  7. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe

    PubMed Central

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems. PMID:26584676

  8. Probing the coexistence of spin density wave and superconducting orders in organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Arjun

    We have conducted thermal and electrical transport measurements on the compound (TMTSF)2PF6 at temperatures down to 300 mK , magnetic fields up to 32 T and pressures up to 8 kbar. (TMTSF)2PF 6 may be tuned by pressure to exhibit a variety of low temperature ground states. From SDW at low pressures, to Superconducting metal at high pressures. In the vicinity of 6 kbar of pressure, samples show on cooling, first a SDW phase transition and then superconductivity. This coexistence of two transitions, is also seen in other material classes, for example, The Pnictides and the Heavy fermion superconductors. While in those classes the physics of simultaneous competing orders is not easy to explore, in (TMTSF)2PF 6 , owing in part to its remarkably reliable crystal growth, and its simple yet feature rich electronic structure, the situation is now clearer. Simultaneous resistivity and thermopower measurements under pressure along all three crystal axes, provide evidence for phase separation between SDW and metallic domains. The pressure evolution of the phase boundaries may also be qualitatively followed. The metallic domains in coexistence are identi ed as the high pressure metal phase by a variety of signatures in magnetoresistance( the presence of Field induced Spin density waves, Rapid oscillations, the Lebed oscillations and Danner-Chaikin-Kang oscillations.) The main result of this thesis is a characterisation of the coexistence state that allows us to eliminate various theoretical models and assert that the result of interacting SDW and Metallic orders is a phase separation into large scale domains with domain widths of the order of micrometers in these salts. Further that the domain walls follow a well defined geometry linked to the geometry of the lattice.

  9. Development of a new colorimetric and red-emitting fluorescent dual probe for G-quadruplex nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Wu; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Liu, Hui-Yun; Ye, Wen-Jie; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2014-07-01

    A tailor-made colorimetric and red-emitting fluorescent dual probe for G-quadruplex nucleic acids was developed by incorporating a coumarin-hemicyanine fluorophore into an isaindigotone framework. The significant and distinct changes in both the color and fluorescence of this probe enable the label-free and visual detection of G-quadruplex structures. PMID:24841696

  10. Quantitative determination of uric acid using CdTe nanoparticles as fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dongri; Seo, Min-Ho; Huy, Bui The; Pham, Quoc-Thai; Conte, Maxwell L; Thangadurai, Daniel; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-15

    A convenient enzymatic optical method for uric acid detection was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of ligand-capped CdTe nanoparticles by H2O2 which was generated from the enzymatic reaction of uric acid. The interactions between the CdTe nanoparticles capped with different ligands (glutathione, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and thioglycerol) and H2O2 were investigated. The fluorescence quenching studies of GSH-capped CdTe nanoparticles demonstrated an excellent sensitivity to H2O2. The effects of uric acid, uricase and H2O2 on the fluorescence intensity of CdTe nanoparticles were also explored. The detection conditions, reaction time, pH value, incubation period and the concentration of uricase and uric acid were optimized. The detection limit of uric acid was found to be 0.10 µM and the linear range was 0.22-6 µM under the optimized experimental conditions. These results typify that CdTe nanoparticles could be used as a fluorescent probe for uric acid detection. PMID:26433069

  11. STM probe on the surface electronic states of spin-orbit coupled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenwen

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is the interaction of an electron's intrinsic angular momentum (spin) with its orbital momentum. The strength of this interaction is proportional to Z4 where Z is the atomic number, so generally it is stronger in atoms with higher atomic number, such as bismuth (Z=83) and iridium (Z=77). In materials composed of such heavy elements, the prominent SOC can be sufficient to modify the band structure of the system and lead to distinct phase of matter. In recent years, SOC has been demonstrated to play a critical role in determining the unusual properties of a variety of compounds. SOC associated materials with exotic electronic states have also provided a fertile platform for studying emergent phenomena as well as new physics. As a consequence, the research on these interesting materials with any insight into understanding the microscopic origin of their unique properties and complex phases is of great importance. In this context, we implement scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to explore the surface states (SS) of the two major categories of SOC involved materials, Bi-based topological insulators (TI) and Ir-based transition metal oxides (TMO). As a powerful tool in surface science which has achieved great success in wide variety of material fields, STM/STS is ideal to study the local density of states of the subject material with nanometer length scales and is able to offer detailed information about the surface electronic structure. In the first part of this thesis, we report on the electronic band structures of three-dimensional TIs Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se 3. Topological insulators are distinct quantum states of matter that have been intensely studied nowadays. Although they behave like ordinary insulators in showing fully gapped bulk bands, they host a topologically protected surface state consisting of two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions which exhibits metallic behavior. Indeed, this unique gapless surface state is a

  12. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  13. Fluorescence imaging of siRNA delivery by peptide nucleic acid-based probe.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Iwai, Kenta; Kuge, Shusuke; Teramae, Norio; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based fluorescent probe for the analysis of siRNA delivery to living cells. The probe, Py-AA-TO, possesses thiazole orange (TO) and pyrene moieties in the C- and N-termini of PNA, and can function as a light-up probe capable of selective binding to 3'-overhanging nucleotides of target siRNAs. The affinity-labeling of the siRNAs with Py-AA-TO facilitates fluorescence imaging of cellular uptake of polymer-based carriers encapsulating the siRNAs (polyplexes) through endocytosis and subsequent sequestration into lysosome. In addition, flow cytometric measurements reveal that the monitoring of Py-AA-TO fluorescence inside the cells is successfully applicable to the analysis of the polyplex disassembly. These promising functions of Py-AA-TO are presented and discussed as a basis for the design of molecular probes for fluorescent imaging and quantitative analysis of the siRNA delivery process. PMID:25864675

  14. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  15. Slow Domain Motions of an Oligomeric Protein from Deep-Sea Hyperthermophile probed by Neutron Spin Echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Dhindsa, Gurpreet; Sharp, Melissa; Stingaciu, Laura R.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Xiang-Qiang Chu Team

    Deep-sea microorganisms have the ability to survive under extreme conditions, such as high pressure and high temperature. In this work, we used the combination of the neutron spin-echo (NSE) and the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques to study the inter-domain motions of the inorganic pyrophosphate (IPPase) enzyme derived from thermostable microorganisms Thermococcus thioreducens. The IPPase has hexameric quaternary structure with molecular mass of approx. 120kDa (each subunit of 20kDa), which is a large oligomeric structure. The understanding of its slow inter-domain motions can be the key to explain how they are able to perform catalytic activity at higher temperature compared to mesophilic enzymes, thus leading to adapt to extreme environment present at the seabed. The NSE can probe these slow motions directly in the time domain up to several tens of nanoseconds at the nanometers length scales, while the corresponding structural change can be explored by the SANS. Our results provide a better picture of the local flexibility and conformational substates unique to these types of proteins, which will help us better understandthe relation between protein dynamics and their biological activities

  16. Structural aspects in self-assembled systems of polyoxyethylene surfactants, as studied by the spin probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, Horia

    1998-12-01

    Typical examples of structural characterization of self-assembled systems by the spin probes technique, selected from our representative results accumulated in the last years of systematic studies, are presented. The choice of the examples has aimed at emphasizing the potentiality of this technique in the study of self-assembled systems, in general, and of those of PEO surfactants, in particular. By using specific ESR parameters (the nitrogen hyperfine splitting (hfs), aN, the rotational correlation time, τc, the order parameter, S) of a variety of properly chosen nitroxides, problems such hydration degree and profile of the PEO chains, ordering and order profile along these chains, their penetrability by the oil solvent, role of the terminal OH in the micellization, as well as differences in these quantities vs . the nature of the aggregate (micelle, reverse micelle, lamellar phase, etc.), nature of the surfactants (conventional or triblock copolymer), solubilizates (water in reverse micelles or various alcohols in micelles) and temperature have been discussed.

  17. The magnetic particle in a box: Analytic and micromagnetic analysis of probe-localized spin wave modes

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan Du, Chunhui; Manuilov, Sergei A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Fengyuan; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    The dipole field from a probe magnet can be used to localize a discrete spectrum of standing spin wave modes in a continuous ferromagnetic thin film without lithographic modification to the film. Obtaining the resonance field for a localized mode is not trivial due to the effect of the confined and inhomogeneous magnetization precession. We compare the results of micromagnetic and analytic methods to find the resonance field of localized modes in a ferromagnetic thin film, and investigate the accuracy of these methods by comparing with a numerical minimization technique that assumes Bessel function modes with pinned boundary conditions. We find that the micromagnetic technique, while computationally more intensive, reveals that the true magnetization profiles of localized modes are similar to Bessel functions with gradually decaying dynamic magnetization at the mode edges. We also find that an analytic solution, which is simple to implement and computationally much faster than other methods, accurately describes the resonance field of localized modes when exchange fields are negligible, and demonstrating the accessibility of localized mode analysis.

  18. Measurements of d2n and A1n: Probing the neutron spin structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Flay, D.; Posik, M.; Parno, D. S.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W. R.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; et al

    2016-09-06

    We report on the results of the E06-014 experiment performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall A, where a precision measurement of the twist-3 matrix elementmore » $d_2$ of the neutron ($$d_{2}^{n}$$) was conducted. This quantity represents the average color Lorentz force a struck quark experiences in a deep inelastic electron scattering event off a neutron due to its interaction with the hadronizing remnants. This color force was determined from a linear combination of the third moments of the spin structure functions $g_1$ and $g_2$ on $$^{3}$$He after nuclear corrections had been applied to these moments. The kinematics included two average $$Q^{2}$$ bins of $3.2$ GeV$$^{2}$$ and $4.3$ GeV$$^{2}$$, and Bjorken-$x$ $$0.25 \\leq x \\leq 0.90$$ covering the DIS and resonance regions. We found $d_2^n$ to be small and negative for $ = 3.2$ GeV$$^{2}$$, and smaller for $ = 4.3$ GeV$$^{2}$$, consistent with a lattice QCD calculation. The twist-4 matrix element $$f_{2}^{n}$$ was extracted by combining our $$d_{2}^{n}$$ with the world data on $$\\Gamma_{1}^{n} = \\int_{0}^{1} g_{1}^{n} dx$$. We found $$f_{2}^{n}$$ to be roughly an order of magnitude larger than $$d_{2}^{n}$$. Utilizing the extracted $$d_{2}^{n}$$ and $$f_{2}^{n}$$ data, we separated the color force into its electric and magnetic components, $$F_{E}^{y,n}$$ and $$F_{B}^{y,n}$$, and found them to be equal and opposite in magnitude, in agreement with instanton model predictions but not with those from QCD sum rules. Additionally, we have extracted the neutron virtual photon-nucleon asymmetry $$A_{1}^{n}$$, the structure function ratio $$g_{1}^{n}/F_{1}^{n}$$, and the quark ratios $$(\\Delta u + \\Delta \\bar{u})/(u + \\bar{u})$$ and $$(\\Delta d + \\Delta \\bar{d})/(d + \\bar{d})$$. Lastly, these results were found to be consistent with DIS world data and with the prediction of the constituent quark model but at odds with those of perturbative QCD at large $x$.« less

  19. Structural Changes of a Doubly Spin-Labeled Chemically Driven Molecular Shuttle Probed by PELDOR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Paola; Bleve, Valentina; Mezzina, Elisabetta; Schäfer, Christian; Ragazzon, Giulio; Albertini, Marco; Carbonera, Donatella; Credi, Alberto; Di Valentin, Marilena; Lucarini, Marco

    2016-06-20

    Gaining detailed information on the structural rearrangements associated with stimuli-induced molecular movements is of utmost importance for understanding the operation of molecular machines. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was employed to monitor the geometrical changes arising upon chemical switching of a [2]rotaxane that behaves as an acid-base-controlled molecular shuttle. To this aim, the rotaxane was endowed with stable nitroxide radical units in both the ring and axle components. The combination of PELDOR data and molecular dynamic calculations indicates that in the investigated rotaxane, the ring displacement along the axle, caused by the addition of a base, does not alter significantly the distance between the nitroxide labels, but it is accompanied by a profound change in the geometry adopted by the macrocycle. PMID:27123774

  20. Ascorbic acid-functionalized Ag NPs as a probe for colorimetric sensing of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'souza, Stephanie L.; Pati, Ranjan; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we report the use of ascorbic acid-capped silver nanoparticles (AA-Ag NPs) as a probe for selective colorimetric detection of glutathione (GSH) in aqueous solution. This detection system was based on the GSH-induced aggregation of AA-Ag NPs, resulting in drastic changes in the absorption spectra and color of the AA-Ag NPs system. The GSH-induced AA-Ag NPs aggregation was confirmed by UV-visible spectrometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. Under optimal conditions, this method exhibited good linearity over the concentration ranges from 5.0 to 50 µM, with the limit of detection 2.4 × 10-7 M. This method was successfully applied to detect GSH in the presence of other biomolecules, which confirms that this probe can be used for the detection of GSH in real samples.

  1. Insights into 6‐Methylsalicylic Acid Bio‐assembly by Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, James S.; Havemann, Judith; Potter, Helen K.; Huang, Fanglu; Riva, Elena; Connolly, Jack; Wilkening, Ina; Song, Lijiang; Leadlay, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chemical probes capable of reacting with KS (ketosynthase)‐bound biosynthetic intermediates were utilized for the investigation of the model type I iterative polyketide synthase 6‐methylsalicylic acid synthase (6‐MSAS) in vivo and in vitro. From the fermentation of fungal and bacterial 6‐MSAS hosts in the presence of chain termination probes, a full range of biosynthetic intermediates was isolated and characterized for the first time. Meanwhile, in vitro studies of recombinant 6‐MSA synthases with both nonhydrolyzable and hydrolyzable substrate mimics have provided additional insights into substrate recognition, providing the basis for further exploration of the enzyme catalytic activities. PMID:26833898

  2. Kinetics and motional dynamics of spin-labeled yeast iso-1-cytochrome c: 1. Stopped-flow electron paramagnetic resonance as a probe for protein folding/unfolding of the C-terminal helix spin-labeled at cysteine 102.

    PubMed

    Qu, K; Vaughn, J L; Sienkiewicz, A; Scholes, C P; Fetrow, J S

    1997-03-11

    The kinetics of chemically induced folding and unfolding processes in spin-labeled yeast iso-1-cytochrome c were measured by stopped-flow electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Stopped-flow EPR, based on a new dielectric resonator structure [Sienkiewicz, A., Qu, K., & Scholes, C. P. (1994) Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 68-74], gives a new temporal component to probing nanosecond molecular tumbling motions that are modulated by macromolecular processes requiring time resolution of milliseconds to seconds. The stopped-flow EPR technique presented in this work is a kinetic technique that has not been previously used with such a time resolution on spin-labeled systems, and it has the potential for application to numerous spin-labeled sites in this and other proteins. The cysteine-specific spin-label, methanethiosulfonate spin-label (MTSSL), was attached to yeast iso-1-cytochrome c at the single naturally occurring cysteine102, and the emphasis for this work was on this disulfide-attached spin-labeled prototype. This probe has the advantage of reflecting the protein tertiary fold, as shown by recent, systematic site-directed spin labeling of T4 lysozyme [Mchaourab, H. S. Lietzow, M. A., Hideg, K., & Hubbell, W. L. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 7692-7704], and protein backbone dynamics, as also shown by model peptide studies [Todd, A. P., & Millhauser, G. L. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 5515-5523]. The C-terminal cytochrome c helix where the label is attached is thought to be critical in the initial steps of protein folding and unfolding. Stopped-flow EPR resolved the monoexponential, guanidinium-induced unfolding process at pH 6.5 with an approximately 20 ms time constant; this experiment required less than 150 microL of 80 microM spin-labeled protein. We observed an approximately 50-fold decrease of this unfolding time from the 1 s range to the 20 ms time range as the guanidinium denaturant concentration was increased from 0.6 to 2.0 M. The more complex refolding kinetics of our labeled

  3. The use of variable temperature and magic-angle sample spinning in studies of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earl, W.L.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thorn, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Intensity distortions and poor signal to noise in the cross-polarization magic-angle sample spinning NMR of fulvic acids were investigated and attributed to molecular mobility in these ostensibly "solid" materials. We have shown that inefficiencies in cross polarization can be overcome by lowering the sample temperature to about -60??C. These difficulties can be generalized to many other synthetic and natural products. The use of variable temperature and cross-polarization intensity as a function of contact time can yield valuable qualitative information which can aid in the characterization of many materials. ?? 1987.

  4. Measurement of the magneto-optical response of Fe and CrO2 epitaxial films by pump-probe spectroscopy: Evidence for spin-charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpene, E.; Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Puppin, E.; Mansurova, M.; Münzenberg, M.; Zhang, X.; Gupta, A.

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the magneto-optical response of Fe and CrO2 epitaxial films by pump-probe polarimetry, showing that charge and spin dynamics can be unambiguously disentangled. The time-resolved Kerr ellipticity and rotation in the metallic sample are essentially identical after the initial transient (shorter than a picosecond), but they considerably differ in the oxide film, even tens of picoseconds past the optical excitation. These differences are determined by the combined effects of photoexcited charge carriers and spins on the Kerr signal, but a detailed polarimetric analysis can explicitly unravel these contributions. In addition, the diagonal and off-diagonal terms of the dielectric tensor can be retrieved, providing the complete dynamical characterization of magnetic and optical properties in a ferromagnet, which is of utmost importance to understand spin evolution in magnetically correlated complex oxide materials.

  5. Photo-Induced Spin-State Conversion in Solvated Transition Metal Complexes Probed via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-04-30

    Solution-phase photoinduced low-spin to high-spin conversion in the FeII polypyridyl complex [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+ (where tren(py)3 is tris(2-pyridylmethyliminoethyl)amine) has been studied via picosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy. Following 1A1 --> 1MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excitation at 560 nm, changes in the iron L2- and L3-edges were observed concomitant with formation of the transient high-spin 5T2 state. Charge-transfer multiplet calculations coupled with data acquired on low-spin and high-spin model complexes revealed a reduction in ligand field splitting of 1 eV in the high-spin state relative to the singlet ground state. A significant reduction in orbital overlap between the central Fe-3d and the ligand N-2p orbitals was directly observed, consistent with the expected ca. 0.2 Angstrom increase in Fe-N bond length upon formation of the high-spin state. The overall occupancy of the Fe-3d orbitals remains constant upon spin crossover, suggesting that the reduction in sigma-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of pi-back-bonding in the metal-ligand interactions. These results demonstrate the feasibility and unique potential of time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study ultrafast reactions in the liquid phase by directly probing the valence orbitals of first-row metals as well as lighter elements during the course of photochemical transformations.

  6. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  7. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  8. Extending the distance range accessed with continuous wave EPR with Gd3+ spin probes at high magnetic fields†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Devin T.; Ma, Zhidong; Meade, Thomas J.; Goldfarb, Daniella; Han, Songi

    2014-01-01

    Interspin distances between 0.8 nm and 2.0 nm can be measured through the dipolar broadening of the continuous wave (cw) EPR spectrum of nitroxide spin labels at X-band (9.4 GHz, 0.35 T). We introduce Gd3+ as a promising alternative spin label for distance measurements by cw EPR above 7 Tesla, where the |−1/2〉 to |1/2〉 transition narrows below 1 mT and becomes extremely sensitive to dipolar broadening. To estimate the distance limits of cw EPR with Gd3+, we have measured spectra of frozen solutions of GdCl3 at 8.6 T (240 GHz) and 10 K at concentrations ranging from 50 mM to 0.1 mM, covering a range of average interspin distances. These experiments show substantial dipolar broadening at distances where line broadening cannot be observed with nitroxides at X-band. This data, and its agreement with calculated dipolar-broadened lineshapes, show Gd3+ to be sensitive to distances as long as ~3.8 nm. Further, the linewidth of a bis-Gd3+ complex with a flexible ~1.6 nm bridge is strongly broadened as compared to the mono-Gd3+ complex, demonstrating the potential for application to pairwise distances. Gd-DOTA-based chelates that can be functionalized to protein surfaces display linewidths narrower than aqueous GdCl3, implying they should be even more sensitive to dipolar broadening. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of tailored Gd3+ labels and high magnetic fields can extend the longest interspin distances measurable by cw EPR from 2.0 nm to 3.8 nm. cw EPR data at 260 K demonstrate that the line broadening remains clear out to similar average interspin distances, offering Gd3+ probes as promising distance rulers at temperatures higher than possible with conventional pulsed EPR distance measurements. PMID:23732863

  9. A Large Sample Volume Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for In-Situ Investigations with Constant Flow of Reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Sears, Jesse A.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ford, Joseph J.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Kake; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Hoyt, David W.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-02-21

    A large-sample-volume constant-flow magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR probe is reported for in-situ studies of the reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions. In our approach, the reactants are introduced into the catalyst bed using a fixed tube at one end of the MAS rotor while a second fixed tube, linked to a vacuum pump, is attached at the other end of the rotor. The pressure difference between both ends of the catalyst bed inside the sample cell space forces the reactants flowing through the catalyst bed, which improves the diffusion of the reactants and products. This design allows the use of a large sample volume for enhanced sensitivity and thus permitting in-situ 13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance. As an example of application, we show that reactants, products and reaction transition states associated with the 2-butanol dehydration reaction over a mesoporous silicalite supported heteropoly acid catalyst (HPA/meso-silicalite-1) can all be detected in a single 13C CF-MAS NMR spectrum at natural abundance. Coke products can also be detected at natural 13C abundance and under the stopped flow condition. Furthermore, 1H CF-MAS NMR is used to identify the surface functional groups of HPA/meso-silicalite-1 under the condition of in-situ drying . We also show that the reaction dynamics of 2-butanol dehydration using HPA/meso-silicalite-1 as a catalyst can be explored using 1H CF-MAS NMR.

  10. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  11. Quantitative approaches to monitor protein–nucleic acid interactions using fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, John M.; Clingman, Carina C.; Ryder, Sean P.

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by proteins is required for nearly every aspect of gene expression. Quantitative binding experiments are a useful tool to measure the ability of a protein to distinguish between multiple sequences. Here, we describe the use of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes to quantitatively monitor protein/nucleic acid interactions. We review two complementary experimental methods, fluorescence polarization and fluorescence electrophoretic mobility shift assays, that enable the quantitative measurement of binding affinity. We also present two strategies for post-synthetic end-labeling of DNA or RNA oligonucleotides with fluorescent dyes. The approaches discussed here are efficient and sensitive, providing a safe and accessible alternative to the more commonly used radio-isotopic methods. PMID:21098142

  12. Folic acid-conjugated europium complexes as luminescent probes for selective targeting of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quici, Silvio; Casoni, Alessandro; Foschi, Francesca; Armelao, Lidia; Bottaro, Gregorio; Seraglia, Roberta; Bolzati, Cristina; Salvarese, Nicola; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-02-26

    We report the synthesis of three optical probes (Eu(3+)⊂1, Eu(3+)⊂2, and Eu(3+)⊂3) having a luminescent Eu complex (signaling unit) bonded in different positions to folic acid (FA), the folate receptor (FR) targeting unit. The structures of the two regioisomers Eu(3+)⊂1 and Eu(3+)⊂2 were assigned by mass spectrometric experiments. The optical properties and stability of these probes were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline, cell culture medium, rat serum, and cellular lysate, and results indicated that they are chemically and photophysically stable. Cytotoxicity was studied with ovarian cancer cells having high (SKOV-3), intermediate (OVCAR-3), low (IGROV-1), or null (A2780) expression of FRs. The internalized probe, evaluated in SKOV-3, IGROV-1, and A2780 cells, was in the order Eu(3+)⊂2 > Eu(3+)⊂1 > Eu(3+)⊂3. No internalization was observed for A2780 cells. Such results, together with those obtained in competition experiments of FA versus Eu(3+)⊂2 and FA or Eu(3+)⊂2 versus (3)H-FA, indicate that internalization is receptor-mediated and that Eu(3+)⊂2 shows high selectivity and specificity for FR. PMID:25602505

  13. Probing the formation and evolution of comets via nuclear spin temperatures of C_2H_6, CH_3OH, CH_4, NH_3, and H_2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G.; Mumma, M.; Bonev, B.; DiSanti, M.; Paganini, L.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Gibb, E.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are true remnants of our primordial Solar System, and provide unique clues to its formation and evolution, including the delivery of organics and water to our planet. A key indicator stored in the molecular structure of the nuclear ices is the spin temperature (T_{spin}), derived from spin-isomeric ratios (R_{spin}, e.g., ortho/para). At the time when cometary ices formed, the prevailing temperature defined the relative abundance of the different spin-isomeric species, and herewith R_{spin} and T_{spin} are normally treated as ''remnant thermometers'' probing the formation environments of cometary molecules. Radiative and collisional transitions between the ortho and para states are strongly forbidden and herewith this indicator is preserved over time. Most of our knowledge of this indicator comes from the measurements of the ortho-para ratios in water and NH_2 (a proxy for ammonia), suggesting a common T_{spin} near 30 K. This information is based on a restricted sample of comets, and the measurements are particularly sensitive to the molecular modeling technique and adopted spectral database. Here, we present new methodologies for extracting spin temperatures from ethane (C_2H_6), methane (CH_4), and methanol (CH_3OH), and advanced new models for ortho/para water (H_2O) and ammonia (NH_3). Our H_2O analysis is based on the most complete fluorescence radiative-transfer model to date, which incorporates 1,200 million transitions including those originating from high-energy levels that are activated in comets via a non-resonant cascade. In a similar fashion, we developed non-resonant fluorescence models for NH_3 and HCN, and quantum-band models for the ν_7 band of C_2H_6 and ν_3 band of CH_3OH. All models respect spin-symmetry non-conversion radiative rules, and make use of a realistic solar spectrum for the computation of fluorescence pumps. We applied these new methods to derive spin-isomeric ratios for H_2O, CH_4, C_2H_6, CH_3OH, and NH_3 from three high

  14. Designed diblock hairpin probes for the nonenzymatic and label-free detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Chen, Junhua; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2016-05-15

