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  1. The Net Will BE the Place where Most Interactions Will Take Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarelli, Guido

    As society becomes more and more interconnected (we just started to add our environment to the net with the Internet of Things revolution), the net will be the place where most inter actions will take place...

  2. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  3. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  4. Kiwifruit: taking its place in the global fruit bowl.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol; Courtney, David

    2013-01-01

    While the world total production of kiwifruit has increased by over 50% during the last decade, the kiwifruit remains a niche fruit, taking up an estimated 0.22% of the global fruit bowl, which is dominated by apples, oranges, and bananas. Even though kiwifruit's share of the global fruit bowl has remained largely unchanged over the past 15 years, the scope for growth in the category is significant, with the nutritional and production characteristics of kiwifruit being on the right side of key global consumer trends around health and sustainability. Taking advantage of these consumer trends is one of two key challenges for the global kiwifruit industry. The second challenge is to harness the diverse natural and cultivated range of kiwifruit varieties (colors, flavors, sizes, and shapes) to stimulate the interest of consumers and grow the share of kiwifruit in the fruit basket through selecting cultivars that can develop meaningful market segments and meet consumer demand.

  5. 2012 CCCC Chair's Address: Stories Take Place--A Performance in One Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Malea

    2012-01-01

    This is a written version of the address that Malea Powell gave at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Convention in St. Louis, Missouri, on Thursday, March 22, 2012. This address is a collection of stories. According to her, stories take place. Stories practice place into space. Stories produce habitable spaces. She…

  6. Studying Activities That Take Place in Speech Interactions: A Theoretical and Methodological Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Dizier de Almeida, Valérie; Colletta, Jean-Marc; Auriac-Slusarczyk, Emmanuelle; Specogna, Antonietta; Simon, Jean-Pascal; Fiema, Gabriela; Luxembourger, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a theoretical and methodological framework based on a pluralistic, concerted approach to the study of activities that take place in and through speech interactions. The framework has a general scope, applying to any collective activity taking form through language interactions. It contributes to a fuller understanding of the…

  7. Marine Planktonic Archaea Take Up Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ouverney, Cleber C.; Fuhrman, Jed A.

    2000-01-01

    Archaea are traditionally thought of as “extremophiles,” but recent studies have shown that marine planktonic Archaea make up a surprisingly large percentage of ocean midwater microbial communities, up to 60% of the total prokaryotes. However, the basic physiology and contribution of Archaea to community microbial activity remain unknown. We have studied Archaea from 200-m depths of the northwest Mediterranean Sea and the Pacific Ocean near California, measuring the archaeal activity under simulated natural conditions (8 to 17°C, dark and anaerobic) by means of a method called substrate tracking autoradiography fluorescence in situ hybridization (STARFISH) that simultaneously detects specific cell types by 16S rRNA probe binding and activity by microautoradiography. In the 200-m-deep Mediterranean and Pacific samples, cells binding the archaeal probes made up about 43 and 14% of the total countable cells, respectively. Our results showed that the Archaea are active in the uptake of dissolved amino acids from natural concentrations (nanomolar) with about 60% of the individuals in the archaeal communities showing measurable uptake. Bacteria showed a similar proportion of active cells. We concluded that a portion of these Archaea is heterotrophic and also appears to coexist successfully with Bacteria in the same water. PMID:11055931

  8. Questions and Answers Regarding Actions to Take When Ending Shelter-in-Place

    SciTech Connect

    Shumpert, B.

    2003-12-30

    Shelter-in-place has found increasing acceptance as an effective protective action option for communities participating in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Studies have confirmed that it can provide optimum protection under certain accident conditions. However, emergency managers and planners, as well as the public, continue to be troubled by the need to end sheltering when the plume has passed in order to avoid sustained exposure to the small amount of agent that has penetrated the shelter. One of the concerns posed by this necessity is uncertainty regarding what hazards will then be faced in the environment outside the shelter and what actions can be taken to avoid those hazards. This report attempts to address those uncertainties. It recognizes that there is an extremely low probability that the environment outside the shelter will be contaminated with chemical agent residue. However, as people comply with an official recommendation to leave their shelters, they probably can't be certain that the environment is free from contamination. Therefore, this report identifies and explains specific and simple actions they can take to avoid the possibility of exposure to chemical agent hazards outside their shelters. It addresses such issues as the actions people should take upon ending shelter-in-place, what clothing they should wear, how they should handle animals, and what they should do about food in their homes and produce in their gardens.

  9. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after... What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? Certain types.... These communication methods are optional. Type of information exchange When Purpose Parties involved...

  10. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  11. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  12. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  13. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  14. [Marketing approval and market surveillance of medical devices in Germany: Where does policy integration take place?].

    PubMed

    Lang, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011 new regulatory measures regarding medical devices have been set up with the aim to eliminate obstacles to innovations and to find more coordinated ways to marketing authorisation and market surveillance. This essay investigates whether these new and existing coordination mechanisms build up to a Joined-up Government approach. The analysis shows that the regulatory process should be adjusted along several dimensions. First, many organisations lack awareness regarding their stakeholders and focus solely on their immediate organisational activities. Second, the regulatory process (marketing authorisation and market surveillance) is too fragmented for an effective communication to take place. Finally, the underlying strategy process is an ad-hoc approach lacking continuity and continued involvement of, in particular, the responsible federal ministries.

  15. The 'taking place' of health and wellbeing: towards non-representational theory.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin J; Chen, Sandra; Myers, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    For the last two decades health geography has focused on the dynamics between health and place. Although the social constructivist perspective of much research has provided many insights into the meanings of health and health care arguably, mirroring progress in the parent discipline of human geography, there could be a far more serious engagement with non-representational theory and the 'taking place' of health and health care. To showcase the importance and potential of this broadly, the idea of wellbeing is re-approached. The paper reflects on the ways wellbeing has been treated in research primarily as a meaningful and relatively prescribed state of life, to the neglect of process. Based on this critique, a qualitative study then illustrates the most immediate and everyday ways wellbeing might arise through 'affect'; the pre-personal mobile energies and intensities that result from physical encounters within assemblages of bodies and objects. Indeed, theoretically the findings support the proposition that, at one level, wellbeing might not be taken from environment but instead might emerge as the affective environment. They certainly raise awareness of how much in health might originate at the surface, prior to meaning, within life's infinite spatial doings, and thus they launch some final thoughts on the wider challenges and opportunities for non-representational health geographies.

  16. DSC studies of retrogradation and amylose lipid complex transition taking place in gamma irradiated wheat starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, K.; Eliasson, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation ( 60Co) with doses of 5-30 kGy on the amylose-lipid complex transition and retrogradation occurring in gels containing ca. 50% and ca. 20% wheat starch was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) during heating-cooling-heating cycles (up to three cycles). Transition of the amylose-lipid complex occurs in all the irradiated samples at a lower temperature as compared to the non-irradiated starch. That effect was larger when the radiation dose was higher. A further thermal treatment causes a decrease of the transition temperature in the irradiated samples, with no effect or increase of that temperature observed for the non-irradiated ones. Irradiation hinders retrogradation taking place in 50% gels but facilitates the process occurring in 20% gels. The differences between the irradiated and the non-irradiated samples are more evident in the every next heating or cooling cycle as well as after storage and in the case of ca. 50% suspensions as compared to ca. 20% suspensions. The results point out to the deterioration of the structure of the complexes formed in the irradiated starch as compared to the non-irradiated one.

  17. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Eveline JM; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus JM

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. Objective To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Methods Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults’ needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying

  18. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  19. OECD Global Science Forum's Astronomy Workshop to take place in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    members of the national astronomical community. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) are explicitly represented. Experts from the world-wide astronomy community have been invited to set the stage and provide input for the discussions. The choice by Germany and the OECD to make Munich the venue of this Global Science Forum Workshop is no coincidence. It is a recognition of the important role played by many institutions in the Munich region in the field of Astronomy and Astrophysics. They include the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität where the Workshop will take place, the Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik and the European Southern Observatory. These institutions are all participating in large programmes and projects in astronomy. ESO, for its part, is at the leading edge of world astronomy with its flagship facility, the Very Large Telescope in Paranal (Chile) and the newly started ALMA project at Chajnantor (Chile), being carried out in partnership between Europe and North America. Public Talks (Munich) on December 1, 2003 As a prelude to the Workshop, two public keynote presentations will take place on December 1 at the Deutsches Museum in Munich at 18:00 CET. The speakers are Malcolm Longair, Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy and Head of Laboratory, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (UK) and Martin Harwit, Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, Cornell University, and former Director of the National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC (USA). The talks will be given in English and the entry to this public event is free. Professor Longair will speak on "Astrophysics and Cosmology in the Twenty-First Century" and Professor Harwit will speak on "The Growth of Understanding of our Universe". You can find more informaton on the Public Talks web page.

  20. Posttranslational N-glycosylation takes place during the normal processing of human coagulation factor VII.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Gert; Kristensen, Claus; Steenstrup, Thomas Dock

    2005-05-01

    N-glycosylation is normally a cotranslational process that occurs during translocation of the nascent protein to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the present study, however, we demonstrate posttranslational N-glycosylation of recombinant human coagulation factor VII (FVII) in CHO-K1 and 293A cells. Human FVII has two N-glycosylation sites (N145 and N322). Pulse-chase labeled intracellular FVII migrated as two bands corresponding to FVII with one and two N-glycans, respectively. N-glycosidase treatment converted both of these band into a single band, which comigrated with mutated FVII without N-glycans. Immediately after pulse, most labeled intracellular FVII had one N-glycan, but during a 1-h chase, the vast majority was processed into FVII with two N-glycans, demonstrating posttranslational N-glycosylation of FVII. Pulse-chase analysis of N-glycosylation site knockout mutants demonstrated cotranslational glycosylation of N145 but primarily or exclusively posttranslational glycosylation of N322. The posttranslational N-glycosylation appeared to take place in the same time frame as the folding of nascent FVII into a secretion-competent conformation, indicating a link between the two processes. We propose that the cotranslational conformation(s) of FVII are unfavorable for glycosylation at N332, whereas a more favorable conformation is obtained during the posttranslational folding. This is the first documentation of posttranslational N-glycosylation of a non-modified protein in mammalian cells with an intact N-glycosylation machinery. Thus, the present study demonstrates that posttranslational N-glycosylation can be a part of the normal processing of glycoproteins.

  1. Lycopene isomerisation takes place within enterocytes during absorption in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Richelle, Myriam; Sanchez, Belén; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Lambelet, Pierre; Bortlik, Karlheinz; Williamson, Gary

    2010-06-01

    Lycopene in fruits and vegetables occurs mostly (80-97 %) in the all-E configuration, whereas a considerable proportion of lycopene in the human body is present as Z-isomers. The Z-isomers offer potentially better health benefits and show improved antioxidant activity in vitro when compared with the all-E-isomer. The absorption of dietary lycopene is a complex process involving transfer of the carotenoid from the food matrix into micelles, uptake by enterocytes, packaging into chylomicrons and finally secretion into plasma. Isomerisation could take place at any of these individual steps. By exploiting in vitro and in vivo models, we traced lycopene isomerisation during absorption using various methods to mimic gastric and duodenal conditions, incorporation into mixed micelles, absorption and metabolism by various Caco-2 cell clones, and performed a postprandial study in human subjects to identify the profile of lycopene isomers in plasma chylomicrons. We demonstrate that all-E-lycopene remains unchanged during its passage in the gastrointestinal tract, including its incorporation into mixed micelles. The key site of lycopene isomerisation is inside the intestinal cells resulting in 29 % of lycopene as Z-isomers. Lycopene isomerisation in the various Caco-2 cell clones is consistent with that observed in human chylomicrons formed in a postprandial state. There is no selection in the release of lycopene isomers from enterocytes. Although there is a huge inter-individual variability of total lycopene absorption reported both in in vitro intestinal cell lines as well as in human chylomicrons, the lycopene isomer profile is quite similar.

  2. An Experimental Investigation of the Process of Isotope Exchange that Takes Place when Heavy Water Is Exposed to the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the recently developed method for rapid measurement of maximum density temperature to determine the rate at which hydrogen and deuterium isotope exchange takes place when a sample of heavy water is exposed to the atmosphere. We also provide a simple explanation for the observed linear rate of transition. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? 636.402 Section 636.402 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges §...

  4. Advice from Rural Elders: What It Takes to Age in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Cheryl J.; Willoughby, Deborah F.; Battisto, Dina G.

    2011-01-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place (AIP), and there are psychological, physiological, and economic benefits in doing so. However, it is especially challenging to AIP in rural communities. AIP models have been tested in urban settings and age-segregated communities, but they are not appropriate for rural communities. This paper presents rural AIP…

  5. A Reaction that Takes Place in Beakers but not in Conical Flasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin; Ophardt, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Inductors are substances that undergo a reaction and in so doing markedly accelerate or induce a simultaneous reaction. An experiment showing a reaction involving the oxidation of iodide to iodine by chromium (VI) found to be slow in the absence of acid, but which proceeded rapidly when iron (II) was induced is demonstrated.

  6. 23 CFR 636.401 - What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place prior... What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document? Verbal or written information exchanges (such as in the first-phase of a two-phase selection procedure) must...

  7. LIDAR for remote sensing of contaminations on water and earth surfaces taking place during oil-gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayev, A.; Tagiyev, B.; Allahverdiyev, K.; Musayev, A.; Sadikhov, I.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of contaminations on water and earth surfaces (oil spills, films) taking place during oil-gas extraction is an interesting and actual problem. This problem may be solved by using different methods of optical spectroscopy, including: •Raman scattering; •light induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS); •fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) LIDARs are successfully used for remote sensing of chemical and biological substances at atmosphere. A new laser induced fluorescence (LIF) KA-14 LIDAR system for detecting of oil spills on the sea surface was employed at the National Aviation Academy of Azerbaijan. LIDAR's parameters are as follows: •laser CFR 200- type QUANTEL, λ = 355 nm, beam Ø = 5.35 mm, f = 20 Hz, pulse duration τ = 7 ns, pulse power 60 mJ; •diameter of Newtonian- type telescope is 200 mm; •collimator expansion of the laser beam diameter- not less than 3; •angle range of telescope measurements relative to horizon: from -20 to +20 degree; •spectral range of measurements: from 380 to 750 nm, number of spectral channels- 32; •maximum range of measurements- not less than 250 m. This LIDAR is the first performing these kind of research not only on the Azerbaijan beach of Caspian sea, but also on the earth places of Absheron peninsula, where oil-gas production takes place. We hope that the performance of LIDAR will have an International recognition and will make noticeable input on the International Research of Caspian sea surfaces.

  8. Organelle import of proteins with dual targeting properties into mitochondria and chloroplasts takes place by the general import pathways.

    PubMed

    Langner, Uwe; Baudisch, Bianca; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of the endosymbiotic gene transfer, most mitochondrial and chloroplastic proteins are nuclear encoded and synthesized in the cytosol as precursor proteins with transit peptides mediating transport to their subcellular destination. It is often assumed that these transit peptides are strictly monospecific for a single organelle. But in recent years more and more proteins have been identified which carry transit peptides that are capable of mediating transport into both mitochondria and chloroplasts. In a recent study we showed with a combination of in silico, in organello, and in vivo approaches that the frequency of such proteins is apparently much higher than usually anticipated.(1) Here we demonstrate with in organello competition experiments that the import of 2 of these dually targeted proteins (GrpE and EF-Tu) takes place by the same import pathways that are used by organelle proteins with "typical" monospecific targeting properties.

  9. Evidence That Both Normal and Immune Elimination of Schistosoma mansoni Take Place at the Lung Stage of Migration Prior to Parasite Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    AD-A265 56 \\1 PUBLICATION REPORT 1740 18/93 EVIDENCE THAT BOTH NORMAL AND IMMUNE ELIMINATION OFSCHISTOSOMA MANSONI TAKE PLACE AT THE LUNG STAGE OF...Anct,•,n Society Md T•pical Mcld•dm &W I1,lit EVIDENCE THAT BOTH NORMAL AND IMMUNE ELIMINATION OF SCIIISTOSOMA MANSONI TAKE PLACE AT THE LUNG STAGE OF...distribution of autoradiographic foci observed in this and previous studies following percutaneous infection with 1$Se-labeled Schistosoma mansoni

  10. Swedish scientists take acid-rain research to developing nations

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1995-12-01

    In the realm of acid-rain research, Sweden looms large on the world stage. It is the country where scientists first proved more than 30 years ago that airborne chemicals could and did cross international boundaries to acidify lakes and forests far from where the pollution was generated. Now, Swedish scientists are leading an international effort to map acid-rain patterns in the developing countries of Asia, where new industrial activity seems to be recreating problems that European and North American policy makers have already taken steps to solve. Topics covered in this article include acid rain on the rise in Asia; visualizing and validating the data; funding as the key to steady research.

  11. miRNA repression of translation in vitro takes place during 43S ribosomal scanning

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Decimo, Didier; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at multiple levels by repressing translation, stimulating deadenylation and inducing the premature decay of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Although the mechanism by which miRNAs repress translation has been widely studied, the precise step targeted and the molecular insights of such repression are still evasive. Here, we have used our newly designed in vitro system, which allows to study miRNA effect on translation independently of deadenylation. By using specific inhibitors of various stages of protein synthesis, we first show that miRNAs target exclusively the early steps of translation with no effect on 60S ribosomal subunit joining, elongation or termination. Then, by using viral proteases and IRES-driven mRNA constructs, we found that translational inhibition takes place during 43S ribosomal scanning and requires both the poly(A) binding protein and eIF4G independently from their physical interaction. PMID:23161679

  12. Young People Take Their Rightful Places as Full and Contributing Members of a World Class Workforce: Philadelphia Youth Network Annual Report 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Youth Network, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The title of this year's annual report has particular meaning for all of the staff at the Philadelphia Youth Network. The phrase derives from Philadelphia Youth Network's (PYN's) new vision statement, developed as part of its recent strategic planning process, which reads: All of our city's young people take their rightful places as full and…

  13. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  18. 23 CFR 636.401 - What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document? 636.401 Section 636.401 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges §...

  19. Placing the power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers - taking the next step.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rohan; Howden, Mark; Hayman, Peter

    2013-07-30

    This paper explores heuristic methods with potential to place the analytical power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers. The complexity of real options analysis has led to patchy or ephemeral adoption even by corporate managers familiar with the financial-market origins of valuation methods. Intuitively accessible methods for estimating the value of real options have begun to evolve, but their evaluation has mostly been limited to researcher-driven applications. In this paper we work closely with Bush Heritage Australia to evaluate the potential of real options analysis to support the intuitive judgement of conservation estate managers in covenanting land with uncertain future conservation value due to climate change. The results show that modified decision trees have potential to estimate the option value of covenanting individual properties while time and ongoing research resolves their future conservation value. Complementing this, Luehrman's option space has potential to assist managers with limited budgets to increase the portfolio value of multiple properties with different conservation attributes.

  20. Avoidance of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus in leaf-cutting ants: Learning can take place entirely at the colony dump

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Plants initially accepted by foraging leaf-cutting ants are later avoided if they prove unsuitable for their symbiotic fungus. Plant avoidance is mediated by the waste produced in the fungus garden soon after the incorporation of the unsuitable leaves, as foragers can learn plant odors and cues from the damaged fungus that are both present in the recently produced waste particles. We asked whether avoidance learning of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus can take place entirely at the colony dump. In order to investigate whether cues available in the waste chamber induce plant avoidance in naïve subcolonies, we exchanged the waste produced by subcolonies fed either fungicide-treated privet leaves or untreated leaves and measured the acceptance of untreated privet leaves before and after the exchange of waste. Second, we evaluated whether foragers could perceive the avoidance cues directly at the dump by quantifying the visits of labeled foragers to the waste chamber. Finally, we asked whether foragers learn to specifically avoid untreated leaves of a plant after a confinement over 3 hours in the dump of subcolonies that were previously fed fungicide-treated leaves of that species. After the exchange of the waste chambers, workers from subcolonies that had access to waste from fungicide-treated privet leaves learned to avoid that plant. One-third of the labeled foragers visited the dump. Furthermore, naïve foragers learned to avoid a specific, previously unsuitable plant if exposed solely to cues of the dump during confinement. We suggest that cues at the dump enable foragers to predict the unsuitable effects of plants even if they had never been experienced in the fungus garden. PMID:28273083

  1. Avoidance of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus in leaf-cutting ants: Learning can take place entirely at the colony dump.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Andrés; Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Plants initially accepted by foraging leaf-cutting ants are later avoided if they prove unsuitable for their symbiotic fungus. Plant avoidance is mediated by the waste produced in the fungus garden soon after the incorporation of the unsuitable leaves, as foragers can learn plant odors and cues from the damaged fungus that are both present in the recently produced waste particles. We asked whether avoidance learning of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus can take place entirely at the colony dump. In order to investigate whether cues available in the waste chamber induce plant avoidance in naïve subcolonies, we exchanged the waste produced by subcolonies fed either fungicide-treated privet leaves or untreated leaves and measured the acceptance of untreated privet leaves before and after the exchange of waste. Second, we evaluated whether foragers could perceive the avoidance cues directly at the dump by quantifying the visits of labeled foragers to the waste chamber. Finally, we asked whether foragers learn to specifically avoid untreated leaves of a plant after a confinement over 3 hours in the dump of subcolonies that were previously fed fungicide-treated leaves of that species. After the exchange of the waste chambers, workers from subcolonies that had access to waste from fungicide-treated privet leaves learned to avoid that plant. One-third of the labeled foragers visited the dump. Furthermore, naïve foragers learned to avoid a specific, previously unsuitable plant if exposed solely to cues of the dump during confinement. We suggest that cues at the dump enable foragers to predict the unsuitable effects of plants even if they had never been experienced in the fungus garden.

  2. Modulation of Bmp4 signalling in the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that take place in early thymus and parathyroid development in avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Neves, Hélia; Dupin, Elisabeth; Parreira, Leonor; Le Douarin, Nicole M

    2012-01-15

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are crucial for the development of the endoderm of the pharyngeal pouches into the epithelia of thymus and parathyroid glands. Here we investigated the dynamics of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that take place at the earliest stages of thymic and parathyroid organogenesis using the quail-chick model together with a co-culture system capable of reproducing these early events in vitro. The presumptive territories of thymus and parathyroid epithelia were identified in three-dimensionally preserved pharyngeal endoderm of embryonic day 4.5 chick embryos on the basis of the expression of Foxn1 and Gcm2, respectively: the thymic rudiment is located in the dorsal domain of the third and fourth pouches, while the parathyroid rudiment occupies a more medial/anterior pouch domain. Using in vitro quail-chick tissue associations combined with in ovo transplantations, we show that the somatopleural but not the limb bud mesenchyme, can mimic the role of neural crest-derived pharyngeal mesenchyme to sustain development of these glands up to terminal differentiation. Furthermore, mesenchymal-derived Bmp4 appears to be essential to promote early stages of endoderm development during a short window of time, irrespective of the mesenchymal source. In vivo studies using the quail-chick system and implantation of growth factor soaked-beads further showed that expression of Bmp4 by the mesenchyme is necessary during a 24 h-period of time. After this period however, Bmp4 is no longer required and another signalling factor produced by the mesenchyme, Fgf10, influences later differentiation of the pouch endoderm. These results show that morphological development and cell differentiation of thymus and parathyroid epithelia require a succession of signals emanating from the associated mesenchyme, among which Bmp4 plays a pivotal role for triggering thymic epithelium specification.

  3. The major olive pollen allergen (Ole e I) shows both gametophytic and sporophytic expression during anther development, and its synthesis and storage takes place in the RER.

    PubMed

    de Dios Alché, J; Castro, A J; Olmedilla, A; Fernández, M C; Rodríguez, R; Villalba, M; Rodríguez-García, M I

    1999-08-01

    The distribution of Ole e I (the major olive pollen allergen) and its transcripts was investigated in the anther from premeiotic stages until the dehiscent pollen stage. Crude protein extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting and probed with a monoclonal antibody to Ole e I. The protein, with three variants, was found to accumulate from the early microspore stage onwards. In addition to the previously reported localization of the protein, Ole e I has been immunolocalized for the first time within the pollen wall and in the tapetum. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis using specific oligonucleotides and RNA extracted from whole anthers revealed that the Ole e I gene is expressed from the late tetrad stage onwards. No expression was found in control tissues such as petals, roots or leaves. Light microscopy in situ hybridization on developing flower buds and dehiscent pollen confirmed the transcripts to be present in both the microspores and the sporophytic tissue (tapetum). Labeling was found primarily in the tapetum, reaching the highest concentration in the cytoplasm of the developing and mature pollen, once tapetum started to degenerate. In situ hybridization at the transmission electron microscope level showed the transcripts to accumulate on ribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. These studies, together with others carried out previously by us, indicated that both synthesis and storage of Ole e I take place in the endoplasmic reticulum, coincidentally with the conspicuous changes suffered by this membrane system during pollen development. This process is most likely controlled at the transcriptional level. The localization of the protein in the pollen ectexine bring new insights into the function of the allergen, which are discussed.

  4. Place and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannatella, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Do places matter educationally? When Edward Casey remarks: "The world is, minimally and forever, a place-world", we might take this statement as presupposing without argument that places exist as a given, that we know what a place is, a point that Aristotle would have never taken for granted and in fact neither does Casey. I find Casey's remark…

  5. Place-focused physical activity research, human agency, and social justice in public health: taking agency seriously in studies of the built environment.

    PubMed

    Blacksher, Erika; Lovasi, Gina S

    2012-03-01

    Built environment characteristics have been linked to health outcomes and health disparities. However, the effects of an environment on behavior may depend on human perception, interpretation, motivation, and other forms of human agency. We draw on epidemiological and ethical concepts to articulate a critique of research on the built environment and physical activity. We identify problematic assumptions and enumerate both scientific and ethical reasons to incorporate subjective perspectives and public engagement strategies into built environment research and interventions. We maintain that taking agency seriously is essential to the pursuit of health equity and the broader demands of social justice in public health, an important consideration as studies of the built environment and physical activity increasingly focus on socially disadvantaged communities. Attention to how people understand their environment and navigate competing demands can improve the scientific value of ongoing efforts to promote active living and health, while also better fulfilling our ethical obligations to the individuals and communities whose health we strive to protect.

