Science.gov

Sample records for acid storage disease

  1. Genetics Home Reference: sialic acid storage disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions sialic acid storage disease sialic acid storage disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Sialic acid storage disease is an inherited disorder that primarily ...

  2. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  3. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  4. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  5. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: diagnosis and treatment of Wolman and Cholesteryl Ester Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Porto, Anthony F

    2014-09-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is responsible for the hydrolysis of cholesterol esters and triglycerides. LAL is coded by the LIPA gene on chromosome 10q23.31. Its deficiency leads to two autosomal recessive disorders, Wolman disease (WD) and Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease (CESD). WD has an estimated incidence of 1 in 500,000 live births and is the result of a complete loss of LAL and presents in infancy with vomiting, diarrhea, poor weight gain and hepatomegaly subsequently leading to death. CESD is the result of partial loss of LAL and its presentation is more variable. Patients may be asymptomatic or present with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases and dystipidemia which may be confused with the diagnosis of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. CESD is currently underdiagnosed and has an estimated prevalence as high as I in 40,000 individuals. Radiologic findings in WD is calcification of the adrenal glands. Hepatomegaly is noted on CT scan in both WD and CESD. MRI may demonstrate accumulation of cholesterol esters and may be useful to study effects of potential medical therapies. The diagnosis of WD and CESD is based on LIPA gene sequencing and the measurement of LAL levels in peripheral blood leukocytes. Treatment of LAL deficiency is currently limited to control of cholesterol levels and to prevent premature atherosclerosis. Use of enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human LAL in short-term studies has shown to be safe and effective. PMID:25345094

  6. Low and moderate concentrations of lysobisphosphatidic acid in brain and liver of patients affected by some storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Kahma, K; Brotherus, J; Haltia, M; Renkonen, O

    1976-07-01

    The relative amount of lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), known also as bis(monoacylglycerly)phosphate, among the total phospholipids was analyzed in post mortem samples of brain and liver of patients affected by four storage diseases. In spite of the extensive accumulation of storage lysosomes, none of the samples revealed a highly evelated LBPA content comparable to that found in the liver in Niemann-Pick disease and in the liver in lipidosis induced by 4,4'-diethylaminoethoxyhexestrol. We conclude that, although LBPA is often present in high concentration in lysosomes of many types of cells, it is not always a major component of these organelles. PMID:948249

  7. Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Edward M.

    2001-05-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), over 40 different diseases, are now considered treatable disorders. Only a few short years ago, Lysosomal storage disorders were seen as interesting neurodegenerative disorders without any potential for treatment. Effective treatment strategies such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), and glycolipid synthesis inhibition have been developed in the last 20 years and continue to be researched and evaluated. Bone marrow transplantation began approximately 15 years ago and has shown benefit for some of the lysosomal storage disorders. In order to be effective, the transplant must be performed early in the course of the disease, before the development of irreversible neurologic damage. Diseases such as Hurler appear to respond to BMT, however, improvement in bone disease is much less vigorous than responses in other organs. Krabbe disease responds if the transplant is performed before irreversible signs of neurologic damage appear. Metachromatic leukodystrophy may respond if the transplant can be performed early enough although peripheral nerve findings appear to progress. Other diseases, eg, GM1- and GM2-gangliosidoses do not appear to be altered by BMT. Despite its high cost, ERT has been very effective treatment for type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy for other LSDs, including ERT for Fabry and Pompe diseases, which are planned to be imminently introduced, and other enzymes such as for Morquio and Hunter diseases that are in the study phases, may be marketed in the very near future. Glycolipid inhibitors, such as N-butyldeoxynijirimycin (OGS-918), have been effective in reducing the liver and spleen volume in type I Gaucher disease. These oral inhibitors may prove to be important adjuncts to ERT and provide the advantage of being able to cross the blood/brain barrier, which limits enzyme access to brain. Currently, clinical studies are being conducted on patients

  8. Lysosomal Lipid Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a “traffic jam.” This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement. PMID:21502308

  9. Enhanced efficacy of an AAV vector encoding chimeric, highly secreted acid alpha-glucosidase in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2006-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16987711

  10. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms include an enlarged liver and spleen, abnormal eye movement, extensive and progressive brain damage, spasticity, seizures, limb ... or Type 2 Gaucher disease. Major symptoms include eye movement disorders, cognitive deficit, poor coordination, an enlarged spleen ...

  11. Evasion of immune responses to introduced human acid alpha-glucosidase by liver-restricted expression in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Sun, Baodong; Yang, Xiaoyi; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Schneider, Ayn; Brown, Talmage; Young, Sarah P; Clay, Timothy M; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chen, Y T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease) is caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) and manifests as muscle weakness, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus vectors containing either a liver-specific promoter (LSP) (AAV-LSPhGAApA) or a hybrid CB promoter (AAV-CBhGAApA) to drive human GAA expression were pseudotyped as AAV8 and administered to immunocompetent GAA-knockout mice. Secreted hGAA was detectable in plasma between 1 day and 12 weeks postadministration with AAV-LSPhGAApA and only from 1 to 8 days postadministration for AAV-CBGAApA. No anti-GAA antibodies were detected in response to AAV-LSPhGAApA (<1:200), whereas AAV-CBhGAApA provoked an escalating antibody response starting 2 weeks postadministration. The LSP drove approximately 60-fold higher GAA expression than the CB promoter in the liver by 12 weeks following vector administration. Furthermore, the detected cellular immunity was provoked by AAV-CBhGAApA, as detected by ELISpot and CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte immunodetection. GAA activity was increased to higher than normal and glycogen content was reduced to essentially normal levels in the heart and skeletal muscle following administration of AAV-LSPhGAApA. Therefore, liver-restricted GAA expression with an AAV vector evaded immunity and enhanced efficacy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16005263

  12. Glycogen storage diseases: New perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Hasan

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inherited metabolic disorders of glycogen metabolism. Different hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and cortisol regulate the relationship of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis. The overall GSD incidence is estimated 1 case per 20000-43000 live births. There are over 12 types and they are classified based on the enzyme deficiency and the affected tissue. Disorders of glycogen degradation may affect primarily the liver, the muscle, or both. Type Ia involves the liver, kidney and intestine (and Ib also leukocytes), and the clinical manifestations are hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia. Type IIIa involves both the liver and muscle, and IIIb solely the liver. The liver symptoms generally improve with age. Type IV usually presents in the first year of life, with hepatomegaly and growth retardation. The disease in general is progressive to cirrhosis. Type VI and IX are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by a deficiency of the liver phosphorylase and phosphorylase kinase system. There is no hyperuricemia or hyperlactatemia. Type XI is characterized by hepatic glycogenosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. Type II is a prototype of inborn lysosomal storage diseases and involves many organs but primarily the muscle. Types V and VII involve only the muscle. PMID:17552001

  13. Primer on lead-acid storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

  14. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  15. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  16. Ezetimibe markedly attenuates hepatic cholesterol accumulation and improves liver function in the lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mouse, a model for cholesteryl ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-01-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) plays a critical role in the intracellular handling of lipids by hydrolyzing cholesteryl esters (CE) and triacylglycerols (TAG) contained in newly internalized lipoproteins. In humans, mutations in the LAL gene result in cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD), or in Wolman disease (WD) when the mutations cause complete loss of LAL activity. A rat model for WD and a mouse model for CESD have been described. In these studies we used LAL-deficient mice to investigate how modulating the amount of intestinally-derived cholesterol reaching the liver might impact its mass, cholesterol content, and function in this model. The main experiment tested if ezetimibe, a potent cholesterol absorption inhibitor, had any effect on CE accumulation in mice lacking LAL. In male Lal(-/-) mice given ezetimibe in their diet (20 mg/day/kg bw) for 4 weeks starting at 21 days of age, both liver mass and hepatic cholesterol concentration (mg/g) were reduced to the extent that whole-liver cholesterol content (mg/organ) in the treated mice (74.3±3.4) was only 56% of that in those not given ezetimibe (133.5±6.7). There was also a marked improvement in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. Thus, minimizing cholesterol absorption has a favorable impact on the liver in CESD. PMID:24370824

  17. Enhanced Efficacy of an AAV Vector Encoding Chimeric, Highly-Secreted Acid α-glucosidase in Glycogen Storage Disease Type II

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P.; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1×1010 vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3×1010 vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16987711

  18. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  19. 2. ACID STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ACID STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Acid Storage Shed, North of launch area, northwest of earthen berm of Acid Fueling Station, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  20. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VII

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions glycogen storage disease type VII glycogen storage disease type VII Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type VII (GSDVII) is an inherited disorder ...

  2. Optical Data Storage in Acid Red Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Deepa; Palanisamy, P. K.

    High-density optical data storage is a current field gaining importance where research work is done in abundance to bring about holographic CDs to light. Dye-doped gelatin films are promising candidates as recording materials for holographic data storage because of the ease of preparation and low cost. In this report we suggest some acid red dyes as useful recording materials for optical data storage. Acid red dyes namely Acid Red 73 and Acid Red 114 that are completely water-soluble are used to sensitize gelatin thin films for data storage. These dyes have their absorption peak around 514 nm. Two coherent beams of Argon ion laser (514.5 nm) are used to form the grating in the dye-sensitized gelatin films. The grating formed is found to be permanent. The diffraction efficiency of each material as a function of different parameters like dye concentration, writing beam intensities and their ratios and spatial frequency has been studied and presented. An attempt to store data in the sample has been made.

  3. Pompe disease: Shared and unshared features of lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong-A; Kakhlon, Or; Li, Lishu; Myerowitz, Rachel; Raben, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease, an inherited deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA), is a severe metabolic myopathy with a wide range of clinical manifestations. It is the first recognized lysosomal storage disorder and the first neuromuscular disorder for which a therapy (enzyme replacement) has been approved. As GAA is the only enzyme that hydrolyses glycogen to glucose in the acidic environment of the lysosome, its deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation within and concomitant enlargement of this organelle. Since the introduction of the therapy, the overall understanding of the disease has progressed significantly, but the pathophysiology of muscle damage is still not fully understood. The emerging complex picture of the pathological cascade involves disturbance of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial abnormalities, dysfunctional autophagy, accumulation of toxic undegradable materials, and accelerated production of lipofuscin deposits that are unrelated to aging. The relationship of Pompe disease to other lysosomal storage disorders and potential therapeutic interventions for Pompe disease are discussed. PMID:26619007

  4. Echocardiographic abnormalities in the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gross, D M; Williams, J C; Caprioli, C; Dominguez, B; Howell, R R

    1988-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharide storage diseases express themselves clinically with a wide variety of abnormalities, including growth and mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities, clouded corneas, nerve compression syndromes, upper airway obstruction and cardiovascular involvement, to name the most common. In most cases the cause of early death is cardiorespiratory failure secondary to cardiovascular involvement and upper airway obstruction. The findings of cardiac ultrasound examination in 29 children, adolescents and young adults are presented. In addition to the previously well-described abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves in several types of mucopolysaccharide storage disease, we report patchy involvement in some cases, 3 instances of asymmetric septal hypertrophy not previously reported in mucopolysaccharide storage diseases, cardiac involvement in half of our patients with Sanfilippo syndrome and a lack of age-related severity of cardiac involvement even within the specific syndromes. PMID:3122547

  5. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  6. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-05-29

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  7. Novel Mutation in a Patient with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Patrick; Raikar, Sheela; Jimenez, Jennifer; Furuya, Katryn N.

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol ester storage disease (CESD) is a chronic liver disease that typically presents with hepatomegaly. It is characterized by hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, high-density lipoprotein deficiency, and abnormal lipid deposition within multiple organs. It is an autosomal recessive disease that is due to a deficiency in lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity, which is coded by the lysosomal acid lipase gene (LIPA). We describe the case of a 5-year-old south Asian female incidentally found to have hepatomegaly, and subsequent workup confirmed the diagnosis of CESD. DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of a novel hepatic mutation. It is a four-nucleotide deletion c.57_60delTGAG in exon 2 of the LIPA gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a premature translation stop downstream of the deletion (p.E20fs) and, therefore, is felt to be a disease-causing mutation. PMID:25722898

  8. Secondary metabolic changes in von Gierke's disease (Type I glycogen storage disease).

    PubMed

    Blackett, P R

    1982-01-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase in Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) results in hypoglycemia and excessive accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate. As a result, lactic acid, uric acid, and lipids are formed as end-products. The formation of these metabolites are discussed with an emphasis on monitoring therapeutic progress. In addition, hyperlipidemia and associated changes in apolipoproteins are considered as indices of the clinical course. PMID:6753728

  9. Scintigraphic abnormalities in glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, J H; Gates, G F; Landing, B H; Kogut, M D; Roe, T F

    1978-04-01

    Fifteen patients with glycogen-storage disease type 1 (von Gierke's disease) were evaluated by serial scintigraphy, with a clearly recognizable pattern of an enlarged liver with diminished radionuclide accumulation, splenomegaly with considerably increased uptake and renomegaly. In seven of these patients with GSD-1 scintigraphy demonstrated focal defects of varying size. Small or stable defects suggest benign hepatic adenomata, whereas malignant change occurred in growing large lesions. The potential malignant end-point of hepatic-cell carcinoma in GSD-1 warrants careful serial liver scintigraphy with scintiangiography on a routine basis. PMID:204758

  10. Uromodulin storage diseases: clinical aspects and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Caridi, Gianluca; Rampoldi, Luca; Tardanico, Regina; Izzi, Claudia; Pirulli, Doroti; Amoroso, Antonio; Casari, Giorgio; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2004-12-01

    The recent discovery of mutations in the uromodulin gene ( UMOD ) in patients with medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN), and glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) provides the opportunity for a revision of pathogenic aspects and puts forth the basis for a renewed classification. This review focuses on clinical, pathological, and cell biology advances in UMOD -related pathological states, including a review of the associated clinical conditions described to date in the literature. Overall, 31 UMOD mutations associated with MCKD2 and FJHN (205 patients) and 1 mutation associated with GCKD (3 patients) have been described, with a cluster at exons 4 and 5. Most are missense mutations causing a cysteine change in uromodulin sequence. No differences in clinical symptoms between carriers of cysteine versus polar residue changes have been observed; clinical phenotypes invariably are linked to classic MCKD2/FJHN. A common motif among all reports is that many overlapping symptoms between MCKD2 and FJHN are present, and a separation between these 2 entities seems unwarranted or redundant. Cell experiments with mutant variants indicated a delay in intracellular maturation and export dynamics, with consequent uromodulin storage within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Patchy uromodulin deposits in tubule cells were found by means of immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy showed dense fibrillar material in the ER. Mass spectrometry showed only unmodified uromodulin in urine of patients with UMOD mutations. Lack of uromodulin function(s) is associated with impairments in tubular function, particularly the urine-concentrating process, determining water depletion and hyperuricemia. Intracellular uromodulin trapping within the ER probably has a major role in determining tubulointerstitial fibrosis and renal failure. We propose the definition of uromodulin storage diseases for conditions with proven UMOD mutations

  11. Identification of mutations in Type IV glycogen storage disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Kishnani, P.; Chen, Y.T.

    1994-09-01

    Type IV glycogen storage disease (GSD IV, Andersen disease) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) activity, which results in the accumulation of glycogen with unbranched, long, outer chains in the tissues. The molecular basis of the disease is not known. We studied four patients with the disease; three with typical presentation of progressive liver cirrhosis and failure, and one with severe and fatal neonatal hypotonia and cardiomyopathy. Southern blot analysis with EcoRI or MspI did not detect gross DNA rearrangement, deletion or duplication in patients` glycogen branching enzyme genes. Northern analysis with total cellular RNAs isolated from skin fibroblast MI strains of three patients with typical clinical presentation showed a normal level and size (2.95 kb) of GBE mRNA hybridization band in two and absent mRNA hybridization band in the remaining one. The patient with atypical severe neonatal hypotonia demonstrated a less intense and smaller size (2.75 kb) of mRNA hybridization band. A 210 hp deletion from nucleotide sequence 873 to 1082 which causes 70 amino acids missing from amino acid sequence 262 to 331 was detected in all 17 clones sequenced from the fatal hypotonia patient. This deletion is located in the region which is highly conserved between prokaryotic, yeast and human GBE polypeptide sequences, and also includes the first of the four regions which constitute the catalytic active sites of most of amylolytic enzymes. A point mutation C-T (1633) which changes the amino acid from Arginine to Cystine was found in 19 of 20 cDNA clones from a patient with classical clinical presentation. This point mutation was unique to this patient and was not observed in three other patients or normal controls. This is the first report on the molecular basis of GSD IV and our data indicated the presence of extensive genetic heterogeneity in the disease.

  12. Caffeoylquinic Acids in Storage Roots of Sixteen Sweetpotato Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contents of chlorogenic acid and the 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5- isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQA) in the storage root tissues of sixteen sweetpotato genotypes were determined. Averaged over genotypes, the contents of the four compounds were highest in the cortex, intermediate in the stele and lo...

  13. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Megan E.; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss. PMID:26578874

  14. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Michael H.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is worldwide interest in newborn screening for lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that give better results when carried out early in life. Screens with high differentiation between affected and nonaffected individuals are critical because of the large number of potential false positives. CONTENT This review summarizes 3 screening methods: (a) direct assay of enzymatic activities using tandem mass spectrometry or fluorometry, (b) immunocapture-based measurement of lysosomal enzyme abundance, and (c) measurement of biomarkers. Assay performance is compared on the basis of small-scale studies as well as on large-scale pilot studies of mass spectrometric and fluorometric screens. SUMMARY Tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry techniques for direct assay of lysosomal enzymatic activity in dried blood spots have emerged as the most studied approaches. Comparative mass spectrometry vs fluorometry studies show that the former better differentiates between nonaffected vs affected individuals. This in turn leads to a manageable number of screen positives that can be further evaluated with second-tier methods. PMID:25477536

  15. Clinical studies in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boudes, Pol F

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) consist of over 40 diseases, some of which are amenable to treatment. In this review, we consider the regulatory context in which LSDs studies are performed, highlight design specificities and explore operational challenges. Orphan drug legislations, both in Europe and US, were effective to stimulate LSDs drug development. However, regulators flexibilities toward approval vary leading to global discrepancies in access to treatments. Study designs are constrained because few patients can be studied. This implies LSDs treatments need to demonstrate large levels of clinical efficacy. If not, an appropriate level of evidence is difficult to achieve. While biomarkers could address this issue, none have been truly accepted as primary outcome. Enrichment of study population can increase the chance of success, especially with clinical outcomes. Adaptive designs are operationally challenging. Innovative methods of analysis can be used, notably using a patient as his/her own control and responder analysis. The use of extension phases and patient registries as a source of historical comparison can facilitate data interpretation. Operationally, few patients are available per centers and multiple centers need to be initiated in multiple countries. This impacts time-lines and budget. In the future, regulators flexibility will be essential to provide patients access to innovative treatments. PMID:25003011

  16. Diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders: Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Britt A; Dajnoki, Angela; Bodamer, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher Disease (GD) is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA). The clinical phenotype follows a spectrum ranging from severe early-onset to milder late-onset disease. The absence of neurological involvement defines GD type I, whereas neuronopathic features define GD type II and III. Early diagnosis may be important for timely initiation of enzyme replacement therapy to prevent disease complications, although the enzyme does not cross the blood brain barrier. Diagnosis of GD can be readily achieved by analysis of GBA in leukocytes, fibroblasts, and/or dried blood spots using fluorometric, microfluidic or mass spectrometry-based assays. Low GBA activities are typically confirmed through molecular analysis of the GBA gene. GBA analysis in dried blood spots may be attractive for high-throughput screening of at-risk individuals and/or newborn infants. The method detailed in this unit is based on GBA analysis by tandem mass spectrometry following incubation of dried blood spots with the GBA-specific substrate D-glucosyl-β1-1'-N-dodecanoyl-D-erythro-sphingosine [C12-glucocerebroside (C36H69NO8)] and internal standard N-myristoyl-D-erythro-sphingosine [C14-ceramide (C32H63NO3)]. GBA activities in more than 2,000 newborn infants showed a mean of 22.0 ± 13.8 μmol/hr/liter (median: 19.9 μmol/hr/liter; 95% CI: 21.41-22.59 μmol/hr/liter). GBA activities in an adult population (n >1,200) showed generally lower enzyme activities than newborns, with a mean of 9.87 ± 9.35 μmol/hr/liter (median: 8.06 μmol/hr/liter). GBA activities in ten adult patients with confirmed GD were less than 4.2 μmol/hr/liter and in seven infants and children with GD less than 1.24 μmol/hr/liter. This method is robust, sensitive, and suitable for high-throughput analysis of hundreds of samples. PMID:25042717

  17. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON PLANT DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most plant diseases consist of delicate interactions between higher plants and microorganisms. Acidic precipitation represents an environmental stress that has been shown to affect expected development of some diseases and similar phenomena under experimental conditions. From the...

  18. Tay Sachs and Related Storage Diseases: Family Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiderman, Gerald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Based on interviews with 24 families, the article discusses family planning and the choices available to those families in which a child has previously died from Tay-Sachs or related lipid storage diseases. (IM)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orphanet: Glycogen storage disease due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (7 links) ... JY, Mansfield BC. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6PC) gene that cause type Ia glycogen ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), reduced thyroid activity (hypothyroidism), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (the most common ... Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hypothyroidism MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Type 2 Diabetes These resources from ...

  1. Accumulation of Oxygenated Fatty Acids in Oat Lipids During Storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids were identified in oat grain by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. We hypothesized that most of these were the results of lipoxygenase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring concentrations of these compounds after hydrothermal treatments and storage of oat groa...

  2. Enhancing charge storage of conjugated polymer electrodes with phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Michal; Rębiś, Tomasz; Inganäs, Olle

    2016-01-01

    We here present studies of electrochemical doping of poly(1-aminoanthraquinone) (PAAQ) films with three structurally different phenolic acids. The examined phenolic acids (sinapic, ferulic and syringic acid) were selected due to their resemblance to redox active groups, which can be found in lignin. The outstanding electrochemical stability of PAAQ films synthesized for this work enabled extensive cycling of phenolic acid-doped PAAQ films. Potentiodynamic and charge-discharge studies revealed that phenolic acid-doped PAAQ films exhibited enhanced capacitance in comparison to undoped PAAQ films, together with appearance of redox activity characteristics specific for each dopant. Electrochemical kinetic studies performed on microelectrodes affirmed the fast electron transfer for hydroquinone-to-quinone reactions with these phenolic compounds. These results imply the potential application of phenolic acids in cheap and degradable energy storage devices.

  3. Glycogen storage disease types I and II: treatment updates.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, D D; Kishnani, P S; Chen, Y T

    2007-04-01

    Prior to 2006 therapy for glycogen storage diseases consisted primarily of dietary interventions, which in the case of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II (GSD II; Pompe disease) remained essentially palliative. Despite improved survival and growth, long-term complications of GSD type I (GSD I) have not responded to dietary therapy with uncooked cornstarch or continuous gastric feeding. The recognized significant risk of renal disease and liver malignancy in GSD I has prompted efforts towards curative therapy, including organ transplantation, in those deemed at risk. Results of clinical trials in infantile Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme) showed prolonged survival reversal of cardiomyopathy, and motor gains. This resulted in broad label approval of Myozyme for Pompe disease in 2006. Furthermore, the development of experimental therapies, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy, holds promise for the availability of curative therapy in GSD I and GSD II/Pompe disease in the future. PMID:17308886

  4. Glycogen storage disease types I and II: Treatment updates

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, P. S.; Chen, Y. T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Prior to 2006 therapy for glycogen storage diseases consisted primarily of dietary interventions, which in the case of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II (GSD II; Pompe disease) remained essentially palliative. Despite improved survival and growth, long-term complications of GSD type I (GSD I) have not responded to dietary therapy with uncooked cornstarch or continuous gastric feeding. The recognized significant risk of renal disease and liver malignancy in GSD I has prompted efforts towards curative therapy, including organ transplantation, in those deemed at risk. Results of clinical trials in infantile Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme) showed prolonged survival reversal of cardiomyopathy, and motor gains. This resulted in broad label approval of Myozyme for Pompe disease in 2006. Furthermore, the development of experimental therapies, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy, holds promise for the availability of curative therapy in GSD I and GSD II/Pompe disease in the future. PMID:17308886

  5. [Alpha-linolenic acid and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Ristić, Gordana; Tepsić, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANCE AND METABOLISM OF ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID: Alpha-linolenic acid is an essential fatty acid which cannot be produced in the body and must be taken by food. Both in animals and humans, alpha-linolenic acid is desaturated and elongated into eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. It is also incorporated into plasma and tissue lipids and its conversion is affected by levels of linoleic acid. POTENTIAL ROLE IN PATHOGENESIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: Diet enriched in n-3 fatty acids, especially alpha-linolenic acid, reduces the incidence of cardiac death. Studies have shown that alpha linolenic acid prevents ventricular fibrillation which is the main cause of cardiac death. Studies in rats suggest that alpha-linolenic acid may be more effective in preventing ventricular fibrillations than eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Furthermore, alpha-linolenic acid is the main fatty acid decreasing platalet aggregation which is an important step in thrombosis i.e. non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke. DIETARY SOURCES AND NUTRITION RECOMMENDATIONS: Dietary sources include flaxseed and flaxseed oil, canola oil, soybean and soybean oil, pumpkin seed and pumpkin oil, walnuts and walnut oil. Strong evidence supports beneficial effects of alpha-linolenic acid and its dietary sources should be incorporated into balanced diet for prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The recommended daily intake is 2 g with a ratio of 5/1 for linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid. PMID:15510909

  6. Genetics Home Reference: cholesteryl ester storage disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... accumulation of fatty deposits on the artery walls ( atherosclerosis ) is usually seen early in life. The deposits ... Testing Registry: Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Atherosclerosis MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Cirrhosis These resources from MedlinePlus offer ...

  7. 21. Public Works Department Drawing 461M8 (1943), 'Sulphuric Acid Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Public Works Department Drawing 461-M-8 (1943), 'Sulphuric Acid Storage System-Storage Tank Details' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Acid Mixing Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  8. Sialic acids and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vinay S; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    An important underlying mechanism that contributes to autoimmunity is the loss of inhibitory signaling in the immune system. Sialic acid-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins or Siglecs are a family of cell surface proteins largely expressed in hematopoietic cells. The majority of Siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in immune cells that bind to sialic acid-containing ligands and recruit SH2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases to their cytoplasmic tails. They deliver inhibitory signals that can contribute to the constraining of immune cells, and thus protect the host from autoimmunity. The inhibitory functions of CD22/Siglec-2 and Siglec-G and their contributions to tolerance and autoimmunity, primarily in the B lymphocyte context, are considered in some detail in this review. The relevance to autoimmunity and unregulated inflammation of modified sialic acids, enzymes that modify sialic acid, and other sialic acid-binding proteins are also reviewed. PMID:26683151

  9. Infant case of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: Wolman's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukhan, Meghmala; Saha, Amit; Vara, Roshni; Bhaduri, Bim

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which causes two distinct clinical phenotypes: Wolman's disease and cholesterol ester storage disease. LAL hydrolyses LDL-derived triglycerides and cholesterol esters to glycerol or cholesterol and free fatty acids. Its deficiency leads to accumulation of intracellular triglycerides and/or cholesterol esters. In early onset LAL deficiency, clinical manifestations start in the first few weeks of life with persistent vomiting, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, liver dysfunction and hepatic failure. Adrenal calcification is a striking feature but is present in only about 50% of cases. We report a case of an infant presenting with vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatosplenomegaly and poor weight gain that was subsequently diagnosed as Wolman's disease. He was entered into a clinical trial for LAL replacement therapy. This case reinforces that early onset LAL deficiency should be considered in a baby presenting with failure to thrive, gastrointestinal symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. PMID:24832708

  10. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  11. Uric acid lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando; Sposato, Barbara; Romeo, Franco

    2016-06-15

    Recent evidence would indicate that high serum uric acid (SUA) levels can be a significant and independent risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and heart failure. In the last few years an independent risk relationship between hyperuricemia, cardiovascular disease and mortality has also been reported. Hyperuricemia has been shown as an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and an independent and conjoint association of either gout and SUA with total and cardiovascular mortality has been reported, with mortality impact in gout patients increasing with rising SUA concentrations, even for SUA levels in the normal to high range. These findings prompted a growing research interest on the possible benefits of uric acid lowering drugs in cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, clinical studies have reported on the beneficial effects of uric acid lowering drugs, in particular of xanthine oxidase inhibitors, in hypertension, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Two main mechanisms have been claimed to explain the dangerous effects of hyperuricemia and, as a consequence, the benefits of uric acid lowering therapy: endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence from human studies on the role of acid uric lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases for practical and clinical purposes. The possible mechanisms underlying the benefits of acid uric lowering therapy are also addressed. PMID:26386814

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VI

    MedlinePlus

    ... a result, liver cells cannot use glycogen for energy. Since glycogen cannot be broken down, it accumulates within liver cells, causing these cells to become enlarged and dysfunctional. Learn more about the gene associated with glycogen storage disease type VI PYGL Related Information What is ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type 0

    MedlinePlus

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen , which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 ...

  14. Pre-harvest application of oxalic acid increases quality and resistance to Penicillium expansum in kiwifruit during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuyan; Yu, Jie; Brecht, Jeffrey K; Jiang, Tianjia; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Bruno) fruits were sprayed with 5mM oxalic acid (OA) at 130, 137, and 144 days after full blossom, and then harvested at commercial maturity [soluble solid content (SSC) around 10.0%] and stored at room temperature (20 ± 1 °C). Pre-harvest application of OA led to fruit with higher ascorbic acid content at harvest, slowed the decreases in fruit firmness and ascorbic acid content and increase in SSC during storage, and also decreased the natural disease incidence, lesion diameter, and patulin accumulation in fruit inoculated with Penicillium expansum, indicating that the OA treatment increased quality and induced disease resistance in kiwifruit. It was suggested that the increase in activities of defense-related enzymes and in levels of substances related to disease resistance might collectively contribute to resistance in kiwifruit against fungi such as P. expansum in storage. PMID:26213007

  15. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  16. Lipid storage myopathy in von Gierke's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Santa, T; Inoue, K; Omae, T

    1978-09-01

    An 18-year-old girl with von Gierke's disease associated with a lipid storage myopathy is reported. The diagnosis of von Gierke's disease was made from decreased activity in glucose-6-phosphatase in the jejunal biopsy specimen. Neurologically she showed generalized hypotonia of the muscles, atrophy of bilateral proximal muscles of the lower extremities, weakness in neck flexors, deltoid and lumbar girdle muscles, and a positive Gower's sign. Muscle biopsy from flexor femoris muscle revealed fatty deposition in type 1 fibers and atrophy of type 2 fibers and the diagnosis of an accompanying lipid storage myopathy was made. This case also had a ventricular septal defect confirmed by right cardiac catheterization. PMID:213538

  17. Identification of retinoyl complexes as the autofluorescent component of the neuronal storage material in Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, L S; Kin, N M; Baker, R R; Carpenter, S; Andermann, F

    1977-03-25

    Cytosomes filled with intensely fluorescent material in the form of curvilinear bodies were isolated by density gradient centrifugation followed by pronase digestion from the cerebral cortex of a child who had died at age 7 from the late infantile form of Batten disease. Forty-three percent of the dry weight of the storage material was extracted by a mixture of chloroform and methanol, leaving a waterinsoluble amorphous fluorescent residue. Infrared spectroscopy, proton magnetic resonance spectrscopy, and mass spectrometry of this residue strongly suggested the presence of retinoyl polyenes linked to a small peptide. Base hydrolysis and methanolysis yielded retinoic acid and methyl retinoate, respectively. Ozonolysis yielded a product derived from the substituted cyclohexenyl ring of vitamin A. The results indicate that the fluorescent component of the neuronal storage material is a retinoyl complex and is not derived from peroxidized polyunsatured fatty acids as previously thought. PMID:841336

  18. Hypertension in a child with type IA glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A J; Verani, R R; Howell, R R; Conley, S B

    1988-03-01

    Hypertension and proteinuria were observed in a 2-year-old child with type IA (von Gierke's) glycogen storage disease (GSD). She had evidence of hyperfiltration and had elevated selective renal vein renins. On renal biopsy, increased mesangial cell matrix and cellularity were observed with focal thickening and irregularity of the basement membrane. This case may be representative of the early renal findings in type IA GSD. PMID:3422787

  19. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV: A Case With Histopathologic Findings in First-Trimester Placental Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B; Lund, Allan M

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies. PMID:26166723

  20. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... one of the inherited metabolic disorders known as lipid storage diseases. Lipids are fatty materials that include oils, fatty acids, ... research to find ways to treat and prevent lipid storage disorders such as Gaucher disease. For example, ...

  1. Dental findings in a child with glycogen storage disease type IA.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Aysun

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I, also known von Gierke's disease, is a rare, severe autosomal recessive disorder due to a defect in liver, kidney, and intestinal mucosa. The existence of delayed development of the dentition, increased incidence of dental caries, taurodontism, and prolonged bleeding following dental procedures should lead clinicians to consider type I glycogen storage disease. A 10-year-old boy with glycogen storage disease type I whose condition was first diagnosed when he was 4 years of age, was referred to the clinic for multiple caries and evaluation of delayed tooth eruption. On physical examination, the patient was cooperative, with short stature, protuberant abdomen, and growth retardation. Laboratory findings indicated that blood levels of pyruvate, triglycerate, uric acid, and cholesterol were elevated. Intraorally delayed mixed dentition was evident, and approximal caries were found in teeth 55, 54, 52, 51, 61, 62, 65, 74, 84, and 85. The most significant radiographic finding was consistent with taurodontism of the molar teeth. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric films showed that dimensions of the craniofacial complex were strongly reduced. Evaluation of the patient's dental age was approximately 6 years. PMID:17508073

  2. Mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Muallem, Shmuel

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a class of genetic disorders in which proteins responsible for digestion or absorption of endocytosed material do not function or do not localize properly. The resulting cellular “indigestion” causes buildup of intracellular storage inclusions that contain unprocessed lipids and proteins that form macromolecular complexes. The buildup of storage material is associated with degenerative processes that are observed in all LSDs, albeit the correlation between the amount of storage inclusions and the severity of the degenerative processes is not always evident. The latter suggests that a specific mechanism set in motion by aberrant lysosomal function drives the degenerative processes in LSDs. It is becoming increasingly clear that in addition to their function in degrading endocytosed material, lysosomes are essential housekeeping organelles responsible for maintaining healthy population of intracellular organelles, in particular mitochondria. The present review surveys the current knowledge on the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis and its possible role as a contributing factor to mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis and to cell death in LSDs. PMID:18242695

  3. 20. Public Works Department Drawing 461M7 (1943), 'Sulphuric Acid Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Public Works Department Drawing 461-M-7 (1943), 'Sulphuric Acid Storage System-Building 463 Details' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Acid Mixing Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. 29. Public Works Department Drawing 461S18 (1943), 'Sulphuric Acid Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Public Works Department Drawing 461-S-18 (1943), 'Sulphuric Acid Storage System-Details Of Tank Platform' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Acid Mixing Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  5. Postharvest salicylic acid treatment reduces storage rots in water-stressed but no unstressed sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) reduces storage rots in a number of postharvest crops. SA’s ability to protect sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots from common storage rot pathogens, however, is unknown. To determine the potential of SA to reduce storage losses caused by three common...

  6. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing tissue-specific promoters have achieved a high degree of efficacy. Efficacy of gene therapy for Pompe disease depend upon the induction of immune tolerance to the therapeutic enzyme. Efficacy of von Gierke disease is transient, waning gradually over the months following vector administration. Small molecule therapies have been evaluated with the goal of improving standard of care therapy or ameliorating the cellular abnormalities associated with specific GSDs. The receptor-mediated uptake of the therapeutic enzyme in Pompe disease was enhanced by administration of β2 agonists. Rapamycin reduced the liver fibrosis observed in GSD III. Further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD, if efficacy from preclinical research is observed in future clinical trials and these treatments become clinically available. PMID:26122079

  7. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing tissue-specific promoters have achieved a high degree of efficacy. Efficacy of gene therapy for Pompe disease depend upon the induction of immune tolerance to the therapeutic enzyme. Efficacy of von Gierke disease is transient, waning gradually over the months following vector administration. Small molecule therapies have been evaluated with the goal of improving standard of care therapy or ameliorating the cellular abnormalities associated with specific GSDs. The receptor-mediated uptake of the therapeutic enzyme in Pompe disease was enhanced by administration of β2 agonists. Rapamycin reduced the liver fibrosis observed in GSD III. Further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD, if efficacy from preclinical research is observed in future clinical trials and these treatments become clinically available. PMID:26122079

  8. Relative acidic compartment volume as a lysosomal storage disorder–associated biomarker

    PubMed Central

    te Vruchte, Danielle; Speak, Anneliese O.; Wallom, Kerri L.; Al Eisa, Nada; Smith, David A.; Hendriksz, Christian J.; Simmons, Louise; Lachmann, Robin H.; Cousins, Alison; Hartung, Ralf; Mengel, Eugen; Runz, Heiko; Beck, Michael; Amraoui, Yasmina; Imrie, Jackie; Jacklin, Elizabeth; Riddick, Kate; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Wassif, Christopher A.; Rolfs, Arndt; Rimmele, Florian; Wright, Naomi; Taylor, Clare; Ramaswami, Uma; Cox, Timothy M.; Hastings, Caroline; Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Ory, Daniel S.; Arias, Begona; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Sillence, Daniel J.; Wraith, James E.; Porter, Forbes D.; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Platt, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) occur at a frequency of 1 in every 5,000 live births and are a common cause of pediatric neurodegenerative disease. The relatively small number of patients with LSDs and lack of validated biomarkers are substantial challenges for clinical trial design. Here, we evaluated the use of a commercially available fluorescent probe, Lysotracker, that can be used to measure the relative acidic compartment volume of circulating B cells as a potentially universal biomarker for LSDs. We validated this metric in a mouse model of the LSD Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) and in a prospective 5-year international study of NPC patients. Pediatric NPC subjects had elevated acidic compartment volume that correlated with age-adjusted clinical severity and was reduced in response to therapy with miglustat, a European Medicines Agency–approved drug that has been shown to reduce NPC1-associated neuropathology. Measurement of relative acidic compartment volume was also useful for monitoring therapeutic responses of an NPC2 patient after bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, this metric identified a potential adverse event in NPC1 patients receiving i.v. cyclodextrin therapy. Our data indicate that relative acidic compartment volume may be a useful biomarker to aid diagnosis, clinical monitoring, and evaluation of therapeutic responses in patients with lysosomal disorders. PMID:24487591

  9. Calcium kinetics in glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    PubMed

    Goans, R E; Weiss, G H; Vieira, N E; Sidbury, J B; Abrams, S A; Yergey, A L

    1996-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (Von Gierke's disease) is one of the more common glycogen storage diseases (GSD). GSD 1a patients can have severe idiopathic osteopenia, often beginning at a young age. Since calcium tracer studies offer a sensitive probe of the bone microenvironment and of calcium deposition, kinetics might be disturbed in patients with GSD 1a. Plasma dilution kinetics obtained using the stable isotope 42Ca are shown in this paper to be quite different between GSD 1a patients and age-matched controls. Comparison of kinetic parameters in these two populations is made using a new binding site model for describing calcium dynamics at the plasma-bone interface. This model describes reversible binding of calcium ions to postulated short-term and long-term sites by a retention probability density function psi (t). Using this analysis, adult GSD subjects exhibited a significant decrease (P = 0.023) in the apparent half-life of a calcium ion on the longer-term site compared with controls. The general theory of calcium tracer dilution kinetics is then discussed in terms of a new model of short-term calcium homeostasis recently proposed by Bronner and Stein [5]. PMID:8939770

  10. Glycogen storage disease type Ia in two littermate Maltese puppies.

    PubMed

    Brix, A E; Howerth, E W; McConkie-Rosell, A; Peterson, D; Egnor, D; Wells, M R; Chen, Y T

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) (von Gierke's disease) was identified in two 47-day-old littermate Maltese puppies. The puppies were presented for necropsy with a history of failure to thrive, mental depression, and poor body condition. Gross findings included small body size and emaciation (212 and 246 g versus 595 g for normal littermate), severely enlarged pale livers (48 and 61 g), and pale kidneys. Histologically, there was marked diffuse vacuolation of hepatocytes with large amounts of glycogen and small amounts of lipid. Renal tubular epithelium was mildly to moderately vacuolated. Soft tissue mineralization was present in renal tubules and pulmonary alveolar septa. Biochemical analysis showed that levels of glucose-6-phosphatase were markedly reduced in liver (0.3 and 0.4 microM/minute/g tissue versus 4.7 +/- 1.5 microM/minute/g tissue for controls) and kidney (0.45 and 0.4 microM/minute/g tissue versus 4.1 microM/minute/g tissue for controls) and that glycogen content was increased in liver (9.4% and 9.4% versus 1.3% +/- 1.4% for controls). This is the first confirmed report of animals with glycogen storage disease type Ia. PMID:8578635

  11. Renal handling of free sialic acid in normal humans and patients with Salla disease or renal disease.

    PubMed

    Seppala, R; Renlund, M; Bernardini, I; Tietze, F; Gahl, W A

    1990-08-01

    The renal handling of free sialic acid, a negatively charged sugar, was investigated in normal humans and in patients with impaired sialic acid metabolism or impaired renal function. A sensitive assay for sialic acid, based upon the specific degradation of free sialic acid by N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, was developed to measure small amounts of sialic acid in human plasma. Using this assay on plasma from patients with disorders of sialic acid metabolism, we determined that the fractional excretion of sialic acid was maintained at approximately 98% over a wide range of filtered loads, i.e., from 40 to 2617 nmoles/minute. In other patients with different degrees of renal insufficiency, free sialic acid clearance varied directly with creatinine clearance, indicating filtration of this sugar by renal glomeruli. In patients with renal Fanconi syndrome, the urinary excretion of free sialic acid was independent of the severity of the generalized tubular defect, indicating that sialic acid was not reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. These findings indicate that sialic acid is filtered but not reabsorbed by the human kidney, in contrast with the handling of other sugars known to be reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. In addition, three of eight patients with Salla disease, a storage disorder due to impaired lysosomal transport of free sialic acid, were found to have reduced creatinine clearances, but all Salla disease patients had entirely normal renal tubular function. PMID:2381164

  12. Ganglioside storage diseases: on the road to management.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Rockwell, Hannah E; Heinecke, Karie A; Martin, Douglas R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical and genetic basis for the GM1 and GM2 gangliosidoses has been known for decades, effective therapies for these diseases remain in early stages of development. The difficulty with many therapeutic strategies for treating the gangliosidoses comes largely from their inability to remove stored ganglioside once it accumulates in central nervous system (CNS) neurons and glia. This chapter highlights advances made using substrate reduction therapy and gene therapy in reducing CNS ganglioside storage. Information obtained from mouse and feline models provides insight on therapeutic strategies that could be effective in human clinical trials. In addition, information is presented showing how a calorie-restricted diet might facilitate therapeutic drug delivery to the CNS. The development of multiple new therapeutic approaches offers hope that longer-term management of these diseases can be achieved. It is also clear that multiple therapeutic strategies will likely be needed to provide the most complete management. PMID:25151393

  13. Ascorbic acid deficiency in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, A D; Sherlock, S

    1976-01-01

    Leucocyte ascorbic acid (LAA) levels were measured in 138 patients with liver disease. Significantly reduced levels were found in 37 patients with alcoholic liver disease (P less than 0-01) and 25 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (P less than 0-05). In the primary biliary cirrhosis patients, cholestyramine therapy was associated with significantly lower levels of the vitamin (P less than 0-05). Liver ascorbic acid measured in Menghini needle biopsies in 20 patients was significantly correlated with LAA (r=0-807, P less than 0-001). No significant correlation was found between LAA and haematological indices, conventional liver function tests, or cholesterol levels in any group of patients. Patients with LAA levels below 100 nM/10(8) WBC had significantly higher antipyrine half-lives (mean=28-3 h) than patients with LAA levels above this level (mean=18-6 h) (P less than 0-05). Delayed drug metabolism related to low LAA should be considered when drugs metabolised by the liver are prescribed for patients with alcoholic liver disease or primary biliary cirrhosis. PMID:976794

  14. Natural Progression of Canine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yi, Haiqing; Austin, Stephanie L; Thurberg, Beth L; Young, Sarah P; Fyfe, John C; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme activity. Hepatomegaly, muscle degeneration, and hypoglycemia occur in human patients at an early age. Long-term complications include liver cirrhosis, hepatic adenomas, and generalized myopathy. A naturally occurring canine model of GSD IIIa that mimics the human disease has been described, with progressive liver disease and skeletal muscle damage likely due to excess glycogen deposition. In the current study, long-term follow-up of previously described GSD IIIa dogs until 32 mo of age (n = 4) and of family-owned GSD IIIa dogs until 11 to 12 y of age (n = 2) revealed that elevated concentrations of liver and muscle enzyme (AST, ALT, ALP, and creatine phosphokinase) decreased over time, consistent with hepatic cirrhosis and muscle fibrosis. Glycogen deposition in many skeletal muscles; the tongue, diaphragm, and heart; and the phrenic and sciatic nerves occurred also. Furthermore, the urinary biomarker Glc4, which has been described in many types of GSD, was first elevated and then decreased later in life. This urinary biomarker demonstrated a similar trend as AST and ALT in GSD IIIa dogs, indicating that Glc4 might be a less invasive biomarker of hepatocellular disease. Finally, the current study further demonstrates that the canine GSD IIIa model adheres to the clinical course in human patients with this disorder and is an appropriate model for developing novel therapies. PMID:26884409

  15. Citric acid demineralization of cementum and dentin: the effect of the storage medium.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C; Sterrett, J D; Russell, C

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if the root surface topography of teeth, stored in saline and subsequently treated with citric acid, differred from the root surface topography of teeth that were treated immediately upon extraction, 12 freshly extracted adult human permanent teeth, with proximal surfaces free of caries and periodontal disease, were treated in succession. The crowns were removed at the level of periodontal attachment, the teeth sectioned buccal-lingually and a treatment area deligniated on each proximal section. The treatment area of 6 teeth was root planed to expose dentin (D) and scaled to remove adherent tissue and leave a cementum surfaces (C) on the other 6 teeth. A coronal-apical groove down the middle of the treatment area divided it into approximately equal parts or experimental regions. One proximal section of each tooth was placed in physiologic saline (S) and treated after 6 weeks of storage while the other proximal section was freshly treated (F). Treatment consisted of applying a 30% citric acid (CA) solution (pH = 1.60) for 5 min. Cotton pellets soaked in the citric acid solution were placed (P) on one half of the experimental area and heavily burnished (B) on the other half. Treatment areas were subsequently prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. Assessment was made of (i) the % of surface area tufted, (ii) fibril tufting depth (0.3) and (iii) fibril tufting density (1.3). Similarities were found in the data for both storage methods (F and S) across each application technique (P or B) and each tooth surface (D or C) with respect to the (i) % area tufted and (ii) frequency distribution of tufting depth scores. As for the application techniques, the data for burnishing was greater than placed across each storage method (F or S) and each tooth surface (D or C) for the same two parameters. The results of the study indicated that 6-week physiologic saline storage does not affect root surface demineralization by citric acid

  16. Efficacy of an adeno-associated virus 8-pseudotyped vector in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Young, Sarah P; Schneider, Ayn; Bird, Andrew; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) can be corrected by liver-targeted gene therapy in GSD-II, if secretion of GAA is accompanied by receptor-mediated uptake in cardiac and skeletal muscle. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human (h) GAA was pseudotyped as AAV8 (AAV2/8) and injected intravenously into immunodeficient GSD-II mice. High levels of hGAA were maintained in plasma for 24 weeks following AAV2/8 vector administration. A marked increase in vector copy number in the liver was demonstrated for the AAV2/8 vector compared to the analogous AAV2/2 vector. GAA deficiency in the heart and skeletal muscle was corrected with the AAV2/8 vector in male GSD-II mice, consistent with receptor-mediated uptake of hGAA. Male GSD-II mice demonstrated complete correction of glycogen storage in heart and diaphragm with the AAV2/8 vector, while female GSD-II mice had correction only in the heart. A biomarker for GSD-II was reduced in both sexes following AAV2/8 vector administration. Therefore, GAA production with an AAV2/8 vector in a depot organ, the liver, generated evidence for efficacious gene therapy in a mouse model for GSD-II. PMID:15585406

  17. 78 FR 15753 - Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... COMMISSION Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power..., DG-1269 ``Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear... lead-acid storage batteries in nuclear power plants. DATES: Submit comments by May 13, 2013....

  18. Effect of Lactic Acid Etching on Bonding Effectiveness of Orthodontic Bracket after Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of lactic acid at various concentrations on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with the resin adhesive system before and after water storage. Materials and Methods. Hundred extracted human premolars were divided into 5 treatment groups and etched for 30 seconds with one of the following agents: lactic acid solution with (A) 10%, (B) 20%, (C) 30%, and (D) 50%; group E, 37% phosphoric acid (control). Metal brackets were bonded using a Transbond XT. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by shear bond strength after 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = .001). Results. Lactic acid concentration and water storage resulted in significant differences for brackets bond strength (P < .001). 20% lactic acid had significantly higher mean bond strength values (SD) for all conditions: 24 hours [12.2 (.7) MPa] and 6 months [10.1 (.6) MPa] of water storage. 37% phosphoric acid had intermediate bond strength values for all conditions: 24 hours [8.2 (.6) MPa] and 6 months [6.2 (.6) MPa] of water storage. Also, there were differences in bond strength between storage time, with a reduction in values from 24 hours and 6 months for all experimental groups (P < .001). Conclusion. Lactic acid could be used in place of phosphoric acid as an enamel etchant for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25006465

  19. Liver transplantation in glycogen storage disease type I.

    PubMed

    Boers, Susanna J B; Visser, Gepke; Smit, Peter G P A; Fuchs, Sabine A

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by defects in the glucose-6-transporter/glucose-6-phosphatase complex, which is essential in glucose homeostasis. Two types exist, GSDIa and GSDIb, each caused by different defects in the complex. GSDIa is characterized by fasting intolerance and subsequent metabolic derangements. In addition to these clinical manifestations, patients with GSDIb suffer from neutropenia with neutrophil dysfunction and inflammatory bowel disease.With the feasibility of novel cell-based therapies, including hepatocyte transplantations and liver stem cell transplantations, it is essential to consider long term outcomes of liver replacement therapy. We reviewed all GSDI patients with liver transplantation identified in literature and through personal communication with treating physicians. Our review shows that all 80 GSDI patients showed improved metabolic control and normal fasting tolerance after liver transplantation. Although some complications might be caused by disease progression, most complications seemed related to the liver transplantation procedure and subsequent immune suppression. These results highlight the potential of other therapeutic strategies, like cell-based therapies for liver replacement, which are expected to normalize liver function with a lower risk of complications of the procedure and immune suppression. PMID:24716823

  20. Dietary management of Type I glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Folk, C C; Greene, H L

    1984-03-01

    The most commonly recognized type of glycogen storage disease (von Gierke's disease) results from deficient glucose-6-phosphatase activity. This enzyme is the last step in the release of free glucose from the liver into the circulation. Thus, the most prominent and life-threatening complication in the illness is severe and often prolonged hypoglycemia, which occurs after the dietary glucose is normally removed from the circulation. With an optimal dietary intake spaced at 2 1/2- to 3 1/2-hour intervals, the blood glucose can be maintained in the normal range during the daytime, but hypoglycemia may occur during overnight fasting. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the illness have led to the use of frequent high-starch feedings during the day and nocturnal intragastric infusions of liquid formulas containing glucose polymers. The liquid formula is infused through either a nasogastric or a gastrostomy tube continuously at night while the patient sleeps. The success of this treatment not only has improved the survival rate but also has corrected the abnormal blood chemistries and generated a more normal rate of growth and development. Because patients with this disease are reaching adulthood in greater numbers, it is necessary for dietitians caring for adults as well as for children to become familiar with the prescribed methods of treatment. PMID:6583274

  1. Liver transplantation in glycogen storage disease type I

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by defects in the glucose-6-transporter/glucose-6-phosphatase complex, which is essential in glucose homeostasis. Two types exist, GSDIa and GSDIb, each caused by different defects in the complex. GSDIa is characterized by fasting intolerance and subsequent metabolic derangements. In addition to these clinical manifestations, patients with GSDIb suffer from neutropenia with neutrophil dysfunction and inflammatory bowel disease. With the feasibility of novel cell-based therapies, including hepatocyte transplantations and liver stem cell transplantations, it is essential to consider long term outcomes of liver replacement therapy. We reviewed all GSDI patients with liver transplantation identified in literature and through personal communication with treating physicians. Our review shows that all 80 GSDI patients showed improved metabolic control and normal fasting tolerance after liver transplantation. Although some complications might be caused by disease progression, most complications seemed related to the liver transplantation procedure and subsequent immune suppression. These results highlight the potential of other therapeutic strategies, like cell-based therapies for liver replacement, which are expected to normalize liver function with a lower risk of complications of the procedure and immune suppression. PMID:24716823

  2. Large Animal Models and New Therapies for Glycogen Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD), a unique category of inherited metabolic disorders, were first described early in the 20th century. Since then, the biochemical and genetic bases of these disorders have been determined, and an increasing number of animal models for GSD have become available. At least 7 large mammalian models have been developed for laboratory research on GSDs. These models have facilitated the development of new therapies, including gene therapy, which are undergoing clinical translation. For example, gene therapy prolonged survival and prevented hypoglycemia during fasting for greater than one year in dogs with GSD type Ia, and the need for periodic re-administration to maintain efficacy was demonstrated in that dog model. The further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD and other inherited metabolic disorders. PMID:25224826

  3. Large animal models and new therapies for glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD), a unique category of inherited metabolic disorders, were first described early in the twentieth century. Since then, the biochemical and genetic bases of these disorders have been determined, and an increasing number of animal models for GSD have become available. At least seven large mammalian models have been developed for laboratory research on GSDs. These models have facilitated the development of new therapies, including gene therapy, which are undergoing clinical translation. For example, gene therapy prolonged survival and prevented hypoglycemia during fasting for greater than one year in dogs with GSD type Ia, and the need for periodic re-administration to maintain efficacy was demonstrated in that dog model. The further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD and other inherited metabolic disorders. PMID:25224826

  4. Emerging therapies for glycogen storage disease type I.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, D D; Kishnani, P S; Bali, D; Chen, Y-T

    2009-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) is caused by deficiency of the glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit in type Ia or of glucose-6-phosphate transporter in type Ib. The cellular bases for disruptions of homeostasis have been increasingly understood in GSD I, including those for anemia, renal failure and neutropenia. Advances in the understanding of cellular abnormalities in GSD I have provided rationales for new therapy, and recent developments in gene therapy have led to potential curative treatments for GSD I. These advances will benefit patients with GSD I in the future, improving both quality of life and survival, as well as illuminating the molecular effects of altered metabolism upon multiple organ systems. PMID:19541498

  5. Relation of serum uric acid to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Audrey H; Gladden, James D; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ahmed, Ali; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes recent published literature on the association between serum uric acid and cardiovascular disease, a relationship which is complex and not fully elucidated. Uric acid may be a marker for risk, a causative agent in cardiovascular disease, or both. Various biologic factors can influence serum uric acid levels, and serum uric acid level itself is closely related to conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and impaired glucose metabolism, that contribute to cardiovascular disease pathophysiology. Serum uric acid levels have been found to be associated with adverse outcomes, including mortality, in the general population. In addition, serum uric acid is associated with increased risk for incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. In the setting of established systolic heart failure, serum uric acid is positively associated with disease severity and mortality risk. Whether targeting treatment based on uric acid levels might affect clinical outcomes is still being studied. PMID:26341316

  6. 13. VIEW OF S202(PERHAPS AN ACID STORAGE SHED), LOOKING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF S-202(PERHAPS AN ACID STORAGE SHED), LOOKING SOUTH Everett Weinreb, photographer, April 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Control of storage rot by induction of plant defense mechanisms using jasmonic acid and salicylic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage rots contribute to sugarbeet postharvest losses by consuming sucrose and producing carbohydrate impurities that increase sugar loss to molasses. Presently, storage rots are controlled by cooling storage piles. This method of control, however, requires favorable weather conditions for stora...