    The detection of nucleic acid sequences is of great importance in a variety of fields. An ultrasensitive DNA sensing platform is constructed using elaborately designed diblock hairpin probes (DHPs) that are composed of hairpin and poly-adenine blocks. The introduction of an initiator DNA target triggers the catalytic assembly of probes DHP1, DHP2 and DHP3 to fabricate numerous poly-adenine-tailed branched DNA junctions, which significantly amplify the signal of the target-DNA-recognizing event without any enzyme. Coupled to a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric assay, the amplified recognition signal can be quantitatively detected or visually read with the naked eye. The combination of the high-efficiency target-catalyzed DHP assembly and sensitive gold-based colorimetric assay offers an ultrasensitive detection of DNA with a detection limit of 0.1 pM and a dynamic range from 0.01 to 5 pM. The proposed sensing platform can discriminate even single-base mutations. Moreover, the sensing platform can be expanded to detect pollutant-degrading-bacteria-specific DNA sequences. The proposed sensing system should offer an alternative approach for the detection of nucleic acids in the fields of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and environmental sciences. PMID:26765529

  15. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  16. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  17. Boronic Acid: A Bio-Inspired Strategy To Increase the Sensitivity and Selectivity of Fluorescent NADH Probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jingye; Kim, Beomsue; Peng, Juanjuan; Berry, Stuart N; Ni, Yong; Su, Dongdong; Lee, Jungyeol; Yuan, Lin; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-08-24

    Fluorescent probes have emerged as an essential tool in the molecular recognition events in biological systems; however, due to the complex structures of certain biomolecules, it remains a challenge to design small-molecule fluorescent probes with high sensitivity and selectivity. Inspired by the enzyme-catalyzed reaction between biomolecule and probe, we present a novel combination-reaction two-step sensing strategy to improve sensitivity and selectivity. Based on this strategy, we successfully prepared a turn-on fluorescent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) probe, in which boronic acid was introduced to bind with NADH and subsequently accelerate the sensing process. This probe shows remarkably improved sensitivity (detection limit: 0.084 μM) and selectivity to NADH in the absence of any enzymes. In order to improve the practicality, the boronic acid was further modified to change the measurement conditions from alkalescent (pH 9.5) to physiological environment (pH 7.4). Utilizing these probes, we not only accurately quantified the NADH weight in a health care product but also evaluated intracellular NADH levels in live cell imaging. Thus, these bio-inspired fluorescent probes offer excellent tools for elucidating the roles of NADH in biological systems as well as a practical strategy to develop future sensitive and selective probes for complicated biomolecules. PMID:27500425

  18. An aldehyde group-based P-acid probe for selective fluorescence turn-on sensing of cysteine and homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunlei; Wang, Xiu; Shen, Lei; Deng, Wenping; Liu, Haiyun; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2016-06-15

    A highly sensitive and selective turn on fluorescent probe P-acid-aldehyde (P-CHO) is developed for the determination of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy). The probe is designed and synthesized by incorporating the specific functional group aldehyde group for thiols into a stable π-conjugated material 4,4'-(2,5-dimethoxy-1,4-phenylene) bis(ethyne-2,1-diyl) dibenzoic acid (P-acid). The probe fluorescence is quenched through donor photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET) between the fluorophore (P-acid) and the recognition group (aldehyde group). In the presence of thiols, Cys and Hcy can selectively react with aldehyde group of the probe because the inhibition of d-PET between fluorophore and recognition group. Therefore, a turn-on fluorescent sensor was established for the fluorescence recovery. Under the optimized conditions, the fluorescence response of probe is directly proportional to the concentration of Cys in the range of 4-95 NM L(-1), with a detection limit 3.0 nM. In addition, the sensing system exhibits good selectively toward Cys and Hcy in the presence of other amino acids. It has been successfully applied for bioimaging of Cys and Hcy in living cells with low cell toxicity. PMID:26802748

  19. Radiolytic Modification and Reactivity of Amino Acid Residues Serving as Structural Probes for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting is a convenient and sensitive technique for mapping solvent-accessible surfaces of proteins and examining the structure and dynamics of biological assemblies. In this study, the reactivities and tendencies to form easily detectible products for all 20 (common) amino acid side chains along with cystine are directly compared using various standards. Although we have previously reported on the oxidation of many of these residues, this study includes a detailed examination of the less reactive residues and better defines their usefulness in hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting experiments. All 20 amino amides along with cystine and a few tripeptides were irradiated by -rays, the products were analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry, and rate constants of modification were measured. The reactivities of amino acid side chains were compared based on their loss of mass spectral signal normalized to the rate of loss for Phe or Pro that were radiolyzed simultaneously to serve as internal standards. In this way, accurate quantitation of relative rates could be assured. A reactivity order of amino acid side chains was obtained as Cys > Met > Trp > Tyr > Phe > cystine > His > Leu, Ile > Arg, Lys, Val > Ser, Thr, Pro > Gln, Glu > Asp, Asn > Ala > Gly. Ala and Gly are far too unreactive to be useful probes in typical experiments and Asp and Asn are unlikely to be useful as well. Although Ser and Thr are more reactive than Pro, which is known to be a useful probe, their oxidation products are not easily detectible. Thus, it appears that 14 of the 20 side chains (plus cystine) are most likely to be useful in typical experiments. Since these residues comprise 65% of the sequence of a typical protein, the footprinting approach provides excellent coverage of the side-chain reactivity for proteins.

  20. (1) Majorana fermions in pinned vortices; (2) Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits; and (3) Controlling a nanowire spin-orbit qubit via electric-dipole spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2014-03-01

    We study a heterostructure which consists of a topological insulator and a superconductor with a hole. This system supports a robust Majorana fermion state bound to the vortex core. We study the possibility of using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (i) to detect the Majorana fermion in this setup and (ii) to study excited states bound to the vortex core. The Majorana fermion manifests itself as an H-dependent zero-bias anomaly of the tunneling conductance. The excited states spectrum differs from the spectrum of a typical Abrikosov vortex, providing additional indirect confirmation of the Majorana state observation. We also study how to manipulate and probe Majorana fermions using super-conducting circuits. In we consider a semiconductor nanowire quantum dot with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), which can be used to achieve a spin-orbit qubit. In contrast to a spin qubit, the spin-orbit qubit can respond to an external ac electric field, i.e., electric-dipole spin resonance. We develop a theory that can apply in the strong SOC regime. We find that there is an optimal SOC strength ηopt = √ 2/2, where the Rabi frequency induced by the ac electric field becomes maximal. Also, we show that both the level spacing and the Rabi frequency of the spin-orbit qubit have periodic responses to the direction of the external static magnetic field. These responses can be used to determine the SOC in the nanowire. FN is partly supported by the RIKEN CEMS, iTHES Project, MURI Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics, JSPS-RFBR Contract No. 12-02-92100, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S), MEXT Kakenhi on Quantum Cybernetics, and the JSPS via its FIRST program.

  1. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  2. Exploring the Hybridization Thermodynamics of Spherical Nucleic Acids to Tailor Probes for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Pratik Shailesh

    Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), three-dimensional nanoparticle conjugates composed of densely packed and highly oriented oligonucleotides around organic or inorganic nanoparticles, are an emergent class of nanostructures that show promise as single-entity agents for intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) detection and gene regulation. SNAs exhibit superior biocompatibility and biological properties compared to linear oligonucleotides, enabling them to overcome many of the limitations of linear oligonucleotides for use in biomedical applications. However, the origins of these biologically attractive properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, the chemistry underlying one such property is studied in detail, and the findings are applied towards the rational design of more effective SNAs for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Chapter 1 introduces the synthesis of SNAs, the unique properties that make them superior to linear nucleic acids for biomedicine, and previously studied applications of these structures. Chapter 2 focuses on quantitatively studying the impact of the chemical structure of the SNA on its ability to hybridize multiple complementary nucleic acids. This chapter lays the groundwork for understanding the factors that govern SNA hybridization thermodynamics and how to tailor SNAs to increase their binding affinity to target mRNA strands. Chapters 3 and 4 capitalize on this knowledge to engineer probes for intracellular mRNA detection and gene regulation applications. Chapter 3 reports the development of an SNA-based probe that can simultaneously report the expression level of two different mRNA transcripts in live cells and differentiate diseased cells from non-diseased cells. Chapter 4 investigates the use of topically-applied SNAs to down-regulate a critical mediator of impaired wound healing in diabetic mice to accelerate wound closure. This study represents the first topical therapeutic application of SNA nanotechnology to treat open

  3. Rapid thermal annealing of spin-coated phosphoric acid films for shallow junction formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1997-07-01

    Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of spin-coated phosphoric acid (H3PO4) films on silicon substrates has been studied for the formation of shallow junctions. The junctions are characterized by spreading resistance profiling. Device quality, shallow (<0.2 μm), n+p junctions are formed by the resulting phosphorous diffusion with the junction depth and surface concentration depending on the RTA conditions. The films have been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after various RTA treatments. The presence of P=O bonds in the films becomes evident after the RTA treatment at elevated temperatures (>750 °C), below which absorption bands originating from water species are noted. More than 15% efficient, shallow emitter, large-area (10 cm×10 cm) n+pp+ silicon solar cells are fabricated with a short-time processing using this rapid thermal processing technique.

  4. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, E.; Ernst, H.; Freude, D.; Froehlich, T.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1991-01-01

    {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR was used to elucidate the nature of the catalytic activity of zeolite H-ZSM-5. {sup 1}H MAS NMR of sealed samples after mild hydrothermal dealumination shows that the enhanced activity for n-hexane cracking is not due to an enhanced Bronstead acidity. The concentrations of the various OH groups and aluminous species suggest that the reason for the enhanced catalytic activity is the interaction of the n-hexane molecule with a bridging hydroxyl group and with extra-framework aluminium species, which give rise to the enhanced activity, cannot be easily removed from their positions, and are therefore immobilized by the zeolitic framework.

  5. Spin-lattice coupling in uranium dioxide probed by magnetostriction measurements at high magnetic fields (P08358-E001-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary magnetostriction measurements have already shown a strong interplay of lattice dynamic and magnetism in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, and give unambiguous evidence of strong spin- phonon coupling in uranium dioxide. Further studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in magnetic and paramagnetic states and details of the spin-phonon coupling.

  6. Using spin labels to study molecular processes in soils: Covalent binding of aromatic amines to humic acids of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, O. N.; Kholodov, V. A.; Perminova, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Interactions of aliphatic and aromatic amines with soil and humic acids isolated from it are studied by means of spin labels and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Nitroxyl radicals containing amino groups are used as spin labels. It is found experimentally that aromatic amines are instantaneously converted to the bound state. It is shown that the microareas of their incorporation are characterized by a significant delay in the reduction of the nitroxyl fragment of spin-label molecules, indicating the formation of condensed structures typical of an oxidative binding mechanism. It is concluded that aliphatic amines do not bind to humic acids. It is noted that the studied process allows elucidating the formation of bound xenobiotic residues in soils.

  7. A Sensitive Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe Assay for Detection of BRAF V600 Mutations in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Long; Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Hsieh, Jia-Juan; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Chiou, Chiuan-Chian

    Mutated v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) is an important biomarker for the prediction of therapeutic efficacy of several anticancer drugs. The detection of BRAF mutation faces two challenges: Firstly, there are multiple types of mutations, and secondly, tumor samples usually contain various amounts of wild-type, normal tissues. Here, we describe a newly established method for sensitive detection of multiple types of BRAF V600 mutations in excess wild-type background. The method introduced a fluorophore-tagged peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to serve as both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamp and sensor probe, which inhibited the amplification of wild-type templates during PCR and revealed multiple types of mutant signals during melting analysis. We demonstrated the design and optimization process of the method, and applied it in the detection of BRAF mutations in 49 melanoma samples. This PNA probe assay method detected three types of mutations in 17 samples, and was much more sensitive than conventional PCR plus Sanger sequencing. PMID:27566656

  8. Homonuclear dipolar recoupling under ultra-fast magic-angle spinning: probing 19F-19F proximities by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Hu, Bingwen; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Deng, Feng; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2010-03-01

    We describe dipolar recoupling methods that accomplish, at high magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequencies, the excitation of double-quantum (DQ) coherences between spin-1/2 nuclei. We employ rotor-synchronized symmetry-based pulse sequences which are either gamma-encoded or non-gamma-encoded. The sensitivity and the robustness to both chemical-shift anisotropy and offset are examined. We also compare different techniques to avoid signal folding in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional double-quantum<-->single-quantum (DQ-SQ) spectra. This comprehensive analysis results in the identification of satisfactory conditions for dipolar (19)F-(19)F recoupling at high magnetic fields and high MAS frequencies. The utility of these recoupling methods is demonstrated with high-resolution DQ-SQ NMR spectra, which allow probing (19)F-(19)F proximities in powered fluoroaluminates. PMID:20044288

  9. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  10. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  11. Using nitrile-derivatized amino acids as infrared probes of local environment.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Zelleka; Huang, Cheng-Yen; Wang, Ting; De León, Brenda; DeGrado, William F; Gai, Feng

    2003-01-15

    It is well-known that the C=N stretching vibration in acetonitrile is sensitive to solvent. Therefore, we proposed in this contribution to use this vibrational mode to report local environment of a particular amino acid in proteins or local environmental changes upon binding or folding. We have studied the solvent-induced frequency shift of two nitrile-derivatized amino acids, which are, AlaCN and PheCN, in H(2)O and tetrahydrofuran (THF), respectively. Here, THF was used to approximate a protein's hydrophobic interior because of its low dielectric constant. As expected, the C=N stretching vibrations of both AlaCN and PheCN shift as much as approximately 10 cm(-1) toward higher frequency when THF was replaced with H2O, indicative of the sensitivity of this vibration to solvation. To further test the utility of nitrile-derivatized amino acids as probes of the environment within a peptide, we have studied the binding between calmodulin (CaM) and a peptide from the CaM binding domain of skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK(579-595)), which contains a single PheCN. MLCK(579-595) binds to CaM in a helical conformation. When the PheCN was substituted on the polar side of the helix, which was partially exposed to water, the C=N stretching vibration is similar to that of PheCN in water. In constrast, when PheCN is introduced at a site that becomes buried in the interior of the protein, the C=N stretch is similar to that of PheCN in THF. Together, these results suggest that the C=N stretching vibration of nitrile-derivatized amino acids can indeed be used as local internal environmental markers, especially for protein conformational studies. PMID:12517152

  12. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  13. Spin Labeling ESR Investigation of a Role of Humic Acids at Covalent Binding of Xenobiotics to Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    The environmental risk of organic xenobiotic chemicals released into soils is controlled by their sorption and binding processes. However, the molecular mechanisms of reversible and irreversible interactions of xenobiotics with soil constituents and an influence of humic substances on this interaction are only partly understood. New methods and approaches aimed at understanding of molecular mechanisms in the soil environment and a role of humic substances in the sorption and binding processes are today required to manage and keep the quality of soil used and fertilized in agricultural industry. The paper presents a new approach of using stable ESR spin labels to investigate a role of humic substances in the interactions of organic xenobiotic chemicals with constituents of natural soil via the typical functional groups of xenobiotics, such as Amines. At the experiment, the nitroxide spin labels, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl), Amino-TEMPO (4-amino-2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl) and Aniline spin labels (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl), were added to samples of different natural soils, such luvisol, cambisol and chernozem. Amino-TEMPO and Aniline spin labels include the aliphatic amino and aromatic amino functional groups, respectively. A significant broadening of the ESR spectrum of Aniline spin labels incubated in different soils indicated a stable effect of covalent binding of the spin labels to soil constituents via the aromatic amino, whereas the ESR spectra of the other two spin labels were not broadened that pointed at the absence of covalent binding of spin labels via the aliphatic amino. As shown, a part of bound spin labels via the aromatic amino increased with increasing of the concentration of humic acids in soil. The same broadened signals were also be detected with the humic acids extracted from the investigated soils. A strong covalent binding of spin labels to humic substances via the aromatic amines was

  14. A highly selective turn-on fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid based on hypochlorous acid-induced oxidative intramolecular cyclization of boron dipyrromethene-hydrazone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chieh; Venkatesan, Parthiban; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2015-07-01

    A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe, HBP, was developed for the detection of hypochlorous acid based on the specific hypochlorous acid-promoted oxidative intramolecular cyclization of heterocyclic hydrazone in response to the amount of HOCl. The reaction is accompanied by a 41-fold increase in the fluorescent quantum yield (from 0.004 to 0.164). The fluorescence intensity of the reaction between HOCl and HBP is linear in the HOCl concentration range of 1-8 μM with a detection limit of 2.4 nM (S/N=3). Confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging using RAW264.7 cells showed that the new probe HBP could be used as an effective fluorescent probe for detecting HOCl in living cells. PMID:26043093

  15. E.S.R. of spin-trapped radicals in gamma-irradiated polycrystalline amino acids. Chromatographic separation of radicals.

    PubMed

    Makino, K; Riesz, P

    1982-06-01

    The free radicals produced by gamma-radiolysis of polycrystalline amino acids (L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-proline) at room temperature in the absence of air were investigated by spin trapping with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). The spin adducts produced by dissolving the irradiated solids in aqueous MNP solutions were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and then identified by e.s.r. Deamination (ring-opening reaction for L-proline) was observed for all amino acid. For L-valine and L-leucine, H-abstraction from the tertiary carbon in the side chains occurred. For isoleucine, H-abstractions from the alpha-carbon of the amino acid and from a non-terminal carbon in the side chain were found. PMID:6288602

  16. A colorimetric and near-infrared fluorescent probe with high sensitivity and selectivity for acid phosphatase and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongqian; Li, Benhao; Xiao, Liangliang; Ouyang, Jia; Sun, Shiguo; Pang, Yi

    2014-08-14

    A dual-channel including a colorimetric and fluorescent probe based on the aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) and enzymolysis approach has been presented to screen acid phosphatase (ACP) and its inhibitor. Moreover, the ACP activity was determined by real time assay. PMID:24957006

  17. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  18. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  19. Studies on the photolytic breakdown of hydroperoxides and peroxidized fatty acids by using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Spin trapping of alkoxyl and peroxyl radicals in organic solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M J; Slater, T F

    1986-01-01

    Spin trapping using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) has been used to detect and distinguish between the carbon-centred, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals produced during the photolytic decomposition of hydroperoxides. Photolysis of tert-butyl and cumene hydroperoxides, and peroxidized fatty acids, in toluene, with low levels of u.v. light, is shown to lead to the initial production of alkoxyl radicals by homolysis of the oxygen-oxygen bond. Subsequent reaction of these radicals with excess hydroperoxide leads, by hydrogen abstraction, to the production of peroxyl radicals that can be detected as their corresponding adducts with the spin trap. Subsequent breakdown of these adducts produces alkoxyl radicals and a further species that is believed to be the oxidized spin-trap radical 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrrolidone-2-oxyl. No evidence was obtained at low hydroperoxide concentrations, with either the cumene or lipid alkoxyl radicals, for the occurrence of beta-scission reactions; the production of low levels of carbon-centred radicals is believed to be due to the alternative reactions of hydrogen abstraction, ring closure, and/or 1,2 hydrogen shifts. Analogous experiments with 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (TMPO) led only to the trapping of alkoxyl radicals with no evidence for peroxyl radical adducts, this is presumably due to a decreased rate of radical addition because of increased steric hindrance. PMID:3030287

  20. Probing Hole Spins in an InAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Molecule subject to Lateral Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangyu; Bryant, Garnett; Doty, Matthew

    Quantum dot molecules (QDMs) are structures in which coherent interactions between two or more adjacent quantum dots (QDs) can lead to unique, tunable electronic and spin properties. We explore computationally spin-mixing interactions in the molecular states of single holes confined in vertically-stacked InAs/GaAs self-assembled QDMs. We consider the spin properties of the hole states subject to electric fields that have components both parallel and perpendicular to the molecular stacking axis. We compute the energies of the QDM hole states under various electric and magnetic fields with a combination of full tight binding atomistic calculations and approximate atomistic results using eigenstates found at particular fields as a basis to extrapolate to other fields. We observe a relatively large Stark shift in hole states with the application of lateral electric fields, as well as a quenching of the Zeeman splitting. Most importantly, we observe that lateral electric fields induce hole spin mixing with a magnitude that increases with increasing lateral electric field over a moderate range. These results suggest that applied lateral electric fields provide an opportunity to fine-tune and manipulate, in situ, the energy levels and spin properties of single holes confined in QDMs.

  1. Infrared probe of spin-phonon coupling in antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice compound Li2MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seungjae; Lee, Sanghyun; Jeon, Seyoung; Park, Je-Geun; Moon, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated temperature-dependent infrared-active phonon modes of honeycomb Li2MnO3 which shows an antiferromagnetic transition at T N  =  36 K. In the far-infrared frequency region, we observed fourteen phonon modes. We obtained the temperature dependence of each phonon mode from the analysis of optical conductivity spectra by using the Lorentz and the Fano-type oscillator models. We found that the resonance frequencies of nine phonon modes showed an anomalous behavior near T N that should be attributed to the spin-phonon coupling. We calculated the magnitude of the spin-phonon coupling constant from the shift in the resonance frequencies of the phonon modes below T N. Our results suggest that Li2MnO3 is weakly frustrated and that spin-phonon coupling plays a role in antiferromagnetic ordering.

  2. Evaluation of oxygen-response times of phthalocyanine-based crystalline paramagnetic spin probes for EPR oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Deepti S.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Petryakov, Sergey; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the temporal response of particulate-based EPR oximetry probes to changes in partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). In order to accurately evaluate the oxygen-response time, we developed a method for rapid modulation of pO2 in a chamber containing the probe using an oscillator-driven speaker–diaphragm setup. The apparatus was capable of producing sinusoidal changes in pO2 at frequencies up to 300 Hz or more. The pressure-modulation setup was used to evaluate the temporal response of some of the most commonly used phthalocyanine-based particulate probes. For validation, the time-response of the probes was compared to that of a high sensitivity pressure sensor. The results revealed that some particulate probes could respond to changes in pO2 with a temporal response of 3.3 ms (300 Hz). The observations were interpreted in the light of their crystalline packing in favor of oxygen diffusion. The results of the present study should enable the selection of probes for oximetry applications requiring high temporal resolution. PMID:18479953

  3. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  4. Impact of nucleic acid self-alignment in a strong magnetic field on the interpretation of indirect spin-spin interactions.

    PubMed

    Vavřinská, Andrea; Zelinka, Jiří; Šebera, Jakub; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Fiala, Radovan; Boelens, Rolf; Sklenář, Vladimír; Trantírek, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear and homonuclear direct (D) and indirect (J) spin-spin interactions are important sources of structural information about nucleic acids (NAs). The Hamiltonians for the D and J interactions have the same functional form; thus, the experimentally measured apparent spin-spin coupling constant corresponds to a sum of J and D. In biomolecular NMR studies, it is commonly presumed that the dipolar contributions to Js are effectively canceled due to random molecular tumbling. However, in strong magnetic fields, such as those employed for NMR analysis, the tumbling of NA fragments is anisotropic because the inherent magnetic susceptibility of NAs causes an interaction with the external magnetic field. This motional anisotropy is responsible for non-zero D contributions to Js. Here, we calculated the field-induced D contributions to 33 structurally relevant scalar coupling constants as a function of magnetic field strength, temperature and NA fragment size. We identified two classes of Js, namely (1)JCH and (3)JHH couplings, whose quantitative interpretation is notably biased by NA motional anisotropy. For these couplings, the magnetic field-induced dipolar contributions were found to exceed the typical experimental error in J-coupling determinations by a factor of two or more and to produce considerable over- or under-estimations of the J coupling-related torsion angles, especially at magnetic field strengths >12 T and for NA fragments longer than 12 bp. We show that if the non-zero D contributions to J are not properly accounted for, they might cause structural artifacts/bias in NA studies that use solution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26685997

  5. Probing the spin polarization of current by soft x-ray imaging of current-induced magnetic vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Shinya; Fischer, Peter; Im, Mi-Young; Yamada, Keisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kohno, Hiroshi; Ono, Teruo

    2008-12-09

    Time-resolved soft X-ray transmission microscopy is applied to image the current-induced resonant dynamics of the magnetic vortex core realized in a micron-sized Permalloy disk. The high spatial resolution better than 25 nm enables us to observe the resonant motion of the vortex core. The result also provides the spin polarization of the current to be 0.67 {+-} 0.16 for Permalloy by fitting the experimental results with an analytical model in the framework of the spin-transfer torque.

  6. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

    1999-11-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

  7. Quantification of Syntrophic Fatty Acid-β-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor by Oligonucleotide Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kaare H.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S. wolfei LYB was closely related to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, of which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas. PMID:10543784

  8. Antimicrobial Poly(lactic acid)-Based Nanofibres Developed by Solution Blow Spinning.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Du, Wen-Xian; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Williams, Tina G; Wood, Delilah F; Imam, Syed H; Orts, William J; Lopez-Rubio, Amparo; Lagaron, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports on the development of hybrid poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibres loaded with highly crystalline bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers (BCNW) by the novel solution blow spinning method. Furthermore, fibres with antimicrobial properties were generated by incorporating carvacrol and THC as antimicrobial agents and the biocide effect against Listeria monocytogenes was studied. Initially, PLA blow spun fibres containing BCNW were optimized in terms of morphology and thermal properties. The addition of BCNW was seen to significantly increase the viscosity and surface tension of solutions, restricting the capacity to form fibres for concentrations greater than 30 wt.-% BCNW. 15 wt.-% BCNW was selected as the optimum nanofiller loading as it led to the most uniform fibres morphology, with BCNW homogeneously distributed along the fibres' axis. Subsequently, carvacrol and THC were incorporated into the fibres to confer them with antimicrobial properties, although the hydrophobic PLA matrix did not provide an efficient release of the antimicrobials. Thus, hydrophilic substances were added in order to trigger the antimicrobials release through water sorption mechanisms. The addition of the BCNW filler was not seen to significantly increase the antimicrobial capacity of the fibres by itself and, hence, gelatin was added to help promoting further the hydrophylicity and biocide performance of the fibres. Nevertheless, for the more hydrophilic THC, the biocide capacity of the fibres with gelatin was accentuated further by the presence of the BCNW. PMID:26328414

  9. Self-assembly of pluronic block copolymers in aqueous dispersions of single-wall carbon nanotubes as observed by spin probe EPR.