  6. Systemic treatment with the enteric bacterial fermentation product, propionic acid, produces both conditioned taste avoidance and conditioned place avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Foley, Kelly A; Gibson, James; Fudge, Melissa A; Kavaliers, Martin; Cain, Donald P; Macfabe, Derrick F

    2012-02-01

    Propionic acid, an enteric bacterial fermentation product, has received recent attention in regards to satiety and obesity in humans. The possibility that propionic acid might produce internal aversive cues was investigated in two experiments using conditioned taste avoidance and place avoidance procedures to index the potential aversive nature of systemic treatment with propionic acid in male rats. Experiment 1 examined the effect of systemic treatment with propionic acid (500 mg/kg), LiCl (95 mg/kg) or vehicle (all corrected to pH 7.5) on the formation of conditioned taste avoidance using a lickometer procedure. On 3 acquisition days three groups of rats were injected with propionic acid, LiCl or vehicle, following 30 min access to 0.3M sucrose solution. Both the Propionic acid group and the LiCl group evidenced a conditioned taste avoidance by the end of the acquisition period. During a drug free extinction phase the Propionic acid group showed extinction of the taste avoidance whereas the LiCl group did not. Experiment 2 involved place preference conditioning with propionic acid treatment associated with one novel context and vehicle with a different novel context on 6 conditioning trials for each type of injection. Place avoidance was assessed on two drug free extinction trials. Multi-variable assessment of the unconditioned (Acquisition Trials) and conditioned effects (Extinction Trials) of propionic acid on locomotor activity was quantified as was chamber choice time on the extinction trials. Propionic acid induced a significant place avoidance and significantly reduced locomotor activity on some acquisition trials. During the extinction trials rats exhibited enhanced locomotor activity levels in the propionic acid associated chamber, likely due to the conditioned aversive nature of this chamber.

  7. Effects of proton irradiation on a gas phase in which condensation takes place. I Negative Mg-26 anomalies and Al-26. [applied to solar and meteoritic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.; Walker, A.; Huss, G.; Morgan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, isotopic effects in magnesium generated in a proton-irradiated gas phase are examined, taking only (p,n), (p,d), and (p, alpha) reactions in magnesium, aluminum, and silicon into consideration. In the presence of proton radiation, the three elements are 'removed' from the gas phase by condensation. It is required that a value of Al-26/Al-27 greater than 6 times 10 to the -5th must be reached, consistent with the value deduced by Lee Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg (1976) from their studies of the Allende meteorite. The calculations show that fast aluminum condensation reduces the required proton fluence substantially, that a significant fraction of aluminum remains uncondensed when the above value of the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is reached, that a detectable MG-24 excess is very likely to occur, that detectable negative MG-28 anomalies can be generated, and that proton fluxes and irradiation times can be varied simultaneously, and over a wide range of values, without significant changes in the required proton fluence.

  8. Leaf processing behaviour in Atta leafcutter ants: 90% of leaf cutting takes place inside the nest, and ants select pieces that require less cutting.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Ryan W; Carlson, Katherine A; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Nesson, Michael H; Shepard, Christopher A; Schofield, Robert M S

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutter ants cut trimmings from plants, carry them to their underground nests and cut them into smaller pieces before inoculating them with a fungus that serves as a primary food source for the colony. Cutting is energetically costly, so the amount of cutting is important in understanding foraging energetics. Estimates of the cutting density, metres of cutting per square metre of leaf, were made from samples of transported leaf cuttings and of fungal substrate from field colonies of Atta cephalotes and Atta colombica. To investigate cutting inside the nest, we made leaf-processing observations of our laboratory colony, A. cephalotes. We did not observe the commonly reported reduction of the leaf fragments into a pulp, which would greatly increase the energy cost of processing. Video clips of processing behaviours, including behaviours that have not previously been described, are linked. An estimated 2.9 (±0.3) km of cutting with mandibles was required to reduce a square metre of leaf to fungal substrate. Only about 12% (±1%) of this cutting took place outside of the nest. The cutting density and energy cost is lower for leaf material with higher ratios of perimeter to area, so we tested for, and found that the laboratory ants had a preference for leaves that were pre-cut into smaller pieces. Estimates suggest that the energy required to transport and cut up the leaf material is comparable to the metabolic energy available from the fungus grown on the leaves, and so conservation of energy is likely to be a particularly strong selective pressure for leafcutter ants.

  9. Leaf processing behaviour in Atta leafcutter ants: 90% of leaf cutting takes place inside the nest, and ants select pieces that require less cutting

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Ryan W.; Carlson, Katherine A.; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Nesson, Michael H.; Shepard, Christopher A.; Schofield, Robert M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutter ants cut trimmings from plants, carry them to their underground nests and cut them into smaller pieces before inoculating them with a fungus that serves as a primary food source for the colony. Cutting is energetically costly, so the amount of cutting is important in understanding foraging energetics. Estimates of the cutting density, metres of cutting per square metre of leaf, were made from samples of transported leaf cuttings and of fungal substrate from field colonies of Atta cephalotes and Atta colombica. To investigate cutting inside the nest, we made leaf-processing observations of our laboratory colony, A. cephalotes. We did not observe the commonly reported reduction of the leaf fragments into a pulp, which would greatly increase the energy cost of processing. Video clips of processing behaviours, including behaviours that have not previously been described, are linked. An estimated 2.9 (±0.3) km of cutting with mandibles was required to reduce a square metre of leaf to fungal substrate. Only about 12% (±1%) of this cutting took place outside of the nest. The cutting density and energy cost is lower for leaf material with higher ratios of perimeter to area, so we tested for, and found that the laboratory ants had a preference for leaves that were pre-cut into smaller pieces. Estimates suggest that the energy required to transport and cut up the leaf material is comparable to the metabolic energy available from the fungus grown on the leaves, and so conservation of energy is likely to be a particularly strong selective pressure for leafcutter ants. PMID:26909161

  10. [A clinical case of development of lactic acid acidosis in a diabetic patient taking metformin].

    PubMed

    Cesur, Mustafa; Cekmen, Nedum; Cetinbas, Riza R; Badalov, Pavel; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanide. Due to its effects in suppressing the hepatic production of endogenous glucose and in increasing insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, the agent is used particularly in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, in which insulin resistance is especially pronounced. Lactic acidosis is one of the most important side effects of metformin. A male patient, born in 1923, was admitted to the emergency unit of our hospital for sudden vertigo, weakness, dyspnea, cyanosis, and lethargy. His history data showed that the patient had been suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus for 10 years and taking Glargin (insulin), 12 U/kg, once daily and Glucophage (metformin), 850 mg thrice daily. The patient's general condition was fair; stupor, time and spatial orientation were absent. Analysis of arterial blood gases showed the presence of metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. Thereafter the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit of the hospital; intubated and connected to a T-bird ventilation apparatus. On the following day, an analysis of arterial blood gases indicated the proximity of the results to their physiological parameters. Ventilation was stopped; and monitoring of the patient continued by following the T-shape type of ventilation discontinuation. There were no X-ray signs of pneumonia or pulmonary edema. On the same day, the patient was extubated and oxygen inhalation in a dose of L/min was continued through a mask. On day 4 since therapy was initiated, the patient's vital signs, serum sugar and lactate levels became normal. By determining a new treatment regimen, the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit. Dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia developed in the patient resulted from lactic acidosis caused by the use of metformin. It should be remembered that dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia, which suddenly developed in metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, may be

  11. When George Washington Takes Second Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Florence Holmes

    This document discusses biographies of women, chosen to appeal to young girls, including "So Young a Queen,""Indian Captive,""Wilderness Wife,""Louisa,""Molly Garfield in the White House,""I Mary,""I Varina,""Pattern for a Heroine: The Life Story of Rebecca Gratz,""Theodosia,""Child of the Silent Night,""The Silent Storm," and "Invincible Louisa."…

  12. Combined Administration of Levetiracetam and Valproic Acid Attenuates Age Related Hyperactivity of CA3 Place Cells, Reduces Place Field Area, and Increases Spatial Information Content in Aged Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Robitsek, RJ; Ratner, MH; Stewart, TM; Eichenbaum, H; Farb, DH

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory deficits associated with age-related mild cognitive impairment have long been attributed to impaired processing within the hippocampus. Hyperactivity within the hippocampal CA3 region that is associated with aging is mediated in part by a loss of inhibitory interneurons and thought to underlie impaired performance in spatial memory tasks, including the abnormal tendency in aged animals to pattern complete spatial representations. Here, we asked whether the spatial firing patterns of simultaneously recorded CA3 and CA1 neurons in young and aged rats could be manipulated pharmacologically to selectively reduce CA3 hyperactivity and thus, according to hypothesis, the associated abnormality in spatial representations. We used chronically implanted high-density tetrodes to record the spatial firing properties of CA3 and CA1 units during animal exploration for food in familiar and novel environments. Aged CA3 place cells have higher firing rates, larger place fields, less spatial information content, and respond less to a change from a familiar to a novel environment than young CA3 cells. We also find that the combination of levetiracetam (LEV) + valproic acid (VPA), previously shown to act as a cognitive enhancer in tests of spatial memory, attenuate CA3 place cell firing rates, reduce place field area, and increase spatial information content in aged but not young adult rats. This is consistent with drug enhancing the specificity of neuronal firing with respect to spatial location. Contrary to expectation, however, LEV + VPA reduces place cell discrimination between novel and familiar environments, i.e., spatial correlations increase, independent of age even though drug enhances performance in cognitive tasks. The results demonstrate that spatial information content, or the number of bits of information encoded per action potential, may be the key correlate for enhancement of spatial memory by LEV + VPA. PMID:25941121

  13. Combined administration of levetiracetam and valproic acid attenuates age-related hyperactivity of CA3 place cells, reduces place field area, and increases spatial information content in aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Robitsek, Jonathan; Ratner, Marcia H; Stewart, Tara; Eichenbaum, Howard; Farb, David H

    2015-12-01

    Learning and memory deficits associated with age-related mild cognitive impairment have long been attributed to impaired processing within the hippocampus. Hyperactivity within the hippocampal CA3 region that is associated with aging is mediated in part by a loss of functional inhibitory interneurons and thought to underlie impaired performance in spatial memory tasks, including the abnormal tendency in aged animals to pattern complete spatial representations. Here, we asked whether the spatial firing patterns of simultaneously recorded CA3 and CA1 neurons in young and aged rats could be manipulated pharmacologically to selectively reduce CA3 hyperactivity and thus, according to hypothesis, the associated abnormality in spatial representations. We used chronically implanted high-density tetrodes to record the spatial firing properties of CA3 and CA1 units during animal exploration for food in familiar and novel environments. Aged CA3 place cells have higher firing rates, larger place fields, less spatial information content, and respond less to a change from a familiar to a novel environment than young CA3 cells. We also find that the combination of levetiracetam (LEV) + valproic acid (VPA), previously shown to act as a cognitive enhancer in tests of spatial memory, attenuate CA3 place cell firing rates, reduce place field area, and increase spatial information content in aged but not young adult rats. This is consistent with drug enhancing the specificity of neuronal firing with respect to spatial location. Contrary to expectation, however, LEV + VPA reduces place cell discrimination between novel and familiar environments, i.e., spatial correlations increase, independent of age even though drug enhances performance in cognitive tasks. The results demonstrate that spatial information content, or the number of bits of information encoded per action potential, may be the key correlate for enhancement of spatial memory by LEV + VPA.

  14. Places to Go: Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Educators are becoming increasingly interested in alternatives to learning management systems (LMS) Blackboard and WebCT. Stephen Downes's column Places to Go turns to one internationally popular open source LMS--Moodle. Downes takes the reader through Moodle's Web site, which is simultaneously a Web site about its LMS and an example of what its…

  15. Sanctified Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnisch, Cynthia S.

    2010-01-01

    Cynthia Harnisch shares her unique perspective on the revered place that museums and community arts organizations occupy in the lives of the people they serve. She relates how, as vice president of the Autry National Center in 1994, she came to be introduced to Inner-City Arts and through that introduction discovered a new respect and recognition…

  16. Retinol and riboflavin supplementation decreases the prevalence of anemia in Chinese pregnant women taking iron and folic Acid supplements.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ai G; Schouten, Evert G; Zhang, Feng Z; Kok, Frans J; Yang, Fang; Jiang, Dian C; Sun, Yong Y; Han, Xiu X

    2008-10-01

    In rural China, many pregnant women in their third trimester suffer from anemia (48%) and iron deficiency (ID; 42%), often with coexisting deficiencies of retinol and riboflavin. We investigated the effect of retinol and riboflavin supplementation in addition to iron plus folic acid on anemia and subjective well-being in pregnant women. The study was a 2-mo, double-blind, randomized trial. Subjects (n = 366) with anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) acid. The iron+folic acid (IF) group (n = 93) served as reference, the iron+folic acid+retinol group (IFA) (n = 91) was treated with 2000 mug retinol, the iron+folic acid+riboflavin group (IFB) (n = 91) with 1.0 mg riboflavin, and the iron+folic acid+retinol+riboflavin group (IFAB) (n = 91) with retinol and riboflavin. After the 2-mo intervention, the Hb concentration increased in all 4 groups (P < 0.001). The increase in the IFAB group was 5.4 +/- 1.1 g/L greater than in the IF group (P < 0.001). The reduced prevalence of anemia (Hb < 110g/L) and ID anemia were significantly greater in the groups supplemented with retinol and /or riboflavin than in the IF group. Moreover, gastrointestinal symptoms were less prevalent in the IFA group than in the IF group (P < 0.05) and improved well-being was more prevalent in the groups receiving additional retinol and/or riboflavin than in the IF group (P < 0.05). Thus, a combination of iron, folic acid, retinol, and riboflavin was more effective than iron plus folic acid alone. Multimicronutrient supplementation may be worthwhile for pregnant women in rural China.

  17. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala) with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS.

  18. The Non-Protein Amino Acid BMAA Is Misincorporated into Human Proteins in Place of l-Serine Causing Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNAAla with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of l-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by l-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  19. Privileged Girls: The Place of Femininity and Femininity in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Johannah

    2014-01-01

    Constructions of femininity and attendant notions of feminism are being produced in different ways in different places around the world. This is a complicated global process that cannot be reduced to analyses that take place in nation states. This paper seeks to respond to and enhance Angela McRobbie's compelling argument about understandings of…

  20. Taking Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembering to take them. Some over-the-counter products, supplements, or natural remedies can interfere with the effectiveness of your prescribed medicines. Tell your diabetes educator about ANY supplements you are taking so ...

  1. A Sense of Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Labeled image for A Sense of Place

    NASA's Mars Exploration rover Spirit continues to descend along the east side of the 'Columbia Hills,' taking panoramic views of surrounding terrain at the end of each day of driving. This helps members of the science team get a sense of place before proceeding, kind of the way a hiker pauses now and then to view the scenery. Scientists and engineers use panoramas like this to select interesting rocks and soils for further study and to plan a safe path for the rover.

    In this image mosaic, Spirit is pausing to take a good look around while descending due east toward a ridge nicknamed 'Haskin Ridge.' Before driving the rest of the way down, Spirit will take a panoramic image of the large, deep basin to the left of the ridge, labeled 'East Basin,' which was not visible from the summit. A longer-term destination is the prominent, round, platform-like feature labeled 'Home Plate.'

    This 360-degree panorama was assembled from images Spirit took with its navigation camera on the 651st martian day, or sol (Nov. 2, 2005), of its exploration of Gusev Crater on Mars. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  2. Community and the Politics of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmis, Daniel

    The preamble to Montana's constitution, which expresses gratitude for Montana's landscape, reflects an understanding that the political culture of a place is not something apart from the place itself. By the same token, the strengthening of political culture must take place and must be studied in the context of very specific places and the people…

  3. Taking Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merson, Martha, Ed.; Reuys, Steve, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Following an introduction on "Taking Risks" (Martha Merson), this journal contains 11 articles on taking risks in teaching adult literacy, mostly by educators in the Boston area. The following are included: "My Dreams Are Bigger than My Fears Now" (Sharon Carey); "Making a Pitch for Poetry in ABE [Adult Basic…

  4. Taking control over intracellular fatty acid levels is essential for the analysis of thermogenic function in cultured primary brown and brite/beige adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongguo; Fromme, Tobias; Schweizer, Sabine; Schöttl, Theresa; Klingenspor, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipocytes, conferred by mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), is receiving great attention because metabolically active brown adipose tissue may protect humans from metabolic diseases. In particular, the thermogenic function of brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue, known as brite (or beige) adipocytes, is currently of prime interest. A valid procedure to quantify the specific contribution of UCP1 to thermogenesis is thus of vital importance. Adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis is a common way to activate UCP1. We here report, however, that in this frequently applied setup, taking control over intracellular fatty acid levels is essential for the analysis of thermogenic function in cultured brown and brite adipocytes. By the application of these findings, we demonstrate that UCP1 is functionally thermogenic in intact brite adipocytes and adrenergic UCP1 activation is largely dependent on adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) rather than hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). PMID:25135951

  5. Taking antacids

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnesium may cause diarrhea. Brands with calcium or aluminum may cause constipation. Rarely, brands with calcium may ... you take large amounts of antacids that contain aluminum, you may be at risk for calcium loss, ...

  6. Mountain Hike North of Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Begining at the S-Turn at Mill B., Near Hidden Falls, and Taking Trail Leading to Mt. Raymond and Other Intersting Places.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Keith L.

    2004-11-01

    Our first objective is to leave the highway via Mill B North Fork by taking the Big Cottonwood Canyon trail that leads to Maxfield Basin, where 3 trails intersect, just s. of Mount Raymond (Elev. 10,241 ft.) the n. trail takes us down to the Mill Creek Canyon Road, at about 1 mi. (+) east of intersection with Church Park Picnic Ground road. At Maxfield Basin, again, the east trail skirts around Mt. Raymond and has another intersection with a trail running n. thru the area of Gobblers Knob (elev. 10,246 ft.), to White Fir Pass and turns w. at Bowman Fk. until it connects with Porter Fork and then the Mill Creek Road. The remaining trail at Mill A Basin, just e. of Mount Raymond, long before Gobblers Knob is seen, runs east past a spring, and connects to Butler Fork (which begins at 3.775 mi., measured along highway from Mill B, North Fork), which leads directly to Dog Lake. Evidently both Dog Lake and Lake Desolation (changing U.S. Geological Survey maps from Mount Aire, Utah to Park City West, Utah) have connected outlets, at least during certain times of the year. Following the trail s. e. (down) that follows near Summit Co. and Salt Lake County, we pass by the radio transmitters shown on Park City, West, Utah, map and finally enter the Brighton, Utah map with Scott Hill, Scott Pass, the important highway leading to Midway Reservoir, and beyond, Bloods Lake ( 9500 ft.), Clayton Peak (10,721 ft.) and Lake Lackawaxen ( 9980 ft.), our final destination showing through. One may easily walk the distance to lake Lackawaxen from Bloods Lake by staying south of the ridgecrest and by following the hollow down for a while. This completes our destination. Recall that the main roadway here was already passed over about 1/2 mile n. of Bloods Lake; this thoroughfare has its beginning at about 0.4 miles below (or North) of the Brighton Loop, where the road to city of Midway leaves the main Big Cottonwood Highway going n. and runs e., on the average, going past Midway Reservoir

  7. What is taking place in science classrooms?: A case study analysis of teaching and learning in seventh-grade science of one Alabama school and its impact on African American student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Lashaunda Renea

    This qualitative case study investigated the teaching strategies that improve science learning of African American students. This research study further sought the extent the identified teaching strategies that are used to improve African American science learning reflect culturally responsive teaching. Best teaching strategies and culturally responsive teaching have been researched, but there has been minimal research on the impact that both have on science learning, with an emphasis on the African American population. Consequently, the Black-White achievement gap in science persists. The findings revealed the following teaching strategies have a positive impact on African American science learning: (a) lecture-discussion, (b) notetaking, (c) reading strategies, (d) graphic organizers, (e) hands-on activities, (f) laboratory experiences, and (g) cooperative learning. Culturally responsive teaching strategies were evident in the seventh-grade science classrooms observed. Seven themes emerged from this research data: (1) The participating teachers based their research-based teaching strategies used in the classroom on all of the students' learning styles, abilities, attitudes towards science, and motivational levels about learning science, with no emphasis on the African American student population; (2) The participating teachers taught the state content standards simultaneously using the same instructional model daily, incorporating other content areas when possible; (3) The participating African American students believed their seventh-grade science teachers used a variety of teaching strategies to ensure science learning took place, that science learning was fun, and that science learning was engaging; (4) The participating African American students genuinely liked their teacher; (5) The participating African American students revealed high self-efficacy; (6) The African American student participants' parents value education and moved to Success Middle School

  8. Double Take

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins by discussing the results of two studies recently conducted in Australia. According to the two studies, taking a gap year between high school and college may help students complete a degree once they return to school. The gap year can involve such activities as travel, service learning, or work. Then, the paper presents links to…

  9. Taking Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  10. Brazilian physicists take centre stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    With the FIFA World Cup taking place in Brazil this month, Susan Curtis travels to South America's richest nation to find out how its physicists are exploiting recent big increases in science funding.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir Plus Dasabuvir With or Without Ribavirin in HCV-Infected Patients Taking Concomitant Acid-Reducing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Mitchell L; Rustgi, Vinod; Bennett, Michael; Forns, Xavier; Asselah, Tarik; Planas Vila, Ramon; Liu, Li; Pedrosa, Marcos; Moller, Jonathan; Reau, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acid-reducing agents (ARAs) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) that increase gastric pH can alter the bioavailability of antiviral drugs, particularly relevant in patients with advanced liver disease caused by chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection seeking therapy. Using integrated data from six phase 3 studies, we report the safety and efficacy of the 3-direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimen containing ombitasvir (OBV, an NS5A inhibitor), ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir (PTV/r, an NS3/4A protease inhibitor), and dasabuvir (DSV, an NS5B polymerase inhibitor) with or without ribavirin (RBV) for HCV genotype 1 patients taking concomitant ARAs and PPIs. METHODS: Treatment-naïve or peginterferon/RBV treatment-experienced patients with or without compensated cirrhosis received OBV/PTV/r and DSV with or without weight-based RBV. Rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), defined as HCV RNA below the lower limit of quantification, 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) and safety were evaluated in patients who were receiving concomitant ARAs. RESULTS: Among 2,053 patients enrolled and dosed with study drug, 410 (20%) were receiving concomitant ARAs; of these, 308 (15%) were taking concomitant PPIs. Rates of SVR12 were 95.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 93.5–97.4%) among patients receiving an ARA, and 96.3% (95% CI 95.3–97.2%) in patients not receiving a concomitant ARA. Similarly, among patients receiving a PPI or not, SVR12 was achieved in 95.1% (95% CI 92.1–97.0%) and 96.4% (95% CI 95.5–97.2%), respectively. Response rates were high regardless of treatment regimen (with or without RBV), and among patients receiving a standard or high dose of PPIs. Regarding safety, adverse events and serious adverse events were more frequently reported in patients taking concomitant ARAs, though baseline population differences may have played a role. CONCLUSIONS: In phase 3 trials of OBV/PTV/r plus DSV and RBV in HCV genotype 1-infected patients, SVR12 rates were high

  12. Sex steroid hormone metabolism takes place in human ocular cells.

    PubMed

    Coca-Prados, Miguel; Ghosh, Sikha; Wang, Yugang; Escribano, Julio; Herrala, Annakaisa; Vihko, Pirkko

    2003-08-01

    Steroids are potentially important mediators in the pathophysiology of ocular diseases. In this study, we report on the gene expression in the human eye of a group of enzymes, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs), involved in the biosynthesis and inactivation of sex steroid hormones. In the eye, the ciliary epithelium, a neuroendocrine secretory epithelium, co-expresses the highest levels of 17HSD2 and 5 mRNAs, and in lesser level 17HSD7 mRNA. The regulation of gene expression of these enzymes was investigated in vitro in cell lines, ODM-C4 and chronic open glaucoma (GCE), used as cell models of the human ciliary epithelium. The estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (10(-7) M) and androgen agonist, R1881 (10(-8) M) elicited in ODM-C4 and GCE cells over a 24 h time course a robust up-regulation of 17HSD7 mRNA expression. 17HSD2 was up-regulated by estradiol in ODM-C4 cells, but not in GCE cells. Under steady-state conditions, ODM-C4 cells exhibited a predominant 17HSD2 oxidative enzymatic activity. In contrast, 17HSD2 activity was low or absent in GCE cells. Our collective data suggest that cultured human ciliary epithelial cells are able to metabolize estrogen, androgen and progesterone, and that 17HSD2 and 7 in these cells are sex steroid hormone-responsive genes and 17HSD7 is responsible to keep on intra/paracrine estrogenic milieu.

  13. Using Personalized Education to Take the Place of Standardized Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Pengyu

    2014-01-01

    Economic model has been greatly shifted from labor demanding to innovation demanding, which requires education system has to produce creative people. This paper illustrates how traditional education model accrued and developed based on satisfying the old economic model for labor demanding but did not meet the new social requirement for innovation…

  14. Can Quality Program Evaluation Really Take Place in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jerry A.

    High-stakes assessments are those in which the results of tests or other measures can lead to decisions that may affect school administrators, teachers, and students substantially. Whether high-stakes assessment results in misleading information due to extraneous factors associated with the conditions under which the assessment occurs is explored.…

  15. Places for Pedagogies, Pedagogies for Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhn, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Working with an understanding of assemblage as the ad hoc groupings of vibrant materials and elements, this article argues that conceptualizing place as an assemblage opens possibilities for bridging the gap between subjects and objects that continue to structure pedagogy. Considering "place" as an assemblage of humans and their multiple…

  16. Re(Place) Your Typical Writing Assignment: An Argument for Place-Based Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Place-based writing affords students an opportunity to write meaningfully about themselves, grounded in a place that they know. Place-based writing is versatile and can be additive--taking just a week or two within a semester of different projects--or transformative, if positioned as the theme for an entire course. If students can learn to write…

  17. Pentavalent technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc-99m (V) DMSA] brain SPECT: does it have a place in predicting survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme?

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Mustafa, M; Abd El-Hadi, E; Monier, A; Badwey, A; Saad, E

    2015-01-01

    Pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99m (V) DMSA) is reported as a useful tool for detection of residual or recurrent gliomas. We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). 40 patients [21 males and 19 females; mean age 48.6 ± 12.2 years] with GBM were included. Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT was done after surgery and before onset of radiation therapy or chemotherapy (Baseline study), at 4-6 weeks and at 6 months as a follow-up after therapy. The end point of the study was clinical follow-up for 2 years and/or death. 4-6 weeks after therapy, 40 and 60 % had negative and positive Tc-99m (V) DMSA for viable tumor tissues respectively (P = 0.09). At 6 months follow-up, 62.5 % of (V) DMSA negative patients and 12.5 % of the positive subjects were responders (P = 0.001). The median over-all survival (OS) of all patients was 12.3 month [range 5-24 month]. Patients with positive (V) DMSA had worse survival (8.87 month) compared to the negative ones (16.67 month) (P = 0.0001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT studies at 4-6 weeks and 6-months follow-up were independent prognostic factors for survival [OR 1.069; 95 % CI 1.417-2.174; P = 0.03 and OR 1.055; 95 % CI 0.821-1.186; P = 0.01 respectively]. Stratification of tumors into risk groups based on prognostic parameters may improve outcome by altering or intensifying treatment methods. Technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid brain SPECT may have an additional prognostic role in patients with GBM which needs further evaluation in larger future series.