  8. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaustuv

    2015-07-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease. PMID:26835382

  9. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease. PMID:26835382

  10. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Spee, Bart; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S.; Chen, Chen; Geijsen, Niels; Oosterhoff, Loes A.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Pelaez, Nicolas; Fieten, Hille; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Grinwis, Guy C.; Chan, Jefferson; Huch, Meritxell; Vries, Robert R.G.; Clevers, Hans; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C.; Schotanus, Baukje A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids) opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease pathways, the dog is considered the best model for human liver disease. Here we report the establishment of a long-term canine hepatic organoid culture allowing undifferentiated expansion of progenitor cells that can be differentiated toward functional hepatocytes. We show that cultures can be initiated from fresh and frozen liver tissues using Tru-Cut or fine-needle biopsies. The use of Wnt agonists proved important for canine organoid proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that successful gene supplementation in hepatic organoids of COMMD1-deficient dogs restores function and can be an effective means to cure copper storage disease. PMID:26455412

  11. [Multiple calcium oxalate stone formation in a patient with glycogen storage disease type I (von Gierke's disease) and renal tubular acidosis type I: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, A; Segawa, T; Kakehi, Y; Takeuchi, H

    1993-07-01

    A case of multiple urinary stones in a patient with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) is reported. In spite of the presence of hyperuricemia, these stones did not consist of uric acid, but mainly of calcium oxalate. Laboratory studies revealed distal renal tubular acidosis and hypocitraturia, but no significant abnormality in calcium metabolism. We discussed the mechanism of calcium stone formation in our case, and its prophylactic treatment by oral administration of citrate compound. PMID:8362684

  12. Antioxidant enzymes and fatty acid composition as related to disease resistance in postharvest loquat fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yang, Zhenfeng; Cai, Yuting; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-11-15

    Two cultivars of loquat fruit were stored at 20°C for 10days to investigate the relationship between disease resistance, and fatty acid composition and activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that decay incidence increased with storage time in both cultivars. A significantly lower disease incidence was observed in 'Qingzhong' fruit than in 'Fuyang', suggesting 'Qingzhong' had increased disease resistance. Meanwhile, 'Qingzhong' fruit also had lower levels of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and lower lipoxygenase activity, but higher levels of linolenic and linoleic acids and higher activities of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) compared with 'Fuyang'. These results suggest that the higher levels of linolenic and linoleic acids and the higher activity of CAT and APX have a role in disease resistance of postharvest loquat fruit. PMID:24912701

  13. Continuous glucose monitoring in the treatment of obesity in patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Korljan Jelaska, Betty; Ostojić, Sanja Baršić; Berović, Nina; Kokić, Višnja

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I is characterized by impaired production of glucose from glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis resulting in severe hypoglycaemia and increased production of lactic acid, triglyceride and uric acid. The most common type, glycogenosis type Ia, demands a balanced, sufficient carbohydrate intake to preserve normal 24-h glycaemia. Insufficient intake of carbohydrates can cause hypoglycaemia, as the missing glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme cannot free the glucose stored as liver glycogen and nor is gluconeogenesis possible. The principle means of handling this disorder is to avoid starving by taking regular meals during the day and night. Such a dietary regimen could lead to obesity. Herein, we present the case of an adult patient with glycogenosis type Ia suffering from hyperuricaemia, dyslipidaemia and arterial hypertension. The accumulation of these cardiovascular risk factors could lead to the early onset of atherosclerosis, which should be postponed by contemporary methods of surveillance and treatment. Learning points Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring may be of value in every adult patient with GSD type I to evaluate the actual prevalence of eventual hypoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic episodes.Good dietary management minimizes the metabolic abnormalities of the disease and decreases the risk of long-term complications.Treatment of obesity in patients with GSD reduces the risk of earlier atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24683476

  14. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23722089

  15. Transformation of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Nishida, T.; Yao, T.

    1986-03-01

    In vivo 7 beta-epimerization of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid and the role of 7-ketolithocholic acid as an intermediate in this biotransformation were studied in 11 patients with Crohn's disease and in 5 healthy volunteers. The incorporation of deuterium into biliary ursodeoxycholic acid and 7-ketolithocholic acid was determined by computed gas chromatography-mass fragmentography after ingestion of a dideuterated chenodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic-11,12-d2 acid. The incorporation of deuterium into ursodeoxycholic acid increased to a peak level at 48 h in the patients with Crohn's disease, but was delayed in healthy volunteers. In 8 patients and 2 healthy controls there were small amounts of 7-ketolithocholic acid in bile. The incorporation of deuterium into 7-ketolithocholic acid was confirmed in only 2 patients and the peak level was noted at 48 h. These observations suggest that 7-ketolithocholic acid is an intermediate of this biotransformation in patients with Crohn's disease.

  16. Gene Therapy for Type I Glycogen Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The type I glycogen storage diseases (GSD-I) are a group of related diseases caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) system, a key enzyme complex that is essential for the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis between meals. The complex consists of a glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) that translocates glucose-6-phosphate from the cytoplasm into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a G6Pase-α catalytic unit that hydrolyses the glucose-6-phosphate into glucose and phosphate. A deficiency in G6Pase-α causes GSD type Ia (GSD-Ia) and a deficiency in G6PT causes GSD type Ib (GSD-Ib). Both GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, while GSD-Ib patients also suffer symptoms of neutropenia and myeloid dysfunctions. G6Pase-α and G6PT are both hydrophobic endoplasmic reticulum-associated transmembrane proteins that can not expressed in soluble active forms. Therefore protein replacement therapy of GSD-I is not an option. Animal models of GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib that mimic the human disorders are available. Both adenovirus- and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapies have been evaluated for GSD-Ia in these model systems. While adenoviral therapy produces only short term corrections and only impacts liver expression of the gene, AAV-mediated therapy delivers the transgene to both the liver and kidney, achieving longer term correction of the GSD-Ia disorder, although there are substantial differences in efficacy depending on the AAV serotype used. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib in the animal model is still in its infancy, although an adenoviral construct has improved the metabolic profile and myeloid function. Taken together further refinements in gene therapy may hold long term benefits for the treatment of type I GSD disorders. PMID:17430128

  17. Oral small molecule therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Neal J

    2013-11-01

    For more than 20 years, "enzyme replacement therapy" (ERT) has been the prevalent treatment approach for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Unfortunately, ERT, as currently administered, is ineffective for primary neuronopathic LSDs. For LSDs whose major disease burden is non-neurological, ERT efficacy is limited by uneven tissue distribution and penetration, immunological intolerance, and disturbed intracellular homeostasis associated with persistent mutant enzymes that are not "replaced" by ERT. Many of these limitations might be circumvented by oral, low molecular weight pharmaceuticals that address relevant LSD pathophysiology and distribute widely in steady state concentrations in all cells and body tissues including the CNS. Two oral small molecule drugs (miglustat and cysteamine) are currently approved for clinical use and two (eliglustat and migalastat) are in advanced stage clinical trials. Several others are in early stages of clinical or pre-clinical investigation. This article reviews current knowledge of small molecule treatment for LSDs including approaches such as substrate synthesis inhibition, pharmacological chaperones, and proteostasis modification. PMID:24380126

  18. Content and potential biological activity of dicaffeoylquinic acids in sweetpotato storage roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three dicaffeoylquinic acid isomers (3,4-, 3,5-, and 4,5-DCQA) were identified in sweetpotato (USPI 399163) storage root cortex by methanol extraction followed by preparative-reversed phase and silicic acid column chromatography. Structures were confirmed by HPLC-MS. DCQAs were quantified in the st...

  19. Content and Potential Biological Activity of Dicaffeoylquinic Acids in Sweetpotato Storage Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three dicaffeoylquinic acid isomers (3,4-, 3,5-, and 4,5-DCQA) were identified in sweetpotato (USPI 399163) storage root cortex by methanol extraction followed by preparative-reversed phase and silicic acid column chromatography. Structures were confirmed by HPLC-MS. DCQAs were quantified in the st...

  20. Microbiological preservation of cucumbers for bulk storage by the use of acetic acid and food preservatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial growth did not occur when cucumbers were preserved without a thermal process by storage in solutions containing acetic acid, sodium benzoate, and calcium chloride to maintain tissue firmness. The concentrations of acetic acid and sodium benzoate required to assure preservation were low en...

  1. Disease models for the development of therapies for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Motabar, Omid; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Zheng, Wei; Ottinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare diseases in which the function of the lysosome is disrupted by the accumulation of macromolecules. The complexity underlying the pathogenesis of LSDs and the small, often pediatric, population of patients make the development of therapies for these diseases challenging. Current treatments are only available for a small subset of LSDs and have not been effective at treating neurological symptoms. Disease-relevant cellular and animal models with high clinical predictability are critical for the discovery and development of new treatments for LSDs. In this paper, we review how LSD patient primary cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular models are providing novel assay systems in which phenotypes are more similar to those of the human LSD physiology. Furthermore, larger animal disease models are providing additional tools for evaluation of the efficacy of drug candidates. Early predictors of efficacy and better understanding of disease biology can significantly affect the translational process by focusing efforts on those therapies with the higher probability of success, thus decreasing overall time and cost spent in clinical development and increasing the overall positive outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:27144735

  2. Three consecutive pregnancies in a patient with glycogen storage disease type IA (von Gierke's disease).

    PubMed

    Ryan, I P; Havel, R J; Laros, R K

    1994-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IA is associated with metabolic abnormalities that can compromise fetal outcome. Normal outcome can be achieved by maintaining euglycemia throughout gestation. We report three consecutive pregnancies in a patient with glycogen storage disease type IA. The patient, a 35-year-old woman, has been maintained on a regimen of nightly nasogastric or cornstarch feedings for the past 12 years with improving metabolic control, reduced liver size, and no progression of multiple hepatic adenomas. On confirmation of each pregnancy, early in the first trimester nightly feeding was changed from cornstarch ingestion to Polycose by nasogastric intubation, with good metabolic control. During the last trimester of each pregnancy metabolic control showed further improvement, with lowering of lactate, urate, and triglyceride levels. During the first pregnancy unexpected fetal death occurred at 33 weeks. During the last two pregnancies, the patient was admitted at 33 and 34 weeks, respectively, for closer supervision of metabolic status and fetal monitoring. She underwent a cesarean section at 35 weeks 4 days of gestation and was delivered of a girl. She underwent a repeat cesarean section at 35 weeks 2 days for the subsequent gestation and was delivered of a boy. Both infants are healthy and appear to be unaffected by von Gierke's disease. Hepatic adenomas did not enlarge during the pregnancies. Meticulous management resulted in normal pregnancy outcomes in two consecutive gestations. Rapid fetal growth late in the third trimester may require particularly careful supervision to maintain euglycemia. PMID:8203427

  3. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  4. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid inhibit growth of three sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage rots contribute to postharvest losses by consuming sucrose and increasing carbohydrate impurities that increase sugar loss to molasses during processing. They also increase root respiration rate, which causes additional sucrose loss and contributes to pile warming. Currently, storage rots ...

  5. Ethylenedioxy-PIP2 oxalate reduces ganglioside storage in juvenile Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Julian R; Wilson, Michael W; Larsen, Scott D; Rockwell, Hannah E; Shayman, James A; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2013-04-01

    Sandhoff disease is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the lysosomal hydrolase β-hexosaminidase. Deficiency in this enzyme leads to excessive accumulation of ganglioside GM2 and its asialo derivative, GA2, in brain and visceral tissues. Small molecule inhibitors of ceramide-specific glucosyltransferase, the first committed step in ganglioside biosynthesis, reduce storage of GM2 and GA2. Limited brain access or adverse effects have hampered the therapeutic efficacy of the clinically approved substrate reduction molecules, eliglustat tartrate and the imino sugar NB-DNJ (Miglustat). The novel eliglustat tartrate analog, 2-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-2-yl)-N-((1R,2R)-1-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1, 4]dioxin-6-yl)-1-hydroxy-3-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)propan-2-yl)acetamide (EtDO-PIP2, CCG-203586 or "3h"), was recently reported to reduce glucosylceramide in murine brain. Here we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of 3h in juvenile Sandhoff (Hexb-/-) mice. Sandhoff mice received intraperitoneal injections of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or 3h (60 mg/kg/day) from postnatal day 9 (p-9) to postnatal day 15 (p-15). Brain weight and brain water content was similar in 3h and PBS-treated mice. 3h significantly reduced total ganglioside sialic acid, GM2, and GA2 content in cerebrum, cerebellum and liver of Sandhoff mice. Data from the liver showed that 3h reduced the key upstream ganglioside precursor (glucosylceramide), providing evidence for an on target mechanism of action. No significant differences were seen in the distribution of cholesterol or of neutral and acidic phospholipids. These data suggest that 3h can be an effective alternative to existing substrate reduction molecules for ganglioside storage diseases. PMID:23417430

  6. Kefir Grains Change Fatty Acid Profile of Milk during Fermentation and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, C. P.; Álvares, T. S.; Gomes, L. S.; Torres, A. G.; Paschoalin, V. M. F.; Conte-Junior, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have reported that lactic acid bacteria may increase the production of free fatty acids by lipolysis of milk fat, though no studies have been found in the literature showing the effect of kefir grains on the composition of fatty acids in milk. In this study the influence of kefir grains from different origins [Rio de Janeiro (AR), Viçosa (AV) e Lavras (AD)], different time of storage, and different fat content on the fatty acid content of cow milk after fermentation was investigated. Fatty acid composition was determined by gas chromatography. Values were considered significantly different when p<0.05. The highest palmitic acid content, which is antimutagenic compost, was seen in AV grain (36.6g/100g fatty acids), which may have contributed to increasing the antimutagenic potential in fermented milk. Higher monounsaturated fatty acid (25.8g/100g fatty acids) and lower saturated fatty acid (72.7g/100g fatty acids) contents were observed in AV, when compared to other grains, due to higher Δ9-desaturase activity (0.31) that improves the nutritional quality of lipids. Higher oleic acid (25.0g/100g fatty acids) and monounsaturated fatty acid (28.2g/100g fatty acids) and lower saturated fatty acid (67.2g/100g fatty acids) contents were found in stored kefir relatively to fermented kefir leading to possible increase of antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic potential and improvement of nutritional quality of lipids in storage milk. Only high-lipidic matrix displayed increase polyunsaturated fatty acids after fermentation. These findings open up new areas of study related to optimizing desaturase activity during fermentation in order to obtaining a fermented product with higher nutritional lipid quality. PMID:26444286

  7. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes. PMID:26842324

  8. ANESTHESIA MANAGEMENT IN AN INFANT WITH GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE II (POMPE DISEASE).

    PubMed

    Al Atassi, Abdulaleem; Al Zughaibi, Nezar; Naeim, Anas; Al Basha, Abdulatif; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2015-10-01

    Pompe or Glycogen Storage Disease type II (GSD-II) is a genetic disorder affecting both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Historically, patients with the infantile form usually die within the first year of life due to cardiac and respiratory failure. Recently a promising enzyme replacement therapy has resulted in improved clinical outcomes and a resurgence of elective anesthesia for these patients. Understanding the unique cardiac physiology in patients with GSD-II is essential to providing safe general anesthesia. Additional care in maximizing coronary perfusion pressure and minimizing arrhythmia risk must be given. For these reasons, it is recommended that anesthesia for infantile Pompe patients should specifically avoid propofol or high concentrations of sevoflurane and, instead, use an agent such as ketamine as the cornerstone for induction in order to better support coronary perfusion pressure and to avoid decreasing diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with vasodilatory agents. We present the anesthetic technique in a case of infantile type Pompe disease. PMID:26860026

  9. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and L-arginine levels in children with glycogen storage disease type I.

    PubMed

    Kasapkara, Çiğdem Seher; Tümer, Leyla; Biberoglu, Gursel; Kasapkara, Ahmet; Hasanoğlu, Alev

    2013-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) often have marked hyperlipidemia with abnormal lipoprotein profiles. This metabolic abnormality improves, but is not fully corrected, with dietary therapy; therefore, these patients may be at high risk for the development of atherosclerosis. A recently discussed cardiovascular risk factor, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a naturally occuring product of asymmetric methylation of proteins, is an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ADMA causes endothelial dysfunction, vasoconstriction, blood pressure elevation, atherosclerosis, and kidney disease progression. A high prevalence of elevated plasma ADMA levels is observed in adults with hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, peripheral arterial disease, coronary artery disease, preeclampsia, heart failure, liver disease, stroke, and many other clinical disorders. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the endothelial function in patients with GSD-I by using ADMA levels. High-performance liquid chromatography - based method was used for measuring ADMA and L-arginine levels in plasma. The ADMA level was similar between children with GSD-I and the age-matched healthy control group (0.9±0.28 vs. 1.1±0.45 μmol/L; p=0.18). The L-arginine plasma levels in patients with GSD-I were found to be 55.7±41.3 and 91.6±50.2 μmol/L in healthy controls. The preservation of normal endothelial function may result from diminished platelet aggregation, increased levels of apolipoprotein E, decreased susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein to oxidation (possibly related to the altered lipoprotein fatty acid profile in GSD-I), and increased antioxidative defenses in plasma protecting against lipid peroxidation. PMID:23412857

  10. [Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of lysosomal storage diseases].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi-ru; Bao, Xin-hua

    2005-08-18

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a group of genetic disorders that result from the defect in lysosomal function. Signs and symptoms are variable, it is difficult to diagnose this group of disease merely by the clinical manifestation. The diagnosis usually is made by measuring the activity of the corresponding enzyme. Gene mutational analysis is useful for the diagnosis of some of the lysosome storage diseases. The treatment has focused on the replacement of the defective enzyme responsible for the disease and the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Both of them have achieved exciting outcomes in some of the diseases. PMID:16086072

  11. Long term storage of dilute acid pretreated corn stover feedstock and ethanol fermentability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Shao, Shuai; Bao, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This study reported a new solution of lignocellulose feedstock storage based on the distributed pretreatment concept. The dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment (DDAP) was conducted on corn stover feedstock, instead of ammonia fiber explosion pretreatment. Then the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover was stored for three months during summer season with high temperature and humidity. No negative aspects were found on the physical property, composition, hydrolysis yield and ethanol fermentability of the long term stored pretreated corn stover, plus the additional merits including no chemicals recovery operation, anti-microbial contaminant environment from stronger acid and inhibitor contents, as well as the mild and slow hydrolysis in the storage. The new pretreatment method expanded the distributed pretreatment concept of feedstock storage with potential for practical application. PMID:26639616

  12. Formic acid as a hydrogen storage material - development of homogeneous catalysts for selective hydrogen release.

    PubMed

    Mellmann, Dörthe; Sponholz, Peter; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2016-07-11

    Formic acid (FA, HCO2H) receives considerable attention as a hydrogen storage material. In this respect, hydrogenation of CO2 to FA and dehydrogenation of FA are crucial reaction steps. In the past decade, for both reactions, several molecularly defined and nanostructured catalysts have been developed and intensively studied. From 2010 onwards, this review covers recent advancements in this area using homogeneous catalysts. In addition to the development of catalysts for H2 generation, reversible H2 storage including continuous H2 production from formic acid is highlighted. Special focus is put on recent progress in non-noble metal catalysts. PMID:27119123

  13. Plasma free fatty acid metabolism during storage of platelet concentrates for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J; DiMinno, G; Alam, I; Silver, M; Murphy, S

    1987-01-01

    New containers allow storage of platelet concentrates (PC) at 22 degrees C for up to 7 days, during which glycolytic and oxidative metabolism is vigorous. Recent evidence suggests that 85 percent of adenosine triphosphate regeneration is based on oxidative metabolism and that substrates other than glucose may be used. Because platelets can oxidize free fatty acids (FFA) as a possible source of energy during storage, the authors studied their availability, distribution, and turnover. Plasma FFA concentration was unchanged after 1 day of PC storage but significantly increased on Days 3, 5, and 7. Platelet-free plasma (PFP) stored under the same conditions as PC demonstrated a progressive increase in FFA, suggesting that some of the FFA accumulating in PC were derived from plasma rather than platelets. Indeed, during PC storage, plasma triglycerides decreased significantly, suggesting that they are a possible source of the increased levels of FFA found on Day 3 and thereafter. Thus, PC have a plasma FFA pool available continuously for oxidation during storage. Studies with radiolabeled palmitate suggested that FFA oxidation by platelets occurs during storage. The current findings show that plasma FFA could be a significant substrate for oxidative metabolism during storage of PC and that the oxidized FFA are replenished at least in part from plasma. These results may allow platelet storage to be improved, particularly in synthetic media. PMID:3629676

  14. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  15. Degradation kinetic modelling of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Remini, Hocine; Mertz, Christian; Belbahi, Amine; Achir, Nawel; Dornier, Manuel; Madani, Khodir

    2015-04-15

    The stability of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) during one month of storage was investigated at 4-37 °C. The effects of ascorbic acid fortification (at 100, 200 mg L(-1)) and deaeration, temperature/time storage on the kinetic behaviour were determined. Ascorbic acid was monitored by HPLC-DAD and colour intensity by spectrophotometric measurements. Degradation kinetics were best fitted by first-order reaction models for both ascorbic acid and colour intensity. Three models (Arrhenius, Eyring and Ball) were used to assess the temperature-dependent degradation. Following the Arrhenius model, activation energies were ranged from 51 to 135 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid and from 49 to 99 kJ mol(-1) for colour intensity. The effect of storage temperature and deaeration are the most influent factors on kinetics degradation, while the fortification revealed no significant effect on ascorbic acid content and colour intensity. PMID:25466074

  16. Fatty acid metabolism: Implications for diet, genetic variation, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Gu, Zhennan; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.

    2014-01-01

    Cultures across the globe, especially Western societies, are burdened by chronic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Several factors, including diet, genetics, and sedentary lifestyle, are suspected culprits to the development and progression of these health maladies. Fatty acids are primary constituents of cellular physiology. Humans can acquire fatty acids by de novo synthesis from carbohydrate or protein sources or by dietary consumption. Importantly, regulation of their metabolism is critical to sustain balanced homeostasis, and perturbations of such can lead to the development of disease. Here, we review de novo and dietary fatty acid metabolism and highlight recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between dietary influences and genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism and their role in chronic diseases. PMID:24511462

  17. Effect of storage time and temperature on the survival of Clostridium botulinum spores in acid media.

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, T E; Pflug, I J

    1977-01-01

    Clostridium-botulinum type A and type B spores were stored in tomato juice (pH 4.2) and citric acid-phosphate buffer (pH 4.2) at 4, 22, and 32 degrees C for 180 days. The spore count was determined at different intervals over the 180-day storage period. There was no significant decrease in the number of type A spores in either the tomato juice or citric acid-phosphate buffer stored for 180 days at 4, 22, and 32 degrees C. The number of type B spores did not decrease when storage was at 4 degrees C, but there was an approximately 30% decrease in the number of spores after 180 days of storage at 22 and 32 degrees C. PMID:18990

  18. Role of bioactive fatty acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Uribe, Misael; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat deposition in hepatocytes, and a strong association with nutritional factors. Dietary fatty acids are classified according to their biochemical properties, which confer their bioactive roles. Monounsaturated fatty acids have a dual role in various human and murine models. In contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids exhibit antiobesity, anti steatosic and anti-inflammatory effects. The combination of these forms of fatty acids-according to dietary type, daily intake and the proportion of n-6 to n-3 fats-can compromise hepatic lipid metabolism. A chemosensory rather than a nutritional role makes bioactive fatty acids possible biomarkers for NAFLD. Bioactive fatty acids provide health benefits through modification of fatty acid composition and modulating the activity of liver cells during liver fibrosis. More and better evidence is necessary to elucidate the role of bioactive fatty acids in nutritional and clinical treatment strategies for patients with NAFLD. PMID:27485440

  19. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver and spleen in the diagnosis of storage diseases].

    PubMed

    Shapieva, Z M; Kucheruk, O V; Sinitsyn, V E; Mershina, E A

    2015-01-01

    Storage diseases (thesaurismoses, storage reticuloses) are the common name of a large group of hyperplastic non-leukemic diseases characterized by congenital or acquired metabolic disturbances and abnormal accumulation of metabolic products in blood and/or cells of different organs and by hyperplasia of mononuclear phagocyte elements in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and other organs, which makes the diseases systemic. Among the imaging techniques for diffuse liver diseases, ultrasonography and X-ray computed tomography are most commonly used for their diagnosis and follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the highest sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing liver diseases. The paper considers the current MRI procedures that are used to diagnose storage diseases and to quantify found changes. For Gaucher's disease, the potentials of novel techniques, such as MR spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and chemical shift imaging (Dickson's method) for the estimation of revealed changes, are described. For hemochromatosis, the contribution of T2 WI to the quantification of iron overload in the liver parenchyma is depicted, which is an alternative invasive procedure in its determination. Incorporation of MRI into the examination algorithm for patients with storage diseases will be able to improve the detection of these rare diseases and to monitor the efficiency of performed therapy. PMID:26552230

  20. 78 FR 58574 - Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... identification as Draft Regulatory Guide, DG-1269, in the Federal Register on March 12, 2013 (78 FR 15753), for a... COMMISSION Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power..., Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The...

  1. Effect of preservatives, temperature and storage duration on stability of nucleic acids of pleopod tissues of Penaeus vannamei (Boone) and screening of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Remany, M C; Cyriac, Daly; Raju, P Krishnakanth Varada; Prem, Sruthi O C; Panda, A K; Kumar, Jaideep; Samraj, Y C Thampi

    2015-10-01

    In shrimp farming, screening for economically significant viral pathogens in nucleic acids of shrimps is vital for disease surveillance programmes and further, to take necessary precautions to ensure the sustainability of the farms and thereby the shrimp industry. Different preservatives, temperature and storage durations of the pleopod tissues of Penaeus vannamei broodstock were tested to investigate its effect on the quality and quantity of the nucleic acids. The pleopods were subjected to two preservation regimes and the yield and stability of the extracted nucleic acids were monitored over a time period of 12 months. Stability of the nucleic acids was assessed with nested polymerase chain reaction, and the yield was checked spectrophotometrically. Data was analysed by performing two way ANOVA and Tukeys Paired test. Preservation treatments included storage at -20 degrees C and 5 degrees C in RNAlater and in 70% ethanol. Significant variation (P < 0.05) was observed in both DNA and RNA yield and stability from ethanol and RNAlater stored pleopods at 5 degrees C. However, the yield and stability did not differ (P > 0.05) in both the preservatives at -20 degrees C. The RNA was degraded and yielded lesser quantity when pleopod tissues were stored in ethanol at -20 degrees C than when stored in RNAlater during storage duration of 9 months. This study would help the shrimp farmers and researchers to adopt better preservation strategy, vital for shrimp disease surveillance programmes and for traceability studies in the event of any disease outbreak. PMID:26665297

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology for disease modeling and drug screening with emphasis on lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent derivation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells of patients with familial and sporadic forms of diseases and the demonstration of their ability to give rise to disease-relevant cell types provide an excellent opportunity to gain further insights into the mechanisms responsible for the pathophysiology of these diseases and develop novel therapeutic drugs. Here, we review the recent advances in iPSC technology for modeling of various lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) and discuss possible strategies through which LSD-iPSCs can be exploited to identify novel drugs and improve future clinical treatment of LSDs. PMID:22925465

  3. Correction of glycogen storage disease type II by an adeno-associated virus vector containing a muscle-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Schneider, Ayn; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure due to acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) deficiency. An AAV2 vector pseudotyped as AAV6 (AAV2/6 vector) transiently expressed high-level human GAA in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice without reducing glycogen storage; however, in immunodeficient GAA-KO/SCID mice the AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced the glycogen content of the injected muscle for 24 weeks. A CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrate was observed in response to the AAV2/6 vector in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. When a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter was substituted for the CB promoter (AAV-MCKhGAApA), that AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced glycogen content in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. Muscle-restricted expression of hGAA provoked only a humoral (not cellular) immune response. Intravenous administration of a high number of particles of AAV-MCKhGAApA as AAV2/7 reduced the glycogen content of the heart and skeletal muscle and corrected individual myofibers in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice 24 weeks postinjection. In summary, persistent correction of muscle glycogen content was achieved with an AAV vector containing a muscle-specific promoter in GAA-KO mice, and this approach should be considered for muscle-targeted gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:15922959

  4. Electricity storage in biofuels: selective electrocatalytic reduction of levulinic acid to valeric acid or γ-valerolactone.

    PubMed

    Xin, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Qi, Ji; Chadderdon, David J; Qiu, Yang; Warsko, Kayla M; Li, Wenzhen

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we report an effective approach to electricity storage in biofuels by selective electrocatalytic reduction of levulinic acid (LA) to high-energy-density valeric acid (VA) or γ-valerolactone (gVL) on a non-precious Pb electrode in a single-polymer electrolyte membrane electrocatalytic (flow) cell reactor with a very high yield of VA (>90 %), a high Faradaic efficiency (>86 %), promising electricity storage efficiency (70.8 %), and a low electricity consumption (1.5 kWhL(VA)(-1) ). The applied potential and electrolyte pH can be used to accurately control the reduction products: lower overpotentials favor the production of gVL, whereas higher overpotentials facilitate the formation of VA. A selectivity of 95 % to VA in acidic electrolyte (pH 0) and 100 % selectivity to gVL in neutral electrolyte (pH 7.5) are obtained. The effect of the molecular structure on the electrocatalytic reduction of ketone and aldehyde groups of biomass compounds was investigated. Whereas LA can be fully electroreduced to VA though a four-electron transfer, the C-O groups are only electroreduced to -OH by a two-electron-transfer process when glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid serve as feedstocks. PMID:23457116

  5. Type 304L stainless steel surface microstructure: Performance in hydride storage and acid cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    The performance of stainless steel as the container in hydride storage bed systems has been evaluated, primarily using scanning electron microscopy. No adverse reaction between Type 304L stainless steel and either LaNi{sub 5{minus}x},Al{sub x}, or palladium supported on Kieselguhr granules (silica) during exposure in hydrogen was found in examination of retired prototype storage bed containers and special compatibility test samples. Intergranular surface ditching, observed on many of the stainless steel surfaces examined, was shown to result from air annealing and acid cleaning of stainless steel during normal fabrication. The ditched air annealed and acid cleaned stainless steel samples were more resistant to subsequent acid attack than vacuum annealed or polished samples without ditches.

  6. Metabolic Encephalopathy and Lipid Storage Myopathy Associated with a Presumptive Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation Defect in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Biegen, Vanessa R.; McCue, John P.; Donovan, Taryn A.; Shelton, G. Diane

    2015-01-01

    A 1-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu presented for episodic abnormalities of posture and mentation. Neurological examination was consistent with a bilaterally symmetric multifocal encephalopathy. The dog had a waxing-and-waning hyperlactemia and hypoglycemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilaterally symmetric cavitated lesions of the caudate nuclei with less severe abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Empirical therapy was unsuccessful, and the patient was euthanized. Post-mortem histopathology revealed bilaterally symmetric necrotic lesions of the caudate and cerebellar nuclei and multi-organ lipid accumulation, including a lipid storage myopathy. Malonic aciduria and ketonuria were found on urinary organic acid screen. Plasma acylcarnitine analysis suggested a fatty acid oxidation defect. Fatty acid oxidation disorders are inborn errors of metabolism documented in humans, but poorly described in dogs. Although neurological signs have been described in humans with this group of diseases, descriptions of advanced imaging, and histopathology are severely lacking. This report suggests that abnormalities of fatty acid metabolism may cause severe, bilateral gray matter necrosis, and lipid accumulation in multiple organs including the skeletal muscles, liver, and kidneys. Veterinarians should be aware that fatty acid oxidation disorders, although potentially fatal, may be treatable. A timely definitive diagnosis is essential in guiding therapy. PMID:26664991

  7. Bile acid conjugation in early stage cholestatic liver disease before and during treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, M; Setchell, K D; Crosignani, A; Podda, M; O'Connell, N; Ferraris, R; Hofmann, A F; Galatola, G

    1996-04-30

    The efficiency of bile acid conjugation before and during therapy with 600 mg/day of ursodeoxycholic acid was measured in seven adult patients with early chronic cholestatic liver disease (6 with primary biliary cirrhosis; 1 with primary sclerosing cholangitis). Duodenal bile samples were obtained by aspiration and the proportion of unconjugated bile acids was determined using lipophilic anion exchange chromatography to separate bile acid classes, followed by analysis of individual bile acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The proportion of conjugated bile acids was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Use of a (99m)Tc-HIDA recovery marker permitted the absolute mass of unconjugated bile acids in the gallbladder to be calculated. Unconjugated bile acids comprised 0.4% of total biliary bile acids before and 0.2% during ursodeoxycholic acid therapy, indicating highly efficient conjugation of bile acids. During therapy, percentage unconjugated ursodeoxycholic acid significantly increased from (mean +/- S.D.) 13 +/- 13% to 54 +/- 12%; P < 0.002. When the unconjugated and conjugated fractions of bile acids were compared, there was an enrichment in unconjugated fraction for cholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid and a depletion for chenodeoxycholic acid both in basal condition and during ursodeoxycholic acid therapy, suggesting that hydrophilic bile acids were conjugated less efficiently. During therapy, the conjugation efficiency significantly increased for cholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid. The pretreatment mass of total unconjugated bile acids in the gallbladder was (mean +/- S.D.) 4.4 +/- 3.2 mumol, and was not significantly changed by ursodeoxycholic acid therapy (6.2 +/- 3.5 mumol). However, ursodeoxycholic acid therapy caused a significant increase in the mass of unconjugated ursodeoxycholic acid. It is concluded that endogenous bile acids and exogenous ursodeoxycholic acid when given at the usual dose are efficiently conjugated in

  8. Non-inhibitory antibodies impede lysosomal storage reduction during enzyme replacement therapy of a lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ulrich; Matthes, Frank; Weigelt, Cecilia; Andersson, Claes; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2008-04-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is a treatment option for several lysosomal storage disorders. We reported previously that treatment of a knockout mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disease metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) by intravenous injection of recombinant human arylsulfatase A (rhASA) reduces sulfatide storage and improves nervous system pathology and function. Here, we show that treated mice can develop anti-rhASA antibodies, which impede sulfatide clearance without inhibiting enzyme activity. The neutralizing effect of antibodies was reproduced in cell culture models of MLD by demonstrating that mouse immune serum reduces the ability of rhASA to clear sulfatide from cultured ASA-deficient Schwann and kidney cells. We show that reduced clearance is due to an antibody-mediated blockade of mannose 6-phosphate receptor-dependent enzyme uptake, retargeting of rhASA from sulfatide-storing cells to macrophages, intracellular misrouting of rhASA, and reduction of enzyme stability. Induction of immunotolerance to rhASA by transgenic expression of an active site mutant of human ASA restores sulfatide clearance in mice. The data indicate that the influence of non-inhibitory antibodies must be more intensively considered in evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of enzyme replacement in lysosomal storage disorders in general and in patients without cross-reacting material specifically. PMID:18360747

  9. Plasma amino-acid patterns in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M Y; Marshall, A W; Milsom, J P; Sherlock, S

    1982-01-01

    Plasma amino-acid concentrations were measured in 167 patients with liver disease of varying aetiology and severity, all free of encephalopathy, and the results compared with those in 57 control subjects matched for age and sex. In the four groups of patients with chronic liver disease (26 patients with chronic active hepatitis, 23 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 11 with cryptogenic cirrhosis, and 48 with alcoholic hepatitis +/- cirrhosis) plasma concentrations of methionine were significantly increased, while concentrations of the three branched chain amino-acids were significantly reduced. In the first three groups of patients plasma concentrations of aspartate, serine, and one or both of the aromatic amino-acids tyrosine and phenylalanine were also significantly increased, while in the patients with alcoholic hepatitis +/- cirrhosis plasma concentrations of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were significantly reduced. In the three groups of patients with minimal, potentially reversible liver disease (31 patients with alcoholic fatty liver, 10 with viral hepatitis, and 18 with biliary disease) plasma concentrations of proline and the three branched chain amino-acids were significantly reduced. Patients with alcoholic fatty liver also showed significantly reduced plasma phenylalanine values. Most changes in plasma amino-acid concentrations in patients with chronic liver disease may be explained on the basis of impaired hepatic function, portal-systemic shunting of blood, and hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglucagonaemia. The changes in patients with minimal liver disease are less easily explained. PMID:7076013

  10. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  11. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  12. Fifteen years of follow-up of a liver transplant recipient with glycogen storage disease type Ia (Von Gierke disease).

    PubMed

    Maya Aparicio, A C; Bernal Bellido, C; Tinoco González, J; Garcia Ruíz, S; Aguilar Romero, L; Marín Gómez, L M; Suárez Artacho, G; Alamo Martínez, J M; Serrano Díez-Canedo, J; Padillo Ruíz, F J; Gomez Bravo, M A

    2013-01-01

    Von Gierke's disease or glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an infrequent metabolic disease caused by an atypical accumulation of glycogen. The principal cause of this pathology is deficiency of the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme. Herein we have reported a case of a young man with a history of Von Gierke's disease (GSD-Ia) since childhood who developed hepatocellular adenomatosis brought to light by ultrasounds and TACs. The patient began to develop early chronic renal failure, necessitating simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation. Years later continuous reviews at the nephrology and hepatobiliopancreatic surgery services show he has a good quality of life and a normal hepatorenal profile. PMID:24314991

  13. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... metabolic disease caused by the harmful buildup of lipids (fatty materials such as oils and acids) in ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Additional research funded by the NINDS ...

  14. [Supplementation with omega fatty acids in various diseases].

    PubMed

    Sicińska, Paulina; Pytel, Edyta; Kurowska, Joanna; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-01-01

    For some decades, an increase in propagation of coronary heart disease, obesity, diabetes, tumors and mental disorders has been observed. Consequently, new and effective methods of treatment of these diseases using drugs and diet supplements have been developed. A promising solution is the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of some diseases. These compounds have broad application in prevention of many diseases and are used to support standard therapies. Their activity is connected with participation in metabolic processes regulating biochemical transformations in cells and tissues. Omega-3 fatty acids regulate production of cytokines, increased levels of which may contribute to occurrence of chronic inflammatory diseases, autoaggression of the immunological system, arteriosclerosis or tumor development. These substances exert a beneficial effect on the blood system by improvement of blood circulation and nerve signal transmission. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of irregular heartbeat, stabilize arterial pressure, and restore balance in cholesterol metabolism disorders. They also play a key role in maintaining physical and mental efficiency; thus administration of these compounds for young children is of great importance. Nevertheless, administration of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet seems to be essential. The purpose of this study is to present the structure and sources of omega-3 and - 6 fatty acids and discuss the problems concerning therapeutic use of these compounds in various disorders. PMID:26206997

  15. A Novel Mutation in PNPLA2 Leading to Neutral Lipid Storage Disease With Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Daniel B.; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Hays, Arthur P.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in PNPLA2, a gene encoding adipose triglyceride lipase, lead to neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy. Objective To report the clinical and molecular features of a case of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy resulting from a novel mutation in PNPLA2. Design Case report. Setting University hospital. Patient A 65-year-old man with progressive muscle weakness and high serum creatine kinase levels. Intervention Direct sequencing of the PNPLA2 gene. Results Identification of a novel homozygous mutation in the patient’s PNPLA2 gene confirmed the suspected diagnosis of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy. Conclusion Screening of the PNPLA2 gene should be considered for patients presenting with high levels of creatine kinase, progressive muscle weakness, and systemic lipid accumulation. The presence of Jordans anomaly can be a strong diagnostic clue. PMID:22964912

  16. Bile acid synthetic defects and liver disease: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Bove, Kevin E; Heubi, James E; Balistreri, William F; Setchell, Kenneth D R

    2004-01-01

    Bile acid synthetic defects (BASD), uncommon genetic disorders that are responsible for approximately 2% of persistent cholestasis in infants, are reviewed with emphasis on morphology of associated liver disease. The associated liver diseases may be life threatening, and are treatable, usually by replacement of deficient primary bile acids. Specific diagnosis is made by analysis of body fluids (bile, blood, and urine) using fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy (FAB-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Inborn errors have been demonstrated for four single enzymes involved in modification of the sterol nucleus and in five steps in modification of the side-chain to form cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids, the primary bile acids. With few exceptions, BASD cause liver diseases that vary from severe to mild depending on the defect. In three of four known defects of sterol nucleus modification, liver disease is progressive. Progression of liver disease is most rapid when the defect results in accumulation of toxic monohydroxy and unsaturated oxo-bile acids. Liver disease may be transient, delayed in onset and mild. Reduced bile flow caused by atypical bile acids contributes to cholestasis and may be the dominant factor in defects of side-chain synthesis, peroxisomal abiogenesis and S-L-O syndrome. Pathological findings may include intralobular cholestasis with giant cell transformation, prevalence of necrotic hepatocytes including giant cell forms, and hepatitic injury confined to the portal limiting plate where the smallest bile ductules may be injured and where fibrosis typically develops. Interlobular bile ducts are usually spared. Ultrastructure of liver reveals nonspecific changes with the possible exception of unusual canalicular morphology in some defects. The course of BASD may be modified by replacement of deficient primary bile acids, which produces beneficial feedback inhibition of abnormal bile acid production and enhances choluresis. Giant

  17. Abnormal neuronal metabolism and storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy) disease.

    PubMed

    Walkley, S U; Thrall, M A; Haskins, M E; Mitchell, T W; Wenger, D A; Brown, D E; Dial, S; Seim, H

    2005-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI, also known as Maroteaux-Lamy disease, is an inherited disorder of glycosaminoglycan catabolism caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphatase (4S). A variety of prominent visceral and skeletal defects are characteristic, but primary neurological involvement has generally been considered absent. We report here that the feline model of MPS VI exhibits abnormal lysosomal storage in occasional neurones and glia distributed throughout the cerebral cortex. Abnormal lysosomal inclusions were pleiomorphic with some resembling zebra bodies and dense core inclusions typical of other MPS diseases or the membranous storage bodies characteristic of the gangliosidoses. Pyramidal neurones were shown to contain abnormal amounts of GM2 and GM3 gangliosides by immunocytochemical staining and unesterified cholesterol by histochemical (filipin) staining. Further, Golgi staining of pyramidal neurones revealed that some possessed ectopic axon hillock neurites and meganeurites similar to those described in Tay-Sachs and other neuronal storage diseases with ganglioside storage. Some animals evaluated in this study also received allogeneic bone marrow transplants, but no significant differences in neuronal storage were noted between treated and untreated individuals. These studies demonstrate that deficiency of 4S activity can lead to metabolic abnormalities in the neurones of central nervous system in cats, and that these changes may not be readily amenable to correction by bone marrow transplantation. Given the close pathological and biochemical similarities between feline and human MPS VI, it is conceivable that children with this disease have similar neuronal involvement. PMID:16150124

  18. An analytical study of a lead-acid flow battery as an energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alex; Mukerjee, Santanu; Lee, Sang C.; Lee, Dong-Ha; Park, Sam

    2014-03-01

    The most important issue with our current clean energy technology is the dependence on environmental conditions to produce power. To solve this problem a wide range of energy storage devices are being explored for grid-scale energy storage including soluble lead-acid flow batteries. Flow batteries offer a unique solution to grid-scale energy storage because of their electrolyte tanks which allow easy scaling of storage capacity. This study seeks to further understand the mechanisms of a soluble lead acid flow battery using simulations. The effects of varies changes to operating conditions and the system configuration can be explored through simulations. The simulations preformed are 2D and include the positive electrode, negative electrode, and the flow space between them. Simulations presented in this study show Pb(II) surface concentration, external electric potential, and PbO/PbO2 surface concentration on the positive electrode. Simulations have shown increasing cell temperature can increase external electric potential by as much as 0.2 V during charge. Simulations have also shown electrolyte velocity is an important aspect when investigating lead deposition onto the electrodes. Experimental work was performed to validate simulation results of current density and voltage. Good correlation was found between experimental work and simulation results.

  19. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-10-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  20. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  1. [Role of lipoic acid in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Huk-Kolega, Halina; Skibska, Beata; Kleniewska, Paulina; Piechota, Aleksandra; Michalski, Łukasz; Goraca, Anna

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative stress disturbs organism's homeostasis and leads to excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Researchers are still focused on antioxidants that help to reduce oxidative stress level and are helpful in treatment of diseases were ROS overproduction is observed. Among those antioxidants is lipoic acid (LA). When applied systemically LA accumulates in tissues and is converted to dihyrolipoic acid (DHLA) by lipoamide dehydrogenase. Both LA and DHLA are biologically active. LA scavenges hydroxyl radical, subchloric acid and singlet oxygen. Moreover, LA is able to chelate transient ions. Therefore, LA is used in diabetic nephropaties, fungi or heavy metal intoxication, liver diseases, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. This review surveys the antioxidant ability of LA and its role in pathological states where increased concentration of ROS is observed. PMID:21991851

  2. Glycyrrhizic Acid in the Treatment of Liver Diseases: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-yuan; Cao, Hong-yan; Cheng, Gen-hong; Sun, Ming-yu

    2014-01-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is a triterpene glycoside found in the roots of licorice plants (Glycyrrhiza glabra). GA is the most important active ingredient in the licorice root, and possesses a wide range of pharmacological and biological activities. GA coupled with glycyrrhetinic acid and 18-beta-glycyrrhetic acid was developed in China or Japan as an anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antiallergic drug for liver disease. This review summarizes the current biological activities of GA and its medical applications in liver diseases. The pharmacological actions of GA include inhibition of hepatic apoptosis and necrosis; anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory actions; antiviral effects; and antitumor effects. This paper will be a useful reference for physicians and biologists researching GA and will open the door to novel agents in drug discovery and development from Chinese herbs. With additional research, GA may be more widely used in the treatment of liver diseases or other conditions. PMID:24963489

  3. Evolution of Acetic Acid Bacteria During Fermentation and Storage of Wine

    PubMed Central

    Joyeux, A.; Lafon-Lafourcade, S.; Ribéreau-Gayon, P.

    1984-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria were present at all stages of wine making, from the mature grape through vinification to conservation. A succession of Gluconobacter oxydans, Acetobacter pasteurianus, and Acetobacter aceti during the course of these stages was noted. Low levels of A. aceti remained in the wine; they exhibited rapid proliferation on short exposure of the wine to air and caused significant increases in the concentration of acetic acid. Higher temperature of wine storage and higher wine pH favored the development and metabolism of these species. PMID:16346581

  4. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  5. Fatty acids, membrane viscosity, serotonin and ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Novel markers for ischemic heart disease are under investigation by the scientific community at international level. This work focuses on a specific platelet membrane fatty acid condition of viscosity which is linked to molecular aspects such as serotonin and G proteins, factors involved in vascular biology. A suggestive hypothesis is considered about the possibility to use platelet membrane viscosity, in relation to serotonin or, indirectly, the fatty acid profile, as indicator of ischemic risk. PMID:20825633

  6. Acid-sensing ion channels in pain and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wemmie, John A.; Taugher, Rebecca J.; Kreple, Collin J.

    2015-01-01

    Why do neurons sense extracellular acid? In large part, this question has driven increasing investigation on acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in the CNS and the peripheral nervous system for the past two decades. Significant progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of ASICs at the molecular level. Studies aimed at clarifying their physiological importance have suggested roles for ASICs in pain, neurological and psychiatric disease. This Review highlights recent findings linking these channels to physiology and disease. In addition, it discusses some of the implications for therapy and points out questions that remain unanswered. PMID:23783197

  7. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Holl, Eda K; Shumansky, Kara L; Borst, Luke B; Burnette, Angela D; Sample, Christopher J; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2016-08-30

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal's ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:27528673

  8. Distribution of saposin proteins (sphingolipid activator proteins) in lysosomal storage and other diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, Y; O'Brien, J S; Kishimoto, Y

    1990-01-01

    Saposins (A, B, C, and D) are small glycoproteins required for the hydrolysis of sphingolipids by specific lysosomal hydrolases. Concentrations of these saposins in brain, liver, and spleen from normal humans as well as patients with lysosomal storage disease were determined. A quantitative HPLC method was used for saposin A, C, and D and a stimulation assay was used for saposin B. In normal tissues, saposin D was the most abundant of the four saposins. Massive accumulations of saposins, especially saposin A (about 80-fold increase over normal), were found in brain of patients with Tay-Sachs disease or infantile Sandhoff disease. In spleen of adult patients with Gaucher disease, saposin A and D accumulations (60- and 17-fold, respectively, over normal) were higher than that of saposin C (about 16-fold over normal). Similar massive accumulations of saposins A and D were found in liver of patients with fucosidosis (about 70- and 20-fold, respectively, over normal). Saposin D was the primary saposin stored in the liver of a patient with Niemann-Pick disease (about 30-fold over normal). Moderate increases of saposins B and D were found in a patient with GM1 gangliosidosis. Normal or near normal levels of all saposins were found in patients with Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, adrenoleukodystrophy, I-cell disease, mucopolysaccharidosis types 2 and 3B, or Jansky-Bielschowsky disease. The implications of the storage of saposins in these diseases are discussed. PMID:2110365

  9. Gene Therapy Approaches for Lysosomal Storage Disease: Next-Generation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Darin J.; Clément, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomal storage diseases are a group of rare inborn errors of metabolism resulting from deficiency in normal lysosomal function. These diseases are characterized by progressive accumulation of storage material within the lysosomes of affected cells, ultimately leading to cellular dysfunction. Multiple tissues ranging from musculoskeletal and visceral to tissues of the central nervous system are typically involved in disease pathology. Since the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) to manage some LSDs, general clinical outcomes have significantly improved; however, treatment with infused protein is lifelong and continued disease progression is still evident in patients. Viral gene therapy may provide a viable alternative or adjunctive therapy to current management strategies for LSDs. In this review, we discuss the various viral vector systems that have been developed and some of the strategy designs for the treatment of LSDs. PMID:22794786

  10. Benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminide induces a storage disease-like phenotype by perturbing the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Fausto; Real, Francisco X

    2003-04-01

    The sugar analog O-benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-d-galactosaminide (BG) is an inhibitor of glycan chain elongation and inhibits alpha2,3-sialylation in mucus-secreting HT-29 cells. Long-term exposure of these cells to BG is associated with the accumulation of apical glycoproteins in cytoplasmic vesicles. The mechanisms involved therein and the nature of the vesicles have not been elucidated. In these cells, a massive amount of BG metabolites is synthesized. Because sialic acid is mainly distributed apically in epithelial cells, it has been proposed that the BG-induced undersialylation of apical membrane glycoproteins is responsible for their intracellular accumulation due to a defect in anterograde traffic and that sialic acid may constitute an apical targeting signal. In this work, we demonstrate that the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins does not result mainly from defects in anterograde traffic. By contrast, in BG-treated cells, endocytosed membrane proteins were retained intracellularly for longer periods of time than in control cells and colocalized with accumulated MUC1 and beta(1) integrin in Rab7/lysobisphosphatidic acid(+) vesicles displaying features of late endosomes. The phenotype of BG-treated cells is reminiscent of that observed in lysosomal storage disorders. Sucrose induced a BG-like, lysosomal storage disease-like phenotype without affecting sialylation, indicating that undersialylation is not a requisite for the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins. Our findings strongly support the notion that the effects observed in BG-treated cells result from the accumulation of BG-derived metabolites and from defects in the endosomal pathway. We propose that abnormal subcellular distribution of membrane glycoproteins involved in cellular communication and/or signaling may also take place in lysosomal storage disorders and may contribute to their pathogenesis. PMID:12538583

  11. The effect of fermentation and storage on free amino acids of tarhana.

    PubMed

    Erbas, M; Ertugay, M F; Erbas, M O; Certel, M

    2005-08-01

    A study on the evaluation of free amino acids (FAAs) in tarhana during fermentation and storage was performed. The FAAs in tarhana were determined by RP-HPLC with a fluorescence detector following extraction from the sample and derivatization with dansyl chloride. The amount of FAAs increased significantly (p<0.01) during fermentation and storage. The increase in the content of total free amino acids (TFAAs) and total free essential amino acids (TFEAAs) of fermented tarhana, which was used with yogurt bacteria and baker's yeast, was 57% and 93%, respectively. The amino acids primarily responsible for the increase were valine and tryptophan followed by methionine, alanine, isoleucine + leucine, phenylalanine, arginine, proline, and lysine. The TFAA content of tarhana at the end of fermentation was found to be 8% of total protein (16.8%). The ratio of TFEAAs/TFAAs was initially 0.46 and increased to 0.57 at the end of fermentation. The TFAA content of wet tarhanas was higher than that of the dry counterpart. It was found that the TFAA content of dry tarhana was 25% lower than the fresh wet tarhana (FWT), at the end of fermentation. It was concluded that the decrease in FAAs in dry tarhana was due to the Maillard reaction and partial degradation of FAAs during dehydration. PMID:16236596

  12. Acid-leached α-MnO2 nanowires for electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byles, Bryan; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina

    2014-09-01

    We present synthesis, acid-leaching, characterization and electrochemistry of α-MnO2 nanowires with tunnel crystal structure. This material is used as a matrix for lithium ions intercalation to provide insights into the effects of postsynthesis treatment on charge storage properties. Hydrothermal treatment of precursors produced 20 - 200 nm thick and tens of microns long nanowires. Acid leaching was carried out in the concentrated nitric acid at room temperature and resulted in the change of material composition and surface area. Original α-MnO2 nanowires showed initial discharge specific capacity of 96 mAh/g, while acid-leached material exhibited higher capacity values. This work forms the basis for future study aimed at understanding of correlation between crystal structure, composition and morphology of the "host" matrix and nature of the "guest" ions for beyond lithium electrochemical energy storage. In addition, we demonstrate single nanowire electrochemical cells for the study of electrochemically-correlated mechanical properties of the nanowires.