    PubMed

    Florent, Marc; Shvartzman-Cohen, Rina; Goldfarb, Daniella; Yerushalmi-Rozen, Rachel

    2008-04-15

    The self-assembly of Pluronic block copolymers in dispersions of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) was investigated by spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Nitroxide spin labeled block copolymers derived from Pluronic L62 and P123 were introduced in minute amounts into the dispersions. X-band EPR spectra of the SWNT dispersions and of native polymer solutions were measured as a function of temperature. All spectra, below and above the critical micelle temperature (CMT), were characteristic of the fast limit motional regime. The temperature dependence of the 14N isotropic hyperfine coupling, aiso, and the rotational correlation time, tauc, were determined. It was observed that, below the CMT, EPR does not distinguish between chains adsorbed on SWNT and free chains. Above CMT, substantial differences were observed: in the native solution, the Pluronics spin labels experience only one environment, Sm, assigned to spin labels in the corona of the Pluronic micelle, whereas in the SWNT dispersions, in addition to Sm, a second population of nonaggregated, individual chains, Si, is observed. The relative amounts of Sm and Si were found to depend on the relative concentrations of the Pluronic and SWNT. Furthermore, the aggregates formed in the SWNT dispersions do not show the typical increase in chain-end mobility as a function of temperature, observed in the post-CMT regime of the native Pluronic solutions. This suggests a larger dynamical coupling among aggregated chains in the presence of the SWNT as compared to the native micelles. The overall findings are consistent with the formation of a new type of aggregates, composed of a SWNT-polymer hybrid. PMID:18331068

  10. Exchange Bias as a Probe of the Incommensurate Spin-Density Wave in Epitaxial Fe/Cr(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. S.; Wang, L.; Steiner, K. A.; Crowell, P. A.; Leighton, C.

    2006-12-01

    We report clear multiple period oscillations in the temperature dependence of exchange bias in an Fe thin film exchange coupled to a neighboring Cr film. The oscillations arise due to an incommensurate spin-density wave in the Cr, with wave vector perpendicular to the Fe/Cr(001) interface. The exchange bias and coercivity allow for a determination of the extent of the thermally driven wavelength expansion, the (strain-suppressed) spin-flip transition temperature, and the Cr Néel temperature, which show a crossover from bulklike to finite-size behavior at a Cr thickness of ˜1100Å. The data are consistent with a transition from a transverse to longitudinal wave on cooling.

  11. First observation of high-spin states in {sup 214}Po: Probing the valence space beyond {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Astier, Alain; Porquet, Marie-Genevieve

    2011-01-15

    Excited states in {sup 214}Po have been populated using the {sup 18}O + {sup 208}Pb reaction at 85-MeV beam energy and studied with the Euroball IV {gamma}-multidetector array. The level scheme has been built up to {approx}2.7-MeV excitation energy and spin I=12({h_bar}/2{pi}) from the triple-{gamma} coincidence data. Spin and parity values of most of the observed states have been assigned from the {gamma}-angular properties. The configurations of the yrast states are discussed using results of empirical shell-model calculations and by analogy with the neighboring nuclei. The {sup 214}Po level scheme established in this work constitutes an important step for the determination of the effective nucleon-nucleon interactions beyond N=126.

  12. Antiferromagnetic spin structure and lithium ion diffusion in Li2MnO3 probed by μ+SR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Jun; Mukai, Kazuhiko; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Harada, Masashi; Månsson, Martin; Kamazawa, Kazuya; Andreica, Daniel; Amato, Alex; Hillier, Adrian D.

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate the antiferromagnetic (AF) spin structure below TN˜35 K and to clarify the diffusive behavior of Li+ ions in the layered compound Li2MnO3, we have performed a muon-spin rotation and relaxation (μ+SR) experiment using a powder sample in the temperature range between 2 and 500 K. Below TN, the zero-field (ZF-) μ+SR spectrum showed a clear oscillation that consists of two muon-spin precession signals with different frequencies. Combining with the dipole field calculations, it was found that the most probable spin structure for Li2MnO3 is the Cx-type AF order in which Mn moments align parallel or antiparallel to the a axis in the [Li1/3Mn2/3]O2 layer, and a ferromagnetic chain along the a axis aligns antiferromagnetically along both the b and c axes. The ordered Mn moment was estimated as 2.62μB at 2 K. In the paramagnetic state, ZF- and longitudinal-field μ+SR spectra exhibited a dynamic nuclear field relaxation. From the temperature dependence of the field distribution width, the Li+ ions were found to diffuse mainly along the c axis through the Li ion in the [Li1/3Mn2/3]O2 layer. Also, based on the field fluctuation rate, a self-diffusion coefficient of Li+ ions (DLi) at 300 K was estimated as 4.7(4)×10-11 cm2/s with the thermal activation energy Ea=0.156(3) eV.

  13. Jet drifts and flips in radio galaxies as probes of the historical evolution of spin axis in supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Hall Roberts, David

    2015-08-01

    Jets in radio galaxies create twin lobes of synchrotron plasma on opposite sides of the host elliptical. The jets are believed to emerge along the spin axis of the central supermassive black hole. The history of evolution in spin axis is traced in the off axis distortions in the radio structure. We have analyzed the radio structures in a large sample of distorted radio galaxies to examine black hole spin axis behavior. These sources are selected specifically to have low axial-ratio structures and hence off-axis distortions that are, however, unbiased with respect to the nature of the distortions.We have imaged 52 radio galaxies having length to width ratio less than 1 to obtain detailed radio structures that enable a tracing of the origin of the off-axis radio emission. The unique sample consists of radio sources where the off axis radio emission originates from strategic locations - regions closer to the host galaxy and from the outer ends of the jets. A third category consists of sources where there is only a swathe of radio emission nearly orthogonal to the radio axis and passing through the central radio core.Our study has highlighted the potential of radio galaxies in tracing black hole spin axis changes over time; we use the occurrence rates of the different categories of sources to derive occurrence rates of drifts and flips in black hole axis. Since the host galaxies are an unbiased sampling of luminous elliptical galaxies, the rates derived are relevant to this parent population (Roberts, Cohen, Lu, Saripalli and Subrahmanyan, 2015, arXiv150203954; Roberts, Saripalli, Subrahmanyan, 2015, arXiv150302021).

  14. Near-infrared fluorescence probe for the determination of acid phosphatase and imaging of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zihan; Liu, Ziping; Zhang, Hao; Su, Xingguang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we developed a near-infrared mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped CuInS2 quantum dot (QD) fluorescence probe for the detection of acid phosphatases (ACP), which is an important biomarker and indicator of prostate cancer. The fluorescence of CuInS2 QDs could be quenched by Cu(2+), and then the addition of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) could effectively turn on the quenched fluorescence due to the strong interaction between Cu(2+) and ATP. The ACP could catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP, which would disassemble the complex of Cu(2+)-ATP. Therefore, the recovered fluorescence could be quenched again by the addition of ACP. In our method, the limit of detection (LOD) is considerably low for ACP detection in solution. Using the CuInS2 QDs fluorescence probe, we successfully performed in vitro imaging of human prostate cancer cells. PMID:25632410

  15. Detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms using very short, locked nucleic acid TaqMan probes.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sergio; D'Orso, Fabio; Morelli, Giorgio

    2008-06-25

    Many countries have introduced mandatory labeling requirements on foods derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based upon the TaqMan probe chemistry has become the method mostly used to support these regulations; moreover, event-specific PCR is the preferred method in GMO detection because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence of the exogenous integrant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of very short (eight-nucleotide long), locked nucleic acid (LNA) TaqMan probes in 5'-nuclease PCR assays for the detection and quantification of GMOs. Classic TaqMan and LNA TaqMan probes were compared for the analysis of the maize MON810 transgene. The performance of the two types of probes was tested on the maize endogenous reference gene hmga, the CaMV 35S promoter, and the hsp70/cryIA(b) construct as well as for the event-specific 5'-integration junction of MON810, using plasmids as standard reference molecules. The results of our study demonstrate that the LNA 5'-nuclease PCR assays represent a valid and reliable analytical system for the detection and quantification of transgenes. Application of very short LNA TaqMan probes to GMO quantification can simplify the design of 5'-nuclease assays. PMID:18494480

  16. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH. PMID:23391931

  17. Theoretical study of the NLO responses of some natural and unnatural amino acids used as probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Derrar, S N; Sekkal-Rahal, M; Derreumaux, P; Springborg, M

    2014-08-01

    The first hyperpolarizabilities β of the natural aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine have been investigated using several methods and basis sets. Some of the theoretical results obtained were compared to the only experimental hyper-Rayleigh scattering data available. The sensitivity of tryptophan to its local environment was analyzed by constructing two-dimensional potential energy plots around the dipeptide tryptophan-lysine. Static hyperpolarizabilities β(0) of the found minima were calculated by a second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) method in combination with the 6-31+G(d) basis set. Moreover, the efficiency of tryptophan and those of a series of unnatural amino acids as endogenous probe molecules were tested by calculating the nonlinear responses of some peptides. Impressive results were obtained for the amino acid ALADAN, which shows significantly improved nonlinear performance compared to other amino acids with weak nonlinear responses. PMID:25092242

  18. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (Cdbnd C) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210 nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140 nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50 s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution.

  19. A carbon dot-based "off-on" fluorescent probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhao; Wang, Libing; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2015-08-15

    We herein report a facile, one-step pyrolysis synthesis of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) using citric acid as the carbon source and lysine as the surface passivation reagent. The as-prepared CDs show narrow size distribution, excellent blue fluorescence and good photo-stability and water dispersivity. The fluorescence of the CDs was found to be effectively quenched by ferric (Fe(III)) ions with high selectivity via a photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Upon addition of phytic acid (PA) to the CDs/Fe(III) complex dispersion, the fluorescence of the CDs was significantly recovered, arising from the release of Fe(III) ions from the CDs/Fe(III) complex because PA has a higher affinity for Fe(III) ions compared to CDs. Furthermore, we developed an "off-on" fluorescence assay method for the detection of phytic acid using CDs/Fe(III) as a fluorescent probe. This probe enables the selective detection of PA with a linear range of 0.68-18.69 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio is 3) of 0.36 μM. The assay method demonstrates high selectivity, repeatability, stability and recovery ratio in the detection of the standard and real PA samples. We believe that the facile operation, low-cost, high sensitivity and selectivity render this CD-based "off-on" fluorescent probe an ideal sensing platform for the detection of PA. PMID:25829220

  20. pH-Sensitive Polymeric Micelle-based pH Probe for Detecting and Imaging Acidic Biological Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ju; Kang, Han Chang; Hu, Jun; Nichols, Joseph W.; Jeon, Yong Sun; Bae, You Han

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of monomeric pH probes for acidic tumor environments, this study designed a mixed micelle pH probe composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-b- poly(L-histidine) (PHis) and PEG-b-poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), which is well-known as an effective antitumor drug carrier. Unlike monomeric histidine and PHis derivatives, the mixed micelles can be structurally destabilized by changes in pH, leading to a better pH sensing system in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The acidic pH-induced transformation of the mixed micelles allowed pH detection and pH mapping of 0.2–0.3 pH unit differences by pH-induced “on/off”-like sensing of NMR and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The micellar pH probes sensed pH differences in non-biological phosphate buffer and biological buffers such as cell culture medium and rat whole blood. In addition, the pH-sensing ability of the mixed micelles was not compromised by loaded doxorubicin. In conclusion, PHis-based micelles could have potential as a tool to simultaneously treat and map the pH of solid tumors in vivo. PMID:22861824

  1. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (CC) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution. PMID:27236136

  2. Polymer dynamics near the surface and in the bulk of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) probed by zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Salman, Zaher; Giblin, Sean R.; Han, Yun Yu; Leach, Gary W.; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The results of many experiments on polymers such as polystyrene indicate that the polymer chains near a free surface exhibit enhanced dynamics when compared with the bulk. We have investigated whether this is the case for poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) by using zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy to characterize a local probe, the F-Mu+-F state, which forms when spin-polarized positive muons are implanted in PTFE. Low-energy muons (implantation energies from 2.0 to 23.0 keV) were used to study the F-Mu+-F state between ˜23 and 191 nm from the free surface of PTFE. Measurements were also made with surface muons (4.1 MeV) where the mean implantation depth is on the order of ˜0.6 mm. The relaxation rate of the F-Mu+-F state up to ˜150 K was found to be significantly higher for muons implanted at 2.0 keV than for higher implantation energies, which suggests that the polymer chains in a region on the order of a few tens of nanometers from the free surface are more mobile than those in the bulk.

  3. Polymer dynamics near the surface and in the bulk of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) probed by zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Iain; Salman, Zaher; Giblin, Sean R; Han, Yun Yu; Leach, Gary W; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The results of many experiments on polymers such as polystyrene indicate that the polymer chains near a free surface exhibit enhanced dynamics when compared with the bulk. We have investigated whether this is the case for poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) by using zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy to characterize a local probe, the F-Mu(+)-F state, which forms when spin-polarized positive muons are implanted in PTFE. Low-energy muons (implantation energies from 2.0 to 23.0 keV) were used to study the F-Mu(+)-F state between ∼ 23 and 191 nm from the free surface of PTFE. Measurements were also made with surface muons (4.1 MeV) where the mean implantation depth is on the order of ∼ 0.6 mm. The relaxation rate of the F-Mu(+)-F state up to ∼ 150 K was found to be significantly higher for muons implanted at 2.0 keV than for higher implantation energies, which suggests that the polymer chains in a region on the order of a few tens of nanometers from the free surface are more mobile than those in the bulk. PMID:25353500

  4. Contributions of the electronic spin and orbital current to the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} magnetic field probed in polarised neutron diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cassam-Chenaie, Patrick; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2012-08-14

    Polarised neutron diffraction experiments conducted at 4.2 K on Cs{sub 3}CoCl{sub 5} crystals have been analysed by using a four-dimensional model Hilbert space made of ab initio n-electron wave functions of the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} molecular ion. Two spin-orbit mixing coefficients and several configuration interaction coefficients have been optimized by fitting calculated magnetic structure factors to experimental ones, to obtain the best ensemble density operator that is representable in the model space. A goodness of fit, {chi}{sup 2}, less then 1 has been obtained for the first time for the two experimental data sets available. In the present article, the optimized density operators are used to calculate the magnetic field densities that are the genuine observables probed in neutron diffraction experiments. Density maps of such observables are presented for the first time and numerical details are provided. The respective contributions of spin density and orbital current to the magnetic field density are analyzed.

  5. Erratum for the Appendix of "Measuring small compartment dimensions by probing diffusion dynamics via Non-uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin-Echo (NOGSE) NMR" [J. Magn. Reson. 247 (2014) 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemesh, Noam; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-05-01

    This corrects a typo of Eq. (A4) in the Erratum [J. Magn. Reson. 247 (2014) 110] for the Appendix of "Measuring small compartment dimensions by probing diffusion dynamics via Non-uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin-Echo (NOGSE) NMR". The Erratum should have read as follow:

  6. Detection of Sialic Acid-Utilising Bacteria in a Caecal Community Batch Culture Using RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Young, Wayne; Egert, Markus; Bassett, Shalome A.; Bibiloni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids are monosaccharides typically found on cell surfaces and attached to soluble proteins, or as essential components of ganglioside structures that play a critical role in brain development and neural transmission. Human milk also contains sialic acid conjugated to oligosaccharides, glycolipids, and glycoproteins. These nutrients can reach the large bowel where they may be metabolised by the microbiota. However, little is known about the members of the microbiota involved in this function. To identify intestinal bacteria that utilise sialic acid within a complex intestinal community, we cultured the caecal microbiota from piglets in the presence of 13C-labelled sialic acid. Using RNA-based stable isotope probing, we identified bacteria that consumed 13C-sialic acid by fractionating total RNA in isopycnic buoyant density gradients followed by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Addition of sialic acid caused significant microbial community changes. A relative rise in Prevotella and Lactobacillus species was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in the genera Escherichia/Shigella, Ruminococcus and Eubacterium. Inspection of isotopically labelled RNA sequences suggests that the labelled sialic acid was consumed by a wide range of bacteria. However, species affiliated with the genus Prevotella were clearly identified as the most prolific users, as solely their RNA showed significantly higher relative shares among the most labelled RNA species. Given the relevance of sialic acid in nutrition, this study contributes to a better understanding of their microbial transformation in the intestinal tract with potential implications for human health. PMID:25816158

  7. A universal strategy for visual chiral recognition of α-amino acids with l-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoxin; Zhou, Fulin; Xu, Chunli; Li, Baoxin

    2016-02-01

    The ability to recognize and quantify the chirality of alpha-amino acids constitutes the basis of many critical areas for specific targeting in drug development and metabolite probing. It is still challenging to conveniently distinguish the enantiomer of amino acids largely due to the lack of a universal and simple strategy. In this work, we report a strategy for the visual recognition of α-amino acids. It is based on the chirality of l-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles (l-TA-capped AuNPs, ca. 13 nm in diameter). All of 19 right-handed α-amino acids can induce a red-to-blue color change of l-TA-capped AuNP solution, whereas all of the left-handed amino acids (except cysteine) cannot. The chiral recognition can be achieved by the naked eye and a simple spectrophotometer. This method does not require complicated chiral modification, and excels through its low-cost, good availability of materials and its simplicity. Another notable feature of this method is its high generality, and this method can discriminate almost all native α-amino acid enantiomers. This versatile method could be potentially used for high-throughput chiral recognition of amino acids. PMID:26759834

  8. Fabrication of Magnetic Probes for Spin-Polarized STM Studies of the Fe3O4 (001) and (111) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, S. F.; Mariotto, G.; Berdunov, N.; Murphy, S.; Jordan, K.; Shvets, I. V.

    2003-12-01

    Electrochemical etching in an aqueous solution (NaOH, HCl), using a teflon tubing to physically restrict the active etching region, has been developed to fabricate Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) tips from a range of magnetic materials. Tips have been produced from polycrystalline MnNi, Cr, Fe and Ni with small radius of curvature, high aspect ratio and apexes in the 50-100 nm range. Atomic resolution STM images have been achieved on the Fe3O4 (001) and (111) surface using MnNi tips, which are interpreted in terms of a possible spin-polarized effect.

  9. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Henn, T.; Kiessling, T. Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V.

    2013-12-15

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  10. Detection of Chromosomal Inversions Using Non-Repetitive Nucleic Acid Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and a kit for the identification of chromosomal inversions are described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  11. Detection of chromosomal inversions using non-repetitive nucleic acid probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for the identification of chromosomal inversions is described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  12. Development of electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy to probe the secondary structure of recombinant membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongfu; Sahu, Indra D; Gibson, Kaylee R; Muhammad, Nefertiti B; Bali, Avnika P; Comer, Raven G; Liu, Lishan; Craig, Andrew F; Mccarrick, Robert M; Dabney-Smith, Carole; Sanders, Charles R; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-11-01

    Membrane proteins conduct many important biological functions essential to the survival of organisms. However, due to their inherent hydrophobic nature, it is very difficult to obtain structural information on membrane-bound proteins using traditional biophysical techniques. We are developing a new approach to probe the secondary structure of membrane proteins using the pulsed EPR technique of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy. This method has been successfully applied to model peptides made synthetically. However, in order for this ESEEM technique to be widely applicable to larger membrane protein systems with no size limitations, protein samples with deuterated residues need to be prepared via protein expression methods. For the first time, this study shows that the ESEEM approach can be used to probe the local secondary structure of a (2) H-labeled d8 -Val overexpressed membrane protein in a membrane mimetic environment. The membrane-bound human KCNE1 protein was used with a known solution NMR structure to demonstrate the applicability of this methodology. Three different α-helical regions of KCNE1 were probed: the extracellular domain (Val21), transmembrane domain (Val50), and cytoplasmic domain (Val95). These results indicated α-helical structures in all three segments, consistent with the micelle structure of KCNE1. Furthermore, KCNE1 was incorporated into a lipid bilayer and the secondary structure of the transmembrane domain (Val50) was shown to be α-helical in a more native-like environment. This study extends the application of this ESEEM approach to much larger membrane protein systems that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography and/or NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26355804

  13. Human papillomavirus 35 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 35 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 35 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 35 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  14. Human papillomavirus 56 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorinez, A.T.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes an HPV 56 hybridization probe. It comprises: a member selected from the group consisting of HPV 56 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and HPV 56 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  15. Human papillomavirus 44 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 44 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (1) HPV 44 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 44 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  16. Human papillomavirus 43 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 43 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 43 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 43 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  17. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  18. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  19. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  20. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1999-03-30

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  1. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1998-11-24

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  2. Nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles as affinity probes for enrichment of histidine-tagged proteins and phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Ya-Shiuan; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chen, Cheng-Tai; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-10-01

    We herein demonstrate superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with nitrilotriacetic acid derivative (NTA) that can bind with different immobilized metal ions are capable of probing diverse target species. Immobilized Ni(II) on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles have the capability of selectively trapping histidine (His)-tagged proteins such as a mutated streptopain tagged with 6x His, i.e., C192S (MW approximately 42 kDa), from cell lysates. Enrichment was achieved by vigorously mixing the sample solution and the nanoparticles by pipetting in and out of a sample vial for only 30 s. After enrichment, the probe-target species could be readily isolated by magnetic separation. We also characterized the proteins enriched on the affinity probes using on-probe tryptic digestion under microwave irradiation for only 2 min, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Using this enrichment and tryptic digestion, the target species can be rapidly enriched and characterized, reducing the time required for carrying out the complete analysis to less than 10 min. Furthermore, when either Zr(IV) or Ga (III) ions are immobilized on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles, the nanoparticles have the capability of selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides from tryptic digests of alpha-, beta-caseins, and diluted milk. The detection limit for the tryptic digests of alpha- and beta-caseins is approximately 50 fmol. PMID:17784733

  3. Probing temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of GdFeCo film by Kerr loops and ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wei Liu, Hao-Liang; Cai, Jian-Wang; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Wu, Hong-Ye

    2015-01-26

    The magnetic anisotropy is of both scientific and technological interest for magneto-optical material GdFeCo film. We characterize the magnetic anisotropy of a 20 nm GdFeCo film from 265 K to 320 K via Kerr loops and ferromagnetic resonance. With increasing temperature, both of the first-order uniaxial magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy increase. However, the competition between them causes a temperature-driven spin reorientation transition (SRT) and the effective perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decrease from 2.22 × 10{sup 4 }ergs/cm{sup 3} (288 K) to −1.56 × 10{sup 4 }ergs/cm{sup 3} (317 K). The positive second-order uniaxial magnetic anisotropy determines an easy-cone state as the mediated state during SRT.

  4. Polarized Neutron Diffraction to Probe Local Magnetic Anisotropy of a Low-Spin Fe(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Ridier, Karl; Mondal, Abhishake; Boilleau, Corentin; Cador, Olivier; Gillon, Béatrice; Chaboussant, Grégory; Le Guennic, Boris; Costuas, Karine; Lescouëzec, Rodrigue

    2016-03-14

    We have determined by polarized neutron diffraction (PND) the low-temperature molecular magnetic susceptibility tensor of the anisotropic low-spin complex PPh4 [Fe(III) (Tp)(CN)3 ]⋅H2 O. We found the existence of a pronounced molecular easy magnetization axis, almost parallel to the C3 pseudo-axis of the molecule, which also corresponds to a trigonal elongation direction of the octahedral coordination sphere of the Fe(III) ion. The PND results are coherent with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, magnetometry, and ab initio investigations. Through this particular example, we demonstrate the capabilities of PND to provide a unique, direct, and straightforward picture of the magnetic anisotropy and susceptibility tensors, offering a clear-cut way to establish magneto-structural correlations in paramagnetic molecular complexes. PMID:26890339

  5. Probing the neutron star spin evolution in the young Small Magellanic Cloud Be/X-ray binary SXP 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Turolla, R.

    2012-03-01

    The newly discovered Be/X-ray binary in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 1062, provides the first example of a robust association with a supernova remnant (SNR). The short age estimated for the SNR qualifies SXP 1062 as the youngest known source in its class, ?. As such, it allows us to test current models of magnetorotational evolution of neutron stars in a still unexplored regime. Here we discuss possible evolutionary scenarios for SXP 1062 in an attempt to reconcile its long spin period, ?, and short age. Although several options can be considered, like an anomalously long initial period or the presence of a fossil disc, our results indicate that SXP 1062 may host a neutron star born with a large initial magnetic field, typically in excess of ˜ 1014 G, which then decayed to ˜ 1013 G.

  6. DNA and RNA "traffic lights": synthetic wavelength-shifting fluorescent probes based on nucleic acid base substitutes for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Carolin; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2013-08-01

    The DNA base substitute approach by the (S)-3-amino-1,2-propanediol linker allows placing two fluorophores in a precise way inside a given DNA framework. The double helical architecture around the fluorophores, especially the DNA-induced twist, is crucial for the desired photophysical interactions. Excitonic, excimer, and energy transfer interactions yield fluorescent DNA and RNA probes with dual emission color readout. Especially, our DNA and RNA "traffic light" that combines the green emission of TO with the red emission of TR represents an important tool for molecular imaging and can be applied as aptasensors and as probes to monitor the siRNA delivery into cells. The concept can be extended to the synthetically easier to access postsynthetic 2'-modifications and the NIR range. Thereby, the pool of tailor-made fluorescent nucleic acid conjugates can be extended. PMID:23796243

  7. A Far-Red Emitting Probe for Unambiguous Detection of Mobile Zinc in Acidic Vesicles and Deep Tissue†

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Fuentes, Pablo; Wrobel, Alexandra T.; Zastrow, Melissa L.; Khan, Mustafa; Georgiou, John; Luyben, Thomas T.; Roder, John C.; Okamoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mobile zinc in acidic environments remains challenging because most small-molecule optical probes display pH-dependent fluorescence. Here we report a reaction-based sensor that detects mobile zinc unambiguously at low pH. The sensor responds reversibly and with a large dynamic range to exogenously applied Zn2+ in lysosomes of HeLa cells, endogenous Zn2+ in insulin granules of MIN6 cells, and zinc-rich mossy fiber boutons in hippocampal tissue from mice. This long-wavelength probe is compatible with the green-fluorescent protein, enabling multicolor imaging, and facilitates visualization of mossy fiber boutons at depths of >100 µm, as demonstrated by studies in live tissue employing two-photon microscopy. PMID:25815162

  8. A ratiometric fluorescent probe based on boron dipyrromethene and rhodamine Förster resonance energy transfer platform for hypochlorous acid and its application in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2016-05-19

    We have developed a ratiometric fluorescent probe BRT based on boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and rhodamine-thiohydrazide Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) platform for sensing hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with high selectivity and sensitivity. The probe can detect HOCl in 15 s with the detection limit of 38 nM. Upon mixing with HOCl the fluorescence colour of probe BRT changed from green to orange. Moreover, probe BRT was applied to successfully monitor HOCl in living RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:27126792

  9. Real-Time PCR Genotyping using Taqman Probes to Detect High Oleic Acid Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid, a monounsaturated, omega-9 fatty acid is an important agronomic trait in peanut cultivars because it provides increased shelf life, improved flavor, enhanced fatty acid composition, and a beneficial effect on human health. Currently, most high oleic peanuts confer limited resistance to ...