  18. How to Cope with Sheltering in Place

    MedlinePlus

    ... your own or a relative’s home, school, or work. Sheltering in place may be required because of an emergency such ... things to keep yourself calm while sheltering in place. Relax your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate or ...

  19. Place and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, David

    2013-01-01

    David Orr's classic article links education to living in the outdoors and studying all disciplines through the unifying lens of place. Pedagogy of place counters abstraction, it is the natural world embodying principles of learning that involve direct observation, investigation, experimentation, and manual skills. Place is the laboratory providing…

  20. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues.

  1. 48 CFR 1346.503 - Place of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....503 Section 1346.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 1346.503 Place of acceptance. Insert a clause substantially similar to 1352... supplies and/or services will take place....

  2. 48 CFR 1346.503 - Place of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....503 Section 1346.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 1346.503 Place of acceptance. Insert a clause substantially similar to 1352... supplies and/or services will take place....

  3. 48 CFR 1346.503 - Place of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....503 Section 1346.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 1346.503 Place of acceptance. Insert a clause substantially similar to 1352... supplies and/or services will take place....

  4. The value of place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-03-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate environment is clear, and we are presented with examples of how they strive to make connections between the content and what they are familiar with—namely their surroundings. "Place" is identified as a term with complex meanings and interpretations, even in the scope of place-based science education, and understanding how the term is used in any given scenario is essential to understanding the implications of place-based education. Is place used as a location, locale or a sense of place? To understand "place" is to acknowledge that for the individual, it is highly situational, cultural and personal. It is just such attributes that make place-based education appealing, and potentially powerful, pedagogically on one hand, yet complex for implementation on the other. The argument is posed that place is particularly important in the context of education about the environment, which in its simplest manifestation, connects formal science curriculum to resources that are local and tangible to students. The incorporation of place in such a framework seeks to bridge the gap between formal school science subjects and students' lived experiences, yet acknowledges the tensions that can arise between accommodating place meanings and the desire to acculturate students into the language of the scientific community. The disconnect between guiding policy frameworks and the reality of the Next Generation Science Standards is addressed opening an avenue for further discussion of the importance of socio-cultural frameworks of science learning in an ever increasing era of accountability.

  5. Schooling Out of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaghy, Cathryn

    2006-01-01

    Education in rural communities is an interesting site for an analysis of the relationship between place and the cultural politics of schooling. In particular the movements of people, ideas and practices to and from, and also within, rural places suggest the need for theorizing on rural education to consider the relevance of new mobility…

  6. Place as Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Digital technology is redrawing the library's blueprint. Planners are thinking in new ways about how to design libraries as places for learning rather than primarily as storehouses of information. This thinking has given rise to much discussion--and to many publications--about the "library as place." In this article, the author asks why not also…

  7. The Case for Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2012-01-01

    Bookstores, record stores, libraries, Facebook: these places--both physical and virtual--demonstrate an established and essential purpose as centers of community, expertise, convenience, immediacy, and respect. Yet as digital, mobile, and social shifts continue to transform culture and interactions, these spaces and places transform, too.…

  8. About Maggie's Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmens, Carol E.

    1982-01-01

    Describes "Maggie's Place," the library computer system of the Pikes Peak Library District, Colorado Springs, Colorado, noting its use as an electronic card catalog and community information file, accessibility by home users and library users, and terminal considerations. (EJS)

  9. Gateway to New Atlantis Attraction Takes Shape

    NASA Video Gallery

    The home of space shuttle Atlantis continues taking shape at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Crews placed the nose cone atop the second of a replica pair of solid rocket boosters. A life-...

  10. Artist Place Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Art history can be a little dry at times, but the author is always trying to incorporate new ways of teaching it. In this article, she describes a project in which students were to create a place setting out of clay that had to be unified through a famous artist's style. This place setting had to consist of at least five pieces (dinner plate, cup…

  11. Take Steps Toward a Healthier Life | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is promoting wellness by encouraging individuals to take the stairs. In an effort to increase participation in this program, NIH has teamed up with Occupational Health Services (OHS). OHS is placing NIH-sponsored “Take the Stairs” stickers on stair entrances, stair exits, and elevators.

  12. SToPV: A Five Minute Assessment of Place Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    Place value underpins much of what people do in number. In this article, the author describes some simple tasks that may be used to assess students' understanding of place value. This set of tasks, the Six Tasks of Place Value (SToPV), takes five minutes to administer and can give direct insight into a student's understanding of the number system…

  13. The Right Place, The Right Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, William G.; Irish, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Superintendents are in the right place at the right time to take advantage of a golden opportunity to reverse a trend that threatens the nation's schools and communities. They are now uniquely positioned to stop the retreat of good-hearted, well-intentioned citizens from public life. In this article, the authors present perpetual traps that…

  14. The Laboratory: A Place to Investigate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, John W., Ed.

    The contributors to this volume take the position that the undergraduate biology laboratory should be a place where students conduct their own investigations rather than follow recipes supplied by the instructor. The first part of the collection discusses the need for this reform, with special consideration given to both majors and nonmajors. A…

  15. Finding Place in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Chris

    2011-01-01

    As a society, we are less and less comfortable in our localities. We have embraced the idea of a globalized placelessness, where everything, everywhere, resonates with a sameness. What do we lose, educationally and in society at large, when we reduce our inhabited places to those components that provide material wealth alone? If students and…

  16. Narrative in Unexpected Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Proposes to return narrative to a more central place in historical writing. Answers critics who complain that history texts do not properly emphasize democracy and citizenship. Suggests using narrative to tell stories students will remember while including a major theme or conclusion. Warns against overuse, wordiness, and sacrifice of human…

  17. Creativity: Does Place Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that creativity has the greatest potential to flourish if a learning environment is embedded within a community that emphasises a deep sense of place. Yet in a globalised world, rootedness is often regarded as antithetical to creativity. But far from representing dead artefacts that are anti-modern and non-economic, culture and…

  18. The Pedagogy of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludick, Pat

    2001-01-01

    Examines adolescents' study of place from the perspective of urban and rural Montessori programs. Adolescents are invited into a study of the city or town or even a neighborhood surrounding the school as an opportunity to experience their own community and society. Highlights potential activities and areas for research. (KB)

  19. Designing Places for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Anne, Ed.

    This book presents information about the condition of schools around the United States. It also describes the link between architecture and academic success and offers suggestions for improving the design of existing and future school buildings. Eleven articles look at schools as places of deep meaning and show how that view can alter approaches…

  20. The Value of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate…

  1. Universities Are Funny Places!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Universities are funny places. They have a strong sense of hierarchy and rank. They have an amazing disparity in salary levels and status between staff, are class conscious, and are run by a large bureaucracy that oils and keeps the machinery going. They operate as educational institutions and yet also are entrepreneurial, marketing themselves in…

  2. Teaching With Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Designed for social studies educators, this theme issue presents 11 articles about historic places that feature a variety of ideas for elementary and secondary lesson plans, curricula, and program development. The articles are: (1) "Where did History Happen?" (Beth M. Boland); (2) "Creating a Partnership" (Carol D. Shull); (3)…

  3. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  4. Space Place Prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Novati, Alexander; Fisher, Diane K.; Leon, Nancy J.; Netting, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Space Place Prime is public engagement and education software for use on iPad. It targets a multi-generational audience with news, images, videos, and educational articles from the Space Place Web site and other NASA sources. New content is downloaded daily (or whenever the user accesses the app) via the wireless connection. In addition to the Space Place Web site, several NASA RSS feeds are tapped to provide new content. Content is retained for the previous several days, or some number of editions of each feed. All content is controlled on the server side, so features about the latest news, or changes to any content, can be made without updating the app in the Apple Store. It gathers many popular NASA features into one app. The interface is a boundless, slidable- in-any-direction grid of images, unique for each feature, and iconized as image, video, or article. A tap opens the feature. An alternate list mode presents menus of images, videos, and articles separately. Favorites can be tagged for permanent archive. Face - book, Twitter, and e-mail connections make any feature shareable.

  5. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  7. Taking multiple medicines safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000883.htm Taking multiple medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... directed. Why you may Need More Than one Medicine You may take more than one medicine to ...

  8. Place memory in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Wessnitzer, Jan; Mangan, Michael; Webb, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Certain insect species are known to relocate nest or food sites using landmarks, but the generality of this capability among insects, and whether insect place memory can be used in novel task settings, is not known. We tested the ability of crickets to use surrounding visual cues to relocate an invisible target in an analogue of the Morris water maze, a standard paradigm for spatial memory tests on rodents. Adult female Gryllus bimaculatus were released into an arena with a floor heated to an aversive temperature, with one hidden cool spot. Over 10 trials, the time taken to find the cool spot decreased significantly. The best performance was obtained when a natural scene was provided on the arena walls. Animals can relocate the position from novel starting points. When the scene is rotated, they preferentially approach the fictive target position corresponding to the rotation. We note that this navigational capability does not necessarily imply the animal has an internal spatial representation. PMID:18230590

  9. Taking centre stage...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    HAMLET (Highly Automated Multimedia Light Enhanced Theatre) was the star performance at the recent finals of the `Young Engineer for Britain' competition, held at the Commonwealth Institute in London. This state-of-the-art computer-controlled theatre lighting system won the title `Young Engineers for Britain 1998' for David Kelnar, Jonathan Scott, Ramsay Waller and John Wyllie (all aged 16) from Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh. HAMLET replaces conventional manually-operated controls with a special computer program, and should find use in the thousands of small theatres, schools and amateur drama productions that operate with limited resources and without specialist expertise. The four students received a £2500 prize between them, along with £2500 for their school, and in addition they were invited to spend a special day with the Royal Engineers. A project designed to improve car locking systems enabled Ian Robinson of Durham University to take the `Working in industry award' worth £1000. He was also given the opportunity of a day at sea with the Royal Navy. Other prizewinners with their projects included: Jun Baba of Bloxham School, Banbury (a cardboard armchair which converts into a desk and chair); Kobika Sritharan and Gemma Hancock, Bancroft's School, Essex (a rain warning system for a washing line); and Alistair Clarke, Sam James and Ruth Jenkins, Bishop of Llandaff High School, Cardiff (a mechanism to open and close the retractable roof of the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff). The two principal national sponsors of the competition, which is organized by the Engineering Council, are Lloyd's Register and GEC. Industrial companies, professional engineering institutions and educational bodies also provided national and regional prizes and support. During this year's finals, various additional activities took place, allowing the students to surf the Internet and navigate individual engineering websites on a network of computers. They also visited the

  10. Creating Sacred Places for Children in Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian children in grades 4-6 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  11. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 7&8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 7-8 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  12. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 9-12 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  13. Remembering Places: Student Reliance on Place in Timed Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Donna

    2009-01-01

    This is the story of a research journey that follows the trail of a novel evaluand--"place." I examine place as mentioned by rising juniors in timed exams. Using a hybridized methodology--the qualitative approach of a hermeneutic dialectic process as described by Guba and Lincoln (1989), and the quantitative evidence of place mention--I query…

  14. Taking the Long View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robert B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Legal studies faculty need to take the long view in their academic and professional lives. Taking the long view would seem to be a cliched piece of advice, but too frequently legal studies faculty, like their students, get focused on meeting the next short-term hurdle--getting through the next class, grading the next stack of papers, making it…

  15. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  16. Orion Spacecraft Takes Shape

    NASA Video Gallery

    Technicians move the two halves of the Orion crew exploration vehicle's crew module into place to fuse them together at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. The Lockheed Martin Orio...

  17. A Critical Pedagogy of Place and the Critical Place(s) of Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The notion of place-based education as grounding student learning in the local raises important questions about what constitutes the "local" in a now closely interconnected world and what constitutes an educational "place" when places of learning are shifting, as both new virtual sites emerge and old physical ones, including schools, lose some of…

  18. Take the IBS Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Committed to Quality in Patient Care TAKE THE IBS TEST Do you have recurrent abdominal pain or ... have a real and treatable medical condition called irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Your doctor now has new information and ...

  19. Take Meds Faithfully

    MedlinePlus

    ... was a good idea.) I Wider use of electronic prescription pills boxes and reminder devices that can ... to help you take your medicines are proliferating. Electronic pill reminder devices are available at most large ...

  20. Enacting a Place-Responsive Research Methodology: Walking Interviews with Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Jonathan; Mannion, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Place-based and place-responsive approaches to outdoor learning and education are developing in many countries but there is dearth of theoretically-supported methodologies to take a more explicit account of place in research in these areas. In response, this article outlines one theoretical framing for place-responsive methodologies for…

  1. Synthesis of bio-based methacrylic acid by decarboxylation of itaconic acid and citric acid catalyzed by solid transition-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; van Haveren, Jacco; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-09-01

    Methacrylic acid, an important monomer for the plastics industry, was obtained in high selectivity (up to 84%) by the decarboxylation of itaconic acid using heterogeneous catalysts based on Pd, Pt and Ru. The reaction takes place in water at 200-250 °C without any external added pressure, conditions significantly milder than those described previously for the same conversion with better yield and selectivity. A comprehensive study of the reaction parameters has been performed, and the isolation of methacrylic acid was achieved in 50% yield. The decarboxylation procedure is also applicable to citric acid, a more widely available bio-based feedstock, and leads to the production of methacrylic acid in one pot in 41% selectivity. Aconitic acid, the intermediate compound in the pathway from citric acid to itaconic acid was also used successfully as a substrate.

  2. A Place for Everything, and Everything in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, John

    2008-01-01

    Sixteen papers on the general theme of the "place" of psychology, particularly in higher education, arose from the author's paper "Psychology in its place." Several themes emerge from the disparate contributions. The author discusses two papers which directly comment on his original one, the papers of John Newland and Tom…

  3. Cooperative Ecology & Place: Development of a Pedagogy of Place Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewicki, James

    The major tenets of a pedagogy of place are that nature teaches; understanding place is indispensable to community; where and how a student learns is as vital as what a student learns; and respect is integral to learning. Environmental literacy is the capacity to perceive and interpret the relative health of environmental systems and to take…

  4. Taking a Broader View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2005-01-01

    A study on stem cells is presented by understanding the environment in which they are found, the support cells and blood vessels as well as the protein scaffolds and other molecules. Researchers found that stem cells in reproductive tissue are surrounded by a pocket of support cells that hold them in place and align them to divide properly, so…

  5. SR-71 Taking Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of three U.S. Air Force SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft originally retired from operational service and loaned to NASA for a high-speed research program retracts its landing gear after taking off from NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. One of the SR-71As was later returned to the Air Force for active duty in 1995. Data from the SR-71 high-speed research program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic/hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of

  6. A Safe and Welcoming Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the theme of safe and comforting places for children, and how libraries can help provide safe havens for children. Presents a survey of safe places in selected works of children's literature. Includes a sampler of creative activities focusing on the theme, and a list of resources (books and videotapes). (AEF)

  7. Teachers Taking Professional Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Normore, Anthony H.; Floyd, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Preservice teachers get their first teaching position hoping to take the first step toward becoming professional educators and expecting support from experienced colleagues and administrators, who often serve as their mentors. In this article, the authors present the story of Kristine (a pseudonym), who works at a middle school in a large U.S.…

  8. Taking the long view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Patrick; Smith, Emma

    2016-10-01

    A new study of the long-term employment prospects of UK science and engineering students suggests that talk of a skills shortage is overblown, with most graduates in these disciplines taking jobs outside science. Researchers Patrick White and Emma Smith discuss their findings and what they mean for current physics students

  9. Simulating Price-Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a price-takers' market simulation geared toward principles-level students. This simulation demonstrates that price-taking behavior is a natural result of the conditions that create perfect competition. In trials, there is a significant degree of price convergence in just three or four rounds. Students find this…

  10. Take a Bow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Greg; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Performing-arts centers can provide benefits at the high school and collegiate levels, and administrators can take steps now to get the show started. When a new performing-arts center comes to town, local businesses profit. Events and performances draw visitors to the community. Ideally, a performing-arts center will play many roles: entertainment…

  11. It Takes a Township

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNiff, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I argue for higher education practitioners to take focused action to contribute to transforming their societies into open and democratically negotiated forms of living, and why they should do so. The need is especially urgent in South Africa, whose earlier revolutionary spirit led to massive social change. The kind of social…

  12. Taking Library Leadership Personally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather; Macauley, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the emerging trends for leadership in the knowledge era. It discusses these within the context of leading, creating and sustaining the performance development cultures that libraries require. The first step is to recognise that we all need to take leadership personally no matter whether we see ourselves as leaders or followers.…

  13. N-Substituted Imines by the Copper-Catalyzed N-Imination of Boronic Acids and Organostannanes with O-Acyl Ketoximes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Songbai; Yu, Ying; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic quantities of copper (I) or copper (II) sources catalyze the N-imination of boronic acids and organostannanes through reaction with oxime O-carboxylates under non-basic conditions. This method tolerates various functional groups and takes place efficiently using aryl, heteroaryl, and alkenyl boronic acids and stannanes. PMID:17444649

  14. Auditory perspective taking.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Eric; Brock, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Effective communication with a mobile robot using speech is a difficult problem even when you can control the auditory scene. Robot self-noise or ego noise, echoes and reverberation, and human interference are all common sources of decreased intelligibility. Moreover, in real-world settings, these problems are routinely aggravated by a variety of sources of background noise. Military scenarios can be punctuated by high decibel noise from materiel and weaponry that would easily overwhelm a robot's normal speaking volume. Moreover, in nonmilitary settings, fans, computers, alarms, and transportation noise can cause enough interference to make a traditional speech interface unusable. This work presents and evaluates a prototype robotic interface that uses perspective taking to estimate the effectiveness of its own speech presentation and takes steps to improve intelligibility for human listeners.

  15. Take the "C" Train

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author recalls several of her experiences in which she successfully pulled her boats out of river holes by throwing herself to the water as a sea-anchor. She learned this trick from her senior guides at a spring training. Her guides told her, "When you're stuck in a hole, take the "C" train."" "Meaning?" The author asked her…

  16. It Takes an Ecosystem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-25

    Business Review (April 2006). [7] Marco Iansiti and Roy Levien. “Strategy as Ecology,” Harvard Business Review , March 2004. 27 It Takes an... Harvard Business Review (March 2004). [8] Viljainen, Martti & Kauppinen, Marjo. "Software Ecosystems: A Set of Management Practices for Platform...E. “How Competitive Forces Shape Strategy.” Harvard Business Review (March 1979). [11] ASA(ALT) Common Operating Environment Implementation Plan

  17. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-08-02

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map.

  18. People and Places. Teacher's Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Priscilla H., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews teachers' resources related to people and places. Most of these focus on the identification of geographic locations and historical biographies of famous individuals or groups of people. Includes discussions of reference works, audio cassettes, activity kits, and fiction. (MJP)

  19. The Place of Creative Nonfiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the topic of creative nonfiction and how it is addressed throughout this special issue. Suggests that how creative nonfiction is placed does have implications for literature and writing, both creative and non. (SG)

  20. Why It Takes Prevention, Not Detection, to Fight Bioterrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janata, Jiri (Art)

    2005-01-01

    Following the events which took place on September 11, 2001, and the anthrax attacks which occurred after that date, US authorities became concerned with the idea that an assault with chemical or biological weapons could take place on American territory or in American ships or planes. A worrisome model for such an assault was the 1995 terrorist…

  1. Effects of feeding extruded full-fat cottonseed pellets in place of tallow as a fat source for finishing heifers on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, sensory traits, display color, and fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Stelzleni, A M; Froetschel, M A; Pringle, T D

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of supplemental feeding of full-fat extruded cottonseed pellets (FFECS) compared with tallow on carcass characteristics, sensory traits, retail display color, and fatty acid profiles, especially CLA isomers in finishing heifers. Twenty-one Angus heifers (450 ± 5 kg) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 experimental diets: 1) 100% supplemental fat from tallow at 4.1% of ration DM (TAL), 2) a 50:50 ratio of supplemental fat from a combination of tallow at 2.1% and FFECS at 12.8% of ration DM (TAL/ECS), and 3) 100% supplemental fat from FFECS at 25.6% ration DM (ECS). All rations were formulated to contain 7.5% fat on a DM basis. Heifers were individually fed, ad libitum, for 82 d, and BW, G:F, DMI, ADG, and body composition via ultrasound were collected at 3 to 4 wk intervals. After 82 d on feed heifers were slaughtered under federal inspection, and carcass characteristics were measured (at 24 h). The LM was removed for retail display color (1, 3, 6, 10 d), Warner-Bratzler shear force (1, 3, 7, 14, 21 d postmortem aging), sensory analysis (1, 7, 14, 21 d postmortem aging), and fatty acid profile analysis. Subcutaneous fat, including all layers, was removed from the LM for fatty acid profile analysis, and ground beef patties (80:20) were produced with lean from the brisket and fat from the plate for retail color analysis (1, 2, 4, 7 d). Supplemental fat source did not influence feedlot performance for any of the traits measured (P > 0.12) or any carcass traits related to yield, quality, or LM color at the 12th- to 13th-rib interface (P > 0.15). Supplemental fat source did not affect Warner-Bratzler shear force or any sensory traits (P > 0.20), but LM steaks became more tender as postmortem aging time increased up to 14 d (P < 0.01). During retail display of LM steaks and beef patties, the only difference was LM steaks from ECS were darker (lower L* value) than TAL or TAL/ECS steaks (P < 0.02). As display time

  2. John Dewey and a Pedagogy of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayanandhan, Stephanie Raill

    2009-01-01

    If asked to define the idea of "place" one might struggle. Yet people across time and cultures readily share examples of important places or safe places or "foreign" places with one another and offer heartfelt descriptions in literature and art of childhood places, favorite places, strange places. Akinbola Akinwumi, paraphrasing Yi-Fu Tuan,…

  3. The Path Is Place: Skateboarding, Graffiti and Performances of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on two performances of place involving graffiti and skateboarding: the first looks at a graffiti intervention by SKL0, an urban artist in Singapore, and the second examines the "Long Live Southbank" ("LLSB") campaign to resist the relocation of Southbank's Undercroft, an appropriated skate space in London.…

  4. Microgravity Smoldering Combustion Takes Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment lifted off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in September 1995 on the STS-69 mission. This experiment is part of series of studies focused on the smolder characteristics of porous, combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a nonflaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of combustible materials. Common examples of smoldering are nonflaming embers, charcoal briquettes, and cigarettes. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering, both in microgravity and Earth gravity. As with other forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of air and the transport of heat, and therefore, the rate of combustion. Results of the microgravity experiments will be compared with identical experiments carried out in Earth's gravity. They also will be used to verify present theories of smoldering combustion and will provide new insights into the process of smoldering combustion, enhancing our fundamental understanding of this frequently encountered combustion process and guiding improvement in fire safety practices.

  5. Taking action against violence.

    PubMed

    Kunz, K

    1996-05-01

    Significant increase in violent crimes in recent years forced Icelandic men to take action against violence. Television was seen as a major contributory factor in increasing violence. Surveys indicate that 10-15 years after television broadcasting commences in a particular society, the incidence of crime can be expected to double. While the majority of the individuals arrested for violent crimes are men, being male does not necessarily mean being violent. The Men's Committee of the Icelandic Equal Rights Council initiated a week-long information and education campaign under the theme "Men Against Violence". This campaign involved several events including an art exhibit, speeches on violence in families, treatment sought by those who are likely to resort to violence, booklet distribution among students in secondary schools, and a mass media campaign to raise public awareness on this pressing problem.

  6. Places to Go: Google's Search Results for "Net Generation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In his Places to Go column for a special issue on the Net Generation, Stephen Downes takes an unexpected trip--to Google. According to Downes, Google epitomizes the essence of the Net Generation. Infinitely searchable and adaptable, Google represents the spirit of a generation raised in the world of the Internet, a generation that adapts…

  7. After Dark in the Antipodes: Pedagogy, Place and Queer Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Vicki; Rasmussen, Mary Lou

    2010-01-01

    This paper pursues issues of pedagogy, place and queer phenomenology in the context of what might be meant by the term "after-queer" or "what falls outside queer" as we currently theorise, practice and locate queer. Inspired by Sara Ahmed's account of how bodies become oriented by the ways in which they take up time and space,…

  8. Play Memories and Place Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study examined play memories from childhood to adulthood of 478 university students between ages 20 and 62 as exhibited in drawings of play memories and questionnaire responses. The study focused on the role of the physical environment and place identity in play memories and individual identity development. Findings showed that…

  9. The Social Attachment to Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Michael S.; Sorenson, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Many theories either implicitly or explicitly assume that individuals readily move to places that improve their financial well-being. Other forces, however, offset these tendencies; for example, people often wish to remain close to family and friends. We introduce a methodology for determining how individuals weigh these countervailing forces, and…

  10. Sense of Place in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This journal issue contains interviews, essays, short stories, and poetry focusing on sense of place in Appalachia. In interviews, author Wilma Dykeman discussed past and recent novels set in Appalachia with interviewer Sandra L. Ballard; and novelist Lee Smith spoke with interviewer Pat Arnow about how Appalachia has shaped her writing. Essays…

  11. Sense of Place Curriculum Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Central Regional Educational Lab., Oak Brook, IL.

    This document describes a curriculum model that aims to help students gain a sense of stewardship toward their community and an appreciation for their heritage. At the Sense of Place Symposium, Iowa teachers and administrators worked together to develop an interdisciplinary curriculum framework that would connect students to their communities. The…

  12. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  13. A Place on the Shelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Devon

    2007-01-01

    If we read to discover new worlds, we also read to find ourselves. For gays and lesbians, this act of discovery can be problematic: literature has so often excluded them. In the last decades, as gays and lesbians have grown increasingly vocal in the effort to secure their rightful place in society, a broad range of fiction has emerged that…

  14. Place recognition using batlike sonar

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14188.001 PMID:27481189

  15. Creative Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This journal contains articles and materials to help teachers instruct students about U.S. historical and cultural heritage. Articles and teaching materials are: "History in the Hands of Tomorrow's Citizens" (C. D. Shull; B. M. Boland); "On-Site Learning--The Power of Historic Places" (J. O. Horton); "Visualizing…

  16. "Changing Places" in Changed Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Thirty years ago, every American academic going on a research trip or a sabbatical to England carried a copy of David Lodge's comic classic, "Changing Places" (1975), which told a tale of two 40-year-old professors of English literature and two embattled campuses in the eventful spring of 1969. An ineffectual British academic, Philip…

  17. The place of care in ethical theory.

    PubMed

    Veatch, R M

    1998-04-01

    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of care and justice are then explored, suggesting three possible meanings for that contrast. Next, the possibility that care theorists are taking up the debate over the relation between principles and cases is considered. Finally, it is suggested that care theorists may be pressing for consideration of an entirely new question in moral theory: the assessment of the normative appropriateness of relationships. Issues needing to be addressed in an ethic of relationships are suggested.