  13. Ultrasonographic features of hepatic adenomas in type I glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, R A; Samuels, B I; Silver, T M

    1983-02-01

    Focal hepatic masses were delineated by ultrasonography in three of five patients with type I glycogen storage disease (von Gierke's disease). Small hepatic adenomas were visualized as solitary or multiple hyperechoic solid lesions within enlarged, abnormally echogenic livers of increased attenuation. Larger adenomas were heterogeneous, with hypoechoic foci presumed to be secondary to necrosis, hemorrhage, or both. A previously unreported ultrasonographic finding is the markedly enhanced sound transmission identified deep to these solid tumors. PMID:6302304

  14. Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotei...

  15. Amino acid and protein changes in tilapia and Spanish mackerel after irradiation and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kahtani, Hassan A.; Abu-Tarboush, Hamza M.; Atia, Mohamed; Bajaber, Adnan S.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; El-Mojaddidi, Mohamed A.

    1998-01-01

    Some amino acids in tilapia decreased while some others increased when subjected to doses up to 10.0 kGy. However, 10 kGy contributed to a significant reduction in all amino acids of Spanish mackerel. Variations in amino acid contents continued during post-irradiation storage with no consistant trend of increase or decrease. SDS-PAGE of protein from both fish showed 27 bands of subunits with MW < 14.0-94.0 KD. Isoelectric focusing patterns of sarcoplasmic protein of unirradiated and irradiated fish showed no charge in the number of bands, while some changes were observed in the intensities of the anodic and cathodic bands depending on isoelectric points (pIs).

  16. Familial nephropathy associated with hepatic type of glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, H; Ogawa, K; Takahashi, I

    1976-11-01

    The female patient was diagnosed as having Von Gierke's disease at 14 years of age, based on clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and liver biopsy. At 19 years of age she had uremia and died from its deterioration at 24 years of age. The parents were consanguineous, and a 27-year-old sister is presently hospitalized for renal insufficiency with hepatomegaly. On autopsy, the patient's kidneys were highly contracted and contained a number of small cysts, mainly in the medulla. Histological examination indicated periglomerular fibrosis, glomerular hyalinization, tubular atrophy or cystic dilatation and intersitial fibrosis with round cell infiltration. These findings correspond to Fanconi's familial juvenile nephronophthisis, except for age. The liver was markedly enlarged and indicated severe, glycogen deposits, but the kidney did not contain glycogen deposits. It can, therefore, be presumed that the renal lesions were not a secondary consequence of long-term glycogen deposits but that renal and hepatic lesions were associated with each other. PMID:1070908

  17. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  18. The Effect of Sampling and Storage on the Fecal Microbiota Composition in Healthy and Diseased Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tedjo, Danyta I.; Jonkers, Daisy M. A. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H.; Masclee, Ad A.; van Best, Niels; Pierik, Marieke J.; Penders, John

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cohort studies are currently being designed to investigate the human microbiome in health and disease. Adequate sampling strategies are required to limit bias due to shifts in microbial communities during sampling and storage. Therefore, we examined the impact of different sampling and storage conditions on the stability of fecal microbial communities in healthy and diseased subjects. Fecal samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 irritable bowel syndrome and 8 inflammatory bowel disease patients were collected on site, aliquoted immediately after defecation and stored at -80°C, -20°C for 1 week, at +4°C or room temperature for 24 hours. Fecal transport swabs (FecalSwab, Copan) were collected and stored for 48-72 hours at room temperature. We used pyrosequencing of the 16S gene to investigate the stability of microbial communities. Alpha diversity did not differ between all storage methods and -80°C, except for the fecal swabs. UPGMA clustering and principal coordinate analysis showed significant clustering by test subject (p<0.001) but not by storage method. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and (un)weighted UniFrac showed a significant higher distance between fecal swabs and -80°C versus the other methods and -80°C samples (p<0.009). The relative abundance of Ruminococcus and Enterobacteriaceae did not differ between the storage methods versus -80°C, but was higher in fecal swabs (p<0.05). Storage up to 24 hours (at +4°C or room temperature) or freezing at -20°C did not significantly alter the fecal microbial community structure compared to direct freezing of samples from healthy subjects and patients with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26024217

  19. The effect of sampling and storage on the fecal microbiota composition in healthy and diseased subjects.

    PubMed

    Tedjo, Danyta I; Jonkers, Daisy M A E; Savelkoul, Paul H; Masclee, Ad A; van Best, Niels; Pierik, Marieke J; Penders, John

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cohort studies are currently being designed to investigate the human microbiome in health and disease. Adequate sampling strategies are required to limit bias due to shifts in microbial communities during sampling and storage. Therefore, we examined the impact of different sampling and storage conditions on the stability of fecal microbial communities in healthy and diseased subjects. Fecal samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 irritable bowel syndrome and 8 inflammatory bowel disease patients were collected on site, aliquoted immediately after defecation and stored at -80 °C, -20 °C for 1 week, at +4°C or room temperature for 24 hours. Fecal transport swabs (FecalSwab, Copan) were collected and stored for 48-72 hours at room temperature. We used pyrosequencing of the 16S gene to investigate the stability of microbial communities. Alpha diversity did not differ between all storage methods and -80 °C, except for the fecal swabs. UPGMA clustering and principal coordinate analysis showed significant clustering by test subject (p < 0.001) but not by storage method. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and (un)weighted UniFrac showed a significant higher distance between fecal swabs and -80 °C versus the other methods and -80 °C samples (p < 0.009). The relative abundance of Ruminococcus and Enterobacteriaceae did not differ between the storage methods versus -80 °C, but was higher in fecal swabs (p < 0.05). Storage up to 24 hours (at +4 °C or room temperature) or freezing at -20 °C did not significantly alter the fecal microbial community structure compared to direct freezing of samples from healthy subjects and patients with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26024217

  20. Computed tomography of the liver and kidneys in glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Doppman, J L; Cornblath, M; Dwyer, A J; Adams, A J; Girton, M E; Sidbury, J

    1982-02-01

    Glycogen, in concentrations encountered in von Gierke's disease, has computed tomography (CT) attenuation coefficients in the 50 to 70 Hounsfield unit (HU: 1,000 scale) range and accounts for the increased density of the liver. However, in eight patients with Type I glycogen storage disease, simultaneous hepatic infiltration with fat and glycogen led to a range of liver CT densities from 13 to 80 HU. Fatty infiltration may facilitate the demonstration of hepatic tumors in older patients with this disease. Half the patients showed increased attenuation coefficients of the renal cortex, indicating glycogen deposition in the kidneys. PMID:6950959

  1. Vitamins, fatty acids, and antioxidant capacity stability during storage of freeze-dried human milk.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Blanca; Castellote, Ana Isabel; Montes, Rosa; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Although freezing is the most common method used to preserve human milk, nutritional and immunological components may be lost during storage. Freeze-drying could increase the shelf life of human milk, while preserving its original characteristics. Seventy-two samples of freeze-dried human milk were stored for different periods of time, up to a maximum of 3 months, at 4 °C or 40 °C. Vitamin C, tocopherols, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acids composition were analyzed. A new HILIC-UHPLC method improving vitamin C determination was also validated. Ascorbic acid and total vitamin C concentrations significantly decreased at both temperatures, while antioxidant capacity only decreased at 40 °C. Fatty acids composition and both γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol contents remained unaltered. The stability after storage of freeze-dried milk was higher than that reported for frozen or fresh milk indicating that freeze-drying is a promising option to improve the preservation of human milk in banks. PMID:24840090

  2. Lactic acid is a sperm motility inactivation factor in the sperm storage tubules

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Mei; Mizushima, Shusei; Hiyama, Gen; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Shiba, Kogiku; Inaba, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Yoshinobu; Atsumi, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Takashi; Sasanami, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Although successful fertilization depends on timely encounters between sperm and egg, the decoupling of mating and fertilization often confers reproductive advantages to internally fertilizing animals. In several vertebrate groups, postcopulatory sperm viability is prolonged by storage in specialized organs within the female reproductive tract. In birds, ejaculated sperm can be stored in a quiescent state within oviductal sperm storage tubules (SSTs), thereby retaining fertilizability for up to 15 weeks at body temperature (41 °C); however, the mechanism by which motile sperm become quiescent within SSTs is unknown. Here, we show that low oxygen and high lactic acid concentrations are established in quail SSTs. Flagellar quiescence was induced by lactic acid in the concentration range found in SSTs through flagellar dynein ATPase inactivation following cytoplasmic acidification (acid in promoting sperm quiescence in SSTs and opened up a new opportunity for technological improvement in prolonging sperm longevity at ambient or body temperature. PMID:26619826

  3. Lactic acid is a sperm motility inactivation factor in the sperm storage tubules.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Mei; Mizushima, Shusei; Hiyama, Gen; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Shiba, Kogiku; Inaba, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Yoshinobu; Atsumi, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Takashi; Sasanami, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Although successful fertilization depends on timely encounters between sperm and egg, the decoupling of mating and fertilization often confers reproductive advantages to internally fertilizing animals. In several vertebrate groups, postcopulatory sperm viability is prolonged by storage in specialized organs within the female reproductive tract. In birds, ejaculated sperm can be stored in a quiescent state within oviductal sperm storage tubules (SSTs), thereby retaining fertilizability for up to 15 weeks at body temperature (41°C); however, the mechanism by which motile sperm become quiescent within SSTs is unknown. Here, we show that low oxygen and high lactic acid concentrations are established in quail SSTs. Flagellar quiescence was induced by lactic acid in the concentration range found in SSTs through flagellar dynein ATPase inactivation following cytoplasmic acidification (acid in promoting sperm quiescence in SSTs and opened up a new opportunity for technological improvement in prolonging sperm longevity at ambient or body temperature. PMID:26619826

  4. Lectin histochemistry and ultrastructure of feline kidneys from six different storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Castagnaro, M; Alroy, J; Ucci, A A; Glew, R H

    1987-01-01

    We have compared the pattern of lectin staining with the ultrastructural features of kidneys from normal cats and 19 cats with 6 different lysosomal storage diseases. The diseases studied include GM1 and GM2 gangliosidosis, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS)-I and MPS-VI, sphingomyelin-lipidosis (i.e., Niemann-Pick disease) and mannosidosis. Ten different biotinylated lectins were used as histochemical probes for carbohydrate residues and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex as visualant. Concanavalia ensiformis agglutinin (Con A) stained mesangial cells in all storage diseases but GM1, epithelial cells in sphingomyelin-lipidosis and mannosidosis, endothelial cells in GM1 and mannosidosis and Bowman's capsule cells in all but GM2. Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I (GS-I) stained the glomerular endothelium in all six diseases, but not in control kidneys. Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) stained the glomerular epithelium only in GM1 and MPS-I. Succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (SWGA) stained the glomerular endothelium and epithelium in mannosidosis, and the glomerular epithelium and Bowman's capsule in MPS-I. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated an accumulation of oligosaccharides in cases of mannosidosis and GM1 gangliosidosis, a mixture of oligosaccharides and lipids in MPS-I, MPS-VI and GM2 gangliosidosis and only lipid storage in sphingomyelin lipidosis. These studies show that morphologic and histochemical changes are manifested in some kidney cell types in lysosomal storage diseases, even though the enzyme deficiency occurs in all cell types. Furthermore, we show that the nature of the undegraded stored material is complex and that other factors, such as rate of membrane turn over, membrane composition, and cell function may influence the amount and nature of the "stored" material. PMID:2892300

  5. Embryonal Hepatoblastoma with Co-existent Glycogen Storage Disease in a Seven-month-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Brahma Prakash; Bhat, Nowneet Kumar; Wasim, Sanobar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is an uncommon malignant liver tumour diagnosed usually during the first three years of life. It presents as abdominal mass with elevated alpha fetoprotein levels. The definite diagnosis requires histopathological confirmation. Although conditions like Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) or Beckwith-Wiedman Syndrome may be associated with hepatoblastomas, storage disorders are uncommonly documented. We describe a rare case of hepatoblastoma with co-existent glycogen storage disease in an infant male who presented with a progressively increasing mass in abdomen along with failure to thrive. PMID:27042474

  6. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  7. Survival of acid adapted and non-acid adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in pasteurized orange juice and yogurt under different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Valdés, Lorena; Bernardo, Ana; Prieto, Miguel; López, Mercedes

    2013-10-01

    The survival capacity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acid adapted and non-acid adapted cells was monitored in pasteurized yogurt (pH 4.1) and orange juice (pH 3.6) during storage at different temperatures (4, 10, 25 and 37 ). Acid adapted and non-acid adapted cells were obtained by means of their growth for 36 h in Brain Heart Infusion broth acidified at pH 4.8 with citric acid and buffered (pH 7.0) Brain Heart Infusion broth, respectively. S. typhimurium showed a great ability to survive in both foodstuffs and, especially, in yogurt, where both acid adapted and non-acid adapted populations suffered only a reduction of about 1.3-1.9 log10 cycles after 43 days of storage in the range of temperatures 4-25 . At 37  a higher bacterial inactivation was observed (4.0-4.4 log10 cycles). In orange juice, a different behaviour was observed for acid-adapted and non-acid adapted cells. Whereas non-acid adapted cells survived better than acid adapted cells at 4 and 10 , acid adapted cells showed enhanced survival abilities at higher temperatures (25 and 37 ). Thus, the times required to achieve a 5 log10 cycles reduction for non-acid adapted and acid adapted cells were 10.2 and 6.0 (4 ), 6.3 and 4.2 (10 ), 0.6 and 1.0 (25 ) and 0.10 and 0.15 (37 ) days, respectively. Evidence found in this study demonstrates that refrigeration temperatures protect S. typhimurium from inactivation in acid foods and indicates that S. typhimurium acid tolerance response (ATR) is determined by storage temperature and food composition. PMID:23729421

  8. Development of a bile acid-based newborn screen for Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Covey, Douglas F; Scherrer, David E; Earley, Brian; Gale, Sarah E; Farhat, Nicole Y; Porter, Forbes D; Dietzen, Dennis J; Orsini, Joseph J; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Zhang, Xiaokui; Reunert, Janice; Marquardt, Thorsten; Runz, Heiko; Giugliani, Roberto; Schaffer, Jean E; Ory, Daniel S

    2016-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a fatal, neurodegenerative, cholesterol storage disorder. With new therapeutics in clinical trials, it is imperative to improve diagnostics and facilitate early intervention. We used metabolomic profiling to identify potential markers and discovered three unknown bile acids that were increased in plasma from NPC but not control subjects. The bile acids most elevated in the NPC subjects were identified as 3β,5α,6β-trihydroxycholanic acid and its glycine conjugate, which were shown to be metabolites of cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol, an oxysterol elevated in NPC. A high-throughput mass spectrometry-based method was developed and validated to measure the glycine-conjugated bile acid in dried blood spots. Analysis of dried blood spots from 4992 controls, 134 NPC carriers, and 44 NPC subjects provided 100% sensitivity and specificity in the study samples. Quantification of the bile acid in dried blood spots, therefore, provides the basis for a newborn screen for NPC that is ready for piloting in newborn screening programs. PMID:27147587

  9. The Impact of Enzyme Characteristics on Corn Stover Fiber Degradation and Acid Production During Ensiled Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haiyu; Richard, Tom L.; Moore, Kenneth J.

    Ensilage can be used to store lignocellulosic biomass before industrial bioprocessing. This study investigated the impacts of seven commerical enzyme mixtures derived from Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei, and T. longibrachiatum. Treatments included three size grades of corn stover, two enzyme levels (1.67 and 5 IU/g dry matter based on hemicellulase), and various ratios of cellulase to hemicellulase (C ∶ H). The highest C ∶ H ratio tested, 2.38, derived from T. reesei, resulted in the most effective fermentation, with lactic acid as the dominant product. Enzymatic activity during storage may complement industrial pretreatment; creating synergies that could reduce total bioconversion costs.

  10. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production. PMID:27596402

  11. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of starch microencapsulated fatty acids as phase change materials thermal energy storage applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable starch-oil composites can be prepared from renewable resources by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous slurries of starch and vegetable oils or other hydrophobic materials. Fatty acids such as stearic acid are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage applica...

  12. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen that has been found in many thermally processed foods. The effects of thermal processing, gamma and UV-C irradiation on formation of furan from different fatty acids was studied. In addition, formation of furan from fatty acid emulsions during storage at 25C and...

  13. Snap-through anti-ignition vent cap for lead acid storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, E.M.; Heiser, J.I.

    1980-11-11

    A vented battery cap is provided which is adapted to engage at least one of a plurality of fill holes in an automotive storage battery or similar lead acid battery and which has pressure release means for venting the combustible gases produced within that storage battery under conditions such as overcharge conditions into the atmosphere. The cap itself is comprised of substantially two portions, a base member which fits into at least one of the fill holes and a top member which snap-fits through the base member. The pressure release means comprises a plurality of extremely narrow slits on both the top and underside of the cap which have widths in the order of 0.003 to 0.005 of an inch. The remainder of the battery cap is tightly sealed to prevent any extraneous leaks of battery gases received from the automotive battery from leaking into the atmosphere. The slits are so constructed to facilitate the safe expulsion of any volume of gas normally produced by an automotive storage battery, while virtually eliminating the likelihood that ignition of gases within the atmosphere will result in explosive consequences either within the battery cap or within the battery itself.

  14. The change of fatty acids composition of Polish biscuits during storage.

    PubMed

    Koczoń, Piotr; Lipińska, Edyta; Czerniawska-Piątkowska, Ewa; Mikuła, Małgorzata; Bartyzel, Bartłomiej J

    2016-07-01

    Commercially available Polish biscuits were stored for 10months under different storage conditions i.e. in temperatures of 5°C and 20°C. The chemical quality alteration caused by chemical reactions occurring within biscuits were studied in terms of change of composition of fat extracted from studied samples in one-month intervals. Correlation of data from standard methods e.g. gas chromatography or classic titration with FT-IR spectroscopy, was followed by calculation of four statistical models that accurately predicted peroxide value, oxidative stability, polar fraction content and unsaturated trans fatty acid content in any samples. On the basis of data obtained, scheme of chemical reactions involved in oxidation process was suggested. A critical time of storage was proposed as an indicator of the period of the highest rate of chemical changes. Among factors considered to influence oxidative stability, the following had the greatest impact: initial water content, initial fat content, and time of storage. PMID:26920303

  15. Spillover of Fatty Acids During Dietary Fat Storage in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Almandoz, Jaime P.; Singh, Ekta; Howell, Lisa A.; Grothe, Karen; Vlazny, Danielle T.; Smailovic, Almira; Irving, Brian A.; Nelson, Robert H.; Miles, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Spillover of lipoprotein lipase-generated fatty acids from chylomicrons into the plasma free fatty acid (FFA) pool is an important source of FFA and reflects inefficiency in dietary fat storage. We measured spillover in 13 people with type 2 diabetes using infusions of a [3H]triolein-labeled lipid emulsion and [U-13C]oleate during continuous feeding, before and after weight loss. Body fat was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography. Participants lost ∼14% of body weight. There was an ∼38% decrease in meal-suppressed FFA concentration (P < 0.0001) and an ∼23% decrease in oleate flux (P = 0.007). Fractional spillover did not change (P = NS). At baseline, there was a strong negative correlation between spillover and leg fat (r = −0.79, P = 0.001) and a positive correlation with the trunk-to-leg fat ratio (R = 0.56, P = 0.047). These correlations disappeared after weight loss. Baseline leg fat (R = −0.61, P = 0.027) but not trunk fat (R = −0.27, P = 0.38) negatively predicted decreases in spillover with weight loss. These results indicate that spillover, a measure of inefficiency in dietary fat storage, is inversely associated with lower body fat in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23349503

  16. A multifunctional energy-storage system with high-power lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Schroeder, M.; Stephanblome, T.; Handschin, E.

    A multifunctional energy storage system is presented which is used to improve the utilization of renewable energy supplies. This system includes three different functions: (i) uninterruptible power supply (UPS); (ii) improvement of power quality; (iii) peak-load shaving. The UPS application has a long tradition and is used whenever a reliable power supply is needed. Additionally, nowadays, there is a growing demand for high quality power arising from an increase of system perturbation of electric grids. Peak-load shaving means in this case the use of renewable energy stored in a battery for high peak-load periods. For such a multifunctional application large lead-acid batteries with high power and good charge acceptance, as well as good cycle life are needed. OCSM batteries as with positive tubular plates and negative copper grids have been used successfully for a multitude of utility applications. This paper gives two examples where multifunctional energy storage systems have started operation recently in Germany. One system was installed in combination with a 1 MW solar plant in Herne and another one was installed in combination with a 2 MW wind farm in Bocholt. At each place, a 1.2 MW h (1 h-rate) lead-acid battery has been installed. The batteries consist of OCSM cells with the standard design but modified according to the special demand of a multifunctional application.

  17. Postharvest chitosan-g-salicylic acid application alleviates chilling injury and preserves cucumber fruit quality during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youzuo; Zhang, Meiling; Yang, Huqing

    2015-05-01

    The effect of salicylic acid with and without chitosan, or a chitosan-g-salicylic acid complex, on chilling injury and post-harvest quality of cucumber stored at 2 °C for 12 days plus 2 days at 20 °C was investigated. The results showed the chitosan-g-salicylic acid coating inhibited chilling injury better than salicylic acid alone or with chitosan. Chitosan-g-salicylic acid also reduced weight loss and respiration rate, limited increases in malondialdehyde content and electrolyte leakage, and maintained higher total soluble solids, chlorophyll and ascorbic acid content. Furthermore, this coating increased the endogenous salicylic acid concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase in cucumber during storage. Our study suggests that chitosan-g-salicylic acid alleviated chilling injury in cucumber through sustained-release of salicylic acid and the higher antioxidant enzymes concentrations. PMID:25529719

  18. Identification of glycoprotein storage diseases by lectins: a new diagnostic method.

    PubMed

    Alroy, J; Orgad, U; Ucci, A A; Pereira, M E

    1984-12-01

    The specific diagnosis of glycoprotein storage diseases is made by demonstrating a deficiency in enzyme activity or an elevation of undegraded oligosaccharides in cells or body fluids. Prospective sampling and expensive specialized biochemistry, which is also time consuming, are required for such studies. We used lectin reagents on paraffin-embedded tissue sections to identify the specific sugars in undegraded stored substances. We studied 22 cases of glycoprotein storage diseases and differentiated histochemically between alpha- and beta-mannosidosis, fucosidosis, and sialisidosis. Cells affected with alpha-mannosidosis stained with Concanavalia ensiformis (Con A), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), and succinyl-WGA (S-WGA), while beta-mannosidosis cells did not stain with any of the lectins used. In fucosidosis the affected cells stained with Ulex europeus-I (UEA-I), while sialisidosis-affected cells stained with WGA, and in three cases with Arachis hypogea (PNA). This study indicates that lectin histochemistry provides a reliable specific diagnostic pattern for some glycoprotein storage diseases using a simple and inexpensive method. PMID:6501863

  19. Influence of Citric Acid on the Pink Color and Characteristics of Sous Vide Processed Chicken Breasts During Chill Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki-Won

    2015-01-01

    Chicken breast dipped with citric acid (CA) was treated by sous vide processing and stored in a refrigerated state for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 14 d. A non-dipped control group (CON) and three groups dipped in different concentrations of citric acid concentration were analyzed (0.5%, 0.5CIT; 2.0%, 2CIT and 5.0%, 5CIT; w/v). Cooking yield and moisture content increased due to the citric acid. While the redness of the juice and meat in all groups showed significant increase during storage, the redness of the citric acid groups was reduced compared to the control group (p<0.05). The percentage of myoglobin denaturation (PMD) of the CA groups was also increased according to the level of CA during storage. Total aerobic counts, Enterobacteriaceae counts, volatile basic nitrogen and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were generally lower in the citric acid-treated samples than in untreated ones, indicating extended shelf life of the cooked chicken breast dipped in citric acid solution. The shear force of the 2CIT and 5CIT groups was significantly lower (p<0.05). The findings indicated positive effects in the physicochemical properties and storage ability of sous vide chicken breast at 2% and 5% citric acid concentrations. PMID:26761885

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J.; Thomas, C. J.; Radcliffe, J.; Itsiopoulos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia. PMID:26301243

  1. Lactic acid elevation in extramitochondrial childhood neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Kang, P B; Hunter, J V; Kaye, E M

    2001-09-01

    We report three children, each of whom seemed to have a primary mitochondrial disorder at presentation but was eventually diagnosed with an extramitochondrial inherited metabolic disease. The first patient presented at 6 months with developmental delay. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an abnormal signal in the white matter, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed elevated lactate peaks. A muscle biopsy showed complex IV deficiency, but leukocyte measurement of galactosylceramide beta-galactosidase activity was markedly diminished, consistent with Krabbe's disease. The second patient presented at birth with seizures and later had developmental delays. There was brain atrophy on neuroimaging. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels were elevated. She had persistently elevated urine thiosulfate, which was diagnostic for molybdenum cofactor deficiency. The third child presented at 2 months with seizures and hypotonia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an abnormal signal in the basal ganglia and surrounding white matter, whereas magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed elevated lactate peaks. A brain biopsy was diagnostic for Alexander's disease. These cases and others in the literature suggest that lactic acid elevation in the central nervous system can be found in a number of extramitochondrial neurologic diseases. Such diseases would constitute a third category of lactic acidosis. PMID:11575606

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease alters intestinal bile acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Jahnel, Jörg; Fickert, Peter; Hauer, Almuthe C; Högenauer, Christoph; Avian, Alexander; Trauner, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids (BAs) critically depends on absorption of BA in the terminal ileum and colon, which can be affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diarrhea in IBD is believed to result in part from BA malabsorption (BAM). We explored whether IBD alters mRNA expression of key intestinal BA transporters, BA detoxifying systems, and nuclear receptors that regulate BA transport and detoxification. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, mucosal biopsy specimens from the terminal ileum in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and from the descending colon in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were assessed for mRNA expression. Levels were compared with healthy controls. The main ileal BA uptake transporter, the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, was downregulated in active CD and UC and in CD in remission. Other significant changes such as repression of breast cancer-related protein and sulphotransferase 2A1 were seen only during active disease. In UC, pancolitis (but not exclusively left-sided colitis) was associated with altered expression of major BA transporters [multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3), MRP4, multidrug resistance gene 1, organic solute transporter α/β] and nuclear receptors (pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor) in the descending colon. UC pancolitis leads to broad changes and CD ileitis to selective changes in intestinal BA transporter expression. Early medical manipulation of intestinal BA transporters may help prevent BAM. PMID:24965812

  3. Effect of Frozen Storage on the Gel-Forming Ability of Surimi Treated by Acid and Alkaline Solubilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Deaño, L.; Tovar, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    Rheological changes during five months of frozen storage of horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) surimi elaborated by acid (Type A) and alkali (Type B) treatment, and their ability to form gels were evaluated. Frozen storage provoked a sligthly increase of rigidity and toughness in surimi B due to the loss of water holding capacity. This effect on surimi B disrupts the gel forming ability of muscle proteins, and the resulting gel experiments an increase of viscoelastic moduli, maximum stress and gel strength, showing a more increment in the network firmness after five months of frozen storage, however it is still better gel than that from method A.

  4. Lysosomal storage disease: gene therapy on both sides of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2014-01-01

    Most lysosomal storage disorders affect the nervous system as well as other tissues and organs of the body. Previously, the complexities of these diseases, particularly in treating neurologic abnormalities, were too great to surmount. However, based on recent developments there are realistic expectations that effective therapies are coming soon. Gene therapy offers the possibility of affordable, comprehensive treatment associated with these diseases currently not provided by standards of care. With a focus on correction of neurologic disease by systemic gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidoses types I and IIIA, we review some of the major recent advances in viral and non-viral vectors, methods of their delivery and strategies leading to correction of both the nervous and somatic tissues as well as evaluation of functional correction of neurologic manifestations in animal models. We discuss two questions: what systemic gene therapy strategies work best for correction of both somatic and neurologic abnormalities in a lysosomal storage disorder and is there evidence that targeting peripheral tissues (e.g., in the liver) has a future for ameliorating neurologic disease in patients? PMID:25410058

  5. Glycogen storage disease type III: A novel Agl knockout mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pagliarani, Serena; Lucchiari, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Violano, Raffaella; Ripolone, Michela; Bordoni, Andreina; Nizzardo, Monica; Gatti, Stefano; Corti, Stefania; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2014-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency in the glycogen debranching enzyme, encoded by AGL. Essential features of this disease are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and growth retardation. Progressive skeletal myopathy, neuropathy, and/or cardiomyopathy become prominent in adults. Currently, there is no available cure. We generated an Agl knockout mouse model by deletion of the carboxy terminus of the protein, including the carboxy end of the glucosidase domain and the glycogen-binding domain. Agl knockout mice presented serious hepatomegaly, but we did not observe signs of cirrhosis or adenomas. In affected tissues, glycogen storage was higher than in wild-type mice, even in the central nervous system which has never been tested in GSDIII patients. The biochemical findings were in accordance with histological data, which clearly documented tissue impairment due to glycogen accumulation. Indeed, electron microscopy revealed the disruption of contractile units due to glycogen infiltrations. Furthermore, adult Agl knockout animals appeared less prompt to move, and they exhibited kyphosis. Three-mo-old Agl knockout mice could not run, and adult mice showed exercise intolerance. In addition, older affected animals exhibited an accelerated respiratory rate even at basal conditions. This observation was correlated with severe glycogen accumulation in the diaphragm. Diffuse glycogen deposition was observed in the tongues of affected mice. Our results demonstrate that this Agl knockout mouse is a reliable model for human glycogenosis type III, as it recapitulates the essential phenotypic features of the disease. PMID:25092169

  6. Prevention of lysosomal storage diseases and derivation of mutant stem cell lines by preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research. PMID:23320174

  7. Effect of storage temperature in a Cambodian field setting on the fatty acid composition in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Nurhasan, M; Roos, N; Aristizabal Henao, J J; Chamnan, C; Stark, K D; Lauritzen, L

    2015-05-01

    Fatty acid analysis requires standardized collection and storage of samples, which can be a challenge under field conditions. This study describes the effect of storage temperature on fatty acid composition in two sets of whole blood samples collected from 66 children in a rural area in Cambodia. The samples were stored with butylated hydroxytoluene at -20 °C and -80 °C and the latter required extra transfers due to storage facility limitation. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by high-throughput gas-chromatography and evaluated by paired t-tests and Bland-Altman plots. Total amounts of fat in -20 °C and -80 °C samples did not differ, but there was relatively more highly unsaturated fatty acids (15.8 ± 2.7 vs. 14.4 ± 2.5%, p < 0.001) and a lower n-6/n-3 ratio (6.4 ± 1.4 vs. 6.9 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) in the -20 °C samples. Our results indicate that the importance of storage temperature should be evaluated in the context of storage facility availability and risk of temperature fluctuations during transport. PMID:25753812

  8. Magnetic resonance findings of the corpus callosum in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  9. Magnetic Resonance Findings of the Corpus Callosum in Canine and Feline Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  10. Investigation of "mysterious" disease in livestock: hydrocyanic acid poisoning.

    PubMed

    Krishna, L; Katoch, R C

    1989-12-01

    An investigation of "mysterious" disease due to hydrocyanic acid (HCN) poisoning in livestock in this state was carried out. Detailed clinicopathological and pathological studies were conducted. Characteristic signs of acute tympany followed with profuse frothing, convulsions and dyspnea were recorded. Cynosis of the mucosa with characteristic anoxemic tissue changes and a high concentration of HCN in rumen content, feed and skeletal muscles were recorded. These were sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Successful treatment with a specific antidote was achieved, and further morbidity and mortality was checked. PMID:2559533

  11. Chemical stabilization of oils rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during storage.

    PubMed

    Pop, F

    2011-04-01

    During the microencapsulation process, the fish oil undergoes multiple changes in its physical properties such as bulkiness and dispersibility in aqueous phase and dry matrix. Autoxidation already occurred in the first stages of the microencapsulation process itself during emulsification and spray-drying. An efficient stabilization was achieved using a ternary combination of lipophilic antioxidants, synergistic compounds and a trace metal chelator, e.g. a combination of tocopherols, rich in the δ-derivative and low in the α-derivative, with ascorbyl palmitate and lecithin. Trace metal chelation by, e.g. Citrem or lecithin in combination with ascorbyl palmitate proved to be of particular importance in the emulsion, but not during the storage of the microencapsulated oil. In the microencapsulated oil, the addition of rosemary extract rich in carnosic acid to ternary blends of tocopherols, ascorbyl palmitate and lecithin or Citrem significantly retarded autoxidation. PMID:21447601

  12. Radiation and storage-induced ageing of polypyrrole doped with dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, P.; Brack, N.; Hale, P. S.; Prissanaroon, W.; Welter, E.; Pigram, P. J.

    2005-04-01

    The effects of storage and exposure to X-rays on the surface chemistry of electrochemically prepared polypyrrole (PPy) doped with dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For irradiation, different photon sources (lab source and synchrotron radiation) and energies (1.4-9 keV) were chosen. This covers an energy range of relevance for many X-ray based investigations (e.g. XPS or X-ray absorption spectroscopy) of PPy[DBSA], PPy-metal interfaces, and transition metals embedded into PPy. The DBSA doping level and the concentration ratio of sulfonate species are discussed as a function of storage and irradiation times, and links between both ageing parameters are given. New sulfur species are found to emerge upon repeated soft X-ray irradiation. Severe changes in the polaron/bipolaron structure of PPy[DBSA] during exposure to high energy (several keV) synchrotron radiation are observed, and the results are discussed in the light of photon absorption and photoelectron generation in the polymer surface.

  13. Effect of shortening replacement with flaxseed oil on physical, sensory, fatty acid and storage characteristics of cookies.

    PubMed

    Rangrej, V; Shah, V; Patel, J; Ganorkar, P M

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid imparted good evidence of health benefits. Flaxseed oil, being the richest vegetarian source of alpha linolenic acid (omega-3 fatty acid), was incorporated in cookies by replacing shortening at level of 5 %, 10 %, 20 %, 30 %, 40 % and 50 %. Effect of shortening replacement with flaxseed oil on physical, textural and sensory attributes were investigated. Spread ratio and breaking strength of cookies increased as flaxseed oil level increased. Sensory score was not significantly affected up to 30 % shortening replacement with flaxseed oil as compared with the control cookies. Above 30 % flaxseed oil, sensory score was adversely affected. Fatty acid profile confirmed the enhancement of omega-3 fatty acid from 0 (control) to 14.14 % (30 % flaxseed oil cookies). The poly-unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (P/S) increased from 0.088 (control) to 0.57 while ω - 6 to ω -3 fatty acid ratio of flaxseed oil cookies decreased from 4.51 (control) to 0.65 in the optimized cookies. The data on storage characteristics of the control and 30 % flaxseed oil cookies showed that there was significant change in the moisture content, Peroxide value (PV) and overall acceptability (OAA) up to 28 days of storage at 45 °C packed in polyethylene bags. Flaxseed oil cookies were acceptable up to 21 days of storage and afterwards noticeable off flavour was perceived. PMID:26028753

  14. In search of proof-of-concept: gene therapy for glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of life threatening long-term complications in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) has emphasized the need for new therapies, such as gene therapy, which could achieve biochemical correction of glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency and reverse clinical involvement. We have developed gene therapy with a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector that: 1) prevented mortality and corrected glycogen storage in the liver, 2) corrected hypoglycemia during fasting, and 3) achieved efficacy with a low number of vector particles in G6Pase-deficient mice and dogs. However, the gradual loss of transgene expression from episomal AAV vector genomes eventually necessitated the administration of a different pseudotype of the AAV vector to sustain dogs with GSD-Ia. Further preclinical development of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy is therefore warranted in GSD-Ia. PMID:22310927

  15. A Guided Tour of the Structural Biology of Gaucher Disease: Acid-β-Glucosidase and Saposin C

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in both acid-β-glucosidase (GCase) and saposin C lead to Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. The past several years have seen an explosion of structural and biochemical information for these proteins, which have provided new insight into the biology and pathogenesis of Gaucher disease, as well as opportunities for new therapeutic directions. Nearly 20 crystal structures of GCase are now available, from different heterologous sources, complexed with different ligands in the active site, in different glycosylation states, as well as one that harbors a prevalent disease-causing mutation, N370S. For saposin C, two NMR and 3 crystal structures have been solved, each with its unique snapshot. This review focuses on the details of these structures to highlight salient common and disparate features that contribute to our current state of knowledge of this complex orphan disease. PMID:22145077

  16. Very prolonged liposomal amphotericin B use leading to a lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Michot, J M; Gubavu, C; Fourn, E; Maigne, G; Teicher, E; Angoulvant, A; Blanche, S; Lortholary, O; Coilly, A; Duclos-Vallée, J C; Sebagh, M; Guettier, C; Aumont, C; Delfraissy, J F; Lambotte, O

    2014-06-01

    Amphotericin B is a powerful polyene antifungal drug used for treating systemic fungal infections and is usually administered for a short period. Side effects after prolonged use are unknown in humans. Here we report the case of a 28-year-old man suffering from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), treated for invasive cerebral aspergillosis with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) for a very long time (8 consecutive years). We describe the efficacy and safety of this treatment in the long term. Aspergillosis was kept under control as long as L-AmB therapy was maintained, but relapsed when the dose was reduced. No overt renal toxicity was noted. The patient gradually developed hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia. Abnormalities of bone marrow were similar to the sea-blue histiocyte syndrome. Liver biopsy showed images of nodular regenerative hyperplasia related to CGD as well as a histiocytic storage disease. We discuss the very prolonged use of L-AmB leading to the development of a lysosomal storage disease. PMID:24787480

  17. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Depner, Christopher M.; Tripathy, Sasmita

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on Greenland Inuits in the 1970s and subsequent human studies have established an inverse relationship between the ingestion of omega-3 fatty acids [C20–22 ω 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)], blood levels of C20–22 ω 3 PUFA, and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). C20–22 ω 3 PUFA have pleiotropic effects on cell function and regulate multiple pathways controlling blood lipids, inflammatory factors, and cellular events in cardiomyocytes and vascular endothelial cells. The hypolipemic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic properties of these fatty acids confer cardioprotection. Accordingly, national heart associations and government agencies have recommended increased consumption of fatty fish or ω 3 PUFA supplements to prevent CVD. In addition to fatty fish, sources of ω 3 PUFA are available from plants, algae, and yeast. A key question examined in this review is whether nonfish sources of ω 3 PUFA are as effective as fatty fish-derived C20–22 ω 3 PUFA at managing risk factors linked to CVD. We focused on ω 3 PUFA metabolism and the capacity of ω 3 PUFA supplements to regulate key cellular events linked to CVD. The outcome of our analysis reveals that nonfish sources of ω 3 PUFA vary in their capacity to regulate blood levels of C20–22 ω 3 PUFA and CVD risk factors. PMID:22904344

  18. Selection for low erucic acid and genetic mapping of loci affecting the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in meadowfoam seed storage lipids.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, S D; Kishore, V K; Crane, J M; Slabaugh, M B; Knapp, S J

    2009-06-01

    Erucic acid (22:1(13)) has been identified as an anti-nutritional compound in meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) and other oilseeds in the Brassicales, a classification which has necessitated the development of low erucic acid cultivars for human consumption. The erucic acid concentrations of meadowfoam wild types (8%-24%) surpass industry standards for human consumption (acid lines and identify loci affecting the accumulation of 22:1(13) and other very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in meadowfoam seed storage lipids. LE76, a low erucic acid line, was developed by 3 cycles of selection in an ethyl methanesulfonate-treated wildtype population. LE76 produced 3% 22:1(13), threefold less than the M0 population. Wildtype x LE76 F2 populations produced continuous, approximately normal erucic and dienoic acid distributions. Loss-of-function mutations apparently did not segregate and individuals with low 22:1(13) concentrations (storage lipids by genotyping and phenotyping wildtype x low erucic acid F2 progeny. Composite interval mapping identified 3 moderately large-effect erucic acid QTL. The low erucic acid parent transmitted favorable alleles for 2 of 3 QTL, suggesting low erucic acid cultivars can be developed by combining favorable alleles transmitted by wildtype and low erucic acid parents. PMID:19483773

  19. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  20. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD. PMID:20606731

  1. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD. PMID:20606731

  2. G-quadruplex nucleic acids and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuliang; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Alternate DNA structures that deviate from B-form double-stranded DNA such as G-quadruplex (G4) DNA can be formed by sequences that are widely distributed throughout the human genome. G-quadruplex secondary structures, formed by the stacking of planar quartets composed of four guanines that interact by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding, can affect cellular DNA replication and transcription, and influence genomic stability. The unique metabolism of G-rich chromosomal regions that potentially form quadruplexes may influence a number of biological processes including immunoglobulin gene rearrangements, promoter activation and telomere maintenance. A number of human diseases are characterized by telomere defects, and it is proposed that G-quadruplex structures which form at telomere ends play an important role in telomere stability. Evidence from cellular studies and model organisms suggests that diseases with known defects in G4 DNA helicases are likely to be perturbed in telomere maintenance and cellular DNA replication. In this minireview, we discuss the connections of G-quadruplex nucleic acids to human genetic diseases and cancer based on the recent literature. PMID:20670277

  3. Plasmid-based gene transfer ameliorates visceral storage in a mouse model of Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Katsuyama, Kayoko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Kosaka, Kenji; Aoki, Ichiro; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2003-03-01

    Sandhoff disease is a severe neurodegenerative disorder with visceral involvement caused by mutations in the HEXB gene coding for the beta subunit of the lysosomal hexosaminidases A and B. HEXB mutations result in the accumulation of undegraded substrates such as GM2 and GA2 in lysosomes. We evaluated the efficacy of cationic liposome-mediated plasmid gene therapy using the Sandhoff disease mouse, an animal model of a human lysosomal storage disease. The mice received a single intravenous injection of two plasmids, encoding the human alpha and beta subunits of hexosaminidase cDNAs. As a result, 10-35% of normal levels of hexosaminidase expression, theoretically therapeutic levels, were achieved in most visceral organs, but not in the brain, 3 days after injection with decreased levels by day 7. Histochemical staining confirmed widespread enzyme activity in visceral organs. Both GA2 and GM2 were reduced by almost 10% and 50%, respectively, on day 3, and by 60% and 70% on day 7 compared with untreated age-matched Sandhoff disease mice. Consistent with the biochemical results, a reduction in GM2 was observed in liver cells histologically as well. These initial findings support further development of the plasmid gene therapy against lysosomal diseases with visceral pathology. PMID:12682727

  4. Combination Therapies for Lysosomal Storage Diseases: A Complex Answer to a Simple Problem.

    PubMed

    Macauley, Shannon L

    2016-06-01

    Abstract Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of 40-50 rare monogenic disorders that result in disrupted lysosomal function and subsequent lysosomal pathology. Depending on the protein or enzyme deficiency associated with each disease, LSDs affect an array of organ systems and elicit a complex set of secondary disease mechanisms that make many of these disorders difficult to fully treat. The etiology of most LSDs is known and the innate biology of lysosomal enzymes favors therapeutic intervention, yet most attempts at treating LSDs with enzyme replacement strategies fall short of being curative. Even with the advent of more sophisticated approaches, like substrate reduction therapy, pharmacologic chaperones, gene therapy or stem cell therapy, comprehensive treatments for LSDs have yet to be achieved. Given the limitations with individual therapies, recent research has focused on using a combination approach to treat LSDs. By coupling protein-, cell-, and gene- based therapies with small molecule drugs, researchers have found greater success in eradicating the clinical features of disease. This review seeks to discuss the positive and negatives of singular therapies used to treat LSDs, and discuss how, in combination, studies have demonstrated a more holistic benefit on pathological and functional parameters. By optimizing routes of delivery, therapeutic timing, and targeting secondary disease mechanisms, combination therapy represents the future for LSD treatment. PMID:27491211

  5. Identification and quantification of the oxidation products derived from α-acids and β-acids during storage of hops ( Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Matsukura, Yasuko; Ozaki, Hiromi; Nishimura, Koichi; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2013-03-27

    α-Acids and β-acids, two main components of hop resin, are known to be susceptible to oxygen and degraded during hop storage, although the oxidation products in stored hops have not been fully identified. In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis method suitable for separation and quantification of the oxidation products. This HPLC analysis clearly proved, for the first time, that humulinones and hulupones are major products in oxidized hops. We are also the first to identify novel 4'-hydroxy-allohumulinones, suggested to be oxidative products of humulinones, by means of NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Using the developed analytical method, changes in α- and β-acids and their oxidation products during hop storage were clearly revealed for the first time. PMID:23469991

  6. Therapy Development for the Lysosomal Storage Disease Fucosidosis using the Canine Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jessica L; Taylor, Rosanne M

    2016-06-01

    Abstract Fucosidosis (OMIM 23000) is an inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase a-L-fucosidase due to mutations in the FUCA1 gene. Without enzyme-targeted therapy patients rarely survive beyond the first decade of life, and therapy options other than supportive care are limited. Hematopoietic transplants, first developed in the fucosidosis dog model, are the only treatment option available capable of delaying the disease course. However, due to the risks and exclusion criteria of this treatment additional therapies are required. The development of additional therapies including intravenous and intra-cerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and gene therapy, which have been trialed in the canine model, will be discussed. PMID:27491218

  7. Activation of glycolysis and apoptosis in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Yang, Liu; Damodaran, Tirupapuliyur; Desai, Dev; Diehl, Anna Mae; Alzate, Oscar; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-08-01

    The deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia, growth retardation, renal failure, hepatic adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver involvement includes the massive accumulation of glycogen and lipids due to accumulated glucose-6-phosphate and glycolytic intermediates. Proteomic analysis revealed elevations in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and other enzymes involved in glycolysis. GAPDH was markedly increased in murine G6Pase-deficient hepatocytes. The moonlighting role of GAPDH includes increasing apoptosis, which was demonstrated by increased TUNEL assay positivity and caspase 3 activation in the murine GSD-Ia liver. These analyses of hepatic involvement in GSD-Ia mice have implicated the induction of apoptosis in the pathobiology of GSD-Ia. PMID:19419892

  8. The development and use of small molecule inhibitors of glycosphingolipid metabolism for lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayman, James A.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid (GSL) storage diseases have been the focus of efforts to develop small molecule therapeutics from design, experimental proof of concept studies, and clinical trials. Two primary alternative strategies that have been pursued include pharmacological chaperones and GSL synthase inhibitors. There are theoretical advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches. Pharmacological chaperones are specific for an individual glycoside hydrolase and for the specific mutation present, but no candidate chaperone has been demonstrated to be effective for all mutations leading to a given disorder. Synthase inhibitors target single enzymes such as glucosylceramide synthase and inhibit the formation of multiple GSLs. A glycolipid synthase inhibitor could potentially be used to treat multiple diseases, but at the risk of lowering nontargeted cellular GSLs that are important for normal health. The basis for these strategies and specific examples of compounds that have led to clinical trials is the focus of this review. PMID:24534703

  9. Filter Paper-based Nucleic Acid Storage in High-throughput Solid Tumor Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Stachler, Matthew; Jia, Yonghui; Sharaf, Nematullah; Wade, Jacqueline; Longtine, Janina; Garcia, Elizabeth; Sholl, Lynette M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular testing of tumors from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is central to clinical practice; however, it requires histology support and increases test turnaround time. Prospective fresh frozen tissue collection requires special handling, additional storage space, and may not be feasible for small specimens. Filter paper-based collection of tumor DNA reduces the need for histology support, requires little storage space, and preserves high-quality nucleic acid. We investigated the performance of tumor smears on filter paper in solid tumor genotyping, as compared with paired FFPE samples. Whatman FTA Micro Card (FTA preps) smears were prepared from 21 fresh tumor samples. A corresponding cytology smear was used to assess tumor cellularity and necrosis. DNA was isolated from FTA preps and FFPE core samples using automated methods and quantified using SYBR green dsDNA detection. Samples were genotyped for 471 mutations on a mass spectrophotometry-based platform (Sequenom). DNA concentrations from FTA preps and FFPE correlated for untreated carcinomas but not for mesenchymal tumors (Spearman σ=0.39 and σ=-0.1, respectively). Average DNA concentrations were lower from FTA preps as compared with FFPE, but DNA quality was higher with less fragmentation. Seventy-six percent of FTA preps and 86% of FFPE samples generated adequate DNA for genotyping. FTA preps tended to perform poorly for collection of DNA from pretreated carcinomas and mesenchymal neoplasms. Of the 16 paired DNA samples that were genotyped, 15 (94%) gave entirely concordant results. Filter paper-based sample preservation is a feasible alternative to FFPE for use in automated, high-throughput genotyping of carcinomas. PMID:25221956

  10. A novel GBE1 gene variant in a child with glycogen storage disease type IV.

    PubMed

    Said, Samar M; Murphree, Marine I; Mounajjed, Taofic; El-Youssef, Mounif; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV is an autosomal recessive disorder of carbohydrates caused by deficiency of amylo-1-4-glycanoglycosyltransferase, which leads to accumulation of amylopectin-like polysaccharides in tissues including liver, heart and neuromuscular system. More than 40 different mutations in the glycogen branching enzyme gene (GBE1) have been described. In this study, we report a 2-year-old boy who presented with developmental delay and muscle weakness. He subsequently was diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type IV based on a liver biopsy histology and electron microscopy. Glycogen branching enzyme activity was in the low range. Genetic analysis demonstrated a novel heterozygous variant (c.760A>G; p.Thr254Ala) in exon 6 of the GBE1 gene, which is believed to be pathogenic. This variant was inherited from the patient's mother who was asymptomatic with normal glycogen branching enzyme activity. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal additional variations in the GBE1 gene. PMID:27107456

  11. Glucose and glycogen metabolism in erythrocytes from normal and glycogen storage disease type III subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Shimon W.; Chayoth, Reuben; Levin, Stanley; Lazarovitz, Ela; Rubinstein, David

    1968-01-01

    Active glycogen metabolism has been demonstrated in both normal and glycogen-rich erythrocytes taken from patients with type III glycogen storage disease. Activity of all enzymes catalyzing the reactions required for the synthesis and degradation of glycogen have been demonstrated in the mature erythrocytes. Uniformly labeled glucose-14C is incorporated into glycogen in intact cells of both types during incubation. Replacement of the glucose-14C by unlabeled glucose in the medium resulted in a significant loss of radioactivity from cellular glycogen. In the absence of the substrate a progressive shortening of outer branches occurred during incubation of intact glucogen-rich cells. Using cells from patients with type III glycogen storage disease, which have sufficient glycogen content to be analyzed by β-amylolysis, we demonstrated that the glucosyl units are first incorporated in the outer tiers, then transferred to the core where they tend to accumulate due to the absence of amylo-1,6-glucosidase. The glycogen-rich cells have a more rapid rate of glucose utilization upon incubation which is not reflected by a higher lactate production. The increased rate of glucose utilization did not result from an increased rate of glucose incorporation into glycogen in affected cells. The rate of 14CO2 production from glucose-1-14C during incubation was not significantly different in the two types of cells unless methylene blue was added as an electron acceptor, in which case the glycogen-rich cells oxidized glucose to CO2 more rapidly. PMID:5240360

  12. A review of room temperature storage of biospecimen tissue and nucleic acids for anatomic pathology laboratories and biorepositories

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jerry J; Mirsadraei, Leili; Sanchez, Desiree E; Wilson, Ryan W; Shabihkhani, Maryam; Lucey, Gregory M; Wei, Bowen; Singer, Elyse J; Mareninov, Sergey; Yong, William H

    2014-01-01

    Frozen biospecimens are crucial for translational research and contain well preserved nucleic acids and protein. However, the risk for catastrophic freezer failure as well as space, cost, and environmental concerns argue for evaluating long-term room temperature storage alternatives. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues have great value but their use is limited by cross-linking and fragmentation of nucleic acids, as well as loss of enzymatic activity. Stabilization solutions can now robustly preserve fresh tissue for up to 7 days at room temperature. For longer term storage, commercial vendors of chemical matrices claim real time stability of nucleic acids of over 2 years and their accelerated aging studies to date suggest stability for 12 years for RNA and 60 years for DNA. However, anatomic pathology biorepositories store mostly frozen tissue rather than nucleic acids. Small quantities of tissue can be directly placed on some chemical matrices to stabilize DNA, however RNA and proteins are not preserved. Current lyophilization approaches can preserve histomorphology, DNA, RNA, and proteins though RNA shows moderate degradation after 1–2 years. Formalin free fixatives show improved but varying abilities to preserve nucleic acids and face validation as well as cost barriers in replacing FFPE specimens. The paraffin embedding process can degrade RNA. Development of robust long-term room temperature biospecimen tissue storage technology can potentially reduce costs for the biomedical community in the face of growing targeted therapy needs and decreasing budgets. PMID:24362270

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid metabolism and elimination in cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salous, Abdelghaffar Kamal

    The bioactive lipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are present in human and mouse plasma at a concentration of ~0.1-1 microM and regulate physiological and pathophysiological processes in the cardiovascular system including atherothrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and immune function, edema formation, and permeability. PPAP2B, the gene encoding LPP3, a broad activity integral membrane enzyme that terminates LPA actions in the vasculature, has a single nucleotide polymorphism that been recently associated with coronary artery disease risk. The synthesis and signaling of LPA and S1P in the cardiovascular system have been extensively studied but the mechanisms responsible for their elimination are less well understood. The broad goal of this research was to examine the role of LPP3 in the termination of LPA signaling in models of cardiovascular disease involving vascular wall cells, investigate the role of LPP3 in the elimination of plasma LPA, and further characterize the elimination of plasma LPA. The central hypothesis is that LPP3 plays an important role in attenuating the pathological responses to LPA signaling and that it mediates the elimination of exogenously applied bioactive lipids from the plasma. These hypotheses were tested using molecular biological approaches, in vitro studies, synthetic lysophospholipid mimetics, modified surgical procedures, and mass spectrometry assays. My results indicated that LPP3 played a critical role in attenuating LPA signaling mediating the pathological processes of intimal hyperplasia and vascular leak in mouse models of disease. Additionally, enzymatic inactivation of lysophospholipids by LPP and PLA enzymes in the plasma was not a primary mechanism for the rapid elimination of plasma LPA and S1P. Instead, evidence strongly suggested a transcellular uptake mechanism by hepatic non-parenchymal cells as the predominant mechanism for elimination of these molecules. These results support a model in

  14. Lysosomal storage diseases and the heat shock response: convergences and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ingemann, Linda; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes play a vital role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the recycling of cell constituents, a key metabolic function which is highly dependent on the correct function of the lysosomal hydrolases and membrane proteins, as well as correct membrane lipid stoichiometry and composition. The critical role of lysosomal functionality is evident from the severity of the diseases in which the primary lesion is a genetically defined loss-of-function of lysosomal hydrolases or membrane proteins. This group of diseases, known as lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), number more than 50 and are associated with severe neurodegeneration, systemic disease, and early death, with only a handful of the diseases having a therapeutic option. Another key homeostatic system is the metabolic stress response or heat shock response (HSR), which is induced in response to a number of physiological and pathological stresses, such as protein misfolding and aggregation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, nutrient deprivation, elevated temperature, viral infections, and various acute traumas. Importantly, the HSR and its cardinal members of the heat shock protein 70 family has been shown to protect against a number of degenerative diseases, including severe diseases of the nervous system. The cytoprotective actions of the HSR also include processes involving the lysosomal system, such as cell death, autophagy, and protection against lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and have shown promise in a number of LSDs. This review seeks to describe the emerging understanding of the interplay between these two essential metabolic systems, the lysosomes and the HSR, with a particular focus on their potential as a therapeutic target for LSDs. PMID:24837749

  15. A Nonsense Mutation in the Acid α-Glucosidase Gene Causes Pompe Disease in Finnish and Swedish Lapphunds

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a recessively inherited and often fatal disorder caused by the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, an enzyme encoded by the GAA gene and needed to break down glycogen in lysosomes. This glycogen storage disease type II has been reported also in Swedish Lapphund dogs. Here we describe the genetic defect in canine Pompe disease and show that three related breeds from Scandinavia carry the same mutation. The affected dogs are homozygous for the GAA c.2237G>A mutation leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid position 746. The corresponding mutation has previously been reported in humans and causes infantile Pompe disease in combination with a second fully deleterious mutation. The affected dogs from both the Finnish as well as the Swedish breed mimic infantile-onset Pompe disease genetically, but also clinico-pathologically. Therefore this canine model provides a valuable tool for preclinical studies aimed at the development of gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23457621

  16. A nonsense mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene causes Pompe disease in Finnish and Swedish Lapphunds.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Eija H; Reuser, Arnold J J; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a recessively inherited and often fatal disorder caused by the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, an enzyme encoded by the GAA gene and needed to break down glycogen in lysosomes. This glycogen storage disease type II has been reported also in Swedish Lapphund dogs. Here we describe the genetic defect in canine Pompe disease and show that three related breeds from Scandinavia carry the same mutation. The affected dogs are homozygous for the GAA c.2237G>A mutation leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid position 746. The corresponding mutation has previously been reported in humans and causes infantile Pompe disease in combination with a second fully deleterious mutation. The affected dogs from both the Finnish as well as the Swedish breed mimic infantile-onset Pompe disease genetically, but also clinico-pathologically. Therefore this canine model provides a valuable tool for preclinical studies aimed at the development of gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23457621

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease: can omega-3 fatty acids really help?