  10. Physical characterization of the state of motion of the phenalenyl spin probe in cation-exchanged faujasite zeolite supercages with pulsed EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetschman, D. C.; Dwyer, D. W.; Fox, J. D.; Frederick, C. K.; Scull, S.; Thomas, G. D.; Utterback, S. G.; Wei, J.

    1994-08-01

    The molecular motion of the phenalenyl (PNL) spin probe in the supercages of cation-exchanged X and Y zeolites (faujasites) has been physically characterized by pulsed and continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Both X and Y zeolites, whose cation sites were exchanged with the alkali metal ions, Li +, Na +, K +, Rb + and Cs + were examined. There is a good correspondence between the temperature dependences of the PNL electron spin phase memory time and the CW EPR spectra. Both display evidence of a thermal activation from a stationary, non-rotating molecular state to a low-temperature state of in-plane rotation (Das et al., Chem Phys. 143 (1990) 253). The rate of in-plane rotation is an activated process, with E* | / R=1289 |+- 35 K and 1462 ± 47 K in NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The rotation appears to be about an axis along which the half-filled, non-bonding π orbital interacts with the exchanged cation in the supercage. Both CW and pulsed EPR also show a higher temperature activation from the in-plane rotating state to an effectively isoptropic state of rotation of PNL in which the PNL-cation bond is thought to be broken, with E* ⊥ / R=2050 ± 110 K, 1956 ± 46K, 1335 ± 97 K in LiX, NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The strength of the PNL-cation bonding decreases with increasing cation atomic number as indicated by E* ⊥ and the peripheral repulsion (crowding) of PNL increases with cation size as indicated E* |. There are qualitative indications that the binding of PNL to the cations in the Y zeolite is stronger than in the X zeolite.

  11. Switching of the Spin-Density-Wave in CeCoIn5 probed by Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk Y.; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Weickert, Franziska; Bauer, Eric D.; Ronning, Filip; Thompson, Joe D.; Movshovich, Roman

    Unconventional superconductor CeCoIn5 orders magnetically in a spin-density-wave (SDW) in the low-temperature and high-field corner of the superconducting phase. Recent neutron scattering experiment revealed that the single-domain SDW's ordering vector Q depends strongly on the direction of the magnetic field, switching sharply as the field is rotated through the anti-nodal direction. This switching may be manifestation of a pair-density-wave (PDW) p-wave order parameter, which develops in addition to the well-established d-wave order parameter due to the SDW formation. We have investigated the hypersensitivity of the magnetic domain with a thermal conductivity measurement. The heat current (J) was applied along the [110] direction such that the Q vector is either perpendicular or parallel to J, depending on the magnetic field direction. A discontinuous change of the thermal conductivity was observed when the magnetic field is rotated around the [100] direction within 0 . 2° . The thermal conductivity with the Q parallel to the heat current (J ∥Q) is approximately 15% lager than that with the Q perpendicular to the heat current (J ⊥Q). This result is consistent with additional gapping of the nodal quasiparticle by the p-wave PDW coupled to SDW. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

  12. Pulsed Electron Double Resonance in Structural Studies of Spin-Labeled Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, O. S.; Tsvetkov, Yu. D.

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with the application of the pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) method to studies of spin-labeled DNA and RNA with complicated spatial structures, such as tetramers, aptamers, riboswitches, and three- and four-way junctions. The use of this method for studying DNA damage sites is also described. PMID:23556128

  13. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23-230) as detected by [(1)H, (15)N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn(2+)-binding to the octarepeat motif. PMID:27341298

  14. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23–230) as detected by [1H, 15N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn2+-binding to the octarepeat motif. PMID:27341298

  15. The Use of p-Aminobenzoic Acid as a Probe Substance for the Targeted Profiling of Glycine Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Nortje, Carla; van der Sluis, Rencia; van Dijk, Alberdina Aike; Erasmus, Elardus

    2016-03-01

    Glycine conjugation facilitates the metabolism of toxic aromatic acids, capable of disrupting mitochondrial integrity. Owing to the high exposure to toxic substrates, characterization of individual glycine conjugation capacity, and its regulatory factors has become increasingly important. Aspirin and benzoate have been employed for this purpose; however, adverse reactions, aspirin intolerance, and Reye's syndrome in children are substantial drawbacks. The goal of this study was to investigate p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as an alternative glycine conjugation probe. Ten human volunteers participated in a PABA challenge test, and p-aminohippuric acid (PAHA), p-acetamidobenzoic acid, and p-acetamidohippuric acid were quantified in urine. The glycine N-acyltransferase gene of the volunteers was also screened for two polymorphisms associated with normal and increased enzyme activity. All of the individuals were homozygous for increased enzyme activity, but excretion of PAHA varied significantly (16-56%, hippurate ratio). The intricacies of PABA metabolism revealed possible limiting factors and the potential of PABA as an indicator of Phase 0 biotransformation. PMID:26484797

  16. Probing the Active Center of Benzaldehyde Lyase with Substitutions and the Pseudosubstrate Analogue Benzoylphosphonic Acid Methyl Ester

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; McLeish, Michael J.; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-28

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg{sup 2+} as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these types of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analogue of benzoylformic acid, is used to probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 {angstrom} (Protein Data Bank entry 3D7K) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase.

  17. Probing the active center of benzaldehyde lyase with substitutions and the pseudo-substrate analog benzoylphosphonic acid methyl ester

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; McLeish, Michael J.; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg2+ as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these type of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analog of benzoylformic acid, is used to probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 Å (PDB ID: 3D7K) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase. PMID:18570438

  18. Mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots as fluorescence probe for the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2015-11-01

    Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dot (QDs) fluorescent probes were synthesized in aqueous solution and used for the determination of salicylic acid. The interaction between the MPA-capped CdTe QDs and salicylic acid was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and some parameters that could modify the fluorescence were investigated to optimize the measurements. Under optimum conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity of MPA-capped CdTe QDs was linearly proportional to the concentration of salicylic acid in the range of 0.5-40 µg mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination of 0.998, and the limit of detection was 0.15 µg mL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products, and satisfactory results were obtained that were in agreement with both the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and the claimed values. The recovery of the method was in the range 99 ± 3% to 105 ± 9%. The proposed method is simple, rapid, cost effective, highly sensitivity and eminently suitable for the quality control of pharmaceutical preparation. The possible mechanisms for the observed quenching reaction was also discussed. PMID:25683730

  19. Distortional binding of transition state analogs to human purine nucleoside phosphorylase probed by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vetticatt, Mathew J; Itin, Boris; Evans, Gary B; Schramm, Vern L

    2013-10-01

    Transition state analogs mimic the geometry and electronics of the transition state of enzymatic reactions. These molecules bind to the active site of the enzyme much tighter than substrate and are powerful noncovalent inhibitors. Immucillin-H (ImmH) and 4'-deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-9-methylene Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) are picomolar inhibitors of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (hPNP). Although both molecules are electronically similar to the oxocarbenium-like dissociative hPNP transition state, DADMe-ImmH is more potent than ImmH. DADMe-ImmH captures more of the transition state binding energy by virtue of being a closer geometric match to the hPNP transition state than ImmH. A consequence of these similarities is that the active site of hPNP exerts greater distortional forces on ImmH than on DADMe-ImmH to "achieve" the hPNP transition state geometry. By using magic angle spinning solid-state NMR to investigate stable isotope-labeled ImmH and DADMe-ImmH, we have explored the difference in distortional binding of these two inhibitors to hPNP. High-precision determinations of internuclear distances from NMR recoupling techniques, rotational echo double resonance, and rotational resonance, have provided unprecedented atomistic insight into the geometric changes that occur upon binding of transition state analogs. We conclude that hPNP stabilizes conformations of these chemically distinct analogs having distances between the cation and leaving groups resembling those of the known transition state. PMID:24043827

  20. Diffusive behavior in LiMPO4 with M=Fe, Co, Ni probed by muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Jun; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Harada, Masashi; Kamazawa, Kazuya; Ikedo, Yutaka; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Ofer, Oren; Månsson, Martin; Ansaldo, Eduardo J.; Chow, Kim H.; Kobayashi, Genki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2012-02-01

    In order to study the diffusive nature of lithium transition-metal phospho-olivines, we measured muon-spin relaxation (μ+SR) spectra for the polycrystalline LiMPO4 samples with M=Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni in the temperature range between 50 and 500 K. The μ+SR spectra under zero applied field are strongly affected by the magnetic moments of the 3d electrons in the M2+ ions so that, for LiMnPO4, it was difficult to detect the relaxation change caused by the diffusion due to the large Mn2+(S=5/2) moments. However, diffusive behavior was clearly observed via the relaxation due to nuclear dipolar fields above ˜150 K for LiFePO4, LiCoPO4, and LiNiPO4 as S decreased from 2 to 1. From the temperature dependence of the nuclear field fluctuation rate, self-diffusion coefficients of Li+ ions (DLi) at 300 K and its activation energy (Ea) were estimated, respectively, as ˜3.6(2)×10-10 cm2/s and Ea=0.10(2) eV for LiFePO4, ˜1.6(1)×10-10 cm2/s and Ea=0.10(1) eV for LiCoPO4, and ˜2.7(4)×10-10 cm2/s and Ea=0.17(2) eV for LiNiPO4, assuming that the diffusing Li+ ions jump between the regular site and interstitial sites.

  1. Monitoring of ppm level humic acid in surface water using ZnO-chitosan nano-composite as fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumallick, Srijita; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2015-05-01

    Surface water contains natural pollutants humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid at ppm level which form carcinogenic chloro-compounds during chlorination in water treatment plants. We report here synthesis of ZnO-chitosan (CS) nano-composites by simple hydrothermal technique and examined their application potential as fluorescent probe for monitoring ppm level HA. These ZnO-CS composites have been characterized by HRTEM, EDX, FTIR, AFM and Fluorescence Spectra. HRTEM images show the formation of ZnO-CS nano-composites of average diameter of 50-250 nm. Aqueous dispersions of these nano-composites show fluorescence emission at 395 nm when excited at 300 nm which is strongly quenched by ppm level HA indicating their possible use in monitoring ppm level HA present in surface water.

  2. Use of peptide nucleic acid probes for rapid detection and enumeration of viable bacteria in recreational waters and beach sand.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto

    2006-01-01

    Environmental monitoring and public health risk assessments require methods that are rapid and quantitative with defined sensitivity and specificity thresholds. Although several molecular techniques have been developed to rapidly detect bacteria in complex matrices, the challenge to simultaneously detect and enumerate only viable cells remains a limiting factor to their routine application. This chapter describes the use of peroxidase-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to simultaneously detect and count live Staphylococcus aureus, a human pathogen in sea water and beach sand. Mixed bacteria from the environmental sample were immobilized on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane filters and allowed to form microcolonies during a 5-h incubation on Tryptic soy agar plates. PNA probes targeting species-specific regions of the 16S rRNA sequences of S. aureus were then used to hybridize the target bacteria in situ. Probes were detected by capturing chemiluminiscence on instant (e.g., Polaroid) films. Each viable cell (i.e., rRNA producing) is detected as a light spot from its microcolony on the film after scanning the image into a computer. This rapid in situ hybridization technique is simple and highly sensitive and could be developed into portable kits for monitoring pathogens and indicators in the environment. PMID:16957353

  3. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  4. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  5. Carboxylic Acid Ionophores as Probes of the Role of Calcium in Biological Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    The biological effects of calcium ionophores are described, focusing on arachidonic acid oxygenation, and the formation of a number of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. These metabolites are involved in a number of bodily functions, and their production may be regulated by calcium.

  6. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization method using Peptide Nucleic Acid probes for rapid detection of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella spp.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal infection occurring in women of reproductive age. It is widely accepted that the microbial switch from normal microflora to BV is characterized by a decrease in vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus species together with an increase of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobes. Our goal was to develop and optimize a novel Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence in situ Hybridization assay (PNA FISH) for the detection of Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis in mixed samples. Results Therefore, we evaluated and validated two specific PNA probes by using 36 representative Lactobacillus strains, 22 representative G. vaginalis strains and 27 other taxonomically related or pathogenic bacterial strains commonly found in vaginal samples. The probes were also tested at different concentrations of G. vaginalis and Lactobacillus species in vitro, in the presence of a HeLa cell line. Specificity and sensitivity of the PNA probes were found to be 98.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 87.8 to 99.9%) and 100% (95% CI, from 88.0 to 100.0%), for Lactobacillus spp.; and 100% (95% CI, from 92.8 to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, from 81.5 to 100.0%) for G. vaginalis. Moreover, the probes were evaluated in mixed samples mimicking women with BV or normal vaginal microflora, demonstrating efficiency and applicability of our PNA FISH. Conclusions This quick method accurately detects Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis species in mixed samples, thus enabling efficient evaluation of the two bacterial groups, most frequently encountered in the vagina. PMID:23586331

  7. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  8. Label-free nucleic acids detection based on DNA templated silver nanoclusters fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Based on DNA templated Ag NCs (DNA/Ag NCs) fluorescent probe, a label-free fluorescent method was developed for the detection of clinical significant DNA fragments from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Firstly, a hairpin probe, containing target DNA recognition sequence and guanine-rich sequence, was designed to hybridize with the target DNA and form a blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex. Then, exonuclease III (Exo III) was employed to stepwise hydrolyze the mononucleotides from formed blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex, releasing the target DNA and guanine-rich sequence. Finally, DNA/Ag NCs fluorescent probe was introduced to hybridize with the guanine-rich sequence, leading to an enhanced fluorescence signal for detection. The proposed method could detect as low as 2.9×10(-10) mol L(-1) HIV-1 DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against mismatched target DNA. Furthermore, the method possessed perfect recoveries in cells lysate and human serum, showing potential to be used in biological samples. PMID:25863386

  9. Double-stem Hairpin Probe and Ultrasensitive Colorimetric Detection of Cancer-related Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianguo; Li, Hongling; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Qian, Jun; Xue, Chang; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The development of a versatile biosensing platform to screen specific DNA sequences is still an essential issue of molecular biology research and clinic diagnosis of genetic disease. In this work, we for the first time reported a double-stem hairpin probe (DHP) that was simultaneously engineered to incorporate a DNAzyme, DNAzyme's complementary fragment and nicking enzyme recognition site. The important aspect of this hairpin probe is that, although it is designed to have a long ds DNA fragment, no intermolecular interaction occurs, circumventing the sticky-end pairing-determined disadvantages encountered by classic molecular beacon. For the DHP-based colorimetric sensing system, as a model analyte, cancer-related DNA sequence can trigger a cascade polymerization/nicking cycle on only one oligonucleotide probe. This led to the dramatic accumulation of G-quadruplexes directly responsible for colorimetric signal conversion without any loss. As a result, the target DNA is capable of being detected to 1 fM (six to eight orders of magnitude lower than that of catalytic molecular beacons) and point mutations are distinguished by the naked eye. The described DHP as a-proof-of-concept would not only promote the design of colorimetric biosensors but also open a good way to promote the diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases. PMID:26909108

  10. Double-stem Hairpin Probe and Ultrasensitive Colorimetric Detection of Cancer-related Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianguo; Li, Hongling; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Qian, Jun; Xue, Chang; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The development of a versatile biosensing platform to screen specific DNA sequences is still an essential issue of molecular biology research and clinic diagnosis of genetic disease. In this work, we for the first time reported a double-stem hairpin probe (DHP) that was simultaneously engineered to incorporate a DNAzyme, DNAzyme's complementary fragment and nicking enzyme recognition site. The important aspect of this hairpin probe is that, although it is designed to have a long ds DNA fragment, no intermolecular interaction occurs, circumventing the sticky-end pairing-determined disadvantages encountered by classic molecular beacon. For the DHP-based colorimetric sensing system, as a model analyte, cancer-related DNA sequence can trigger a cascade polymerization/nicking cycle on only one oligonucleotide probe. This led to the dramatic accumulation of G-quadruplexes directly responsible for colorimetric signal conversion without any loss. As a result, the target DNA is capable of being detected to 1 fM (six to eight orders of magnitude lower than that of catalytic molecular beacons) and point mutations are distinguished by the naked eye. The described DHP as a-proof-of-concept would not only promote the design of colorimetric biosensors but also open a good way to promote the diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases. PMID:26909108

  11. ω-Azido fatty acids as probes to detect fatty acid biosynthesis, degradation, and modification[S

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Alexander J.; Bode, Helge B.

    2014-01-01

    FAs play a central role in the metabolism of almost all known cellular life forms. Although GC-MS is regarded as a standard method for FA analysis, other methods, such as HPLC/MS, are nowadays widespread but are rarely applied to FA analysis. Here we present azido-FAs as probes that can be used to study FA biosynthesis (elongation, desaturation) or degradation (β-oxidation) upon their uptake, activation, and metabolic conversion. These azido-FAs are readily accessible by chemical synthesis and their metabolic products can be easily detected after click-chemistry based derivatization with high sensitivity by HPLC/MS, contributing a powerful tool to FA analysis, and hence, lipid analysis in general. PMID:25013232

  12. Molecular recognition of α-cyclodextrin (CD) to choral amino acids based on methyl orange as a molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuexian, Fan; Yu, Yang; Shaomin, Shuang; Chuan, Dong

    2005-03-01

    The molecular recognition interaction of α-CD to chiral amino acids was investigated by using spectrophotometry based on methyl orange as a molecular probe. The molecular recognition ability depended on the inclusion formation constants. The molecular recognition of α-CD to aromatic amino acids was the order: DL-tryptophan > L-tryptophan > L-phenylalanine > L-tyrosine ≈ DL-β-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine; whereas for aliphatic amino acids, the order was: L- iso-leucine > L-leucine ≈ L-methionine ≈ DL-mehtionine > D-leucine. The effect of temperature on the inclusion interaction was examined and the thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process, Δ G, Δ H, Δ S, were determined. The experimental results indicated that the inclusion process was an exothermic and enthalpy-driven process accompanied with a negative or minor positive entropic contribution. The inclusion interaction between α-CD and amino acids satisfied the law of enthalpy-entropy compensation. The compensation temperature was 291 K.

  13. Molecular recognition of alpha-cyclodextrin (CD) to choral amino acids based on methyl orange as a molecular probe.

    PubMed

    Yuexian, Fan; Yu, Yang; Shaomin, Shuang; Chuan, Dong

    2005-03-01

    The molecular recognition interaction of alpha-CD to chiral amino acids was investigated by using spectrophotometry based on methyl orange as a molecular probe. The molecular recognition ability depended on the inclusion formation constants. The molecular recognition of alpha-CD to aromatic amino acids was the order: DL-tryptophan > L-tryptophan > L-phenylalanine > L-tyrosine approximately DL-beta-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine; whereas for aliphatic amino acids, the order was: L-iso-leucine > L-leucine approximately L-methionine approximately DL-mehtionine > D-leucine. The effect of temperature on the inclusion interaction was examined and the thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process, delta G, delta H, delta S, were determined. The experimental results indicated that the inclusion process was an exothermic and enthalpy-driven process accompanied with a negative or minor positive entropic contribution. The inclusion interaction between alpha-CD and amino acids satisfied the law of enthalpy-entropy compensation. The compensation temperature was 291 K. PMID:15683802

  14. Anomalous spin polarization in the photoreduction of chromone-2-carboxylic acid with alcohol induced by hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Keishi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2000-02-01

    The addition effect of hydrochloric acid (HCl) on the photoreduction of chromone-2-carboxylic acid (CRCA) is studied by time-resolved EPR. The EPR lines of CRCA ketyl radical show an enhanced absorption in the presence of HCl, while without HCl these show an emissive character. On the other hand, the lines of the CRCA alkyl type radical show an emissive character whether HCl is included or not. The simultaneous reactions of the closely-lying two excited triplet states (T 1 and T 2) of CRCA may induce the above anomalous CIDEP behavior.

  15. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  16. Probing Phosphorus Efficient Low Phytic Acid Content Soybean Genotypes with Phosphorus Starvation in Hydroponics Growth System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Singh, Tiratha Raj; Hada, Alkesh; Jolly, Monica; Ganapathi, Andy; Sachdev, Archana

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient required for soybean growth but is bound in phytic acid which causes negative effects on both the environment as well as the animal nutrition. Lowering of phytic acid levels is associated with reduced agronomic characteristics, and relatively little information is available on the response of soybean plants to phosphorus (P) starvation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different P starvation concentrations on the phytic acid content, growth, and yield of seven mutant genotypes along with the unirradiated control, JS-335, in a hydroponics growth system. The low phytic acid containing mutant genotypes, IR-JS-101, IR-DS-118, and IR-V-101, showed a relatively high growth rate in low P concentration containing nutrient solution (2 μM), whereas the high P concentration (50 μM) favored the growth of IR-DS-111 and IR-DS-115 mutant genotypes containing moderate phytate levels. The mutant genotypes with high phytic acid content, IR-DS-122, IR-DS-114, and JS-335, responded well under P starvation and did not have any significant effect on the growth and yield of plants. Moreover, the reduction of P concentration in nutrient solution from 50 to 2 μM also reduced the phytic acid content in the seeds of all the soybean genotypes under study. The desirable agronomic performance of low phytic acid containing mutant genotype IR-DS-118 reported in this study suggested it to be a P-efficient genotype which could be considered for agricultural practices under P limiting soils. PMID:26239443

  17. Distance measurements across randomly distributed nitroxide probes from the temperature dependence of the electron spin phase memory time at 240 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Devin T.; Takahashi, Susumu; Sherwin, Mark S.; Han, Songi

    2012-10-01

    At 8.5 T, the polarization of an ensemble of electron spins is essentially 100% at 2 K, and decreases to 30% at 20 K. The strong temperature dependence of the electron spin polarization between 2 and 20 K leads to the phenomenon of spin bath quenching: temporal fluctuations of the dipolar magnetic fields associated with the energy-conserving spin "flip-flop" process are quenched as the temperature of the spin bath is lowered to the point of nearly complete spin polarization. This work uses pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 240 GHz to investigate the effects of spin bath quenching on the phase memory times (TM) of randomly-distributed ensembles of nitroxide molecules below 20 K at 8.5 T. For a given electron spin concentration, a characteristic, dipolar flip-flop rate (W) is extracted by fitting the temperature dependence of TM to a simple model of decoherence driven by the spin flip-flop process. In frozen solutions of 4-Amino-TEMPO, a stable nitroxide radical in a deuterated water-glass, a calibration is used to quantify average spin-spin distances as large as r¯=6.6 nm from the dipolar flip-flop rate. For longer distances, nuclear spin fluctuations, which are not frozen out, begin to dominate over the electron spin flip-flop processes, placing an effective ceiling on this method for nitroxide molecules. For a bulk solution with a three-dimensional distribution of nitroxide molecules at concentration n, we find W∝n∝1/r, which is consistent with magnetic dipolar spin interactions. Alternatively, we observe W∝n for nitroxides tethered to a quasi two-dimensional surface of large (Ø ˜ 200 nm), unilamellar, lipid vesicles, demonstrating that the quantification of spin bath quenching can also be used to discern the geometry of molecular assembly or organization.

  18. Distance measurements across randomly distributed nitroxide probes from the temperature dependence of the electron spin phase memory time at 240 GHz.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Devin T; Takahashi, Susumu; Sherwin, Mark S; Han, Songi

    2012-10-01

    At 8.5 T, the polarization of an ensemble of electron spins is essentially 100% at 2 K, and decreases to 30% at 20 K. The strong temperature dependence of the electron spin polarization between 2 and 20 K leads to the phenomenon of spin bath quenching: temporal fluctuations of the dipolar magnetic fields associated with the energy-conserving spin "flip-flop" process are quenched as the temperature of the spin bath is lowered to the point of nearly complete spin polarization. This work uses pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 240 GHz to investigate the effects of spin bath quenching on the phase memory times (T(M)) of randomly-distributed ensembles of nitroxide molecules below 20 K at 8.5 T. For a given electron spin concentration, a characteristic, dipolar flip-flop rate (W) is extracted by fitting the temperature dependence of T(M) to a simple model of decoherence driven by the spin flip-flop process. In frozen solutions of 4-Amino-TEMPO, a stable nitroxide radical in a deuterated water-glass, a calibration is used to quantify average spin-spin distances as large as r=6.6 nm from the dipolar flip-flop rate. For longer distances, nuclear spin fluctuations, which are not frozen out, begin to dominate over the electron spin flip-flop processes, placing an effective ceiling on this method for nitroxide molecules. For a bulk solution with a three-dimensional distribution of nitroxide molecules at concentration n, we find W∝n∝1/r(3), which is consistent with magnetic dipolar spin interactions. Alternatively, we observe W∝n(32) for nitroxides tethered to a quasi two-dimensional surface of large (Ø∼200 nm), unilamellar, lipid vesicles, demonstrating that the quantification of spin bath quenching can also be used to discern the geometry of molecular assembly or organization. PMID:22975249

  19. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  20. Fast Li ion dynamics in the solid electrolyte Li7 P3 S11 as probed by (6,7) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wohlmuth, Dominik; Epp, Viktor; Wilkening, Martin

    2015-08-24

    The development of safe and long-lasting all-solid-state batteries with high energy density requires a thorough characterization of ion dynamics in solid electrolytes. Commonly, conductivity spectroscopy is used to study ion transport; much less frequently, however, atomic-scale methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are employed. Here, we studied long-range as well as short-range Li ion dynamics in the glass-ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . Li(+) diffusivity was probed by using a combination of different NMR techniques; the results are compared with those obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. Our NMR relaxometry data clearly reveal a very high Li(+) diffusivity, which is reflected in a so-called diffusion-induced (6) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation peak showing up at temperatures as low as 313 K. At this temperature, the mean residence time between two successful Li jumps is in the order of 3×10(8) s(-1) , which corresponds to a Li(+) ion conductivity in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-3) S cm(-1) . Such a value is in perfect agreement with expectations for the crystalline but metastable glass ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . In contrast to conductivity measurements, NMR analysis reveals a range of activation energies with values ranging from 0.17 to 0.26 eV, characterizing Li diffusivity in the bulk. In our case, through-going Li ion transport, when probed by using macroscopic conductivity spectroscopy, however, seems to be influenced by blocking grain boundaries including, for example, amorphous regions surrounding the Li7 P3 S11 crystallites. As a result of this, long-range ion transport as seen by impedance spectroscopy is governed by an activation energy of approximately 0.38 eV. The findings emphasize how surface and grain boundary effects can drastically affect long-range ionic conduction. If we are to succeed in solid-state battery technology, such effects have to be brought under control by, for example, sophisticated densification or through the preparation

  1. Fabrication and characterization of polylactic acid and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofibers through centrifugal spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patlan, Richard

    Biocompatible polymer nanofibers hold great potential in the biomedical engineering field. Their biodegradable nature and enhanced properties could help solve a wide array of health related problems, particularly in the areas of tissue regeneration, drug delivery, and biosensor design. The novel Forcespinning™ method allows the production of submicron fibers without many of the drawbacks found in electrospinning, while also providing a substantial increase in fiber production. The aim of the study was to utilize this method to fabricate non-woven nanofibrous mats composed of polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite fibers. The morphology, thermal properties, and crystalline structure of the resulting nanofibers were then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD).