  18. Plasma jet takes off.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, L

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a series of joint research projects by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Beta Squared of Allen, Texas, and the University of California at Los Angeles, there is now a more environmentally sound method for cleaning semiconductor chips that may also be effective in cleaning up chemical, bacterial, and nuclear contaminants. The Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet uses a type of ionized gas called plasma to clean up contaminants by binding to them and lifting them away. In contrast to the corrosive acids and chemical solvents traditionally used to clean semiconductor chips, the jet oxidizes contaminants, producing only benign gaseous by-products such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. The new technology is also easy to transport, cleans thoroughly and quickly, and presents no hazards to its operators. PMID:10417375

  19. Environmentalists take the offensive

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, H.

    1983-04-01

    The unfortunate polarization between businessmen and environmentalists will intensify this year as Congress, manned with newly-elected allies of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), reviews the nation's fundamental pollution-control and conservation laws, the Clean Air Act, and the Clean Water Act. Emotions and controversy over EPA's management of its toxic-waste Superfund cleanup program may prevent careful, reasonable review of the environmental issues at stake, and EPA forecasts the issues will be discussed politically, rather than substantively. Business lobbyists argue that their people support clean air and water and safe disposal of wastes too, but are also concerned with the entanglements of expensive red tape, unenforceable timetables, and counterproductive procedures. Especially sensitive areas of debate are those dealing with acid rain legislation, wilderness area designations, and budget cuts in natural resources and ecology protection.

  20. Pairing K-12 Teachers with Geographic Researchers: Why It Should Take Place and How It Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orvis, Kenneth H.; Horn, Sally P.; Jumper, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Contends that excitement can be infused into the K-12 geography curriculum by involving teachers in real research projects led by professional geographers. Describes a project where K-12 teachers and geographers participated in geography field research in the mountain highlands of the Valle Nuevo Scientific Reserve of the Dominican Republic. (CMK)

  1. Mismatch negativity to acoustical illusion of beat: how and where the change detection takes place?

    PubMed

    Chakalov, Ivan; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Wollbrink, Andreas; Pantev, Christo

    2014-10-15

    In case of binaural presentation of two tones with slightly different frequencies the structures of brainstem can no longer follow the interaural time differences (ITD) resulting in an illusionary perception of beat corresponding to frequency difference between the two prime tones. Hence, the beat-frequency does not exist in the prime tones presented to either ear. This study used binaural beats to explore the nature of acoustic deviance detection in humans by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Recent research suggests that the auditory change detection is a multistage process. To test this, we employed 26 Hz-binaural beats in a classical oddball paradigm. However, the prime tones (250 Hz and 276 Hz) were switched between the ears in the case of the deviant-beat. Consequently, when the deviant is presented, the cochleae and auditory nerves receive a "new afferent", although the standards and the deviants are heard identical (26 Hz-beats). This allowed us to explore the contribution of auditory periphery to change detection process, and furthermore, to evaluate its influence on beats-related auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs). LORETA-source current density estimates of the evoked fields in a typical mismatch negativity time-window (MMN) and the subsequent difference-ASSRs were determined and compared. The results revealed an MMN generated by a complex neural network including the right parietal lobe and the left middle frontal gyrus. Furthermore, difference-ASSR was generated in the paracentral gyrus. Additionally, psychophysical measures showed no perceptual difference between the standard- and deviant-beats when isolated by noise. These results suggest that the auditory periphery has an important contribution to novelty detection already at sub-cortical level. Overall, the present findings support the notion of hierarchically organized acoustic novelty detection system.

  2. Does Reflective Learning Take Place in Online MBA Introductory Quantitative Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Blake A.; Walsh, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Online education has grown dramatically over the past 15 years. At the university level, researchers have shown that online education has both its advantages--greater flexibility and access to student--and disadvantages--like disconnection with other students and faculty. Another possible drawback for the students enrolled in an online course is…

  3. Improving the Performance of High School Students: Focusing on Connections and Transitions Taking Place in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crist, Cynthia; Jacquart, Mary; Shupe, David A.

    Too many students entering colleges or universities find that they lack the essential skills and knowledge required for college. One reason for high school graduates' lack of preparedness for college is a serious lack of communication between the preschool-12 and postsecondary education systems. Like other states, Minnesota has focused…

  4. When Private Schools Take Public Dollars: What's the Place of Accountability in School Voucher Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hentges, Christina M.; Petrilli, Michael J.; Winkler, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    Of all the arguments that critics of school voucher programs advance, the one that may resonate loudest with the public concerns school accountability. Opponents say it's not fair to hold public schools accountable for their results (under No Child Left Behind and similar systems) and then let private schools receive taxpayer dollars--however…

  5. In what time scale proton transfer takes place in a live CHO cell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate, HPTS) in a live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is studied by time resolved confocal microscopy. The cytoplasm region of the cell is stained by a photoacid, HPTS (HA). The time constant of initial proton transfer (τPT) in the cell is found to be ˜10 times longer than that in bulk water, while the time constants of recombination (τrec) and dissociation (τdiss) in the cell are ˜3 times and ˜2 times longer, respectively. The slower rate of proton transfer (˜10 times) inside the CHO cell compared to that in bulk water is ascribed to slower solvation dynamics, lower availability of free water molecules, and disruption of hydrogen-bond network inside the cell. Translational and rotational diffusion of HPTS inside a single CHO cell have been investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and picosecond anisotropy measurement, respectively. Both the translational and rotational diffusion slow down inside the live cell. FCS studies indicate that HPTS remains tightly bound to a macromolecule inside the cell.

  6. Orthodontics in 3 millennia. Chapter 8: The cephalometer takes its place in the orthodontic armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Norman

    2006-04-01

    After World War II, cephalometric radiography came into widespread use, enabling orthodontists to measure changes in tooth and jaw positions produced by growth and treatment. Cephalometrics revealed that many malocclusions resulted from faulty jaw relationships, not just malposed teeth, and made it possible to see that jaw growth could be altered by orthodontic treatment. Since 1931, a multitude of analyses have been developed, whereby the face is inscribed in triangles, rectangles, and polygons, permitting the orthodontist to dissect the profile into an array of angular and distance measurements. Those who embraced too quickly these measurements as a panacea soon learned that they are best taken with a grain of good judgment.

  7. Where Does the Transformation of Precipitated Ceria Nanoparticles in Hydroponic Plants Take Place?

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Zhang, Junzhe; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Lijuan; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have been found to be partly biotransformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in plants, yet the transformation process and mechanism are not fully understood. Here, we try to clarify the specific site and necessary conditions for the transformation of precipitated CeO2 NPs in hydroponic cucumber plants. Three different treatment modes were adopted according to whether the NPs were incubated with roots all the time or not. Results showed that exposure modes significantly affect the translocation and transformation of CeO2 NPs. In the normal exposure mode, Ce was present as a Ce(IV) and Ce(III) mixture in the roots and shoots, and the proportion of Ce(III) in the shoots was enhanced obviously with the increase of exposure time. The results of short-time incubation and petiole exposure modes suggested that CeO2 NPs could not be reduced within a short incubation time (3 h) or be further reduced inside the plant tissues. It was deduced that root surfaces are the sites, and the physicochemical interaction between the NPs and root exudates at the nanobio interface is the necessary condition for the transformation of CeO2 NPs in plant systems. These results will contribute to understanding the transformation mechanism of CeO2 and other metal-based NPs and properly evaluate their ecological effects.

  8. To impose enhanced penalties for certain drug offense that take place on Federal property.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Nunes, Devin [R-CA-22

    2013-06-05

    07/15/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Systemic analysis of desertification processes taking place in the Limpopo river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Mario; Attorre, Fabio; Vitale, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Desertification and land degradation are phenomena that ranks among the greatest environmental challenges of our time. Desertification is a global issue, with serious implications worldwide for biodiversity, socio-economic stability and sustainable development. Biophysical indicators of land degradation and desertification, like Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and Total Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) were provided by remote sensing technology (MODIS). The study aims to evaluate the dynamical changes of NPP and Reco in the Limpopo river basin, a Southern African region that includes, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe, during the time period 2001-2010. In particular, the relations between NPP, Reco, environmental, physiological and land use parameters have been widely investigated through the application of a new and powerful statistical classifier, the Random Forest Analysis (RFA), and a general non-linear model, the Response Surface Regression Model (GRM). RFA highlighted that Temperature is one of the most important predictors affecting NPP and Reco in the Limpopo river basin. Conversely, other environmental parameters like, Precipitation, Evapotranspiration and Vegetation cover rarely influence NPP and Reco. Our results provide information on desertification and land degradation phenomena and a first step for identifying practices to mitigate their negative impacts. However, it must be taken into account that NPP and Reco depend by a multitude of factors (e.g. human activities, socio-economic policies) and can vary in relation to spatial and temporal scale. In order to achieve a better understanding of land degradation and desertification processes, land use and socio-economic variables should be considered.

  10. The Eclipsing Binary Di Herculis: One Mystery Solved, But Another Takes Its Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Nicole; Guinan, E.; Maloney, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 8th-mag eclipsing binary DI Herculis has perplexed scientists for the past few decades due to its anomalously slow apsidal motion rate. DI Her consists of two main-sequence stars (B5V, B6V), with P(orb) = 10.55 days, and eccentricity(e= 0.489). Since the apsidal motion is dominated by General Relativity, the system is one of the few tests available for verifying the theory. Combining the expected classical (1.93°/100 yr) and relativistic (2.34°/100 yr) effects, the predicted apsidal motion rate is 4.27°/100 yr. Our recent determination of the apsidal motion yields 1.33°+/-0.25 /100 yr, based on eclipse timings from 1936-2008. Recently, Albrecht et al (2009, Nature 461) have apparently solved the apsidal motion anomaly of DI Her, finding that the axes of both stars are significantly inclined from the normal to the orbital plane. This was determined from the radial velocity curves and observing the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during primary and secondary eclipses. Having significantly misaligned axes of rotation produces a perturbation that greatly reduces the classical apsidal motion effect, thus explaining the observed small apsidal motion rate. Even though this discovery apparently solves the problem, it raises new questions as to how the axes are so tilted. Additionally, tilted axes are expected to contribute to other orbital effects, such as changes in orbital inclination, which have not yet observed from the apparent constancy in eclipse depths over time. We have also searched for evidence of small periodic oscillations in the eclipse timings and found no evidence of a light travel time effect arising from a possible tertiary component. Further, we find evidence that the projected rotation axes of the stars may be precessing, since it appears that the value of V(rot)sini has increased over the past 30 years. This research was supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST05-07536/42.

  11. Interdisciplinary Discussions of Hydrology and River Linking Take Place in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay P.

    2004-05-01

    Considerable investment has been made in the development, construction, and management of water resources projects in the past 150 years. Many of these projects have caused deleterious environmental consequences, such as erosion and sedimentation of reservoirs, water logging, and alkalinization and salinization of irrigated lands. With the rising demand worldwide for quality water, the increasing call for preservation of environmental quality and sustenance of biodiversity, and the simultaneous and growing acceptance that the water use and management strategies of the past have often been unsustainable, there is an urgent need for wide-ranging discussions of past water resources policies and practices. Scientists, engineers, planners, managers, administrators, and policy makers recently met in Bhopal, India, to discuss problems and exchange ideas pertaining to water, water use, and the environment in arid, semi-arid, sub-humid, humid, and tropical regions. More than 400 participants representing 30 countries, including Australia, Canada, India, Germany, France, Italy, the United States, and the United Kingdom, among others attended Water and Environment (WE)-2003.

  12. When Private Schools Take Public Dollars: What's the Place of Accountability in School Voucher Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hentges, Christina M.; Petrilli, Michael J.; Winkler, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    Critics of school voucher programs argue that private schools that receive taxpayer dollars should be held accountable to the same standards as public schools. School choice supporters counter that private schools should be left alone to answer to the parents of their students. The authors advocate for a re-visit to the discussion of…

  13. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... alcohol testing site, you must ensure that it provides visual and aural privacy to the employee being... privacy requirements of paragraph (c) is not readily available, this part allows a reasonable suspicion or... site must afford visual and aural privacy to the employee to the greatest extent practicable. (f)...

  14. Writing from the Broken Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Recounts the author's own experience writing about deeply painful experiences in her own life, and the gift of healing this journey offered. Argues that such writing takes a special kind of courage, and that these books (a volume of poetry about sexual abuse, and the other a novel about a troubled family) hold out a promise of hope and healing.…

  15. There's No Place Like School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, the principal of a rural Oregon elementary school used a 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant and Title I funds to design a program to address homeless children's personal and social well-being. Kids eat a nutritious breakfast, take showers, get clothes washed, receive positive feedback, and participate in after-school…

  16. The Magical Place Called Opera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raplenovich, Kay

    1996-01-01

    "Create Your Own," month-long "Artist in Education" residencies sponsored by the Ohio Arts Council, are used to guide students and teachers through the process of taking the vision of an original opera conceived by students and turning it into a reality. A local opera company is actually created. "Create Your Own"…

  17. [The place of the child].

    PubMed

    Molenat, F

    2008-08-01

    A child's self-construction and access to his identity depend on the conditions of affective security in which he is raised and his genealogical references, the founders of his own place in society. The quality of the professional care at the different stages of the birth process is confirmed as a major variable in the parents' sense of security, followed by the child's. The drift toward the illusion of a right to a child is tempered by the attention that can be contributed by all healthcare providers who come into contact with couples when they request artificial procreation: recognition of their request, but also of their suffering, so as to separate the child's place from parental projections that may be poorly adjusted to the child's needs.

  18. There's no place like home.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1996-02-05

    When the school system in tiny Colby, Kans., signed onto a health plan that excluded the only hospital in the entire county, its citizens learned an important lesson. ¿If we're not working together,¿ says the hospital's administrator, ¿health plans and medical centers are going to come in here and take business away from us.¿ Here's what they learned about keeping rural health care rural.

  19. A Place Pedagogy for "Global Contemporaneity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret J.

    2010-01-01

    Around the globe people are confronted daily with intransigent problems of space and place. Educators have historically called for place-based or place-conscious education to introduce pedagogies that will address such questions as how to develop sustainable communities and places. These calls for place-conscious education have included liberal…

  20. An anthropologist in unexpected places

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Johan Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Much contemporary anthropology has turned away from exclusive focus on so-called “primitive” tribes in far-away places. The study of urban people has become more prominent, and some researchers have also turned their gaze towards marginalized minorities in their communities. Philippe Bourgois is an example of this. He is well known for studying crack dealers in East Harlem, New York ( In Search of Respect) and homeless heroin addicts in San Francisco (Righteous Dopefiend). Kula Kula was lucky enough to catch him in his office, and had a chat via skype. PMID:25436019

  1. PLACES Aircraft Experiment Test Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    7 7 -7 II’ DNA-TR-81-223 ~ PLACES AIRCRAFT EXPERIMENT TEST RESULTS ESL, Incorporated 495 Java Drive...Incorporated AREA , WORK UNIT NUMBERS 495 Java Drive Task S99QAXHB-00007 Sunnyvale, California 94086 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12...a, . C . . . ’. . ’’ " ’ ’ " ’ " ." "" " " "S """" " ", " " "" :""’" " ’ ,.U I p.00 I’. (v cu C. 2Sso7 012 22S 7571 linq ~ STR IE 0i aA 0 Fiue1-16 A

  2. Acid deposition and vehicle emissions: European environmental pressures on Britain

    SciTech Connect

    Brackley, P.

    1987-01-01

    This study, from the Joint Energy Programme and the Policy Studies Institute, examines the increasing political pressure being placed on Britain by members of the European community to take major steps toward improved environmental protection. Taking acid rain and vehicle emissions as typical examples of the conflict, the author examines Sweden, West Germany and France, as well as Britain, and unravels the criticisms, the arguments and the various approaches being taken to deal with environmental concerns. His conclusions point to widespread conflicts between differing national priorities and indicate that Britain may not be the only 'black sheep' in this continuing debate.

  3. Taking Sides on "Takings": Rhetorical Resurgence of the Sagebrush Rebellion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaviello, Tony

    The "Takings Clause" of the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution seems clear enough: when the government takes an individual's property, it must pay him or her for it. The "Sagebrush Rebellion" refers to the numerous incarnations of a movement to privatize public lands and contain environmental regulation. This…

  4. Pyrrolidone - a new solvent for the methylation of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Pinckney, D.J.; Booker, S.E.

    1975-01-01

    In the past, humic acid has been methylated by suspending it in a solution of diazomethane in diethyl ether, and degrading the partly methylated humic acid to release those parts of the molecule that were methylated. Only small fragments of the molecule have been identified by this technique. In the procedure described here the humic acid is dissolved in 2-pyrrolidone and methylated by the addition of diazomethane in diethyl ether and ethanol to the solution. Because the humic acid is completely dissolved in the reaction medium, disaggregation of the humic acid particles takes place and much more complete methylation is obtained. The methylated products may be fractionated by countercurrent distribution and analyzed by mass spectrometry.

  5. Place-Identity in a School Setting: Effects of the Place Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcouyeux, Aurore; Fleury-Bahi, Ghozlane

    2011-01-01

    Studies on place identity show positive relationships between the evaluation of a place and mechanisms involved in place identification. However, individuals also identify with places of low social prestige (places that bear a negative social image). Few authors investigate the nature of place identity processes in this case. The goal of this…

  6. Oh, the Places They Went: SBOs Share Their Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    "Oh the Places You'll Go!" That Dr. Seuss book is a standard gift for graduates as they are sent out into the world-whether it's off to college or into the world of work. "You can steer yourself any direction you choose." What direction did school business officials take to get where they are today? The most recent…

  7. The astrophysics of crowded places.

    PubMed

    Davies, Melvyn

    2002-12-15

    Today the Sun is in a relatively uncrowded place. The distance between it and the nearest other star is relatively large (about 200,000 times the Earth-Sun distance!). This is beneficial to life on Earth; a close encounter with another star is extremely unlikely. Such encounters would either remove the Earth from its orbit around the Sun or leave it on an eccentric orbit similar to a comet's. But the Sun was not formed in isolation. It was born within a more-crowded cluster of perhaps a few hundred stars. As the surrounding gas evaporated away, the cluster itself evaporated too, dispersing its stars into the Galaxy. Virtually all stars in the Galaxy share this history, and here I will describe the role of 'clusterness' in a star's life. Stars are often formed in larger stellar clusters (known as open and globular clusters), some of which are still around today. I will focus on stars in globular clusters and describe how the interactions between stars in these clusters may explain the zoo of stellar exotica which have recently been observed with instruments such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the X-ray telescopes XMM-Newton and Chandra. In recent years, myriad planets orbiting stars other than the Sun--the so-called 'extrasolar' planets--have been discovered. I will describe how a crowded environment will affect such planetary systems and may in fact explain some of their mysterious properties.

  8. Taking Over a Broken Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Taking over a broken program can be one of the hardest tasks to take on. However, working towards a vision and a common goal--and eventually getting there--makes it all worth it in the end. In this article, the author shares the lessons she learned as the new director for the Bright Horizons Center in Ashburn, Virginia. She suggests that new…

  9. Taking Chances in Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Lindsey; Knox, David

    2016-01-01

    A 64 item Internet questionnaire was completed by 381 undergraduates at a large southeastern university to assess taking chances in romantic relationships. Almost three fourths (72%) self-identified as being a "person willing to take chances in my love relationship." Engaging in unprotected sex, involvement in a "friends with…

  10. An Acid-Base Chemistry Example: Conversion of Nicotine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, John H.

    1999-10-01

    The current government interest in nicotine conversion by cigarette companies provides an example of acid-base chemistry that can be explained to students in the second semester of general chemistry. In particular, the conversion by ammonia of the +1 form of nicotine to the easier-to-assimilate free-base form illustrates the effect of pH on acid-base equilibrium. The part played by ammonia in tobacco smoke is analogous to what takes place when cocaine is "free-based".

  11. Survey cover pages: to take or not to take.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Lam, Charlene; Wiederman, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    In survey research, the elements of informed conset, including contact information for the researchers and the Institutional Review Board, may be located on a cover page, which participants are advised that they may take. To date, we are not aware of any studies examining the percentage of research participants that actually take these cover pages, which was the purpose of this study. Among a consecutive sample of 419 patients in an internal medicine setting, 16% removed the cover page. There were no demographic predictors regarding who took versus did not take the cover page.

  12. Sensor technology to support Aging in Place.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Miller, Steven J; Galambos, Colleen; Alexander, Greg; Keller, James; Popescu, Mihail

    2013-06-01

    Older adults want to age in place at home. Sensor technology has the potential to help by monitoring individuals' health status, detecting emergency situations, and notifying health care providers. Researchers at the University of Missouri are investigating the impact of registered nurse care coordination and technology on the ability of older adults to age in place. Technology coupled with care coordination has improved clinical outcomes. This article presents an overview of the Aging in Place research, TigerPlace as a Missouri-sponsored Aging in Place facility, and the sensor technology developed to support Aging in Place.

  13. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  14. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  15. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  16. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  17. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  18. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  19. 29 CFR 1471.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who places the information into the EPLS? 1471.520 Section... GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 1471.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions to exclude persons under this part or...

  20. 5 CFR 919.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Who places the information into the EPLS... List System § 919.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions to... enter the following information about those persons into the EPLS: (a) Information required by §...

  1. 5 CFR 919.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Who places the information into the EPLS... List System § 919.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions to... enter the following information about those persons into the EPLS: (a) Information required by §...

  2. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  3. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  4. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  5. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  6. Taking Research into Schools: The West Lothian Action Enquiry Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binnie, Lynne M.; Allen, Kristen; Beck, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the efforts of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) to develop its practice in the area of research. It will argue that the Action Enquiry model of service delivery can empower teaching staff and may allow an effective means of change and improvement to take place in schools. This model steers research towards providing…

  7. Teaching Kids with Learning Disabilities to Take Public Transit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Taking public transit can make anyone nervous, especially in a large or medium-sized city where there are many different bus lines going many different places. The author's daughter, Anna, has multiple learning disabilities and may never learn to drive, but she wants to be as independent as possible so the author taught her to ride the bus. This…

  8. 76 FR 79409 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... environmental reasons (such as presence of marine mammals). Pile driving would typically take place 6 days per... underwater acoustic environment consists of ambient sound, defined as environmental background sound levels... reduction in sound levels. Both environmental conditions and the characteristics of the sound...

  9. The Space Place: Adventures in Informal Education - and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D.; Leon, N.

    2001-12-01

    products both economical and comprehensive. While the Space Place effort started as a New Millennium Program effort, it was quickly expanded to all NASA missions who wish to participate. The team soon realized that the informal education community wanted a variety of content - not just more and more information about a few missions, but rather a continuous infusion of new content from new missions. This expansion of the Space Place program allows any mission to take advantage of the existing Space Place infrastructure and alliances - and provides the much-needed variety of materials that the informal education community desires. This poster session will provide an overview of the Space Place effort within the informal education community, and will illustrate some of the valuable lessons learned by the team in working with this rich and varied community.

  10. Hawaii Play Fairway Analysis: Hawaiian Place Names

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-11-15

    Compilation of Hawaiian place names indicative of heat. Place names are from the following references: Pukui, M.K., and S.H. Elbert, 1976, Place Names of Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI 96822, 289 pp. ; Bier, J. A., 2009, Map of Hawaii, The Big Island, Eighth Edition, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI  96822, 1 sheet.; and Reeve, R., 1993, Kahoolawe Place Names, Consultant Report No. 16, Kahoolawe Island Conveyance Commission, 259 pp.

  11. Nurse! What's Taking So Long?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164577.html Nurse! What's Taking So Long? Study at a children's ... in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto. That rarely happens, however, and ...

  12. LRO Takes the Moon's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the June 2011 lunar eclipse, scientists will be able to get a unique view of the moon. While the sun is blocked by the Earth, LRO's Diviner instrument will take the temperature on the lunar ...

  13. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Features Take Care with Pet Reptiles and Amphibians Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... helpful resources. Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles and Amphibians Always wash your hands thoroughly after handling reptiles ...

  14. Taking Care of Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack or stroke. Lifestyle changes, like making smart food choices and being physically active, and taking medicine can ... your risk by managing your “ABCs” with smart food choices, physical activity, and medicine. Losing weight and quitting ...

  15. LRO Takes the Moon's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the December 2011 lunar eclipse, LRO's Diviner instrument will take the temperature on the lunar surface. Since different rock sizes cool at different rates, scientists will be able to infer...

  16. Taking America To New Heights

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is taking America to new heights with its Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) partners. In 2011, NASA entered into funded Space Act Agreements (SAAs) w...

  17. Anthropological Studies of Native American Place Names.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Traces development of Native American place name studies from Boas (1880s) to the present. Argues that place names convey information about physical environments but also reveal how people perceive, conceptualize, and utilize their environment. Suggests the utility of place names as a framework for cultural analysis and describes recent…

  18. Sense of Place in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alex; Stedman, Richard C.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2012-01-01

    Although environmental education research has embraced the idea of sense of place, it has rarely taken into account environmental psychology-based sense of place literature whose theory and empirical studies can enhance related studies in the education context. This article contributes to research on sense of place in environmental education from…

  19. Spirit Takes a Turn for Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This rear hazard-identification camera image looks back at the circular tracks made in the martian soil when the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove about 3 meters (10 feet) toward the mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack, Spirit's first rock target. Spirit made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet). The drive took about 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. The two rocks in the upper left corner of the image are called 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi.' In the upper right corner is a portion of the lander, now known as the Columbia Memorial Station.

  20. Historical consideration of place: inviting multiple histories and narratives in place-based education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Miyoun

    2010-12-01

    Drawing upon van Eijck and Roth's notion of "place as chronotope," this review paper discusses historical consideration of place as it assists us to conceptualize place in its collective, political, and dialogical nature. In a place, we are positioned amidst of the multiplicity of histories and narratives within ever shifting various contexts of place. Historical consideration acknowledges multiplicity and marginalization in a place, thus, legitimizes multiple place histories and invites multiple narratives to engage in dialogical process of place. With historical consideration, place identity can be approached and framed in its collective, dialogical nature within larger social, political contexts of place. The paper further suggests that place based education should be able to acknowledge and invite multiple histories and marginalized voices of students into creating a place to dwell together.

  1. Professionalism: Teachers Taking the Reins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helterbran, Valeri R.

    2008-01-01

    It is essential that teachers take a proactive look at their profession and themselves to strengthen areas of professionalism over which they have control. In this article, the author suggests strategies that include collaborative planning, reflectivity, growth in the profession, and the examination of certain personal characteristics.