    PubMed

    Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Goulart, Ricardo de Alvares; Quesada, Karina; Bechara, Marcelo Dib; de Carvalho, Antonely de Cássio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants to the traditional therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied to enhance the efficacy of the treatment and improve patients' quality of life. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3FA) have been associated with attenuation of the inflammatory responses in IBD, possibly acting as substrates for anti-inflammatory eicosanoid production, similar to prostaglandins and leukotrienes. ω3FA also act as substrates for the synthesis of resolvins, maresins and protectins, indispensable in resolving inflammation processes. These acids may influence the development or course of IBD by: reducing oxidative stress, production of tumor necrosis factor-α and proinflammatory cytokines; working as chemopreventive agents; and decreasing the expression of adhesion molecules. There are numerous controversies in the literature on the effects of ω3FA in the prevention or treatment of IBD, but their effects in reducing inflammation is incontestable. Therefore, more studies are warranted to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms and establish the recommended daily intake to prevent or induce remission in IBD patients. PMID:26752948

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease: can omega-3 fatty acids really help?

    PubMed Central

    Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Goulart, Ricardo de Alvares; Quesada, Karina; Bechara, Marcelo Dib; de Carvalho, Antonely de Cássio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants to the traditional therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied to enhance the efficacy of the treatment and improve patients’ quality of life. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3FA) have been associated with attenuation of the inflammatory responses in IBD, possibly acting as substrates for anti-inflammatory eicosanoid production, similar to prostaglandins and leukotrienes. ω3FA also act as substrates for the synthesis of resolvins, maresins and protectins, indispensable in resolving inflammation processes. These acids may influence the development or course of IBD by: reducing oxidative stress, production of tumor necrosis factor-α and proinflammatory cytokines; working as chemopreventive agents; and decreasing the expression of adhesion molecules. There are numerous controversies in the literature on the effects of ω3FA in the prevention or treatment of IBD, but their effects in reducing inflammation is incontestable. Therefore, more studies are warranted to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms and establish the recommended daily intake to prevent or induce remission in IBD patients. PMID:26752948

  19. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA. PMID:26747026

  20. Impaired autophagy in the lipid storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C1 disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sovan; Carroll, Bernadette; Buganim, Yosef; Maetzel, Dorothea; Ng, Alex H.M.; Cassady, John; Cohen, Malkiel; Chakraborty, Souvik; Wang, Haoyi; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde; Gsponer, Joerg; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid storage disorders is not clear. Here we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where maturation of autophagosomes is impaired due to defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whilst the lysosomal proteolytic function remains unaffected. Expression of functional NPC1 protein rescues this defect. Inhibition of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation. Compromised autophagy was seen in disease-affected organs of Npc1 mutant mice. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that HP-β-cyclodextrin, which is used for cholesterol depletion treatment, impedes autophagy, whereas stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Our data suggest that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may provide a rational treatment strategy for NPC1 disease. PMID:24290752

  1. Misdiagnosis as steatohepatitis in a family with mild glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Huang, Shi-Wei; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Sun, Chih-Hao; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Liu, Chinsu; Lo, Ming-Yu; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-11-01

    The manifestations of glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD 1a) are usually so prominent in childhood that it is readily diagnosed by pediatricians. However, a mild form of the disease may only become apparent during adolescence or adulthood. We observed a brother and sister with subtle manifestations of the disease, which was discovered after the brother's son was diagnosed with typical GSD 1a. The adult siblings never suffered from hypoglycemia, had normal fasting blood glucose and liver transaminases at the time of diagnosis, and were taller than average for Chinese. Their only notable disease manifestations were recurrent gouty arthritis associated with hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia during adolescence. When diagnosed, the brother had multiple benign and malignant hepatic tumors, and died of fulminant metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma 6 months after liver transplantation. p.M121V/p.R83H and p.M121V/p.M121V genotypic constellations of the G6PC gene were identified in this family. Both siblings were homozygous for the newly identified p.M121V mutation. The infant had compound heterozygous mutations, p.R83H and p.M121V. We recommend that mild GSD should be considered in the adolescents with unexplained hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia, despite the presence of normal blood glucose levels. This report also reminds us that hepatocellular carcinoma could develop even in very mild GSD 1a patients. PMID:22909800

  2. Trans fatty acids - A risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2014-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are produced either by hydrogenation of unsaturated oils or by biohydrogenation in the stomach of ruminant animals. Vanaspati ghee and margarine have high contents of TFA. A number of studies have shown an association of TFA consumption and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This increased risk is because TFA increase the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization have come up with the recommendation that the contents of TFA in human dietary fat should be reduced to less than 4%. There is high prevalence of CVD in Pakistan. High consumption of vanaspati ghee which contains 14.2-34.3% of TFA could be one of the factors for this increased burden of CVD in Pakistan. Consumption of dietary fat low in TFA would be helpful in reducing the risk of CVD in South Asia. Denmark by banning the sale of food items with TFA has brought down the number of deaths due to coronary heart disease by nearly 50% over a period of 20 years. Public awareness about the adverse effects of TFA on human health would be extremely important. Media can play a very effective role in educating the masses and advocating the policy for the sale of only low TFA food items. Literature sources: Google and US National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health were the sources of papers cited in this review article. PMID:24639860

  3. Bugs, genes, fatty acids, and serotonin: Unraveling inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Kaunitz, Jonathan; Nayyar, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    The annual incidence of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease has increased at an alarming rate. Although the specific pathophysiology underlying IBD continues to be elusive, it is hypothesized that IBD results from an aberrant and persistent immune response directed against microbes or their products in the gut, facilitated by the genetic susceptibility of the host and intrinsic alterations in mucosal barrier function. In this review, we will describe advances in the understanding of how the interaction of host genetics and the intestinal microbiome contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD, with a focus on bacterial metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as possible key signaling molecules.  In particular, we will describe alterations of the intestinal microbiota in IBD, focusing on how genetic loci affect the gut microbial phylogenetic distribution and the production of their major microbial metabolic product, SCFAs. We then describe how enteroendocrine cells and myenteric nerves express SCFA receptors that integrate networks such as the cholinergic and serotonergic neural systems and the glucagon-like peptide hormonal pathway, to modulate gut inflammation, permeability, and growth as part of an integrated model of IBD pathogenesis.  Through this integrative approach, we hope that novel hypotheses will emerge that will be tested in reductionist, hypothesis-driven studies in order to examine the interrelationship of these systems in the hope of better understanding IBD pathogenesis and to inform novel therapies.

  4. Trans fatty acids – A risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2014-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are produced either by hydrogenation of unsaturated oils or by biohydrogenation in the stomach of ruminant animals. Vanaspati ghee and margarine have high contents of TFA. A number of studies have shown an association of TFA consumption and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This increased risk is because TFA increase the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization have come up with the recommendation that the contents of TFA in human dietary fat should be reduced to less than 4%. There is high prevalence of CVD in Pakistan. High consumption of vanaspati ghee which contains 14.2-34.3% of TFA could be one of the factors for this increased burden of CVD in Pakistan. Consumption of dietary fat low in TFA would be helpful in reducing the risk of CVD in South Asia. Denmark by banning the sale of food items with TFA has brought down the number of deaths due to coronary heart disease by nearly 50% over a period of 20 years. Public awareness about the adverse effects of TFA on human health would be extremely important. Media can play a very effective role in educating the masses and advocating the policy for the sale of only low TFA food items. Literature sources: Google and US National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health were the sources of papers cited in this review article. PMID:24639860

  5. Early deficits in motor coordination and cognitive dysfunction in a mouse model of the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder, Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulinello, Maria; Chen, Fengying; Dobrenis, Kostantin

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of lysosomal storage diseases, including Sandhoff disease, are frequently employed to test therapies directed at the central nervous system. We backbred such mice and conducted a behavioral test battery which included sensorimotor and cognitive assessments. This is the first report of short-term memory deficits in a murine model of Sandhoff disease. We also document early onset of motor deficits using the balance beam test. PMID:18611415

  6. Ascorbic acid absorption in Crohn's disease. Studies using L-(carboxyl-/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, S.H.; Shaffer, J.L.; Johns, C.W.; Bennett, R.J.; Irving, M.H.

    1989-04-01

    Total body pool and intestinal absorption of ascorbic acid were studied in 12 patients undergoing operation for Crohn's disease (six with fistulae and six without) and in six control patients undergoing operation for reasons other than Crohn's disease. L-(carboxyl-/sup 14/C)Ascorbic acid, 0.19-0.40 megabecquerels (MBq), was given orally. After a period of equilibration, the labeled ascorbic acid was flushed out of the patient's body tissues using large doses of unlabeled ascorbic acid. Intestinal absorption of ascorbic acid, assessed from the total cumulative urinary /sup 14/C recovery, was found to be similar in patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease (73.9 +/- 8.45%), those without fistulas (72.8 +/- 11.53%), and in controls (80.3 +/- 8.11%). Total body pools of ascorbic acid, calculated using the plasma /sup 14/C decay curves, were similar in patients with Crohn's disease with fistulas (17.1 +/- 5.91 mg/kg), patients without fistulas (9.6 +/- 3.58 mg/kg), and in controls (13.3 +/- 4.28 mg/kg). The results indicate that ascorbic acid absorption is normal in patients with both fistulizing and nonfistulizing Crohn's disease. The results suggest that routine supplements of vitamin C are not necessary unless oral ascorbic acid intake is low.

  7. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  8. Quantum dots increased fat storage in intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans by influencing molecular basis for fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhi, Lingtong; Qu, Yangyang; Wang, Dayong

    2016-07-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model animal for fat storage study. In nematodes, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) induced an increase in fat storage in intestine that is partially due to prolonged defecation cycle length, and not attributed to altered feeding or cadmium ion released from CdTe QDs. Moreover, CdTe QDs altered the molecular basis of both synthesis and degradation of fatty acid; however, CdTe QDs did not influence that of degradation of phospholipids. CdTe QDs increased expression of fasn-1 and pod-2 genes encoding enzymes required for fatty acid synthesis, and decreased expression of acs-2 and ech-1 genes encoding enzymes required for fatty acid β-oxidation. The altered molecular basis of fatty acid synthesis or degradation by CdTe QDs acted in intestine to regulate fat storage. Our study highlights the potential of CdTe QDs in influencing lipid metabolism in certain organs or tissues in animals. PMID:26956412

  9. Effect of acid adaptation on inactivation of Salmonella during drying and storage of beef jerky treated with marinades.

    PubMed

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Samelis, John; Kendall, Patricia A; Smith, Gary C

    2003-12-15

    This study evaluated the influence of pre-drying marinade treatments on inactivation of acid-adapted or nonadapted Salmonella on beef jerky during preparation, drying and storage. The inoculated (five-strain composite, 6.0 log CFU/cm2) slices were subjected to the following marinades (24 h, 4 degrees C) prior to drying at 60 degrees C for 10 h and aerobic storage at 25 degrees C for 60 days: (1) no marinade, control (C), (2) traditional marinade (TM), (3) double amount of TM modified with added 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce with 5% ethanol (MM), (4) dipping into 5% acetic acid and then TM (AATM), and (5) dipping into 1% Tween 20 and then into 5% acetic acid, followed by TM (TWTM). Bacterial survivors were determined on tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate and xylose-lysine-tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar. Results indicated that drying reduced bacterial populations in the order of pre-drying treatments TWTM (4.8-6.0 log CFU/cm2)> or =AATM> or =MM>TM> or =C (2.6-5.0 log CFU/cm2). Nonadapted Salmonella were significantly (P<0.05) more resistant to inactivation during drying than acid-adapted Salmonella in all treatments. Bacterial populations decreased below the detection limit (-0.4 log CFU/cm2) as early as 7 h during drying or remained detectable even after 60 days of storage, depending on acid adaptation, pre-drying treatment, and agar media. The results indicated that acid adaptation may not cause increased resistance of Salmonella to the microbial hurdles involved in jerky processing and that use of modified marinades in manufacturing jerky may improve the effectiveness of drying in inactivating Salmonella. PMID:14580973

  10. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong

    2015-05-15

    The effects of gamma and UV-C irradiation in comparison with thermal processing and storage at 25°C on formation of furan from different fatty acids were investigated. Results showed that furan was generated from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic and linolenic acid during thermal (120°C, 25 min) and UV-C (11.5 J/cm(2)) treatments. Gamma irradiation (up to 20 kGy) did not induce formation of significant amounts of furan from any of the fatty acids studied. Storage of unsaturated fatty acid emulsions at 25°C for 3 days led to the formation of furan (7-11 ng/mL) even without prior thermal or non-thermal treatments. pH significantly impacted furan formation with >3.5 times more furan formed at pH 9 than at pHs 3 or 6 during 3 days at 25°C. The addition of Trolox, BHA, and propyl gallate had no significant effect on furan formation from linolenic acid while α-tocopherol and FeSO4 promoted furan formation. PMID:25577103

  11. Basic and Acidic Leaching of Sludge from Melton Valley Storage Tank W-25

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L., Egan, B.Z., Beahm, E.C., Chase, C.W., Anderson, K.K.

    1997-10-01

    Bench-scale leaching tests were conducted with samples of tank waste sludge from the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate separation technology processes for use in concentrating the radionuclides and reducing the volume of waste for final disposal. This paper discusses the hot cell apparatus, the characterization of the sludge, the leaching methodology, and the results obtained from a variety of basic and acidic leaching tests of samples of sludge at ambient temperature. Basic leaching tests were also conducted at 75 and 95 deg C. The major alpha-,gamma., and beta-emitting radionuclides in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids were {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm {sup 90}Sr, Pu, U, and Th. The other major metals (in addition to the U and Th) and anions were Na, Ca, Al, K, Mg, NO{sub 3}{sup -},CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, and O{sup 2-} organic carbon content was 3.0 +/- 1.0%. The pH was 13. A surprising result was that about 93% of the {sup 137}Cs in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids was bound in the solids and could not be solubilized by basic leaching at ambient temperature and 75 deg C. However, the solubility of the {sup 137}Cs was enhanced by heating the sludge to 95 deg C. In one of the tests,about 42% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed by leaching with 6.3 M NaOH at 95 deg C.Removing {sup 137}Cs from the W-25 sludge with nitric acid was a slow process. About 13% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed in 16 h with 3.0 M HNO{sub 3}. Only 22% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed in 117 h usi 6.0 M HNO{sub 3}. Successive leaching of sludge solids with 0.5 M, 3.0 M, 3.0 M; and 6.0 M HNO{sub 3} for a total mixing time of 558 h removed 84% of the {sup 137}Cs. The use of caustic leaching prior to HNO{sub 3} leaching, and the use of HF with HNO{sub 3} in acidic leaching, increased the rate of {sup 137}Cs dissolution. Gel formation proved to be one of the biggest problems associated with HNO{sub 3

  12. Hyaluronic acid uptake in the assessment of sinusoidal endothelial cell damage after cold storage and normothermic reperfusion of rat livers.

    PubMed

    Reinders, M E; van Wagensveld, B A; van Gulik, T M; Frederiks, W M; Chamuleau, R A; Endert, E; Klopper, P J

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of hyaluronic acid (HA) was used to assess preservation damage to sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) during cold storage and subsequent normothermic reperfusion of rat livers. After 8, 16, 24, and 48 h storage in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution, livers were gravity-flushed via the portal vein with a standard volume of cold UW solution containing 50 micrograms/l HA. The effluent was collected for analysis of HA, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The mean uptake of HA at 0 h was 59.1% +/- 4.6% (mean +/- SEM). After 8 h of storage, HA uptake was similar (55.5% +/- 7.3%), whereas after 16 h of storage it was reduced to 34.7% +/- 5.8%. At 24 and 48 h of storage, no uptake of HA was found. In a second series of experiments, livers were stored in UW solution and subsequently reperfused for 90 min with a Krebs-Henseleit solution (37 degrees C) in a recirculating system containing 150 micrograms/l HA. Following 8 h of storage, 34.6% +/- 8.0% of the initial HA concentration was taken up from the perfusate. After 16 and 24 h of storage, no uptake of HA was found. The results of this study indicate that damage to SEC occurs progressively during storage, leading to zero uptake of HA by the rat livers at 24 h of cold ischemia time. Additional reperfusion injury to the SEC was demonstrated by the reduced ability of the SEC to take up HA following normothermic reperfusion. The uptake of exogenous HA in preserved livers, used as a tool to assess SEC injury, enables the detection of early preservation damage. PMID:8875786

  13. The Evidence for α-Linolenic Acid and Cardiovascular Disease Benefits: Comparisons with Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid12

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Jennifer A.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n–3) has advanced markedly during the past decade. It is now evident that ALA benefits CVD risk. The expansion of the ALA evidence base has occurred in parallel with ongoing research on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n–3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n–3) and CVD. The available evidence enables comparisons to be made for ALA vs. EPA + DHA for CVD risk reduction. The epidemiologic evidence suggests comparable benefits of plant-based and marine-derived n–3 (omega-3) PUFAs. The clinical trial evidence for ALA is not as extensive; however, there have been CVD event benefits reported. Those that have been reported for EPA + DHA are stronger because only EPA + DHA differed between the treatment and control groups, whereas in the ALA studies there were diet differences beyond ALA between the treatment and control groups. Despite this, the evidence suggests many comparable CVD benefits of ALA vs. EPA + DHA. Thus, we believe that it is time to revisit what the contemporary dietary recommendation should be for ALA to decrease the risk of CVD. Our perspective is that increasing dietary ALA will decrease CVD risk; however, randomized controlled clinical trials are necessary to confirm this and to determine what the recommendation should be. With a stronger evidence base, the nutrition community will be better positioned to revise the dietary recommendation for ALA for CVD risk reduction. PMID:25398754

  14. The evidence for α-linolenic acid and cardiovascular disease benefits: Comparisons with eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jennifer A; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) has advanced markedly during the past decade. It is now evident that ALA benefits CVD risk. The expansion of the ALA evidence base has occurred in parallel with ongoing research on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and CVD. The available evidence enables comparisons to be made for ALA vs. EPA + DHA for CVD risk reduction. The epidemiologic evidence suggests comparable benefits of plant-based and marine-derived n-3 (omega-3) PUFAs. The clinical trial evidence for ALA is not as extensive; however, there have been CVD event benefits reported. Those that have been reported for EPA + DHA are stronger because only EPA + DHA differed between the treatment and control groups, whereas in the ALA studies there were diet differences beyond ALA between the treatment and control groups. Despite this, the evidence suggests many comparable CVD benefits of ALA vs. EPA + DHA. Thus, we believe that it is time to revisit what the contemporary dietary recommendation should be for ALA to decrease the risk of CVD. Our perspective is that increasing dietary ALA will decrease CVD risk; however, randomized controlled clinical trials are necessary to confirm this and to determine what the recommendation should be. With a stronger evidence base, the nutrition community will be better positioned to revise the dietary recommendation for ALA for CVD risk reduction. PMID:25398754

  15. Substrate deprivation therapy: a new hope for patients suffering from neuronopathic forms of inherited lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a group of disorders caused by defects in enzymes responsible for degradation of particular compounds in lysosomes. In most cases, these diseases are fatal, and until recently no treatment was available. Introduction of enzyme replacement therapy was a breakthrough in the treatment of some of the diseases. However, while this therapy is effective in reduction of many somatic symptoms, its efficacy in the treatment of the central nervous system is negligible, if any, mainly because of problems with crossing the blood-brain-barrier by intravenously administered enzyme molecules. On the other hand, there are many lysosomal storage diseases in which the central nervous system is affected. Results of very recent studies indicate that in at least some cases, another type of therapy, called substrate deprivation therapy (or substrate reduction therapy) may be effective in the treatment of neuronopathic forms of lysosomal storage diseases. This therapy, based on inhibition of synthesis of the compounds that cannot be degraded in cells of the patients, has been shown to be effective in several animal models of various diseases, and recent reports demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of patients suffering from Niemann-Pick C disease and Sanfilippo disease. PMID:17998597

  16. Urinary glucaric acid excretion in rheumatoid arthritis: influence of disease activity and disease modifying drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Addyman, R; Beyeler, C; Astbury, C; Bird, H A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if a correlation exists between cytochrome P-450 enzyme induction and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), measuring urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (GA) as an index of phase II drug metabolism. METHODS: Patients with RA were treated with sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate, or D-penicillamine in standard dose regimens, for 24 weeks. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or non-inflammatory arthritis (NIA) acted as controls. The urinary GA:creatinine ratio was measured at 0, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Patients with RA had a slightly greater urinary GA:creatinine ratio than patients with AS or NIA at baseline; this increased during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Sulphasalazine treatment had a greater effect on GA excretion than sodium aurothiomalate or D-penicillamine; this difference was statistically significant between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.01). Gamma glutamyltranspeptidase concentration showed a weak correlation with GA excretion between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.03), but all other measurements of changes in disease activity (plasma viscosity, C reactive protein, platelets, and articular index) were found not to correlate with GA excretion between weeks 0-12 or 0-24. CONCLUSION: The increased excretion of GA in patients with RA receiving DMARD treatment is probably the result of an indirect effect on hepatic metabolism bearing no relationship to disease activity. PMID:8774168

  17. [Glycogen storage disease by amylo 1,6-glucosidase deficiency (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Méndez Aparicio, F M

    1980-10-01

    A case of liver glycogen storage disease with amylo 1,6-glucosidase deficiency is reported. Enlarged liver was found at birth, and it is now accompanied by splenomegaly, low fasting blood glucose with ketonuria, elevation of transaminase values and glycogen accumulation with connective periportal tissue in liver histological study. In this glucogenosis results of functional tests on carbohidrate metabolism and glycogen enzymatic assay showed a direct relationship between functional and biochemical behaviour of liver cells. Amylo 1,6-glucosidase deficiency is accompanied by absence of glucogenolysis when glucagon is administrated after a long fast, and an increase of blood glucose when glucagon is administrated after food ingestion. Glycolisis tests show blood lactate elevation when some hexose or alanine are administrated; glyconeogenesis tests show blood glucose elevation when hexose, alanine or glycerol are administrated. PMID:6937153

  18. Glycogenosis storage type I diseases and evolutive adenomatosis: an indication for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lerut, Jan P; Ciccarelli, Olga; Sempoux, Christine; Danse, Etienne; deFlandre, Jacques; Horsmans, Yves; Sokal, Etienne; Otte, Jean-Bernard

    2003-12-01

    We report on two cases of type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) complicated by malignant tumors. A 23-year-old man had GSD Ia with adenomatosis. He underwent transplantation for rapidly growing and radiologically changing adenomata. At histological examination, one adenoma had become a hepatocellular carcinoma. A 22-year-old, HBV-infected woman had GSD type Ib with adenomatosis. At follow-up, several tumors showed changing morphological characteristics. Pre-transplant laparotomy confirmed the presence of a metastatic cholangiocarcinoma. Liver transplantation should be considered in GSD type I patients with adenomatosis, especially when tumor characteristics change. Regular detailed Doppler ultrasound and magnetic nuclear resonance screening during childhood and adolescence are, therefore, mandatory in order for the timing of transplantation to be optimized. PMID:12904843

  19. Autophagy-enhancing drug carbamazepine diminishes hepatocellular death in fibrinogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Puls, Florian; Goldschmidt, Imeke; Bantel, Heike; Agne, Clemens; Bröcker, Verena; Dämmrich, Maximilian; Lehmann, Ulrich; Berrang, Jens; Pfister, Eva-Doreen; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Baumann, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    Fibrinogen storage disease (FSD) is a rare autosomal-dominant hereditary disorder characterized by hypofibrinogenemia and accumulation of fibrinogen aggregates within the hepatocellular endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Some FSD patients present with elevated amino-transferases and fibrosis/cirrhosis similar to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD), also an ER storage disease. Pharmacological stimulation of autophagy has been shown to mediate clearance of protein aggregates and halt progression of liver fibrosis in in vivo models of ATD. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of autophagy and a possible response to autophagy-enhancing therapy in patients with FSD. Hepatic fibrosis was assessed by transient elastography in 2 newly identified FSD families with fibrinogen Aguadilla and Brescia mutations, encompassing 8 affected members. Available liver biopsies were assessed for autophagy. Two patients, who had had elevated alanine amino-transaminase levels (2-5 above upper limit of normal), were treated with the autophagy enhancer carbamazepine (CBZ). Transient elastography did not show evidence of significant fibrosis in any affected family members. Quantitative electron microscopy of one patient showed a 5.15-fold increase of late stage autophagocytic vacuoles compared to control livers. CBZ at low anticonvulsive treatment levels led to rapid normalization of alanine-aminotransferase and decrease of caspase-cleaved and uncleaved cytokeratin-18 fragments (M30 and M65). These effects reversed after discontinuation of treatment. Response to CBZ may be mediated by pharmacologically enhanced autophagy resulting in reduction of aggregate-related toxicity in FSD. These results suggest clinical applicability of pharmacological stimulation of autophagy in FSD, but potentially also in other related disorders. PMID:23707368

  20. Implications of modifying membrane fatty acid composition on membrane oxidation, integrity, and storage viability of freeze-dried probiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marie-Louise R W; Petersen, Mikael A; Risbo, Jens; Hümmer, Magdalena; Clausen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of altering the fatty acid profile of the lipid membrane on storage survival of freeze-dried probiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, as well as study the membrane integrity and lipid oxidation. The fatty acid composition of the lipid membrane of L. acidophilus La-5 was significantly different upon growth in MRS (containing Tween 80, an oleic acid source), or in MRS with Tween 20 (containing C12:0 and C14:0), linoleic, or linolenic acid supplemented. Bacteria grown in MRS showed the highest storage survival rates. No indications of loss of membrane integrity could be found, and membrane integrity could therefore not be connected with loss of viability. Survival of bacteria grown with linoleic or linolenic acid was more negatively affected by the presence of oxygen, than bacteria grown in MRS or with Tween 20 supplemented. A small, but significant, loss of linolenic acid during storage could be identified, and an increase of volatile secondary oxidation products during storage was found for bacteria grown in MRS, or with linoleic, or linolenic acid supplemented, but not for bacteria grown with Tween 20. Overall, the results indicate that lipid oxidation and loss of membrane integrity are not the only or most important detrimental reactions which can occur during storage. By altering the fatty acid composition, it was also found that properties of oleic acid gave rise to more robust bacteria than more saturated or unsaturated fatty acids did. PMID:25823709

  1. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  2. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  3. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haiqing; Thurberg, Beth L.; Curtis, Sarah; Austin, Stephanie; Fyfe, John; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Kishnani, Priya S.; Sun, Baodong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR). The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions. PMID:22736456

  4. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Thurberg, Beth L; Curtis, Sarah; Austin, Stephanie; Fyfe, John; Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR). The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions. PMID:22736456

  5. Hypochlorous acid and taurine-N-monochloramine in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mainnemare, A; Mégarbane, B; Soueidan, A; Daniel, A; Chapple, I L C

    2004-11-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multi-factorial disease involving anaerobic bacteria and the generation of an inflammatory response, including the production of metalloproteinases, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and eicosanoids. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and taurine-N-monochloramine (TauCl) are the end-products of the neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) respiratory burst. They act synergistically to modulate the inflammatory response. In the extracellular environment, HOCl and TauCl may directly neutralize interleukin 6 (IL-6) and several metalloproteinases, while HOCl increases the capacity of alpha(2)-macroglobulin to bind Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, IL-2, and IL-6, and facilitates the release of various growth factors. TauCl inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. HOCl activates tyrosine kinase signaling cascades, generating an increase in the production of extracellular matrix components, growth factors, and inflammatory mediators. Thus, HOCl and TauCl appear to play a crucial role in the periodontal inflammatory process. Taken together, these findings may offer opportunities for the development of novel host-modulating therapies for the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:15505230

  6. Ascorbic acid and rates of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L; Dodge, Hiroko; Frei, Balz; Calabrese, Carlo; Oken, Barry S; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Quinn, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The brain maintains high levels of ascorbic acid (AA) despite a concentration gradient favoring diffusion from brain to peripheral tissues. Dietary antioxidants, including AA, appear to modify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that neurodegeneration in AD is modified by brain levels of AA. Thirty-two patients with mild to moderate AD participated in a biomarker study involving standardized clinical assessments over one year. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected at baseline for AA and albumin content. Cognitive measures were collected at baseline and one year. CSF and plasma AA failed to predict cognitive decline independently, however, CSF: plasma AA ratio did. After adding CSF Albumin Index (an established marker of blood-brain barrier integrity) to the regression models the effect of CSF: plasma AA ratio as a predictor of cognitive decline was weakened. CSF: plasma AA ratio predicts rate of decline in AD. This relationship may indicate that the CSF: plasma AA ratio is an index of AA availability to the brain or may be an artifact of a relationship between blood-brain barrier impairment and neurodegeneration. PMID:19158425

  7. Fatty acid composition in double and multilayered microcapsules of ω-3 as affected by storage conditions and type of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martín, Estefanía; Antequera Rojas, Teresa; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Ruiz Carrascal, Jorge; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad

    2016-03-01

    Spray-dried microcapsules from double (DM) and multilayered (MM) fish oil emulsions were produced to evaluate the effect of type of emulsion on the fatty acid composition during the microencapsulation process and after one month of storage at refrigeration (4°C) and room (20°C) temperature. Encapsulation efficiency, loading and loading efficiency were significantly higher in MM than in DM. C20:5 n-3 (EPA) and C22:6 n-3 (DHA) showed higher proportions in MM than in DM. Some differences in microstructural features were detected, with DM showing cracks and pores. The influence of the storage was significant, decreasing the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in both MM and DM, above all at 20°C. This decrease was more notable in DM. Multilayered emulsions are more suitable to encapsulate fish oil in terms of quantity of encapsulated oil, microstructure of the microcapsules and protection of fatty acids, especially EPA and DHA, during storage. PMID:26471582

  8. Temperature Affects the Use of Storage Fatty Acids as Energy Source in a Benthic Copepod (Platychelipus littoralis, Harpacticoida).

    PubMed

    Werbrouck, Eva; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Vanreusel, Ann; De Troch, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of storage lipids and their associated fatty acids (FA) is an important means for organisms to cope with periods of food shortage, however, little is known about the dynamics and FA mobilization in benthic copepods (order Harpacticoida). Furthermore, lipid depletion and FA mobilization may depend on the ambient temperature. Therefore, we subjected the temperate copepod Platychelipus littoralis to several intervals (3, 6 and 14 days) of food deprivation, under two temperatures in the range of the normal habitat temperature (4, 15°C) and under an elevated temperature (24°C), and studied the changes in FA composition of storage and membrane lipids. Although bulk depletion of storage FA occurred after a few days of food deprivation under 4°C and 15°C, copepod survival remained high during the experiment, suggesting the catabolization of other energy sources. Ambient temperature affected both the degree of FA depletion and the FA mobilization. In particular, storage FA were more exhausted and FA mobilization was more selective under 15°C compared with 4°C. In contrast, depletion of storage FA was limited under an elevated temperature, potentially due to a switch to partial anaerobiosis. Food deprivation induced selective DHA retention in the copepod's membrane, under all temperatures. However, prolonged exposure to heat and nutritional stress eventually depleted DHA in the membranes, and potentially induced high copepod mortality. Storage lipids clearly played an important role in the short-term response of the copepod P. littoralis to food deprivation. However, under elevated temperature, the use of storage FA as an energy source is compromised. PMID:26986852

  9. Temperature Affects the Use of Storage Fatty Acids as Energy Source in a Benthic Copepod (Platychelipus littoralis, Harpacticoida)

    PubMed Central

    Werbrouck, Eva; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Vanreusel, Ann; De Troch, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of storage lipids and their associated fatty acids (FA) is an important means for organisms to cope with periods of food shortage, however, little is known about the dynamics and FA mobilization in benthic copepods (order Harpacticoida). Furthermore, lipid depletion and FA mobilization may depend on the ambient temperature. Therefore, we subjected the temperate copepod Platychelipus littoralis to several intervals (3, 6 and 14 days) of food deprivation, under two temperatures in the range of the normal habitat temperature (4, 15°C) and under an elevated temperature (24°C), and studied the changes in FA composition of storage and membrane lipids. Although bulk depletion of storage FA occurred after a few days of food deprivation under 4°C and 15°C, copepod survival remained high during the experiment, suggesting the catabolization of other energy sources. Ambient temperature affected both the degree of FA depletion and the FA mobilization. In particular, storage FA were more exhausted and FA mobilization was more selective under 15°C compared with 4°C. In contrast, depletion of storage FA was limited under an elevated temperature, potentially due to a switch to partial anaerobiosis. Food deprivation induced selective DHA retention in the copepod’s membrane, under all temperatures. However, prolonged exposure to heat and nutritional stress eventually depleted DHA in the membranes, and potentially induced high copepod mortality. Storage lipids clearly played an important role in the short-term response of the copepod P. littoralis to food deprivation. However, under elevated temperature, the use of storage FA as an energy source is compromised. PMID:26986852

  10. Progress in Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Glycogen Storage Disease Type II.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Corrado; Semplicini, Claudio; Tonin, Paola; Filosto, Massimiliano; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni; Fanin, Marina

    2009-05-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The disease can be clinically classified into three types: a severe infantile form, a juvenile and an adultonset form. Cases with juvenile or adult onset GSDII mimic limb-girdle muscular dystrophy or polymyositis and are often characterized by respiratory involvement. GSDII patients are diagnosed by biochemical assay and by molecular characterization of the GAA gene. Ascertaining a natural history of patients with heterogeneous late-onset GSDII is useful for evaluating their progressive functional disability. A significant decline is observed over the years in skeletal and respiratory muscle function. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has provided encouraging results in the infantile form. It is not yet known if ERT is effective in late-onset GSDII. We examined a series of 11 patients before and after ERT evaluating muscle strength by MRC, timed and graded functional tests, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), respiratory function by spirometric parameters and quality of life. We observed a partial improvement during a prolonged follow-up from 3 to 18 months. The use of different clinical parameters in the proposed protocol seems crucial to determine the efficacy of ERT, since not all late-onset patients respond similarly to ERT. PMID:21179524

  11. Deadly Outbreak of Iron Storage Disease (ISD) in Italian Birds of the Family Turdidae

    PubMed Central

    PAVONE, Silvia; SALAMIDA, Sonia; PECORELLI, Ivan; ROSSI, Elisabetta; MANUALI, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A widespread deadly outbreak occurred in captive birds belonging to the family Turdidae in Italy. The present study was performed on 46 dead birds coming from 3 small decoy-bird breeders in central Italy. Only Turdus pilaris, Turdus iliacus, Turdus philomelos and Turdus merula were affected. No other species of bird held by these breeders died. A change of diet before the hunting season was reported from all breeders. Full necropsy of the animals and histological investigations of representative tissue samples were performed. Microscopical examination showed marked iron deposits in liver samples. Bacteriological investigations and molecular analysis to exclude bacterial and viral diseases were carried out. Contamination of food pellet samples by mycotoxins and analysis to detect heavy metal contaminants in food pellet samples were considered. An interesting result was the high iron content found in food pellets. It was higher than that considered suitable for birds, especially for species susceptible to development iron storage disease (ISD). Taken together, the results suggested an outbreak of ISD caused by the high iron content of food given to the birds before the hunting season. The high mortality recorded only in species belonging to the family Turdidae suggests a genetic predisposition in the affected birds. PMID:24920545

  12. Exosome Secretion Ameliorates Lysosomal Storage of Cholesterol in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Katrin; Goebel, Cornelia; Runz, Heiko; Möbius, Wiebke; Weiss, Sievert; Feussner, Ivo; Simons, Mikael; Schneider, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Loss of function of the npc1 gene leads to abnormal accumulation of free cholesterol and sphingolipids within the late endosomal and lysosomal compartments resulting in progressive neurodegeneration and dysmyelination. Here, we show that oligodendroglial cells secrete cholesterol by exosomes when challenged with cholesterol or U18666A, which induces late endosomal cholesterol accumulation. Up-regulation of exosomal cholesterol release was also observed after siRNA-mediated knockdown of NPC1 and in fibroblasts derived from NPC1 patients and could be reversed by expression of wild-type NPC1. We provide evidence that exosomal cholesterol secretion depends on the presence of flotillin. Our findings indicate that exosomal release of cholesterol may serve as a cellular mechanism to partially bypass the traffic block that results in the toxic lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. Furthermore, we suggest that secretion of cholesterol by exosomes contributes to maintain cellular cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:20554533

  13. Treating lysosomal storage diseases with pharmacological chaperones: from concept to clinics

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of genetic disorders due to defects in any aspect of lysosomal biology. During the past two decades, different approaches have been introduced for the treatment of these conditions. Among them, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) represented a major advance and is used successfully in the treatment of some of these disorders. However, ERT has limitations such as insufficient biodistribution of recombinant enzymes and high costs. An emerging strategy for the treatment of LSDs is pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), based on the use of chaperone molecules that assist the folding of mutated enzymes and improve their stability and lysosomal trafficking. After proof-of-concept studies, PCT is now being translated into clinical applications for Fabry, Gaucher and Pompe disease. This approach, however, can only be applied to patients carrying chaperone-responsive mutations. The recent demonstration of a synergistic effect of chaperones and ERT expands the applications of PCT and prompts a re-evaluation of their therapeutic use and potential. This review discusses the strengths and drawbacks of the potential therapies available for LSDs and proposes that future research should be directed towards the development of treatment protocols based on the combination of different therapies to improve the clinical outcome of LSD patients. PMID:20049730

  14. Comparative Study of Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide Binary and Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide/Titanium-Oxide Ternary for Use as Energy Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andiarto, Rizky; Khalish Nuryadin, Muhammad; Saleh, Rosari

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a series of stearic acid/Fe3O4, and stearic acid/Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites for thermal energy storage (TES) system were synthesized through a two-step process. Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites were first prepared using sol-gel methods and then both samples were mixed into stearic acid by dispersion technique at three different weight % ratio to stearic acid: 5%, 10% and 15% to obtain stearic acid/Fe3O4, and stearic acid/Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites. Morphologies and structural properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), while thermal properties of the sample were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fhermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD patterns demonstrate, that stearic acid/Fe3O4 contained characteristic peaks of Fe3O4 and stearic acid structures, while peaks corresponded to anatase TiO2 structures appear in stearic acid/ Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites. From the DSC measurements, it is found that the maximum latent heat was found at samples with weight ratio of 5%. Moreover, the enhancement up to 20% of latent heat in solidifying as well as melting processes was observed. TGA measurements show high degradation temperature in the range of 246 - 251°C. The TGA results also shows that the residual mass of the sample matches the composition of Fe3O4 and Fe3O4/TiO2 which is added to the stearic acid.

  15. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Philippart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.

  16. Thalidomide-induced hemorrhagic rash in a patient with myelofibrosis and delta-granule storage pool disease.

    PubMed

    Taj, Asma; Abbi, Kamal; Skeel, Roland T

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is one of the immunomodulating agents used in current oncology practice. We present a case of hemorrhagic rash induced by thalidomide in a patient with delta granule storage pool disease. The patient was getting thalidomide for underlying myelofibrosis. PMID:24105355

  17. Glycogen Storage Disease type 1a – a secondary cause for hyperlipidemia: report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is a rare metabolic disorder, caused by deficient activity of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. It produces fasting induced hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, usually manifested in the first semester of life. Besides, it is also associated with growth delay, anemia, platelet dysfunction, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis. Hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia are almost always present and hepatocellular adenomas and renal dysfunction frequent late complications. Methods The authors present a report of five adult patients with GSD Ia followed in internal medicine appointments and subspecialties. Results Four out of five patients were diagnosed in the first 6 months of life, while the other one was diagnosed in adult life after the discovery of hepatocellular adenomas. In two cases genetic tests were performed, being identified the missense mutation R83C in one, and the mutation IVS4-3C > G in the intron 4 of glucose-6-phosphatase gene, not previously described, in the other. Growth retardation was present in 3 patients, and all of them had anemia, increased bleeding tendency and hepatocellular adenomas; osteopenia/osteoporosis was present in three cases. All but one patient had marked hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia, with evidence of endothelial dysfunction in one case and of brain damage with refractory epilepsy in another case. Proteinuria was present in two cases and end-stage renal disease in another case. There was a great variability in the dietary measures; in one case, liver transplantation was performed, with correction of the metabolic derangements. Conclusions Hyperlipidemia is almost always present and only partially responds to dietary and drug therapy; liver transplantation is the only definitive solution. Although its association with premature atherosclerosis is rare, there have been reports of endothelial dysfunction, raising the possibility for increased cardiovascular risk in this group of

  18. Linking Inflammation and Parkinson Disease: Hypochlorous Acid Generates Parkinsonian Poisons.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Kalogiannis, Mike; Krasnikov, Boris F; Gomlin, Irving; Peltier, Morgan R; Moran, Graham R

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation is a common feature of Parkinson Disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a reactive oxygen species formed by neutrophils and other myeloperoxidase-containing cells during inflammation. HOCl chlorinates the amine and catechol moieties of dopamine to produce chlorinated derivatives collectively termed chlorodopamine. Here, we report that chlorodopamine is toxic to dopaminergic neurons both in vivo and in vitro Intrastriatal administration of 90 nmol chlorodopamine to mice resulted in loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra and decreased ambulation-results that were comparable to those produced by the same dose of the parkinsonian poison, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Chlorodopamine was also more toxic to differentiated SH SY5Y cells than HOCl. The basis of this selective toxicity is likely mediated by chlorodopamine uptake through the dopamine transporter, as expression of this transporter in COS-7 cells conferred sensitivity to chlorodopamine toxicity. Pharmacological blockade of the dopamine transporter also mitigated the deleterious effects of chlorodopamine in vivo The cellular actions of chlorodopamine included inactivation of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, as well as inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. The latter effect is consistent with inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase. Illumination at 670 nm, which stimulates cytochrome c oxidase, reversed the effects of chlorodopamine. The observed changes in mitochondrial biochemistry were also accompanied by the swelling of these organelles. Overall, our findings suggest that chlorination of dopamine by HOCl generates toxins that selectively kill dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in a manner comparable to MPP+. PMID:27026709

  19. Effects of acid adaptation and modified marinades on survival of postdrying Salmonella contamination on beef jerky during storage.

    PubMed

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Kendall, Patricia A; Smith, Gary C

    2003-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the survival of acid-adapted and nonadapted Salmonella cultures inoculated after drying on beef jerky that had been treated with marinades before drying at 60 degrees C for 10 h. Beef slices were (i) not treated prior to refrigeration at 4 degrees C for 24 h (control [C]); (ii) marinated with traditional marinade (TM), (iii) marinated with TM modified with 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce containing 5% ethanol (MM) at twice the amount used in the TM treatment; (iv) dipped into 5% acetic acid and then marinated with TM (AATM); and (v) dipped into 1% Tween 20, then dipped into 5% acetic acid, and then marinated with TM (TWTM); after each treatment, meat slices were refrigerated at 4 degrees C for 24 h prior to drying. Dried slices were inoculated with acid-adapted or nonadapted Salmonella (ca. 5.7 log CFU/cm2) prior to aerobic storage at 25 degrees C for 60 days. Tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate, as well as xylose-lysine-tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar, was used to determine survivor counts. Bacterial decreases achieved with the different treatments were found to be in the following order: TWTM (5.4 to 6.3 log units) > or = AATM > or = MM > C > or = TM (2.9 to 5.1 log units). Acid-adapted Salmonella decreased faster than nonadapted Salmonella for all treatments. Bacterial populations decreased to below the detection limit (-0.4 log CFU/cm2) in as few as 14 days or remained detectable by direct plating after 60 days of storage, depending on acid adaptation, treatment, and agar media. The results of this study indicate that the modified marinades used in jerky processing and the low water activity of the dried product provide antimicrobial effects against possible postprocessing contamination with Salmonella, while the preparation of cultures under acid-adaptation conditions did not increase Salmonella survival during storage and may have reduced it. PMID:12636291

  20. Potassium-Competitive Acid Blockers (P-CABs): Are They Finally Ready for Prime Time in Acid-Related Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Richard H; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    The need for new acid suppressing agents with improved pharmacology and superior antisecretory effects to address unmet clinical needs in acid-related disorders has been evident for over a decade. Recent new antisecretory drugs (IR-omeprazole and MR-dexlansoprazole) only provide a small incremental advance in control of acid secretion over the delayed-release proton pump inhibitors. Vonoprazan (a new potassium-competitive acid blocker) displays more potent and extended 24 h acid suppression and preliminary Japanese trials translate this into meaningful clinical benefits in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori eradication. We review the vonoprazan information to date and the indications, benefits, and concerns of more effective therapeutic control of acid secretion. PMID:26513137

  1. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25616451

  2. Absorption of Amino Acids and Peptides in a Child with a Variant of Hartnup Disease and Coexistent Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, M. J.; Seakins, J. W. T.; Lloyd, June K.; Matthews, D. M.; Cheng, B.; Thomas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    A child with a variant of Hartnup disease and co-existent coeliac disease is described. Oral tolerance tests with L-histidine, L-tyrosine, and glycyl-L-tyrosine, and in vitro uptake studies on a small intestinal biopsy with L-histidine and glycyl-L-histidine, showed impaired absorption of the free amino acids, and showed that absorption of tyrosine and mucosal uptake of histidine was better from the dipeptides than from the free amino acids. This supports the hypothesis that the intestinal mucosa can take up small peptides intact, and that the peptide uptake mechanism is not involved in the intestinal defect of Hartnup disease. PMID:5086513

  3. Alveolar lipoproteinosis in an acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mouse model of Niemann-Pick disease.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Machiko; Dhami, Rajwinder; Schuchman, Edward H

    2003-03-01

    Types A and B Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) are lipid storage disorders caused by the deficient activity of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). In humans, NPD is associated with the dysfunction of numerous organs including the lung. Gene targeting of the ASM gene in transgenic mice produced an animal model with features typical of NPD, including pulmonary inflammation. To assess mechanisms by which ASM perturbed lung function, we studied lung morphology, surfactant content, and metabolism in ASM-deficient mice in vivo. Pulmonary inflammation, with increased cellular infiltrates and the accumulation of alveolar material, was associated with alterations in surfactant content. Saturated phosphatidylcholine (SatPC) content was increased twofold, and sphingomyelin content was increased 5.5-fold in lungs of the ASM knockout (ASMKO) mice. Additional sphingomyelin enhanced the sensitivity of surfactant inhibition by plasma proteins. Clearance of SatPC from the lungs of ASMKO mice was decreased. Catabolism of SatPC by alveolar macrophages from the ASMKO mouse was significantly decreased, likely accounting for decreased pulmonary SatPC in vivo. In summary, ASM is required for normal surfactant catabolism by alveolar macrophages in vivo. Alterations in surfactant composition, including increased sphingomyelin content, contributed to the abnormal surfactant function observed in the ASM-deficient mouse. PMID:12495943

  4. Effects of the storage time on the folic acid added to ready-to-eat meat products manufactured by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán, I.; García, M. L.; Selgas, M. D.

    2013-04-01

    Three different meat products enriched with folic acid (FA) (2.4 mg/100 g) were manufactured: hamburgers, cooked and dry fermented sausages. They were prepared as ready-to-eat (RTE) products using E-beam radiation (2 and 3 kGy) to ensure their safety. The stability of FA and sensory properties of the irradiated meat products were studied during three months of storage under freezing conditions for hamburgers and refrigeration conditions for cooked and dry fermented sausages. FA content was stable in non-irradiated and irradiated hamburgers and cooked sausages over the storage period, whereas it decreased 20% in non-irradiated dry fermented sausages and 12-8% in irradiated samples at 2 and 3 kGy, respectively. Nevertheless, the final amount remained sufficient to provide the recommended daily intake. Panelists rated the sensory properties of the hamburger as satisfactory even after irradiation and 90 days of storage. The overall acceptability of RTE cooked and dry fermented sausages improved slightly with storage (P>0.05).

  5. Splicing mutations in glycogen-storage disease type II: evaluation of the full spectrum of mutations and their relation to patients' phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Stefania; Buratti, Emanuele; Dominissini, Silvia; Montalvo, Anna Lisa; Pittis, Maria Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen-storage disease type II is an autosomal recessive-inherited disorder due to the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase. A large number of mutations in the acid α-glucosidase gene have been described to date. Among them, ∼15% are variations that may affect mRNA splicing process. In this study, we have for the first time comprehensively reviewed the available information on splicing mutations of the acid α-glucosidase gene and we have evaluated their possible impact on the splicing process using different in silico approaches. Out of the 39 different GAA-sequence variations described, an in silico analysis using seven different programs showed that 97% of them are predicted to have an impact on the splicing process. Moreover, this analysis showed a quite good correlation between the impact of the mutation on the splicing process and the clinical phenotype. In addition, we have performed the functional characterization of three novel sequence variants found in Italian patients and still uncharacterized. Using a minigene system, we have confirmed their pathogenic nature. In conclusion, this study has shown that in silico analysis represents a useful tool to select mutations that affect the splicing process of the acid α-glucosidase gene and provides an updated picture of all this kind of mutations reported till now. PMID:21179066

  6. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  7. Antibodies to CBir1 are Associated with Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ib

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael K.; Valentine, John F.; Weinstein, David A.; Polyak, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ib is a congenital disorder of glycogen metabolism that is associated with neutropenia, neutrophil and monocyte dysfunction, and an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that mimics a Crohn's disease phenotype. The enteric microflora is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD; however, its role in the development of GSD-associated IBD is unknown. Antibody reactivity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), Escherichia coli outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC) and bacterial flagellin (anti-CBir1) have been associated with Crohn's disease in the general population, but they have an undetermined association in children and adults with GSD-Ib. Our goal was to examine the association of ASCA, anti-OmpC and anti-CBir1 with the clinical features of GSD-Ib enterocolitis. Methods A retrospective review identified 19 GSD-Ib patients with or without a known diagnosis of enterocolitis. Radiographic, endoscopic and serologic data were collected and assays for ASCA, anti-OmpC, and anti-CBir1 obtained. Results Seven patients had combined radiographic, endoscopic, and histological evidence of intestinal inflammation; the majority had ileocolonic involvement. Seventeen of 19 (89%) patients had elevated anti-CBir1 levels (6/7 in the IBD group and 11/12 in the no clinical evidence of IBD group). Thirteen of 19 (68%) had elevated anti-OmpC levels (5/7 in the IBD group and 8/12 in the no clinical evidence of IBD group). Eleven of 19 (58%) patients had elevated ASCA IgA levels (4/7 in the IBD group and 7/12 in the no clinical evidence of IBD group). Conclusion Nearly all of the GSD type Ib patients had elevated anti-CBir1 levels. The antibody did not differentiate those with and without a diagnosis of GSD-Ib-associated IBD. Seroreactivity to flagellin may represent immune dysfunction rather than active enterocolitis in this patient population. Long-term follow-up of the group without known IBD is required to determine if these antibodies can

  8. Effect of storage and cooking on the fatty acid profile of omega-3 enriched eggs and pork meat marketed in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Douny, Caroline; El Khoury, Rawad; Delmelle, Julien; Brose, François; Degand, Guy; Moula, Nassim; Farnir, Frédéric; Clinquart, Antoine; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acids (FA) profile was determined in n-3 enriched (Columbus™) Belgian eggs and pork in order to evaluate to what extent the n-3 fatty acids, which are very sensitive to oxidation, are resistant to storage or cooking. In standard eggs or pork, no change of the fatty acid profile was observed after storage or cooking without culinary fat, as well as in Columbus™ eggs and pork after storage. Some cooking processes (eggs in custard and meat in oven) induced a slight significant loss of n-3 fatty acids in Columbus™ eggs or pork (11.1% in fat from eggs cooked in custard vs. 15.3% in raw Columbus™ eggs and 11.0% in fat from oven cooked meat vs. 11.6% in raw Columbus™ meat). As expected, when Columbus™ pork is cooked with culinary fat, its fatty acid profile is modified according to the nature of the fat used. PMID:25838892

  9. Effect of storage and cooking on the fatty acid profile of omega-3 enriched eggs and pork meat marketed in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Douny, Caroline; El Khoury, Rawad; Delmelle, Julien; Brose, François; Degand, Guy; Moula, Nassim; Farnir, Frédéric; Clinquart, Antoine; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2015-03-01

    The fatty acids (FA) profile was determined in n-3 enriched (Columbus™) Belgian eggs and pork in order to evaluate to what extent the n-3 fatty acids, which are very sensitive to oxidation, are resistant to storage or cooking. In standard eggs or pork, no change of the fatty acid profile was observed after storage or cooking without culinary fat, as well as in Columbus™ eggs and pork after storage. Some cooking processes (eggs in custard and meat in oven) induced a slight significant loss of n-3 fatty acids in Columbus™ eggs or pork (11.1% in fat from eggs cooked in custard vs. 15.3% in raw Columbus™ eggs and 11.0% in fat from oven cooked meat vs. 11.6% in raw Columbus™ meat). As expected, when Columbus™ pork is cooked with culinary fat, its fatty acid profile is modified according to the nature of the fat used. PMID:25838892

  10. Spontaneous and experimental glycoprotein storage disease of goats induced by Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Armién, A G; Tokarnia, C H; Peixoto, P Vargas; Frese, K

    2007-03-01

    Spontaneous and experimental poisoning with the swainsonine-containing and calystegine-containing plant Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa is described. Three of 8 goats presenting with emaciation, weakness, symmetrical ataxia, posterior paresis, proprioceptive deficits, abnormal posture, abnormal postural reaction, and muscle hypertonia were necropsied. I fistulosa was suspected to be the cause of the neurologic disease in all cases. An experiment was conducted to confirm the diagnosis using 12 goats and diets containing 3 different concentrations of the plant. All goats fed I fistulosa developed neurological signs that were similar to those observed in the spontaneous intoxication. Muscle atrophy and pallor were the only macroscopic changes observed in spontaneous and in experimental intoxication. Histological lesions of spontaneous and experimental animals were similar. The most prominent lesion was cytoplasmic vacuolation in neurons of the central and the autonomous nervous system, pancreatic acinar cells, hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and macrophages of the lymphatic tissues. Neuronal necrosis, axonal spheroids formation, and astrogliosis were additionally observed in the brain. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasmic vacuoles consisted of distended lysosomes surrounded by a single-layered membrane. Nonreduced end-rests or sequence of alpha-Man, alpha-Glc, beta(1-4)-GlcNAc, and NeuNAc on lysosomal membrane were revealed by lectin histochemistry. Samples of plants used in the experimental trial contained swainsonine and calystegine and their intermediary derivate. We conclude that I fistulosa induces a glycoprotein storage disease primarily based on the inhibition of the lysosomal alpha-mannosidase by the alkaloid swainsonine. PMID:17317794

  11. Cystinosis as a lysosomal storage disease with multiple mutant alleles: Phenotypic-genotypic correlations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease with an unclear enzymatic defect causing lysosomal cystine accumulation with no corresponding elevation of plasma cystine levels leading to multisystemic dysfunction. The systemic manifestations include a proximal renal tubular defect (Fanconi-like), endocrinal disturbances, eye involvements, with corneal, conjunctival and retinal depositions, and neurological manifestations in the form of brain and muscle dysfunction. Most of the long-term ill effects of cystinosis are observed particularly in patients with long survival as a result of a renal transplant. Its responsible CTNS gene that encodes the lysosomal cystine carrier protein (cystinosin) has been mapped on the short arm of chromosome 17 (Ch17 p13). There are three clinical forms based on the onset of main symptoms: nephropathic infantile form, nephropathic juvenile form and non-nephropathic adult form with predominant ocular manifestations. Avoidance of eye damage from sun exposure, use of cystine chelators (cysteamine) and finally renal transplantation are the main treatment lines. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for carrier parents is pivotal in the prevention of recurrence. PMID:24255892

  12. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  13. Impairment of calcium mobilization in phagocytic cells in glycogen storage disease type 1b.