  2. Measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of dicarboxylic acids using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily A; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-06-21

    Vapor pressures of low volatility compounds are important parameters in several atmospheric processes, including the formation of new particles and the partitioning of compounds between the gas phase and particles. Understanding these processes is critical for elucidating the impacts of aerosols on climate, visibility, and human health. Dicarboxylic acids are an important class of compounds in the atmosphere for which reported vapor pressures often vary by more than an order of magnitude. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS), a relatively new atmospheric pressure ionization technique, is applied for the first time to the measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of a series of dicarboxylic acids. Pyrene was also studied because its vapor pressures and heat of sublimation are relatively well-known. The heats of sublimation measured using ASAP-MS were in good agreement with published values. The vapor pressures, assuming an evaporation coefficient of unity, were typically within a factor of ∼3 lower than published values made at similar temperatures for most of the acids. The underestimation may be due to diffusional constraints resulting from evaporation at atmospheric pressure. However, this study establishes that ASAP-MS is a promising new technique for such measurements. PMID:22432524

  3. Facilitating unambiguous NMR assignments and enabling higher probe density through selective labeling of all methyl containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Frank, Andreas O; Ruggiu, Fiorella; Mamo, Mulugeta; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The deuteration of proteins and selective labeling of side chain methyl groups has greatly enhanced the molecular weight range of proteins and protein complexes which can be studied using solution NMR spectroscopy. Protocols for the selective labeling of all six methyl group containing amino acids individually are available, however to date, only a maximum of five amino acids have been labeled simultaneously. Here, we describe a new methodology for the simultaneous, selective labeling of all six methyl containing amino acids using the 115 kDa homohexameric enzyme CoaD from E. coli as a model system. The utility of the labeling protocol is demonstrated by efficiently and unambiguously assigning all methyl groups in the enzymatic active site using a single 4D (13)C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment, in conjunction with a crystal structure. Furthermore, the six fold labeled protein was employed to characterize the interaction between the substrate analogue (R)-pantetheine and CoaD by chemical shift perturbations, demonstrating the benefit of the increased probe density. PMID:27130242

  4. Insertion of fluorescent fatty acid probes into the outer membranes of the pathogenic spirochaetes Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Cox, D L; Radolf, J D

    2001-05-01

    The authors examined the ability of octadecanoyl (C(18)), hexadecanoyl (C(16)) and dodecanoyl (C(12)) fatty acid (FA) conjugates of 5-aminofluorescein (OAF, HAF and DAF, respectively) to insert into the outer membranes (OMs) of Treponema pallidum, Borrelia burgdorferi and Escherichia coli. Biophysical studies have demonstrated that these compounds stably insert into phospholipid bilayers with the acyl chain within the hydrophobic interior of the apical leaflet and the hydrophilic fluorescein moiety near the phospholipid head groups. Consistent with the known poor intrinsic permeability of the E. coli OM to hydrophobic compounds and surfactants, E. coli was not labelled with any of the FA probes. OAF inserted more readily into OMs of B. burgdorferi than into those of T. pallidum, although both organisms were completely labelled at concentrations at or below 2 microg ml(-1). Intact spirochaetes were labelled with OAF but not with antibodies against known periplasmic antigens, thereby confirming that the probe interacted exclusively with the spirochaetal OMs. Separate experiments in which organisms were cooled to 4 degrees C (i.e. below the OM phase-transition temperatures) indicated that labelling with OAF was due to insertion of the probe into the OMs. B. burgdorferi, but not T. pallidum, was labelled by relatively high concentrations of HAF and DAF. Taken as a whole, these findings support the prediction that the lack of lipopolysaccharide renders T. pallidum and B. burgdorferi OMs markedly more permeable to lipophilic compounds than their Gram-negative bacterial counterparts. The data also raise the intriguing possibility that these two pathogenic spirochaetes obtain long-chain FAs, nutrients they are unable to synthesize, by direct permeation of their OMs. PMID:11320119

  5. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Hubble, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.

    1999-01-19

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  6. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  7. Proficient Detection of Multi-Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Padlock Probes and Lateral Flow Nucleic Acid Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Pavankumar, Asalapuram R; Engström, Anna; Liu, Jie; Herthnek, David; Nilsson, Mats

    2016-04-19

    Tuberculosis is a major communicable disease. Its causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, becomes resistant to antibiotics by acquisition of point mutations in the chromosome. Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is an increasing public health threat, and prompt detection of such strains is of critical importance. As rolling circle amplification of padlock probes can be used to robustly distinguish single-nucleotide variants, we combined this technique with a sensitive lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor to develop a rapid molecular diagnostic test for MDR-TB. A proof-of-concept test was established for detection of the most common mutations [rpoB 531 (TCG/TTG) and katG 315 (AGC/ACC)] causing MDR-TB and verification of loss of the respective wild type. The molecular diagnostic test produces visual signals corresponding to the respective genotypes on lateral flow strips in approximately 75 min. By detecting only two mutations, the test can detect about 60% of all MDR-TB cases. The padlock probe-lateral flow (PLP-LF) test is the first of its kind and can ideally be performed at resource-limited clinical laboratories. Rapid information about the drug-susceptibility pattern can assist clinicians to choose suitable treatment regimens and take appropriate infection control actions rather than prescribing empirical treatment, thereby helping to control the spread of MDR-TB in the community. PMID:26985774

  8. QuShape: Rapid, accurate, and best-practices quantification of nucleic acid probing information, resolved by capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Karabiber, Fethullah; McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Favorov, Oleg V.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical probing of RNA and DNA structure is a widely used and highly informative approach for examining nucleic acid structure and for evaluating interactions with protein and small-molecule ligands. Use of capillary electrophoresis to analyze chemical probing experiments yields hundreds of nucleotides of information per experiment and can be performed on automated instruments. Extraction of the information from capillary electrophoresis electropherograms is a computationally intensive multistep analytical process, and no current software provides rapid, automated, and accurate data analysis. To overcome this bottleneck, we developed a platform-independent, user-friendly software package, QuShape, that yields quantitatively accurate nucleotide reactivity information with minimal user supervision. QuShape incorporates newly developed algorithms for signal decay correction, alignment of time-varying signals within and across capillaries and relative to the RNA nucleotide sequence, and signal scaling across channels or experiments. An analysis-by-reference option enables multiple, related experiments to be fully analyzed in minutes. We illustrate the usefulness and robustness of QuShape by analysis of RNA SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experiments. PMID:23188808

  9. Use of enrichments and nucleic acid probes in monitoring bioremediation of a deep trichloroethylene plume

    SciTech Connect

    Brockman, F.; Payne, W.; Workman, D.; Soong, A.; Manley, S.; Sun, W.; Ogram, A.

    1994-12-31

    The field site was manipulated with injection of air (control experiment), 1% methane (in air), pulsing of air only and 4% methane, and pulsing of 4% methane supplemented with gaseous forms of nitrogen and phosphorus. Gases were injected through a horizontal well into the aquifer and a vacuum was established in a second horizontal well in the vadose zone. Following each injection regime, sediment samples from the contaminated region were analyzed. Analyses included most-probable-number enrichments for physiological groups known or suspected to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE) and per-chloroethylene (PCE), TCE and PCE removal from enrichments, and DNA extraction and hybridization with various gene probes corresponding to enzymes known to degrade TCE or TCE metabolites.

  10. Adaptation and Validation of E-Probe Diagnostic Nucleic Acid Analysis for Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Metagenomic Data from Complex Food Matrices.

    PubMed

    Blagden, Trenna; Schneider, William; Melcher, Ulrich; Daniels, Jon; Fletcher, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently emphasized the need for enhanced technologies to use in investigations of outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. To address this need, e-probe diagnostic nucleic acid analysis (EDNA) was adapted and validated as a tool for the rapid, effective identification and characterization of multiple pathogens in a food matrix. In EDNA, unassembled next generation sequencing data sets from food sample metagenomes are queried using pathogen-specific sequences known as electronic probes (e-probes). In this study, the query of mock sequence databases demonstrated the potential of EDNA for the detection of foodborne pathogens. The method was then validated using next generation sequencing data sets created by sequencing the metagenome of alfalfa sprouts inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7. Nonspecific hits in the negative control sample indicated the need for additional filtration of the e-probes to enhance specificity. There was no significant difference in the ability of an e-probe to detect the target pathogen based upon the length of the probe set oligonucleotides. The results from the queries of the sample database using E. coli e-probe sets were significantly different from those obtained using random decoy probe sets and exhibited 100% precision. The results support the use of EDNA as a rapid response methodology in foodborne outbreaks and investigations for establishing comprehensive microbial profiles of complex food samples. PMID:27052861

  11. Poly(o-phenylenediamine) colloid-quenched fluorescent oligonucleotide as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Li, Hailong; Luo, Yonglan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingwei; Sun, Xuping

    2011-02-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that chemical oxidation polymerization of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) by potassium bichromate at room temperature results in the formation of submicrometer-scale poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD) colloids. Such colloids can absorb and quench dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) very effectively. In the presence of a target, a hybridization event occurs, which produces a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that detaches from the POPD surface, leading to recovery of dye fluorescence. With the use of an oligonucleotide (OND) sequence associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system, we demonstrate the proof of concept that POPD colloid-quenched fluorescent OND can be used as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection with selectivity down to single-base mismatch. PMID:21186809

  12. Spin structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen, Alexandre Deur, Sebastian Kuhn, Zein-eddine Meziani

    2011-06-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have often brought out surprises and puzzles. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, Jefferson Lab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This chapter will highlight Jefferson Lab's unique contributions in the measurements of valence quark spin distributions, in the moments of spin structure functions at low to intermediate Q2, and in the transverse spin structure.

  13. Probing inclusion complexes of cyclodextrins with amino acids by physicochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Roy, Aditi; Saha, Subhadeep

    2016-10-20

    Formations of host-guest inclusion complexes of two natural amino acids, viz., l-Leucine and l-Isoleucine as guests with α and β-cyclodextrins have been investigated which include diverse applications in modern science such as controlled delivery in the field of pharmaceuticals, food processing etc. Surface tension and conductivity studies establish the formation of inclusion complexes with 1:1 stoichiometry. The interactions of cyclodextrins with amino acids have been supported by density, viscosity, refractive index, hydration and solvation number measurements indicating higher degree of inclusion in case of α-cyclodextrin. l-Leucine interacts more with the hydrophobic cavity of cyclodextrin than its isomer. With the help of stability constant by NMR titration, hydrophobic effect, H-bonds and structural effects the formations of inclusion complexes have been explained. PMID:27474589

  14. Protein adsorption on piezoelectric poly(L-lactic) acid thin films by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroca, Nathalie; Vilarinho, Paula M.; Daniel-da-Silva, Ana Luisa; Wu, Aiying; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Gruverman, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    Up until now, no direct evidence of protein adsorption processes associated with polar activity of a piezoelectric has been reported. This work presents the experimental evidence of the protein adsorption process' dependence on the surface polarization of a piezoelectric by showing at the local scale that the process of protein adsorption is highly favored in the poled areas of a piezoelectric polymer such as poly(L-lactic) acid.

  15. Using modern tools to probe the structure-function relationship of fatty acid synthases

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to life and represents one of the most conserved pathways in Nature, preserving the same handful of chemical reactions over all species. Recent interest in the molecular details of the de novo fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been heightened by demand for renewable fuels and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial strains. Central to FAS is the acyl carrier protein (ACP), a protein chaperone that shuttles the growing acyl chain between catalytic enzymes within the FAS. Human efforts to alter fatty acid biosynthesis for oil production, chemical feedstock or antimicrobial purposes has been met with limited success in part due to a lack of detailed molecular information behind the ACP-partner protein interactions inherent to the pathway. This review will focus on recently developed tools for the modification of ACP and analysis of protein-protein interactions, such as mechanism-based crosslinking, and the studies exploiting them. Discussion specific to each enzymatic domain focuses first on mechanism and known inhibitors, followed by available structures and known interactions with ACP. While significant unknowns remain, new understandings into the intricacies of FAS point to future advances in manipulating this complex molecular factory. PMID:25676190

  16. Long-lived frequency shifts observed in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment following microwave irradiation of a nitroxide spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a spin-modulation protocol for force-gradient detection of magnetic resonance that enables the real-time readout of longitudinal magnetization in an electron spin resonance experiment involving fast-relaxing spins. We applied this method to observe a prompt change in longitudinal magnetization following the microwave irradiation of a nitroxide-doped perdeuterated polystyrene film having an electron spin-lattice relaxation time of T{sub 1}{approx}1ms. The protocol allowed us to discover a large, long-lived cantilever frequency shift. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute this persistent signal to deuteron spin magnetization created via transfer of polarization from nitroxide spins.

  17. Protein induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) for probing protein–nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule studies of protein–nucleic acid interactions shed light on molecular mechanisms and kinetics involved in protein binding, translocation, and unwinding of DNA and RNA substrates. In this review, we provide an overview of a single molecule fluorescence method, termed “protein induced fluorescence enhancement” (PIFE). Unlike FRET where two dyes are required, PIFE employs a single dye attached to DNA or RNA to which an unlabeled protein is applied. We discuss both ensemble and single molecule studies in which PIFE was utilized. PMID:24056732

  18. Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance lanthanide probe analyses of short-range conformational interrelations controlling ribonucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Inagaki, F; Miyazawa, T

    1981-05-12

    An advanced method was developed for lanthanide-probe analyses of the conformations of flexible biomolecules such as nucleotides. The new method is to determine structure parameters (such as internal-rotation angles) and population parameters for local conformational equilibria of flexible sites, together with standard deviations of these parameters. As the prominent advantage of this method, the interrelations among local conformations of flexible sites may be quantitatively elucidated from the experimental data of lanthanide-induced shifts and relaxations and vicinal coupling constants. As a structural unit of ribonucleic acids, the molecular conformations and conformational equilibria of uridine 3'-monophosphate in aqueous solution were analyzed. The stable local conformers about the C3'-O3' bond are the G+ (phi' = 281 +/- 11 degrees) and G- (phi' = 211 +/- 8 degrees) forms. The internal rotation about the C3'-O3' bond and the ribose-ring puckering are interrelated; 97 +/- 5% of the C3'-endo ribose ring is associated with the G- form while 70 +/- 22% o the C2'-endo ribose ring is associated with the G+ form. An interdependency also exists between the internal rotation about the C4'-C5' bond and the ribose-ring puckering. These short-range conformational interrelations are probably important in controlling the dynamic aspects of ribonucleic acid structures. PMID:6166319

  19. Mitochondrial, acidic, and cytosolic pHs determination by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy: design of new sensitive targeted pH probes.

    PubMed

    Culcasi, Marcel; Thétiot-Laurent, Sophie; Atteia, Ariane; Pietri, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique technique to monitor noninvasively the energetics of living systems at real time through the detection of a variety of phosphorylated metabolites. Using adequately designed α-aminophosphonates as external probes, we have shown earlier that (31)P NMR can also give access simultaneously to the accurate pH of cytosolic and acidic compartments in normal and stressed cultured cells or isolated perfused organs, a feature that was not possible using endogenous inorganic phosphate as the probe. More recently, we obtained a series of derivatives of these new pH probes that incorporate a triphenylphosphonium cation as a specific vector to the mitochondrion. Here, we describe the synthesis, (31)P NMR pH titrating properties in buffers, and application in cultures of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii of two of these mitochondria-targeted pH probes in comparison with one nonvectorized, yet still informative α-aminophosphonate. PMID:25634273

  20. Adaptation and validation of E-probe diagnostic nucleic acid analysis for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in metagenomic data of complex food matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens are an increasing problem threatening the US food supply. The need for rapid sensitive diagnostic tools that can address multiple types and taxonomic classes of foodbourne pathogens is growing. This paper describes the adaptation of E-probe Diagnostic Nucleic acid Analysis (EDNA)...

  1. ESTIMATION OF BACTERIAL CELL NUMBERS IN HUMIC ACID-RICH SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS WITH PROBES DIRECTED TO 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membr...

  2. New Real-Time PCR Assay Using Locked Nucleic Acid Probes To Assess Prevalence of ParC Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from France

    PubMed Central

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Methlouthi, Imen; Pina, Patrick; Collignon, Anne; Allouch, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay with locked nucleic acid probes was developed to screen mutations at codons 79 and 83 of the Streptococcus pneumoniae parC gene. Only silent mutations were detected among 236 French invasive fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains. This test could be useful for some high-risk patients or in national surveys. PMID:16569894

  3. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effects—Insights for future spin-orbitronics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-07

    Quantification of spin-charge interconversion has become increasingly important in the fast-developing field of spin-orbitronics. Pure spin current generated by spin pumping acts as a sensitive probe for many bulk and interface spin-orbit effects, which has been indispensable for the discovery of many promising new spin-orbit materials. We apply spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect experiments, as a useful metrology, and study spin-orbit effects in a variety of metals and metal interfaces. We quantify the spin Hall effects in Ir and W using the conventional bilayer structures and discuss the self-induced voltage in a single layer of ferromagnetic permalloy. Finally, we extend our discussions to multilayer structures and quantitatively reveal the spin current flow in two consecutive normal metal layers.

  4. Label-free and selective sensing of uric acid with gold nanoclusters as optical probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chang, Yong; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhang, Pu; Lie, Shao Qing; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-05-15

    Clinically, the amount of uric acid (UA) in biological fluids is closely related to some diseases such as hyperuricemia and gout, thus it is of great significance to sense UA in clinical samples. In this work, red gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with relatively high fluorescence quantum yield and strong fluorescence emission were facilely available using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as template. The fluorescence of BSA-protected AuNCs can be sensitively quenched by H2O2, which is further capable of sensing UA through the specific catalytic oxidation with uricase, since it generates stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 by-product. The proposed assay allows for the selective detection of UA in the range of 10-800 μM with a detection limit of 6.6 μM, which is applicable to sense UA in clinical samples with satisfactory results, suggesting its great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26992526

  5. Effects of acid catalyst type on structural, morphological, and optoelectrical properties of spin-coated TiO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobostanfard, Mohammad Reza; Abdizadeh, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    The effects of different acid catalysts of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, boric acid, acetic acid, and citric acid on structural, morphological, and optoelectrical properties of nanocrystalline spin-coated TiO2 thin films synthesized via alkoxide sol-gel route were investigated. It was found that only the sols with HNO3 and HCl are suitable for film preparation. The X-ray diffractometry and Raman analysis showed that crystalline phases could be controlled by the type of acid catalyst. Although the H2SO4 sol shows good stability, it causes extremely different morphology to form due to its different sol nature and high contact angle. Fourier transformed infrared spectra confirmed the presence of acid anion species in all samples even after calcination. Furthermore, it was inferred from UV-visable absorption spectra that although the band gap and thickness of the films are independent of acid catalyst type, the refractive index and porosity of the films are strongly affected by the type of acids.

  6. Trifluorosubstrates as mechanistic probes for an FMN-dependent l-2-hydroxy acid-oxidizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Florence; Vignaud, Caroline; North, Paul; Bodevin, Sabrina

    2016-09-01

    A controversy exists with respect to the mechanism of l-2-hydroxy acid oxidation by members of a family of FMN-dependent enzymes. A so-called carbanion mechanism was initially proposed, in which the active site histidine abstracts the substrate α-hydrogen as a proton, followed by electron transfer from the carbanion to the flavin. But an alternative mechanism was not incompatible with some results, a mechanism in which the active site histidine instead picks up the substrate hydroxyl proton and a hydride transfer occurs. Even though more recent experiments ruling out such a mechanism were published (Rao & Lederer (1999) Protein Science 7, 1531-1537), a few authors have subsequently interpreted their results with variant enzymes in terms of a hydride transfer. In the present work, we analyse the reactivity of trifluorolactate, a substrate analogue, with the flavocytochrome b2 (Fcb2) flavodehydrogenase domain, compared to its reactivity with an NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), for which this compound is known to be an inhibitor (Pogolotti & Rupley (1973) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun, 55, 1214-1219). Indeed, electron attraction by the three fluorine atoms should make difficult the removal of the α-H as a hydride. We also analyse the reactivity of trifluoropyruvate with the FMN- and NAD-dependent enzymes. The results substantiate a different effect of the fluorine substituents on the two enzymes compared to their normal substrates. In the discussion we analyse the conclusions of recent papers advocating a hydride transfer mechanism for the family of l-2-hydroxy acid oxidizing FMN-dependent enzymes. PMID:27155230

  7. Identification of a radical formed in the reaction mixtures of ram seminal vesicle microsomes with arachidonic Acid using high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Katsuyuki; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2010-03-01

    The reaction of ram seminal vesicle (RSV) microsomes with arachidonic acid (AA) was examined using electron spin resonance (ESR), high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance spectrometry (HPLC-ESR), and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESR-MS) combined use of spin trapping technique. A prominent ESR spectrum (alpha(N) = 1.58 mT and alpha(H)beta = 0.26 mT) was observed in the complete reaction mixture of ram seminal vesicle microsomes with arachidonic acid containing 2.0 mg protein/ml ram seminal vesicle (RSV) microsomal suspension, 0.8 mM arachidonic acid, 0.1 M 4-POBN, and 24 mM tris/HCl buffer (pH 7.4). The ESR spectrum was hardly observed for the complete reaction mixture without the RSV microsomes. The formation of the radical appears to be catalyzed by the microsomal components. In the absence of AA, the intensity of the ESR signal decreased to 16 +/- 15% of the complete reaction mixture, suggesting that the radical is derived from AA. For the complete reaction mixture with boiled microsomes, the intensity of the ESR signal decreased to 49 +/- 4% of the complete reaction mixture. The intensity of the ESR signal of the complete reaction mixture with indomethacin decreased to 74 +/- 20% of the complete reaction mixture, suggesting that cyclooxygenese partly participates in the reaction. A peak was detected on the elution profile of HPLC-ESR analysis of the complete reaction mixture. To determine the structure of the peak, an HPLC-ESR-MS analysis was performed. The HPLC-ESR-MS analysis of the peak showed two prominent ions, m/z 266 and m/z 179, suggesting that the peak is a 4-POBN/pentyl radical adduct. An HPLC-ESR analysis of the authentic 4-POBN/pentyl radical adduct comfirmed the identification. PMID:20216946

  8. Probing the interaction of caffeic acid with ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-05-01

    The binding of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and caffeic acid (CFA) was investigated using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis absorption spectrscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) at different temperatures. The study results indicated fluorescence quenching between ZnO NPs and CFA rationalized in terms of a static quenching mechanism or the formation of non-fluorescent CFA-ZnO. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the binding constant (Ka ), number of binding sites (n) and thermodynamic properties were determined. Values of the quenching (KSV ) and binding (Ka ) constants decrease with increasing temperature and the number of binding sites n = 2. The thermodynamic parameters determined using Van't Hoff equation indicated that binding occurs spontaneously involving the hydrogen bond, and van der Waal's forces played a major role in the reaction of ZnO NPs with CFA. The FTIR, TEM and DLS measurements also indicated differences in the structure, morphology and size of CFA, ZnO NPs and their corresponding CFA-ZnO. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27037967

  9. Probing 3D Collective Cancer Invasion Using Double-Stranded Locked Nucleic Acid Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dean, Zachary S; Elias, Paul; Jamilpour, Nima; Utzinger, Urs; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and metastases are responsible for over 90% of human cancer deaths. There is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics for suppressing cancer invasion, the initial step of metastasis. Nevertheless, the regulation of cancer invasion is poorly understood due to a paucity of tools for monitoring the invasion process in 3D microenvironments. Here, we report a double-stranded locked nucleic acid (dsLNA) biosensor for investigating 3D collective cancer invasion. By incorporating multiphoton microscopy and the dsLNA biosensor, we perform dynamic single cell gene expression analysis while simultaneously characterizing the biomechanical interaction between the invading sprouts and the extracellular matrix. Gene profiling of invasive leader cells and detached cells suggest distinctive signaling mechanisms involved in collective and individual invasion in the 3D microenvironment. Our results underscore the involvement of Notch signaling in 3D collective cancer invasion, which warrants further investigation toward antimetastasis therapy in the future. PMID:27529634

  10. Probing Gαi1 Protein Activation at Single Amino Acid Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dawei; Maeda, Shoji; Matkovic, Milos; Mendieta, Sandro; Mayer, Daniel; Dawson, Roger; Schertler, Gebhard F.X.; Madan Babu, M.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2016-01-01

    We present comprehensive single amino acid resolution maps of the residues stabilising the human Gαi1 subunit in nucleotide- and receptor-bound states. We generated these maps by measuring the effects of alanine mutations on the stability of Gαi1 and of the rhodopsin-Gαi1 complex. We identified stabilization clusters in the GTPase and helical domains responsible for structural integrity and the conformational changes associated with activation. In activation cluster I, helices α1 and α5 pack against strands β1-3 to stabilize the nucleotide-bound states. In the receptor-bound state, these interactions are replaced by interactions between α5 and strands β4-6. Key residues in this cluster are Y320, crucial for the stabilization of the receptor-bound state, and F336, which stabilizes nucleotide-bound states. Destabilization of helix α1, caused by rearrangement of this activation cluster, leads to the weakening of the inter-domain interface and release of GDP. PMID:26258638

  11. Chromatographic analysis of the effects of fatty acids and glycation on binding by probes for Sudlow sites I and II to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Debolt, Erin; Suresh, D; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    The primary endogenous ligands of human serum albumin (HSA) are non-esterified fatty acids, with 0.1-2mol of fatty acids normally being bound to HSA. In type II diabetes, fatty acid levels in serum are often elevated, and the presence of high glucose results in an increase in the non-enzymatic glycation of HSA. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used to examine the combined effects of glycation and the presence of long chain fatty acids on the binding of HSA with R-warfarin and l-tryptophan (i.e., probes for Sudlow sites I and II, the major sites for drugs on this protein). Zonal elution competition studies were used to examine the interactions of myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid with these probes on HSA. It was found that all these fatty acids had direct competition with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I of normal HSA and glycated HSA, with the glycated HSA typically having stronger binding for the fatty acids at this site. At Sudlow site II, direct competition was observed for all the fatty acids with l-tryptophan when using normal HSA, while glycated HSA gave no competition or positive allosteric interactions between these fatty acids and l-tryptophan. These data indicated that glycation can alter the interactions of drugs and fatty acids at specific binding sites on HSA. The results of this study should lead to a better understanding of how these interactions may change during diabetes and demonstrate how HPAC can be used to examine drug/solute-protein interactions in complex systems. PMID:26468085

  12. Stimulated quasiparticles in spin-split superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, P.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Bergeret, F. S.