  2. Taking Stands for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lorinda; Rios, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe efforts to help students take a stand for social justice in the College of Education at one predominantly White institution in the western Rocky Mountain region. The authors outline the theoretical frameworks that inform this work and the context of our work. The focus is on specific pedagogical strategies used…

  3. Four Takes on Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebell, Michael A.; Odden, Allan; Rolle, Anthony; Guthrie, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Educational Leadership talks with four experts in the fields of education policy and finance about how schools can weather the current financial crisis. Michael A. Rebell focuses on the recession and students' rights; Allan Odden suggests five steps schools can take to improve in tough times; Anthony Rolle describes the tension between equity and…

  4. Experiencing discrimination increases risk taking.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jeremy P; Koslov, Katrina; Nock, Matthew K; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2013-02-01

    Prior research has revealed racial disparities in health outcomes and health-compromising behaviors, such as smoking and drug abuse. It has been suggested that discrimination contributes to such disparities, but the mechanisms through which this might occur are not well understood. In the research reported here, we examined whether the experience of discrimination affects acute physiological stress responses and increases risk-taking behavior. Black and White participants each received rejecting feedback from partners who were either of their own race (in-group rejection) or of a different race (out-group rejection, which could be interpreted as discrimination). Physiological (cardiovascular and neuroendocrine) changes, cognition (memory and attentional bias), affect, and risk-taking behavior were assessed. Significant participant race × partner race interactions were observed. Cross-race rejection, compared with same-race rejection, was associated with lower levels of cortisol, increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, greater anger, increased attentional bias, and more risk-taking behavior. These data suggest that perceived discrimination is associated with distinct profiles of physiological reactivity, affect, cognitive processing, and risk taking, implicating direct and indirect pathways to health disparities.

  5. College Presidents Take on 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    College presidents have long gotten flak for refusing to take controversial stands on national issues. A large group of presidents opened an emotionally charged national debate on the drinking age. In doing so, they triggered an avalanche of news-media coverage and a fierce backlash. While the criticism may sting, the prime-time fracas may help…

  6. Take Charge of Your Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marshall A.

    2013-01-01

    Today's work world is full of uncertainty. Every day, people hear about another organization going out of business, downsizing, or rightsizing. To prepare for these uncertain times, one must take charge of their own career. This article presents some tips for surviving in today's world of work: (1) Be self-managing; (2) Know what you…

  7. Taking control of anorexia together.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-02-27

    Many people with anorexia receive inadequate treatment for what is a debilitating, relentless and life-threatening illness. In Lincolnshire an innovative nurse-led day programme is helping people stay out of hospital and take back control from the illness. Peer support is crucial to the programme's success.

  8. Historical Consideration of Place: Inviting Multiple Histories and Narratives in Place-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Miyoun

    2010-01-01

    Drawing upon van Eijck and Roth's notion of "place as chronotope," this review paper discusses historical consideration of place as it assists us to conceptualize place in its collective, political, and dialogical nature. In a place, we are positioned amidst of the multiplicity of histories and narratives within ever shifting various contexts of…

  9. Sense of Place in the Practice and Assessment of Place-Based Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semken, Steven; Freeman, Carol Butler

    2008-01-01

    We teach earth, ecological, and environmental sciences in and about "places" imbued with meaning by human experience. Scientific understanding is but one of the many types of meanings that can accrue to a given place. People develop emotional attachments to meaningful places. The "sense of place," encompassing the meanings and…

  10. Mass spectrometric and theoretical studies on the decarboxylation of the anionic lithium complexes of the doubly deprotonated dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang

    2012-05-01

    On the basis of the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) technique and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have studied the decarboxylation reactions of several anionic lithium complexes of the doubly deprotonated dicarboxylic acids, which include succinic acid, L-malic acid, L-mercaptosuccinic acid, L-aspartic acid and oxaloacetic acid, etc. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments indicate that the decarboxylation reactions of these complexes in the gas phase can all take place. DFT calculations show that the α-substituted groups in the dicarboxylic acids, such as sbnd OH, sbnd NH2 and sbnd SH can advance the decarboxylation of the corresponding anionic lithium complexes. Meanwhile, the decarboxylation generally happens at the carboxylate group that is away from the substituent. This opinion is also supported by the bond angle analyses of the carboxylate groups.

  11. The WorkPlace distributed processing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Henderson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Real time control problems require robust, high performance solutions. Distributed computing can offer high performance through parallelism and robustness through redundancy. Unfortunately, implementing distributed systems with these characteristics places a significant burden on the applications programmers. Goddard Code 522 has developed WorkPlace to alleviate this burden. WorkPlace is a small, portable, embeddable network interface which automates message routing, failure detection, and re-configuration in response to failures in distributed systems. This paper describes the design and use of WorkPlace, and its application in the construction of a distributed blackboard system.

  12. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider ...

  13. Effects of ethanol and acetic acid on the transport of malic acid and glucose in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: implications in wine deacidification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M J; Mota, M; Leão, C

    1995-02-15

    Ethanol and acetic acid, at concentrations which may occur during wine-making, inhibited the transport of L-malic acid in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The inhibition was non-competitive, the decrease of the maximum initial velocity following exponential kinetics. Glucose transport was not significantly affected either by ethanol (up to 13%, w/v) or by acetic acid (up to 1.5%, w/v). The uptake of labelled acetic acid followed simple diffusion kinetics, indicating that a carrier was not involved in its transport. Therefore, the undissociated acid appears to be the only form that enters the cells and is probably responsible for the toxic effects. Accordingly, deacidification by Ss. pombe during wine fermentation should take place before, rather than after, the main alcoholic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Aging in Place: Knowing where You Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosel, Natalie

    2003-01-01

    Research on aging in place appropriately emphasizes the value of familiar surroundings. The current study contributes an exploration of elders' personal knowledge of where and with whom they are aging in place, knowledge actively accumulated from a lifetime spent in the same area. Structured conversations over a four-month period with 10 elders…

  15. Section 2--Psychology in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, John

    2008-01-01

    In 1996, Graham Richards published "Putting Psychology in its Place: An introduction from a critical historical perspective." Here, I seek to consider what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education, and not just from a historical perspective. This raises issues about several…

  16. Coloring in the Emotional Language of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Making educational places more inviting to learners is a key aspect of Invitational Theory. This paper introduces a simple technique for sensitizing learners and instructors to how their environment affects their feelings and ability to learn. It describes a learning exercise that may be used to assess, evaluate and transform places, to promote…

  17. A Quiet Place for Student Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    As electronic gadgets predominate a student's life, there comes a need for silence. A quiet place free of electromagnetic spectrum waves, dirty and stray electricity, and the endless chirps, whistles, beeps, and customized signaling. A quiet place can offer solitude for meditation, inspiration, and spiritual awareness. Student involvement in the…

  18. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  19. Urban Environmental Education and Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Urban environmental educators are trying to connect students to the urban environment and nature, and thus develop a certain sense of place. To do so, educators involve students in environmental stewardship, monitoring, activism, and outdoor recreation in cities. At the same time, sense of place has been linked to pro-environmental behaviors and…

  20. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  1. [The mortuary: a place of life].

    PubMed

    Gelot, Antoinette Bernabe

    2011-12-01

    The mortuary is a place where past, present and future converge. It is a place where families can prepare and find peace. Every day, mortuary staff offer humanity and care to the families and loved ones of the deceased, to help them continue to build their own lives.

  2. Adult Learning by "the Biography of Place."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurantowicz, Ewa

    The "biography of place" can be available in the objective (currently valid and predominant) history of a given region of residence or it can be created by individuals in the process of reflections on their own social identity, which is defined by their place of living. Each perspective is conditioned by an epistemological and…

  3. 45 CFR 99.13 - Place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Place. 99.13 Section 99.13 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Preliminary Matters-Notice and Parties § 99.13 Place. The hearing shall be held in the...

  4. Education and Place: A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespor, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In this review essay, Jan Nespor uses three recent contributions to place-based education, Paul Theobald's "Teaching the Commons," C.A. Bowers's "Revitalizing the Commons," and David Gruenewald and Gregory Smith's edited volume "Place-Based Education in the Global Age," to examine some fundamental conceptual and practical issues in the area. One…

  5. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Leder, Johannes; Ketturat, Charlene; Dresler, Martin; Faber, Nadira Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by – more or less qualified – advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) ×2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compared participants with one night of total sleep deprivation to participants with a night of regular sleep. Competency of advisor was manipulated within subjects. We found that sleep deprived participants show increased advice taking. An interaction of condition and competency of advisor and further post-hoc analyses revealed that this effect was more pronounced for the medium competency advisor compared to the high competency advisor. Furthermore, sleep deprived participants benefited more from an advisor of high competency in terms of stronger improvement in judgmental accuracy than well-rested participants. PMID:27109507

  6. Improving the medical 'take sheet'.

    PubMed

    Reed, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The GMC states that "Trainees in hospital posts must have well organised handover arrangements, ensuring continuity of patient care[1]". In the Belfast City Hospital throughout the day there can be multiple new medical admissions. These can be via the GP Unit, transfers for tertiary care, and transfers due to bed shortages in other hospitals. Over the course of 24 hours there can be up to four medical SHOs and three registrars that fill in the take sheet. Due to the variety of admission routes and number of doctors looking after the medical take information can be lost during handover between SHOs. In the current format there is little room to write and key and relevant information on the medical take sheet about new and transferring patients. I felt that this handover sheet could be improved. An initial questionnaire demonstrated that 47% found the old proforma easy to use and 28.2% felt that it allowed them to identify sick patients. 100% of SHOs and Registrars surveyed felt that it could be improved from its current form. From feedback from my colleagues I created a new template and trialled it in the hospital. A repeat questionnaire demonstrated that 92.3% of responders felt the new format had improved medical handover and that 92.6% felt that it allowed safe handover most of the time/always. The success of this new proforma resulted in it being implemented on a permanent basis for new medical admissions and transfers to the hospital.

  7. Finding similar places using the observation-to-generalization place model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a novel observation-to-generalization place model is proposed. It is shown how this model can be used to formally define the problem of finding geographically similar places. The observation-to-generalization model differentiates between observations of phenomena in the environment at a specific location and time, and generalizations about places that are inferred from these observations. A suite of operations is defined to find similar places based on the invariance of generalized place properties, and it is demonstrated how these functions can be applied to the problem of finding similar places based on the topics that people write about in place descriptions. One use for similar-place search is for exploratory research that will enable investigators to perform case-control studies on place data.

  8. [Exfoliative esophagitis while taking dabigatran].

    PubMed

    Scheppach, Wolfgang; Meesmann, Malte

    2015-04-01

    History | A 77-year-old woman was admitted with severe chest pain, heartburn, dysphagia and odynophagia. She had been on dabigatran for 13 months due to atrial fibrillation and arterial hypertension. Investigations and findings | Endoscopy of the esophagus revealed sloughing of mucosal casts, predominantly in the upper half of the organ. Treatment and course | The patient was placed on pantoprazol, local anaesthetic antacid and i. v. fluids. Dabigatran was discontinued. The symptoms disappeared within 3 days. Control endoscopy after 12 days showed complete healing of the esophageal mucosa. Conclusion | The intake of dabigatran was associated with exfoliative esophagitis, possibly due to caustic tissue damage by prolonged drug contact.

  9. Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Andrew; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew T.; Stefanidis, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Place can be generally defined as a location that has been assigned meaning through human experience, and as such it is of multidisciplinary scientific interest. Up to this point place has been studied primarily within the context of social sciences as a theoretical construct. The availability of large amounts of user-generated content, e.g. in the form of social media feeds or Wikipedia contributions, allows us for the first time to computationally analyze and quantify the shared meaning of place. By aggregating references to human activities within urban spaces we can observe the emergence of unique themes that characterize different locations, thus identifying places through their discernible sociocultural signatures. In this paper we present results from a novel quantitative approach to derive such sociocultural signatures from Twitter contributions and also from corresponding Wikipedia entries. By contrasting the two we show how particular thematic characteristics of places (referred to herein as platial themes) are emerging from such crowd-contributed content, allowing us to observe the meaning that the general public, either individually or collectively, is assigning to specific locations. Our approach leverages probabilistic topic modelling, semantic association, and spatial clustering to find locations are conveying a collective sense of place. Deriving and quantifying such meaning allows us to observe how people transform a location to a place and shape its characteristics. PMID:27050432

  10. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  11. Place in Pacific Islands Climate Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, C.; Koh, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding place, including both the environment and its people, is essential to understanding our climate, climate change, and its impacts. For us to develop a sense of our place, we need to engage in multiple ways of learning: observation, experimentation, and opportunities to apply new knowledge (Orr, 1992). This approach allows us to access different sources of knowledge and then create local solutions for local issues. It is especially powerful when we rely on experts and elders in our own community along with information from the global community.The Pacific islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) is a collaboration of partners—school systems, nongovernmental organizations, and government agencies—working to support learning and teaching about climate in the Pacific. Since 2009, PCEP partners have been working together to develop and implement classroom resources, curriculum standards, and teacher professional learning opportunities in which learners approach climate change and its impacts first through the lens of their own place. Such an approach to putting place central to teaching and learning about climate requires partnership and opportunities for learners to explore solutions for and with their communities. In this presentation, we will share the work unfolding in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) as one example of PCEP's approach to place-based climate education. Three weeklong K-12 teacher professional learning workshops took place during June-July 2015 in Majuro, RMI on learning gardens, climate science, and project-based learning. Each workshop was co-taught with local partners and supports educators in teaching climate-related curriculum standards through tasks that can foster sense of place through observation, experimentation, and application of new knowledge. Additionally, we will also share PCEP's next steps in place-based climate education, specifically around emerging conversations about the importance of highlighting

  12. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  13. Place and the experience of air quality.

    PubMed

    Day, Rosemary

    2007-03-01

    This article examines how concepts of place effects are relevant in understanding the public's experience of air pollution. Using qualitative and quantitative data from a case study of four neighbourhoods in north London, the analysis shows how this experience is mediated by multiple aspects of place, which may be seen as overlain. These multiple aspects also provide routes to inequalities in the experience of air pollution. Working with these understandings of the relevance of place could provide ways to mitigate the experience of pollution, and to address environmental health inequalities.

  14. 32 CFR 1653.2 - Procedures for taking an appeal to the President.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for taking an appeal to the President... SYSTEM APPEAL TO THE PRESIDENT § 1653.2 Procedures for taking an appeal to the President. (a) When the Director of Selective Service appeals to the President he shall place in the registrant's file a...

  15. "Don't take diabetes for granted."

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Don't take diabetes for granted." Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... regularly, and take your medicines on time. Don't take diabetes for granted! Fall 2009 Issue: Volume ...

  16. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25582294

  17. n-hydrocarbons conversions over metal-modified solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarubica, A.; Ranđelović, M.; Momčilović, M.; Radulović, N.; Putanov, P.

    2013-12-01

    The quality of a straight-run fuel oil can be improved if saturated n-hydrocarbons of low octane number are converted to their branched counterparts. Poor reactivity of traditional catalysts in isomerization reactions imposed the need for the development of new catalysts among which noble metal promoted acid catalysts, liquid and/or solid acid catalysts take a prominent place. Sulfated zirconia and metal promoted sulfated zirconia exhibit high activity for the isomerization of light alkanes at low temperatures. The present paper highlights the original results which indicate that the modification of sulfated zirconia by incorporation of metals (platinum and rhenium) significantly affects catalytic performances in n-hydrocarbon conversion reactions. Favourable activity/selectivity of the promoted sulfated zirconia depends on the crystal phase composition, critical crystallites sizes, platinum dispersion, total acidity and type of acidity. Attention is also paid to the recently developed solid acid catalysts used in other conversion reactions of hydrocarbons.

  18. Considering place in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Bender, Amy; Clune, Laurie; Guruge, Sepali

    2007-09-01

    When a geographic location is assigned meaning, it becomes a place. The authors argue that place matters as both geographical location and lived experience. They extend the current conceptualization of nursing geography to encompass community health nursing and address intricacies of community nursing practice and research that often go unnoticed. They do so by exploring the notion of place in home and community, including the structural/spatial dimensions of the nurse-client relationship. The authors review the health geography literatures, then discuss the implications for practice and research in community health. They invite community health nurses to critically examine their practice and research with reference to such issues as the power of the nurse, marginalized places as determinants of health, and how best to care for clients living in diverse community settings.

  19. Local Foods, Local Places Summary Reports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These summary reports describe Local Foods, Local Places projects in communities across the country, including farmers markets, cooperatives, community gardens, and other food-related enterprises that can boost local economies and drive revitalization.

  20. Healthy Places for Healthy People 2016 Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Application form for the 2016 round of Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance to help communities work with health care partners to revitalize downtowns and neighborhoods while helping residents live healthier lives.

  1. Time and Place for Teaching Black Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, George B.

    1972-01-01

    Argues that the traditional black church appears latently able and well-placed to complement the effort of the black family to prepare its young children to be black and proud in a white-dominated society. (Author/JM)

  2. Senior Living: There's No Place Like Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living There's No Place Like Home Past Issues / ... state offices on aging; social services organizations; nearby senior centers; and civic, tribal, and religious organizations. They ...

  3. Children and Place: A Natural Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Valerie G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents seven outdoor activities on the environment and ecology to be used at the K-12 grade level. Connects students with the environment they live in and develops the critical sense of place. (Contains 26 references.) (YDS)

  4. Learning as Existential Engagement with/in Place: Departing from Vandenberg and the Reams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ruyu

    2014-01-01

    This article takes Vandenberg's critique of Ream and Ream's view on the Deweyan learning environment as a departing point to explore the educational meaning of place. The divergence between Vandenberg and the Reams reminds us that the place is not merely a physical site for learners to be located in but also a horizon to be engaged with.…

  5. Investigation of acyl migration in mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids under aqueous basic, aqueous acidic, and dry roasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sagar; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Matei, Marius Febi; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2014-09-17

    Acyl migration in chlorogenic acids describes the process of migration of cinnamoyl moieties from one quinic acid alcohol group to another, thus interconverting chlorogenic acid regioisomers. It therefore constitutes a special case of transesterification reaction. Acyl migration constitutes an important reaction pathway in both coffee roasting and brewing, altering the structure of chlorogenic acid initially present in the green coffee bean. In this contribution we describe detailed and comprehensive mechanistic studies comparing inter- and intramolecular acyl migration involving the seven most common chlorogenic acids in coffee. We employe aqueous acidic and basic conditions mimicking the brewing of coffee along with dry roasting conditions. We show that under aqueous basic conditions intramolecular acyl migration is fully reversible with basic hydrolysis competing with acyl migration. 3-Caffeoylquinic acid was shown to be most labile to basic hydrolysis. We additionally show that the acyl migration process is strongly pH dependent with increased transesterification taking place at basic pH. Under dry roasting conditions acyl migration competes with dehydration to form lactones. We argue that acyl migration precedes lactonization, with 3-caffeoylquinic acid lactone being the predominant product.

  6. Foundations of Place: A Multidisciplinary Framework for Place-Conscious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; it also discusses pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to place-consciousness. Drawing on insights from phenomenology, critical geography, bioregionalism, ecofeminism, and other place-conscious traditions, the author gathers…

  7. A Tie for Third Place: Teens Need Physical Spaces as well as Virtual Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heeger, Paula Brehm

    2006-01-01

    "Third places" or public and informal gathering places have declined over the years. Third places, which are "neutral ground" where people gather to discuss, interact, and enjoy the company of those they know, are important for the health of communities. It's a known fact that teens have a strong need to socialize, and their third-space options…

  8. Operationalizing Place: Discovering, Reasoning about, and Exploring Place Knowledge from Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Benjamin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Places and place types, such as "small town", play a fundamental role in how people organize knowledge about the world. Although places are commonly referenced in human communication, often they are not canonically defined and many of the properties people associate with them have proved difficult to operationalize. In information…

  9. Remembering the Roots of Place Meanings for Place-Based Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Garrett

    2011-01-01

    Place-based education seeks to connect learners to local environments through a variety of strategies that increase environmental awareness and connectedness to particular parts of the world. The concept of place meanings encompasses the subjective ways people construct meaning through their experiences with an array of settings. Place meanings…

  10. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-07

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa∼0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ∼50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa=7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ∼1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale.

  11. The Vote and Vax program: public health at polling places.

    PubMed

    Shenson, Douglas; Adams, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Although influenza-associated illness is a major cause of hospitalizations and death among older Americans, only half of adults aged 50 or older-for whom influenza vaccinations are recommended-receive an annual influenza vaccination. National elections, which draw a large number of older voters, take place during influenza vaccination season and represent an untapped opportunity for large-scale delivery of vaccinations. In 2006, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched a program to evaluate the feasibility of delivering influenza vaccinations near polling places. Twenty-five public health agencies were each provided grants of $8000 and asked to implement at least two Vote and Vax clinics. Immunizers were required to obtain prior permission from local election authorities and to charge fees as they would at their other community-based clinics. Influenza vaccination had to be made available both to voters and to nonvoters. On election day, the initiative delivered 13790 influenza vaccinations at 127 polling places in 14 states. More than 80 percent of adult vaccine recipients were in the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control-defined priority groups and 28 percent were "new" influenza vaccination recipients. Vote and Vax is a potentially national strategy that could significantly expand the delivery of influenza vaccinations.

  12. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2015-01-01

    What are the computational laws of hippocampal activity? In this paper we argue for the slowness principle as a fundamental processing paradigm behind hippocampal place cell firing. We present six different studies from the experimental literature, performed with real-life rats, that we replicated in computer simulations. Each of the chosen studies allows rodents to develop stable place fields and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding: adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional dependent firing in the linear track and open field; and morphing and scaling the environment itself. Simulations are based on a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA) network topped by a principal component analysis (ICA) output layer. The slowness principle is shown to account for the main findings of the presented experimental studies. The SFA network generates its responses using raw visual input only, which adds to its biological plausibility but requires experiments performed in light conditions. Future iterations of the model will thus have to incorporate additional information, such as path integration and grid cell activity, in order to be able to also replicate studies that take place during darkness. PMID:26052279

  13. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2014-03-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 who were not, taking anticoagulants. Seventy-one were taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and 32 vitamin K antagonists. Patients were treated according to guidelines developed at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), The Netherlands. The operations studied included surgical extraction (when the surgeon had to incise the gingiva before extraction), non-surgical extraction, apicectomy, and placement of implants. Patients were given standard postoperative care and those taking vitamin K antagonists used tranexamic acid mouthwash postoperatively. No patient developed a severe bleed that required intervention. Seven patients (7%) taking anticoagulants developed mild postoperative bleeds. Patients taking vitamin K antagonists reported 3 episodes (9%) compared with 4 (6%) in the group taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors. Among patients not taking anticoagulants, two (2%) developed mild bleeding. The differences between the groups were not significant. All bleeding was controlled by the patients themselves with compression with gauze. We conclude that dentoalveolar surgery is safe in patients being treated with anticoagulants provided that the conditions described in the ACTA guidelines are met.

  14. Improving Written Communication Through Perspective-taking

    PubMed Central

    Traxler, Matthew J.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    To convey their ideas successfully, writers must envision how readers will interpret their texts. In our previous research (Traxler & Gernsbacher, 1992), we discovered that writers who received feedback from their readers successfully revised descriptions of geometric figures, whereas writers who did not receive feedback did not. We also discovered that writers who received feedback from their readers on one set of descriptions wrote better descriptions of a new set of geometric figures. We concluded that feedback—even a minimal form of feedback—helps writers learn to envision how readers will interpret their texts. In the present research, we investigated another way that writers can learn to envision how readers will interpret their texts. Our treatment placed writers “in their readers’ shoes”. In three experiments, half the writers performed a task that their readers would subsequently perform, and the other half of the writers performed a control task. In our first and second experiments, the writers who gained their readers’ perspective by performing their readers’ task successfully revised their descriptions of geometric figures, whereas writers who performed the control task did not. In our third experiment, we discovered that writers who performed their readers’ task did not improve their descriptions merely because they were exposed to examples of other writers’ descriptions. We concluded that gaining their readers’ perspective helps writers communicate more clearly because perspective-taking helps writers form a mental representation of how readers interpret their texts. PMID:25404785

  15. Infrared astronomy takes center stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick C.; Gatley, Ian; Hollenbach, David

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of infrared astronomy, including the ability to detect cool matter, explore the hidden universe, reveal a wealth of spectral lines, and reach back to the beginning of time are outlined. Ground-based infrared observations such as observations in the thermal infrared region are discussed as well as observations utilizing infrared telescopes aboard NASA aircraft and orbiting telescopes. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy are described, and it is pointed out that infrared astronomers can penetrate obscuring dust to study stars and interstellar matter throughout the Milky Way galaxy. Application of various infrared instruments to the investigation of stars and planets is emphasized, and focus is placed on the discovery of clouds or disks of particles around mature stars and acquisition of high-resolution spectra of the gaseous and solid materials orbiting on the fringes of the solar system.

  16. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond.

  17. Amino acid chiral recognition using X-ray diffraction of thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragoi, D.; Kulleck, J.; Kanik, I.; Beegle, L. W.

    2003-01-01

    The astrobiological search for life, both extinct and extant, on other solar system bodies will take place via several planned lander missions to Mars, Europa and Titan. The detection and identification of organic molecules that have been associated with life is a major technical achievement. Terrestrial life utilizes organic molecules, such as amino acids, as its basic building block. Detection of an entometeric excess of L over D forms of amino acids would be a powerful sign that life had existed on Mars at one time.

  18. Towards a chronotopic theory of "place" in place-based education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2010-12-01

    The notion of place, as in place- based education, has received considerable attention in educational theorizing because of its potential to link students, their lifeworlds, and their experiences in particular settings to formal education. However, in current debates of place-based education, the notion of place is emerging as problematic. The purpose of this study is to contribute to a rethinking of place in a form that is appropriate for describing and theorizing its occurrence in a world we share with others. We understand place as the result of a dialectical and dialogical relation of the material world and its chronotopic (time-space) nature in the various conversations (discourses) in which it is constituted as this place; that is, we view place as a lived entity that results from a dialogical transaction between a community and its material environment at a particular moment in cultural-historical time and which hence shapes and is shaped by the identity of the people. We exemplify our rethinking with a case of an environmental education project in which place unfolds as a chronotope from a dialogue between scientific and indigenous voices. The implications of this rethinking of place for place-based education are discussed.

  19. Taking charge: a personal responsibility.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, D M

    1987-01-01

    Women can adopt health practices that will help them to maintain good health throughout their various life stages. Women can take charge of their health by maintaining a nutritionally balanced diet, exercising, and using common sense. Women can also employ known preventive measures against osteoporosis, stroke, lung and breast cancer and accidents. Because women experience increased longevity and may require long-term care with age, the need for restructuring the nation's care system for the elderly becomes an important women's health concern. Adult day care centers, home health aides, and preventive education will be necessary, along with sufficient insurance to maintain quality care and self-esteem without depleting a person's resources. PMID:3120224

  20. Taking advantage of natural biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W.A.; Bartlett, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical manufacturing facility in central New Jersey evaluated alternatives to address low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater. Significant natural attenuation of VOCs was observed in groundwater, and is believed to be the result of natural biodegradation, commonly referred to as intrinsic bioremediation. A study consisting of groundwater sampling and analysis, field monitoring, and transport modeling was conducted to evaluate and confirm this phenomenon. The primary conclusion that can be drawn from the study is that observed natural attenuation of VOCs in groundwater is due to natural biodegradation. Based on the concept that natural biodegradation will minimize contaminant migration, bioventing has been implemented to remove the vadose-zone source of VOCs to groundwater. Taking advantage of natural biodegradation has resulted in significant cost savings compared to implementing a conventional groundwater pump-and-treat system, while still protecting human health and the environment.