    PubMed

    Korchak, H M; Garty, B Z; Stanley, C A; Baker, L; Douglas, S D; Kilpatrick, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1b, in contrast to patients with GSD 1a, are susceptible to recurrent bacterial infections suggesting defective phagocytic function. We have demonstrated a selective defect in respiratory burst activity but not in degranulation by phagocytic cells in GSD 1b but not in GSD 1a. The respiratory burst abnormality in phagocytic cells from GSD 1b patients was associated with impaired calcium mobilization, whereas these processes were normal in GSD 1a patients. Therefore, the alteration in calcium mobilization was an indication of a signalling defect in phagocytic cells from GSD 1b. However, calcium mobilization was normal in lymphocytes, indicating that defective calcium mobilization was not a global finding in circulating leukocytes, but was specific to phagocytic cells. Calcium mobilization in response to ionomycin was reduced suggesting decreased calcium stores in GSD 1b neutrophils. Therefore, altered phagocytic cell function in GSD 1b patients appears to be associated with diminished calcium mobilization and defective calcium stores. This defective calcium signalling was associated with a selective defect in respiratory burst activity but not degranulation. PMID:8319725

  14. Esophageal Stricture Secondary to Candidiasis in a Child with Glycogen Storage Disease 1b

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Choi, Shin Jie; Kim, Woo Sun; Park, Sung-Sup; Moon, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal candidiasis is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients; however, candida esophagitis induced stricture is a very rare complication. We report the first case of esophageal stricture secondary to candidiasis in a glycogen storage disease (GSD) 1b child. The patient was diagnosed with GSD type 1b by liver biopsy. No mutation was found in the G6PC gene, but SLC37A4 gene sequencing revealed a compound heterozygous mutation (p.R28H and p.W107X, which was a novel mutation). The patient's absolute neutrophil count was continuously under 1,000/µL when he was over 6 years of age. He was admitted frequently for recurrent fever and infection, and frequently received intravenous antibiotics, antifungal agents. He complained of persistent dysphagia beginning at age 7 years. Esophageal stricture and multiple whitish patches were observed by endoscopy and endoscopic biopsy revealed numerous fungal hyphae consistent with candida esophagitis. He received esophageal balloon dilatation four times, and his symptoms improved. PMID:27066451

  15. NATURAL HISTORY OF HEPATOCELLULAR ADENOMA FORMATION IN GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE I

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David Q.; Fiske, Laurie M.; Carreras, Caroline T.; Weinstein, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To characterize the natural history and factors related to hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) development in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Study design Retrospective chart review was performed for 117 patients with GSD I. Kaplan-Meier analysis of HCA progression among two groups of patients with GSD Ia (five-year mean triglyceride concentration ≤500 mg/dL and >500 mg/dL); analysis of serum triglyceride concentration, body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS), and height SDS between cases at time of HCA diagnosis and age- and sex-matched controls. Results Logrank analysis of Kaplan-Meier survival curve demonstrated a significant difference in progression to HCA between the five-year mean triglyceride groups (p = 0.008). No significant difference was detected in progression to adenoma event between sexes. Serum triglyceride concentration was significantly different at time of diagnosis of adenoma (737±422 mg/dL) compared with controls (335±195 mg/dL) (p = 0.009). Differences in height SDS (p = 0.051) and BMI SDS (p = 0.066) approached significance in our case-control analysis. Conclusion Metabolic control may be related to HCA formation in patients with GSD Ia. Optimizing metabolic control remains critical, and further studies are warranted to understand the pathogenesis of adenoma development. PMID:21481415

  16. Acoustically accessible window determination for ultrasound mediated treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shutao; Raju, Balasundar I.; Leyvi, Evgeniy; Weinstein, David A.; Seip, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa patients. As the success of USMD treatments is largely dependent on the accessibility of the targeted tissue by the focused ultrasound beam, this study presents a quantitative approach to determine the acoustically accessible liver volume in GSDIa patients. Models of focused ultrasound beam profiles for transducers of varying aperture and focal lengths were applied to abdomen models reconstructed from suitable CT and MRI images. Transducer manipulations (simulating USMD treatment procedures) were implemented via transducer translations and rotations with the intent of targeting and exposing the entire liver to ultrasound. Results indicate that acoustically accessible liver volumes can be as large as 50% of the entire liver volume for GSDIa patients and on average 3 times larger compared to a healthy adult group due to GSDIa patients' increased liver size. Detailed descriptions of the evaluation algorithm, transducer-and abdomen models are presented, together with implications for USMD treatments of GSDIa patients and transducer designs for USMD applications.

  17. Reduction of volatile fatty acids and odor offensiveness by anaerobic digestion and solid separation of dairy manure during manure storage.

    PubMed

    Page, Laura H; Ni, Ji-Qin; Zhang, Hao; Heber, Albert J; Mosier, Nathan S; Liu, Xingya; Joo, Hung-Soo; Ndegwa, Pius M; Harrison, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) play an important role in the biodegradation of organic wastes and production of bioenergy under anaerobic digestion, and are related to malodors. However, little is known about the dynamics of VFA during dairy manure storage. This study evaluated the characteristics of VFA in dairy manure before and after anaerobic co-digestion in a laboratory experiment using eight lab-scale reactors. The reactors were loaded with four different types of dairy manure: (1) liquid dairy manure from a freestall barn, (2) mixture of dairy manure and co-digestion food processing wastes at the inlet of an anaerobic digester, (3) effluent from the digester outlet, and (4) the liquid fraction of effluent from a solid separator. Four VFA (acetic, propionic, butyric, and 2-methylbutyric acids) were identified and quantified in weekly manure samples from all reactors. Results showed that the dominant VFA was acetic acid in all four manure sources. The off-farm co-digestion wastes significantly increased the total VFA concentrations and the proportions of individual VFA in the influent. The dairy manure under storage demonstrated high temporal and spatial variations in pH and VFA concentrations. Anaerobic digestion reduced the total VFA by 86%-96%; but solid-liquid separation did not demonstrate a significant reduction in total VFA in this study. Using VFA as an indicator, anaerobic digestion exhibited an effective reduction of dairy manure odor offensiveness. PMID:25617873

  18. ERECTA, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and jasmonic acid modulate quantitative disease resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana to Verticillium longisporum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Verticillium longisporum is a soil-borne vascular pathogen infecting cruciferous hosts such as oilseed rape. Quantitative disease resistance (QDR) is the major control means, but its molecular basis is poorly understood so far. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed using a new (Bur×Ler) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of Arabidopsis thaliana. Phytohormone measurements and analyses in defined mutants and near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used to identify genes and signalling pathways that underlie different resistance QTL. Results QTL for resistance to V. longisporum-induced stunting, systemic colonization by the fungus and for V. longisporum-induced chlorosis were identified. Stunting resistance QTL were contributed by both parents. The strongest stunting resistance QTL was shown to be identical with Erecta. A functional Erecta pathway, which was present in Bur, conferred partial resistance to V. longisporum-induced stunting. Bur showed severe stunting susceptibility in winter. Three stunting resistance QTL of Ler origin, two co-localising with wall-associated kinase-like (Wakl)-genes, were detected in winter. Furthermore, Bur showed a much stronger induction of salicylic acid (SA) by V. longisporum than Ler. Systemic colonization was controlled independently of stunting. The vec1 QTL on chromosome 2 had the strongest effect on systemic colonization. The same chromosomal region controlled the level of abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) in response to V. longisporum: The level of ABA was higher in colonization-susceptible Ler than in colonization-resistant Bur after V. longisporum infection. JA was down-regulated in Bur after infection, but not in Ler. These differences were also demonstrated in NILs, varying only in the region containing vec1. All phytohormone responses were shown to be independent of Erecta. Conclusions Signalling systems with a hitherto unknown role in the QDR of A. thaliana against V. longisporum were

  19. Energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  20. Gorham–Stout disease of the proximal fibula treated with radiotherapy and zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Yerganyan, V.V.; Body, J.J.; De Saint Aubain, N.; Gebhart, M.

    2015-01-01

    Gorham–Stout disease is a rare disease characterized by anarchic lymphovascular proliferation causing resorption of bone sometimes leading to disastrous complications. Bone tissue is progressively replaced by angiomatic and lymphangiomatic tissue and finally by fibrous tissue. This disease is known to be ubiquitous and of complex etiology. We present a case of Gorham–Stout disease of the proximal fibula invading the proximal tibia and soft tissues of the popliteal space that was successfully treated with radiotherapy and zoledronic acid. PMID:26579487

  1. Branching enzyme activity of cultured amniocytes and chorionic villi: prenatal testing for type IV glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B I; Brown, D H

    1989-01-01

    Although type IV glycogen storage disease (Andersen disease; McKusick 23250) is considered to be a rare, autosomally recessive disorder, of the more than 600 patients with glycogenosis identified in our laboratory by enzymatic assays, 6% have been shown to be deficient in the glycogen branching enzyme. Most of the 38 patients with type IV glycogen storage disease who are known to us have succumbed at a very early age, with the exception of one male teenager, an apparently healthy 7-year-old male, and several 5-year-old patients. Fourteen pregnancies at risk for branching enzyme deficiency have been monitored using cultured amniotic fluid cells, and four additional pregnancies have been screened using cultured chorionic villi. Essentially no branching enzyme activity was detectable in eight samples (amniocytes); activities within the control range were found in five samples (three amniocyte and two chorionic villi samples); and five samples appeared to have been derived from carriers. In two of the cases lacking branching enzyme activity, in which the pregnancies were terminated and fibroblasts were successfully cultured from the aborted fetuses, no branching enzyme activity was found. Another fetus, which was predicted by antenatal assay to be affected, was carried to term. Skin fibroblasts from this baby were deficient in branching enzyme. Pregnancies at risk for glycogen storage disease due to the deficiency of branching enzyme can be successfully monitored using either cultured chorionic villi or amniocytes. PMID:2521770

  2. The relevance of the storage of subunit c of ATP synthase in different forms and models of Batten disease (NCLs).

    PubMed

    Palmer, David N

    2015-10-01

    The discoveries of specific protein storage in the NCLs, particularly of subunit c of ATP synthase in most, and the sphingolipid activator proteins, SAPs or saposins A and D in CLN1, CLN10 and an unassigned form are reviewed. The subunit c stored in the relevant NCLs is the complete mature molecule including an unusual modification found only in animal species, trimethylation of its lysine-43. Because of its strongly hydrophobic and lipid-like properties subunit c is easily overlooked or incorrectly described. This is becoming more of a problem as subunit c is not detected in standard proteomic investigations. Methods are reviewed that allow its unequivocal characterisation. Subunit c storage and cellular storage body accumulation do not cause the neuropathology characteristic of these diseases. The function of the trimethyl group on lysine-43 of subunit c is considered, along with some indications of where its normal turnover may be disrupted in the NCLs. PMID:26093153

  3. PNPLA3, the triacylglycerol synthesis/hydrolysis/storage dilemma, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide and candidate gene association studies have identified several variants that predispose individuals to developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the gene that has been consistently involved in the genetic susceptibility of NAFLD in humans is patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3, also known as adiponutrin). A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in PNPLA3 (rs738409 C/G, a coding variant that encodes an amino acid substitution  I148M) is significantly associated with fatty liver and histological disease severity, not only in adults but also in children. Nevertheless, how PNPLA3 influences the biology of fatty liver disease is still an open question. A recent article describes new aspects about PNPLA3 gene/protein function and suggests that the  I148M variant promotes hepatic lipid synthesis due to a gain of function. We revise here the published data about the role of the  I148M variant in lipogenesis/lipolysis, and suggest putative areas of future research. For instance we explored in silico whether the rs738409 C or G alleles have the ability to modify miRNA binding sites and miRNA gene regulation, and we found that prediction of PNPLA3 target miRNAs shows two miRNAs potentially interacting in the 3’UTR region (hsa-miR-769-3p and hsa-miR-516a-3p). In addition, interesting unanswered questions remain to be explored. For example, PNPLA3 lies between two CCCTC-binding factor-bound sites that could be tested for insulator activity, and an intronic histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation peak predicts an enhancer element, corroborated by the DNase I hypersensitivity site peak. Finally, an interaction between PNPLA3 and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 2 is suggested by data miming. PMID:23155331

  4. Effects of a propionic-acid based preservative on storage characteristics of alfalfa-orchardgrass hay in large-rectangular bales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, various formulations of organic acids have been marketed as preservatives, most specifically for use on hays that could not be field-dried to moisture concentrations low enough to reduce or eliminate spontaneous heating during storage. These preservatives are often propionic-acid-bas...

  5. Fatty acid interactions with genetic polymorphisms for cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: The number of studies investigating interactions between genes and nutrients for cardiovascular disease continues to grow, and holds tremendous potential for reducing disease risk at the level of the individual genotype. However, understanding the limitations and challenges of int...

  6. Combining nutrition, food science and engineering in developing solutions to Inflammatory bowel diseases--omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as an example.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Smith, Bronwen G; James, Bryony J

    2010-10-01

    The Inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are debilitating conditions, characterised by lifelong sensitivity to certain foods, and often a need for surgery and life-long medication. The anti-inflammatory effects of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated acids justify their inclusion in enteral nutrition formulas that have been associated with disease remission. However, there have been variable data in clinical trials to test supplementary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in inducing or maintaining remission in these diseases. Although variability in trial design has been suggested as a major factor, we suggest that variability in processing and presentation of the products may be equally or more important. The nature of the source, and rapidity of getting the fish or other food source to processing or to market, will affect the percentage of the various fatty acids, possible presence of heavy metal contaminants and oxidation status of the various fatty acids. For dietary supplements or fortified foods, whether the product is encapsulated or not, whether storage is under nitrogen or not, and length of time between harvest, processing and marketing will again profoundly affect the properties of the final product. Clinical trials to test efficacy of these products in IBD to date have utilised the relevant skills of pharmacology and gastroenterology. We suggest that knowledge from food science, nutrition and engineering will be essential to establish the true role of this important group of compounds in these diseases. PMID:21776456

  7. The relationship between blood lead levels and morbidities among workers employed in a factory manufacturing lead-acid storage battery.

    PubMed

    Kalahasthi, Ravi Babu; Barman, Tapu; Rajmohan, H R

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to find the relationship between blood lead levels (BLLs) and morbidities among 391 male workers employed in a factory manufacturing lead-acid storage batteries. A predesigned questionnaire was used to collect information on subjective health complaints and clinical observation made during a clinical examination. In addition to monitoring of BLL, other laboratory parameters investigated included hematological and urine-δ-aminolevulinic acid levels. Logistic regression method was used to evaluate the relationship between BLL and morbidities. The BLL among workers was associated with an odd ratio of respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI), and musculoskeletal (MSD) morbidities. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin and packed cell volume variables were associated with respiratory problems. The variables of alcohol consumption and hematological parameters were associated with GI complaints. Systolic blood pressure was related to MSD in workers exposed to Pb during the manufacturing process. PMID:23859360

  8. Effect of baking and storage on the fatty acid composition of cookies with chia seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed is an ancient crop of the Aztecs that has recently gained interest as a functional food. Chia seeds are a good source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant activity. However, the effect of baking and storage on the antioxidant properties of chia seed meal is not ...

  9. [Association of fatty acid metabolism with systemic inflammatory response in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, Y K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Zhukova, N V; Antonuk, M V; Lobanova, E G; Kalinina, E P

    2016-03-01

    We examined composition of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NFAs), erythrocyte fatty acids, levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different type of the inflammatory response. The results of our study show that asthma and COPD in remission are associated with changes in the composition NFAs of plasma, FA of erythrocytes, level eicosanoid despite the difference in the regulation of immunological mechanisms of systemic inflammation. These changes are characterized by excessive production of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites (thromboxane B2, leukotriene B4) and deficiency of their functional antagonist, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). The recognized association between altered fatty acid composition and disorders of the immune mechanisms of regulation of systemic inflammation in COPD and asthma demonstrated the important role of fatty acids and their metabolites in persistence of inflammatory processes in diseases of the respiratory system in the condition of remission. PMID:27420629

  10. The fate of haloacetic acids and trihalomethanes in an aquifer storage and recovery program, Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; McKay, W.A.; Colec, E.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of disinfection byproducts during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is evaluated for aquifers in Southern Nevada. Rapid declines of haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations during ASR, with associated little change in Cl concentration, indicate that HAAs decline primarily by in situ microbial oxidation. Dilution is only a minor contributor to HAA concentration declines during ASR. Trihalomethane (THM) concentrations generally increased during storage of artificial recharge (AR) water and then declined during recovery. The decline of THM concentrations during recovery was primarily from dilution of current season AR water with residual AR water remaining in the aquifer from previous ASR seasons and native ground water. In more recent ASR seasons, for wells with the longest history of ASR, brominated THMs declined during storage and recovery by processes in addition to dilution. These conclusions about THMs are indicated by THM/Cl values and supported by a comparison of measured and model predicted THM concentrations. Geochemical mixing models were constructed using major-ion chemistry of the three end-member waters to calculate predicted THM concentrations. The decline in brominated THM concentrations in addition to that from dilution may result from biotransformation processes.

  11. Changes in urocanic acid, histamine, putrescine and cadaverine levels in Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) during storage at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zare, Davood; Muhammad, Kharidah; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ghazali, H M

    2013-08-15

    Histamine, putrescine cadaverine and cis-urocanic acid (UCA) have all been implicated or suggested in scombroid fish poisoning. However, there is little information on UCA especially during storage. Changes in their contents during storage of whole Indian mackerel at 0, 3±1, 10±1 for up to 15 days and 23±2°C for up to 2 days were monitored. Fresh muscles contained 14.83 mg/kg trans-UCA, 2.23 mg/kg cis-UCA and 1.86 mg/kg cadaverine. Histamine and putrescine were not detected. After 15 days at 0 and 3°C, trans-UCA content increased to 52.83 and 189.51 mg/kg, respectively, and decreased to <2 mg/kg at the other two temperatures. Storage at 10°C also resulted in an increase in trans-UCA after 3 days, only to decrease after 6 days. The concentration of cis-UCA increased nearly 13-fold after 15 days at 0 and 3°C, decreased at 10°C and remained unchanged at 23°C. Histamine, putrescine and cadaverine levels increased significantly (P value<0.05) at all temperatures especially at 23°C. PMID:23561112

  12. Oenological characteristics, amino acids and volatile profiles of Hongqu rice wines during pottery storage: Effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuting; Huang, Jiamei; Xie, Tingting; Huang, Luqiang; Zhuang, Weijin; Zheng, Yafeng; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-07-15

    Hongqu rice wines were subjected to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments of 200 MPa and 550 MPa at 25 °C for 30 min and effects on wine quality during pottery storage were examined. HHP treatment can significantly (p<0.05) decrease the content of fusel-like alcohols and maintain the concentration of lactones in these wines. After 18 months of storage, the HHP-treated wines exhibited a more rapid decrease in total sugars (9.3-15.3%), lower free amino acid content (e.g. lysine content decreased by 45.0-84.5%), and higher ketone content (e.g. 6- and 14-fold increase for 2-nonanone). These changes could be attributed to the occurrence of Maillard and oxidation reactions. The wines treated at 550 MPa for 30 min developed about twice as rapidly during pottery storage than untreated wines based on principal component analysis. After only 6 months, treated wines had a volatile composition and an organoleptic quality similar to that of untreated wines stored in pottery for 18 months. PMID:26948638

  13. Development of a mechanical mover device by compositing hydrogen storage alloy thin films with a perfluorosulfonic acid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Takashi; Uchida, Haru-Hisa; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2007-01-01

    Perfluorosulfonic Acid (PFSA) film, commonly used in the Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFC), indicates conductance of proton and permeability of H IIO. In this study a mechanical composite mover device with this PFSA and hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) thin films was made up for expecting the movement driven by volume change in the course of hydrogen migration between PFSA and HSA layers. Hydrogen storage alloy, such as LaNi 5 indicates as much as 25% of volume change in the course of H II absorption in gas phase. Using this characteristics, a mechanical mover device was made of PFSA film of an electrolyte polymer sandwiched by hydrogen storage alloy thin films with Au-Pd intermediate layers. The mover device was operated by migrating hydrogen ions from the PFSA layer to the HSA layer, which were generated by electrolysis of H IIO in a PFSA layer. Electrical potential was given from the outsides lead wires. All experiments were carried out in the water. We confirmed large interesting movement generated by migration of hydrogen ion by applying electric potentials.

  14. Two Cases of Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Type III Glycogen Storage Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Berman-Rosenzweig, Erika S; Slonim, Alfred E; Chung, Wendy K

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) comprise a large, heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal glycogen deposition. Multiple cases in the literature have demonstrated an association between GSD type I and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We now also report on two patients with GSD type III and PAH, a novel association. The first patient was a 16-year-old girl of Nicaraguan descent with a history of hepatomegaly and growth retardation. Molecular testing identified a homozygous 17delAG mutation in AGL consistent with GSD type IIIb. At the age of 16, she was found to have PAH and was started on medical therapy. Two years later, she developed acute chest pain and died shortly thereafter. The second patient is a 13-year-old girl of Colombian descent homozygous for the c.3911dupA mutation consistent with GSD IIIa. An echocardiogram at age 2 showed left ventricular hypertrophy, which resolved following the institution of a high protein, moderate carbohydrate diet during the day and continuous gastric-tube feeding overnight. At the age of 12, she was found to have pulmonary hypertension. She was started on sildenafil, and her clinical status has shown marked improvement including normalization of her elevated transaminases. PAH may be a rare association in patients with GSD IIIa and IIIb and should be evaluated with screening echocardiograms for cardiac hypertrophy or if they present with symptoms of right-sided heart failure such as shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis, fatigue, dizziness, syncope, or edema. Early diagnosis of PAH is important as increasingly effective treatments are now available. PMID:23430832

  15. AAV vector-mediated reversal of hypoglycemia in canine and murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Kozink, Daniel M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Demaster, Amanda K; Kruse, Meghan A; Vaughn, Valerie; Hillman, Steven; Bird, Andrew; Jackson, Mark; Brown, Talmage; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) profoundly impairs glucose release by the liver due to glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a small human G6Pase transgene was pseudotyped with AAV8 (AAV2/8) to optimize liver tropism. Survival was prolonged in 2-week-old G6Pase (-/-) mice by 600-fold fewer AAV2/8 vector particles (vp), in comparison to previous experiments involving this model (2 x 10(9) vp; 3 x 10(11) vp/kg). When the vector was pseudotyped with AAV1, survival was prolonged only at a higher dose (3 x 10(13) vp/kg). The AAV2/8 vector uniquely prevented hypoglycemia during fasting and fully corrected liver G6Pase deficiency in GSD-Ia mice and dogs. The AAV2/8 vector has prolonged survival in three GSD-Ia dogs to >11 months, which validated this strategy in the large animal model for GSD-Ia. Urinary biomarkers, including lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, were corrected by G6Pase expression solely in the liver. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was reduced almost to the normal level in vector-treated GSD-Ia mice and dogs, as was the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in GSD-Ia mice. These preclinical data demonstrated the efficacy of correcting hepatic G6Pase deficiency, and support the further preclinical development of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:18362924

  16. Chromosomal and genetic alterations in human hepatocellular adenomas associated with type Ia glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Chuang, Tzu-Po; Bali, Deeksha; Koeberl, Dwight; Austin, Stephanie; Weinstein, David A; Murphy, Elaine; Chen, Ying-Ting; Boyette, Keri; Liu, Chu-Hao; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Li, Ling-Hui

    2009-12-15

    Hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) is a frequent long-term complication of glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) and malignant transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is known to occur in some cases. However, the molecular pathogenesis of tumor development in GSD I is unclear. This study was conducted to systematically investigate chromosomal and genetic alterations in HCA associated with GSD I. Genome-wide SNP analysis and mutation detection of target genes was performed in ten GSD Ia-associated HCA and seven general population HCA cases for comparison. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 60% of the GSD Ia HCA and 57% of general population HCA. Intriguingly, simultaneous gain of chromosome 6p and loss of 6q were only seen in GSD Ia HCA (three cases) with one additional GSD I patient showing submicroscopic 6q14.1 deletion. The sizes of GSD Ia adenomas with chromosome 6 aberrations were larger than the sizes of adenomas without the changes (P = 0.012). Expression of IGF2R and LATS1 candidate tumor suppressor genes at 6q was reduced in more than 50% of GSD Ia HCA that were examined (n = 7). None of the GSD Ia HCA had biallelic mutations in the HNF1A gene. These findings give the first insight into the distinct genomic and genetic characteristics of HCA associated with GSD Ia. These results strongly suggest that chromosome 6 alterations could be an early event in the liver tumorigenesis in GSD I, and may be in general population. These results also suggest an interesting relationship between GSD Ia HCA and steps to HCC transformation. PMID:19762333

  17. Pregnancy in glycogen storage disease type Ib: gestational care and report of first successful deliveries

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Rodriguez, Christina; Bhattacharya, Kaustav; Steinkrauss, Linda; Stanley, Charles A.; Weinstein, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease (GSD) have been surviving well into adulthood since continuous glucose therapy was introduced in the 1970s, and there have been many documented successful pregnancies in women with this condition. Historically, few individuals with type Ib GSD, however, survived into adulthood prior to the introduction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the late 1980s. There are no previously published reports of pregnancies in GSD type Ib. In this case report we describe the course and management of five successful pregnancies in three patients with GSD type Ib. Patient 1 experienced an increase in glucose requirement in all three of her pregnancies, starting from the second trimester onwards. There were no major complications related to neutropenia except for oral ulcers. The infants did well, except for respiratory distress in two of them at birth. Patient 2 used cornstarch to maintain euglycemia, but precise dosing was not part of her regimen, and, hence, an increase in metabolic demands was difficult to demonstrate. She developed a renal calculus and urinary tract infection during her pregnancy and had chronic iron deficiency anemia but no neutropenia. The neonate did well after delivery. Patient 3 had poor follow-up during pregnancy. Increasing glucose requirements, worsening lipid profile, neutropenia associated with multiple infections, and anemia were noted. The newborn infant did well after delivery. In addition to the case reports, the challenges of the usage of G-CSF, the treatment of enterocolitis, and comparisons with the management of GSD Ia are discussed. PMID:20386986

  18. Application of edible coating and acidic washing for extending the storage life of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Naser; Zahedi, Younes

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocolloid-based materials have been extensively used to coat fruit and vegetables to prolong shelf-life. The effects of different concentrations of acidic washing (acetic, ascorbic, citric and malic acids) followed by coating with gum arabic (GA), carboxymethyl cellulose and emulsified gum arabic (EGA) were evaluated on the weight loss (WL), firmness and color of mushroom. The WL of the uncoated mushrooms was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that of the coated ones, and the minimum WL was obtained with EGA coating. The mushrooms washed with malic and ascorbic acids showed minimum and maximum of WL, respectively. Loss in firmness of the EGA-coated mushrooms was by 21% (the minimum of loss), while loss value of the uncoated ones was by 39% (the maximum of loss). Firmness of mushrooms was not influenced by the acid type. Concentration of the acid significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the firmness of mushrooms, and at the lowest concentration of acid (1%), the mushrooms tissue was firmest. The L* value of the mushrooms coated with GA was higher than that of others. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in L* value and a significant (p < 0.05) increase in a* and b* values occurred in the mushrooms washed with acetic acid. Overall, washing with 1% citric or malic acid followed by coating with EGA resulted in minimum decrease in WL and firmness of the mushrooms. PMID:23175781

  19. Probiotic viability and storage stability of yogurts and fermented milks prepared with several mixtures of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mani-López, E; Palou, E; López-Malo, A

    2014-05-01

    Currently, the food industry wants to expand the range of probiotic yogurts but each probiotic bacteria offers different and specific health benefits. Little information exists on the influence of probiotic strains on physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of yogurts and fermented milks. Six probiotic yogurts or fermented milks and 1 control yogurt were prepared, and we evaluated several physicochemical properties (pH, titratable acidity, texture, color, and syneresis), microbial viability of starter cultures (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) and probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus reuteri) during fermentation and storage (35 d at 5°C), as well as sensory preference among them. Decreases in pH (0.17 to 0.50 units) and increases in titratable acidity (0.09 to 0.29%) were observed during storage. Only the yogurt with S. thermophilus, L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and L. reuteri differed in firmness. No differences in adhesiveness were determined among the tested yogurts, fermented milks, and the control. Syneresis was in the range of 45 to 58%. No changes in color during storage were observed and no color differences were detected among the evaluated fermented milk products. Counts of S. thermophilus decreased from 1.8 to 3.5 log during storage. Counts of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus also decreased in probiotic yogurts and varied from 30 to 50% of initial population. Probiotic bacteria also lost viability throughout storage, although the 3 probiotic fermented milks maintained counts ≥ 10(7)cfu/mL for 3 wk. Probiotic bacteria had variable viability in yogurts, maintaining counts of L. acidophilus ≥ 10(7) cfu/mL for 35 d, of L. casei for 7d, and of L. reuteri for 14 d. We found no significant sensory preference among the 6 probiotic yogurts and fermented milks or the control. However, the yogurt and fermented milk made with L. casei were better accepted. This

  20. New insights into sulfur amino acids function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAAs) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable amino acid and is...

  1. Dietary Trans Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Past and Present

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary trans double bond fatty acids have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There are two main sources of dietary trans fatty acids: meat and dairy fats, and partially-hydrogenated oils. Due to a number of factors, including changes in federal labeling requirements fo...

  2. The Quality Changes of Postharvest Mulberry Fruit Treated by Chitosan-g-Caffeic Acid During Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Caifeng; Han, Beibei; Zheng, Yu; Liu, Lili; Li, Changlong; Sheng, Sheng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wu, Fuan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effects of chitosan-g-caffeic acid (CTS-g-CA) on improving the quality and extending the shelf life of postharvest mulberry fruit during storage at 4 °C for 18 d. CTS-g-CA was enzymatically synthesized using laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus as a catalyst. The synergistic effects of CTS-g-CA treatment on mulberry fruit were evaluated using a co-toxicity factor (cf). The results showed that the rotting rate of CTS-g-CA-treated fruit was 37.67% (compared with that of the control at 97.67%) on day 18. The weight loss and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the CTS-g-CA-treated mulberry fruit were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those of the control, CA, CTS, and CA+CTS treatments. Moreover, the DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities of the CTS-g-CA treatment were both higher than those of the control. Furthermore, the CTS-g-CA treatment also maintained higher levels of main active substances, such as anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, polyphenols and flavones, in mulberry fruit than the other treatments. Therefore, CTS-g-CA could be used to improve the quality and extend the shelf life of postharvest mulberry fruit during cold storage. PMID:26992122

  3. Multiple-unit tablet of probiotic bacteria for improved storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jun; Lee, Ga Hyeon; Jun, Joonho; Son, Miwon; Kang, Myung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate probiotics-loaded pellets in a tablet form to improve storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect. Bacteria-loaded pellets primarily prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate were compressed into tablets with highly compressible excipients and optimized for flow properties, hardness, and disintegration time. The optimized probiotic tablet consisted of enteric-coated pellets (335 mg), microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102, 37.5 mg), and porous calcium silicate (25 mg) and allowed whole survival of living bacteria during the compaction process with sufficient tablet hardness (13 kp) and disintegration time (14 minutes). The multiple-unit tablet showed remarkably higher storage stability under ambient conditions (25°C/60% relative humidity) over 6 months and resistance to acidic medium compared to uncoated strains or pellets. Repeated intake of this multiple-unit tablet significantly lowered plasma level of endotoxin, a pathogenic material, compared to repeated intake of bare probiotics or marketed products in rats. These results, therefore, suggest that the multiple-unit tablet is advantageous to better bacterial viability and gain the beneficial effects on the gut flora, including the improvement of intestinal barrier function. PMID:27103789

  4. Multiple-unit tablet of probiotic bacteria for improved storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jun; Lee, Ga Hyeon; Jun, Joonho; Son, Miwon; Kang, Myung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate probiotics-loaded pellets in a tablet form to improve storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect. Bacteria-loaded pellets primarily prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate were compressed into tablets with highly compressible excipients and optimized for flow properties, hardness, and disintegration time. The optimized probiotic tablet consisted of enteric-coated pellets (335 mg), microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102, 37.5 mg), and porous calcium silicate (25 mg) and allowed whole survival of living bacteria during the compaction process with sufficient tablet hardness (13 kp) and disintegration time (14 minutes). The multiple-unit tablet showed remarkably higher storage stability under ambient conditions (25°C/60% relative humidity) over 6 months and resistance to acidic medium compared to uncoated strains or pellets. Repeated intake of this multiple-unit tablet significantly lowered plasma level of endotoxin, a pathogenic material, compared to repeated intake of bare probiotics or marketed products in rats. These results, therefore, suggest that the multiple-unit tablet is advantageous to better bacterial viability and gain the beneficial effects on the gut flora, including the improvement of intestinal barrier function. PMID:27103789

  5. Changes in the Amino Acid Composition of Bogue (Boops boops) Fish during Storage at Different Temperatures by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ciampa, Alessandra; Picone, Gianfranco; Laghi, Luca; Nikzad, Homa; Capozzi, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to obtain information about the changes occurring in Bogue (Boops boops) fish during storage. For this purpose, 1H-NMR spectra were recorded at 600 MHz on trichloroacetic acid extracts of fish flesh stored over a 15 days period both at 4 °C and on ice. Such spectra allowed the identification and quantification of amino acids, together with the main organic acids and alcohols. The concentration of acidic and basic free amino acids was generally found to increase and decrease during storage, respectively. These concentration changes were slow during the first days, as a consequence of protein autolysis, and at higher rates afterward, resulting from microbial development. Two of the amino acids that showed the greatest concentration change were alanine and glycine, known to have a key role in determining the individual taste of different fish species. The concentration of serine decreased during storage, as highlighted in the literature for frozen fish samples. Differences in the amino acids concentration trends were found to be related to the different storage temperatures from day 4 onwards. PMID:22822452

  6. Sex and depot differences in ex vivo adipose tissue fatty acid storage and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Chen, Liang; Oberschneider, Elisabeth; Harteneck, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue fatty acid storage varies according to sex, adipose tissue depot, and degree of fat gain. However, the mechanism(s) for these variations is not completely understood. We examined whether differences in adipose tissue glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) might play a role in these variations. We optimized an enzyme activity assay for total GPAT and GPAT1 activity in human adipose tissue and measured GPAT activity. Omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue was collected from obese and nonobese adults for measures of GPAT and GPAT1 activities, ex vivo palmitate storage, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) and diacylglycerol-acyltransferase (DGAT) activities, and CD36 protein. Total GPAT and GPAT1 activities decreased as a function of adipocyte size in both omental (r = −0.71, P = 0.003) and subcutaneous (r = −0.58, P = 0.04) fat. The relative contribution of GPAT1 to total GPAT activity increased as a function of adipocyte size, accounting for up to 60% of GPAT activity in those with the largest adipocytes. We found strong, positive correlations between ACS, GPAT, and DGAT activities for both sexes and depots (r values 0.58–0.91) and between these storage factors and palmitate storage rates into TAG (r values 0.55–0.90). We conclude that: 1) total GPAT activity decreases as a function of adipocyte size; 2) GPAT1 can account for over half of adipose GPAT activity in hypertrophic obesity; and 3) ACS, GPAT, and DGAT are coordinately regulated. PMID:25738782

  7. Handling and Storage Procedures Have Variable Effects on Fatty Acid Content in Fishes with Different Lipid Quantities

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Martina D.; Kainz, Martin J.; Graeve, Martin; Colombo, Stefanie M.

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the most accurate data on fatty acid (FA) contents are obtained when samples are analyzed immediately after collection. For logistical reasons, however, this is not always feasible and samples are often kept on ice or frozen at various temperatures and for diverse time periods. We quantified temporal changes of selected FA (μg FAME per mg tissue dry weight) from 6 fish species subjected to 2 handling and 3 storage methods and compared them to FA contents from muscle tissue samples that were processed immediately. The following species were investigated: Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio), Freshwater Drum (Aplodinotus grunniens), Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), Antarctic Eelpout (Pachycara brachycephalum), Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus). The impact of storage method and duration of storage on FA contents were species-specific, but not FA-specific. There was no advantage in using nitrogen gas for tissue samples held on ice for 1 week; however, holding tissue samples on ice for 1 week resulted in a loss of FA in Charr. In addition, most FA in Trout and Charr decreased in quantity after being stored between 3 and 6 hours on ice. Freezer storage temperature (-80 or -20°C) also had a significant effect on FA contents in some species. Generally, we recommend that species with high total lipid content (e.g. Charr and Trout) should be treated with extra caution to avoid changes in FA contents, with time on ice and time spent in a freezer emerging as significant factors that changed FA contents. PMID:27479304

  8. Handling and Storage Procedures Have Variable Effects on Fatty Acid Content in Fishes with Different Lipid Quantities.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Martina D; Kainz, Martin J; Graeve, Martin; Colombo, Stefanie M; Arts, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the most accurate data on fatty acid (FA) contents are obtained when samples are analyzed immediately after collection. For logistical reasons, however, this is not always feasible and samples are often kept on ice or frozen at various temperatures and for diverse time periods. We quantified temporal changes of selected FA (μg FAME per mg tissue dry weight) from 6 fish species subjected to 2 handling and 3 storage methods and compared them to FA contents from muscle tissue samples that were processed immediately. The following species were investigated: Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio), Freshwater Drum (Aplodinotus grunniens), Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), Antarctic Eelpout (Pachycara brachycephalum), Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus). The impact of storage method and duration of storage on FA contents were species-specific, but not FA-specific. There was no advantage in using nitrogen gas for tissue samples held on ice for 1 week; however, holding tissue samples on ice for 1 week resulted in a loss of FA in Charr. In addition, most FA in Trout and Charr decreased in quantity after being stored between 3 and 6 hours on ice. Freezer storage temperature (-80 or -20°C) also had a significant effect on FA contents in some species. Generally, we recommend that species with high total lipid content (e.g. Charr and Trout) should be treated with extra caution to avoid changes in FA contents, with time on ice and time spent in a freezer emerging as significant factors that changed FA contents. PMID:27479304

  9. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  10. SALICYLIC ACID- AND NITRIC OXIDE-MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current advances in plant defense signaling is discussed, with emphasis on the role of nitric oxide and salicylic acid in the development of disease resistance. Nitric Oxide has recently been shown to have an important role in plant disease resistance. We show an increase in NOS-like activity in TMV...

  11. Battery energy-storage systems — an emerging market for lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. F.

    Although the concept of using batteries for lead levelling and peak shaving has been known for decades, only recently have these systems become commercially viable. Changes in the structure of the electric power supply industry have required these companies to seek more cost-effective ways of meeting the needs of their customers. Through experience gained, primarily in the USA, batteries have been shown to provide multiple benefits to electric utilities. Also, lower maintenance batteries, more reliable electrical systems, and the availability of methods to predict costs and benefits have made battery energy-storage systems more attractive. Technology-transfer efforts in the USA have resulted in a willingness of electric utilities to install a number of these systems for a variety of tasks, including load levelling, peak shaving, frequency regulation and spinning reserve. Additional systems are being planned for several additional locations for similar applications, plus transmission and distribution deferral and enhanced power quality. In the absence of US champions such as the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute, ILZRO is attempting to mount a technology-transfer programme to bring the benefits of battery energy-storage to European power suppliers. As a result of these efforts, a study group on battery energy-storage systems has been established with membership primarily in Germany and Austria. Also, a two-day workshop, prepared by the Electric Power Research Institute was held in Dublin. Participants included representatives of several European power suppliers. As a result, ESB National Grid of Ireland has embarked upon a detailed analysis of the costs and benefits of a battery energy-storage system in their network. Plans for the future include continuation of this technology-transfer effort, assistance in the Irish effort, and a possible approach to the European Commission for funding.

  12. Effects of different steeping methods and storage on caffeine, catechins and gallic acid in bag tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Jye; Hwang, Lucy Sun; Lin, Jau-Tien

    2007-07-13

    Bag teas, packed 3g of ground black, green, oolong, paochoung and pu-erh tea leaves (the particle size used was 1-2mm), were steeped in 150 mL of 70, 85 or 100 degrees C hot water to study the effects of the number of steeping (the same bag tea was steeped repeatedly eight times, 30s each time, as done in China for making ceremonial tea) and varied steeping durations (0.5-4 min) on caffeine, catechins and gallic acid in tea infusions. The changes in tea infusions during storage at 4 or 25 degrees C for 0-48 h and the variations in these compounds of bag tea infused with 150 mL of 4 or 25 degrees C cold water for 0.5-16 h were also investigated. A HPLC method with a C18 column and a step gradient solvent system consisting of acetonitrile and 0.9% acetic acid in deionized water was used for analysis. Results for all kinds of tea samples showed that the second tea infusion contained the highest contents of caffeine, catechins and gallic acid when bag teas were steeped in 70 degrees C water. It was different from that steeped at 85 and 100 degrees C, the highest contents existed in the first infusion. These compounds decreased gradually in later infusions. Higher amounts of caffeine, catechins and gallic acid could be released from bag teas as hotter water was used. As steeping duration prolonged, these ingredients increased progressively, however, their levels were lower than that cumulated from the infusions with the identical bag tea prepared recurrently at the same temperature and time points. (-)-Gallocatechin gallate and (+)-catechin existed in these tea infusions rarely and could not be detected until a certain amount of them infusing. Except gallic acid that showed a significant increase and caffeine that exhibited no significant change, all kinds of catechins decreased appreciably after tea infusions were stored at 25 degrees C for 36 h; nevertheless, all of them showed no evident changes at 4 degrees C storage. The caffeine, catechins and gallic acid in tea

  13. Uric acid and coronary artery disease: An elusive link deserving further attention.

    PubMed

    Biscaglia, Simone; Ceconi, Claudio; Malagù, Michele; Pavasini, Rita; Ferrari, Roberto

    2016-06-15

    Uric acid is the final product of purine metabolism. Classically it is recognized as the cause of gouty arthritis and kidney stones. Western civilization has increased serum levels of uric acid which is no longer considered a benign plasma solute. It has been postulated and recently demonstrated that it can penetrate cell membrane and exerts damaging intracellular actions such as oxidation and inflammation. These observations have stimulated several epidemiological researches suggesting that hyperuricemia is linked or even provokes hypertension and coronary artery disease. In this review we summarize the current evidences regarding uric acid which contribute in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease. PMID:26318389

  14. Serum bile acid profiling reflects enterohepatic detoxification state and intestinal barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Gnewuch, Carsten; Liebisch, Gerhard; Langmann, Thomas; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Dieplinger, Hans; Zahn, Alexandra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Rogler, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine free and conjugated serum bile acid (BA) levels in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) subgroups with defined clinical manifestations. METHODS: Comprehensive serum BA profiling was performed in 358 IBD patients and 310 healthy controls by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Serum levels of hyodeoxycholic acid, the CYP3A4-mediated detoxification product of the secondary BA lithocholic acid (LCA), was increased significantly in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), while most other serum BA species were decreased significantly. Total BA, total BA conjugate, and total BA glycoconjugate levels were decreased only in CD, whereas total unconjugated BA levels were decreased only in UC. In UC patients with hepatobiliary manifestations, the conjugated primary BAs glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were as significantly increased as the secondary BAs LCA, ursodeoxycholic acid, and tauroursodeoxycholic acid compared to UC patients without hepatobiliary manifestations. Finally, we found that in ileocecal resected CD patients, the unconjugated primary BAs, cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid, were increased significantly compared to controls and patients without surgical interventions. CONCLUSION: Serum BA profiling in IBD patients that indicates impaired intestinal barrier function and increased detoxification is suitable for advanced diagnostic characterization and differentiation of IBD subgroups with defined clinical manifestations. PMID:19575493

  15. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24907105

  16. Pathways of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Utilization: Implications for Brain Function in Neuropsychiatric Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joanne J.; Green, Pnina; Mann, J. John; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25498862

  17. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Pramod K.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Macugen” is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions. PMID:25050359

  18. The importance of the omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2008-06-01

    Several sources of information suggest that human beings evolved on a diet with a ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 essential fatty acids (EFA) of approximately 1 whereas in Western diets the ratio is 15/1-16.7/1. Western diets are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids, and have excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids compared with the diet on which human beings evolved and their genetic patterns were established. Excessive amounts of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a very high omega-6/omega-3 ratio, as is found in today's Western diets, promote the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, whereas increased levels of omega-3 PUFA (a lower omega-6/omega-3 ratio), exert suppressive effects. In the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, a ratio of 4/1 was associated with a 70% decrease in total mortality. A ratio of 2.5/1 reduced rectal cell proliferation in patients with colorectal cancer, whereas a ratio of 4/1 with the same amount of omega-3 PUFA had no effect. The lower omega-6/omega-3 ratio in women with breast cancer was associated with decreased risk. A ratio of 2-3/1 suppressed inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and a ratio of 5/1 had a beneficial effect on patients with asthma, whereas a ratio of 10/1 had adverse consequences. These studies indicate that the optimal ratio may vary with the disease under consideration. This is consistent with the fact that chronic diseases are multigenic and multifactorial. Therefore, it is quite possible that the therapeutic dose of omega-3 fatty acids will depend on the degree of severity of disease resulting from the genetic predisposition. A lower ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is more desirable in reducing the risk of many of the chronic diseases of high prevalence in Western societies, as well as in the developing countries. PMID:18408140

  19. The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Eicosapentaenoic Acid Accelerates Disease Progression in a Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gladman, Stacy; Biggio, Maria Luigia; Marino, Marianna; Jayasinghe, Maduka; Ullah, Farhan; Dyall, Simon C.; Malaspina, Andrea; Bendotti, Caterina; Michael-Titus, Adina

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by loss of motor neurons that currently has no cure. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), have many health benefits including neuroprotective and myoprotective potential. We tested the hypothesis that a high level of dietary EPA could exert beneficial effects in ALS. The dietary exposure to EPA (300 mg/kg/day) in a well-established mouse model of ALS expressing the G93A superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation was initiated at a pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stage, and the disease progression was monitored until the end stage. Daily dietary EPA exposure initiated at the disease onset did not significantly alter disease presentation and progression. In contrast, EPA treatment initiated at the pre-symptomatic stage induced a significantly shorter lifespan. In a separate group of animals sacrificed before the end stage, the tissue analysis showed that the vacuolisation detected in G93A-SOD1 mice was significantly increased by exposure to EPA. Although EPA did not alter motor neurone loss, EPA reversed the significant increase in activated microglia and the astrocytic activation seen in G93A-SOD1 mice. The microglia in the spinal cord of G93A-SOD1 mice treated with EPA showed a significant increase in 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, a highly toxic aldehydic oxidation product of omega-3 fatty acids. These data show that dietary EPA supplementation in ALS has the potential to worsen the condition and accelerate the disease progression. This suggests that great caution should be exerted when considering dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplements in ALS patients. PMID:23620776

  20. Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tabbaa, Maria; Golubic, Mladen; Roizen, Michael F.; Bernstein, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been used to treat a range of different conditions, including periodontal disease (PD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That DHA helps with these oral and gastrointestinal diseases in which inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis play key roles, raises the question of whether DHA may assist in the prevention or treatment of other inflammatory conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome, which have also been linked with inflammation and alterations in normal host microbial populations. Here we review established and investigated associations between DHA, PD, and IBD. We conclude that by beneficially altering cytokine production and macrophage recruitment, the composition of intestinal microbiota and intestinal integrity, lipopolysaccharide- and adipose-induced inflammation, and insulin signaling, DHA may be a key tool in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23966110

  1. Ryanodine receptor antagonists adapt NPC1 proteostasis to ameliorate lipid storage in Niemann-Pick type C disease fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Chung, Chan; Shen, Dongbiao; Xu, Haoxing; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2012-07-15

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a lysosomal storage disorder most often caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 gene. The encoded multipass transmembrane protein is required for cholesterol efflux from late endosomes and lysosomes. Numerous missense mutations in the NPC1 gene cause disease, including the prevalent I1061T mutation that leads to protein misfolding and degradation. Here, we sought to modulate the cellular proteostasis machinery to achieve functional recovery in primary patient fibroblasts. We demonstrate that targeting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium levels using ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists increased steady-state levels of the NPC1 I1061T protein. These compounds also promoted trafficking of mutant NPC1 to late endosomes and lysosomes and rescued the aberrant storage of cholesterol and sphingolipids that is characteristic of disease. Similar rescue was obtained using three distinct RyR antagonists in cells with missense alleles, but not with null alleles, or by over-expressing calnexin, a calcium-dependent ER chaperone. Our work highlights the utility of proteostasis regulators to remodel the protein-folding environment in the ER to recover function in the setting of disease-causing missense alleles. PMID:22505584

  2. Periodontal disease: modulation of the inflammatory cascade by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sculley, D V

    2014-06-01

    Periodontal disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis, is caused by the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and the host immune system. The ensuing oxidative stress and inflammatory cascade result in the destruction of gingival tissue, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This article reviews the underlying mechanisms and host-bacteria interactions responsible for periodontal disease and evidence that nutritional supplementation with fish oil may provide a protective effect. Historical investigations of diet and disease have highlighted an inverse relationship between ingestion of fish oil, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the incidence of typical inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and coronary heart disease. Ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, results in their incorporation into membrane phospholipids, which can alter eicosanoid production after stimulation during the immune response. These eicosanoids promote a reduction in chronic inflammation, which has led to the proposal that fish oil is a possible modulator of inflammation and may reduce the severity of periodontal diseases. Tentative animal and human studies have provided an indication of this effect. Further human investigation is needed to establish the protective effects of fish oil in relation to periodontal disease. PMID:23889472

  3. The Unexpected Uses of Urso- and Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid in the Treatment of Non-liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Sheila; Longley, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is the taurine conjugate of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a US Food and Drug Administration–approved hydrophilic bile acid for the treatment of certain cholestatic liver diseases. There is a growing body of research on the mechanism(s) of TUDCA and its potential therapeutic effect on a wide variety of non-liver diseases. Both UDCA and TUDCA are potent inhibitors of apoptosis, in part by interfering with the upstream mitochondrial pathway of cell death, inhibiting oxygen-radical production, reducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and stabilizing the unfolded protein response (UPR). Several studies have demonstrated that TUDCA serves as an anti-apoptotic agent for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. In addition, TUDCA plays an important role in protecting against cell death in certain retinal disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. It has been shown to reduce ER stress associated with elevated glucose levels in diabetes by inhibiting caspase activation, up-regulating the UPR, and inhibiting reactive oxygen species. Obesity, stroke, acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and a long list of acute and chronic non-liver diseases associated with apoptosis are all potential therapeutic targets for T/UDCA. A growing number of pre-clinical and clinical studies underscore the potential benefit of this simple, naturally occurring bile acid, which has been used in Chinese medicine for more than 3000 years. PMID:24891994

  4. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  5. Storage of methane as volatile fatty acids for intermittent fuel use

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, N.P.; Mehta, K.; Callihan, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    A process for on-site production of methane from sweet potato canning wastes was developed. In this process methane is stored conveniently as a liquid in the form of organic acids which are produced in an acid pond. When methane is needed, the acids are pumped into a methane pond underneath a sludge blanket, where high rates of methane production begin shortly after feeding. A demonstration plant has been designed and is being constructed using the existing pond system and facilities in a sweet potato canning factory in Louisiana. The methane produced is burned on-site to generate process steam for use in the main plant. 14 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Synthesis, storage, and stability of (4-/sup 14/C)oxaloacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, M.D.; Heldt, H.W.