    2016-01-01

    In superconductors spin split by an exchange field, thermal effects are coupled to spin transport. We show how an oscillating electromagnetic field in such systems creates spin imbalance, that can be detected with a spin-polarized probe. The sign and magnitude of the probe signal result from a competition between processes converting field-induced spin energy imbalance to spin imbalance, dominant at low frequencies, and microwave-driven pair breaking at high frequencies. In the presence of spin-flip scattering, we show that ac excitation also leads to multistabilities in the superconducting state.

  13. Electron spin echo modulation study of AOT reverse micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Baglioni, P. ); Nakamura, Hiroshi ); Kevan, L. )

    1991-05-02

    Electron spin echo deuterium modulation studies have been carried out for x-doxylstearic acid spin probes in frozen reversed micellar solutions of sodium bis(2-ethyl-1-hexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane as a function of the water pool size with deuterium located in the isooctane or in the water. The results determine the probe location and conformation in the reverse micelle and the amount of water and isooctane penetration into the AOT interface. Modulation effects due to the interaction of the unpaired electron with deuterated isooctane or deuterated water show that the probes are in an extended conformation and are located at the interface of the reverse micelle. The results obtained are in good agreement with the current view of the structure of AOT reversed micelles in liquids and demonstrate at a molecular level that the micellar structure is retained upon fast freezing.

  14. Double-labeled donor probe can enhance the signal of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in detection of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Yukio; Kondo, Satoshi; Sase, Ichiro; Suga, Takayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Furusawa, Iwao; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    A set of fluorescently-labeled DNA probes that hybridize with the target RNA and produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals can be utilized for the detection of specific RNA. We have developed probe sets to detect and discriminate single-strand RNA molecules of plant viral genome, and sought a method to improve the FRET signals to handle in vivo applications. Consequently, we found that a double-labeled donor probe labeled with Bodipy dye yielded a remarkable increase in fluorescence intensity compared to a single-labeled donor probe used in an ordinary FRET. This double-labeled donor system can be easily applied to improve various FRET probes since the dependence upon sequence and label position in enhancement is not as strict. Furthermore this method could be applied to other nucleic acid substances, such as oligo RNA and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-oligos) to enhance FRET signal. Although the double-labeled donor probes labeled with a variety of fluorophores had unexpected properties (strange UV-visible absorption spectra, decrease of intensity and decay of donor fluorescence) compared with single-labeled ones, they had no relation to FRET enhancement. This signal amplification mechanism cannot be explained simply based on our current results and knowledge of FRET. Yet it is possible to utilize this double-labeled donor system in various applications of FRET as a simple signal-enhancement method. PMID:11121494

  15. Triplex-Forming Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe Having Thiazole Orange as a Base Surrogate for Fluorescence Sensing of Double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a new fluorescent sensing probe for double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by integrating thiazole orange (TO) as a base surrogate into triplex-forming PNA. Our probe forms the thermally stable triplex with the target dsRNA at acidic pH; and the triplex formation is accompanied by the remarkable light-up response of the TO unit. The binding of our probe to the target dsRNA proceeds very rapidly, allowing real-time monitoring of the triplex formation. Importantly, we found the TO base surrogate in our probe functions as a universal base for the base pair opposite the TO unit in the triplex formation. Furthermore, the TO unit is significantly more responsive for the fully matched dsRNA sequence compared to the mismatch-containing sequences, which enables the analysis of the target dsRNA sequence at the single-base pair resolution. The binding and sensing functions of our probe are described for the development of fluorescent probes applicable to sensing biologically relevant dsRNA. PMID:27442229

  16. High-affinity homologous peptide nucleic acid probes for targeting a quadruplex-forming sequence from a MYC promoter element.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadeep; Tanious, Farial A; Wilson, W David; Ly, Danith H; Armitage, Bruce A

    2007-09-18

    Guanine-rich DNA and RNA sequences are known to fold into secondary structures known as G-quadruplexes. Recent biochemical evidence along with the discovery of an increasing number of sequences in functionally important regions of the genome capable of forming G-quadruplexes strongly indicates important biological roles for these structures. Thus, molecular probes that can selectively target quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) are envisioned as tools to delineate biological functions of quadruplexes as well as potential therapeutic agents. Guanine-rich peptide nucleic acids have been previously shown to hybridize to homologous DNA or RNA sequences forming PNA-DNA (or RNA) quadruplexes. For this paper we studied the hybridization of an eight-mer G-rich PNA to a quadruplex-forming sequence derived from the promoter region of the MYC proto-oncogene. UV melting analysis, fluorescence assays, and surface plasmon resonance experiments reveal that this PNA binds to the MYC QFS in a 2:1 stoichiometry and with an average binding constant Ka = (2.0 +/- 0.2) x 10(8) M(-1) or Kd = 5.0 nM. In addition, experiments carried out with short DNA targets revealed a dependence of the affinity on the sequence of bases in the loop region of the DNA. A structural model for the hybrid quadruplex is proposed, and implications for gene targeting by G-rich PNAs are discussed. PMID:17718513

  17. Denaturant effects on HbGp hemoglobin as monitored by 8-anilino-1-naphtalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) probe.

    PubMed

    Barros, Ana E B; Carvalho, Francisco A O; Alves, Fernanda R; Carvalho, José W P; Tabak, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    Glossoscolex paulistus extracellular hemoglobin (HbGp) stability has been monitored in the presence of denaturant agents. 8-Anilino-1-naphtalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) was used, and spectroscopic and hydrodynamic studies were developed. Dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) induces an increase in ANS fluorescence emission intensity, with maximum emission wavelength blue-shifted from 517 to 493 nm. Two transitions are noticed, at 2.50 and 9.50 mmol/L of DTAB, assigned to ANS interaction with pre-micellar aggregates and micelles, respectively. In oxy-HbGp, ANS binds to protein sites less exposed to solvent, as compared to DTAB micelles. In DTAB-HbGp-ANS ternary system, at pH 7.0, protein aggregation, oligomeric dissociation and unfolding were observed, while, at pH 5.0, aggregation is absent. DTAB induced unfolding process displays two transitions, one due to oligomeric dissociation and the second one, probably, to the denaturation of dissociated subunits. Moreover, guanidine hydrochloride and urea concentrations above 1.5 and 4.0 mol/L, respectively, induce the full HbGp denaturation, with reduction of ANS-bound oxy-HbGp hydrophobic patches, as noticed by fluorescence quenching up to 1.0 and 5.0 mol/L of denaturants. Our results show clearly the differences in probe sensitivity to the surfactant, in the presence and absence of protein, and new insights into the denaturant effects on HbGp unfolding. PMID:25546245

  18. Synthesis of fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) and their use for probing peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial growth in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Erkin; Tekkam, Srinivas; Hall, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent D-amino acids (FDAAs) are efficiently incorporated into the peptidoglycan of diverse bacterial species at the sites of active peptidoglycan biosynthesis, allowing specific and covalent probing of bacterial growth with minimal perturbation. Here, we provide a protocol for the synthesis of four FDAAs emitting light in blue, green or red and for their use in peptidoglycan labeling of live bacteria. Our modular synthesis protocol gives easy access to a library of different FDAAs made with commercially available fluorophores. FDAAs can be synthesized in a typical chemistry laboratory in 2–3 days. The simple labeling procedure involves addition of the FDAAs to the bacterial sample for the desired labeling duration and stopping further label incorporation by fixation or by washing away excess dye. We discuss several scenarios for the use of these labels including short or long labeling durations, and the combination of different labels in pure culture or complex environmental samples. Depending on the experiment, FDAA labeling can take as little as 30 s for a rapidly growing species such as Escherichia coli. PMID:25474031

  19. Application of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) to study DNA drug complexes and probing helical propensity of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Marek; Cieplak, Piotr

    2005-05-01

    We present the preliminary results of two computer experiments involving the application of an external force to molecular systems. In the first experiment we simulated the process of pulling out a simple intercalator, the 9-aminoacridine molecule, from its complex with a short DNA oligonucleotide in aqueous solution. Removing a drug from the DNA is assumed to be an opposite process to the complex formation. The force and energy profiles suggest that formation of the DNA-9-aminoacridine complex is preferred when the acridine approaches the DNA from the minor groove rather than the major groove side. For a given mode of pulling the intercalation process is also shown to be nucleotide sequence dependent. In another computer experiment we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations for stretching short, containing 15 amino acids, helical polypeptides in aqueous solution using an external force. The purpose of these simulations is to check whether this type of approach is sensitive enough to probe the sequence dependent helical propensity of short polypeptides.

  20. The application of peptide nucleic acid probes for rapid detection and enumeration of eubacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in recreational beaches of S. Florida.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Mohammed, Renuka; Echeverry, Andrea; Green, Melissa; Bonilla, Tonya; Hartz, Aaron; McCorquodale, Don; Rogerson, Andrew

    2004-05-01

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was achieved within 6-8 h of processing. Following 5 h of incubation on TSA, soybean peroxidase-labeled peptide nucleic acid probes (Boston Probes, Boston, MA) targeting species-specific 16S rRNA sequences of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were used to hybridize microcolonies of the target species in-situ. In addition, a universal probe for 16S rRNA sequences was used to target the eubacteria. Probes were detected after a light generating reaction with a chemiluminescent substrate and their presence recorded on Polaroid film. The probes showed limited cross-reactivity with mixed indigenous bacteria extracted from seawater and sand by shaking with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Specificity and cross-reactivity was tested on the reference bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Vibrio, Shigella, Salmonella, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia and Citrobacter. These tests confirmed that the probes were specific for the microorganisms of interest and were unaffected by high salt levels. The results of the PNA chemiluminescent in situ hybridization were compared with traditional plate count methods (PCM) for total 'freshwater' eubacteria, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Counts of eubacteria and S. aureus were comparable with numbers obtained from traditional plate counts but levels of P. aeruginosa were higher with PNA than with PCM. It is possible that PNA is more sensitive than PCM because it can detect microcolonies on the agar surface that never fully develop with the plate count method. We conclude that the in situ hybridization technique used here represents an important potential tool for the rapid monitoring of novel indicator organisms in

  1. Development of a BODIPY-based ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid and its application in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuzhe; Zhou, Li; Qiang, Fei; Wang, Feiyi; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Chunchang

    2016-03-10

    A BODIPY-based ratiometric fluorescent probe for HOCl has been designed based on the transduction of thioether to sulfoxide function. This probe features a marked absorption and emission blue-shift upon the HOCl-promoted rapid transduction, enabling the highly selective and ratiometric detection. In addition, the probe works excellently within a wide pH range of 4-10, addressing the existing pH dependency issue. Living cells studies demonstrate that the probe is cell membrane permeable and can be employed successfully to image endogenous HOCl generation in macrophage cells. PMID:26893093

  2. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  3. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  4. Investigation of the distribution of acidity strength in zeolites by temperature-programmed desorption of probe molecules. 2. Dealuminated Y-type zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Karge, H.G.; Dondur, V. ); Weitkamp, J. )

    1991-01-10

    The acidity of dealuminated hydrogen forms of Y-type zeolites (Si/Al = 2.4-8.6) is determined by temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia or pyridine, which is monitored through a mass spectrometer. Four types of acidic sites are indicated by ammonia, viz., weak Broensted and/or Lewis centers and medium and strong Broensted and strong Lewis sites. In contrast, pyridine, after sample activation at 675 K, probed only two types of sites, i.e., medium and strong Broensted sites. This difference is ascribed to different accessibility of sites for the two probe molecules. From the desorption spectra (i) the fractional coverage of the various sites, (ii) the most frequent energies of activation, {anti E}{sub d}, for desorption, and (iii) the probability functions of the activation energies are derived by using a previously described method of evaluation.

  5. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  6. A unique "turn-on" fluorescence signalling strategy for highly specific detection of ascorbic acid using carbon dots as sensing probe.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jessica Fung Yee; Chin, Suk Fun; Ng, Sing Muk

    2016-11-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) that showed strong blue fluorescence were successfully synthesised from sodium alginate via furnace pyrolysis. The single step pyrolytic synthesis was simple to perform while yielded CDs with high photostability, good water solubility and minimum by-products. In order to design the probe with "turn-on" sensing capability, the CDs were screened against a series of metal cations to first "turn-off" the fluorescence. It was found that ferric ions (Fe(3+)) were most responsive and effective in quenching the fluorescence of CDs. Based on this observation, the conditioning of the probe was performed to ensure the fluorescence was completely quenched, while not overloading the system with Fe(3+). At the optimised condition, the CDs-Fe(3+) mixture served as a highly specific detection probe for ascorbic acid (AA). The analytical potential of the probe was evaluated and showed a good linear range of response for AA concentration of 24-40μg/mL. The selectivity study against other possible co-existing species was carried out and proved that our unique "turn-on" fluorescence signalling strategy was highly effective and selective towards AA as the target analyte. The probe was demonstrated for quantification of AA in real samples, which was the commercially available vitamin C supplement. The result showed good accuracy with minimum deviation from standard method adopted for validation purpose. PMID:27290666

  7. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  8. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  9. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.

  10. Fluorescence determination of DNA with 1-pyrenebutyric acid nanoparticles coated with β-cyclodextrin as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Chen, Hongqi; Xia, Tingting

    2005-04-01

    A novel ultrasonication method has been successfully developed for the preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBAC)/β-cyclodextrin(β-CD) complex nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. Complex nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonication are smaller and better dispersed than single PBAC nanoparticles. At pH 3.0, the relative fluorescence intensity of complex nanoparticles of PBAC/β-CD can be quenched by the concentration of DNA. Based on this, a novel fluorimetric method has been developed for rapid determination of DNA. In comparison with single organic fluorophores, these nanoparticle probes are better water-solubility, more stable and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.2-15 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-12 μg mL -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limit is 0.01 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.02 μg mL -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of seven replicate measurements is 1.2% for 2.0 μg mL -1 ct-DNA and 1.4% for 2.0 μg mL -1 fs-DNA, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory. A mechanism proposed to explain the process also has been studied.

  11. Analysis of protein-protein interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines using phthalic acid chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein-protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES). Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively. PMID:25402641

  12. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines Using Phthalic Acid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein–protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES). Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively. PMID:25402641

  13. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  14. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  15. The Perils of Pathogen Discovery: Origin of a Novel Parvovirus-Like Hybrid Genome Traced to Nucleic Acid Extraction Spin Columns

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, Samia N.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Lee, Deanna; Coffey, Lark L.; Phan, Tung; Rein-Weston, Annie; Aronsohn, Andrew; Hackett, John; Delwart, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was used for discovery and de novo assembly of a novel, highly divergent DNA virus at the interface between the Parvoviridae and Circoviridae. The virus, provisionally named parvovirus-like hybrid virus (PHV), is nearly identical by sequence to another DNA virus, NIH-CQV, previously detected in Chinese patients with seronegative (non-A-E) hepatitis. Although we initially detected PHV in a wide range of clinical samples, with all strains sharing ∼99% nucleotide and amino acid identity with each other and with NIH-CQV, the exact origin of the virus was eventually traced to contaminated silica-binding spin columns used for nucleic acid extraction. Definitive confirmation of the origin of PHV, and presumably NIH-CQV, was obtained by in-depth analyses of water eluted through contaminated spin columns. Analysis of environmental metagenome libraries detected PHV sequences in coastal marine waters of North America, suggesting that a potential association between PHV and diatoms (algae) that generate the silica matrix used in the spin columns may have resulted in inadvertent viral contamination during manufacture. The confirmation of PHV/NIH-CQV as laboratory reagent contaminants and not bona fide infectious agents of humans underscores the rigorous approach needed to establish the validity of new viral genomes discovered by next-generation sequencing. PMID:24027301

  16. A rapid microwave synthesis of nitrogen-sulfur co-doped carbon nanodots as highly sensitive and selective fluorescence probes for ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junxia; Yu, Jie; Feng, Suling; Su, Li

    2016-06-01

    A ultrafast one-step microwave-assisted method was developed for the synthesis of nitrogen-sulfur co-doped carbon nanodots (N,S-CDs) by using ethylenediamine as the carbon source and sulfamic acid as the surface passivation reagent. The morphology and the properties of N,S-CDs were explored by a series of techniques, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The prepared N,S-CDs exhibit bright blue photoluminescence with a high fluorescence quantum yield (FLQY) up to 28%, and high stability and excellent water solubility. A N,S-CDs-based fluorescent probe was developed for sensitive detection ascorbic acid (AA) in the presence of Cu(2+), based on the mechanism that AA reduces Cu(2+) to Cu(+), then Cu(+) quenches the fluorescence of N,S-CDs through electron or energy transfer due to the interaction between Cu(+) and thiol ligand on the N,S-CDs surface. The observed linear response concentration range was from 0.057 to 4.0μM to AA with a detection limit as low as 18nM. The probe exhibited a highly selective response toward AA even in the presence of possible interfering substances, such as uric acid and citric acid. Moreover, these promising features made the sensing system used for the analysis of human serum and urine samples. PMID:27130124

  17. Indole-3-acetic acid biosensor based on G-rich DNA labeled AuNPs as chemiluminescence probe coupling the DNA signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun, Xu; Mei, Zhenghua; Wang, Zhouping; He, Yunhua

    2012-09-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for detection of phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was developed by using G-rich DNA labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as CL probe coupling the DNA signal amplification technology. The IAA antibody was immobilized on carboxyl terminated magnetic beads (MBs). In the presence of IAA, antibody labeled AuNPs were captured by antibody functionalized MBs. The DNA on AuNPs is released by a ligand exchange process induced by the addition of DTT. The released DNA is then acted as the linker and hybridized with the capture DNA on MBs and probe DNA on AuNPs CL probe. The CL signal is obtained via the instantaneous derivatization reaction between a specific CL reagent, 3,4,5-trimethoxyl-phenylglyoxal (TMPG), and the G-rich DNA on AuNPs CL probe. IAA can be detected in the concentration range from 0.02 ng/mL to 30 ng/mL, and the limit of detection is 0.01 ng/mL.

  18. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  19. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  20. Design, Synthesis, EPR-Studies and Conformational Bias of Novel Spin-Labeled DCC-Analogues for the Highly Regioselective Labeling of Aliphatic and Aromatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Gölz, Jan Philipp; NejatyJahromy, Yaser; Bauer, Mirko; Muhammad, Ashraf; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Grimme, Stefan; Schiemann, Olav; Menche, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Novel types of spin-labeled N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimides (DCC) are reported that bear a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl (TEMPO) residue on one side and different aromatic and aliphatic cyclohexyl analogues on the other side of the diimide core. These readily available novel reagents add efficiently to aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids, forming two possible spin-labeled amide derivatives with different radical distances of the resulting amide. The addition of aromatic DCC analogues proceeds with excellent selectivity, giving amides where the carboxylic acid is exclusively connected to the aromatic residue, while little or no selectivity was observed for the aliphatic congeners. The usefulness of these adducts in structural studies was demonstrated by EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) measurements of biradical adducts of biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acids. These analyses also reveal high degrees of conformational bias for aromatic DCC derivatives, which further underlines the powerfulness of these novel reagents. This observation was further corroborated by quantum chemical calculations, giving a detailed understanding of the structural dynamics, while detailed information on the solid state structure of all novel reagents was obtained by X-ray structure analyses. PMID:27272435

  1. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid) complex as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yao; Lin, Dajie; Shao, Lijia; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23762388

  2. A naphthalene-based two-photon fluorescent probe for selective and sensitive detection of endogenous hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Yu-Ren; Zhao, Xiong-Jie; Guo, Dong

    2016-11-01

    An efficient naphthalene-based two-photon fluorescent probe for endogenous HClO has been reported in the present study, which consists of a 6-(2-benzothiazolyl)-2-naphthalenol fluorophore connected with a 4-aminophenol (the fluorescence quenching and response group). This probe exhibits a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of 7.6nM over other reactive oxygen species and analyte species, and the fluorescence intensity enhanced 103-fold when responsed. Furthermore, it was successfully used for two-photon imaging of endogenous HClO in live cells with high-resolution. PMID:27591640

  3. Spin-phonon and magnetostriction phenomena in CaMn{sub 7}O{sub 12} helimagnet probed by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nonato, A.; Araujo, B. S.; Ayala, A. P.; Maciel, A. P.; Yanez-Vilar, S.; Sanchez-Andujar, M.; Senaris-Rodriguez, M. A.; Paschoal, C. W. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this letter, we investigated the temperature-dependent Raman spectra of CaMn{sub 7}O{sub 12} helimagnet from room temperature down to 10 K. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode parameters shows remarkable anomalies for both antiferromagnetic and incommensurate transitions that this compound undergoes at low temperatures. The anomalies observed at the magnetic ordering transition indicate a spin-phonon coupling at higher-temperature magnetic transition in this material, while a magnetostriction effect at the lower-temperature magnetic transition.

  4. Neuronal acid-induced [Zn²⁺]i elevations calibrated using the low-affinity ratiometric probe FuraZin-1.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2015-11-01

    The experiments were carried out on primary cultures of murine cortical neurons from cryopreserved preparations obtained from embryonic-day-16 fetuses. To calibrate acid-induced intracelluar [Zn(2+) ] ([Zn(2+) ]i ) elevations, a low affinity (Kd = 39 μM at pH 6.1) ratiometric Zn(2+) probe, FuraZin-1, was used. A pHi drop from 7.2 to 6.1 caused [Zn(2+) ]i elevations reaching 2 μM; when the thiol-reactive agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was subsequently applied, [Zn(2+) ]i increased further to 5.6 μM; analogous acid- and NEM-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations could also be detected but not calibrated, using the high affinity Zn(2+) probe FluoZin-3. The data indicate that NEM causes Zn(2+) release from ligands that chelate Zn(2+) at pH 6.1. ATP could also chelate Zn(2+) at pH 6.1 because its pKa is about 6.8. Therefore, it was tested whether an ATP depletion affects the acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations. The ATP depletion was induced by inhibiting mitochondrial and glycolytic ATP production. Interestingly, an almost complete ATP depletion (confirmed using a luciferin/luciferase assay) failed to affect the acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i increases. These data suggest that the total amount of Zn(2+) accumulated in intracellular ATP-dependent stores (Zn(2+) -ATP complexes and organelles that accumulate Zn(2+) in an ATP-dependent manner) is negligible compared to the amount of Zn(2+) accumulated in the acid-sensitive intracellular ligands. In vitro, upon acidification, Zn(2+) -cysteine complexes release Zn(2+) and ATP chelates the released Zn(2+) . However, in vivo (cultured neurons), an ATP depletion failed to enhance acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations. These [Zn(2+) ]i elevations were calibrated using a low affinity ratiometric probe FuraZin-1; they reached 2 µM levels and increased to 5 µM when a thiol-reactive agent, N-ethylmaleimide, compromised Zn(2+) binding by cysteines. PMID:26263185

  5. Probing many body effects using Fourier Transform Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy: Can spin-orbit splitting in dispersion be observed in q-space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Gelareh; UBC Labortory for Atomic Imaging Research (LAIR)) Team

    Well studied surface systems such as Ag and Cu provide a safe platform to test novel spectroscopy methods that can have extended applications in near future. Our current focus is given to Fourier Transform Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (FT-STS) that allows us to study scattering effects (quasiparticle interactions - namely QPI) of CO and Co on Cu(111) surface. Magnetic Co adatoms are expected to generate a spin-orbit split in dispersion in QPI(q) space, the existence of which is confirmed by the k-space angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) of Cu(111) surface in the recent years. Hence the previously observed electron-phonon kink and spin-orbit splitting of the dispersion, as well as the scattering properties of CO molecules and Co adatoms, should also be observable in QPI space via FT-STS of Cu(111), and compatible with previous studies on similar systems. We are using a low temperature (4.2 K) commercial Scanning Tunneling Microscope (CREATEC STM) that operates using Nanonis electronic controllers and software which allows us to perform FT-STS as well as topological imaging.

  6. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating 13C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% 13C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation. PMID:25217022

  7. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Potable-Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lehtola, Markku J.; Torvinen, Eila; Miettinen, Ilkka T.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Here, we present for the first time a high-affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting Mycobacterium avium bacteria, including the opportunistically pathogenic subspecies M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. There is evidence that M. avium subsp. avium especially is able to survive and grow in drinking-water biofilms and possibly transmit via drinking water. The designed PNA probe (MAV148) specificity was tested with several bacterial species, including other mycobacteria and mycolic acid-containing bacteria. From the range of bacterial strains tested, only M. avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were hybridized. The PNA FISH method was applied successfully to detect M. avium subsp. avium spiked in water samples and biofilm established within a Propella biofilm reactor fed with potable water from a distribution supply. PMID:16391126

  8. How Cation-Pi Interactions Enhance and Structure the Binding of Metal Ions to Amino Acids and Peptides. Dialanine Probed by Irmpd Spectroscopy as a Prime Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos

    2010-06-01

    Spectroscopic examination of metalated amino acids and model peptides in the infrared region gives incisive conformational information. The role of cation-pi interactions of the metal ions with aromatic amino acids in structuring the complexes and enforcing particular architectures is being clarified by such experiments using IRMPD action spectroscopy as the experimental probe. The presence of multiple aromatic groups as in dialanine gives particularly stringent conformational stabilization. Comparing spectroscopic peak shifts across a range of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions, ranging from lithium to cesium, and from calcium to barium, allows us to view the systematic relations between normal mode frequencies and ion/peptide interactions. The spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX free electron laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm-1.