  1. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    This is the only occasion on which all four of ESA's Cluster II spacecraft will be on display together in Europe. Four Spacecraft, One Mission The unique event takes place near the end of the lengthy assembly and test programme, during which each individual spacecraft is being assembled in sequence, one after the other. Two have already completed their assembly and systems testing and are about to be stored in special containers at IABG prior to shipment to the Baikonur launch site in Kazakhstan next spring. In the case of the other two, flight models 5 and 8, installation of the science payloads has finished, but their exhaustive series of environmental tests at IABG have yet to begin. Following delivery to the launch site next April, the satellites will be launched in pairs in June and July 2000. Two Soyuz rockets, each with a newly designed Fregat upper stage, are being provided by the Russian-French Starsem company. This will be the first time ESA satellites have been launched from the former Soviet Union. Cluster II is a replacement for the original Cluster mission, which was lost during the maiden launch of Ariane 5 in June 1996. ESA, given the mission's importance in its overall strategy in the area of the Sun-Earth connection, decided to rebuild this unique project. ESA member states supported that proposal. On 3 April 1997, the Agency's Science Programme Committee agreed. Cluster II was born. European Teamwork Scientific institutions and industrial enterprises in almost all the 14 ESA member states and the United States are taking part in the Cluster II project. Construction of the eight Cluster / Cluster II spacecraft has been a major undertaking for European industry. Built into each 1200 kg satellite are six propellant tanks, two pressure tanks, eight thrusters, 80 metres of pipework, about 5 km of wiring, 380 connectors and more than 14 000 electrical contacts. All the spacecraft were assembled in the giant clean room at the Friedrichshafen plant of

  2. Finding lichens in all the right places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The scientific process of discovery can take surprising twists.Take William Bull, a professor emeritus of geosciences at the University of Arizona, with whom Eos recently spoke. One day in December 1989, as Bull gazed across the pastoral New Zealand scenery with sheep grazing in the foreground of the Southern Alps, his paranoia led to a new discovery about how to date past earthquakes and possibly help to forecast future ground shaking.

  3. Salicylic acid and some of its derivatives as antibacterial agents for viscose fabric.

    PubMed

    Kantouch, A; El-Sayed, A Atef; Salama, M; El-Kheir, A Abou; Mowafi, S

    2013-11-01

    Salicylic acid and three of its derivatives were used to provide antibacterial properties to viscose fabrics. The four bactericides used were bonded to the viscose fabrics using epichlorohydrin or polymer binders. Optimization of the salicylic acid and its derivatives as well as the concentration of polymers was reported. The ability of the polymer binders to attract and bind the four bactericides was observed. The overall results show that the antibacterial reactivity of salicylic acid and its derivatives are in the following order 5-bromosalicylic acid>salicylic acid>5-chlorosalicylic acid>4-chlorosalicylic acid. Using epichlorohydrin as a binding agent, unfortunately, inhibits the bactericidal activity of the four bactericides. The FTIR study concludes that the reaction between salicylic acid as well as its derivatives with epichlorohydrin takes place through the phenolic group of the acids. The unexpected deterioration in the bactericidal properties of salicylic acid and its derivatives as a result of the treatment with epichlorohydrin could be due to the nature of interaction between the epichlorohydrin molecule and the acids molecules. PVP and PU show superior ability to sustain the four bactericides used even after 10 washing cycles.

  4. No More Robots: Building Kids' Character, Competence, and Sense of Place. [Re]Thinking Environmental Education. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Place-based education offers a compelling opportunity to engage students in the life of their community. More than just taking a field trip, participants in a place-based project make sustained efforts to make a difference and learn basic skills along the way. Academic concepts come to life as real-world problems are investigated from a local…

  5. Cure-in-place process for seals

    DOEpatents

    Hirasuna, Alan R.

    1981-01-01

    A cure-in-place process which allows a rubber seal element to be deformed to its service configuration before it is cross-linked and, hence, is a plastic and does not build up internal stress as a result of the deformation. This provides maximum residual strength to resist the differential pressure. Furthermore, the process allows use of high modulus formulations of the rubber seal element which would otherwise crack if cured and then deformed to its service configuration, resulting in a seal which has better gap bridging capability. Basically, the process involves positioning an uncured seal element in place, deforming it to its service configuration, heating the seal element, curing it in place, and then fully seating the seal.

  6. Place attachment among retirees in Greensburg, Kansas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Cartlidge, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    On 4 May 2007 an ef-5 tornado leveled 95 percent of Greensburg, Kansas. Because city leaders encouraged everyone to use “green” building techniques as they rebuilt their homes and businesses, not only has the return to normalcy been exceedingly slow, but some of the town's older residents feel that officials have overlooked their needs. These minor episodes of discord enabled us to learn what features are most important to people in retirement. The features include identifiable landmarks, a space in which to socialize, and age-specific businesses. We assert that the lessons learned in Greensburg are applicable to other communities with a sizable older population. As baby boomers rapidly enter retirement they will seek places to live that are elder friendly and enable them to effectively bond with place. As previous research attests, people who have a strong attachment to place commonly have a good quality of life.

  7. World grain takes a spill.

    PubMed

    Brown, L R

    1992-01-01

    World grain production decreased 5% in 1991, which combined with the 90 million in population increase resulted in a 6.4% decline/person. This is the largest drop ever recorded. Currently world production is off 9% from the all time high in 1984 of 757 pounds/person. There are many signs that this trend will continue. Soil erosion continues to decrease the amount of available farm land, irrigation water logs fields, deforestation and desertification, air pollution, acid rain and increased ultra violet light form depleting ozone are all adding to the problem. Currently in the US 28 million acres idle as part of commodity supply management and 34 million acres are designated threatened and are in Conservation Reserve. However, even with this area put into production, the total area worldwide is still smaller than it was in 1984.

  8. Hippocampal place cells, context, and episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Smith, David M; Mizumori, Sheri J Y

    2006-01-01

    Although most observers agree that the hippocampus has a critical role in learning and memory, there remains considerable debate about the precise functional contribution of the hippocampus to these processes. Two of the most influential accounts hold that the primary function of the hippocampus is to generate cognitive maps and to mediate episodic memory processes. The well-documented spatial firing patterns (place fields) of hippocampal neurons in rodents, along with the spatial learning impairments observed with hippocampal damage support the cognitive mapping hypothesis. The amnesia for personally experienced events seen in humans with hippocampal damage and the data of animal models, which show severe memory deficits associated with hippocampal lesions, support the episodic memory account. Although an extensive literature supports each of these hypotheses, a specific contribution of place cells to episodic memory has not been clearly demonstrated. Recent data from our laboratory, together with previous findings, indicate that hippocampal place fields and neuronal responses to task-relevant stimuli are highly sensitive to the context, even when the contexts are defined by abstract task demands rather than the spatial geometry of the environment. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that place fields reflect a more general context processing function of the hippocampus. Hippocampal context representations could serve to differentiate contexts and prime the relevant memories and behaviors. Since episodic memories, by definition, include information about the time and place where the episode occurred, contextual information is a necessary prerequisite for any episodic memory. Thus, place fields contribute importantly to episodic memory as part of the needed context representations. Additionally, recent findings indicate that hippocampal neurons differentiate contexts at progressively finer levels of detail, suggesting a hierarchical coding scheme which

  9. Consumer views about aging-in-place

    PubMed Central

    Grimmer, Karen; Kay, Debra; Foot, Jan; Pastakia, Khushnum

    2015-01-01

    Background Supporting older people’s choices to live safely and independently in the community (age-in-place) can maximize their quality of life and minimize unnecessary hospitalizations and residential care placement. Little is known of the views of older people about the aging-in-place process, and how they approach and prioritize the support they require to live in the community accommodation of their choice. Purpose To explore and synthesize the experiences and perspectives of older people planning for and experiencing aging-in-place. Methods Two purposively sampled groups of community-dwelling people aged 65+ years were recruited for individual interviews or focus groups. The interviews were semistructured, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Themes were identified by three researchers working independently, then in consort, using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Forty-two participants provided a range of insights about, and strategies for, aging-in-place. Thematic saturation was reached before the final interviews. We identified personal characteristics (resilience, adaptability, and independence) and key elements of successful aging-in-place, summarized in the acronym HIPFACTS: health, information, practical assistance, finance, activity (physical and mental), company (family, friends, neighbors, pets), transport, and safety. Discussion This paper presents rich, and rarely heard, older people’s views about how they and their peers perceive, characterize, and address changes in their capacity to live independently and safely in the community. Participants identified relatively simple, low-cost, and effective supports to enable them to adapt to change, while retaining independence and resilience. The findings highlighted how successful aging-in-place requires integrated, responsive, and accessible primary health and community services. PMID:26604723

  10. Homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation in water-dicarboxylic acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    Binary heterogeneous nucleation of water-succinic/glutaric/malonic/adipic acid on nanometer-sized particles is investigated within the frame of classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. Homogeneous nucleation is also included for comparison. It is found that the nucleation probabilities depend on the contact angle and on the size of the seed particles. New thermodynamical properties, such as saturation vapor pressure, density and surface tension for all the dicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions are included in the calculations. While the new surface tension and density formulations do not bring any significant difference in the computed nucleation rate for homogeneous nucleation for succinic and glutaric acids, the use of the newly derived equations for the vapor pressure decrease the acid concentrations in gas phase by 3 orders of magnitude. According to our calculations, the binary heterogeneous nucleation of succinic acid-water and glutaric acid-water - although it requires a 3-4 orders of magnitude lower vapor concentrations than the homogeneous nucleation - cannot take place under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand binary homogeneous nucleation of adipic acid-water systems might be possible under conditions occuring in upper boundary layer. However, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between the surface and the molecules of the nucleating vapor should be considered in the future.

  11. Modeling of Nearshore-Placed Dredged Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Research Program Modeling of Nearshore- Placed Dredged Material Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Ernest R. Smith, Rusty Permenter...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling of Nearshore- Placed Dredged Material 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S

  12. Chromotropic acid-formaldehyde reaction in strongly acidic media. The role of dissolved oxygen and replacement of concentrated sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Fagnani, E; Melios, C B; Pezza, L; Pezza, H R

    2003-05-28

    The procedure for formaldehyde analysis recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is the Chromotropic acid spectrophotometric method, which is the one that uses concentrated sulphuric acid. In the present study the oxidation step associated with the aforementioned method for formaldehyde determination was investigated. Experimental evidence has been obtained indicating that when concentrated H(2)SO(4) (18 mol l(-1)) is used (as in the NIOSH procedure) that acid is the oxidizing agent. On the other hand, oxidation through dissolved oxygen takes place when concentrated H(2)SO(4) is replaced by concentrated hydrochloric (12 mol l(-1)) and phosphoric (14.7 mol l(-1)) acids as well as by diluted H(2)SO(4) (9.4 mol l(-1)). Based on investigations concerning the oxidation step, a modified procedure was devised, in which the use of the potentially hazardous and corrosive concentrated H(2)SO(4) was eliminated and advantageously replaced by a less harmful mixture of HCl and H(2)O(2).

  13. Apollo - Lunar Take Off Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Lunar Take Off Simulator: This simulator is used by scientists at the Langley Research Center ... to help determine human ability to control a lunar launch vehicle in vertical alignment during takeoff from the moon for rendezvous with a lunar satellite vehicle on the return trip to earth. The three-axis chair, a concept which allows the pilot to sit upright during launch, gives the navigator angular motion (pitch, role, and yaw) cues as he operates the vehicle through a sidearm control system. The sight apparatus in front of the pilot's face enables him to align the vehicle on a course toward a chosen star, which will be followed as a guidance reference during the lunar launch. The pilot's right hand controls angular motions, while his left hand manipulates the thrust lever. The simulator is designed for operation inside an artificial planetarium, where a star field will be projected against the ceiling during 'flights'. The tests are part of an extensive NASA program at Langley in the study of problems relating to a manned lunar mission. (From a NASA Langley, photo release caption.)

  14. Place knowing of persons and populations: restoring the place work of nursing.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Place emerges when space acquires definition in social constructions of meaning as landscape-languages, which reflect assumptions about physical and social realities. The place work of nursing, which resonated throughout Nightingale's work and the profession's evolution, focuses on human health and healing in the historical transitions and landscape-languages of populations. However, evidence-based practice dominated by empirical knowing inadequately addresses complex health and illness dynamics between place and populations. Translating evidence to the life course experiences of individuals and populations requires place knowing of human situated embodiment within discrete space. An exploration of the concept of place, its application to nursing, and the need for a place paradigm for practice is presented. A sense of salience and situated cognition has been identified as the essential element of the transformation needed in the education of nurses. Place knowing integrates other patterns of knowing (empirical, ethical, aesthetical, personal, unknowing, sociopolitical, and emancipatory) in a situated cognition. Place knowing, like other established patterns of knowing, is a significant epistemological foundation of nursing. Place knowing allows the nuanced intricately complex dynamics of embodied situated human health and illness to be examined, the salience of the particulars to be considered, and the whole of the landscape-languages to emerge.

  15. Exploring the Place of Exemplary Science Teaching. This Year in School Science 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley-Oliphant, Ann E., Ed.

    Exemplary science teaching is an experience that fosters wonder, excitement, and risk-taking. This book presents essays which attempt to describe the culture of classrooms of exemplary science teachers. Chapter titles are: "Exploring the Place of Exemplary Science Teaching" (Ann E. Haley-Oliphant); "The Voices of Exemplary Science Teachers" (Ann…

  16. 41 CFR 105-68.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... information into the EPLS? 105-68.520 Section 105-68.520 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General... System § 105-68.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions...

  17. 26 CFR 301.7605-1 - Time and place of examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Discovery of Liability and Enforcement of Title... will take into account the following factors— (i) The location of the taxpayer's current residence; (ii) The location of the taxpayer's current principal place of business; (iii) The location at which...

  18. 19 CFR 4.3 - Vessels required to enter; place of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the customhouse, and services may be requested outside of normal business hours. Customs may take... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessels required to enter; place of entry. 4.3 Section 4.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY;...

  19. Toward a Civic Rhetoric for Technologically and Scientifically Complex Places: Invention, Performance, and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, W. Michele; Grabill, Jeffrey T.

    2007-01-01

    The spaces in which public deliberation most often takes place are institutionally, technologically, and scientifically complex. In this article, we argue that in order to participate, citizens must be able to invent valued knowledge. This invention requires using complex information technologies to access, assemble, and analyze information in…

  20. A Researcher "Called" to "Taboo" Places?: A Burgeoning Research Method in African-Centered Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockley, Kmt G.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a self-reflexive analysis of the complexities of conducting Afrocentric education research while living with a "double consciousness." Having been "called" to places that are considered to be "taboo" the author takes readers on a journey that begins in his busy mind and ends in on the African continent in a "rabbit hole."…

  1. 28 CFR 2.47 - Warrant placed as a detainer and dispositional review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dispositional review. 2.47 Section 2.47 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE... serving a new sentence in a federal, state or local institution, a parole violation warrant may be placed... section, the Commission may take any action specified in § 2.52. (e)(1) A parole violator whose parole...

  2. 28 CFR 2.47 - Warrant placed as a detainer and dispositional review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dispositional review. 2.47 Section 2.47 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE... serving a new sentence in a federal, state or local institution, a parole violation warrant may be placed... section, the Commission may take any action specified in § 2.52. (e)(1) A parole violator whose parole...

  3. A Critical Language Policy of Place: Framing an Ecological Perspective in Language Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantero, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    This paper stresses the importance of enacting positive transformation in language policy and planning in the United States as delineated by the idea of radical localism and supported by a critical pedagogy of place. Initially, I ask the following questions: Does NCLB impact opportunities for English language learners to take part in their…

  4. The Place of Literature in an English Language Teaching Program: What Do Students Think about It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tehan, Patricia; Yuksel, Dogan; Inan, Banu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes and opinions of students towards the use and place of literature course in language teaching. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 3 groups of students: (a) the students who had not taken any literature courses before (n = 7), (b) the students who were taking a literature course at the time of the…

  5. Embodied Experiences of Place: A Study of History Learning with Mobile Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, S.; Jewitt, C.; Sakr, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an empirical study that takes a multimodal analytical approach to examine how mobile technologies shape students' exploration and experience of place during a history learning activity in situ. In history education, mobile technologies provide opportunities for authentic experiential learning activities that have the potential…

  6. Places as Recovery Machines: Vulnerability and Neighborhood Change after Major Hurricanes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pais, Jeremy F.; Elliott, James R.

    2008-01-01

    This study advances a conceptual framework for understanding the transformation of places into recovery machines after major hurricanes. This framework contends that in the years following such disasters, pro-growth coalitions take advantage of new sources of material and symbolic capital to promote further demographic growth. It also contends…

  7. The physical and chemical characteristics of particles in indoor air where high fluoride coal burning takes place

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, S.L.; Ji, R.D.; Cao, S.R. )

    1990-12-01

    In China, more than 10 million people suffer from fluorosis caused by the burning of high fluoride coal. Analysis of the particulate matters of indoor air from these fluorosis areas reveals a logarithmic distribution of particle sizes. The levels of F- and SO4(2-) adsorbed or absorbed on the particles ranged from 16.27 to 46.18 micrograms/m3 and from 244.7 to 374.6 micrograms/m3, respectively. Gaseous and soluble fluorides constituted a considerable proportion of the inorganic fluorides. Nevertheless, the level of F- in air was considered to be inadequate to cause the observed severity of fluorosis. It is speculated that additional intake of F- from contaminated foods might also be a major factor contributing to the fluorosis. Additionally, some volatile elements (e.g., sulfur and its derivatives) might have some relation to fluorosis of this type.

  8. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... succeeding or the immediately preceding taxable year in applying these tests. For example, if with respect to... 50-percent or the 85-percent foreign direct cost test. The activities comprising these economic... or indirect subcontractor of a person under contract with the FSC. For example, assume that a...

  9. To 'take their place among the productive members of society': Vocational rehabilitation of WWI wounded at Erskine

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In 1916, the foundation of the Princess Louise Scottish Hospital for Limbless Sailors and Soldiers (still in existence today as Erskine), on the banks of the River Clyde in Scotland, was a direct response to the need for specialised medical facilities to deal with the unprecedented number of injured service personnel returning from the Great War. At the hospital, the West of Scotland medical and industrial communities came together to mend broken bodies with prosthetic technology, as well as physical and mental rehabilitation to prepare the limbless to re-enter the job market. This paper explores the establishment of manual therapy workshops at Erskine and how such programmes of vocational rehabilitation were culturally informed by the concerns and anxieties of both the military and civilian populations of the First World War-era. PMID:28286873

  10. The Learner, the Media and the Community: How Does Learning Take Place in the Other CALL Triangle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockett, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    In this research project, students in applied linguistics were asked to keep blogs over a three-month period in which they reported on their online informal learning of English through activities such as social networking, downloading films and TV series and listening to music on demand. The study is situated within the framework of complexity…

  11. 76 FR 40697 - Water and Wastewater Trade Mission to Australia Taking Place September 12-15, 2011; Now Opened to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... September 12-15, 2011, to help U.S. firms find business partners and sell equipment and services in Sydney... Australia through one-on-one meetings with potential partners, and through establishing long-term business... Department of Commerce official and will include business- to-business matchmaking with local...

  12. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or more of the foreign trading gross receipts of the product or product line grouping during the current year or (ii) 50 percent or more of the foreign trading gross receipts of the product or product... States. (a) In general. Section 924(b)(1)(B) provides that a FSC has foreign trading gross receipts...

  13. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or more of the foreign trading gross receipts of the product or product line grouping during the current year or (ii) 50 percent or more of the foreign trading gross receipts of the product or product... States. (a) In general. Section 924(b)(1)(B) provides that a FSC has foreign trading gross receipts...

  14. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Management and Budget, Executive Office of the President. (ii) Customer groupings. A customer grouping... customers. Through its existing agreements with a domestic unrelated person, the related supplier... requirements of section 924(d)(1)(A). For example, if a FSC sells a product to a foreign customer by...

  15. The Investigation of Mobbing Events Taking Place at Higher Education Institutions in Turkey Considering the Reflections on Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çubukçu, Zühal; Girmen, Pinar; Dönmez, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    The business-life related competition established in modern communities has also brought about some other problems. The attacks and intimidation attempts have introduced the term of "mobbing" which is defined as regular and continuous psychological violence faced by people always trying to produce and win from those who they work with.…

  16. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-percent foreign direct cost test on the basis of other types of groupings, such as all transactions with... 50-percent or the 85-percent foreign direct cost test. The activities comprising these economic processes may be performed by the FSC or by any other person acting under contract with the FSC....

  17. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... is a single-toilet room, having a full-length privacy door, within which urination can occur. (1) No... include is a multistall restroom. (1) Such a site must provide substantial visual privacy (e.g., a toilet..., a mobile facility (e.g., a van), a dedicated collection facility, or any other location meeting...

  18. The Bay in Place of a Glacier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Wayne

    1997-01-01

    The cultural resource specialist at Glacier Bay National Park (Alaska) explains the collaborative efforts of park staff and the Hoonah Tlingit to overcome language and cultural barriers in documenting park place names and clan oral history and traditions. The new park-community relationship, which follows decades of conflict, includes training…

  19. Viewing Places: Students as Visual Ethnographers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a micro-ethnographic study that took place during a summer research course for six undergraduate and four graduate students majoring in the disciplines of architecture, art education, geography, landscape architecture and an integrative arts program. The research sought to implement ethnographic, visual methods as a means to…

  20. Video Games and the Pedagogy of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article the author explores the construction of place within virtual worlds and, in particular, in video games that appeal widely to children and youths. With the notable exception of "edutainment" titles, gaming and education have traditionally been viewed as separate pursuits. Yet, after school, millions of children and teens spend…

  1. Indian Place Names in South Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasque, Thomas J.

    A cursory examination of place names on a map of South Dakota does not reflect the important role that Indians have played in the state and their relation to the land framed by its borders. Only three towns with populations over 1,000 bear names that clearly come from Indian languages: Sioux Falls, Sisseton, and Yankton. The hostile relationship…

  2. Knowing Our Place in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2004-01-01

    In many areas of the country, career and technical education programs are connecting learning with the resources, culture, history and people of the places where they are based. They are also forging a special connection between education and the needs of the community. Two such programs are discussed in this article. In the first example,…

  3. Embodied Reimagining of Pedagogical Places/Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Shilpi; Bryzzheva, Lyudmila

    2012-01-01

    Students often find themselves disconnected from foundations courses such as Philosophy of Education, citing the abstract nature of some of the ideas studied and a perceived disconnect from practical issues. Moreover, the place/space of the university classroom itself can be seen to contribute to students' disengagement and stunting of their…

  4. Reframing Primary Curriculum through Concepts of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Kerith; Green, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Australian curricula name "sustainability" as a key priority area with implications for preparing pre-service teachers. In the research that generated this paper, we asked: How can framing teaching through space and place inform pre-service teachers' pedagogical thinking and practice? In new third year Bachelor of Education (primary)…

  5. Evaluation Criteria for the Places of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the concept of school library as a place of learning for students. He contends that a school library must be conceived in terms of three aspects. First, it should have a creative school library media specialist to lead the principal through a meaningful vision of what the library could be in terms of…

  6. Place-pitch manipulations with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Macherey, Olivier; Carlyon, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Pitch can be conveyed to cochlear implant (CI) listeners via both place of excitation and temporal cues. The transmission of place cues may be hampered by several factors including limitations on the insertion depth and number of implanted electrodes, and the broad current spread produced by monopolar stimulation. The following series of experiments investigate several methods to partially overcome these limitations. Experiment 1 compares two recently published techniques that aim to activate more apical fibers than produced by monopolar or bipolar stimulation of the most apical contacts. The first technique (phantom stimulation) manipulates the current spread by simultaneously stimulating two electrodes with opposite-polarity pulses of different amplitudes. The second technique manipulates the neural spread of excitation by using asymmetric pulses and exploiting the polarity-sensitive properties of auditory nerve fibers. The two techniques yielded similar results and were shown to produce lower place pitch percepts than stimulation of monopolar and bipolar symmetric pulses. Furthermore, combining these two techniques may be advantageous in a clinical setting. Experiment 2 proposes a novel method to create place pitches intermediate to those produced by physical electrodes by using charge-balanced asymmetric pulses in bipolar mode with different degrees of asymmetry. PMID:22423718

  7. The Place of Emotion in Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Jeanette M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Two studies examined the place of emotion in self-construct models. The first presented three categories of adolescent identity types: connected, contracted, and expanded. The second verified that the contracted and expanded categories were more typical of adolescents than of children or adults. (MDM)

  8. Parentally Placed Private School Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopko, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    This document focuses on state education agency (SEA) support for child find, consultation and provision of equitable service provisions for parentally placed private school students with disabilities. Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) completed this activity as part of its cooperative…

  9. The Barnes Foundation: A Place for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Rika

    2007-01-01

    This article tells the story of the author's invitation to teach at the Barnes Foundation, and her transformative experience as a teacher in this extraordinary place. The author comes to realize that the Barnes is the physical realization of a philosophical dream, and progresses to an understanding of how Albert C. Barnes collected and assembled…

  10. The Family Place Children's Therapeutic Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLange, Christine

    1986-01-01

    Describes the children's therapeutic program at The Family Place (a shelter for victims of family violence), designed to provide children with positive role models, positive experiences, and healthy alternatives to dealing with frustration and anger. The program has three major components: crisis intervention activities, remedial activities, and…

  11. In-Time On-Place Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauters, Merja; Purma, Jukka; Leinonen, Teemu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this short paper is to look at how mobile video recording devices could support learning related to physical practices or places and situations at work. This paper discusses particular kind of workplace learning, namely learning using short video clips that are related to physical environment and tasks preformed in situ. The paper…

  12. Good Jobs--but Places for Women?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Pat

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with men and women's experience of elite positions and with the extent to which such positions are seen as places for women, so as to provide an insight into their commitment to continuing in them. Senior management in universities are elite positions in terms of income; those who occupy them are relatively powerful…

  13. Is There a Place for Character Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasy, Kim L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends in school curricula place a heavy focus on the improvement of basic skills test scores. As a result, the role of character education has been diminished. This article provides a rationale for the incorporation of a character education program within the school curricula, a working definition of character education, and the role of…