    1985-03-01

    A simple procedure for preparing (4-/sup 14/C)oxaloacetic acid based on the reaction between (/sup 14/C)HCO-3 and phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is described. A simple method for preparing highly purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from maize leaves is described and the degradation of oxaloacetate under conditions of varying pH and divalent metal ion concentration is reported. (4-/sup 14/C)Oxaloacetic acid is stable for several months in 0.1 M HCl solution at -80 degrees C.

  7. Sodium Chloride Diffusion in Low-Acid Foods during Thermal Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Ellen R; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at modeling sodium chloride (NaCl) diffusion in foods during thermal processing using analytical and numerical solutions and at investigating the changes in NaCl concentrations during storage after processing. Potato, radish, and salmon samples in 1% or 3% NaCl solutions were heated at 90, 105, or 121 °C for 5 to 240 min to simulate pasteurization and sterilization. Selected samples were stored at 4 or 22 °C for up to 28 d. Radish had the largest equilibrium NaCl concentrations and equilibrium distribution coefficients, but smallest effective diffusion coefficients, indicating that a greater amount of NaCl diffused into the radish at a slower rate. Effective diffusion coefficients determined using the analytical solution ranged from 0.2 × 10(-8) to 2.6 × 10(-8) m²/s. Numerical and analytical solutions showed good agreement with experimental data, with average coefficients of determination for samples in 1% NaCl at 121 °C of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. During storage, food samples equilibrated to a similar NaCl concentration regardless of the thermal processing severity. The results suggest that sensory evaluation of multiphase (solid and liquid) products should occur at least 14 d after processing to allow enough time for the salt to equilibrate within the product. PMID:27060992

  8. Thiadiazole Carbamates: Potent Inhibitors of Lysosomal Acid Lipase and Potential Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Therapeuticsa

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Anton I.; Cosner, Casey C.; Mariani, Christopher J.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wiest, Olaf; Helquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized at the cellular level by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids in lysosomal storage organelles. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) has been recently identified as a potential therapeutic target for NPC. LAL can be specifically inhibited by a variety of 3,4-disubstituted thiadiazole carbamates. An efficient synthesis of the C(3) oxygenated/C(4) aminated analogues has been developed that furnishes the products in high yields and high degrees of purity. Common intermediates can also be used for the synthesis of the C(3) carbon substituted derivatives. Herein we tested various thiadiazole carbamates, amides, esters, and ketones for inhibition of LAL. In addition, we tested a diverse selection of commercially available non-thiadiazole carbamates. Our studies show that, among the compounds examined herein, only thiadiazole carbamates are effective inhibitors of LAL. We present a mechanism for LAL inhibition by these compounds whereby LAL transiently carbamoylates the enzyme similarly to previously described inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by rivastigmine and other carbamates as well as acylation of various lipases by orlistat. PMID:20557099

  9. Hyaluronic acid as a biomarker of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    ORASAN, OLGA HILDA; CIULEI, GEORGE; COZMA, ANGELA; SAVA, MADALINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a significant public health problem worldwide. The degree of liver fibrosis secondary to these diseases is important, because it is the main predictor of their evolution and prognosis. Hyaluronic acid is studied as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases, in an attempt to avoid the complications of liver puncture biopsy, considered the gold standard in the evaluation of fibrosis. We review the advantages and limitations of hyaluronc acid, a biomarker, used to manage patients with chronic viral hepatitis B or C infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, HIV-HCV coinfection, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, biliary atresia, hereditary hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27004022

  10. Amino acid and peptide absorption in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Kumar, Parveen J.; Perrett, D.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to study amino acid and peptide absorption in eight normal control subjects, 13 patients with untreated adult coeliac disease, and 16 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis who had varying morphological abnormalities of the small bowel. All subjects were perfused with isotonic solutions containing 10 mM glycyl-L-alanine and 10 mM glycine + 10 mM L-alanine. Patients with adult coeliac disease had impaired absorption of glycine (p < 0·01) and L-alanine (p < 0·05) from the amino acid solution compared with the control subjects. Amino acid uptake from the dipeptide solution was not significantly impaired, although four individual patients had impaired uptake of both amino acids. In contrast to these findings, very few patients with dermatitis herpetiformis had impaired amino acid absorption from either solution. Sodium absorption was impaired from both solutions when the groups of patients with adult coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis with subtotal villous atrophy and partial villous atrophy were studied, and there were patients in each group who secreted sodium and water. The results suggest that malabsorption of dietary protein is unlikely to occur in dermatitis herpetiformis but may occur and contribute to protein deficiency seen in some severe cases of adult coeliac disease. The impairment of sodium and water absorption provides evidence that there may be functional impairment of the jejunal mucosa in dermatitis herpetiformis as well as in adult coeliac disease. PMID:4820629

  11. Ascorbic Acid Profiles in 'Delicious' and 'Honeycrisp' Apples During on-Tree Development and Cold Storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in plants are involved in a number of processes both beneficial (signal transduction) and detrimental (induction of physiological disorders). ROS toxicity can be ameliorated by a number of metabolic systems or compounds in plant tissue including L-Ascorbic acid...

  12. Chiral amino acid metabolomics for novel biomarker screening in the prognosis of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomonori; Hamase, Kenji; Miyoshi, Yurika; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Yasuda, Keiko; Mita, Masashi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids, the enantiomers of L-amino acids, are increasingly recognized as novel biomarkers. Although the amounts of D-amino acids are usually very trace in human, some of them have sporadically been detected in blood from patients with kidney diseases. This study examined whether multiple chiral amino acids would be associated with kidney functions, comorbidities, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by enantioselective analyses of all chiral amino acids with a micro-two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatograph (2D-HPLC)-based analytical platform. 16 out of 21 D-amino acids were detected in plasma from 108 CKD patients in a longitudinal cohort. The levels of D-Ser, D-Pro, and D-Asn were strongly associated with kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration ratio), the levels of D-Ala and D-Pro were associated with age, and the level of D-Asp and D-Pro were associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. D-Ser and D-Asn were significantly associated with the progression of CKD in mutually-adjusted Cox regression analyses; the risk of composite end point (developing to ESKD or death before ESKD) was elevated from 2.7- to 3.8-fold in those with higher levels of plasma D-Ser and D-Asn. These findings identified chiral amino acids as potential biomarkers in kidney diseases. PMID:27188851

  13. Chiral amino acid metabolomics for novel biomarker screening in the prognosis of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomonori; Hamase, Kenji; Miyoshi, Yurika; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Yasuda, Keiko; Mita, Masashi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids, the enantiomers of L-amino acids, are increasingly recognized as novel biomarkers. Although the amounts of D-amino acids are usually very trace in human, some of them have sporadically been detected in blood from patients with kidney diseases. This study examined whether multiple chiral amino acids would be associated with kidney functions, comorbidities, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by enantioselective analyses of all chiral amino acids with a micro-two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatograph (2D-HPLC)-based analytical platform. 16 out of 21 D-amino acids were detected in plasma from 108 CKD patients in a longitudinal cohort. The levels of D-Ser, D-Pro, and D-Asn were strongly associated with kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration ratio), the levels of D-Ala and D-Pro were associated with age, and the level of D-Asp and D-Pro were associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. D-Ser and D-Asn were significantly associated with the progression of CKD in mutually-adjusted Cox regression analyses; the risk of composite end point (developing to ESKD or death before ESKD) was elevated from 2.7- to 3.8-fold in those with higher levels of plasma D-Ser and D-Asn. These findings identified chiral amino acids as potential biomarkers in kidney diseases. PMID:27188851

  14. Effects of abscisic acid and high osmoticum on storage protein gene expression in microspore embryos of Brassica napus

    SciTech Connect

    Wilen, R.W.; Mandel, R.M.; Pharis, R.P.; Moloney, M.M. ); Holbrook, L.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Storage protein gene expression, characteristic of mid- to late embryogenesis, was investigated in microspore embryos of rapeseed (Brassica napus). These embryos, derived from the immature male gametophyte, accumulate little or no detectable napin or cruciferin mRNA when cultured on hormone-free medium containing 13% sucrose. The addition of abscisic acid (ABA) to the medium results in an increase in detectable transcripts encoding both these polypeptides. Storage protein mRNA is induced at 1 micromolar ABA with maximum stimulation occurring between 5 and 50 micromolar. This hormone induction results in a level of storage protein mRNA that is comparable to that observed in zygotic embryos of an equivalent morphological stage. Effects similar to that of ABA are noted when 12.5% sorbitol is added to the microspore embryo medium (osmotic potential = 25.5 bars). Time course experiments, to study the induction of napin and cruciferin gene expression demonstrated that the ABA effect occurred much more rapidly than the high osmoticum effect, although after 48 hours, the levels of napin or cruciferin mRNA detected were similar in both treatments. This difference in the rates of induction is consistent with the idea that the osmotic effect may be mediated by ABA which is synthesized in response to the reduced water potential. Measurements of ABA (by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ({sup 2}H{sub 6})ABA as an internal standard) present in microspore embryos during sorbitol treatment and in embryos treated with 10 micromolar ABA were performed to investigate this possibility. Within 2 hours of culture on high osmoticum the level of ABA increased substantially and significantly above control and reached a maximum concentration within 24 hours. This elevated concentration was maintained for 48 hours after culturing and represents a sixfold increase over control embryos.

  15. Liver Fibrosis in Type I Gaucher Disease: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Transient Elastography and Parameters of Iron Storage

    PubMed Central

    Akkerman, Erik M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Sinkus, Ralph; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Stoker, Jaap; Hollak, Carla E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Long term liver-related complications of type-1 Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder, include fibrosis and an increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Splenectomy has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of liver pathology in GD. High ferritin concentrations are a feature of GD and iron storage in Gaucher cells has been described, but iron storage in the liver in relation to liver fibrosis has not been studied. Alternatively, iron storage in GD may be the result of iron supplementation therapy or regular blood transfusions in patients with severe cytopenia. In this pilot study, comprising 14 type-1 GD patients (7 splenectomized, 7 non-splenectomized) and 7 healthy controls, we demonstrate that liver stiffness values, measured by Transient Elastography and MR-Elastography, are significantly higher in splenectomized GD patients when compared with non-splenectomized GD patients (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). Liver iron concentration was elevated (>60±30 µmol/g) in 4 GD patients of whom 3 were splenectomized. No relationship was found between liver stiffness and liver iron concentration. HFE gene mutations were more frequent in splenectomized (6/7) than in non-splenectomized (2/7) participants (p = 0.10). Liver disease appeared more advanced in splenectomized than in non-splenectomized patients. We hypothesize a relationship with excessive hepatic iron accumulation in splenectomized patients. We recommend that all splenectomized patients, especially those with evidence of substantial liver fibrosis undergo regular screening for HCC, according to current guidelines. PMID:23554863

  16. Colour stabilities of sour cherry juice concentrates enhanced with gallic acid and various plant extracts during storage.

    PubMed

    Navruz, Ayşe; Türkyılmaz, Meltem; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-04-15

    Gallic acid (GA) and pomegranate rind extract (PRE), cherry stem extract (CSE) and green tea extract (GTE) were added to sour cherry juice concentrates (SCJCs) to enhance the colour. Effects of these copigment sources on anthocyanins, colour and turbidity were investigated during storage at -20, 4 and 20°C for 110 days. Cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside (cyd-3-glu-rut, 75%) was the major anthocyanin, followed by cyanidin-3-rutinoside (cyd-3-rut, 23%) and cyanidin-3-sophoroside (cyd-3-soph, 2%). While GA (37-53%), PRE (27-77%) and GTE (44-119%) increased the stabilities of cyd-3-rut and cyd-3-glu-rut, CSE reduced (12-24%) the stabilities of all anthocyanins. Polymeric colour and turbidity values increased after the addition of all extracts and GA. The lowest turbidity value after 110 days of storage at 20°C was determined in the SCJC enhanced with PRE. We recommend the addition of PRE to SCJC for the enhancement of anthocyanin stability and colour intensity, and the reduction in turbidity. PMID:26616935

  17. In vivo hepatic lipid quantification using MRS at 7 Tesla in a mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a

    PubMed Central

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ratiney, Helene; Mutel, Elodie; Guillou, Herve; Mithieux, Gilles; Pilleul, Frank; Rajas, Fabienne; Beuf, Olivier; Cavassila, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of liver lipid content and composition is needed in preclinical research to investigate steatosis and steatosis-related disorders. The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo hepatic fatty acid content and composition using a method based on short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 7 Tesla. A mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a with inducible liver-specific deletion of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene (L-G6pc−/−) mice and control mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 9 months. In control mice, hepatic lipid content was found significantly higher with the HF/HS diet than with the standard diet. As expected, hepatic lipid content was already elevated in L-G6pc−/− mice fed a standard diet compared with control mice. L-G6pc−/− mice rapidly developed steatosis which was not modified by the HF/HS diet. On the standard diet, estimated amplitudes from olefinic protons were found significantly higher in L-G6pc−/− mice compared with that in control mice. L-G6pc−/− mice showed no noticeable polyunsaturation from diallylic protons. Total unsaturated fatty acid indexes measured by gas chromatography were in agreement with MRS measurements. These results showed the great potential of high magnetic field MRS to follow the diet impact and lipid alterations in mouse liver. PMID:23596325

  18. Amyloidosis, Synucleinopathy, and Prion Encephalopathy in a Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disease: The CNS-Biomarker Potential of Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Duncan, F. Jason; Murrey, Darren; Ware, Tierra; Meadows, Aaron; McCarty, Douglas M.; Fu, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a devastating neuropathic lysosomal storage disease with complex pathology. This study identifies molecular signatures in peripheral blood that may be relevant to MPS IIIB pathogenesis using a mouse model. Genome-wide gene expression microarrays on pooled RNAs showed dysregulation of 2,802 transcripts in blood from MPS IIIB mice, reflecting pathological complexity of MPS IIIB, encompassing virtually all previously reported and as yet unexplored disease aspects. Importantly, many of the dysregulated genes are reported to be tissue-specific. Further analyses of multiple genes linked to major pathways of neurodegeneration demonstrated a strong brain-blood correlation in amyloidosis and synucleinopathy in MPS IIIB. We also detected prion protein (Prnp) deposition in the CNS and Prnp dysregulation in the blood in MPS IIIB mice, suggesting the involvement of Prnp aggregation in neuropathology. Systemic delivery of trans-BBB-neurotropic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector mediated not only efficient restoration of functional α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and clearance of lysosomal storage pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery, but also the correction of impaired neurodegenerative molecular pathways in the brain and blood. Our data suggest that molecular changes in blood may reflect pathological status in the CNS and provide a useful tool for identifying potential CNS-specific biomarkers for MPS IIIB and possibly other neurological diseases. PMID:24278249

  19. Production of α-L-iduronidase in maize for the potential treatment of a human lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H; Gloster, Tracey M; Vocadlo, David J; Clarke, Lorne A; Qian, Yi; Kermode, Allison R

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a class of over 70 rare genetic diseases that are amenable to enzyme replacement therapy. Towards developing a plant-based enzyme replacement therapeutic for the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis I, here we expressed α-L-iduronidase in the endosperm of maize seeds by a previously uncharacterized mRNA-targeting-based mechanism. Immunolocalization, cellular fractionation and in situ RT-PCR demonstrate that the α-L-iduronidase protein and mRNA are targeted to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived protein bodies and to protein body-ER regions, respectively, using regulatory (5'- and 3'-UTR) and signal-peptide coding sequences from the γ-zein gene. The maize α-L-iduronidase exhibits high activity, contains high-mannose N-glycans and is amenable to in vitro phosphorylation. This mRNA-based strategy is of widespread importance as plant N-glycan maturation is controlled and the therapeutic protein is generated in a native form. For our target enzyme, the N-glycan structures are appropriate for downstream processing, a prerequisite for its potential as a therapeutic protein. PMID:22990858

  20. Multiple mutations are responsible for the high frequency of 2 lysosomal storage diseases in a small geographic area

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.; Heinisch, U.; Bach, G. |

    1994-09-01

    Late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy is relatively frequent among Arabs in the Galilee. The disease has been diagnosed in 7 Christian and Muslem unrelated families originating from 7 villages in a 20x20 kms area. Molecular analysis of the aryl sulfatase A gene revealed that the disease is caused in these 7 families by 5 different mutations. In each case the patients were homozygous for one of the mutations. Four of the mutations are unique up to now while the other mutation has been reported in Australian patients originating from Lebanon (T274M). This mutation may have been introduced to the Galilee from Lebanon. Comparable observations have been reported by Bach who demonstrated that the high incidence of another lysosmal storage disease, Hurler syndrome, among Arabs and Druses originating from the same region of the Galilee is due to 3 different novel mutations. The Arab population in the lower Galilee is very inbred and large families are very frequent. In this type of population it is expected that relatively soon (3 generations) after a first mutation event the first affected individual will be born. The possible causes for the increase frequency of new mutations in the region are under investigation. We will try to determine whether it may be a general phenomenon which affects various genes or whether it is unique to lysosomal storage disorders.

  1. Transcriptional control of amino acid homeostasis is disrupted in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sbodio, Juan I; Snyder, Solomon H; Paul, Bindu D

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances in amino acid metabolism, which have been observed in Huntington's disease (HD), may account for the profound inanition of HD patients. HD is triggered by an expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the protein huntingtin (Htt), impacting diverse cellular processes, ranging from transcriptional regulation to cognitive and motor functions. We show here that the master regulator of amino acid homeostasis, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), is dysfunctional in HD because of oxidative stress contributed by aberrant cysteine biosynthesis and transport. Consistent with these observations, antioxidant supplementation reverses the disordered ATF4 response to nutrient stress. Our findings establish a molecular link between amino acid disposition and oxidative stress leading to cytotoxicity. This signaling cascade may be relevant to other diseases involving redox imbalance and deficits in amino acid metabolism. PMID:27436896

  2. Transcriptional control of amino acid homeostasis is disrupted in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sbodio, Juan I.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Paul, Bindu D.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in amino acid metabolism, which have been observed in Huntington’s disease (HD), may account for the profound inanition of HD patients. HD is triggered by an expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the protein huntingtin (Htt), impacting diverse cellular processes, ranging from transcriptional regulation to cognitive and motor functions. We show here that the master regulator of amino acid homeostasis, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), is dysfunctional in HD because of oxidative stress contributed by aberrant cysteine biosynthesis and transport. Consistent with these observations, antioxidant supplementation reverses the disordered ATF4 response to nutrient stress. Our findings establish a molecular link between amino acid disposition and oxidative stress leading to cytotoxicity. This signaling cascade may be relevant to other diseases involving redox imbalance and deficits in amino acid metabolism. PMID:27436896

  3. Urolithiasis and psoas abscess in a 2-year-old boy with type 1 glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Zafar; Qazi, Saqib Hamid

    2006-11-01

    We report on a pyogenic psoas abscess secondary to an impacted calcium oxalate ureteric stone in a 2-year-old boy with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1). The patient had a drainage of the abscess through a flank incision followed by percutaneous nephrostomy and open ureterolithotomy. Metabolic acidosis, hyperuricemia, hypocitraturia, and hypercalciuria appear to be significant in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis in patients with GSD-1. Regular ultrasonography of the abdomen along with optimal metabolic control may delay or prevent urolithiasis and its complications in GSD-1 patients. PMID:16932895

  4. Dataset and standard operating procedure for newborn screening of six lysosomal storage diseases: By tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Susan; Buroker, Norman; Cournoyer, Jason J; Potier, Anna M; Trometer, Joseph D; Elbin, Carole; Schermer, Mack J; Kantola, Jaana; Boyce, Aaron; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H; Scott, C Ronald

    2016-09-01

    In this data article we provide a detailed standard operating procedure for performing a tandem mass spectrometry, multiplex assay of 6 lysosomal enzymes for newborn screening of the lysosomal storage diseases Mucopolysaccharidosis-I, Pompe, Fabry, Niemann-Pick-A/B, Gaucher, and Krabbe, (Elliott, et al., 2016) [1]. We also provide the mass spectrometry peak areas for the product and internal standard ions typically observed with a dried blood spot punch from a random newborn, and we provide the daily variation of the daily mean activities for all 6 enzymes. PMID:27508243

  5. Inverse Association Between Serum Uric Acid Levels and Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Du, Na; Xu, Donghua; Hou, Xu; Song, Xuejia; Liu, Cancan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yangang; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The association between Alzheimer's disease and uric acid levels had gained great interest in recent years, but there was still lack of definite evidence. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Relevant studies published before October 26, 2014, were searched in PubMed, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases. Study-specific data were combined using random-effects or fixed-effects models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twenty-four studies (21 case-control and 3 cohort studies) were finally included into the meta-analysis. Those 21 case-control studies included a total of 1128 cases of Alzheimer's disease and 2498 controls without Alzheimer's disease. Those 3 cohort studies included a total of 7327 participants. Meta-analysis showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease had lower levels of uric acid than healthy controls (weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.77 mg/dl, 95 % CI -2.28 to -0.36, P = 0.0002). High serum uric acid levels were significantly associated with decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (risk ratio (RR) = 0.66, 95 % CI 0.52-0.85, P = 0.001). There was low risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. There is an inverse association between serum uric acid levels and Alzheimer's disease. High serum uric acid level is a protective factor of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26084440

  6. Nod2 deficiency protects mice from cholestatic liver disease by increasing renal excretion of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lirui; Hartmann, Phillipp; Haimerl, Michael; Bathena, Sai P.; Sjöwall, Christopher; Almer, Sven; Alnouti, Yazen; Hofmann, Alan F.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Chronic liver disease is characterized by fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. Nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), a member of the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of intracellular immune receptors, plays an important role in the defense against bacterial infection through binding to the ligand muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Here, we investigated the role of Nod2 in the development of liver fibrosis. Methods We studied experimental cholestatic liver disease induced by bile duct ligation or toxic liver disease induced by carbon tetrachloride in wild type and Nod2−/− mice. Results Nod2 deficiency protected mice from cholestatic but not toxin-induced liver injury and fibrosis. Most notably, the hepatic bile acid concentration was lower in Nod2−/− mice than wild type mice following bile duct ligation for 3 weeks. In contrast to wild type mice, Nod2−/− mice had increased urinary excretion of bile acids, including sulfated bile acids, and an upregulation of the bile acid efflux transporters MRP2 and MRP4 in tubular epithelial cells of the kidney. MRP2 and MRP4 were downregulated by IL-1β in a Nod2 dependent fashion. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Nod2 deficiency protects mice from cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis through enhancing renal excretion of bile acids that in turn contributes to decreased concentration of bile acids in the hepatocyte. PMID:24560660

  7. Bioactive compounds during storage of fresh-cut spinach: the role of endogenous ascorbic acid in the improvement of product quality.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Antonella; Degl'Innocenti, Elena; Guidi, Lucia; Graziani, Giulia; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2009-04-01

    Spinach is rich in bioactive constituents such as vitamin C, flavonoids and phenolic acids. In this work, the biochemical modifications occurring during one week of storage at 4 degrees C were evaluated both in intact and in fresh-cut spinach. Results showed that vitamin C concentration is less affected by storage in fresh-cut spinach with respect to intact spinach. MS/MS analysis showed that the main flavonoids are not modified during storage in intact leaves, while some of them increased significantly during storage in the fresh-cut samples. Fresh-cut spinach did not show color alteration even if PPO activity increased significantly during storage. This finding was related to the high ascorbic acid content, which delays the subsequent polymerization events. This finding was confirmed by the unaltered concentration of phenolic compounds in fresh-cut spinach during storage. In conclusion, data about nutritional content and visual performance concurrently suggest that spinach is a suitable species for marketing as a fresh-cut product. PMID:19253961

  8. Aortic ascorbic acid, trace elements, and superoxide dismutase activity in human aneurysmal and occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Hunter, G.C.; Casey, S.M.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-02-01

    Altered trace elements and ascorbic acid metabolism have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, their role in the disease process, or the effect of atherosclerosis on their tissue levels within plaque, is poorly understood. The presence study analyzes the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn, and ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in tissue samples from 29 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and 14 patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD). It was observed that the Fe and Mn concentrations in AAA and AOD tissue were higher than the levels in nondiseased control aorta, whereas Cu and Zn levels in AAA and AOD tissue were similar to the levels in controls. The Zn:Cu ratio was significantly lower in the AAA tissue in comparison to both AOD and control tissue. In addition, AAA and AOD tissue had low ascorbic acid levels and low Cu, Zn-SOD activity with Cu,Zn-SOD:Mn-SOD ratios of 0.27 and 0.19, respectively, compared to a ratio of 3.20 in control aorta. These data indicate that aorta affected by aneurysms and occlusive disease have altered trace element and ascorbic acid concentrations, as well as low Cu,Zn-SOD activity. Although these observations do not directly support the hypothesis that AAA is associated with aortic Cu deficiency they do suggest a role for oxygen radicals or increased lipid peroxidation in occlusive and aneurysmal disease of the aorta.

  9. Nonlinear phenomenon in monocrystalline silicon based PV module for low power system: Lead acid battery for low energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amrani, A.; El Amraoui, M.; El Abbassi, A.; Messaoudi, C.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, we report the indoor photo-electrical measurements of monocrystalline silicon based photovoltaic (PV) module associated with 4 Ah lead acid battery as a storage unit for low power PV system applications. Concerning the PV module, our measurements show, at low illumination regime, that the short circuit current ISC increases linearly with the illumination power levels. Moreover, for high illumination levels, the mechanism of bimolecular recombination and space charge limitation may be intensified and hence the short current of the PV module ISCMod depends sublinearly on the incident optical power; the behavior is nonlinear. For the open circuit voltage of the PV module VOCMod measurements, a linear variation of the VOCMod versus the short circuit current in semi-logarithmic scale has been noticed. The diode ideality factor n and diode saturation current Is have been investigated; the values of n and Is are approximately of 1.3 and 10-9 A, respectively. In addition, we have shown, for different discharging-charging currents rates (i.e. 0.35 A, 0.2 A and 0.04 A), that the battery voltage decreases with discharging time as well as discharging battery capacity, and on the other hand it increases with the charging time and will rise up until it maximized value. The initial result shows the possibility to use such lead acid battery for low power PV system, which is generally designed for the motorcycle battery.

  10. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein. PMID:18298067

  11. A Portable, Pressure Driven, Room Temperature Nucleic Acid Extraction and Storage System for Point of Care Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Samantha; Fan, Andy; Trueb, Jacob; Jareczek, Francis; Mazzochette, Mark; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Many new and exciting portable HIV viral load testing technologies are emerging for use in global medicine. While the potential to provide fast, isothermal, and quantitative molecular diagnostic information to clinicians in the field will soon be a reality, many of these technologies lack a robust front end for sample clean up and nucleic acid preparation. Such a technology would enable many different downstream molecular assays. Here, we present a portable system for centrifuge-free room temperature nucleic acid extraction from small volumes of whole blood (70 µL), using only thermally stable reagents compatible with storage and transport in low resource settings. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of simulated samples demonstrate a lower limit of detection of 1000 copies/ml, with the ability to detect differences in viral load across four orders of magnitude. The system can also be used to store extracted RNA on detachable cartridges for up to one week at ambient temperature, and can be operated using only hand generated air pressure. PMID:23914255

  12. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  13. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E.; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A. Corina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  14. Comparative effects of irradiation, fumigation, and storage on the free amino acids and sugar contents of green, black and oolong teas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Tusneem; Akram, Kashif; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Food irradiation or chemical fumigation can be used to ensure the hygienic quality of teas. The comparative effects of gamma irradiation (5 and 10 kGy) and fumigation (MeBr and PH3) were investigated on the amino acids and sugar contents of Camellia sinensis (green, black and oolong teas) during storage (15±12 °C). The major amino acids found in teas were theanine and glutamic acid. Irradiation increased amino acids such as, leucine, alanine, and glutamic acid, and decreased the histidine. PH3 fumigation resulted in a decrease of tyrosine content; however, the effect of MeBr fumigation was negligible. Storage showed no significant effect on the amino acid content of the irradiated and fumigated teas. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose contents significantly increased upon gamma irradiation (p≤0.05). However, fumigation and subsequent storage did not affect the sugar contents. Irradiation could be a preferred alternative choice to address food safety problems as fumigation is restricted in many countries.

  15. [Role of non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids in chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Heinz, G A; Mashreghi, M-F

    2016-05-01

    Non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids (RNA), including microRNA, long non-coding RNA and circular RNA, can influence the expression of genes mediating inflammatory processes and therefore affect the course and progression of chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent studies using antisense oligonucleotides suggest that such non-coding regulatory RNAs are suitable as novel therapeutic target molecules for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:27115697

  16. Pattern of 24 hour intragastric acidity in active duodenal ulcer disease and in healthy controls.

    PubMed Central

    Merki, H S; Fimmel, C J; Walt, R P; Harre, K; Röhmel, J; Witzel, L

    1988-01-01

    Twenty four hour intragastric acidity was measured by continuous recording using intragastric combined glass electrodes in 46 duodenal ulcer patients within 48 hours of endoscopic confirmation of active ulceration. Acidity during predefined time periods was compared with that measured in 40 healthy controls without gastrointestinal disease: it was significantly higher in duodenal ulcer patients at all times, but 25% of ulcer patients had median 24 hour acidity within the interquartile range of the normal group. During the evening (18,00 to 22,00 h) ulcer patients had considerable acidity with a median of 39.8 (63.1-31.6) mmol/l (interquartile range) compared with 5.6 (22.3-0.4) mmol/l of controls. It is suggested that antisecretory treatment be directed to decrease this period of unbuffered acidity, as well as during the night, which is presently considered of prime importance. PMID:3209116

  17. Effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Yutong; Li, Jinfeng; Hua, Linlin; Han, Bing; Zhang, Yuzhen; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Zhilei; Bai, Hongying; Yin, Honglei; Lou, Jiyu

    2016-09-01

    Caffeic acid is a type of phenolic acid and organic acid. It is found in food (such as tomatoes, carrots, strawberries, blueberries and wheat), beverages (such as wine, tea, coffee and apple juice) as well as Chinese herbal medicines. In the present study, we examined the effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats were randomly divided into three groups: i) control group, ii) AD model group and iii) caffeic acid group. Caffeic acid significantly rescued learning deficits and increased cognitive function in the rats with AD as demonstrated by the Morris water maze task. Furthermore, caffeic acid administration resulted in a significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity and nitrite generation in the rats with AD compared with the AD model group. Furthermore, caffeic acid suppressed oxidative stress, inflammation, nuclear factor‑κB‑p65 protein expression and caspase‑3 activity as well as regulating the protein expression of p53 and phosphorylated (p-)p38 MAPK expression in the rats with AD. These experimental results indicate that the beneficial effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a model of AD were due to the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27430591

  18. Analysis of the Serum Bile Acid Composition for Differential Diagnosis in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Tomonori; Amano, Katsushi; Nakano, Masanori; Masubuchi, Noriko; Sugihara, Masahiro; Matsuura, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the serum bile acid (BA) composition in patients with liver diseases and healthy volunteers to investigate the relationship between the etiologies of liver disease and BA metabolism. Material and Methods. Sera from 150 patients with liver diseases and 46 healthy volunteers were obtained. The serum concentrations of the 16 different BAs were determined according to the LC-MS/MS method and were compared between the different liver diseases. Results. A total of 150 subjects, including patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (n = 44), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (n = 23), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 21), biliary tract disease (n = 20), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 13), and other liver diseases (n = 29), were recruited. The levels of UDCA and GUDCA were significantly higher in the ALD group, and the levels of DCA and UDCA were significantly lower in the biliary tract diseases group than in viral hepatitis group. In the UDCA therapy (−) subgroup, a significantly lower level of TLCA was observed in the ALD group, with lower levels of CDCA, DCA, and GLCA noted in biliary tract diseases group compared to viral hepatitis group. Conclusions. Analysis of the BA composition may be useful for differential diagnosis in liver disease. PMID:25821461

  19. Dynamics of ascorbic acid in ‘Braeburn’ and ‘Gala’ apples during on-tree development and storage in atmospheres conducive to internal browning development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The underlying causes as well as chemical and biochemical alleviation for CO2-induced browning in apple fruit are poorly understood. Ascorbic acid (AsA) dynamics in ‘Braeburn,’ a susceptible cultivar, and ‘Gala,’ a resistant cultivar, were evaluated during on-tree development and storage at 0.5' C ...

  20. Imaging heterogeneity of membrane and storage lipids in transgenic Camelina sativa seeds with altered fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Silva, Jillian E; Anderson, Danielle; Fuchs, Johannes; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Nazarenus, Tara J; Shulaev, Vladimir; Cahoon, Edgar B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-10-01

    Engineering compositional changes in oilseeds is typically accomplished by introducing new enzymatic step(s) and/or by blocking or enhancing an existing enzymatic step(s) in a seed-specific manner. However, in practice, the amounts of lipid species that accumulate in seeds are often different from what one would predict from enzyme expression levels, and these incongruences may be rooted in an incomplete understanding of the regulation of seed lipid metabolism at the cellular/tissue level. Here we show by mass spectrometry imaging approaches that triacylglycerols and their phospholipid precursors are distributed differently within cotyledons and the hypocotyl/radicle axis in embryos of the oilseed crop Camelina sativa, indicating tissue-specific heterogeneity in triacylglycerol metabolism. Phosphatidylcholines and triacylglycerols enriched in linoleic acid (C18:2) were preferentially localized to the axis tissues, whereas lipid classes enriched in gadoleic acid (C20:1) were preferentially localized to the cotyledons. Manipulation of seed lipid compositions by heterologous over-expression of an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase, or by suppression of fatty acid desaturases and elongases, resulted in new overall seed storage lipid compositions with altered patterns of distribution of phospholipid and triacylglycerol in transgenic embryos. Our results reveal previously unknown differences in acyl lipid distribution in Camelina embryos, and suggest that this spatial heterogeneity may or may not be able to be changed effectively in transgenic seeds depending upon the targeted enzyme(s)/pathway(s). Further, these studies point to the importance of resolving the location of metabolites in addition to their quantities within plant tissues. PMID:23808562

  1. In situ localization of the genetic locus encoding the lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (LIPA) deficient in wolman disease to chromosome 10q23. 2-q23. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Rao, N.; Byrum, R.S.; Rothschild, C.B.; Bowden, D.W.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Human acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) is a 46-kDa glycoprotein required for the lysosomal hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides that cells acquire through the receptor-mediated endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins. This activity is essential in the provision of free cholesterol for cell metabolism as well as for the feedback signal that modulates endogenous cellular cholesterol production. The extremely low level of lysosomal acid lipase in patients afflicted with the hereditary, allelic lysosomal storage disorders Woman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) (MIM Number 278000 (6)) is associated with the massive intralysosomal lipid storage and derangements in the regulation of cellular cholesterol production (10). Both WD and CESD cells lack a specific acid lipase isoenzyme and it is thought that the different mutations associated with WD and CESD are in the structural gene for this isoenzyme, LIPA. Analysis of the activity of the acid lipase isoenzyme in cell extracts from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids (4, 11) demonstrated the concordant segregation of the gene locus for lysosomal acid lipase with the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase-1 (GOT1) enzyme marker for human chromosome 10 which was subsequently localized to 10q24.1 q25.1 (8). 11 refs., 1 figs.

  2. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival. PMID:26777559

  3. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease.

    PubMed

    Sherif, S M; Shukla, M R; Murch, S J; Bernier, L; Saxena, P K

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  4. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Sherif , S. M.; Shukla, M. R.; Murch, S. J.; Bernier, L.; Saxena, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  5. Modulation of fatty acid and bile acid metabolism by PPARα protects against alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Hong; Tyburski, John B.; Wang, Yiwen; Strawn, Steve; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol intake affects liver function and causes hepatic pathological changes. It has been shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-null mice developed more pronounced hepatic changes than wild type (WT) mice after chronic exposure to a diet containing 4% alcohol. The remarkable similarity between the histopathology of ALD in Ppara-null model and in humans, and the fact that PPARα expression and activity in human liver are less than one-tenth of those in WT mouse liver make Ppara-null a good system to investigate ALD. Methods In this study, the Ppara-null model was used to elucidate the dynamic regulation of PPARα activity during chronic alcohol intake. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses were used to examine alterations of gene expression and metabolites associated with pathological changes. The changes triggered by alcohol consumption on gene expression and metabolites in Ppara-null mice were compared with those in wild-type mice. Results The results showed that in the presence of PPARα, three major metabolic pathways in mitochondria, namely the fatty acid β-oxidation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and the electron transfer chain, were induced in response to two-month alcohol feeding, while these responses were greatly reduced in the absence of PPARα. In line with the transcriptional modulations of these metabolic pathways, lipidomic profiling showed consistent accumulation of triglycerides in Ppara-null mice, a robust increase of hepatic cholic acid and its derivatives, and a strong induction of fibrogenesis genes exclusively in alcohol-fed Ppara-null mice. Conclusions These observations indicate that PPARα plays a protective role to enhance mitochondrial function in response to chronic alcohol consumption by adaptive transcriptional activation and suggest that activation of this nuclear receptor may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of ALD. PMID:24773203

  6. Genomic Expression Analyses Reveal Lysosomal, Innate Immunity Proteins, as Disease Correlates in Murine Models of a Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Safeukui, Innocent; Yi, Sue; Tamez, Pamela; Shin, Jenny; Velázquez, Peter; Haldar, Kasturi

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1−/− mice relative to Npc1+/− at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher’s disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1−/− as well as Balb/c Npc1nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants) and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1−/− mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1−/− spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue). Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs (hitherto

  7. Storage Stability of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and Circulating Electrolyzed Water and Their Property Changes after Application.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Meng-Meng; Ahn, Juhee; Ma, Yan-Na; Chen, Shi-Guo; Ye, Xing-Qian; Liu, Dong-Hong; Ding, Tian

    2016-03-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been recognized as an effective bactericidal agent with free chlorine, but its limitations include its instability and its great dependence on equipment. Newly developed circulating electrolyzed water (CEW) with a higher available chlorine concentration (ACC) could successfully overcome these limitations. In this study, SAEW (ACC of 20 mg/L), CEW1 (ACC of 200 mg/L), and CEW2 (ACC of 20 mg/L) were evaluated for changes in properties (pH, oxidization reduction potential [ORP], and ACC) during storage in open or closed glass bottles under light or dark conditions at room temperature (approximately 20 °C) and after washing pork and lettuce. Additionally, the washed pork and lettuce were evaluated for total viable counts, pH and general appearance. The results showed that CEW1 with a higher ACC has better stability than SAEW with a lower ACC for the storage and washing experiments, and CEW still remained stable after dilution with distilled water. The property indices of EW were greatly affected for the pork-washing experiments compared with the lettuce-washing experiments, probably due to the existence of alkaline and organic materials on the surface of pork. Furthermore, EWs were more effective for inactivating microbes in lettuce than in pork, while there was no significant difference in tissue pH and the general appearance of pork and lettuce. These findings indicated that CEW with a higher ACC shows potential for reducing foodborne pathogens on pork and lettuce without effects on their physicochemical characteristics, and it can be applied in a diluted form. PMID:26869019

  8. Ascorbic acid, cognitive function, and Alzheimer's disease: a current review and future direction.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L

    2012-01-01

    This narrative review appraises the human and animal studies implicating ascorbic acid (AA) in normal cognitive function and Alzheimer's disease. A research framework for how nutrition affects brain aging is proposed with emphasis on AA intake, status, metabolism, and transport into brain tissue. A final synopsis highlights areas for future research regarding AA nourishment and healthy brain aging. PMID:22419527

  9. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid-Based Delivery: From Bench to Clinical Trials in Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia; Ribeiro, António J; Veiga, Francisco; Silveira, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Delivery of nucleic acids is the most promising therapy for many diseases that remain untreatable. Therefore, many research efforts have been put on finding a safe and efficient delivery system able to provide a sustained response. Viral vectors have proved to be the most efficient for delivery of nucleic acids and, thus, stand as the foremost vector used in current clinical trials. However, safety issues arise as a main concern and mitigate their use, impelling the improvement of non-viral alternatives. This review focuses on the recent advances in pre-clinical development of non-viral polyplexes and lipoplexes for nucleic acid-based delivery, in contrast with vectors being used in present clinical trials. Nucleic acid vectors for neurodegenerative ataxias, Parkinson's disease, retinitis pigmentosa, cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, pancreatic and lung cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis are discussed to illustrate current state of pre-clinical and clinical studies. Thereby, denoting the prospects for treatment of genetic diseases and elucidating the trend in non-viral vector development and improvement which is expected to significantly increase disease rescue exceeding the modest clinical successes observed so far. PMID:27305810

  10. New insights into sulfur amino acid function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAA) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable AA and is transmet...

  11. A randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial of omega-3 fatty acids and alpha lipoic acid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Lynne; Quinn, Joseph; Montine, Thomas; Dodge, Hiroko H; Woodward, William; Baldauf-Wagner, Sara; Waichunas, Dana; Bumgarner, Lauren; Bourdette, Dennis; Silbert, Lisa; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased cholesterol levels are all mechanisms that have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Several epidemiologic studies have reported a decreased risk of AD with fish consumption. This pilot study was designed to evaluate the effects of supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids alone (ω-3) or omega-3 plus alpha lipoic acid (ω-3 + LA) compared to placebo on oxidative stress biomarkers in AD. The primary outcome measure was peripheral F2-isoprostane levels (oxidative stress measure). Secondary outcome measures included performance on: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living/Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL), and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog). Thirty-nine AD subjects were randomized to one of three groups: 1) placebo, 2) ω-3, or 3) ω-3 + LA for a treatment duration of 12 months. Eighty seven percent (34/39) of the subjects completed the 12-month intervention. There was no difference between groups at 12 months in peripheral F2-isoprostane levels (p = 0.83). The ω-3 + LA and ω-3 were not significantly different than the placebo group in ADAS-cog (p = 0.98, p = 0.86) and in ADL (p = 0.15, p = 0.82). Compared to placebo, the ω-3 + LA showed less decline in MMSE (p < 0.01) and IADL (p = 0.01) and the ω-3 group showed less decline in IADL (p < 0.01). The combination of ω-3 + LA slowed cognitive and functional decline in AD over 12 months. Because the results were generated from a small sample size, further evaluation of the combination of omega-3 fatty acids plus alpha-lipoic acid as a potential treatment in AD is warranted. PMID:24077434

  12. Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Predict Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinny-Köster, Benedict; Bartels, Michael; Becker, Susen; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The liver plays a key role in amino acid metabolism. In former studies, a ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (Fischer’s ratio) revealed associations with hepatic encephalopathy. Furthermore, low concentrations of branched-chain amino acids were linked to sarcopenia in literature. Encephalopathy and sarcopenia are known to dramatically worsen the prognosis. Aim of this study was to investigate a complex panel of plasma amino acids in the context of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods 166 patients evaluated for orthotopic liver transplantation were included. 19 amino acids were measured from citrated plasma samples using mass spectrometry. We performed survival analysis for plasma amino acid constellations and examined the relationship to established mortality predictors. Results 33/166 (19.9%) patients died during follow-up. Lower values of valine (p<0.001), Fischer’s ratio (p<0.001) and valine to phenylalanine ratio (p<0.001) and higher values of phenylalanine (p<0.05) and tyrosine (p<0.05) were significantly associated with mortality. When divided in three groups, the tertiles discriminated cumulative survival for valine (p = 0.016), phenylalanine (p = 0.024) and in particular for valine to phenylalanine ratio (p = 0.003) and Fischer’s ratio (p = 0.005). Parameters were also significantly correlated with MELD and MELD-Na score. Conclusions Amino acids in plasma are valuable biomarkers to determine increased risk of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. In particular, valine concentrations and constellations composed of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were strongly associated with prognosis. Due to their pathophysiological importance, the identified amino acids could be used to examine individual dietary recommendations to serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27410482

  13. Role of omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites in asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Arita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are found naturally in fish oil and are commonly thought to be anti-inflammatory nutrients, with protective effects in inflammatory diseases including asthma and allergies. The mechanisms of these effects remain mostly unknown but are of great interest for their potential therapeutic applications. Large numbers of epidemiological and observational studies investigating the effect of fish intake or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adulthood on asthmatic and allergic outcomes have been conducted. They mostly indicate protective effects and suggest a causal relationship between decreased intake of fish oil in modernized diets and an increasing number of individuals with asthma or other allergic diseases. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM: protectins, resolvins, and maresins) are generated from omega-3 fatty acids such as EPA and DHA via several enzymatic reactions. These mediators counter-regulate airway eosinophilic inflammation and promote the resolution of inflammation in vivo. Several reports have indicated that the biosynthesis of SPM is impaired, especially in severe asthma, which suggests that chronic inflammation in the lung might result from a resolution defect. This article focuses on the beneficial aspects of omega-3 fatty acids and offers recent insights into their bioactive metabolites including resolvins and protectins. PMID:25572556

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Formulations in Cardiovascular Disease: Dietary Supplements are Not Substitutes for Prescription Products.

    PubMed

    Fialkow, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid products are available as prescription formulations (icosapent ethyl, omega-3-acid ethyl esters, omega-3-acid ethyl esters A, omega-3-carboxylic acids) and dietary supplements (predominantly fish oils). Most dietary supplements and all but one prescription formulation contain mixtures of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Products containing both EPA and DHA may raise low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In clinical trials, the EPA-only prescription product, icosapent ethyl, did not raise LDL-C compared with placebo. To correct a common misconception, it is important to note that omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements are not US FDA-approved over-the-counter drugs and are not required to demonstrate safety and efficacy prior to marketing. Conversely, prescription products are supported by extensive clinical safety and efficacy investigations required for FDA approval and have active and ongoing safety monitoring programs. While omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements may have a place in the supplementation of diet, they generally contain lower levels of EPA and DHA than prescription products and are not approved or intended to treat disease. Perhaps due to the lack of regulation of dietary supplements, EPA and DHA levels may vary widely within and between brands, and products may also contain unwanted cholesterol or fats or potentially harmful components, including toxins and oxidized fatty acids. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements should not be substituted for prescription products. Similarly, prescription products containing DHA and EPA should not be substituted for the EPA-only prescription product, as DHA may raise LDL-C and thereby complicate the management of patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:27138439

  15. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. PMID:27198192

  16. Three targets of branched-chain amino acid supplementation in the treatment of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2010-05-01

    The article explains the pathogenesis of disturbances in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) and protein metabolism in various forms of hepatic injury and it is suggested that the main cause of decrease in plasma BCAA concentration in liver cirrhosis is hyperammonemia. Three possible targets of BCAA supplementation in hepatic disease are suggested: (1) hepatic encephalopathy, (2) liver regeneration, and (3) hepatic cachexia. The BCAA may ameliorate hepatic encephalopathy by promoting ammonia detoxification, correction of the plasma amino acid imbalance, and by reduced brain influx of aromatic amino acids. The influence of BCAA supplementation on hepatic encephalopathy could be more effective in chronic hepatic injury with hyperammonemia and low concentrations of BCAA in blood than in acute hepatic illness, where hyperaminoacidemia frequently develops. The favorable effect of BCAA on liver regeneration and nutritional state of the body is related to their stimulatory effect on protein synthesis, secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, glutamine production and inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Presumably the beneficial effect of BCAA on hepatic cachexia is significant in compensated liver disease with decreased plasma BCAA concentrations, whereas it is less pronounced in hepatic diseases with inflammatory complications and enhanced protein turnover. It is concluded that specific benefits associated with BCAA supplementation depend significantly on the type of liver disease and on the presence of inflammatory reaction. An important task for clinical research is to identify groups of patients for whom BCAA treatment can significantly improve the health-related quality of life and the prognosis of hepatic disease. PMID:20071143

  17. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester: its protective role against certain major eye diseases.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ugurcu, Veli; Balci, Mehmet; Gurel, Ayse; Erden, Gonul; Cakmak, Ozlem; Akyol, Omer

    2014-11-01

    As an effective compound found mainly in the honeybee product propolis, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been commonly utilized as a medicine and remedial agent, in a number of countries. Specifically, it might inhibit nuclear factor kappa B at micromolar concentrations and demonstrate antioxidant, antineoplastic, antiproliferative, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory features. This review article summarizes the recent progress regarding the favorable effects of CAPE on a number of eye disease models, including cataract and posterior capsule opacification, corneal diseases, retina and optic nerve-related diseases, ischemia/reperfusion injury of retina, inflammation and infection-related diseases. CAPE has been found to exhibit promising efficacy, with minimal adverse effects, in animal and cell culture studies of several eye diseases. PMID:25100535

  18. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the 'classical' (neutral) and 'alternative' (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. PMID:23391614

  19. Evaluation of the effects of a mixture of organic acids and duration of storage on the survival of salmonella on turkey carcasses.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk, Anita

    2015-03-01

    Samples from turkey carcasses previously inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis 33/66 were subjected to the effect of various mixtures of equal parts of organic acid solutions (acetic, ascorbic, citric, lactic, and tartaric acids). The first part of the study concerned analysis of the influence of the mixtures of organic acids over 15 or 30 min on Salmonella Enteritidis on turkey carcasses. Turkey breast samples were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis at 3.7, 2.7, 1.7, 0.7, and 0.07 log CFU. The antibacterial effectiveness of the organic acids differed depending on the initial population of Salmonella on the turkey carcasses. Salmonella was most sensitive to mixtures of equal parts of 1% ascorbic, 1% citric, and 1% tartaric acids. The second part of the study involved determining the influence the organic acid mixtures had on survival of Salmonella Enteritidis on turkey meat stored at 4°C for 2, 4, or 6 days. The level of Salmonella was determined using a most-probable-number method. Salmonella Enteritidis was inoculated into a nutrient broth, incubated at 37°C for 24 h, and then added to the diluent in which the turkey breast samples were immersed for 5 min. The initial Salmonella level of the control samples of turkey breast following immersion was determined in each analysis. After storage at 4°C, turkey samples were transferred to the organic acid solutions for 15 min. Stainless steel templates were used to swab 50 cm(2) of the turkey breast samples. During storage at 4°C, the Salmonella level in the meat samples decreased. The largest decrease occurred at 4°C after 6 days with equal parts of 1% acetic acid, 1% lactic acid, and 1% tartaric acid. Thus, treatment of raw turkey breasts with a mixture of organic acids is a promising option for reducing the risk of the presence of Salmonella. PMID:25719885

  20. A method for measuring disease-specific iduronic acid from the non-reducing end of glycosaminoglycan in mucopolysaccharidosis type II mice.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yohta; Wakabayashi, Taichi; Akiyama, Kazumasa; Hoshina, Hiroo; Higuchi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Eto, Yoshikatsu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder arising from deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), which results in progressive accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in multiple tissues. Accumulated GAGs are generally measured as the amount of total GAGs. However, we recently demonstrated that GAG accumulation in the brain of MPS II model mice cannot be reliably detected by conventional dye-binding assay measuring total GAGs. Here we developed a novel quantitative method for measurement of disease-specific GAGs based on the analysis of 2-sulfoiduronic acid levels derived from the non-reducing terminal end of the polysaccharides by using recombinant human IDS (rhIDS) and recombinant human iduronidase (rhIDUA). This method was evaluated on GAGs obtained from the liver and brain of MPS II mice. The GAGs were purified from tissue homogenates and then digested with rhIDS and rhIDUA to generate a desulfated iduronic acid from their non-reducing terminal end. HPLC analysis revealed that the generated iduronic acid levels were markedly increased in the liver and cerebrum of the MPS II mice, whereas the uronic acid was not detected in wild-type mice. These results indicate that this assay clearly detects the disease-specific GAGs in tissues from MPS II mice. PMID:26051019

  1. Bile acid receptors as targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Gross, Barbara; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis. When dyslipidemia coincides with other metabolic disorders such as obesity, hypertension, and glucose intolerance, defined as the metabolic syndrome (MS), individuals present an elevated risk to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) as well as CVD. Because the MS epidemic represents a growing public health problem worldwide, the development of therapies remains a major challenge. Alterations of bile acid pool regulation in T2D have revealed a link between bile acid and metabolic homeostasis. The bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5 both regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, rendering them potential pharmacological targets for MS therapy. This review discusses the mechanisms of metabolic regulation by FXR and TGR5 and the utility relevance of natural and synthetic modulators of FXR and TGR5 activity, including bile acid sequestrants, in the treatment of the MS. PMID:22550135

  2. The association of infantile osteopetrosis and neuronal storage disease in two brothers.

    PubMed

    Jagadha, V; Halliday, W C; Becker, L E; Hinton, D

    1988-01-01

    Neurological manifestations in infantile osteopetrosis are common and varied, and not always attributable to the skeletal pathology. An unusual association of osteopetrosis with neuronal storage of ceroid lipofuscin is reported in two infant brothers born of nonconsanguinous parents. The first child became symptomatic at age 5 days with weight loss and vomiting. He had poor head control, hypertonia, and persistent fisting, and died at age 2 months. In the second infant, the diagnosis of osteopetrosis was confirmed at age 2 days. His neurological symptoms included blindness, deafness, and recurrent seizures. The infant died at 7 months of age. In both cases, autopsy confirmed the diffuse bony sclerosis with hepatosplenomegaly and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Neuropathological examination revealed cerebral atrophy with ventricular dilation, neuronal loss, and astrogliosis. The most striking finding was widespread accumulation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscin associated with formation of axonal spheroids. The optic nerves were compressed at the optic foramina and showed loss of myelinated axons and gliosis. Rapid Golgi impregnations of neurons from the calcarine cortex in the second infant were analyzed quantitatively, showing a reduction in the total dendritic length and number of branches. The primary defect in osteopetrosis is thought to be a lysosomal dysfunction involving the monocyte cell line from which osteoclasts are derived. Thus, the association in two brothers of osteopetrosis with accumulation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscin may not be fortuitous. The neuronal storage disorder in this instance probably reflects lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:3348081

  3. Fifty years with bile acids and steroids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sjövall, Jan

    2004-08-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites, e.g., steroid hormones and bile acids, constitute a class of compounds of great biological importance. Their chemistry, biochemistry, and regulation in the body have been intensely studied for more than two centuries. The author has studied aspects of the biochemistry and clinical chemistry of steroids and bile acids for more than 50 years, and this paper, which is an extended version of the Schroepfer Medal Award lecture, reviews and discusses part of this work. Development and application of analytical methods based on chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) have been a central part of many projects, aiming at detailed characterization and quantification of metabolic profiles of steroids and bile acids under different conditions. In present terminology, much of the work may be termed steroidomics and cholanoidomics. Topics discussed are bile acids in human bile and feces, bile acid production, bacterial dehydroxylation of bile acids and steroids during the enterohepatic circulation, profiles of steroid sulfates in plasma of humans and other primates, development of neutral and ion-exchanging lipophilic derivatives of Sephadex for sample preparation and group separation of steroid and bile acid conjugates, profiles of steroids and bile acids in human urine under different conditions, hydroxylation of bile acids in liver disease, effects of alcohol-induced redox changes on steroid synthesis and metabolism, alcohol-induced changes of bile acid biosynthesis, compartmentation of bile acid synthesis studied with 3H-labeled ethanol, formation and metabolism of sulfated metabolites of progesterone in human pregnancy, abnormal patterns of these in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy corrected by ursodeoxycholic acid, inherited and acquired defects of bile acid biosynthesis and their treatment, conjugation of bile acids and steroids with N-acetylglucosamine, sulfate-glucuronide double conjugates of hydroxycholesterols

  4. Salicylic and jasmonic acid pathways are necessary for defence against Dickeya solani as revealed by a novel method for Blackleg disease screening of in vitro grown potato.