  9. 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid/hemin nanocomposites act as redox probes and electrocatalysts for constructing a pseudobienzyme-channeling amplified electrochemical aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhuo, Ying; Gan, Xianxue; Bai, Lijuan

    2012-10-29

    A simple wet-chemical strategy for the synthesis of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid (PTCA)/hemin nanocomposites through π-π interactions is demonstrated. Significantly, the hemin successfully conciliates PTCA redox activity with a pair of well-defined redox peaks and intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, which provides potential application of the PTCA self-derived redox activity as redox probes. Additionally, PTCA/hemin nanocomposites exhibit a good membrane-forming property, which not only avoids the conventional fussy process for redox probe immobilization, but also reduces the participation of the membrane materials that act as a barrier of electron transfer. On the basis of these unique properties, a pseudobienzyme-channeling amplified electrochemical aptasensor is developed that is coupled with glucose oxidase (GOx) for thrombin detection by using PTCA/hemin nanocomposites as redox probes and electrocatalysts. With the addition of glucose to the electrolytic cell, the GOx on the aptasensor surface bioelectrocatalyzed the reduction of glucose to produce H(2)O(2), which in turn was electrocatalyzed by the PTCA/hemin nanocomposites. Cascade schemes, in which an enzyme is catalytically linked to another enzyme, can produce signal amplification and therefore increase the biosensor sensitivity. As a result, a linear relationship for thrombin from 0.005 to 20 nM and a detection limit of 0.001 nM were obtained. PMID:23001991

  10. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  11. Fluorescence sensing of phosdrin pesticide by the luminescent Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis(coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) probes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Belal H M; Khairy, Gasser M; Kamel, Rasha M

    2016-04-01

    Luminescence quenching of the Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) (Ln(III)-(CCA)2) probes has been studied in the presence of organophosphorus or organochlorine pesticides; Phosdrin (P1), Malathion (P2), Profenofos (P3), Formothion (P4), Heptachlor (P5), and Endosulfan (P6). The luminescence intensity of lanthanide complex probes Ln(III)-(CCA)2 decreases as the concentration of the Phosdrin pesticide increases, while the other investigated pesticides have no significant influence on the lanthanide fluorescent intensities. It is observed that the quenching of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid by Phosdrin proceeds via static quenching processes according to Stern-Volmer plot. The binding constants (K) and the thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of Ln(III)-(CCA)2 with Phosdrin have been determined. A direct method for the determination of the Phosdrin in ethanol has been developed based on the luminescence changes of the Ln(III)-(CCA)2-phosdrin ternary complexes. The detection limits of P1 were 6.28 and 1.07 μM in case of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-complex, respectively. The influence of various interfering species on the detection of P1 has been investigated to assess the analytical applicability of the method. The new method was applied to determine the Phosdrin pesticide in different types of water samples. PMID:26802539

  12. Fluorescence sensing of phosdrin pesticide by the luminescent Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis(coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Belal H. M.; Khairy, Gasser M.; Kamel, Rasha M.

    2016-04-01

    Luminescence quenching of the Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) (Ln(III)-(CCA)2) probes has been studied in the presence of organophosphorus or organochlorine pesticides; Phosdrin (P1), Malathion (P2), Profenofos (P3), Formothion (P4), Heptachlor (P5), and Endosulfan (P6). The luminescence intensity of lanthanide complex probes Ln(III)-(CCA)2 decreases as the concentration of the Phosdrin pesticide increases, while the other investigated pesticides have no significant influence on the lanthanide fluorescent intensities. It is observed that the quenching of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid by Phosdrin proceeds via static quenching processes according to Stern-Volmer plot. The binding constants (K) and the thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of Ln(III)-(CCA)2 with Phosdrin have been determined. A direct method for the determination of the Phosdrin in ethanol has been developed based on the luminescence changes of the Ln(III)-(CCA)2-phosdrin ternary complexes. The detection limits of P1 were 6.28 and 1.07 μM in case of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-complex, respectively. The influence of various interfering species on the detection of P1 has been investigated to assess the analytical applicability of the method. The new method was applied to determine the Phosdrin pesticide in different types of water samples.

  13. A Selective Imidazoline-2-thione-Bearing Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Hypochlorous Acid in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingling; Heo, Cheol Ho; Kim, Jin A; Lee, Hye Sue; Hu, Ying; Kim, Dayoung; Swamy, Kunemadihalli Mathada Kotraiah; Kim, Gyoungmi; Nam, Sang-Jip; Kim, Hwan Myung; Yoon, Juyoung

    2016-06-21

    Hypochlorite (OCl(-)) plays a key role in the immune system and is involved in various diseases. Accordingly, direct detection of endogenous OCl(-) at the subcellular level is important for understanding inflammation and cellular apoptosis. In the current study, a two-photon fluorescent off/on probe (PNIS) bearing imidazoline-2-thione as an OCl(-) recognition unit and triphenylphosphine (TPP) as a mitochondrial-targeting group was synthesized and examined for its ability to image mitochondrial OCl(-) in situ. This probe, based on the specific reaction between imidazoline-2-thione and OCl(-), displayed a selective fluorescent off/on response to OCl(-) with the various reactive oxygen species in a physiological medium. PNIS was successfully applied to image of endogenously produced mitochondrial OCl(-) in live RAW 264.7 cells via two-photon microscopy. PMID:27212708

  14. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Method Using a Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe for Identification of Salmonella spp. in a Broad Spectrum of Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, C.; Azevedo, N. F.; Fernandes, R. M.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for the rapid detection of Salmonella spp. using a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe was developed. The probe theoretical specificity and sensitivity were both 100%. The PNA-FISH method was optimized, and laboratory testing on representative strains from the Salmonella genus subspecies and several related bacterial species confirmed the predicted theoretical values of specificity and sensitivity. The PNA-FISH method has been successfully adapted to detect cells in suspension and is hence able to be employed for the detection of this bacterium in blood, feces, water, and powdered infant formula (PIF). The blood and PIF samples were artificially contaminated with decreasing pathogen concentrations. After the use of an enrichment step, the PNA-FISH method was able to detect 1 CFU per 10 ml of blood (5 × 109 ± 5 × 108 CFU/ml after an overnight enrichment step) and also 1 CFU per 10 g of PIF (2 × 107 ± 5 × 106 CFU/ml after an 8-h enrichment step). The feces and water samples were also enriched according to the corresponding International Organization for Standardization methods, and results showed that the PNA-FISH method was able to detect Salmonella immediately after the first enrichment step was conducted. Moreover, the probe was able to discriminate the bacterium in a mixed microbial population in feces and water by counter-staining with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). This new method is applicable to a broad spectrum of samples and takes less than 20 h to obtain a diagnosis, except for PIF samples, where the analysis takes less than 12 h. This procedure may be used for food processing and municipal water control and also in clinical settings, representing an improved alternative to culture-based techniques and to the existing Salmonella PNA probe, Sal23S10, which presents a lower specificity. PMID:20453122

  15. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) for the detection of bacteria: The effect of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rui; Santos, Rita S; Madureira, Pedro; Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-05-20

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique widely used for the detection and characterization of microbial populations. FISH is affected by a wide variety of abiotic and biotic variables and the way they interact with each other. This is translated into a wide variability of FISH procedures found in the literature. The aim of this work is to systematically study the effects of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration in the FISH protocol, using a general peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the Eubacteria domain. For this, response surface methodology was used to optimize these 3 PNA-FISH parameters for Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive species (Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus). The obtained results show that a probe concentration higher than 300nM is favorable for both groups. Interestingly, a clear distinction between the two groups regarding the optimal pH and dextran sulfate concentration was found: a high pH (approx. 10), combined with lower dextran sulfate concentration (approx. 2% [w/v]) for Gram-negative species and near-neutral pH (approx. 8), together with higher dextran sulfate concentrations (approx. 10% [w/v]) for Gram-positive species. This behavior seems to result from an interplay between pH and dextran sulfate and their ability to influence probe concentration and diffusion towards the rRNA target. This study shows that, for an optimum hybridization protocol, dextran sulfate and pH should be adjusted according to the target bacteria. PMID:27021959

  16. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  17. Postirradiation effects in alanine dosimeter probes of two different suppliers.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    The measurand relevant for the dosimetry for radiation therapy is the absorbed dose to water, DW. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is establishing a secondary standard for DW for high-energy photon and electron radiation based on electron spin resonance (ESR) of the amino acid alanine. For practical applications, like, for example, intercomparison measurements using the ESR/alanine dosimetry system, the temporal evolution of the ESR signal of irradiated probes is an important issue. This postirradiation behaviour is investigated for alanine pellets of two different suppliers for different storage conditions. The influence of the storage conditions on the temporal evolution may be dependent on the type of probes used. The measurement and analysis method developed at the PTB is able to circumvent the apparent difficulties in the case of alanine/paraffin probes. Care has to be taken in case this method cannot be applied. PMID:18296760

  18. Exploring a 2-Naphthoic Acid Template for the Structure-Based Design of P2Y14 Receptor Antagonist Molecular Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The P2Y14 receptor (P2Y14R), one of eight P2Y G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), is involved in inflammatory, endocrine, and hypoxic processes and is an attractive pharmaceutical target. The goal of this research is to develop high-affinity P2Y14R fluorescent probes based on the potent and highly selective antagonist 4-(4-(piperidin-4-yl)-phenyl)-7-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl)-2-naphthoic acid (6, PPTN). A model of hP2Y14R based on recent hP2Y12R X-ray structures together with simulated antagonist docking suggested that the piperidine ring is suitable for fluorophore conjugation while preserving affinity. Chain-elongated alkynyl or amino derivatives of 6 for click or amide coupling were synthesized, and their antagonist activities were measured in hP2Y14R-expressing CHO cells. Moreover, a new Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488) containing derivative 30 (MRS4174, Ki = 80 pM) exhibited exceptionally high affinity, as compared to 13 nM for the alkyne precursor 22. A flow cytometry assay employing 30 as a fluorescent probe was used to quantify specific binding to P2Y14R. Known P2Y receptor ligands inhibited binding of 30 with properties consistent with their previously established receptor selectivities and affinities. These results illustrate that potency in this series of 2-naphthoic acid derivatives can be preserved by chain functionalization, leading to highly potent fluorescent molecular probes for P2Y14R. Such conjugates will be useful tools in expanding the SAR of this receptor, which still lacks chemical diversity in its collective ligands. This approach demonstrates the predictive power of GPCR homology modeling and the relevance of newly determined X-ray structures to GPCR medicinal chemistry. PMID:25299434

  19. A novel adenosine-based molecular beacon probe for room temperature nucleic acid rapid detection in cotton thread device.

    PubMed

    Du, Ting-E; Wang, Yiyun; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Tian; Mao, Xun

    2015-02-25

    We used cotton thread as substrate to develop a novel room temperature DNA detection device for low-cost, sensitive and rapid detection of a human genetic disease, hereditary tyrosinemia type I related DNA sequences. A novel adenosine based molecular beacon (ABMB) probe modified on gold nanoparticle was used as reporter probe. In the presence of coralyne, a small molecule which can react with adenosines, the ABMB would form a hairpin structure just like traditional molecular beacon used extensively. In the presence of target DNA sequences, the hairpin structure of ABMB modified on gold nanoparticles will be opened and the biotin group modified at one end of the DNA probes will be released and react with the streptavidin immobilized on the test zone of the cotton thread. The response of the thread based DNA test device is linear over the range of 2.5-100 nM complementary DNA. The ability of our developed device for discriminating the single base mismatched DNA related to a human genetic disease, hereditary tyrosinemia type I, was improved comparing with previous report. It is worth mentioning that the whole assay procedure for DNA test is performed under room temperature which simplified the assay procedures greatly. PMID:25702276

  20. Sensitivity enhanced (14)N/(14)N correlations to probe inter-beta-sheet interactions using fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR in biological solids.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Asakura, Tetsuo; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-08-10

    (14)N/(14)N correlations are vital for structural studies of solid samples, especially those in which (15)N isotopic enrichment is challenging, time-consuming and expensive. Although (14)N nuclei have high isotopic abundance (99.6%), there are inherent difficulties in observing (14)N/(14)N correlations due to limited resolution and sensitivity related to: (i) low (14)N gyromagnetic ratio (γ), (ii) large (14)N quadrupolar couplings, (iii) integer (14)N spin quantum number (I = 1), and (iv) very weak (14)N-(14)N dipolar couplings. Previously, we demonstrated a proton-detected 3D (14)N/(14)N/(1)H correlation experiment at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) on l-histidine·HCl·H2O utilizing a through-bond (J) and residual dipolar-splitting (RDS) based heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (J-HMQC) sequence mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR). As an extension of our previous work, in this study we show the utility of dipolar-based HMQC (D-HMQC) in combination with (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing to obtain sensitivity enhanced (14)N/(14)N correlations in more complex biological solids such as a glycyl-l-alanine (Gly-l-Ala) dipeptide, and parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) β-strand alanine tripeptides (P-(Ala)3 and AP-(Ala)3, respectively). These systems highlight the mandatory necessity of 3D (14)N/(14)N/(1)H measurements to get (14)N/(14)N correlations when the amide proton resonances are overlapped. Moreover, the application of long selective (14)N pulses, instead of short hard ones, is shown to improve the sensitivity. Globally, we demonstrate that replacing J-scalar with dipolar interaction and hard- with selective-(14)N pulses allows gaining a factor of ca. 360 in experimental time. On the basis of intermolecular NH/NH distances and (14)N quadrupolar tensor orientations, (14)N/(14)N correlations are effectively utilized to make a clear distinction between the parallel and antiparallel arrangements of the β-strands in (Ala)3 through the

  1. Mechanism-Based Inactivation of Cytochrome P450 2C9 by Tienilic Acid and (±)-Suprofen: A Comparison of Kinetics and Probe Substrate Selection

    PubMed Central

    Hutzler, J. Matthew; Balogh, Larissa M.; Zientek, Michael; Kumar, Vikas; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2009-01-01

    In vitro experiments were conducted to compare kinact, KI and inactivation efficiency (kinact/KI) of cytochrome P450 (P450) 2C9 by tienilic acid and (±)-suprofen using (S)-flurbiprofen, diclofenac, and (S)-warfarin as reporter substrates. Although the inactivation of P450 2C9 by tienilic acid when (S)-flurbiprofen and diclofenac were used as substrates was similar (efficiency of ∼9 ml/min/μmol), the inactivation kinetics were characterized by a sigmoidal profile. (±)-Suprofen inactivation of (S)-flurbiprofen and diclofenac hydroxylation was also described by a sigmoidal profile, although inactivation was markedly less efficient (∼1 ml/min/μmol). In contrast, inactivation of P450 2C9-mediated (S)-warfarin 7-hydroxylation by tienilic acid and (±)-suprofen was best fit to a hyperbolic equation, where inactivation efficiency was moderately higher (10 ml/min/μmol) and ∼3-fold higher (3 ml/min/μmol), respectively, relative to that of the other probe substrates, which argues for careful consideration of reporter substrate when mechanism-based inactivation of P450 2C9 is assessed in vitro. Further investigations into the increased inactivation seen with tienilic acid relative to that with (±)-suprofen revealed that tienilic acid is a higher affinity substrate with a spectral binding affinity constant (Ks) of 2 μM and an in vitro half-life of 5 min compared with a Ks of 21 μM and a 50 min in vitro half-life for (±)-suprofen. Lastly, a close analog of tienilic acid with the carboxylate functionality replaced by an oxirane ring was devoid of inactivation properties, which suggests that an ionic binding interaction with a positively charged residue in the P450 2C9 active site is critical for recognition and mechanism-based inactivation by these close structural analogs. PMID:18838506

  2. Field-Based Stable Isotope Probing Reveals the Identities of Benzoic Acid-Metabolizing Microorganisms and Their In Situ Growth in Agricultural Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Madsen, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    We used a combination of stable isotope probing (SIP), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based respiration, isolation/cultivation, and quantitative PCR procedures to discover the identity and in situ growth of soil microorganisms that metabolize benzoic acid. We added [13C]benzoic acid or [12C]benzoic acid (100 μg) once, four times, or five times at 2-day intervals to agricultural field plots. After monitoring 13CO2 evolution from the benzoic acid-dosed soil, field soils were harvested and used for nucleic acid extraction and for cultivation of benzoate-degrading bacteria. Exposure of soil to benzoate increased the number of culturable benzoate degraders compared to unamended soil, and exposure to benzoate shifted the dominant culturable benzoate degraders from Pseudomonas species to Burkholderia species. Isopycnic separation of heavy [13C]DNA from the unlabeled fraction allowed terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses to confirm that distinct 16S rRNA genes were localized in the heavy fraction. Phylogenetic analysis of sequenced 16S rRNA genes revealed a predominance (15 of 58 clones) of Burkholderia species in the heavy fraction. Burkholderia sp. strain EBA09 shared 99.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with a group of clones representing the dominant RFLP pattern, and the T-RFLP fragment for strain EBA09 and a clone from that cluster matched the fragment enriched in the [13C]DNA fraction. Growth of the population represented by EBA09 during the field-dosing experiment was demonstrated by using most-probable-number-PCR and primers targeting EBA09 and the closely related species Burkholderia hospita. Thus, the target population identified by SIP not only actively metabolized benzoic acid but reproduced in the field upon the addition of the substrate. PMID:18469130

  3. Structure and pH-Induced Structural Rearrangements of the Putative Multidrug Efflux Pump EmrD in Liposomes Probed by Site-directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Trone, Kristin E.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2013-01-01

    EmrD is the only structurally characterized drug/H+ antiporter of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). It has been crystallized in a doubly-occluded conformation that is considered representative of an intermediate state in the transport cycle of MFS transporters. However, unexpected features of the crystal structure and the lack of functional information available for EmrD limit the utility of the structural data. To assess whether the crystal structure represents a stable state in a native-like environment, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the mobility and accessibility of spin labels at 76 positions in six transmembrane (TM) helices of EmrD reconstituted in liposomes. While the EPR data were mostly consistent with the crystal structure, they also revealed significant deviations from the predicted orientation and topology of TM helices at several locations. Additionally, we were unable to reproduce EmrD-dependent multidrug resistance phenotypes in vitro and in cell-based assays of drug transport. In spite of structural and functional discrepancies, we mapped a pH-dependent conformational change in which the cytoplasmic side of the N-terminal half opened locally in response to protonation. This conformational switch is consistent with the expected pH-dependent behavior of MFS H+-coupled antiporters. PMID:24148002

  4. Trifluoroethanol and 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance as a basic surface hydroxyl reactivity probe for zirconium(IV) hydroxide structures.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Glover, T Grant; Mogilevsky, Gregory; Peterson, Gregory W; Wagner, George W

    2011-08-01

    A novel technique for determining the relative accessibility and reactivity of basic surface hydroxyl sites by reacting various zirconium(IV) hydroxide materials with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) and characterizing the resulting material using (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. Studied here are three zirconium hydroxide samples, two unperturbed commercial materials, and one commercial material that is crushed by a pellet press. Factors, such as the ratio of bridging/terminal hydroxyls, surface area, and pore size distribution, are examined and found to affect the ability of the zirconium(IV) hydroxide to react with TFE. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherms, and (1)H MAS NMR were used to characterize the unperturbed materials, while thermogravitric analysis with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry along with the (19)F MAS NMR were used to characterize the materials that were reacted with TFE. Zirconium hydroxide materials with a high surface area and a low bridging/terminal hydroxyl ratio were found to react TFE in the greatest amounts. PMID:21699226

  5. Oxidation and aging in U and Pu probed by spin-orbit sum rule analysis: indications for covalent metal-oxide bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Haire, R; Wall, M; Schwartz, A

    2005-10-07

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to acquire electron energy-loss spectra from phase-specific regions of Pu and U metal, PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}, and aged, self-irradiated Pu metal. The N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f) spectra are analyzed using the spin-orbit sum rule. Our results show that the technique is sensitive enough to detect changes in the branching ratio of the white-line peaks between the metal and dioxide of both U and Pu. There is a small change in the branching ratio between different Pu metals, and the data trends as would be expected for varying f electron localization, i.e., {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, aged {delta}-Pu. Moreover, our results suggest that the metal-oxide bonds in UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} are strongly covalent in nature and do not exhibit an integer valence change as would be expected from purely ionic bonding.

  6. Thio-ketosides of sialic acid containing aryl azides: potential photo-affinity probes for analysis of neuraminidases and sialic acid binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.G.; Lee, L.A.

    1986-05-01

    To date, only a single report describing the synthesis of thio-ketosides of sialic acid has appeared. In this procedure, the pseudo thiourea of acetoneuraminic acid methyl ester (NTU) was used to prepare the sodium thiolate salt. However, in their hands, the preparation of NTU was not straight-forward, and in subsequent reactions thio glycosides were not obtained. Therefore, they have developed an alternate route for introduction of the sulfhydryl group and have prepared novel thio-ketosides with aryl azides. The thio linkage is advantageous since it is not easily cleaved by neuraminidases and it allows incorporation of /sup 35/S as a convenient radioactive label. 2-deoxy-2-S-acetyl-4,7,8,9,- tetra-0-acetyl-N-acetyl neuraminic acid methyl ester was prepared (70% yield) from 2-chloro aceto- neuraminic acid methyl ester and potassium thioacetate in acetone at room temperature (RT) for 90 min. Selective hydrolysis of the thio acetate group was accomplished with equimolar sodium methoxide in DMF. After 10 min at RT, 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenyl azide was added and reaction continued for 60 min. Silicic acid purification, base hydrolysis, and gel filtration chromatography, gave 2'-deoxy-2'-(2-nitro-4-azido-thiophenyl)-..cap alpha..-D-N-acetyl neuraminic acid (35% yield). Other thio-arylazido ketosides were prepared similarly.

  7. Di- and triarylmethylium ions as probes for the ambident reactivities of carbanions derived from 5-benzylated Meldrum's acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Tan, Yue; Berionni, Guillaume; Ofial, Armin R; Mayr, Herbert

    2014-08-25

    The kinetics of the reactions of carbocations with carbanions 1 derived from 5-benzyl-substituted Meldrum's acids 1-H (Meldrum's acid = 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione) were investigated by UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. Benzhydryl cations Ar2CH(+) added exclusively to C-5 of the Meldrum's acid moiety. As the second-order rate constants (kC) of these reactions in DMSO followed the linear free-energy relationship lg k = sN (N+E), the nucleophile-specific reactivity parameters N and sN for the carbanions 1 could be determined. In contrast, trityl cations Ar3C(+) reacted differently. While tritylium ions of low electrophilicity (E<-2) reacted with 1 through rate-determining β-hydride abstraction, more Lewis acidic tritylium ions initially reacted at the carbonyl oxygen of 1 to form trityl enolates, which subsequently reionized and eventually yielded triarylmethanes and 5-benzylidene Meldrum's acids by hydride transfer. PMID:25099696

  8. Multiwell Assay for the Analysis of Sugar Gut Permeability Markers: Discrimination of Sugar Alcohols with a Fluorescent Probe Array Based on Boronic Acid Appended Viologens.

    PubMed

    Resendez, Angel; Panescu, Priera; Zuniga, Ruth; Banda, Isaac; Joseph, Jorly; Webb, Dominic-Luc; Singaram, Bakthan

    2016-05-17

    With the aim of discerning between different sugar and sugar alcohols of biomedical relevance, such as gut permeability, arrays of 2-component probes were assembled with up to six boronic acid-appended viologens (BBVs): 4,4'-o-BBV, 3,3'-o-BBV, 3,4'-o-BBV, 4,4'-o,m-BBV, 4,7'-o-PBBV, and pBoB, each coupled to the fluorophore 8-hydroxypyrene, 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS). These probes were screened for their ability to discriminate between lactulose, l-rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and xylose. Binding studies of sugar alcohols mannitol, sorbitol, erythritol, adonitol, arabitol, galactitol, and xylitol revealed that diols containing threo-1,2-diol units have higher affinity for BBVs relative diols containing erythro-1,2 units. Those containing both threo-1,2- and 1,3-syn diol motifs showed high affinity for boronic acid binding. Fluorescence from the arrays were examined by principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Arrays with only three BBVs sufficed to discriminate between sugars (e.g., lactulose) and sugar alcohols (e.g., mannitol), establishing a differential probe. Compared with 4,4'-o-BBV, 2-fold reductions in lower limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were achieved for lactulose with 4,7-o-PBBV (LOD 41 μM, LOQ 72 μM). Using a combination of 4,4'-o-BBV, 4,7-o-PBBV, and pBoB, LDA statistically segregated lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios from 0.1 to 0.5, consistent with values encountered in small intestinal permeability tests. Another triad containing 3,3'-o-BBV, 4,4'-o-BBV, and 4,7-o-PBBV also discerned similar L/M ratios. This proof-of-concept demonstrates the potential for BBV arrays as an attractive alternate to HPLC to analyze mixtures of sugars and sugar alcohols in biomedical applications and sheds light on structural motifs that make this possible. PMID:27116118

  9. Probing the steric requirements of the γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase active site with fluorinated analogues of vigabatrin

    PubMed Central

    Juncosa, Jose I.; Groves, Andrew P.; Xia, Guoyao; Silverman, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    We have synthesized three analogues of 4-amino-5-fluorohexanoic acids as potential inactivators of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), which were designed to combine the potency of their shorter chain analogue, 4-amino-5-fluoropentanoic acid (AFPA), with the greater enzyme selectivity of the antiepileptic vigabatrin (Sabril®). Unexpectedly, these compounds failed to inactivate or inhibit the enzyme, even at high concentrations. On the basis of molecular modeling studies, we propose that the GABA-AT active site has an accessory binding pocket that accommodates the vinyl group of vigabatrin and the fluoromethyl group of AFPA, but is too narrow to support the extra width of one distal methyl group in the synthesized analogues. PMID:23306054

  10. Spin Currents in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-03-01

    I will discuss the results of our recent spin injection experiments using long-distance non-degenerate undoped (and n-type doped) Si devices. We have a unique capability to recover the details of electron transport on a sub-ns timescale through a ``Larmor clock'' transformation of spin precession data, despite using only quasistatic current measurements. I suggest that this is potentially a new tool for probing non-equilibrium phenomena in semiconductors, revealing both intrinsic and extrinsic materials properties through sensitivity to subtleties of the bandstructure and impurity spectrum. Supported by ONR and NSF.