  14. Changing Places: Resilience in Children Who Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Christine; Heriot, Sandra; Hunt, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) show that more than 40 per cent of Australian children moved their place of residence at least once in the Census period from 1996 to 2001 (ABS, 2001a). The literature varies in its assessment of the impact that this has on children. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations…

  15. "Place" Value: The Rural Perspective. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Vena; Bush, William S.; Theobald, Paul

    Place-based, or "contextualized," mathematics instruction gives learners the opportunity to see how mathematics is relevant to their lives. Such opportunities are crucial to the success of students in rural settings and may be crucial to the survival of rural communities. For the last half century, schools have educated rural children to believe…

  16. Places to Go: YouTube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Founded in 2005 by three former PayPal employees, YouTube has revolutionized the Internet, marking a change from the static Internet to the dynamic Internet. In this edition of Places to Go, Stephen Downes discusses how the rise of a ubiquitous media format--Flash video--has made YouTube's success possible and argues that Flash video has important…

  17. Sense of Place in Child Care Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Marilyn A.

    2007-01-01

    The exterior design of existing preschool environments is evaluated in the context of contemporary writings by architects focusing on creating designs that nurture children's emotions. Sense of place research is discussed in relation to young children's experiences. Findings reveal that the majority of sites included in the study incorporated many…

  18. The National Register of Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed

    2002-01-01

    This journal contains articles and materials to help teachers instruct students about U.S. historical and cultural heritage. Articles and materials are: "The National Register of Historic Places Today" (C. D. Shull); "The (Economic) Value of National Register Listing" (D. D. Rypkema); "The National Register and Heritage…

  19. Making Sense of Place: Sarah's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Jennifer H.

    2008-01-01

    Written from the vantage point of both a mother and teacher educator, the author recounts the journey taken by Sarah, her 4-year old daughter, as she is introduced to and explores map making as a means of representing and making sense of familiar and unfamiliar places. Offering Sarah's experience as context, the author offers both a practical and…

  20. Maggie's Place III: An Electronic Library Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Gitte

    1988-01-01

    Describes the services offered by Maggie's Place, one of the first fully automated libraries in the world. Topics covered include the online catalog; automated technical processes; dial-up access for patrons; community information databases; and online access to U.S. and international library network services. (five references) (CLB)

  1. Jamestown and Disneyland: Two Places in Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrofani, E. Robert; Tideman, Robert

    This unit for high school students uses two dissimilar places in time; (2) Jamestown, Virginia, founded in 1607, one of the earliest settlements in the United States and (2) Disneyland, California, built in 1956, an institution of contemporary culture. The lessons address two fundamental questions in geography: (1) where? and (2) why here rather…

  2. Finding Your Place in Art History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lauren Parmelee

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art history project used with fifth-grade students where they selected a famous painting as a background for a self-portrait. Explains how the students used Adobe Photoshop to place a digital photograph of themselves into a scanned image of the artwork. (CMK)

  3. Critical Caring for People and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindel, Alexandra; Tolbert, Sara

    2017-01-01

    What role does caring play in environmental education? The development of caring relationships in formal school settings remains a foundational yet underexamined concept in environmental education research. This study examines the role of caring relationships between people and place in an urban high school in the United States. We draw upon…

  4. Place Names in Foreign Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hugo

    1978-01-01

    Students find place names--and their origins--interesting. A number of German examples are given, ranging from the Familiar Koeln (Colonia) and Koblenz (Confluentes) to the less familiar Wien ( Celtic vindos, "white water") and Weimar (wihmari, sacred swamp). (WGA)

  5. The Power of Place in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Richard A.; Bennett, Scott

    2005-01-01

    The commonly-used expression "going to college" affirms that higher education is still rooted in place. Our institutions have three cultures in which learners physically immerse themselves: collegiate culture (a generational culture); academic culture (an intellectual culture); and campus culture (an institutional culture). Other agents--the armed…

  6. What a Queer Place Is School!?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    lisahunter,

    2012-01-01

    Schools are queer places. Who would have thought that a book focusing on gender and sexual diversity in schools would even be necessary today? But in a time where education seems to have regressed in its liberalism, coupled with increased accessibility to information and knowledge, Elizabeth Meyer's Gender and Sexual Diversity in Schools: An…

  7. Case study of McCormick place cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Overstreet, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    In the authors business of providing district energy services, competition is the key to his being able to have a positive impact on the environment, business stability, and economic activity. In the district energy industry, the competitive options are for property owners to continue to self generate energy to meet their needs, purchase energy from a company that utilizes electricity during off-peak hours to produce chilled water or take advantage of a total solution of purchasing tri-generation energy from Trigen-Peoples District Energy Company. Tri-generation is an innovative technology which involves the simultaneous production of steam, chilled water, and electricity. The McCormick Place cogeneration project calls for producing steam and chilled water (co-) for use by the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority (MPEA). The plant will produce electricity (tri-) to run the production equipment.

  8. Looking for Planets in all the Right Places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-05-01

    Gravitational lensing has the potential to discover planets in orbits of all sizes, orbiting both nearby and distant stars. Until recently, however, searches for planets via lensing have been conducted by programs best suited to finding only a subset of planetary lenses. During the past year several new approaches have been developed, including searches for small periodic signals near baseline, and monitoring nearby stars. By taking these approaches, we will extend our search for planets to *all* the right places, and will increase the discovery rate. In addition, the extended lensing searches will discover nearby planetary systems that can subsequently be observed using the full range of planet-study techniques, including transit and radial velocity studies as well as direct imaging. I will talk about the theory and also about preliminary results from our monitoring of the first predicted lensing event for evidence of planets orbiting the nearby dwarf star VB 10.

  9. ROCKETS OR JATO JET ASSISTED TAKE OFF UNITS AT THE HIGH PRESSURE COMBUSTION FACILITY - STATIC FIRING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1946-01-01

    ROCKETS OR JATO JET ASSISTED TAKE OFF UNITS AT THE HIGH PRESSURE COMBUSTION FACILITY - STATIC FIRING OF NITRIC ACID ANILINE ROCKET - PERMANGANATE PER OXIDE ROCKET SETUP INCLUDING TWO VIEWS THROUGH CONTROL ROOM SAFETY WINDOW

  10. Denmark's Boernehavens: A Place to Grow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mecham, Neil A.

    2010-01-01

    During the author's trips to Denmark as an instructor of American college students studying abroad, he led groups to visit several "boernehavens," which are the Danish equivalents of U.S. preschools for children ages 3 to 5. Danish society values confident individuals who can take initiative when faced with challenges and opportunities.…

  11. Nucleic acids and endosomal pattern recognition: how to tell friend from foe?

    PubMed

    Brencicova, Eva; Diebold, Sandra S

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system has evolved endosomal and cytoplasmic receptors for the detection of viral nucleic acids as sensors for virus infection. Some of these pattern recognition receptors (PRR) detect features of viral nucleic acids that are not found in the host such as long stretches of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and uncapped single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in case of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and RIG-I, respectively. In contrast, TLR7/8 and TLR9 are unable to distinguish between viral and self-nucleic acids on the grounds of distinct molecular patterns. The ability of these endosomal TLR to act as PRR for viral nucleic acids seems to rely solely on the mode of access to the endolysosomal compartment in which recognition takes place. The current dogma states that self-nucleic acids do not enter the TLR-sensing compartment under normal physiological conditions. However, it is still poorly understood how dendritic cells (DC) evade activation by self-nucleic acids, in particular with regard to specific DC subsets, which are specialized in taking up material from dying cells for cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens. In this review we discuss the current understanding of how the immune system distinguishes between foreign and self-nucleic acids and point out some of the key aspects that still require further research and clarification.

  12. My Place in My World: Literature for Place-Based Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Rachael; Zeece, Pauline Davey

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how children can learn about environmental sciences through place-based education and children's literature. Recent studies suggest that there is a lack of environmental science knowledge among citizens of all ages. Scholars and educators recommend introducing young children to the places in which they live to create an…

  13. Apply an Augmented Reality in a Mobile Guidance to Increase Sense of Place for Heritage Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Lien; Hou, Huei-Tse; Pan, Chao-Yang; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    Based on the sense of place theory and the design principles of guidance and interpretation, this study developed an augmented reality mobile guidance system that used a historical geo-context-embedded visiting strategy. This tool for heritage guidance and educational activities enhanced visitor sense of place. This study consisted of 3 visitor…

  14. "My Place": Exploring Children's Place-Related Identities through Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Emma; Cliff Hodges, Gabrielle; Pointon, Pam; Nikolajeva, Maria; Spring, Erin; Taylor, Liz; Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how children perceive and represent their placed-related identities through reading and writing. It reports on the findings of an 18-month interdisciplinary project, based at Cambridge University Faculty of Education, which aimed to consider children's place-related identities through their engagement with, and creation of,…

  15. Taking medicines - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine you take. Know what medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements you take. Make a list of your medicines ... Will this medicine change how any of my herbal or dietary supplements work? Ask if your new medicine interferes with ...

  16. Taking your blood pressure at home (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly. Compare your home machine with the one at your ... sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly. Compare your home machine with the one at your ...

  17. Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums Browse Sections The Basics Overview Take Action! Brushing ... only in moderation. What causes tooth decay and gum disease? Plaque (“plak”) is a sticky substance that ...

  18. Taking Medicines Safely: Ask Your Pharmacist

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Ask Your Pharmacist Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... brand name medicine. What About Over-The-Counter Medicines? Be careful when taking an OTC drug. For ...

  19. Achievement Place: development of the elected manager system1

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elery L.; Phillips, Elaine A.; Wolf, Montrose M.; Fixsen, Dean L.

    1973-01-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to compare several administrative systems at Achievement Place, a family style behavior modification program for pre-delinquent boys. One aspect of the motivation system at Achievement Place was the token economy in which the youths could earn or lose points that could be exchanged for privileges. Several arrangements for assigning routine tasks and for providing token consequences for task performance were compared for their effectiveness in accomplishing the tasks and for their preference by the boys. The independent variables studied included: (1) individually assigned tasks versus group assigned tasks; (2) consequences for individual performance versus consequences for group performance; (3) a peer managership that could be earned by the highest bidder versus a peer managership that could be determined democratically by the peers. The results suggested that among those systems studied the system that best met the criteria of effectiveness and preference involved a democratically elected peer manager who had the authority both to give and to take away points for his peers' performances. PMID:16795439

  20. Refashioning One’s Place in Time: Stories of Household Downsizing in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Luborsky, Mark R.; Lysack, Catherine L.; Van Nuil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Older adults face a daunting task: while continuing engagements in multiple relationships, investment in their own and others’ futures, and developing life interests and capacities, they also reexamine and sometimes reconfigure the place where their social lives and objects are housed. Some relocate, downsize, to a new smaller place and reducing possessions to ensure an environment supportive of their capacities and desired daily activities. This article examines how key contours of the experiences of place during residential downsizing are infused with unexpectedly heightened awareness and cultivation of one’s sense of place in multiple timeframes. In a discovery mode, the downsizing stories of 40 older adults in southeast Michigan are examined. Findings indicate conflicting temporalities and the natures of cognitions related to decision-making and thinking about being leave-taking and being in place. Findings also highlight in particular how making sense of one’s place is predicated on notions of its time, of being on time and downsizing on time. Further, these characterizations of the lived worlds of older adults’ modes of conceptualizing the nature of downsizing show how an understanding of the meaningfulness of place in later life relocations requires a layered sense of home as places-in multiple timelines. PMID:21765597

  1. Refashioning One's Place in Time: Stories of Household Downsizing in Later Life.

    PubMed

    Luborsky, Mark R; Lysack, Catherine L; Van Nuil, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    Older adults face a daunting task: while continuing engagements in multiple relationships, investment in their own and others' futures, and developing life interests and capacities, they also reexamine and sometimes reconfigure the place where their social lives and objects are housed. Some relocate, downsize, to a new smaller place and reducing possessions to ensure an environment supportive of their capacities and desired daily activities. This article examines how key contours of the experiences of place during residential downsizing are infused with unexpectedly heightened awareness and cultivation of one's sense of place in multiple timeframes. In a discovery mode, the downsizing stories of 40 older adults in southeast Michigan are examined. Findings indicate conflicting temporalities and the natures of cognitions related to decision-making and thinking about being leave-taking and being in place. Findings also highlight in particular how making sense of one's place is predicated on notions of its time, of being on time and downsizing on time. Further, these characterizations of the lived worlds of older adults' modes of conceptualizing the nature of downsizing show how an understanding of the meaningfulness of place in later life relocations requires a layered sense of home as places-in multiple timelines.

  2. [Amino acid chloramines and chlorimines as antiplatelet agents: reactive properties and mechanism of action].

    PubMed

    Murina, M A; Roshchupkin, D I; Petrova, A O; Sergienko, V I

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modifications of thiols, disulfide, and thioester atomic groups in proteins, peptides, and amino acids induced by chloramines or chloramine derivatives of amino acids and other reactive oxidants are considered. In the case of disulfide and thiol groups, production of sulfur-reactive groups may take place, such as disulphide S-oxides and sulphenic groups. Various chloramines and chloramines differently modify sulfur-containing groups. For example, N,N-dichlorotaurine rapidly modifies the thiolgroup in reduced glutathione and N-chloroglycine readily oxidizes the thioester group in methionine. Amino acid chloramines inhibit platelet aggregation by modifying S-containing centres. Autodecay of amino acid chloramines does not affect aggregation as follows from the absence of positive correlation between chloramines decay rate and antiplatelet activity. N,N-dichlorotaurine and its chlorimine derivatives are characterized by high stability and have good prospects as potential antiaggregants.

  3. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  4. 50 CFR 216.11 - Prohibited taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS... jurisdiction of the United States to take any marine mammal on the high seas, or (b) Any person, vessel, or conveyance to take any marine mammal in waters or on lands under the jurisdiction of the United States, or...

  5. 50 CFR 216.11 - Prohibited taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS... jurisdiction of the United States to take any marine mammal on the high seas, or (b) Any person, vessel, or conveyance to take any marine mammal in waters or on lands under the jurisdiction of the United States, or...

  6. 50 CFR 216.11 - Prohibited taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS... jurisdiction of the United States to take any marine mammal on the high seas, or (b) Any person, vessel, or conveyance to take any marine mammal in waters or on lands under the jurisdiction of the United States, or...

  7. 50 CFR 18.11 - Prohibited taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MARINE MAMMALS Prohibitions § 18.11 Prohibited taking. Except as otherwise provided in... subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to take any marine mammal on the high seas, or (b) Any person, vessel, or conveyance to take any marine mammal in waters or on lands under the jurisdiction...

  8. 50 CFR 216.11 - Prohibited taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS... jurisdiction of the United States to take any marine mammal on the high seas, or (b) Any person, vessel, or conveyance to take any marine mammal in waters or on lands under the jurisdiction of the United States, or...

  9. Being there: the library as place*

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Frieda

    2004-01-01

    The value of the library as place is examined in this Janet Doe Lecture. The lecture, which is intended to focus on the history or philosophy of health sciences librarianship, presents an overview of the library as a place in society from ancient times to the present. The impact of information technology and changes in the methods of scholarly publication from print to digital are addressed as well as the role of the library as the repository of the written historical record of cultures. Functions and services of libraries are discussed in light of the physical library facility of the future. Finally, librarians are asked to remember the enduring values of librarianship in planning libraries of the future. PMID:14762459

  10. Burial at Srebrenica: linking place and trauma.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Craig Evan

    2003-02-01

    Five years after the massacre at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Herzegovina, survivors were faced with the decision: where did they want their loved ones buried? This report explores the reasons for their choice in qualitative interviews with 37 survivors of the massacre and 22 key informants performed over the summer 2000. Survivors wanted the loved ones buried at Potocari, a site just outside of Srebrenica, because it represented the site of ultimate horror, was connected to their sense of home, and underscored the various power relationships. The data points to the importance of place for health. Trauma, as it occurs in particular locations, breaks the sense of attachment to a particular place. Restoring the physical and social environment through burial and memorials mitigates the consequences of the trauma. The burial at Potocari provides a window into the mourning, politics, and recovery after mass violence.

  11. Forwardly-placed firearm fire control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frickey, Steven J.

    2001-12-22

    A firearm fire control assembly for disposition in a forwardly placed support-hand operative relationship within a firearm having a combination of a firing pin and a firearm hammer adapted to engage and fire a cartridge, a sear assembly to alternately engage and disengage the combination of the firearm hammer and firing pin, and a trigger assembly including a movable trigger mechanism that is operable to engage the sear assembly to cause the firearm hammer firing pin combination to fire the firearm, a fire control assembly including a fire control depression member and a fire control rod operably connected to the depression member, and being positioned in a forward disposition disposed within a forestock of the firearm, and the depression member adapted to be operably engaged and depressed by the user's conventional forwardly placed support hand to maneuver the fire control rod to provide firing control of the firing of the firearm.

  12. Place attachment and disasters: Knowns and unknowns.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mehdi; Nejat, Ali

    When considering the factors important for disaster recovery, one must consider the attachment individuals have toward their living area. This article reviews and synthesizes the current literature on the determinants of place attachment in the context of postdisaster recovery. Although the majority of the reviewed articles focused on disaster recovery, there were some which had a broader scope and were included due to their importance. This research categorizes the determinants of place attachment into four categories: demographic, socioeconomic, spatial, and psychosocial. Age, ethnicity, and religion were grouped under the category of demographics. Job status, education, and property ownership were categorized under the socioeconomic category. Attachment to home, neighborhood, and city, together with attachment to rural and urban areas, were grouped under the spatial category. Finally, mental health status and community attachment were classified under the psychosocial heading. Based on the outcome of the aforementioned synthesis, this article develops a conceptual framework to guide future research.

  13. In-place testing summary - 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, J.P.

    1990-05-01

    This is one of several reports concerning an on-going in-place testing program of high efficiency filtration and chemical adsorber systems and portable filtered exhausters at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This testing is in support of the Laboratory`s airborne waste management programs and asbestos abatement programs. Periodic in-place testing, along with health physics air sampling will determine whether the air cleaning systems are maintaining acceptable air-cleaning levels. These periodic evaluations help ensure that the plant and surrounding environment are free of any significant radioactive particulates, based on current EPA environmental levels and chemical airborne hazards from processing effluents. This report will provide an overview of system performance, testing methods and procedures.

  14. Readers of narratives take the protagonist's geographical perspective. Evidence from an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    García-Marco, Enrique; Beltrán, David; León, Inmaculada; de Vega, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    This ERP study explores how the reader's brain is sensitive to the protagonist's perspective in the fictitious environment of narratives. Participants initially received narratives describing a protagonist living in a given geographical place. Later on they were given short paragraphs describing another character as "coming" or "going" to a place either close to or distant from the protagonist. Paragraphs referring to distant places elicited larger negative waves than those with places close to the protagonist. Moreover, narratives with the verb to come incoherent with the protagonist's perspective (e.g., "she came to the distant place") elicited larger negative-going waves in the 320-400ms time window than coherent paragraphs (e.g., "she came to the close place"). These results indicate that readers of narratives were able to take the protagonist's geographical perspective, showing discourse-level coherence effects when they read motion sentences with the marked deictic verb to come.

  15. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  16. The Young Men of Marram Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Diana Armatage

    2010-01-01

    Bucky is 29 years old. Jesse is 27 is years old. Paul is 23 years old. They have lived together at Marram Place, a four-bedroom house, for over a year and have become best friends. Each works 20 hours per week in the community for his own spending money. After work, the guys walk, swim, work on computers, help with the housework, deliver a…

  17. In-place filter testing summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, J.P.; Garcia, E.D.; Ortega, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The most common method of identifying particle penetration through a filter or adsorber system is through the performance of a periodic penetration test, i.e., in-place test or leak test using an aerosol or gas vapor to challenge the filter or adsorber system. The aerosol is usually formed by vaporization of a liquid, di-2(ethelhexyl sebacate) (DEHS), and allowed to condense to form liquid particles of a certain size and distribution. The gas vapor is formed by vaporization of Freon 11 liquid. The periodic penetration test, although conducted annually, can and has been demonstrated to show the beginning degradation of a filter or adsorber system. Other evidence of penetration can include detection of radiation downstream of the filter system or the existence of an unusually low pressure drop across the filter, i.e., torn filter, etc. However, these kinds of occurrences show up instantaneously and could release radioactive material to the atmosphere before the systems could be shut down. When a filter system fails the in--place test or is showing evidence of.filter or component degradation, corrective measures are put into place in order to return,the system back to its best operating condition. This report presents a summary of all filter tests.

  18. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  19. 77 FR 21946 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan AGENCY: National Marine... Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan (BDTRP) and implementing regulations by permanently continuing medium... April 30. Members of the Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Team (BDTRT) recommended these regulations...

  20. Delafloxacin: design, development and potential place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Candel, Francisco Javier; Peñuelas, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Delafloxacin (DLX) is a new fluoroquinolone pending approval, which has shown a good in vitro and in vivo activity against major pathogens associated with skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired respiratory tract infections. DLX also shows good activity against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including those resistant to other fluoroquinolones, as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Its pharmacokinetic properties and excellent activity in acidic environments make DLX an alternative in the treatment of these and other infections. In this manuscript, a detailed analysis of this new fluoroquinolone is performed, from its chemical structure to its in vivo activity in recently published clinical trials. Its possible place in the current antimicrobial outlook and in other infectious models is also discussed.

  1. Delafloxacin: design, development and potential place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Candel, Francisco Javier; Peñuelas, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Delafloxacin (DLX) is a new fluoroquinolone pending approval, which has shown a good in vitro and in vivo activity against major pathogens associated with skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired respiratory tract infections. DLX also shows good activity against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including those resistant to other fluoroquinolones, as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Its pharmacokinetic properties and excellent activity in acidic environments make DLX an alternative in the treatment of these and other infections. In this manuscript, a detailed analysis of this new fluoroquinolone is performed, from its chemical structure to its in vivo activity in recently published clinical trials. Its possible place in the current antimicrobial outlook and in other infectious models is also discussed. PMID:28356714

  2. HAWK-I Takes Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    -I/VLT) HAWK-I takes images in the 0.9 to 2.5 micron domain over a large field-of-view of 7.5 x 7.5 arcminutes. This is nine times larger than that of ISAAC, another near-infrared imager on the VLT that went into operation in late 1998. ISAAC has shown how deep near-infrared images can contribute uniquely to the discovery and study of large, distant galaxies, and to the study of discs around stars or even very low mass objects, down to a few Jupiter masses. HAWK-I will build on this experience by being able to study much larger areas with an excellent image quality. HAWK-I has four 2k x 2k array detectors, i.e. a total of 16 million 0.1 arcsecond pixels. "Until the availability of the James Webb Space Telescope in the next decade, it is clear that 8-m class telescopes will provide the best sensitivity achievable in the near-infrared below 3 microns," explained Mark Casali, the ESO scientist responsible for the instrument. Given the wide field, fine sampling and the high sensitivity of HAWK-I, the deepest scientific impact is expected in the areas of faint sources. "With its special filter set, HAWK-I will allow us to peer into the most distant Universe," said Markus Kissler-Patig, the Instrument Scientist. "In particular, with HAWK-I, we will scrutinise the very first objects that formed in the Universe." HAWK-I will also be very well suited for the search for the most massive stars and for the least massive objects in our Galaxy, such as hot Jupiters. But HAWK-I will also be a perfect instrument for the study of outer Solar System bodies, such as distant, icy asteroids and comets. HAWK-I is the eleventh instrument to be installed at ESO's VLT. It bridges the gap between the first and the second generation instruments to be installed on this unique facility.

  3. Genetic background influences nicotine-induced conditioned place preference and place aversion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ise, Yuya; Mori, Tomohisa; Katayama, Shirou; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Wang, Tzu-Chueh

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether genetic differences influence the rewarding effects of nicotine in 4 inbred strains of mice (DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H, and C57BL/6). Nicotine (subcutaneous) induced a place preference in DBA/2 and BALB/c mice but a place aversion in C57BL/6 mice. A low dose of nicotine produced a significant place preference, whereas a high dose of nicotine produced place aversion in C3H mice. These effects were completely reversed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. These results strongly suggest that a conditioned state, such as rewarding effects or aversive effects, can be influenced by genetic background.

  4. Place of death among Botswana's oldest old.

    PubMed

    Lazenby, J Mark; Olshvevski, Jodi

    2012-01-01

    Botswana, a country in sub-Saharan Africa, has been in the midst of an HIV/AIDs pandemic that has halted its previously lengthening life expectancy trend. However, one group to escape immediate effects on falling life span is the oldest old age group (> 80 years). Their roles in the community due to the pandemic, however, have changed. Place of death is an important consideration in end-of-life care for older adults, and one which has been well studied in the Global North. The purpose of this article is to determine where Botswana's oldest old die (home or hospital), and to see whether cause of death, gender, or residence in a city, town, or rural area is associated with place of death. We use death certificate data from 2005 and 2006 to describe where the oldest old Batswana (the name for the people of Botswana) died, home or hospital. Two-thirds died at home. The mean age at death was 88.46 (+/- 6.21) years; more were female (56.9%); and of known causes of death, cardiovascular disease was the leading cause (16.8%). Most stated causes of death (62.4%) were listed as "unknown." Most oldest-old Batswana died in rural areas (70.1%), and in rural areas, proportionally more oldest old died at home compared to cities and towns. On multivariate analysis, being a woman > 80 years of age at death predicted home death. Future longitudinal study needs to determine preferences of place of death and the quality of death of Batswana > 80 years, especially women.

  5. [The place of otorhinolaryngology in modern medicine].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T

    2016-01-01

    This publication is devoted to the peculiar features of the development of otorhinolaryngology as an integral component of modern medical science and practice and the place it now occupies among other disciplines. Much attention is given to the formation of the scientific views of focal infections with special reference to tonsillitis, the role of immune pathology an allergic reactions in etiology and pathogenesis of ENT diseases. Also considered is the problem of the elaboration of the new surgical methods and their application for the treatment of ENT pathology.