    PubMed

    Burra, D D; Mühlenbock, P; Andreasson, E

    2015-09-01

    Potato is major crop ensuring food security in Europe, and blackleg disease is increasingly causing losses in yield and during storage. Recently, one blackleg pathogen, Dickeya solani has been shown to be spreading in Northern Europe that causes aggressive disease development. Currently, identification of tolerant commercial potato varieties has been unsuccessful; this is confounded by the complicated etiology of the disease and a strong environmental influence on disease development. There is currently a lack of efficient testing systems. Here, we describe a system for quantification of blackleg symptoms on shoots of sterile in vitro potato plants, which saves time and space compared to greenhouse and existing field assays. We found no evidence for differences in infection between the described in vitro-based screening method and existing greenhouse assays. This system facilitates efficient screening of blackleg disease response of potato plants independent of other microorganisms and variable environmental conditions. We therefore used the in vitro screening method to increase understanding of plant mechanisms involved in blackleg disease development by analysing disease response of hormone- related (salicylic and jasmonic acid) transgenic potato plants. We show that both jasmonic (JA) and salicylic (SA) acid pathways regulate tolerance to blackleg disease in potato, a result unlike previous findings in Arabidopsis defence response to necrotrophic bacteria. We confirm this by showing induction of a SA marker, pathogenesis-related protein 1 (StPR1), and a JA marker, lipoxygenase (StLOX), in Dickeya solani infected in vitro potato plants. We also observed that tubers of transgenic potato plants were more susceptible to soft rot compared to wild type, suggesting a role for SA and JA pathways in general tolerance to Dickeya. PMID:25903921

  5. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  6. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  7. Lead exposure in the lead-acid storage battery manufacturing and PVC compounding industries.

    PubMed

    Ho, S F; Sam, C T; Embi, G B

    1998-09-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Human Exposure Assessment Location (HEAL) Project which comes under the United Nations Environment Programme/World Health Organisation (UNEP/WHO) Global environmental Monitoring System (GEMS). The objective of the study was to evaluate workers' exposure to lead in industries with the highest exposure. All subjects were interviewed about their occupational and smoking histories, the use of personal protective equipment and personal hygiene. The contribution of a dietary source of lead intake from specified foods known to contain lead locally and personal air sampling for lead were assessed. A total of 61 workers from two PVC compounding and 50 workers from two lead acid battery manufacturing plants were studied together with 111 matched controls. In the PVC compounding plants the mean lead-in-air level was 0.0357 mg/m3, with the highest levels occurring during the pouring and mixing operations. This was lower than the mean lead-in-air level of 0.0886 mg/m3 in the lead battery manufacturing plants where the highest exposure was in the loading of lead ingots into milling machines. Workers in lead battery manufacturing had significantly higher mean blood lead than the PVC workers (means, 32.51 and 23.91 mcg/100 ml respectively), but there was poor correlation with lead-in-air levels. Among the lead workers, the Malays had significantly higher blood lead levels than the Chinese (mean blood levels were 33.03 and 25.35 mcg/100 ml respectively) although there was no significant difference between the two ethnic groups in the control group. There were no significant differences between the exposed and control group in terms of dietary intake of specified local foods known to contain lead. However, Malays consumed significantly more fish than the Chinese did. There were no ethnic differences in the hours of overtime work, number of years of exposure, usage of gloves and respirators and smoking habits. Among the Malays, 94.3% eat with

  8. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease.We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing.The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients' reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group.The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:27603372

  9. The roles of bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in the hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Yuza, Kizuki; Hirose, Yuki; Nakajima, Masato; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Based on research carried out over the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that bile acids act not only as detergents, but also as important signaling molecules that exert various biological effects via activation of specific nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways. Bile acids also regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in the synthesis and metabolism of bile acids, glucose, fatty acids, and lipoproteins, as well as energy metabolism. Receptors activated by bile acids include, farnesoid X receptor α, pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled receptors, TGR5, muscarinic receptor 2, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)2. The ligand of S1PR2, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates various physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We have recently reported that conjugated bile acids, via S1PR2, activate and upregulate nuclear sphingosine kinase 2, increase nuclear S1P, and induce genes encoding enzymes and transporters involved in lipid and sterol metabolism in the liver. Here, we discuss the role of bile acids and S1P signaling in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27459945

  10. Recent Progress on Bile Acid Receptor Modulators for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping

    2016-07-28

    Bile acids are steroid-derived molecules synthesized in the liver, secreted from hepatocytes into the bile canaliculi, and subsequently stored in the gall bladder. During the feeding, bile flows into the duodenum, where it contributes to the solubilization and digestion of lipid-soluble nutrients. After a meal, bile-acid levels increase in the intestine, liver, and also in the systemic circulation. Therefore, serum bile-acid levels serve as an important sensing mechanism for nutrient and energy. Recent studies have described bile acids as versatile signaling molecules endowed with systemic endocrine functions. Bile acids are ligands for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1, M-BAR, and BG37) and nuclear hormone receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR; also known as NR1H4). Acting through these diverse signaling pathways, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose homeostasis, and energy expenditure. These bile-acid-controlled signaling pathways have become the source of promising novel drug targets to treat common metabolic and hepatic diseases. PMID:26878262

  11. Novel Retinoic Acid Receptor Alpha Agonists for Treatment of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN. PMID:22125642

  12. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease. PMID:18490185

  13. Loss of AP-5 results in accumulation of aberrant endolysosomes: defining a new type of lysosomal storage disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R.; Esteves, Typhaine; Darios, Frédéric; Madeo, Marianna; Chang, Jaerak; Roda, Ricardo H.; Dürr, Alexandra; Anheim, Mathieu; Gellera, Cinzia; Li, Jun; Züchner, Stephan; Mariotti, Caterina; Stevanin, Giovanni; Blackstone, Craig; Kruer, Michael C.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptor proteins (AP 1–5) are heterotetrameric complexes that facilitate specialized cargo sorting in vesicular-mediated trafficking. Mutations in AP5Z1, encoding a subunit of the AP-5 complex, have been reported to cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), although their impact at the cellular level has not been assessed. Here we characterize three independent fibroblast lines derived from skin biopsies of patients harbouring nonsense mutations in AP5Z1 and presenting with spastic paraplegia accompanied by neuropathy, parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment. In all three patient-derived lines, we show that there is complete loss of AP-5 ζ protein and a reduction in the associated AP-5 µ5 protein. Using ultrastructural analysis, we show that these patient-derived lines consistently exhibit abundant multilamellar structures that are positive for markers of endolysosomes and are filled with aberrant storage material organized as exaggerated multilamellar whorls, striated belts and ‘fingerprint bodies’. This phenotype can be replicated in a HeLa cell culture model by siRNA knockdown of AP-5 ζ. The cellular phenotype bears striking resemblance to features described in a number of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Collectively, these findings reveal an emerging picture of the role of AP-5 in endosomal and lysosomal homeostasis, illuminates a potential pathomechanism that is relevant to the role of AP-5 in neurons and expands the understanding of recessive HSPs. Moreover, the resulting accumulation of storage material in endolysosomes leads us to propose that AP-5 deficiency represents a new type of LSDs. PMID:26085577

  14. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in mango fruit by modulating proline metabolism and energy status under chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Zheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of oxalic acid on chilling injury, proline metabolism and energy status in mango fruit were investigated after mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zill) were dipped in 5mM oxalic acid solution for 10min at 25°C and then stored at low temperature (10±0.5°C) for 49days thereafter transferred to 25°C for 4days. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid apparently inhibited the development of chilling injury, notably elevated proline accumulation actually associated with increase in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) activity and decrease in proline dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the peel and the flesh, without activation of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) activity, and maintained high ATP level and energy charge in the flesh during storage. It was suggested that these effects of oxalic acid might collectively contribute to improving chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating chilling injury and maintaining quality of mango fruit in long term cold storage. PMID:24001814

  15. Controlled trial of oligopeptide versus amino acid diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, J C; Giaffer, M H; Holdsworth, C D

    1995-01-01

    Elemental diets are effective in inducing remission in active Crohn's disease, but how they exert this therapeutic effect is unclear. In a previous study a whole protein containing diet proved less effective than one in which food antigens were excluded, suggesting that exclusion of food antigens from the gut was a possible mechanism. This study was designed to test whether an oligopeptide diet of hydrolysed proteins was as effective as an amino acid based diet. These diets were equally antigen free but with different nitrogen sources. Forty four patients with active Crohn's disease were randomised in a controlled trial of amino acid versus oligopeptide diet. The feeds were given by nasogastric tube in equicaloric quantities and were the sole form of nutrition. Treatment was continued for four weeks although failure to improve by day 10 resulted in withdrawal. Quantitative leucocyte scintigraphy was used to investigate the effect of diet treatment on gut inflammation. Clinical and nutritional responses to treatment were also measured. Sixteen patients entered remission (including withdrawal of corticosteroids), six patients could not tolerate the nasogastric tube, and 22 patients failed to respond. The two diets were equally effective. Patients who responded had a rapid drop in clinical index of disease activity and a major reduction in the bowel uptake of leucocytes on scintigraphy. The oligopeptide and amino acid based enteral feeds were equally effective at inducing remission in active Crohn's disease. With both diets clinical improvement was accompanied by a reduction in intestinal inflammation. Images Figure 3 PMID:7890238

  16. Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Correction of a Canine Model of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, David A.; Correia, Catherine E.; Conlon, Thomas; Specht, Andrew; Verstegen, John; Onclin-Verstegen, Karine; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet; Mirian, Layla; Cossette, Holly; Falk, Darin J.; Germain, Sean; Clement, Nathalie; Porvasnik, Stacy; Fiske, Laurie; Struck, Maggie; Ramirez, Harvey E.; Jordan, Juan; Andrutis, Karl; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa; von Gierke disease; MIM 232200) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Patients with GSDIa are unable to maintain glucose homeostasis and suffer from severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidosis. The canine model of GSDIa is naturally occurring and recapitulates almost all aspects of the human form of disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based therapy to treat the canine model of GSDIa. After delivery of a therapeutic rAAV2/8 vector to a 1-day-old GSDIa dog, improvement was noted as early as 2 weeks posttreatment. Correction was transient, however, and by 2 months posttreatment the rAAV2/8-treated dog could no longer sustain normal blood glucose levels after 1 hr of fasting. The same animal was then dosed with a therapeutic rAAV2/1 vector delivered via the portal vein. Two months after rAAV2/1 dosing, both blood glucose and lactate levels were normal at 4 hr postfasting. With more prolonged fasting, the dog still maintained near-normal glucose concentrations, but lactate levels were elevated by 9 hr, indicating that partial correction was achieved. Dietary glucose supplementation was discontinued starting 1 month after rAAV2/1 delivery and the dog continues to thrive with minimal laboratory abnormalities at 23 months of age (18 months after rAAV2/1 treatment). These results demonstrate that delivery of rAAV vectors can mediate significant correction of the GSDIa phenotype and that gene transfer may be a promising alternative therapy for this disease and other genetic diseases of the liver. PMID:20163245

  17. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(8): 438-444] PMID:25999178

  18. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy. PMID:25999178

  19. Acids in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate caused quality deterioration of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce during storage in modified atmosphere package.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenqiang; Huang, Lihan; Fan, Xuetong

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies showed that sodium acid sulfate (SAS) and levulinic acid (LA) in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was effective in inactivating human pathogens on Romaine lettuce. The present study investigated the effects of LA and SAS in combination with SDS (as compared with citric acid and chlorine) on the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and sensory quality of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce in modified atmosphere packages during storage at 4 °C. Results showed that LA (0.5% to 3%) and SAS (0.25% to 0.75%) with 0.05% SDS caused detrimental effects on visual quality and texture of lettuce. LA- and SAS-treated samples were sensorially unacceptable due to development of sogginess and softening after 7 and 14 d storage. It appears that the combined treatments caused an increase in the respiration rate of fresh-cut lettuce as indicated by higher CO(2) and lower O(2) in modified atmosphere packages. On the positive side, the acid treatments inhibited cut edge browning of lettuce pieces developed during storage. LA (0.5%), SAS (0.25%), and citric acid (approximately 0.25%) in combination with SDS reduced population of E. coli OH157:H7 by 0.41, 0.87, and 0.58 log CFU/g, respectively, while chlorine achieved a reduction of 0.94 log CFU/g without damage to the lettuce. Therefore, compared to chlorine, LA and SAS in combination with SDS have limited commercial value for fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce due to quality deterioration during storage. PMID:21535517

  20. [Therapeutic efficacy of pantothenic acid preparations in ischemic heart disease patients].

    PubMed

    Borets, V M; Lis, M A; Pyrochkin, V M; Kishkovich, V P; Butkevich, N D

    1987-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness of the pantothenic acid drugs: calciipantothenas and pantethine, was studied in 182 patients with coronary heart disease and stable angina of effort. It is shown that both the drugs produce favourable effects on certain parameters of hemodynamics, on the metabolism of lipids, riboflavin and ascorbic acid. It is recommended that the administration of calciipantothenas in a dose of 300 mg/day, during 3 weeks, be included into the combined treatment of coronary patients with no manifest disorders of lipid metabolism. Patients with manifest hyperlipidemia should be administered pantethine in a dose of 500 mg/day. PMID:3590676

  1. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H+-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  2. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H(+)-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  3. Acid ceramidase and the treatment of ceramide diseases: The expanding role of enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Schuchman, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    Ceramides are a diverse group of sphingolipids that play important roles in many biological processes. Acid ceramidase (AC) is one key enzyme that regulates ceramide metabolism. Early research on AC focused on the fact that it is the enzyme deficient in the rare genetic disorder, Farber Lipogranulomatosis. Recent research has revealed that deficiency of the same enzyme is responsible for a rare form of spinal muscular atrophy associated with myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Due to their diverse role in biology, accumulation of ceramides also has been implicated in the pathobiology of many other common diseases, including infectious lung diseases, diabetes, cancers and others. This has revealed the potential of AC as a therapy for many of these diseases. This review will focus on the biology of AC and the potential role of this enzyme in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27155573

  4. Klüver Bucy syndrome following hypoglycaemic coma in a patient with glycogen storage disease type Ib.

    PubMed

    Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Isapof, Arnaud; Witas, Jean-Bernard; Petit, François M; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    Patients with type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) have poor tolerance to fasting, sometimes less than 3 hours during infancy. Even though most patients are able, as they get older, to tolerate a longer fasting period, they are at permanent risk for fast-induced hypoglycaemia, even in adulthood. Klüver Bucy syndrome, is characterized by psychic blindness (inability to recognize familiar objects), hypermetamorphosis (strong tendency to react to visual stimulus), increased oral exploration, placidity, indiscriminate hyper-sexuality and change in dietary habits. In this case report, we describe the development of Klüver Bucy syndrome in a 28-year-old man with type Ib GSD, following prolonged and severe hypoglycaemia triggered by a common respiratory infection. PMID:21103936

  5. Comparison of dietary therapy and portacaval shunt in the management of a patient with type Ib glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, S M; Greene, H L; Gay, J C; Neblett, W W

    1987-01-01

    A patient with glycogen storage disease type IB (GSD-Ib) is described. Beginning at age 34 months, the patient was managed with dietary measures, including nocturnal intragastric feedings. Therapy caused substantial biochemical and clinical improvement while the patient remained hospitalized; chronic noncompliance at home, however, resulted in profound growth failure and biochemical abnormalities. Due to a previous case report describing clinical, biochemical, and hematological improvement following a portacaval shunt in a similar patient, portacaval shunt was performed in our patient at age 13 years. During the 12 months following surgery, there was no improvement of our patient's growth or of biochemical or hematological abnormalities. Due to the lack of improvement following surgery, 24-hour constant infusion intragastric feedings were instituted and have been associated with substantial benefit. PMID:3123638

  6. Increased cellular cholesterol efflux in glycogen storage disease type Ia mice: a potential mechanism that protects against premature atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew D; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Chou, Janice Yang

    2005-08-29

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) patients manifest a pro-atherogenic lipid profile but are not at elevated risk for developing atherosclerosis. Serum phospholipid, which correlates positively with the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated cholesterol efflux, and apolipoprotein A-IV and E, acceptors for ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-mediated cholesterol transport, are increased in GSD-Ia mice. Importantly, sera from GSD-Ia mice are more efficient than sera from control littermates in promoting SR-BI- and ABCA1-mediated cholesterol effluxes. As the first step in reverse cholesterol transport, essential for cholesterol homeostasis, these observations provide one explanation why GSD-Ia patients are apparently protected against premature atherosclerosis. PMID:16098970

  7. Impact of fungicides on sugarbeet yield, quality, and storage respiration rate in the absence of disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers in the United Kingdom reported that triazole and/or strobilurin fungicides increased sugarbeet, Beta vulgaris, yield by 5%, even when disease pressure was moderate to low. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of fungicides on sugarbeet yield, quality, and postharve...

  8. Impaired Semantic Knowledge Underlies the Reduced Verbal Short-Term Storage Capacity in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Frederic; Majerus, Steve; De Baerdemaeker, Julie; Salmon, Eric; Collette, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    A decrease in verbal short-term memory (STM) capacity is consistently observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although this impairment has been mainly attributed to attentional deficits during encoding and maintenance, the progressive deterioration of semantic knowledge in early stages of AD may also be an important determinant of poor…

  9. The association of bile acid excretion and atherosclerotic coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Charach, Gideon; Grosskopf, Itamar; Rabinovich, Alexander; Shochat, Michael; Weintraub, Moshe; Rabinovich, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Excess cholesterol is usually eliminated from the body by conversion to bile acids excreted in feces as bile salts. The excretion of large amounts of bile protects against atherosclerosis, while diminished excretion may lead to coronary artery disease (CAD). Objective: To investigate a relationship between CAD and bile acid excretion. Methods: Bile acid excretion was compared between 36 patients with proven CAD and 37 CAD-free individuals (controls). The groups were comparable for demographics and selected risk factors. All subjects received a 4-day standard diet that included ∼500 mg of cholesterol. Fecal bile acids from 24-hour stool collections were measured by gas liquid chromatography. Results: CAD patients excreted lower amounts of total bile acids (358 ± 156 mg) than controls (617 ± 293 mg; p < 0.01) and less deoxycholic acid (188.29 ± 98.12 mg versus 325.96 ± 198.57 mg; p < 0.0001) and less lithocholic acid (115.43 ± 71.89 mg versus 197.27 ± 126.87 mg; p < 0.01). Advanced age, male gender, left ventricular ejection fraction and total bile acid levels were significant independent factors that predicted CAD (p < 0.05). Mortality, CAD and cerebrovascular accident development rates were significantly lower for the controls at the 13-year follow up. Conclusion: CAD patients have significantly decreased bile acid excretion levels than non-CAD patients. An impaired ability to excrete cholesterol may be an additional risk factor for CAD development. PMID:21694811

  10. Docosahexaenoic acid status in females of reproductive age with maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Mazer, Laura M; Yi, Sarah H L; Singh, Rani H

    2010-04-01

    Individuals with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) have impaired metabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) valine, isoleucine, and leucine. Life-long dietary therapy is recommended to restrict BCAA intake and thus prevent poor neurological outcomes and death. To maintain adequate nutritional status, the majority of protein and nutrients are derived from synthetic BCAA-free medical foods with variable fatty acid content. Given the restrictive diet and the importance of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in neurological development, this study evaluated the dietary and fatty acid status of females of reproductive age with MSUD attending a metabolic camp. Healthy controls of similar age and sex were selected from existing normal laboratory data. Total lipid fatty acid concentration in plasma and erythrocytes was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Participants with MSUD had normal to increased concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte alpha linolenic acid (ALA) but significantly lower concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as percent of total lipid fatty acids compared with controls (plasma DHA: MSUD 1.03 +/- 0.35, controls 2.87 +/- 1.08; P = 0.001; erythrocyte DHA: MSUD 2.58 +/- 0.58, controls 3.66 +/- 0.80; P = 0.011). Dietary records reflected negligible or no DHA intake over the 3-day period prior to the blood draw (range 0-2 mg). These results suggest females of reproductive age with MSUD have lower blood DHA concentrations than age-matched controls. In addition, the presence of ALA in medical foods and the background diet may not counter the lack of preformed DHA in the diet. The implications of these results warrant further investigation. PMID:20217236

  11. Effects of a propionic acid-based preservative on storage characteristics, nutritive value, and energy content for alfalfa hays packaged in large round bales.

    PubMed

    Coblentz, W K; Bertram, M G

    2012-01-01

    During 2009 and 2010, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) hays from 2 cuttings harvested from the same field site were used to evaluate the effects of a propionic acid-based preservative on the storage characteristics and nutritive value of hays stored as large round bales. A total of 87 large round bales (diameter = 1.5m) were included in the study; of these, 45 bales served as controls, whereas 42 were treated with a commercial propionic acid-based preservative at mean application rates of 0.5±0.14 and 0.7±0.19% of bale weight, expressed on a wet (as is) or dry matter basis, respectively. Initial bale moisture concentrations ranged from 10.2 to 40.4%. Internal bale temperatures were monitored daily during an outdoor storage period, and heating characteristics were summarized for each bale as heating degree days (HDD) >30°C. For acid-treated bales, the regression relationship between HDD and initial bale moisture was best fitted to a quadratic model in which the linear term was dropped to improve fit (Y=2.02x(2) - 401; R(2)=0.77); control hays were best fitted to a nonlinear model in which the independent variable was squared [Y=4,112 - (4,549×e(-0.000559x*x)); R(2)=0.77]. Based on these regressions, acid-treated bales accumulated more HDD than control hays when the initial bale moisture was >27.7%; this occurred largely because acid treatment tended to prolong active heating relative to control hays. Linear regressions of recoveries of dry matter on HDD did not differ on the basis of treatment, yielding a common linear relationship of Y=-0.0066x+96.3 (R(2)=0.75). Regressions relating changes (post-storage - pre-storage) in concentrations of several nutritional components (neutral detergent fiber, lignin, ash, crude protein, and total digestible nutrients) with HDD for acid-treated hays typically exhibited more inflection points or were higher-ordered polynomial regressions than those of control hays. These more complex responses probably reflected the perturbation

  12. [An endogenous dithiol with antioxidant properties: alpha-lipoic acid, potential uses in cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ghibu, S; Richard, C; Delemasure, S; Vergely, C; Mogosan, C; Muresan, A

    2008-06-01

    Alpha-Lipoic acid (ALA) is a natural compound, chemically named 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid, also referred to as thioctic acid. In humans, ALA is synthetized by the liver and other tissues with high metabolic activity: heart, kidney. ALA is both water and fat soluble and therefore, is widely distributed in both cellular membranes and cytosol. Recently, a greater deal of attention has been given to antioxidant function for ALA and its reduced formed: dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). ALA scavenges hydroxyl radicals, hypochlorous acid and singlet oxygen. It may also exert antioxidant effects in biological systems through transitional metal chelation. Dihydrolipoic acid has been shown to have antioxidant but also pro-oxidant properties in systems in which hydroxyl radical was generated. ALA/DHLA ratio has the capacity to recycle endogenous antioxidants such as vitamin E. A number of experimental as well as clinical studies point to the usefulness of ALA as a therapeutic agent for such diverse conditions as diabetes, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, neuropathy, neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia-reperfusion injury. ALA represents a potential agent on the vascular endothelium, recording to ALA/DHLA redox couple is one of the most powerful biological antioxidant systems. PMID:18571145

  13. Serum uric acid and the risk of cardiovascular and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Bardin, Thomas; Dawson, Jesse; Dominiczak, Anna; Kielstein, Jan T; Manolis, Athanasios J; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that chronic hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for hypertension, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular diseases. This highlights the need for greater attention to serum uric acid levels when profiling patients, and suggests that the threshold above which uricemia is considered abnormal is 6  mg/dl, in light of the available evidence. Another important question is whether lowering serum uric acid can improve cardiovascular and renal outcomes, and what therapeutic mechanism of action could provide more clinical benefits to patients; the available literature shows a trend toward improvement associated with administration of urate-lowering drugs, in particular for the xanthine oxidase inhibitors. The demonstrated efficacy of urate-lowering therapy on outcomes other than gout flares leads to the consideration that treatment may be beneficial even in the absence of overt gout when hyperuricemia accompanies other clinical conditions, such as urate deposition, advanced CKD or cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26136207

  14. Evaluation of circulating levels and renal clearance of natural amino acids in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Pivonello, R; Melis, D; Alfieri, R; Filippella, M; Spagnuolo, G; Salvatore, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2002-02-01

    Although the hypercortisolism-induced impairment of protein homeostasis is object of several studies, a detailed evaluation of the complete amino acid profile of patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) has never been performed. The aim of the current open transversal controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary concentrations as well as renal clearance of the complete series of natural amino acids and their relationship with glucose tolerance in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Twenty patients with CD (10 active and 10 cured) and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls entered the study. Measurement of serum and urinary levels of the complete series of natural amino acids was performed in all patients analyzed by cationic exchange high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) after 2 weeks of a standardized protein intake regimen. The renal clearance (renal excretion rate) of each amino acid was calculated on the basis of the serum and urinary concentrations of creatinine and the specific amino acid. Fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose and insulin response to standard glucose load, insulinogenic and homeostasis model insulin resistance (Homa-R) indexes were also evaluated and correlated to the circulating levels and renal clearances of each amino acid. Significantly higher serum (p<0.01) and urinary (p<0.05) levels of alanine and cystine, lower serum and higher urinary levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.05) and higher renal excretion rates of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.01) were found in patients with active CD than in patients cured from the disease and in controls. No difference was found between cured patients and controls. Creatinine clearance was similar in active and cured patients and in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol levels were significantly correlated to urinary cystine levels (r=0.85; p<0.01) and renal excretion rate of leucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05), isoleucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05) and valine (r=-0

  15. Phosphorus Effects on the Mycelium and Storage Structures of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus as Studied in the Soil and Roots by Analysis of Fatty Acid Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, P. A.; Baath, E.; Jakobsen, I.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus between soil and roots, and between mycelial and storage structures, was studied by use of the fatty acid signature 16:1(omega)5. Increasing the soil phosphorus level resulted in a decrease in the level of the fatty acid 16:1(omega)5 in the soil and roots. A similar decrease was detected by microscopic measurements of root colonization and of the length of AM fungal hyphae in the soil. The fatty acid 16:1(omega)5 was estimated from two types of lipids, phospholipids and neutral lipids, which mainly represent membrane lipids and storage lipids, respectively. The numbers of spores of the AM fungus formed in the soil correlated most closely with neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1(omega)5, whereas the hyphal length in the soil correlated most closely with phospholipid fatty acid 16:1(omega)5. The fungal neutral lipid/phospholipid ratio in the extraradical mycelium was positively correlated with the level of root infection and thus decreased with increasing applications of P. The neutral lipid/phospholipid ratio indicated that at high P levels, less carbon was allocated to storage structures. At all levels of P applied, the major part of the AM fungus was found to be present outside the roots, as estimated from phospholipid fatty acid 16:1(omega)5. The ratio of extraradical biomass/intraradical biomass was not affected by the application of P, except for a decrease at the highest level of P applied. PMID:16535691

  16. Periodic Acid-Schiff Staining Parallels the Immunoreactivity Seen By Direct Immunofluorescence in Autoimmune Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Upegui Zapata, Yulieth Alexandra; Howard, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background: In many countries and laboratories, techniques such as direct immunofluorescence (DIF) are not available for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Thus, these laboratories are limited in the full diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases, vasculitis, and rheumatologic diseases. In our experience with these diseases and the patient's skin biopsies, we have noted a positive correlation between periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and immunofluorescence patterns; however, these were just empiric observations. In the current study, we aim to confirm these observations, given the concept that the majority of autoantibodies are glycoproteins and should thus be recognized by PAS staining. Aims: To compare direct immunofluorescent and PAS staining, in multiple autoimmune diseases that are known to exhibit specific direct immunofluorescent patterns. Materials and Methods: We studied multiple autoimmune skin diseases: Five cases of bullous pemphigoid, five cases of pemphigus vulgaris, ten cases of cutaneous lupus, ten cases of autoimmune vasculitis, ten cases of lichen planus (LP), and five cases of cutaneous drug reactions (including one case of erythema multiforme). In addition, we utilized 45 normal skin control specimens from plastic surgery reductions. Results: We found a 98% positive correlation between DIF and PAS staining patterns over all the disease samples. Conclusion: We recommend that laboratories without access to DIF always perform PAS staining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for a review of the reactivity pattern. PMID:27114972

  17. Immune response to enzyme replacement therapies in lysosomal storage diseases and the role of immune tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Dickson, Patricia I; Muldowney, Laurie; Lee, Jessica J; Rosenberg, Amy; Abichandani, Rekha; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Burton, Barbara K; Dewey, Maureen; Freitas, Alexandra; Gavin, Derek; Griebel, Donna; Hogan, Melissa; Holland, Stephen; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot; Turka, Laurence A; Utz, Jeanine J; Wang, Yow-Ming; Whitley, Chester B; Kazi, Zoheb B; Pariser, Anne R

    2016-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Organization for Rare Disease (NORD) convened a public workshop titled "Immune Responses to Enzyme Replacement Therapies: Role of Immune Tolerance Induction" to discuss the impact of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) on efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) intended to treat patients with lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Participants in the workshop included FDA staff, clinicians, scientists, patients, industry, and advocacy group representatives. The risks and benefits of implementing prophylactic immune tolerance induction (ITI) to reduce the potential clinical impact of antibody development were considered. Complications due to immune responses to ERT are being recognized with increasing experience and lengths of exposure to ERTs to treat several LSDs. Strategies to mitigate immune responses and to optimize therapies are needed. Discussions during the workshop resulted in the identification of knowledge gaps and future areas of research, as well as the following proposals from the participants: (1) systematic collection of longitudinal data on immunogenicity to better understand the impact of ADAs on long-term clinical outcomes; (2) development of disease-specific biomarkers and outcome measures to assess the effect of ADAs and ITI on efficacy and safety; (3) development of consistent approaches to ADA assays to allow comparisons of immunogenicity data across different products and disease groups, and to expedite reporting of results; (4) establishment of a system to widely share data on antibody titers following treatment with ERTs; (5) identification of components of the protein that are immunogenic so that triggers and components of the immune responses can be targeted in ITI; and (6) consideration of early ITI in patients who are at risk of developing clinically relevant ADA that have been demonstrated to worsen treatment outcomes. PMID:26597321

  18. Seed storage protein deficiency improves sulfur amino acid content in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): redirection of sulfur from gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Meghan; Chapman, Ralph; Beyaert, Ronald; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2008-07-23

    The contents of sulfur amino acids in seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are suboptimal for nutrition. They accumulate large amounts of a gamma-glutamyl dipeptide of S-methyl-cysteine, a nonprotein amino acid that cannot substitute for methionine or cysteine in the diet. Protein accumulation and amino acid composition were characterized in three genetically related lines integrating a progressive deficiency in major seed storage proteins, phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin, and arcelin. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur contents were comparable among the three lines. The contents of S-methyl-cysteine and gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine were progressively reduced in the mutants. Sulfur was shifted predominantly to the protein cysteine pool, while total methionine was only slightly elevated. Methionine and cystine contents (mg per g protein) were increased by up to ca. 40%, to levels slightly above FAO guidelines on amino acid requirements for human nutrition. These findings may be useful to improve the nutritional quality of common bean. PMID:18588315

  19. Short-Term Stability of Whole Blood Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content on Filter Paper During Storage at -28 °C.

    PubMed

    Pupillo, Daniele; Simonato, Manuela; Cogo, Paola E; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Carnielli, Virgilio P

    2016-02-01

    Finger or heel-pricked blood sampling for fatty acid analysis is suitable especially in newborn infants where blood sampling is difficult and phlebotomy for research can be unethical. The aim of this study was to evaluate dried blood long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) stability during storage at -28 °C. We collected 12 blood cord samples that were analyzed immediately after blood drawing, with and without drying the blood on filter paper. Dried samples were then analyzed 7 days and 1, 3, and 6 months after collection. Butylated hydroxytoluene was added to all samples. Fatty acid composition and (13)C enrichment were measured by gas chromatography and by gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry, respectively. The fatty acid composition, expressed in mol%, of the major LC-PUFA at day 7 was not statistically different from time 0, however lower values were found by the first month of storage. The (13)C enrichment of 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3 did not differ during the whole study period. LC-PUFA analysis from dried umbilical cord blood in neonates should be performed within a week, major losses of LC-PUFA occur afterwards. However, fatty acids obtained from dried blood maintain their (13)C enrichment value for up to 6 months and thus these samples are suitable for natural abundance isotopic studies. PMID:26749585

  20. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong Chae; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Chae, Yun-Soek; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA), has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM). BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant. PMID:25288957

  1. Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and allergic diseases in infancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Miles, Elizabeth A; Calder, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    There may be a causal relationship between intake of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and childhood allergic diseases. This can be explained by plausible biological mechanisms involving eicosanoid mediators produced from the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid. Long chain n-3 PUFAs are found in fish and fish oils. These fatty acids act to oppose the actions of n-6 PUFAs. Thus, it is considered that n-3 PUFAs will lower the risk of developing allergic diseases. In support of this, protective associations have been reported between maternal fish intake during pregnancy and allergic outcomes in infants and children from those pregnancies. However, studies of fish intake during infancy and childhood and allergic outcomes in those infants or children are inconsistent, although some reported a protective association. Supplementing pregnant women with fish oil can induce immunologic changes in cord blood. This supplementation has been reported in some studies to decrease sensitisation to common food allergens and to lower the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. The protective effect of maternal n-3 PUFAs may last until adolescence of the offspring. Fish oil supplementation in infancy may decrease the risk of developing some manifestations of allergic disease, although this benefit may not persist. Whether fish oil is a useful therapy in children with asthma receiving standard therapy is not clear from studies performed to date and this requires further exploration. PMID:23701554

  2. Is Serum Uric Acid Level Correlated with Erectile Dysfunction in Coronary Artery Disease Patients?

    PubMed

    Salavati, Alborz; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Allameh, Farzad; Alizadeh, Farimah; Namdari, Farshad; Hosseinian, Mehdi; Salimi, Elaheh; Heidari, Fariba; Pourmand, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and vascular insufficiency are consequences of modern lifestyle, and vasogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the leading causes of sexual dysfunction which could be prevented like ischemic heart disease if the risk factors are discovered and managed. Seventy-five men scheduled for coronary angiography were asked to fill out the IIEF5 questionnaire and underwent serum lipoprotein-a, uric acid, lipid profile, testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG), dehyderoepiandrostendion sulfate (DHEAS) tests; and the results were compared with those of erectile dysfunction patients with and without coronary artery disease. Ten out of 32 CAD patients (30%) and 6 of 43 normal coronary men had ED Prevalence (P=0.04). The average serum uric acid in ED patients with normal coronary was 5.6 (± 0.68) 6.5 ±078 mg/dl in ED patients of CAD group P=0.034. Men with both ED and CAD had significantly higher levels of lipoprotein-a compared to those CAD patients with normal sexual function. Higher uric acid and lipoprotein-a levels are correlated with the presence of ED in patients with CAD. PMID:27107521

  3. Emerging Roles of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tamanna, Nahid; Mahmood, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), namely, valine, leucine, and isoleucine, are indispensable amino acids required for body protein synthesis. Unlike other amino acids, the BCAAs are primarily catabolised in the extrahepatic tissues. The BCAAs play role in regulation of protein synthesis and turnover as well as maintenance of the body glutamate-glutamine level. In strenuous and traumatic conditions, the BCAAs are oxidized which limits their availability in tissues. Such condition affects the body glutamate-glutamine pool and protein synthesis mechanisms. Thus BCCA supplementation is emerging as a nutritional strategy for treating many diseases. Many studies have found that BCAA administration is able to improve the health status of the patients suffering from different diseases even though there are conditions where they do not exert any effect. There are also some reports where elevated BCAAs have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of diseases. In this review, we have discussed the implication of BCAA supplementation in different pathological conditions and their relevant outcomes.

  4. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in Alzheimer's disease: key questions and partial answers.

    PubMed

    Calon, F

    2011-08-01

    The current rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unfortunately not matched by new treatment options. In the last 10 years, epidemiological, preclinical and clinical data have enlightened the possible preventive action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in AD and other diseases. While the contribution of recent studies to our general knowledge is priceless, many important new questions have been raised. In the present review, we aim at addressing some of these timely interrogations. First, the transport of n-3 PUFA across the blood-brain barrier is underscored based on preclinical data. Second, the relative contribution of two neuroactive n-3 PUFA found in fish oil, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3), remains unclear and is reviewed. Third, clinical trials on neurodegenerative diseases consistently remind us that treating early is critical, and this is likely to be the case with n-3 PUFA in AD as well. Fourth, we draw attention to the possibility that the current knowledge translation approach to make health recommendations might have to be adapted to non-patentable endogenous compounds like n-3 PUFA. We propose that answers to these critical questions will be instrumental toward a rational use of n-3 PUFA in AD. PMID:21605051

  5. Association of elevated levels of cellular lipoteichoic acids of group B streptococci with human neonatal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Nealon, T J; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Cell-associated lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) from late-exponential-phase cultures (serotypes Ia, Ib, Ic, II, and III) of group B streptococci isolated from infected and asymptomatically colonized infants were quantitated and characterized by growing the organisms in a chemically defined medium containing [3H]glycerol and [14C]acetate. Cell pellets were extracted with 45% aqueous phenol and chloroform-methanol and subjected to DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography. Elution profiles resolved three major peaks, I, II, and III, with glycerol and phosphate present in a 1:1 molar ratio in each peak, and results obtained by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion analysis confirmed the presence of poly(glycerol phosphate). Saponification indicated that [14C]acetate was incorporated into fatty acids of peaks I and II only, suggesting that these were cell-associated LTAs. Peak II was of small molecular weight (less than 10,000) and probably represented another species of LTA. Peaks I and II were further demonstrated to be LTA by their ability to sensitize human type O erythrocytes. Peak III lacked fatty acids and was shown to probably be deacylated LTA. Quantitation of cell-associated teichoic acid material produced by the group B streptococcal strains indicated that the clinical isolates from infants with early- or late-onset disease possessed significantly higher levels than did the asymptomatic (clinical isolates from infants without symptoms of disease) group B streptococcal strains. Images PMID:6341233

  6. n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Barden, Anne; O'Callaghan, Nathan; Burke, Valerie; Mas, Emile; Beilin, Lawrence J; Fenech, Michael; Irish, Ashley B; Watts, Gerald F; Puddey, Ian B; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    DNA telomere shortening associates with the age-related increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Reducing oxidative stress, could modify telomere erosion during cell replication, and CVD risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The effect of n-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) on telomere length was studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial in CKD. Eighty-five CKD patients were randomized to: n-3 fatty acids (4 g); CoQ (200 mg); both supplements; or control (4 g olive oil), daily for 8 weeks. Telomere length was measured in neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at baseline and 8 weeks, with and without correction for cell counts. Main and interactive effects of n-3 fatty acids and CoQ on telomere length were assessed adjusting for baseline values. F₂-isoprostanes were measured as markers of oxidative stress. There was no effect of n-3 fatty acids or CoQ on neutrophil or PBMC telomere length. However, telomere length corrected for neutrophil count was increased after n-3 fatty acids (p = 0.015). Post-intervention plasma F₂-isoprostanes were negative predictors of post-intervention telomere length corrected for neutrophil count (p = 0.025).The effect of n-3 fatty acids to increased telomere length corrected for neutrophil count may relate to reduced oxidative stress and increased clearance of neutrophils with shorter telomeres from the circulation. This may be a novel mechanism of modifying CVD risk in CKD patients. PMID:27007392

  7. n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Anne; O’Callaghan, Nathan; Burke, Valerie; Mas, Emile; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Fenech, Michael; Irish, Ashley B.; Watts, Gerald F.; Puddey, Ian B.; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA telomere shortening associates with the age-related increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Reducing oxidative stress, could modify telomere erosion during cell replication, and CVD risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The effect of n-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) on telomere length was studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial in CKD. Eighty-five CKD patients were randomized to: n-3 fatty acids (4 g); CoQ (200 mg); both supplements; or control (4 g olive oil), daily for 8 weeks. Telomere length was measured in neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at baseline and 8 weeks, with and without correction for cell counts. Main and interactive effects of n-3 fatty acids and CoQ on telomere length were assessed adjusting for baseline values. F2-isoprostanes were measured as markers of oxidative stress. There was no effect of n-3 fatty acids or CoQ on neutrophil or PBMC telomere length. However, telomere length corrected for neutrophil count was increased after n-3 fatty acids (p = 0.015). Post-intervention plasma F2-isoprostanes were negative predictors of post-intervention telomere length corrected for neutrophil count (p = 0.025).The effect of n-3 fatty acids to increased telomere length corrected for neutrophil count may relate to reduced oxidative stress and increased clearance of neutrophils with shorter telomeres from the circulation. This may be a novel mechanism of modifying CVD risk in CKD patients. PMID:27007392

  8. Aerosol Disinfection Capacity of Slightly Acidic Hypochlorous Acid Water Towards Newcastle Disease Virus in the Air: An In Vivo Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hakimullah; Thammakarn, Chanathip; Suguro, Atsushi; Ishida, Yuki; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-12-01

    Existence of bioaerosol contaminants in farms and outbreaks of some infectious organisms with the ability of transmission by air increase the need for enhancement of biosecurity, especially for the application of aerosol disinfectants. Here we selected slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW) as a candidate and evaluated its virucidal efficacy toward a virus in the air. Three-day-old conventional chicks were challenged with 25 doses of Newcastle disease live vaccine (B1 strain) by spray with nebulizer (particle size <3 μm in diameter), while at the same time reverse osmosis water as the control and SAHW containing 50 or 100 parts per million (ppm) free available chlorine in pH 6 were sprayed on the treated chicks with other nebulizers. Exposed chicks were kept in separated cages in an isolator and observed for clinical signs. Oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from 2 to 5 days postexposure from each chick, and then the samples were titrated with primary chicken kidney cells to detect the virus. Cytopathic effects were observed, and a hemagglutination test was performed to confirm the result at 5 days postinoculation. Clinical signs (sneezing) were recorded, and the virus was isolated from the control and 50 ppm treatment groups, while no clinical signs were observed in and no virus was isolated from the 100 ppm treatment group. The virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain Sato, too, was immediately inactivated by SAHW containing 50 ppm chlorine in the aqueous phase. These data suggest that SAHW containing 100 ppm chlorine can be used for aerosol disinfection of NDV in farms. PMID:26629621

  9. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV. PMID:26682800

  10. Circadian profiling in two mouse models of lysosomal storage disorders; Niemann Pick type-C and Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Katie; Livieratos, Achilleas; Dumbill, Richard; Hughes, Steven; Ang, Gauri; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Brown, Laurence A; Peirson, Stuart N; Platt, Frances M; Davies, Kay E; Oliver, Peter L

    2016-01-15

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is frequently associated with neurodegenerative disease, yet it is unclear how the specific pathology in these disorders leads to abnormal rest/activity profiles. To investigate whether the pathological features of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) influence the core molecular clock or the circadian behavioural abnormalities reported in some patients, we examined mouse models of Niemann-Pick Type-C (Npc1 mutant, Npc1(nih)) and Sandhoff (Hexb knockout, Hexb(-/-)) disease using wheel-running activity measurement, neuropathology and clock gene expression analysis. Both mutants exhibited regular, entrained rest/activity patterns under light:dark (LD) conditions despite the onset of their respective neurodegenerative phenotypes. A slightly shortened free-running period and changes in Per1 gene expression were observed in Hexb(-/-) mice under constant dark conditions (DD); however, no overt neuropathology was detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Conversely, despite extensive cholesterol accumulation in the SCN of Npc1(nih) mutants, no circadian disruption was observed under constant conditions. Our results indicate the accumulation of specific metabolites in LSDs may differentially contribute to circadian deregulation at the molecular and behavioural level. PMID:26467605

  11. AAV-mediated gene delivery in a feline model of Sandhoff disease corrects lysosomal storage in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Hannah E; McCurdy, Victoria J; Eaton, Samuel C; Wilson, Diane U; Johnson, Aime K; Randle, Ashley N; Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Baker, Henry J; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  12. AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery in a Feline Model of Sandhoff Disease Corrects Lysosomal Storage in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Hannah E.; McCurdy, Victoria J.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Wilson, Diane U.; Johnson, Aime K.; Randle, Ashley N.; Bradbury, Allison M.; Gray-Edwards, Heather L.; Baker, Henry J.; Hudson, Judith A.; Cox, Nancy R.; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  13. Spectrum of AGL mutations in Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type III: identification of 31 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaoxia; Qiu, Zhengqing; Sun, Miao; Wang, Wei; Wei, Min; Zhang, Xue

    2016-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III), a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by hepatomegaly, fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, is caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (AGL). Direct sequencing of human AGL cDNA and genomic DNA has enabled analysis of the underlying genetic defects responsible for GSD III. To date, the frequent mutations in different areas and populations have been described in Italy, Japan, Faroe Islands and Mediterranean area, whereas little has been performed in Chinese population. Here we report a sequencing-based mutation analysis in 43 Chinese patients with GSD III from 41 families. We identified 51 different mutations, including 15 splice-site (29.4%), 11 small deletions (21.6%), 12 nonsense (23.5%), 7 missense (13.7%), 5 duplication (9.8%) and 1 complex deletion/insertion (2.0%), 31 of which are novel mutations. The most common mutation is c.1735+1G>T (11.5%). The association of AGL missense and small in-frame deletion mutations with normal creatine kinase level was observed. Our study extends the spectrum of AGL mutations and suggests a genotype-phenotype correlation in GSD III. PMID:26984562

  14. Impairment of chaperone-mediated autophagy leads to selective lysosomal degradation defects in the lysosomal storage disease cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Gennaro; Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Rocca, Celine J; Monfregola, Jlenia; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Cherqui, Stephanie; Catz, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite accumulation in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) results in impaired cell function and multi-systemic disease. Although substrate reduction and lysosomal overload-decreasing therapies can ameliorate disease progression, the significance of lysosomal overload-independent mechanisms in the development of cellular dysfunction is unknown for most LSDs. Here, we identify a mechanism of impaired chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cystinosis, a LSD caused by defects in the cystine transporter cystinosin (CTNS) and characterized by cystine lysosomal accumulation. We show that, different from other LSDs, autophagosome number is increased, but macroautophagic flux is not impaired in cystinosis while mTOR activity is not affected. Conversely, the expression and localization of the CMA receptor LAMP2A are abnormal in CTNS-deficient cells and degradation of the CMA substrate GAPDH is defective in Ctns−/− mice. Importantly, cysteamine treatment, despite decreasing lysosomal overload, did not correct defective CMA in Ctns−/− mice or LAMP2A mislocalization in cystinotic cells, which was rescued by CTNS expression instead, suggesting that cystinosin is important for CMA activity. In conclusion, CMA impairment contributes to cell malfunction in cystinosis, highlighting the need for treatments complementary to current therapies that are based on decreasing lysosomal overload. PMID:25586965

  15. Circadian profiling in two mouse models of lysosomal storage disorders; Niemann Pick type-C and Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Katie; Livieratos, Achilleas; Dumbill, Richard; Hughes, Steven; Ang, Gauri; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Brown, Laurence A.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is frequently associated with neurodegenerative disease, yet it is unclear how the specific pathology in these disorders leads to abnormal rest/activity profiles. To investigate whether the pathological features of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) influence the core molecular clock or the circadian behavioural abnormalities reported in some patients, we examined mouse models of Niemann-Pick Type-C (Npc1 mutant, Npc1nih) and Sandhoff (Hexb knockout, Hexb−/−) disease using wheel-running activity measurement, neuropathology and clock gene expression analysis. Both mutants exhibited regular, entrained rest/activity patterns under light:dark (LD) conditions despite the onset of their respective neurodegenerative phenotypes. A slightly shortened free-running period and changes in Per1 gene expression were observed in Hexb−/− mice under constant dark conditions (DD); however, no overt neuropathology was detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Conversely, despite extensive cholesterol accumulation in the SCN of Npc1nih mutants, no circadian disruption was observed under constant conditions. Our results indicate the accumulation of specific metabolites in LSDs may differentially contribute to circadian deregulation at the molecular and behavioural level. PMID:26467605

  16. Partial Restoration of Mutant Enzyme Homeostasis in Three Distinct Lysosomal Storage Disease Cell Lines by Altering Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ting-Wei; Fowler, Douglas M; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2008-01-01

    A lysosomal storage disease (LSD) results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil—both US Food and Drug Administration–approved hypertension drugs—partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient–derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely α-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety. PMID:18254660

  17. Combined defects in oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid β-oxidation in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah-Sefaa, Abena; McKenzie, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria provide the main source of energy to eukaryotic cells, oxidizing fats and sugars to generate ATP. Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are two metabolic pathways which are central to this process. Defects in these pathways can result in diseases of the brain, skeletal muscle, heart and liver, affecting approximately 1 in 5000 live births. There are no effective therapies for these disorders, with quality of life severely reduced for most patients. The pathology underlying many aspects of these diseases is not well understood; for example, it is not clear why some patients with primary FAO deficiencies exhibit secondary OXPHOS defects. However, recent findings suggest that physical interactions exist between FAO and OXPHOS proteins, and that these interactions are critical for both FAO and OXPHOS function. Here, we review our current understanding of the interactions between FAO and OXPHOS proteins and how defects in these two metabolic pathways contribute to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:26839416

  18. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  19. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M.; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M.; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  20. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonists and Other Bile Acid Signaling Strategies for Treatment of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Halilbasic, Emina; Fuchs, Claudia; Traussnigg, Stefan; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) respond to bile acids (BAs) by activating transcriptional networks and/or signaling cascades. These cascades affect the expression of a great number of target genes relevant for BA, cholesterol, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. FXR activation in the liver tissue and beyond, such as the gut-liver axis, kidney and adipose tissue, plays a role in metabolic diseases. These BA receptors activators hold promise to become a new class of drugs to be used in the treatment of chronic liver disease, hepatocellular cancer and extrahepatic inflammatory and metabolic diseases. This review discusses the relevant BA receptors, the new drugs that target BA transport and signaling and their possible applications. PMID:27332721

  1. Capillary electrophoresis based on nucleic acid detection for diagnosing human infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Lian, Dong-Sheng; Zhao, Shu-Jin

    2016-05-01

    Rapid transmission, high morbidity, and mortality are the features of human infectious diseases caused by microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses. These diseases may lead within a short period of time to great personal and property losses, especially in regions where sanitation is poor. Thus, rapid diagnoses are vital for the prevention and therapeutic intervention of human infectious diseases. Several conventional methods are often used to diagnose infectious diseases, e.g. methods based on cultures or morphology, or biochemical tests based on metabonomics. Although traditional methods are considered gold standards and are used most frequently, they are laborious, time consuming, and tedious and cannot meet the demand for rapid diagnoses. Disease diagnosis using capillary electrophoresis methods has the advantages of high efficiency, high throughput, and high speed, and coupled with the different nucleic acid detection strategies overcomes the drawbacks of traditional identification methods, precluding many types of false positive and negative results. Therefore, this review focuses on the application of capillary electrophoresis based on nucleic detection to the diagnosis of human infectious diseases, and offers an introduction to the limitations, advantages, and future developments of this approach. PMID:26352354

  2. Phytochemical changes in phenolics, anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, and carotenoids associated with sweetpotato storage and impacts on bioactive properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato phytochemical content was evaluated in four genotypes (NCPUR06-020, Covington, Yellow Covington, and NC07-847) at harvest and after curing/storage for 4 or 8 months. Curing and storage for up to 8 months did not significantly affect total phenolic content in Covington, Yellow Covington, ...

  3. Associations between Homocysteine, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's Disease: Insights from Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The associations between homocysteine (Hcy), folic acid, and vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have gained much interest, while remaining controversial. We aim to perform meta-analyses to evaluate comprehensively: i) Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients in comparison with controls; and ii) the association between Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels and risk of AD. A literature search was performed using Medline and Scopus databases. A total of 68 studies were identified and included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analyses. First, AD patients may have higher level of Hcy, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 in plasma than controls. Further age-subgroup analysis showed no age effect for Hcy levels in plasma between AD patients and matched controls, while the differences in folate and vitamin B12 levels further enlarged with increased age. Second, data suggests that high Hcy and low folate levels may correlate with increased risk of AD occurrence. The comprehensive meta-analyses not only confirmed higher Hcy, lower folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients than controls, but also implicated that high Hcy and low folic acid levels may be risk factors of AD. Further studies are encouraged to elucidate mechanisms linking these conditions. PMID:25854931

  4. Ursolic acid plays a protective role in obesity-induced cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Chiang, Su-Yin; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic disturbance of obesity is one of the most common risk factors of atherosclerosis. Resistin, an obesity-induced adipokine, can induce the expression of cell adhesion molecules and the attachment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Ursolic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in fruits and many herbs, exhibits an array of biological effects such as anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms of the effect of ursolic acid on resistin-induced adhesion of U937 cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data indicated that ursolic acid suppressed the adhesion of U937 to HUVECs and downregulated the expression of adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and E-selectin, in resistin-induced HUVECs by decreasing the production of intracellular reaction oxygen species (ROS) and attenuating the nuclear translocation of NFκB. Ursolic acid appeared to inhibit resistin-induced atherosclerosis, suggesting that ursolic acid may play a protective role in obesity-induced cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26991492

  5. MTHFR C677T polymorphism, folic acid and hyperhomocysteinemia in levodopa treated patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Woitalla, D; Kuhn, W; Müller, T

    2004-01-01

    Certain mutations (TT homozygous; CT heterozygous; CC wild-type) of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene and long-term levodopa application in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) support onset of hyperhomocysteinemia. Total plasma homocysteine (t-hcys) depends on B6, B12, folic acid, all of which support remyelination from t-hcys to methionine. Objective of this trial were to compare B6, B12, folic acid and t-hcys levels in plasma of 83 levodopa treated PD patients and 44 controls. PD patients with the CT or TT genotype had significant higher t-hcys levels than controls or PD patients with the CC allele. Concentrations of B6 or B12 did not differ, but folic acid was significant higher in PD patients with the CT mutation. We recommend MTHFR genotyping, t-hcys monitoring and early vitamin supplementation in PD patients. The folic acid increase in PD patients with the CT allele is hypothetically due to an endogenous upregulation of folic acid absorption to decrease t-hcys. PMID:15354385

  6. Gene-Wise Association of Variants in Four Lysosomal Storage Disorder Genes in Neuropathologically Confirmed Lewy Body Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Lorraine N.; Chan, Robin; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Xinmin; Park, Naeun; Parmalee, Nancy; Kisselev, Sergey; Cortes, Etty; Torres, Paola A.; Pastores, Gregory M.; Vonsattel, Jean P.; Alcalay, Roy; Marder, Karen; Honig, Lawrence L.; Fahn, Stanley; Mayeux, Richard; Shelanski, Michael; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Lee, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Variants in GBA are associated with Lewy Body (LB) pathology. We investigated whether variants in other lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) genes also contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods We performed a genetic analysis of four LSD genes including GBA, HEXA, SMPD1, and MCOLN1 in 231 brain autopsies. Brain autopsies included neuropathologically defined LBD without Alzheimer Disease (AD) changes (n = 59), AD without significant LB pathology (n = 71), Alzheimer disease and lewy body variant (ADLBV) (n = 68), and control brains without LB or AD neuropathology (n = 33). Sequencing of HEXA, SMPD1, MCOLN1 and GBA followed by ‘gene wise’ genetic association analysis was performed. To determine the functional effect, a biochemical analysis of GBA in a subset of brains was also performed. GCase activity was measured in a subset of brain samples (n = 64) that included LBD brains, with or without GBA mutations, and control brains. A lipidomic analysis was also performed in brain autopsies (n = 67) which included LBD (n = 34), ADLBV (n = 3), AD (n = 4), PD (n = 9) and control brains (n = 17), comparing GBA mutation carriers to non-carriers. Results In a ‘gene-wise’ analysis, variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 were significantly associated with LB pathology (p range: 0.03–4.14 x10-5). Overall, the mean levels of GCase activity were significantly lower in GBA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (p<0.001). A significant increase and accumulation of several species for the lipid classes, ceramides and sphingolipids, was observed in LBD brains carrying GBA mutations compared to controls (p range: p<0.05-p<0.01). Interpretation Our study indicates that variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 are associated with LB pathology. Biochemical data comparing GBA mutation carrier to non-carriers support these findings, which have important implications for biomarker development and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25933391

  7. Influence of marinades on survival during storage of acid-adapted and nonadapted Listeria monocytogenes inoculated post-drying on beef jerky.