  11. Propane conversion on Ga-HZSM-5: Effect of aging on the dehydrogenating and acid functions using pyridine as an IR probe

    SciTech Connect

    Meriaudeau, P.; Naccache, C. ); Abdul Hamid, S.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Gallium-loaded zeolite (Ga-HZSM-5) catalysts have been extensively studied in the recent past, not only in respect of their interesting catalytic activity in the aromatization of C[sub 3]-C[sub 5] alkanes (Cyclar Process) but also in respect of theoretical considerations. There is clear evidence that in the reaction of alkanes these catalysts behave as bifunctional catalysts, the acid function being provided by the protons and the dehydrogenation function deriving from Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3] or Ga[sup n+] ions in ionic-exchange positions. Ga-HZSM-5 catalysts deactivate with time on-stream. The deactivation can result from poisoning of the acid centers and/or the dehydrogenating sites by coke deposition or from sintering or phase transformation of the dehydrogenating gallium species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible modifications of Ga centers and H[sup +] sites which may result from the propane reaction. The active centers were studied by infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine, pyridine adsorption being used to probe both H[sup +] and Al, Ga Lewis-acid centers. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Probing thermal stability of the β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid complex by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simion (Ciuciu), Ana-Maria; Aprodu, Iuliana; Dumitrașcu, Loredana; Bahrim, Gabriela Elena; Alexe, Petru; Stănciuc, Nicoleta

    2015-09-01

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin is able to interact with different bioactive compounds, thus being an important candidate in the development of delivery systems with improved functionality. The heat induced changes in the β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid complex were examined by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy results indicated a rigid protein structure in the temperature range 25-70 °C, whereas at temperatures over 75 °C, the rearrangements of the polypeptide chains led to higher exposure of hydrophobic residues. The most significant increase of the accessible surface area with temperature increase was identified in case of Tyr99 and Tyr102. The phase diagram method indicated an all or none transition between two conformations. Due to conformational changes, no contact between Ile56 or Lys60 and the fatty acid could be identified at 85 °C, but new non-bonding interaction were established with Ile12 and Val15. The results obtained in this study provide important details about thermal induced changes in the conformation of β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid complex. Significant conformational changes were registered above 75 °C, suggesting the possibility of obtaining highly functional complexes between whey proteins and natural unsaturated fatty acids.

  13. Probing metal ion complexation with salicylic acid and its derivatives with excited state proton transfer and luminescence anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Friedrich, D.M.; Ainsworth, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives in which the phenolic proton is preserved show a characteristic dual fluorescence: one band in the UV, due to a {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} excited state emission, and the other in the visible range, is assigned to excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The transition energy, quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime as well as fluorescence anisotropy are sensitive to the solvent environment, temperature and properties of the substituents (complexation) at the phenolic and carboxylic oxygens. The ESIPT band disappears in molecules in which the intramolecular hydrogen bond between phenolic hydrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is prohibited. In this work, the complexation of Na(I), Ca(II), Al(III) and La(III) with salicylic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, methylsalicylate and anisic acid in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents has been studied by absorption and steady state luminescence spectroscopy, picosecond to nanosecond luminescence lifetimes and luminescence anisotropy measurements in a range of solvent and in ethanol at 77 K. Speciation in these complex systems, binding characteristics between the metal ion and the ligand, and ligand-centered energetics are discussed in terms of the spectroscopic properties, luminescence and anisotropy decay kinetics.

  14. Probing High School Students' Cognitive Structures and Key Areas of Learning Difficulties on Ethanoic Acid Using the Flow Map Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Qing; Wang, Tingting; Zheng, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was primarily to explore high school students' cognitive structures and to identify their learning difficulties on ethanoic acid through the flow map method. The subjects of this study were 30 grade 1 students from Dong Yuan Road Senior High School in Xi'an, China. The interviews were conducted a week after the students…

  15. Development of a Functional Ruthenium(II) Complex that Can Act as a Photoluminescent and Electrochemiluminescent Dual-signaling Probe for Hypochlorous Acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Wenzhu; Ye, Zhiqiang; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-07-01

    A functional ruthenium(II) complex that can act as a probe for response to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in aqueous media with photoluminescence (PL) and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) dual-signals, [Ru(bpy)2(DB-phen)](PF6)2 [bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine; DB-phen: 5-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylamino)-1,10-phenanthroline)], has been designed and synthesized. The complex is highly luminescent both under the light excitation and the electrochemical induction. It can specifically react with HOCl in physiological pH aqueous media to afford its chlorinated derivative, [Ru(bpy)2(DBCA-phen)](PF6)2 [DBCA-phen: 5-(2,4-dimethoxybenzyl-chloroamino)- 1,10-phenanthroline], accompanied by remarkable decreases in its PL and ECL intensities. The PL and ECL abatements of [Ru(bpy)2(DB-phen)](PF6)2 show good linear correlation to the concentration of HOCl with detection limits at low micromolar concentration level, and the PL and ECL responses of the complex to HOCl are highly specific without interferences of other reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. These features enabled [Ru(bpy)2(DB-phen)](PF6)2 to be used as a probe for the highly selective and sensitive detection of HOCl in aqueous media with PL and ECL dual-modes. PMID:25962768

  16. A potential fluorescent probe: Maillard reaction product from glutathione and ascorbic acid for rapid and label-free dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Song, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yan; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-07-15

    Maillard reactions and their fluorescent products have drawn much attention in the fields of food and life science, however, the application of fluorescent products separated from the reaction as an indicator for detection of certain substances in sensor field has not been mentioned. In this article, we report on an easy-to-synthesize and water-soluble fluorescent probe separated from the typical Maillard reaction products of glutathione and ascorbic acid, with excellent stability and high quantum yield (18.2%). The further application of the probe has been explored for dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols including cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione, which is based on Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of the Maillard reaction fluorescent products (MRFPs) and the fluorescence recovery as the introduction of biothiols. This sensing system exhibits a good selectivity and sensitivity, and the linear ranges for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 0.05-12, 0.5-10, 0.3-20, and 0.3-20μM, respectively. The detection limits for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 22, 47, 96, and 30nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. Furthermore, the practical applications of this sensor for Hg(2+) and biothiols determination in water samples and human plasma sample have been demonstrated with satisfactory results. PMID:27015151

  17. Single glass nanopore-based regenerable sensing platforms with a non-immobilized polyglutamic acid probe for selective detection of cupric ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lizhen; He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-08-19

    A single glass capillary nanopore-based sensing platform for rapid and selective detection of cupric ions is demonstrated by utilizing polyglutamic acid (PGA) as a non-immobilized probe. The detection is based on the significant decrease of ionic current through nanopore and the reversal of ion current rectification responses induced by the chelated cupric ions on the probes when in the presence of cupric ions. PGA shows high selectivity for detecting cupric ions rather than other metal ions. The sensitivity of the sensing platform can be improved about 1-2 orders of magnitude by employing asymmetric salt gradients during the measurements. And the PGA-based nanopore sensing platform shows excellent regenerability for Cu(2+) sensing applications. In addition, the method is found effective and reliable for the detection of cupric ions in real samples with small volume down to 20 μL. This nanopore-based sensing platform will find promising practical applications for the detection of cupric ions. PMID:26343431

  18. Synthesis of a novel fluorescent probe and investigation on its interaction with nucleic acid and analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghui; Wu, Wenqiang; Lian, Xiaoan; Lin, Xucong; Xie, Zenghong

    2008-12-01

    A novel fluorescent probe N-( N-(2-(4-morpholinyl)ethyl)-4-acridinecarboxamide)-α-alanine ( N-( N-(ME)-4-ACA)-α-ALA) was synthesized. The structure was characterized by 1H NMR, MS, elemental analysis, fluorescent and ultraviolet spectra. This new compound exhibited high binding affinity to DNA, intense fluorescence and high water solubility. Experiment indicated that the fluorescent intensity was quenched when DNA was added. A method for DNA determination based on the quenching fluorescence ( λex = 258 nm, λem = 451 nm) of N-( N-(ME)-4-ACA)-α-ALA was established. Under optimal conditions (pH 7.2, CN-( N-(ME)-4-ACA)-α-ALA = 3 × 10 -6 mol L -1), the linear range is 0.1-4.0 μg mL -1 for both fish semen (fsDNA) and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). The corresponding determination limits are 4.6 ng mL -1 for fsDNA and 5.1 ng mL -1 for ct-DNA, respectively. The relative standard deviation is 1.0%. Thus this compound can be used as a DNA fluorescent probe. The experiments proved that the interaction mode between N-( N-(ME)-4-ACA)-α-ALA and DNA was groove binding. The modified Rosenthal's graphical method gave the binding constant of 1.0 × 10 6 L mol -1 and a binding size of 0.31 base pairs per bound drug molecule.

  19. Genotyping of velvet antlers for identification of country of origin using mitochondrial DNA and fluorescence melting curve analysis with locked nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Hong, Ji Young; Kim, Gi Won; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2016-07-01

    Velvet antlers are used medicinally in Asia and possess various therapeutic effects. Prices are set according to the country of origin, which is unidentifiable to the naked eye, and therefore counterfeiting is prevalent. Additionally, antlers of the Canadian elk, which can generate chronic wasting disease, are prevalently smuggled and distributed in the market. Thus, a method for identifying the country of origin of velvet antlers was developed, using polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA, fluorescence melting curve analysis and analysis of locked nucleic acids (LNA). This combined method is capable of identifying five genotypes of velvet antlers in a single experiment using two probes. It also has advantages in multiplexing, simplicity and efficiency in genotyping, when compared to real-time PCR or microarrays. The developed method can be used to improve identification rates in the velvet antler market and, by extension, research based on polymorphisms in DNA sequences. PMID:26094991

  20. Galileo probe relay receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prouty, D. A.; Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1982-01-01

    For the Jovian mission, the data link from the Galileo probe to the orbiter uses suppressed-carrier Manchester encoded BPSK modulation and is protected with R = 1/2, K = 7 convolutional coding. The receiver closes the link by acquiring, tracking, and demodulating the data. It has to operate in a highly stressed environment with severe frequency offset, frequency rate, wind gust, and antenna spin conditions. Salient features are described and breadboard test data presented.

  1. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  2. Probing pH and pressure effects on the apomyoglobin heme pocket with the 2'-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-naphthoyl-4-trans-cyclohexanoic acid fluorophore.

    PubMed Central

    Sire, O; Alpert, B; Royer, C A

    1996-01-01

    The environmentally sensitive fluorophore 2'-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-naphthoyl-4-trans-cyclohexanoic acid (DANCA) has been used to probe the apomyoglobin heme pocket. The unexpected polarity of this domain is generally interpreted as arising from dynamic dipolar relaxation of the peptide dipoles surrounding the heme pocket. In the present work we reexamine the photophysical properties of DANCA in a variety of solvents and complexed with apomyoglobin (apoMb) to further probe the heme pocket environment as a function of external solvent conditions. Absorption and excitation spectra in a number of solvents are consistent with the well-known pi*<--pi (LE) and pi*<--n (CT) electronic absorption transitions observed for naphthylamine derivatives. Dual emission is also a well-documented property of such derivatives. Based on the time scale of the heterogeneity in the decay of the DANCA fluorophore observed in a series of solvents, we propose that the emission properties of DANCA in apoMb are not uniquely attributable to dynamic relaxation events, but also reflect dual emission from both a long-lived, red CT state and the shorter-lived, blue LE state. The pH studies in the range of pH 5-9 of the emission properties of DANCA in apoMb support this hypothesis. They also suggest a specific interaction of DANCA with one or both of the pocket histidyl residues, which leads to a drastic static quenching and red shift of the bound DANCA fluorescence upon protonation. Similar effects are observed with increasing pressure, indicating that these two perturbations alter the DANCA-apoMb complex in a similar fashion. The pressure-induced form of the protein is distinct both energetically and structurally from the previously characterized acid intermediate, in that it is populated above pH 5 and retains a significant degree of integrity of the heme pocket. PMID:8744328

  3. Enhanced Atomic-Scale Spin Contrast due to Spin Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazi, S.; Kubetzka, A.; von Bergmann, K.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-02-01

    Atom manipulation with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is a versatile technique to construct and investigate well-defined atomic spin arrangements. Here we explore the possibility of using a magnetic adatom as a local probe to image surface spin textures. As a model system we choose a Néel state with 120° between neighboring magnetic moments. Close to the threshold of manipulation, the adatom resides in the threefold, magnetically frustrated hollow sites, and consequently no magnetic signal is detected in manipulation images. At smaller tip-adatom distances, however, the adatom is moved towards the magnetically active bridge sites and due to the exchange force of the tip the manipulation process becomes spin dependent. In this way the adatom can be used as an amplifying probe for the surface spin texture.

  4. Current-induced spin-wave Doppler shift.

    PubMed

    Vlaminck, Vincent; Bailleul, Matthieu

    2008-10-17

    Spin transfer appears to be a promising tool for improving spintronics devices. Experiments that quantitatively access the magnitude of the spin transfer are required for a fundamental understanding of this phenomenon. By inductively measuring spin waves propagating along a permalloy strip subjected to a large electrical current, we observed a current-induced spin wave Doppler shift that we relate to the adiabatic spin transfer torque. Because spin waves provide a well-defined system for performing spin transfer, we anticipate that they could be used as an accurate probe of spin-polarized transport in various itinerant ferromagnets. PMID:18927387

  5. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.; Kirsch, J.F. )

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shown that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.

  6. Hexagonal cobalt oxyhydroxide-carbon dots hybridized surface: high sensitive fluorescence turn-on probe for monitoring of ascorbic acid in rat brain following brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Linbo; Wang, Chao; Liu, Kangyu; Wang, Yuhan; Liu, Kun; Lin, Yuqing

    2015-03-17

    In this study, we report a novel and efficient fluorescence probe synthesized by Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-derived carbon dots (CDs)-modified hexagonal cobalt oxyhydroxide(CoOOH) nanoflakes (Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH) for monitoring of cerebral ascorbic acid (AA) in brain microdialysate. The as-prepared Tris-derived CDs with the fluorescence quantum yield of 7.3% are prepared by a one-step pyrolysis strategy of the sole precursor and used as the signal output. After being hybridized with CoOOH nanoflakes to form Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH, the luminescence of the Tris-derived CDs can be efficiently quenched by CoOOH via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Due to the specific redox reaction between the enediol group of AA and hexagonal CoOOH nanoflakes, AA can reduce the hexagonal CoOOH nanoflakes in the Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH and lead to collapse of the hybrized structure, then the release of Tris-derived CDs, and thus finally the fluorescence recovery. Moreover, cobalt ions (II), generated by CoOOH nanoflakes oxidizing AA, almost have no obvious interference on the fluorescence probe, i.e., Tris-derived CDs, which could be ascribed to the surface of Tris-derived CDs containing a few strong chelation groups such as amino/carboxyl/thiol groups, instead of plenty of -OH groups with weak chelation with Co(2+). On the basis of this feature, the Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH fluorescent probe demonstrates a linear range from 100 nM to 20 μM with the detection limit of ∼50 nM, i.e., with an improved sensitivity toward AA detection. Compared with other turn-on fluorescent methods using convenient fluorophore-nitroxide fluorescent probes for detection of AA, the method demonstrated here possesses a facial synthesis route, lower limit of detection, and wider linear range, which validates sensing of AA in the cerebral systems during the calm/ischemia process. This study provides a fluorescence assay for the simple yet facial detection of AA in the cerebral systems and

  7. Optical manipulation of a multilevel nuclear spin in ZnO: Master equation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Rudolph, J.; Wassner, T. A.; Eickhoff, M.; Hägele, D.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the dynamics and optical control of a large quantum mechanical solid state spin system consisting of a donor electron spin strongly coupled to the 9/2 nuclear spin of 115In in the semiconductor ZnO. Comparison of electron spin dynamics observed by time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy with density matrix theory reveals nuclear spin pumping via optically oriented electron spins, coherent spin-spin interaction, and quantization effects of the ten nuclear spin levels. Modulation of the optical electron spin orientation at frequencies above 1 MHz gives evidence for fast optical manipulation of the nuclear spin state.

  8. Probing the "additive effect" in the proline and proline hydroxamic acid catalyzed asymmetric addition of nitroalkanes to cyclic enones.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Govindan, Subramaniyan; Warrier, Jayakumar S

    2005-11-01

    The effect of chirality and steric bulk of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines as additives in the conjugate addition of 2-nitropropane to cyclohexenone, catalyzed by l-proline, was investigated. Neither chirality nor steric bulk affects the enantioselectivity of addition, which gives 86-93% ee in the presence of achiral and chiral nonracemic 2,5-disubstituted piperazines. Proline hydroxamic acid is shown for the first time to be an effective organocatalyst in the same Michael reaction. PMID:16189834

  9. Gold-catalysed cross-coupling between aryldiazonium salts and arylboronic acids: probing the usefulness of photoredox conditions.

    PubMed

    Cornilleau, Thomas; Hermange, Philippe; Fouquet, Eric

    2016-08-21

    The synthesis of biaryl compounds from aryldiazonium salts and arylboronic acids was achieved using PPh3AuCl as catalyst, CsF as base and acetonitrile as solvent. Combined to photosensitizers, irradiation by blue LEDs allowed accelerating the reaction and expanding its scope. Various functional groups were compatible including bromoaryls, iodoaryls, aldehydes and alcohols. A 2-iodobenzyl alcohol moiety was smoothly introduced by this method, enabling its consecutive isotopic labelling by a Pd-catalysed alkoxycarbonylation. PMID:27452177

  10. Human serum albumin-mimetic chromatography based hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as a novel direct probe for protein binding of acidic drugs.

    PubMed

    Salary, Mina; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammadreza

    2015-10-10

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most important drug carrier in humans mainly binding acidic drugs. Negatively charged compounds bind more strongly to HSA than it would be expected from their lipophilicity alone. With the development of new acidic drugs, there is a high need for rapid and simple protein binding screening technologies. Biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) is a mode of micellar liquid chromatography, which can be used as an in vitro system to model the biopartitioning process of drugs when there are no active processes. In this study, a new kind of BMC using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as micellar mobile phases was used for the prediction of protein binding of acidic drugs based on the similar property of CTAB micelles to HSA. The use of BMC is simple, reproducible and can provide key information about the pharmacological behavior of drugs such as protein binding properties of new compounds during the drug discovery process. The relationships between the MLC retention data of a heterogeneous set of 17 acidic and neutral drugs and their plasma protein binding parameter were studied and second-order polynomial models obtained in two different concentrations (0.07 and 0.09M) of CTAB. However, the developed models are only being able to distinguish between strongly and weakly binding drugs. Also, the developed models were characterized by both the descriptive and predictive ability (R(2)=0.885, RCV(2)=0.838 and R(2)=0.898, RCV(2)=0.859 for 0.07 and 0.09M CTAB, respectively). The application of the developed model to a prediction set demonstrated that the model was also reliable with good predictive accuracy. PMID:25988296

  11. Spin-injection spectroscopy of a spin-orbit coupled Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Lawrence W; Sommer, Ariel T; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Bakr, Waseem S; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2012-08-31

    The coupling of the spin of electrons to their motional state lies at the heart of recently discovered topological phases of matter. Here we create and detect spin-orbit coupling in an atomic Fermi gas, a highly controllable form of quantum degenerate matter. We directly reveal the spin-orbit gap via spin-injection spectroscopy, which characterizes the energy-momentum dispersion and spin composition of the quantum states. For energies within the spin-orbit gap, the system acts as a spin diode. We also create a spin-orbit coupled lattice and probe its spinful band structure, which features additional spin gaps and a fully gapped spectrum. In the presence of s-wave interactions, such systems should display induced p-wave pairing, topological superfluidity, and Majorana edge states. PMID:23002844

  12. Muon spin rotation in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MuSR) technique is used to probe the microscopic electron density in materials. High temperature MuSR and magnetization measurements in nickel are in progress to allow an unambiguous determination of the muon impurity interaction and the impurity induced change in local spin density. The first results on uniaxial stress induced frequency shifts in an Fe single crystal are also reported.

  13. Probing the chemical mechanism and critical regulatory amino acid residues of Drosophila melanogaster arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Daniel R; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Ospina, Santiago Rodriguez; Merkler, David J

    2015-11-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2 (AANATL2) catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides from the corresponding acyl-CoA and arylalkylamine. The N-acylation of biogenic amines in Drosophila melanogaster is a critical step for the inactivation of neurotransmitters, cuticle sclerotization, and melatonin biosynthesis. In addition, D. melanogaster has been used as a model system to evaluate the biosynthesis of fatty acid amides: a family of potent cell signaling lipids. We have previously showed that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylakylamides, including long-chain N-acylserotonins and N-acyldopamines. Herein, we define the kinetic mechanism for AANATL2 as an ordered sequential mechanism with acetyl-CoA binding first followed by tyramine to generate the ternary complex prior to catalysis. Bell shaped kcat,app - acetyl-CoA and (kcat/Km)app - acetyl-CoA pH-rate profiles identified two apparent pKa,app values of ∼7.4 and ∼8.9 that are critical to catalysis, suggesting the AANATL2-catalyzed formation of N-acetyltyramine occurs through an acid/base chemical mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved glutamate that corresponds to the catalytic base for other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes did not produce a substantial depression in the kcat,app value nor did it abolish the pKa,app value attributed to the general base in catalysis (pKa ∼7.4). These data suggest that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides using either different catalytic residues or a different chemical mechanism relative to other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes. In addition, we constructed other site-directed mutants of AANATL2 to help define the role of targeted amino acids in substrate binding and/or enzyme catalysis. PMID:26476413

  14. Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon biosensor for the specific identification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences using gold nanoparticle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Rodrigo; Baptista, Pedro; Raniero, Leandro; Doria, Gonçalo; Silva, Leonardo; Franco, Ricardo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon pi 'ii'n devices fabricated on micromachined glass substrates are integrated with oligonucleotide-derivatized gold nanoparticles for a colorimetric detection method. The method enables the specific detection and quantification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences (DNA and RNA) without the need to functionalize the glass surface, allowing for resolution of single nucleotide differences between DNA and RNA sequences—single nucleotide polymorphism and mutation detection. The detector's substrate is glass and the sample is directly applied on the back side of the biosensor, ensuring a direct optical coupling of the assays with a concomitant maximum photon capture and the possibility to reuse the sensor.

  15. Probing Nucleic Acid Interactions and Pre-mRNA Splicing by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Šimková, Eva; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is a powerful technique routinely used to monitor interactions between biomolecules. Here, we focus on the techniques that are used for investigating the structure and interactions of nucleic acids (NAs). We present a brief overview of the most commonly used FRET microscopy techniques, their advantages and drawbacks. We list experimental approaches recently used for either in vitro or in vivo studies. Next, we summarize how FRET contributed to the understanding of pre-mRNA splicing and spliceosome assembly. PMID:23203103

  16. Characterisation of embroidered 3D electrodes by use of anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonic acid as probe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Noemí; Bechtold, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    New electrode designs are required for electrochemical applications such as batteries or fuel cells. Embroidered 3D Cu porous electrodes with a geometric surface of 100 cm2 are presented and characterised by means of the anthraquinone-1,5-disfulfonic acid (AQDS2-) redox system in alkaline solution. The electrochemical behaviour of the 3D electrode is established by the comparison of cyclic voltammetry responses using a micro cell and a 100 cm2 plane Cu-plate electrode. Dependencies of the peak currents and peak-to-peak potential separation on scan rate and AQDS2- concentration are studied. The AQDS2- characterisation is also performed by means of spectroelectrochemical experiments.

  17. Probing the Active Site of MIO-dependent Aminomutases, Key Catalysts in the Biosynthesis of amino Acids Incorporated in Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Bruner, S

    2010-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-{beta}-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated intermediates to form {beta}-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis.

  18. High fluorescence S, N co-doped carbon dots as an ultra-sensitive fluorescent probe for the determination of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Lu, Qiujun; Hou, Yuxin; Liu, Yalan; Zhang, Youyu

    2016-08-01

    Sulfur, nitrogen co-doped carbon dots (S, N co-doped C-dots) as highly selective fluorescent probe for uric acid (UA) detection were designed. The S, N co-doped C-dots with high quantum yield of 73.1% were prepared by hydrothermal method. It was found that the fluorescence of S, N co-doped C-dots was quenched apparently by hydroxyl radicals from Fenton reaction between H2O2 and Fe(2+). The production of H2O2 originated from the oxidization of UA by uricase. Therefore, an optical biosensor was developed for the detection of UA based on Fenton reaction and enzymatic reaction. Under the optimized conditions, two linear relationships between the ratio of fluorescence quenching of the C-dots and UA concentration were found in the range of 0.08-10µM and 10-50µM, respectively. The detection limit was down to 0.07µM. Moreover, the proposed biosensor was successfully applied to the detection of uric acid in human serum samples. PMID:27216657

  19. Folic acid-targeted magnetic Tb-doped CeF3 fluorescent nanoparticles as bimodal probes for cellular fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-Ya; Liu, Yu-Ping; Bai, Ling-Yu; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential applications for diagnostics, imaging and therapy. We developed a facile polyol method to synthesize multifunctional Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3 NPs with small size (<20 nm), high water solubility and good biocompatibility. The NPs were modified by ligand exchange reactions with citric acid (CA) to obtain carboxyl-functionalized NPs (Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3-COOH). Folic acid (FA) as an affinity ligand was then covalently conjugated onto NPs to yield Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3-FA NPs. They were then applied as multimodal imaging agents for simultaneous in vitro targeted fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of HeLa cells with overexpressed folate receptors (FR). The results indicated that these NPs had strong luminescence and enhanced T2-weighted MR contrast and would be promising candidates as multimodal probes for both fluorescence and MRI imaging. PMID:26299897

  20. Probing the active site of MIO-dependent aminomutases, key catalysts in the biosynthesis of beta-amino acids incorporated in secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Heather A; Bruner, Steven D

    2010-09-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-ss-tyrosine from L-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form alpha,ss-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been limited reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the alpha,ss-unsaturated intermediates to form ss-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray cocrystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with L-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis. PMID:20577998