    PubMed

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Kendall, Patricia A

    2003-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the survival of acid-adapted and nonadapted Listeria monocytogenes inoculated post-drying on dried beef slices (beef jerky), which were treated (24 h, 4 degrees C) with the following marinades before drying at 60 degrees C for 10 h: (1) control (C), (2) traditional marinade (TM), (3) modified marinade; double the amount of TM with added 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce with 5% ethanol (MM), (4) dipping into 5% acetic acid and then TM (AATM), and (5) dipping into 1% Tween 20 and then into 5% acetic acid followed by the TM (TWTM). Dried meat slices were inoculated with acid-adapted or nonadapted L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.7 log CFU/cm(2)) prior to aerobic storage at 25 degrees C for 60 days. Survivors were determined using tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate (TSAP) and PALCAM agar. Results showed that surviving bacterial populations on TWTM, AATM, and MM treatments were significantly (P<0.05) lower than those surviving on C and TM until 42 days of storage. By the end of 60 days of storage, bacterial populations in all treatments were not different regardless of acid adaptation or recovery media, except for treatment C inoculated with nonadapted cultures, which had significantly higher TSAP counts than other treatments. There was no significant (P> or =0.05) difference in survival of previously acid-adapted and nonadapted bacterial populations in samples of TWTM, AATM, and MM treatments. However, bacterial populations that were nonadapted were significantly higher than those that were acid-adapted on products of C and TM treatments on days 60 and 24, respectively. The earliest complete elimination (enrichment negative) of the pathogen occurred by day 28 (AATM) in products inoculated with acid-adapted cultures and by day 42 (TWTM and AATM) in products inoculated with nonadapted cultures. These results indicate that use of modified marinades in jerky processing and low water activity provided

  8. Infantile Refsum Disease: Influence of Dietary Treatment on Plasma Phytanic Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Sá, Maria João Nabais; Rocha, Júlio C; Almeida, Manuela F; Carmona, Carla; Martins, Esmeralda; Miranda, Vasco; Coutinho, Miguel; Ferreira, Rita; Pacheco, Sara; Laranjeira, Francisco; Ribeiro, Isaura; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Lacerda, Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) is one of the less severe of Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs), a group of peroxisomal biogenesis disorders resulting from a generalized peroxisomal function impairment. Increased plasma levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and phytanic acid are biomarkers used in IRD diagnosis. Furthermore, an increased plasma level of phytanic acid is known to be associated with neurologic damage. Treatment of IRD is symptomatic and multidisciplinary.The authors report a 3-year-old child, born from consanguineous parents, who presented with developmental delay, retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural deafness and craniofacial dysmorphisms. While the relative level of plasma C26:0 was slightly increased, other VLCFA were normal. Thus, a detailed characterization of the phenotype was essential to point to a ZSD. Repeatedly increased levels of plasma VLCFA, along with phytanic acid and pristanic acid, deficient dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activity in fibroblasts and identification of the homozygous pathogenic mutation c.2528G>A (p.Gly843Asp) in the PEX1 gene, confirmed this diagnosis. Nutritional advice and follow-up was proposed aiming phytanic acid dietary intake reduction. During dietary treatment, plasma levels of phytanic acid decreased to normal, and the patient's development evaluation showed slow progressive acquisition of new competences.This case report highlights the relevance of considering a ZSD in any child with developmental delay who manifests hearing and visual impairment and of performing a systematic biochemical investigation, when plasma VLCFA are mildly increased. During dietary intervention, a biochemical improvement was observed, and the long-term clinical effect of this approach needs to be evaluated. PMID:26303611

  9. Current Evidence Supporting the Link Between Dietary Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Shatha; Pu, Shuaihua; Jones, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Lack of consensus exists pertaining to the scientific evidence regarding effects of various dietary fatty acids on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this article is to review current evidence concerning cardiovascular health effects of the main dietary fatty acid types; namely, trans (TFA), saturated (SFA), polyunsaturated (PUFA; n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA), and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Accumulating evidence shows negative health impacts of TFA and SFA; both may increase CVD risk. Policies have been proposed to reduce TFA and SFA consumption to less than 1 and 7 % of energy intake, respectively. Cardiovascular health might be promoted by replacing SFA and TFA with n-6 PUFA, n-3 PUFA, or MUFA; however, the optimal amount of PUFA or MUFA that can be used to replace SFA and TFA has not been defined yet. Evidence suggests of the potential importance of restricting n-6 PUFA up to 10 % of energy and obtaining an n-6/n-3 ratio as close as possible to unity, along with a particular emphasis on consuming adequate amounts of essential fatty acids. The latest evidence shows cardioprotective effects of MUFA-rich diets, especially when MUFA are supplemented with essential fatty acids; namely, docosahexaenoic acid. MUFA has been newly suggested to be involved in regulating fat oxidation, energy metabolism, appetite sensations, weight maintenance, and cholesterol metabolism. These favorable effects might implicate MUFA as the preferable choice to substitute for other fatty acids, especially given the declaration of its safety for up to 20 % of total energy. PMID:26719191

  10. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE LESIONS ASSOCIATED WITH IRON STORAGE DISEASE IN CAPTIVE EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique M; Crawshaw, Graham J; Garner, Michael M; Frasca, Salvatore; Stasiak, Iga; Rose, Karrie; Neal, Dan; Farina, Lisa L

    2016-03-01

    Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) are one of many species within zoologic collections that frequently develop iron storage disease. The goals of this retrospective multi-institutional study were to determine the tissue distribution of iron storage in captive adult Egyptian fruit bats and the incidence of intercurrent neoplasia and infection, which may be directly or indirectly related to iron overload. Tissue sections from 83 adult Egyptian fruit bats were histologically evaluated by using tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, and Prussian blue techniques. The liver and spleen consistently had the largest amount of iron, but significant amounts of iron were also detected in the pancreas, kidney, skeletal muscle, and lung. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; 11) was the most common neoplasm, followed by cholangiocarcinoma (4). Extrahepatic neoplasms included bronchioloalveolar adenoma (3), pulmonary carcinosarcoma (1), oral sarcoma (1), renal adenocarcinoma (1), transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (1), mammary gland adenoma (1), and parathyroid adenoma (1). There were also metastatic neoplasms of undetermined primary origin that included three poorly differentiated carcinomas, a poorly differentiated sarcoma, and a neuroendocrine tumor. Bats with hemochromatosis were significantly more likely to have HCC than bats with hemosiderosis (P = 0.032). Cardiomyopathy was identified in 35/77 bats with evaluable heart tissue, but no direct association was found between cardiac damage and the amount of iron observed within the liver or heart. Hepatic abscesses occurred in multiple bats, although a significant association was not observed between hemochromatosis and bacterial infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication providing evidence of a positive correlation between hemochromatosis and HCC in any species other than humans. PMID:27010264

  11. Early, sustained efficacy of adeno-associated virus vector-mediated gene therapy in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, D D; Sun, B D; Damodaran, T V; Brown, T; Millington, D S; Benjamin, D K; Bird, A; Schneider, A; Hillman, S; Jackson, M; Beaty, R M; Chen, Y T

    2006-09-01

    The deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia). An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding G6Pase was pseudotyped as AAV8 and administered to 2-week-old GSD-Ia mice (n = 9). Median survival was prolonged to 7 months following vector administration, in contrast to untreated GSD-Ia mice that survived for only 2 weeks. Although GSD-Ia mice were initially growth-retarded, treated mice increased fourfold in weight to normal size. Blood glucose was partially corrected by 2 weeks following treatment, whereas blood cholesterol normalized. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was partially corrected to 25% of the normal level at 7 months of age in treated mice, and blood glucose during fasting remained lower in treated, affected mice than in normal mice. Glycogen storage was partially corrected in the liver by 2 weeks following treatment, but reaccumulated to pre-treatment levels by 7 months old (m.o.). Vector genome DNA decreased between 3 days and 3 weeks in the liver following vector administration, mainly through the loss of single-stranded genomes; however, double-stranded vector genomes were more stable. Although CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrates were present in the liver, partial biochemical correction was sustained at 7 m.o. The development of efficacious AAV vector-mediated gene therapy could significantly reduce the impact of long-term complications in GSD-Ia, including hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia and growth failure. PMID:16672983

  12. Association of plasma uric acid with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure: mendelian randomisation analysis of two large cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Tom M; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the associations between both uric acid levels and hyperuricaemia, with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure, and to explore the potentially confounding role of body mass index. Design Mendelian randomisation analysis, using variation at specific genes (SLC2A9 (rs7442295) as an instrument for uric acid; and FTO (rs9939609), MC4R (rs17782313), and TMEM18 (rs6548238) for body mass index). Setting Two large, prospective cohort studies in Denmark. Participants We measured levels of uric acid and related covariables in 58 072 participants from the Copenhagen General Population Study and 10 602 from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, comprising 4890 and 2282 cases of ischaemic heart disease, respectively. Main outcome Blood pressure and prospectively assessed ischaemic heart disease. Results Estimates confirmed known observational associations between plasma uric acid and hyperuricaemia with risk of ischaemic heart disease and diastolic and systolic blood pressure. However, when using genotypic instruments for uric acid and hyperuricaemia, we saw no evidence for causal associations between uric acid, ischaemic heart disease, and blood pressure. We used genetic instruments to investigate body mass index as a potentially confounding factor in observational associations, and saw a causal effect on uric acid levels. Every four unit increase of body mass index saw a rise in uric acid of 0.03 mmol/L (95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.04), and an increase in risk of hyperuricaemia of 7.5% (3.9% to 11.1%). Conclusion By contrast with observational findings, there is no strong evidence for causal associations between uric acid and ischaemic heart disease or blood pressure. However, evidence supports a causal effect between body mass index and uric acid level and hyperuricaemia. This finding strongly suggests body mass index as a confounder in observational associations, and suggests a role for elevated body mass index or obesity in the development of

  13. Evaluation of food grade solvents for lipid extraction and impact of storage temperature on fatty acid composition of edible seaweeds Laminaria digitata (Phaeophyceae) and Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Matthias; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of different food- and non-food grade extraction solvents on yield and fatty acid composition of the lipid extracts of two seaweed species (Palmaria palmata and Laminaria digitata). The application of chloroform/methanol and three different food grade solvents (ethanol, hexane, ethanol/hexane) revealed significant differences in both, extraction yield and fatty acid composition. The extraction efficiency, in terms of yields of total fatty acids (TFA), was in the order: chloroform/methanol>ethanol>hexane>ethanol/hexane for both species. Highest levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were achieved by the extraction with ethanol. Additionally the effect of storage temperature on the stability of PUFA in ground and freeze-dried seaweed biomass was investigated. Seaweed samples were stored for a total duration of 22months at three different temperatures (-20°C, 4°C and 20°C). Levels of TFA and PUFA were only stable after storage at -20°C for the two seaweed species. PMID:27132836

  14. ATP Depletion, a Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Hyperuricemia in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Harry L.; Wilson, Frederick A.; Hefferan, Patrick; Terry, Annie B.; Moran, Jose Roberto; Slonim, Alfred E.; Claus, Thomas H.; Burr, Ian M.

    1978-01-01

    Other investigators have shown that fructose infusion in normal man and rats acutely depletes hepatic ATP and Pi and increases the rate of uric acid formation by the degradation of preformed nucleotides. We postulated that a similar mechanism of ATP depletion might be present in patients with glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (GSD-I) as a result of ATP consumption during glycogenolysis and resulting excess glycolysis. The postulate was tested by measurement of: (a) hepatic content of ATP, glycogen, phosphorylated sugars, and phosphorylase activities before and after increasing glycolysis by glucagon infusion and (b) plasma urate levels and urate excretion before and after therapy designed to maintain blood glucose levels above 70 mg/dl and thus prevent excess glycogenolysis and glycolysis. Glucagon infusion in seven patients with GSD-I caused a decrease in hepatic ATP from 2.25 ± 0.09 to 0.73 ± 0.06 μmol/g liver (P <0.01), within 5 min, persisting in one patient to 20 min (1.3 μmol/g). Three patients with GSD other than GSD-I (controls), and 10 normal rats, showed no change in ATP levels after glucagon infusion. Glucagon caused an increase in hepatic phosphorylase activity from 163 ± 21 to 311 ± 17 μmol/min per g protein (P <0.01), and a decrease in glycogen content from 8.96 ± 0.51 to 6.68 ± 0.38% weight (P <0.01). Hepatic content of phosphorylated hexoses measured in two patients, showed the following mean increases in response to glucagon; glucose-6-phosphate (from 0.25 to 0.98 μmol/g liver), fructose-6-phosphate (from 0.17 to 0.45 μmol/g liver), and fructose-1,6-diphosphate (from 0.09 to 1.28 μmol/g) within 5 min. These changes, except for glucose-6-phosphate, returned toward preinfusion levels within 20 min. Treatment consisted of continuous intragastric feedings of a high glucose dietary mixture. Such treatment increased blood glucose from a mean level of 62 (range 28-96) to 86 (range 71-143) mg/dl (P <0.02), decreased plasma glucagon from a mean

  15. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-07-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease. PMID:2472426

  16. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-01-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease. PMID:2472426

  17. Ascorbic acid: new role of an age-old micronutrient in the management of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Alagl, Adel S; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2015-03-01

    To review the new role of an age-old micronutrient - ascorbic acid - in the management of periodontal disease. Articles pertaining to the topic were searched in PubMed and other search engines from year 1974 to April 2014 with the following key words: "ascorbic acid," "ascorbate," "vitamin C," "periodontal disease," "gingivitis," "periodontitis," "anti-oxidants" and "elderly." Balanced nutrition is an essential factor in the elderly. Modification of nutritional requirement is important to overcome the effect of an unbalanced diet in older individuals as a result of several external and internal host-associated factors. Micronutrient requirements as aging advances could change, and require due attention. Ascorbic acid and its relationship with periodontal disease are very well known. However, recent changes in the concept of understanding the pathogenicity has led to a new path of therapeutic intervention with ascorbic acid in many chronic diseases. Oxidative stress with its associated burden might alter the disease process. In the era of "periodontal medicine," the impact of remote tissue changes on systemic disease has to be taken into serious consideration. Deficiency of nutritional impact on the host, with micronutrient vitamin C detailed in this review with sources, absorption, interaction and its relationship with systemic disease, and thereby the impact on periodontal disease. Ascorbic acid plays an important role in the aging process, and in the maintenance of periodontal health in the elderly. PMID:25407241

  18. A "Whirly" transcription factor is required for salicylic acid-dependent disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Desveaux, Darrell; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Després, Charles; Mess, Jean-Nicholas; Lévesque, Caroline; Fobert, Pierre R; Dangl, Jeffery L; Brisson, Normand

    2004-02-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is critical for plant disease resistance responses; its global control is not well understood. Salicylic acid (SA) can induce plant defense gene expression and a long-lasting disease resistance state called systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Plant-specific "Whirly" DNA binding proteins were previously implicated in defense gene regulation. We demonstrate that the potato StWhy1 protein is a transcriptional activator of genes containing the PBF2 binding PB promoter element. DNA binding activity of AtWhy1, the Arabidopsis StWhy1 ortholog, is induced by SA and is required for both SA-dependent disease resistance and SA-induced expression of an SAR response gene. AtWhy1 is required for both full basal and specific disease resistance responses. The transcription factor-associated protein NPR1 is also required for SAR. Surprisingly, AtWhy1 activation by SA is NPR1 independent, suggesting that AtWhy1 works in conjunction with NPR1 to transduce the SA signal. Our analysis of AtWhy1 adds a critical component to the SA-dependent plant disease resistance response. PMID:14960277

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Spotlight on Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipoperoxidation Products

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Canuto, Rosa Angela; Daga, Martina; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Lepore, Alessio; Ferretti, Carlo; Dianzani, Chiara; Muzio, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    In several human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced mainly by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is increased. In cancer cells, the increase of ROS production has been associated with mtDNA mutations that, in turn, seem to be functional in the alterations of the bioenergetics and the biosynthetic state of cancer cells. Moreover, ROS overproduction can enhance the peroxidation of fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes. In particular, the peroxidation of mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin leads to the formation of reactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA), which are able to react with proteins and DNA. Covalent modifications of mitochondrial proteins by the products of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the course of oxidative cell stress are involved in the mitochondrial dysfunctions observed in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Such modifications appear to affect negatively mitochondrial integrity and function, in particular energy metabolism, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, antioxidant defenses and stress responses. In neurodegenerative diseases, indirect confirmation for the pathogenetic relevance of LPO-dependent modifications of mitochondrial proteins comes from the disease phenotypes associated with their genetic alterations. PMID:26907355

  20. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Progression of Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Individuals Without Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Maahs, David M.; Johnson, Richard J.; Jalal, Diana I.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rivard, Christopher; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine uric acid (UA) as a possible predictor of the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) using data from the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CAC was measured by electron beam tomography at the baseline and at a follow-up 6.0 ± 0.5 years later. The study population included 443 participants with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects who were free of diagnosed coronary artery disease at baseline. The presence of renal disease was defined by the presence of albuminuria and/or low glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS In subjects without renal disease, serum UA predicted CAC progression (odds ratio 1.30 [95% CI 1.07–1.58], P = 0.007) independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and the presence of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Serum UA levels predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and may be useful in identifying who is at risk for vascular disease in the absence of significant chronic kidney disease. PMID:20798338

  1. Effect of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, on HDM-induced allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Nakada, Emily M; Mihavics, Bethany R; Hoffman, Sidra M; Rattu, Gurkiranjit K; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cahoon, Jonathon M; Lahue, Karolyn G; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Chapman, David G; Desai, Dhimant H; Poynter, Matthew E; Anathy, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response plays a critical role in inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway disease. However, the benefits of inhibiting ER stress in the treatment of allergic airway disease are not well known. Herein, we tested the therapeutic potential of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), in combating allergic asthma, using a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway disease. TUDCA was administered during the HDM-challenge phase (preventive regimen), after the HDM-challenge phase (therapeutic regimen), or therapeutically during a subsequent HDM rechallenge (rechallenge regimen). In the preventive regimen, TUDCA significantly decreased HDM-induced inflammation, markers of ER stress, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and fibrosis. Similarly, in the therapeutic regimen, TUDCA administration efficiently decreased HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, and AHR, but not airway remodeling. Interestingly, TUDCA administered therapeutically in the HDM rechallenge regimen markedly attenuated HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, methacholine-induced AHR, and airway fibrotic remodeling. These results indicate that the inhibition of ER stress in the lungs through the administration of chemical chaperones could be a valuable strategy in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:27154200

  2. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Luis F.; Lin, Cheng-Chao; Zhou, Fang; Germino, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was first identified over 20 years ago, yet its function remains poorly understood. We have used a systems-based approach to examine the effects of acquired loss of Pkd1 in adult mouse kidney as it transitions from normal to cystic state. Methods We performed transcriptional profiling of a large set of male and female kidneys, along with metabolomics and lipidomics analyses of a subset of male kidneys. We also assessed the effects of a modest diet change on cyst progression in young cystic mice. Fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic rates were measured in five control and mutant pairs of epithelial cells. Results We find that females have a significantly less severe kidney phenotype and correlate this protection with differences in lipid metabolism. We show that sex is a major determinant of the transcriptional profile of mouse kidneys and that some of this difference is due to genes involved in lipid metabolism. Pkd1 mutant mice have transcriptional profiles consistent with changes in lipid metabolism and distinct metabolite and complex lipid profiles in kidneys. We also show that cells lacking Pkd1 have an intrinsic fatty acid oxidation defect and that manipulation of lipid content of mouse chow modifies cystic disease. Interpretation Our results suggest PKD could be a disease of altered cellular metabolism. PMID:27077126

  4. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5′-CpApG-3′ trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  5. P4 radiology of hepatobiliary diseases with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Qayyum, Aliya; Bastati, Nina; Fakhrai, Negar; Herold, Christian J; Caseiro Alves, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    A recent paradigm shift in radiology has focused on the globalization of so-called P4 radiology. P4 radiology represents delivery of imaging results that are predictive, personalized, pre-emptive and participatory. The combination of the P4 approach and biomarkers is particularly pertinent to MRI, especially with technological advances such as diffusion-weighted imaging. The development of new liver-specific MRI contrast media, particularly gadoxetic acid, demonstrate specific pharmacokinetic properties, which provide combined morphologic and functional information in the same setting. The evaluation of hepatobiliary pathology beyond morphology gives rise to the possibilty of using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as an imaging biomarker of hepatobiliary diseases. The integration of functional imaging with an understanding of complex disease mechanisms forms the basis for P4 radiology, which may ultimately lead to individualized, cost-effective, targeted therapy for patients. This will enable radiologists to determine the prognosis of the disease and estimate early response to treatment, with the participation of all the required medical disciplines. PMID:24417263

  6. Role in Tumor Growth of a Glycogen Debranching Enzyme Lost in Glycogen Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guin, Sunny; Pollard, Courtney; Ru, Yuanbin; Ritterson Lew, Carolyn; Duex, Jason E.; Dancik, Garrett; Owens, Charles; Spencer, Andrea; Knight, Scott; Holemon, Heather; Gupta, Sounak; Hansel, Donna; Hellerstein, Marc; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Lane, Andrew N.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system, yet our molecular understanding of this disease is incomplete, hampering therapeutic advances. Methods Here we used a genome-wide functional short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen to identify suppressors of in vivo bladder tumor xenograft growth (n = 50) using bladder cancer UMUC3 cells. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify the most frequently occurring shRNAs in tumors. Genes so identified were studied in 561 patients with bladder cancer for their association with stratification of clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The best prognostic marker was studied to determine its mechanism in tumor suppression using anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, xenograft (n = 20), and metabolomic assays. Statistical significance was determined using two-sided Student t test and repeated-measures statistical analysis. Results We identified the glycogen debranching enzyme AGL as a prognostic indicator of patient survival (P = .04) and as a novel regulator of bladder cancer anchorage-dependent (P < .001), anchorage-independent (mean ± standard deviation, 180 ± 23.1 colonies vs 20±9.5 in control, P < .001), and xenograft growth (P < .001). Rescue experiments using catalytically dead AGL variants revealed that this effect is independent of AGL enzymatic functions. We demonstrated that reduced AGL enhances tumor growth by increasing glycine synthesis through increased expression of serine hydroxymethyltransferase 2. Conclusions Using an in vivo RNA interference screen, we discovered that AGL, a glycogen debranching enzyme, has a biologically and statistically significant role in suppressing human cancer growth. PMID:24700805

  7. Serum folic acid and RFC A80G polymorphism in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, Nasim; Tripathi, Manjari; Alam, Rizwan; Luthra, Kalpana; Sharma, Sumit; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Kalaivani, Mani; Mukhopadhyay, Asok K

    2014-02-01

    Low level of vitamin B12 and folic acid has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Serum folic acid and vitamin B12 were assayed in 80 AD and 50 VaD cases and in 120 healthy controls. The reduced folate carrier (RFC1) gene, rs1051266, which encodes the RFC 1, protein was analyzed for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. It was observed that the patients having folic acid <8.45 ng/mL had 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-4.5) times higher odds of having AD and 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1-4.2) times higher odds of having VaD than patients having folic acid ≥8.45 ng/mL. Serum vitamin B12 level did not show any such statistically significant effect in altering the odds. No direct association was found between variant (G) allele or genotype of rs1051266 with AD and VaD cases. On serum folate level no association was observed with gene polymorphism. PMID:24554143

  8. Impact of Precooling and Controlled-Atmosphere Storage on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Accumulation in Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Molin; Ndeurumio, Kessy H; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Zhuoyan

    2016-08-24

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruit cultivars 'Chuliang' and 'Shixia' were analyzed for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation after precooling and in controlled-atmosphere storage. Fruit were exposed to 5% O2 plus 3%, 5%, or 10% CO2 at 4 °C, and GABA and associated enzymes, aril firmness, and pericarp color were measured. Aril softening and pericarp browning were delayed by 5% CO2 + 5% O2. GABA concentrations and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) activities declined during storage at the higher-CO2 treatments. However, GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T; EC 2.6.1.19) activities in elevated CO2-treated fruit fluctuated during storage. GABA concentrations increased after precooling treatments. GAD activity and GABA-T activity were different between cultivars after precooling. GABA concentrations in fruit increased after 3 days of 10% CO2 + 5% O2 treatment and then declined as storage time increased. GABA accumulation was associated with stimulation of GAD activity rather than inhibition of GABA-T activity. PMID:27412947

  9. The Effects of Hempseed Meal Intake and Linoleic Acid on Drosophila Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Jung; Park, Seung Hwan; Han, Ju Hua; Hong, Yoon Ki; Hwang, Soojin; Lee, Soojin; Kim, Darae; Han, Seung Yeop; Kim, Eun Soo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2011-01-01

    Hempseed is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which have potential as therapeutic compounds for the treatment of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular dis-ease. However, the effect of hempseed meal (HSM) intake on the animal models of these diseases has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we assessed the effects of the intake of HSM and PUFAs on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity and neurological phenotypes, and cholesterol uptake, using Drosophila models. HSM intake was shown to reduce H2O2 toxicity markedly, indicating that HSM exerts a profound antioxidant effect. Meanwhile, intake of HSM, as well as linoleic or linolenic acids (major PUFA components of HSM) was shown to ameliorate Aβ42-induced eye degeneration, thus suggesting that these compounds exert a protective effect against Aβ42 cytotoxicity. On the contrary, locomotion and longevity in the Parkinson’s disease model andeye degeneration in the Huntington’s disease model were unaffected by HSM feeding. Additionally, intake of HSM or linoleic acid was shown to reduce cholesterol uptake significantly. Moreover, linoleic acid intake has been shown to delay pupariation, and cholesterol feeding rescued the linoleic acid-induced larval growth delay, thereby indicating that linoleic acid acts antagonistically with cholesterol during larval growth. In conclusion, our results indicate that HSM and linoleic acid exert inhibitory effects on both Aβ42 cytotoxicity and cholesterol uptake, and are potential candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovasculardisease. PMID:21331775

  10. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  11. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. PMID:23313758

  12. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-03-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  13. Hepatorenal correction in murine glycogen storage disease type I with a double-stranded adeno-associated virus vector.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Hall, Gentzon; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Lavin, Peter J; Winn, Michelle P; Kemper, Alex R; Brown, Talmage T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism. PMID:21730973

  14. Hepatorenal Correction in Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type I With a Double-stranded Adeno-associated Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Hall, Gentzon; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Lavin, Peter J; Winn, Michelle P; Kemper, Alex R; Brown, Talmage T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (−/−) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (−/−) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (−/−) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism. PMID:21730973

  15. Efficacy of helper-dependent adenovirus vector-mediated gene therapy in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Sun, B; Bird, A; Chen, Y T; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2007-07-01

    Genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, also known as von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation. We tested whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated hepatic delivery of G6Pase would lead to prolonged survival and sustained correction of the metabolic abnormalities in G6Pase knockout (KO) mice, a model for a severe form of GSD-Ia. An HDAd vector encoding G6Pase was administered intravenously (2 or 5 x 10(12)vector particles/kg) to 2-week-old (w.o.) G6Pase-KO mice. Following HDAd vector administration survival was prolonged to a median of 7 months, in contrast to untreated affected mice that did not survive past 3 weeks of age. G6Pase levels increased more than tenfold between 3 days and 28 weeks after HDAd injection (P < 0.03). The weights of untreated 2 w.o. G6Pase-KO mice were approximately half those of their unaffected littermates, and treatment stimulated their growth to the size of wild-type mice. Severe hypoglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, which are hallmarks of GSD-Ia both in humans and in mice, were also restored to normalcy by the treatment. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was markedly reduced. The efficacy of HDAd-G6Pase treatment in reversing the physiological and biochemical abnormalities associated with GSD-Ia in affected G6Pase-KO mice justifies further preclinical evaluation in murine and canine models of GSD-Ia. PMID:17505475

  16. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  17. Interactions between Diet, Bile Acid Metabolism, Gut Microbiota, and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Suzanne; Chang, Eugene B

    2015-01-01

    The composite human gut microbiomes of Western populations have changed over the past century, brought on by new environmental triggers that often have a negative impact on human health. Diets high in saturated fats and refined sugars and low in fiber are leading candidates for these events and for triggering the increased prevalence of immune-mediated diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our studies have shown that consumption of a 'Western' diet high in saturated (milk-derived) fat (MF) or n-6 polyunsaturated (safflower oil) fat have similar effects on the structure of the colonic microbiome of wild-type and IL- 10(-/-) mice, characterized by increased Bacteroidetes and decreased Firmicutes. However, the MF diet uniquely promotes the expansion of an immunogenic sulfite-reducing pathobiont, Bilophila wadsworthia, a member of the Deltaproteobacteria and minor component of the gut microbiome. This bacterial bloom results from a MF diet-induced shift in hepatic conjugation of bile acids, from glycocholic to taurocholic (TC) acid, which is important for solubilizing the more hydrophobic MF diet. However, it is also responsible for delivery of taurine-derived sulfur to the distal bowel, promoting the assemblage of bile-tolerant microbes such as B. wadsworthia. The bloom of this species promotes a Th1-mediated immune response and the development of colitis in IL-10(-/-) mice. A similar bloom of B. wadsworthia is seen when IL-10(-/-) mice are fed a low-fat diet supplemented with TC. B. wadsworthia colonization of monoassociated germ-free IL-10(-/-) mice was dependent on the host consuming either a high-saturated MF diet or the gavage with TC. Together, these data provide a plausible explanation for the link between diseases such as IBD and dietary-mediated selection of gut microbial pathobionts in genetically susceptible hosts. With this knowledge, it may be possible to mitigate the bloom of these types of pathobionts by modifying the conjugation states of

  18. Oxidative modification of lipoic acid by HNE in Alzheimer disease brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Hardas, Sarita S.; Sultana, Rukhsana; Clark, Amy M.; Beckett, Tina L.; Szweda, Luke I.; Murphy, M. Paul; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of three pathological hallmarks: synapse loss, extracellular senile plaques (SP) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The major component of SP is amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), which has been shown to induce oxidative stress. The AD brain shows increased levels of lipid peroxidation products, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE). HNE can react covalently with Cys, His, or Lys residues on proteins, altering structure and function of the latter. In the present study we measured the levels of the HNE-modified lipoic acid in brain of subjects with AD and age-matched controls. Lipoic acid is a key co-factor for a number of proteins including pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, key complexes for cellular energetics. We observed a significant decrease in the levels of HNE-lipoic acid in the AD brain compared to that of age-matched controls. To investigate this phenomenon further, the levels and activity of lipoamide dehydrogenase (LADH) were measured in AD and control brains. Additionally, LADH activities were measured after in-vitro HNE-treatment to mice brains. Both LADH levels and activities were found to be significantly reduced in AD brain compared to age-matched control. HNE-treatment also reduced the LADH activity in mice brain. These data are consistent with a two-hit hypothesis of AD: oxidative stress leads to lipid peroxidation that, in turn, causes oxidative dysfunction of key energy-related complexes in mitochondria, triggering neurodegeneration. This study is consonant with the notion that lipoic acid supplementation could be a potential treatment for the observed loss of cellular energetics in AD and potentiate the antioxidant defense system to prevent or delay the oxidative stress in and progression of this devastating dementing disorder. PMID:24024140

  19. Apoptotic neutrophils in the circulation of patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b).

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Taco W; Maianski, Nikolai A; Tool, Anton T J; Smit, G Peter A; Rake, Jan Peter; Roos, Dirk; Visser, Gepke

    2003-06-15

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, and growth retardation, and associated-for unknown reasons- with neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. In 5 GSD1b patients in whom nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase activity and chemotaxis were defective, we found that the majority of circulating granulocytes bound Annexin-V. The neutrophils showed signs of apoptosis with increased caspase activity, condensed nuclei, and perinuclear clustering of mitochondria to which the proapoptotic Bcl-2 member Bax had translocated already. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) addition to in vitro cultures did not rescue the GSD1b neutrophils from apoptosis as occurs with G-CSF-treated control neutrophils. Moreover, the 2 GSD1b patients on G-CSF treatment did not show significantly lower levels of apoptotic neutrophils in the bloodstream. Current understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and the accompanying functional demise suggests that GSD1b granulocytes are dysfunctional because they are apoptotic. PMID:12576310

  20. Levels of enzyme activities in six lysosomal storage diseases in Japanese neonates determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Ryuichi; Sakai, Eri; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are caused by defective enzyme activities in lysosomes, characterized by the accumulation of glycolipids, oligosaccharides, mucopolysaccharides, sphingolipids, and other biological substances. Accumulating evidence has suggested that early detection of individuals with LSDs, followed by the immediate initiation of appropriate therapy during the presymptomatic period, usually results in better therapeutic outcomes. The activities of individual enzymes are measured using fluorescent substrates. However, the simultaneous determination of multiple enzyme activities has been awaited in neonatal screening of LSDs because the prevalence of individual LSDs is rare. In this study, the activities of six enzymes associated with LSDs were examined with 6-plex enzyme assay using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The accumulation of enzyme products was almost linear for 0-20 h at 37 °C. Dried blood spots (DBSs) provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were used for quality control (QC). The intraday and interday coefficient of variance values were < 25%. The enzyme activities of healthy individuals were higher than those of LSD-confirmed individuals. These results suggest that the levels of enzyme activities of six LSDs in a Japanese population were comparable to those of a recent report [Elliott et al. Mol Genet Metab 118 (2016) 304-309], providing additional evidence that the 6-plex LSD enzyme assay is a reproducible analytical procedure for neonatal screening. PMID:27625992

  1. Echocardiographic Manifestations of Glycogen Storage Disease III: Increase in Wall Thickness and Left Ventricular Mass over Time

    PubMed Central

    Vertilus, Shawyntee M.; Austin, Stephanie L.; Foster, Kimberly S.; Boyette, Keri E.; Bali, Deeksha; Li, Jennifer S.; Kishnani, Priya S.; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Glycogen Storage Disease (GSD) type III, glycogen debranching enzyme deficiency, causes accumulation of glycogen in liver, skeletal, and cardiac muscle. Some patients develop increased left ventricular (LV) thickness by echocardiography, but the rate of increase and its significance remain unclear. Methods We evaluated 33 patients with GSD type III, 23 with IIIa and 10 with IIIb, ages 1 month – 55.5 yrs, by echocardiography for wall thickness, LV mass, shortening and ejection fractions, at 1 time point (n = 33) and at 2 time points in patients with more than 1 echocardiogram (13 of the 33). Results Of 23 cross-sectional patients with type IIIa, 12 had elevated LV mass, 11 had elevated wall thickness. One type IIIb patient had elevated LV mass but 4 had elevated wall thickness. For those with multiple observations, 9 of 10 with type IIIa developed increased LV mass over time, with 3 already increased at first measurement. Shortening and ejection fractions were generally normal. Conclusion Elevated LV mass and wall thickness is more common in patients with type IIIa but develops rarely in type IIIb, though ventricular systolic function is preserved. This suggests serial echocardiograms with attention to LV thickness and mass are important for care of these patients. PMID:20526204

  2. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of the AGL Gene in a Romanian Patient with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Anca; Rossmann, Heidi; Bucerzan, Simona; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background. Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme. There is a high phenotypic variability due to different mutations in the AGL gene. Methods and Results. We describe a 2.3-year-old boy from a nonconsanguineous Romanian family, who presented with severe hepatomegaly with fibrosis, mild muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, ketotic fasting hypoglycemia, increased transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, and combined hyperlipoproteinemia. GSD type IIIa was suspected. Accordingly, genomic DNA of the index patient was analyzed by next generation sequencing of the AGL gene. For confirmation of the two mutations found, genetic analysis of the parents and grandparents was also performed. The patient was compound heterozygous for the novel mutation c.3235C>T, p.Gln1079⁎ (exon 24) and the known mutation c.1589C>G, p.Ser530⁎ (exon 12). c.3235 >T, p.Gln1079⁎ was inherited from the father, who inherited it from his mother. c.1589C>G, p.Ser530⁎ was inherited from the mother, who inherited it from her father. Conclusion. We report the first genetically confirmed case of a Romanian patient with GSDIIIa. We detected a compound heterozygous genotype with a novel mutation, in the context of a severe hepatopathy and an early onset of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26885414

  3. Mutations in the Glucose-6-Phosphatase-α (G6PC) Gene that Cause Type Ia Glycogen Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6PC) is a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate to glucose and phosphate in the terminal step of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Mutations in the G6PC gene, located on chromosome 17q21, result in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder. GSD-Ia patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, lactic acidemia, and growth retardation. G6PC is a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein, anchored in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum with the active center facing into the lumen. To date, 54 missense, 10 nonsense, 17 insertion/deletion, and 3 splicing mutations in the G6PC gene have been identified in more than 550 patients. Of these, 50 missense, 2 nonsense, and 2 insertion/deletion mutations have been functionally characterized for their effects on enzymatic activity and stability. While GSD-Ia is not more prevalent in any ethnic group, mutations unique to Caucasian, oriental, and Jewish populations have been described. Despite this, GSD-Ia patients exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity and a stringent genotype-phenotype relationship does not exist. PMID:18449899

  4. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of the AGL Gene in a Romanian Patient with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anca; Rossmann, Heidi; Bucerzan, Simona; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background. Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme. There is a high phenotypic variability due to different mutations in the AGL gene. Methods and Results. We describe a 2.3-year-old boy from a nonconsanguineous Romanian family, who presented with severe hepatomegaly with fibrosis, mild muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, ketotic fasting hypoglycemia, increased transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, and combined hyperlipoproteinemia. GSD type IIIa was suspected. Accordingly, genomic DNA of the index patient was analyzed by next generation sequencing of the AGL gene. For confirmation of the two mutations found, genetic analysis of the parents and grandparents was also performed. The patient was compound heterozygous for the novel mutation c.3235C>T, p.Gln1079(⁎) (exon 24) and the known mutation c.1589C>G, p.Ser530(⁎) (exon 12). c.3235 >T, p.Gln1079(⁎) was inherited from the father, who inherited it from his mother. c.1589C>G, p.Ser530(⁎) was inherited from the mother, who inherited it from her father. Conclusion. We report the first genetically confirmed case of a Romanian patient with GSDIIIa. We detected a compound heterozygous genotype with a novel mutation, in the context of a severe hepatopathy and an early onset of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26885414

  5. Fluorescence Polarization Based Nucleic Acid Testing for Rapid and Cost-Effective Diagnosis of Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Charles, Richelle C; Ryan, Edward T; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-11-01

    A new nucleic acid detection method was developed for a rapid and cost-effective diagnosis of infectious disease. This approach relies on the three unique elements: 1) detection probes that regulate DNA polymerase activity in response to the complementary target DNA; 2) universal reporters conjugated with a single fluorophore; and 3) fluorescence polarization (FP) detection. As a proof-of-concept, the assay was used to detect and sub-type Salmonella bacteria with sensitivities down to a single bacterium in less than three hours. PMID:26420633

  6. Resveratrol and Omega-3 Fatty Acid: Its Implications in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhusan; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Kataki, Manjir Sarma; Shah, Kajri; Pathak, Yashwant; Panguluri, Siva Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present review aims at summarizing the major therapeutic roles of resveratrol and omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) along with their related pathways. This article reviews some of the key studies involving the health benefits of resveratrol and O3FAs. Oxidative stress has been considered as one of the most important pathophysiological factors associated with various cardiovascular disease conditions. Resveratrol, with the potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, has been proven to be a significantly protective compound in restoring the normal cardiac health. A plethora of research also demonstrated the reduction of the risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke, and their complications by O3FAs derived from fish and fish oils. This review describes the potential cardioprotective role of resveratrol and O3FAs in ameliorating the endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26697434

  7. Importance of Fatty Acid Compositions in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Yuji; Motoki, Hirohiko; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Okada, Ayako; Tomita, Takeshi; Miyashita, Yusuke; Koyama, Jun; Ikeda, Uichi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Importance of fatty acid components and imbalances has emerged in coronary heart disease. In this study, we analyzed fatty acids and ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a Japanese cohort. Methods Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was diagnosed in 101 patients by ABI ≤0.90 and/or by angiography. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and components of serum fatty acids were examined in all patients (mean age 73.2±0.9 years; 81 males), and compared with those in 373 age- and sex-matched control subjects with no evidence of PAD. Results The presence of PAD (mean ABI: 0.71±0.02) was independently associated with low levels of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.85–0.96; P = 0.002), eicosapentaenoic acid∶arachidonic acid (EPA∶AA) ratio (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.17–0.86; P = 0.021), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96–0.98; P<0.0001), and with a high hemoglobin A1c level (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.06–1.69; P = 0.013). Individuals with lower levels of GLA (≤7.95 µg/mL) and a lower EPA∶AA ratio (≤0.55) had the lowest ABI (0.96±0.02, N = 90), while the highest ABI (1.12±0.01, N = 78) was observed in individuals with higher values of both GLA and EPA∶AA ratio (P<0.0001). Conclusion A low level of GLA and a low EPA∶AA ratio are independently associated with the presence of PAD. Specific fatty acid abnormalities and imbalances could lead to new strategies for risk stratification and prevention in PAD patients. PMID:25191963

  8. Alpha-lipoic acid as a pleiotropic compound with potential therapeutic use in diabetes and other chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marilia Brito; Negrato, Carlos Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid is a naturally occurring substance, essential for the function of different enzymes that take part in mitochondria's oxidative metabolism. It is believed that alpha-lipoic acid or its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid have many biochemical functions acting as biological antioxidants, as metal chelators, reducers of the oxidized forms of other antioxidant agents such as vitamin C and E, and modulator of the signaling transduction of several pathways. These above-mentioned actions have been shown in experimental studies emphasizing the use of alpha-lipoic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for many chronic diseases with great epidemiological as well economic and social impact such as brain diseases and cognitive dysfunctions like Alzheimer disease, obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, burning mouth syndrome, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, some types of cancer, glaucoma and osteoporosis. Many conflicting data have been found concerning the clinical use of alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of diabetes and of diabetes-related chronic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, wound healing and diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The most frequent clinical condition in which alpha-lipoic acid has been studied was in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 1 as well type 2 diabetes. Considering that oxidative stress, a imbalance between pro and antioxidants with excessive production of reactive oxygen species, is a factor in the development of many diseases and that alpha-lipoic acid, a natural thiol antioxidant, has been shown to have beneficial effects on oxidative stress parameters in various tissues we wrote this article in order to make an up-to-date review of current thinking regarding alpha-lipoic acid and its use as an antioxidant drug therapy for a myriad of diseases that could have potential benefits from its use. PMID:25104975

  9. Application of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for storage of solar electricity in stand-alone photovoltaic systems in the northwest areas of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Shounan; Zhou, Qingshen; Kong, Delong; Ma, Jianping

    Photovoltaic (PV) installations for solar electric power generation are being established rapidly in the northwest areas of China, and it is increasingly important for these power systems to have reliable and cost effective energy storage. The lead-acid battery is the more commonly used storage technology for PV systems due to its low cost and its wide availability. However, analysis shows that it is the weakest component of PV power systems. Because the batteries can be over discharged, or operated under partial state of charge (PSOC), their service life in PV systems is shorter than could be expected. The working conditions of batteries in remote area installations are worse than those in situations where technical support is readily available. Capacity-loss in lead-acid batteries operated in remote locations often occurs through sulfation of electrodes and stratification of electrolyte. In northwest China, Shandong Sacred Sun Power Sources Industry Co. Ltd. type GFMU valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are being used in PV power stations. These batteries have an advanced grid structure, superior leady paste, and are manufactured using improved plate formation methods. Their characteristics, and their performance in PV systems, are discussed in this paper. The testing results of GFMU VRLA batteries in the laboratory have shown that the batteries could satisfy the demands of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards for PV systems.

  10. Characterization and storage stability of astaxanthin esters, fatty acid profile and α-tocopherol of lipid extract from shrimp (L. vannamei) waste with potential applications as food ingredient.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Estaca, J; Calvo, M M; Álvarez-Acero, I; Montero, P; Gómez-Guillén, M C

    2017-02-01

    In this work a lipid extract from shrimp waste was obtained and characterized. The most abundant fatty acids found were C16:0, C18:2n6c, C18:1n9c, C22:6n3, and C20:5n3. The extract contained all-trans-astaxanthin, two cis-astaxanthin isomers, 5 astaxanthin monoesters, and 10 astaxanthin diesters (7±1mg astaxanthin/g). C22:6n3 and C20:5n3 were the most frequent fatty acids in the esterified forms. Appreciable amounts of α-tocopherol and cholesterol were also found (126±11mg/g and 65±1mg/g, respectively). Little lipid oxidation was observed after 120days of storage at room temperature, revealed by a slight reduction of ω-3 fatty acids, but neither accumulation of TBARS nor formation of oxidized cholesterol forms was found. This is attributed to the antioxidant effect of astaxanthin and α-tocopherol, as their concentrations decreased as storage continued. The lipid extract obtained has interesting applications as food ingredient, owing to the coloring capacity and the presence of healthy components. PMID:27596389

  11. Outcomes in patients with nonerosive reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor and alginic acid ± glycyrrhetinic acid and anthocyanosides

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Gatti, Mario; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Ivaldi, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of alginic acid alone versus alginic acid combined with low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid and bilberry anthocyanosides as an addon to conventional proton pump inhibitor therapy in relieving symptoms associated with nonerosive reflux disease. Methods This prospective, randomized, 8-week, open-label trial was conducted at two centers. Sixty-three patients with persistent symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were eligible for the study. Patients in group A (n = 31) were treated with pantoprazole and a formula (Mirgeal®) containing alginic acid and low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + standardized Vaccinium myrtillus extract for 4 weeks, then crossed over to the multi-ingredient formula for a further 4 weeks. Patients in group B (n = 32) were treated pantoprazole and alginic acid alone twice daily, then crossed over to alginic acid twice daily for a further 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by medical evaluation of a symptom relief score, estimated using a visual analog scale (0–10). Side effects, tolerability, and compliance were also assessed. Results Of the 63 patients enrolled in the study, 58 (29 in group A and 29 in group B) completed the 8-week trial. The baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. During the study, significant differences were recorded in symptom scores for both groups. In group A, symptoms of chest pain, heartburn, and abdominal swelling were less serious than in group B. Treatment A was better tolerated, did not induce hypertension, and had fewer side effects than treatment B. No significant differences in compliance were found between the two groups. Conclusion Use of low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + bilberry anthocyanosides, together with alginic acid as addon therapy, substantially improves symptoms in patients with nonerosive reflux disease without increasing side effects or worsening

  12. Novel bile acid therapeutics for the treatment of chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hegade, Vinod S.; Speight, R. Alexander; Etherington, Rachel E.; Jones, David E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in understanding the role of bile acids (BAs) as signalling molecules in human metabolism and inflammation have opened new avenues in the field of hepatology research. BAs are no longer considered as simple molecules helping in fat digestion but as agents with real therapeutic value in treating complex autoimmune and metabolic liver diseases. BAs and their receptors such as farnesoid X receptor, transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor have been identified as novel targets for drug development. Some of these novel pharmaceuticals are already in clinical evaluation with the most advanced drugs having reached phase III trials. Chronic liver diseases such as primary biliary cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, for which there is no or limited pharmacotherapy, are most likely to gain from these developments. In this review we discuss recent and the most relevant basic and clinical research findings related to BAs and their implications for novel therapy for chronic liver diseases. PMID:27134666

  13. Resolvins and omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids: Clinical implications in inflammatory diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a central process in several disorders and contributes to cancer progression. Inflammation involves a complex cascade of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling events with protein and lipid mediators. Recent advances in lipid detection have revealed the importance of lipid mediators in inflammation. Omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are found naturally in fish oil and have been extensively studied in multiple inflammatory diseases with improved outcomes. Resolvins are thought to be the active metabolites of ω-3 PUFA, and are responsible for facilitating the resolving phase of acute inflammation. Clinically, resolvins have been associated with resolution of acute kidney injury and acute lung injury, micro and macro vascular response to injury, and inhibition of microglia-activated inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to inflammatory diseases, ω-3 PUFA and resolvins appear to modulate cancer progression. ω-3 PUFA intake has been associated with reduced inflammation in colorectal cancer, and favorable phenotype in breast cancer. Resolvins offer promising therapeutic potential as they may modulate inflammation with minimal side-effects, in contrast to currently available anti-inflammatory medications. This review describes the roles of ω-3 PUFA and resolvins in the inflammatory cascade, various inflammatory diseases, and specific cancers. Additionally, it will discuss the clinical therapeutic potential of resolvins as targets in inflammatory diseases and cancers. PMID:27458590

  14. Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandsma, Robert; Comelli, Elena M.; Arendt, Bianca M.; Zhang, Ling; Fung, Scott; Fischer, Sandra E.; McGilvray, Ian G.; Allard, Johane P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by dysbiosis. The bidirectional effects between intestinal microbiota (IM) and bile acids (BA) suggest that dysbiosis may be accompanied by an altered bile acid (BA) homeostasis, which in turn can contribute to the metabolic dysregulation seen in NAFLD. This study sought to examine BA homeostasis in patients with NAFLD and to relate that with IM data. Methods This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of adults with biopsy-confirmed NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver: NAFL or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: NASH) and healthy controls (HC). Clinical and laboratory data, stool samples and 7-day food records were collected. Fecal BA profiles, serum markers of BA synthesis 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and intestinal BA signalling, as well as IM composition were assessed. Results 53 subjects were included: 25 HC, 12 NAFL and 16 NASH. Levels of total fecal BA, cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and BA synthesis were higher in patients with NASH compared to HC (p<0.05 for all comparisons). The primary to secondary BA ratio was higher in NASH compared to HC (p = 0.004), but ratio of conjugated to unconjugated BAs was not different between the groups. Bacteroidetes and Clostridium leptum counts were decreased in in a subset of 16 patients with NASH compared to 25 HC, after adjusting for body mass index and weight-adjusted calorie intake (p = 0.028 and p = 0.030, respectively). C. leptum was positively correlated with fecal unconjugated lithocholic acid (LCA) (r = 0.526, p = 0.003) and inversely with unconjugated CA (r = -0.669, p<0.0001) and unconjugated CDCA (r = - 0.630, p<0.0001). FGF19 levels were not different between the groups (p = 0.114). Conclusions In adults with NAFLD, dysbiosis is associated with altered BA homeostasis, which renders them at increased risk of hepatic injury. PMID:27203081

  15. The role of folic acid on the hyperhomocysteinemia in the Buerger's disease (Thromboangiitis Obliterans)

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Ali Akbar; Hoghoughi, Mohammad Ali; Eshaghian, Afrooz; Zade, Akbar Hassan; Masoudpour, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The mechanism underlying Buerger's disease (BD) is still unknown. Recently, thrombophilic conditions predisposing to a hypercoagulable state have been hypothesized as triggers for BD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of the hyperhomocysteinemia and level of the anticardiolipin antibodies, and the role of folic acid on the hyperhomocysteinemia and on the rate of the amputations in the patients with BD. Materials and Methods: In an experimental placebo-controlled double-blinded study, between 2004 and 2010, thirty patients with BD were randomly assigned into two groups (14 patients in a drug group and 16 patients in the placebo group). Drug or placebo was administered, and they were followed in 2 and 6 months for homocysteine, Anticardiolipin antibodies and the risk of amputations. Results: At the beginning of the study homocysteine level was higher than normal in 19 patients (63%). There was a significant decrease in homocysteine level during 6 months in folic acid group (P < 0.001), but there was no change in the placebo group. None of our patients had elevated Anticardiolipin antibodies, and there was no change in the level of Anticardiolipin antibody during study. High level of homocysteine did not associate with more amputations during 6 months of study (P > 0.05). Conclusion: This study shows the hyperhomocysteinemia in BD, and the benefit of folic acid treatment in homocysteine lowering, but folic acid doesn’t inhibit the risk of major and minor amputation during 6 months of follow-up. Longer follow-up may reveal the role of folic acid in these patients PMID:25657746

  16. Helicobacter pylori cagL amino acid polymorphisms and its association with gastroduodenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sanket Kumar; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Tripathi, Aparna; Jaiswal, Virendra; Khatoon, Jahanarah; Ghsohal, Uday Chand; Krishnani, Narendra; Husain, Nuzhat

    2013-07-01

    CagL is a pilus protein of Helicobacter pylori that interacts with host cellular α5β1 integrins through its arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif, guiding proper positioning of the T4SS and translocation of CagA. Deletion or sequence variations of cagL significantly diminished the ability of H. pylori to induce secretion of IL-8 by the host cell. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the association of cagL and its amino acid sequence polymorphisms with gastric cancer (GC), peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) as there are no such studies from India. In total, 200 adult patients (NUD 120, PUD 30, GC 50) who underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by rapid urease test, culture, histopathology, and PCR. The collected isolates were screened for cagL genotype by PCR and assessed for amino acid sequence polymorphisms using sequence translation. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in study population was 52.5%. Most of the i