  6. Dynamic NMDAR-mediated properties of place cells during the object place memory task.

    PubMed

    Faust, Thomas W; Robbiati, Sergio; Huerta, Tomás S; Huerta, Patricio T

    2013-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in the hippocampus participate in encoding and recalling the location of objects in the environment, but the ensemble mechanisms by which NMDARs mediate these processes have not been completely elucidated. To address this issue, we examined the firing patterns of place cells in the dorsal CA1 area of the hippocampus of mice (n = 7) that performed an object place memory (OPM) task, consisting of familiarization (T1), sample (T2), and choice (T3) trials, after systemic injection of 3-[(±)2-carboxypiperazin-4yl]propyl-1-phosphate (CPP), a specific NMDAR antagonist. Place cell properties under CPP (CPP-PCs) were compared to those after control saline injection (SAL-PCs) in the same mice. We analyzed place cells across the OPM task to determine whether they signaled the introduction or movement of objects by NMDAR-mediated changes of their spatial coding. On T2, when two objects were first introduced to a familiar chamber, CPP-PCs and SAL-PCs showed stable, vanishing or moving place fields in addition to changes in spatial information (SI). These metrics were comparable between groups. Remarkably, previously inactive CPP-PCs (with place fields emerging de novo on T2) had significantly weaker SI increases than SAL-PCs. On T3, when one object was moved, CPP-PCs showed reduced center-of-mass (COM) shift of their place fields. Indeed, a subset of SAL-PCs with large COM shifts (>7 cm) was largely absent in the CPP condition. Notably, for SAL-PCs that exhibited COM shifts, those initially close to the moving object followed the trajectory of the object, whereas those far from the object did the opposite. Our results strongly suggest that the SI changes and COM shifts of place fields that occur during the OPM task reflect key dynamic properties that are mediated by NMDARs and might be responsible for binding object identity with location.

  7. Place-making with older persons: Establishing sense-of-place through participatory community mapping workshops.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mei Lan; Woolrych, Ryan; Sixsmith, Judith; Canham, Sarah; Battersby, Lupin; Sixsmith, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Principles of aging-in-place emphasize the importance of creating sustainable environments that enable older people to maintain a sense of belonging, autonomy, independence, safety and security. Simply altering the built environment is insufficient for creating more inclusive environments for older persons, as creating 'meaningful' places for aging involves consideration of psychosocial and cultural issues that go beyond issues of physical space. This paper illustrates how applications of community-based participatory research methods, in particular, participatory community mapping workshops (PCMWs), can be used to access experiences of place, identify facilitators and barriers to accessing the built environment and co-create place-based solutions among older people and service providers in a new affordable housing development in Western Canada. Founded on tenets of empowerment and relationship building, four PCMWs were undertaken with 54 participants (N = 38 older people; N = 16 local service providers). PCMWs comprised (i) experiential group walks around the community to access understandings of place and community and (ii) mapping exercises, whereby participants articulated their place-based needs within the context of the new affordable housing development and surrounding neighbourhood. Dialogues were digitally recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Visual data, including photographs taken during experiential group walks were categorized and integrated into the narrative to illustrate place meanings. PCMWs enabled senior housing and social care professionals and decision-makers to co-construct knowledge with older tenants that facilitated place action and change. Key themes identified by participants included: identifying services and needs for health and wellbeing, having opportunities for social participation and overcoming cross-cultural challenges. PCMWs were found to be a nuanced method of identifying needs and resources and generating

  8. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite.

  9. Acidity enhancement of unsaturated bases of group 15 by association with borane and beryllium dihydride. Unexpected boron and beryllium Brønsted acids.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sómer, Ana; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-21

    The intrinsic acidity of CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]CHXH2, HC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CXH2 (X = N, P, As, Sb) derivatives and of their complexes with BeH2 and BH3 has been investigated by means of high-level density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio calculations, using as a reference the ethyl saturated analogues. The acidity of the free systems steadily increases down the group for the three series of derivatives, ethyl, vinyl and ethynyl. The association with both beryllium dihydride and borane leads to a very significant acidity enhancement, being larger for BeH2 than for BH3 complexes. This acidity enhancement, for the unsaturated compounds, is accompanied by a change in the acidity trends down the group, which do not steadily decrease but present a minimum value for both the vinyl- and the ethynyl-phosphine. When the molecule acting as the Lewis acid is beryllium dihydride, the π-type complexes in which the BeH2 molecules interact with the double or triple bond are found, in some cases, to be more stable, in terms of free energies, than the conventional complexes in which the attachment takes place at the heteroatom, X. The most important finding, however, is that P, As, and Sb ethynyl complexes with BeH2 do not behave as P, As, or Sb Brønsted acids, but unexpectedly as Be acids.

  10. Scope and limitations of aliphatic Friedel-Crafts alkylations. Lewis acid catalyzed addition reactions of alkyl chlorides to carbon-carbon double bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, H.; Striepe, W.

    1983-04-22

    Lewis acid catalyzed addition reactions of alkyl halides with unsaturated hydrocarbons have been studied. 1:1 addition products are formed if the addends dissociate faster than the corresponding products; otherwise, polymerization takes place. For reaction conditions under which these compounds exist mainly undissociated, solvolysis constants of model compounds can be used to predict the outcome of any such addition reactions if systems with considerable steric hindrance are excluded.

  11. Taking the Risk Out of Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The ability to understand risks and have the right strategies in place when risky events occur is essential in the workplace. More and more organizations are being confronted with concerns over how to measure their risks or what kind of risks they can take when certain events transpire that could have a negative impact. NASA is one organization that faces these challenges on a daily basis, as effective risk management is critical to the success of its missions especially the Space Shuttle missions. On July 29, 1996, former NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin charged NASA s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance with developing a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) tool to support decisions on the funding of Space Shuttle upgrades. When issuing the directive, Goldin said, "Since I came to NASA [in 1992], we've spent billions of dollars on Shuttle upgrades without knowing how much they improve safety. I want a tool to help base upgrade decisions on risk." Work on the PRA tool began immediately. The resulting prototype, the Quantitative Risk Assessment System (QRAS) Version 1.0, was jointly developed by NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, its Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, and researchers at the University of Maryland. QRAS software automatically expands the reliability logic models of systems to evaluate the probability of highly detrimental outcomes occurring in complex systems that are subject to potential accident scenarios. Even in its earliest forms, QRAS was used to begin PRA modeling of the Space Shuttle. In parallel, the development of QRAS continued, with the goal of making it a world-class tool, one that was especially suited to NASA s unique needs. From the beginning, an important conceptual goal in the development of QRAS was for it to help bridge the gap between the professional risk analyst and the design engineer. In the past, only the professional risk analyst could perform, modify, use, and perhaps even adequately understand PRA. NASA wanted

  12. Complications during pregnancy, delivery, and postnatal stages and place of delivery in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Ataharul; Chowdhury, Rafiqul I; Akhter, Halida H

    2006-10-01

    The utilization of safe motherhood services including maternity care in Bangladesh is very poor. Only a very small proportion of deliveries takes place in a hospital/clinic. This study is based on data from a follow-up study on maternal morbidity in rural Bangladesh. Analysis is performed on the nature of complications by place of delivery. Most of the deliveries have taken place in the women's own or her mother's home. In addition, home deliveries are mostly assisted either by an untrained birth attendant or by relatives or others. Education, economic status, whether pregnancy was wanted or not, regular visits for antenatal care, past history of breathing problems and liver diseases, and palpitation during pregnancy appear to have significant association with place of delivery in rural Bangladesh. The utilization of a hospital/clinic instead of birth at home is higher among women with secondary or higher level of education, who desired the pregnancy, and who made regular visits for antenatal care. Delivery at a mother's home appears to be positively associated with higher economic status, desired pregnancy, gainful employment, and visits for antenatal care. If the respondents suffer from diseases/symptoms, then it is more likely that the delivery would take place in the mother's home.

  13. Composite affinity sorbents and their cleaning in place.

    PubMed

    Girot, P; Moroux, Y; Duteil, X P; Nguyen, C; Boschetti, E

    1990-06-27

    Making large-scale affinity sorbents that are reusable under acceptable hygienic conditions implies specific treatments for cleaning in place with known aqueous solutions of chemical agents. However, common agents such as sodium hydroxide are frequently considered too drastic for the stability of macromolecular biologically active immobilized ligands. According to a large series of trials, it was found that only a mixture of sodium hydroxide and ethanol was actually effective in sterilizing a sorbent in a single step. When hydroxide or an ethanol-acetic acid mixture were used alone, they were not totally efficient in the inactivation of sporulated Bacillus subtilis. Conversely, they were efficient when used sequentially. All these solutions were able to remove pyrogens from chromatographic sorbents. As the sterilizing solutions contained a certain amount of ethanol, the most suitable chromatographic affinity sorbents had to be based on an incompressible matrix. When washing an affinity silica sorbent that had proteins as ligands with solutions such as sodium hydroxide, ethanol-acetic acid or ethanol-sodium hydroxide, it was found that certain sorbents were able to tolerate the treatments without a noticeable decrease in their biochemical activity.

  14. Acid-sensing ion channels in gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  15. The Amateur Scientist: Funny Things Happen When Drops of Oil or Other Substances Are Placed on Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jearl

    1983-01-01

    Discusses solubility interactions of various oils placed on the surface of water and other liquids, explained using the basic forces of gravity, electrical attraction, and quantum mechanics (non-mathematical). Hydrogen and ionic bonding between oleic acid/water is analyzed. An experiment to determine physical properties of the oleic acid molecule…

  16. Scalable, Multithreaded, Partially-in-Place Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Haglin, David J.; Adolf, Robert D.; Mackey, Greg E.

    2013-05-20

    A recent trend in hardware development is producing computing systems that are stretching the number of cores and size of shared-memory beyond where most fundamental serial algorithms perform well. The expectation is that this trend will continue. So it makes sense to rethink our fundamental algorithms such as sorting. There are many situations where data that needs to be sorted will actually fit into the shared memory so applications could benefit from an efficient parallel sorting algorithm. When sorting large data (at least hundreds of Gigabytes) in a single shared memory, there are two factors that affect the algorithm choice. First, does the algorithm sort in-place? And second, does the algorithm scale well beyond tens of threads? Surprisingly, existing algorithms posses either one of these factors, but not both. We present an approach that gracefully degrades in performance as the amount of available working memory decreases relative to the size of the input.

  17. GeoPlace v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rowe, Stephen; Valicka, Christopher G.; Zou, Simon X.

    2016-09-02

    GeoPlace software solves several problems related to efficient sensor placement for remote sensing. It consists of several components. “GeoFoot” finds efficient locations for centering a set of camera images, in order to ensure that the collection of images contains an entire region. It is built on a modified version of “Simple MPS”. GeoSubFoot selects non-overlapping rectangular subregions of a single camera image, in order to devote more resources for higher-fidelity sub-images of those regions. The goal is for the rectangular subregions to contain many user-specified pixels of interest. Simple MPS is a generic program that produces point-sample distributions with blue noise characteristics over arbitrary-dimensional squares. GeoFoot includes an extension of it to sampling from polygons in 2d, including both the inside of the polygon and slightly outside it.

  18. What is Diagnostic Radiology's Place in Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J. W. D.

    1974-01-01

    The question that the title of this lecture poses must depend considerably on the attitude of physicians and surgeons. I have indicated the very low position diagnostic radiology holds in this country relative to our peers in medicine elsewhere. If its improvement is considered to be warranted, we must: (1) Interest medical students at the beginning of their career. (2) Bear in mind that radiologists are likely to be able to teach some anatomy but the reciprocal seldom applies. (3) Obtain chairs in radiology, which are desperately needed. (4) Obtain the acceptance by the medical establishment of the proper place of radiology in clinical medicine. (5) See to the reduction in numbers of unnecessary x-ray examinations. (6) Press for the improvement and enlargement of radiological departments with proper provision for expansion. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 5 PMID:4855415

  19. Prenatal education in the work place.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, H R

    1993-01-01

    Advances in neonatal care have improved survival rates among premature and low-birth-weight (LBW) infants, but highly technical care for these infants costs more than $2 billion a year in the United States. The incidence of premature and LBW infants can be reduced by prenatal education programs that focus on nutrition, obtaining prenatal care, avoiding dangerous substances, and recognizing preterm labor. In an effort to contain health care costs, many companies self-insure employee health benefits and offer health promotion programs designed to improve life style behaviors. This article examines providing a prenatal education program in the work place as a way of reducing the incidence and costs of prematurity and low birth weight.

  20. Benefits of walking and solo experiences in UK wild places.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Elizabeth; Akhurst, Jacqueline; Bannigan, Katrina; James, Hazel

    2016-05-17

    This paper examines human-nature interaction and how therapeutic this relationship is by investigating the efficacy of structured outdoor experience. Two walking and solo experience (WSEs) explored university students' (aged 20-43 years) perceptions of walking through and being with nature. The first was a 5-day journey (n = 4; 3 females and 1 male) and the second (n = 5; 3 females and 2 males) took place over two weekends, with a 2-week interval in-between. Pre- and post-experience interviews, journal writing, group discussions and a 9-month follow-up interviews were used to collect data and thematic analysis [Braun and Clarke (Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qual Res Psychol 2006; 3: :77-101.)] was applied. Both WSEs were considered together during analysis, as well as comparisons made between the two, in order to evaluate implications for practice. Benefits of the WSE that contributed to a general sense of well-being were: (i) gaining a sense of freedom and escape; (ii) gaining a sense of awareness and sensitivity to one's environment and its influence (iii) gaining confidence in being able to cope and take action; (iv) gaining a sense of perspective on and appreciation for life. Furthermore, the meaning participants formed in relation to their environment before, during and after the WSE, and the activity within that environment, played a role in their sense of well-being and in their motivations to re-access nature in other places. Findings suggest that WSEs are a cost effective way to give rise to beneficial and durable experiences, but a more holistic approach to policy is needed.

  1. Social marketing: its place in public health.

    PubMed

    Ling, J C; Franklin, B A; Lindsteadt, J F; Gearon, S A

    1992-01-01

    This review of the public health role of social marketing begins by tracing the history of social marketing and noting that social marketing adopts the traditional marketing framework of product, price, place, and promotion and embraces several methods of commercial marketing as well as consumer research. However, no universally acknowledged definition exists. A review of the literature is divided into three time periods representing early theoretical development, the evaluation of experiences, and increasing acceptance. Concerns about social marketing are discussed in terms of ethics, disempowerment, and the commercialization of health information. Examples of social marketing are then provided from developing countries and are analyzed in groupings defined as tangible products, sustained health practices, and service utilization. Practitioners' views and concerns are also reviewed. The strengths of social marketing include knowledge of the audience, systematic use of qualitative methods, use of incentives, closer monitoring, strategic use of the mass media, realistic expectations, aspiring to high standards, and recognition of price. Weaknesses of social marketing include its time, money, and human requirements; the fact that marketing elements are missing (public health lacks the flexibility to adjust products and services to clients' interests and preferences); and the potential serious impact on the future of Public Service Announcements, which may die out because social marketers pay for air time. After placing social marketing in context with other practices designed to achieve social change, the review ends with the prediction that the public health role of social marketing is likely to increase. The World Health Organization's recent call for health promotion and the UN Children's Fund's social mobilization actions are provided as examples of this increased role. It is noted, however, that social marketing alone cannot solve public health problems.

  2. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  3. Stereoconversion of amino acids and peptides in uryl-pendant binol schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjung; Nandhakumar, Raju; Hong, Jooyeon; Ham, Sihyun; Chin, Jik; Kim, Kwan Mook

    2008-01-01

    (S)-2-Hydroxy-2'-(3-phenyluryl-benzyl)-1,1'-binaphthyl-3-carboxaldehyde (1) forms Schiff bases with a wide range of nonderivatized amino acids, including unnatural ones. Multiple hydrogen bonds, including resonance-assisted ones, fix the whole orientation of the imine and provoke structural rigidity around the imine C==N bond. Due to the structural difference and the increase in acidity of the alpha proton of the amino acid, the imine formed with an L-amino acid (1-l-aa) is converted into the imine of the D-amino acid (1-D-aa), with a D/L ratio of more than 10 for most amino acids at equilibrium. N-terminal amino acids in dipeptides are also predominantly epimerized to the D form upon imine formation with 1. Density functional theory calculations show that 1-D-Ala is more stable than 1-L-Ala by 1.64 kcal mol(-1), a value that is in qualitative agreement with the experimental result. Deuterium exchange of the alpha proton of alanine in the imine form was studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and the results support a stepwise mechanism in the L-into-D conversion rather than a concerted one; that is, deprotonation and protonation take place in a sequential manner. The deprotonation rate of L-Ala is approximately 16 times faster than that of D-Ala. The protonation step, however, appears to favor L-amino acid production, which prevents a much higher predominance of the D form in the imine. Receptor 1 and the predominantly D-form amino acid can be recovered from the imine by simple extraction under acidic conditions. Hence, 1 is a useful auxiliary to produce D-amino acids of industrial interest by the conversion of naturally occurring L-amino acids or relatively easily obtainable racemic amino acids.

  4. Men: Take Charge of Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... they get treatment. Ask your doctor about taking aspirin every day. If you are age 50 to 59, taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of heart ... cancer. Talk with your doctor about whether daily aspirin is right for you. Next section Cost and ...

  5. Take Home Tests: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Data gathered on three kinds of tests (closed-book, open-book, and take-home) covered possible differential achievement on knowledge and cognitive-skill items, student attitudes, and cheating. On take-home tests, scores on knowledge items were found to higher, anxiety level was lower, and cheating was not a problem. (MSE)

  6. Test Taking Skills. A SORD Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Art

    This pamphlet, prepared by the Southern Oregon Research and Development Committee (SORD), offers suggestions for students and teachers for improving students' test-taking skills. Among the skills that students should possess to be prepared for taking tests are knowing the purposes of testing, having experience and practice in testing and following…

  7. 50 CFR 18.11 - Prohibited taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibited taking. 18.11 Section 18.11... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MARINE MAMMALS Prohibitions § 18.11 Prohibited taking. Except as otherwise provided in subpart C, D, or H of this part 18, or part 403, it is unlawful for: (a) Any person, vessel, or...

  8. Does Anticipation Training Affect Drivers' Risk Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Frank P.; Horswill, Mark S.; Alexander, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    Skill and risk taking are argued to be independent and to require different remedial programs. However, it is possible to contend that skill-based training could be associated with an increase, a decrease, or no change in risk-taking behavior. In 3 experiments, the authors examined the influence of a skill-based training program (hazard…

  9. Cost Discrepancy, Signaling, and Risk Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Jim

    2005-01-01

    If risk taking is in some measure a signal to others by the person taking risks, the model of "costly signaling" predicts that the more the apparent cost of the risk to others exceeds the perceived cost of the risk to the risk taker, the more attractive that risk will be as a signal. One hundred and twelve visitors to youth…

  10. Taking Decisions: Assessment for University Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plassmann, Sibylle; Zeidler, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Language testing means taking decisions: about the test taker's results, but also about the test construct and the measures taken in order to ensure quality. This article takes the German test "telc Deutsch C1 Hochschule" as an example to illustrate this decision-making process in an academic context. The test is used for university…

  11. [Man's place and anthropology in bioethics].

    PubMed

    Tomar Romero, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of its epistemological status, the article focuses on the philosophical fundament of bioethics, stressing the need for an authentic anthropology as a reference or starting point. Being an applied ethics, the first fundament of bioethics is in ethics. It shows how only personalistic ethics, which takes as reference the nature or essence of man, can offer objective and universal criteria. Philosophical anthropology studies man as a whole, in an integral manner, from the perspective of its nature or fundamental aspects of his being. It analyzes the distinction and relationship between the philosophical anthropology and the positive anthropologies, as well as with the physical, human and social sciences. Finally, it reflects on the current anthropological crisis and its ethical consequences.

  12. A Sense of Autonomy in Young Children's Special Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Carie

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood is a significant time when children begin to develop their place identity. As they discover their environment, young children claim special places in which to construct their own experiences. In exploring ways to connect children with place, particularly nature, caregivers need to consider children's place perspectives in the…

  13. Influence of nitric acid treatment in different media on X-ray structural parameters of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sudip Maity; Ashim Choudhury

    2008-11-15

    The treatment of coal with nitric acid in aqueous and non-aqueous media introduces changes in the chemical and spatial structure of the organic mass. Four coals of different rank have been treated with nitric acid in aqueous and glacial acetic acid media for assessing the changes in the structural parameters by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Slow-scan XRD has been performed for the raw and treated coals, and X-ray structural parameters (d002, Lc, and Nc) and aromaticity (fa) have been determined by profile-fitting software. Considerable variation of the structural parameters has been observed with respect to the raw coals. The d002 values have decreased in aqueous medium but increased in acetic acid medium; however, Lc, Nc, and fa values have increased in aqueous medium but decreased in acetic acid medium. It is also observed that considerable oxidation takes place during nitric acid treatment in aqueous medium, but nitration is the predominant phenomenon in acetic acid medium. Disordering of the coal structure increases in acetic acid medium, but a reverse trend is observed in the aqueous medium. As a result, structurally modified coals (SMCs) are derived as new coal-derived substances. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  15. Production of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2012-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative production route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains productive for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. Production via fermentation is increasing. Other production methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, production in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed.

  16. Sulfonated reduced graphene oxide as a highly efficient catalyst for direct amidation of carboxylic acids with amines using ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Tavana, Mahdieh Molaee; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-03-01

    Sulfonated reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (rGO-SO3H) were prepared by grafting sulfonic acid-containing aryl radicals onto chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) under sonochemical conditions. rGO-SO3H catalyst was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). rGO-SO3H catalyst was successfully applied as a reusable solid acid catalyst for the direct amidation of carboxylic acids with amines into the corresponding amides under ultrasonic irradiation. The direct sonochemical amidation of carboxylic acid takes place under mild conditions affording in good to high yields (56-95%) the corresponding amides in short reaction times.

  17. Evaluation of formic acid and propionic acid feed additives on environmental and cecal Salmonella Typhimurium in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three trials were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of formic acid and propionic acid on environmental and cecal recovery of Salmonella. Trial 1: Chicks (33/pen) were placed in one of 3 treatments with 8 reps, Trt A: 1 kg/ton formic acid, Trt B: 5 kg/ton formic acid, and Trt C: no formic acid....

  18. [The place of patients and their families as healthcare stakeholders in Europe].

    PubMed

    Didry, Pascale; Steri, David; Brescia, Liliane; Scalabrino, Eva; Remy, Lucile

    2015-10-01

    In the context of the Erasmus student exchange program, nursing students in the second year of their studies at the Institut de Formation en Soins Infirmiers Lionnois (Lionnois Nursing Care Training Institute) in Nancy undertook internships in different European countries. The place given to patients and their families as healthcare stakeholders takes on various forms. Some students share their experience and talk about the situations they encountered in Estonia, Italy and Romania.

  19. Making and Taking Virtual Field Trips in Pre-K and the Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchen, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    A virtual field trip (VFT) is a technology-based experience that allows children to take an educational journey without leaving the classroom. These multimedia presentations bring the sights, sounds, and descriptions of distant places to learners. Virtual field trips vary in complexity. They can range from a single PowerPoint or video presentation…

  20. Perspectives of Mothers in Farmworker Households on Reducing the Take-Home Pathway of Pesticide Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Larkin L.; Starks, Helene E.; Meischke, Hendrika; Thompson, Beti

    2009-01-01

    Farmworkers carry pesticide residue home on their clothing, boots, and skin, placing other household members at risk, particularly children. Specific precautions are recommended to reduce this take-home pathway, yet few studies have examined the perspectives of farmworkers and other household members regarding these behaviors and the reasons for…

  1. 75 FR 34476 - Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Incidental Take and Wetland Fill Permits...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Wetland Fill Permits for Two Condominium Developments on the Fort Morgan Peninsula, Baldwin County, AL...) and place fill in wetlands on the Fort Morgan peninsula, Baldwin County, Alabama. The HCP analyzes the take of the Federally endangered Alabama beach mouse and fill in wetlands incidental to...

  2. 76 FR 80891 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Cape Wind's High Resolution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... that NOAA ask the Department of the Interior (DOI) to defer further action on offshore wind leasing... expects some animals to avoid areas around the airgun array ensonified at the level of the exclusion zone... frequency range that takes place during a time when the animal is traveling through the open ocean,...

  3. Stereotypes and the Achievement Gap: Stereotype Threat Prior to Test Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Markus; Kronberger, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Stereotype threat is known as a situational predicament that prevents members of negatively stereotyped groups to perform up to their full ability. This review shows that the detrimental influence of stereotype threat goes beyond test taking: It impairs stereotyped students to build abilities in the first place. Guided by current theory on…

  4. The Web Surfer: What (Literacy) Skills Does It Take to Surf Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Jessie

    2010-01-01

    This article looks closely at some of the lingering stereotypes that Composition Studies holds toward Web surfing and queries the resulting literacy hierarchy against our students' reading and writing practices that take place online. This article claims that while good progress has been made in the way of revising twenty-first century definitions…

  5. 50 CFR 216.22 - Taking by State or local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sick, it shall be permissible to place it in temporary captivity until such time as it is able to be... in accordance with this subsection whether the animal is dead at the time of taking or dies... Secretary, the report shall contain a description of: (1) The animal involved; (2) The...

  6. 50 CFR 216.22 - Taking by State or local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sick, it shall be permissible to place it in temporary captivity until such time as it is able to be... in accordance with this subsection whether the animal is dead at the time of taking or dies... Secretary, the report shall contain a description of: (1) The animal involved; (2) The...

  7. 50 CFR 216.22 - Taking by State or local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sick, it shall be permissible to place it in temporary captivity until such time as it is able to be... in accordance with this subsection whether the animal is dead at the time of taking or dies... Secretary, the report shall contain a description of: (1) The animal involved; (2) The...

  8. 50 CFR 216.22 - Taking by State or local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sick, it shall be permissible to place it in temporary captivity until such time as it is able to be... in accordance with this subsection whether the animal is dead at the time of taking or dies... Secretary, the report shall contain a description of: (1) The animal involved; (2) The...

  9. 50 CFR 216.22 - Taking by State or local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sick, it shall be permissible to place it in temporary captivity until such time as it is able to be... in accordance with this subsection whether the animal is dead at the time of taking or dies... Secretary, the report shall contain a description of: (1) The animal involved; (2) The...

  10. Taking Math Students from "Blah" to "Aha": What Can We Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajdzievska, Darja

    2014-01-01

    In many post-secondary, introductory mathematics courses failure and withdrawal rates are reaching as high as 50% and average GPA is steadily decreasing. This is a problem that has been witnessed across the globe. With widespread reforms taking place in K-12 mathematics education, many innovative teaching strategies have been created, implemented,…

  11. 75 FR 8652 - Incidental Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Pacific plate. The objective is to understand the water cycle within subduction-systems. Subduction....S. The survey will take place in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the U.S. in water depths... earthquakes occur. Little is known about either of these processes, but water cycling through the system...

  12. [Stewart's acid-base approach].

    PubMed

    Funk, Georg-Christian

    2007-01-01

    In addition to paCO(2), Stewart's acid base model takes into account the influence of albumin, inorganic phosphate, electrolytes and lactate on acid-base equilibrium. It allows a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of acid-base disorders. Particularly simultaneous and mixed metabolic acid-base disorders, which are common in critically ill patients, can be assessed. Stewart's approach is therefore a valuable tool in addition to the customary acid-base approach based on bicarbonate or base excess. However, some chemical aspects of Stewart's approach remain controversial.

  13. Boston's Arnold Arboretum: A Place for Study and Recreation. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alan

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file for the Arnold Arboretum (Massachusetts) and other source material about the Arboretum and Frederick Law Olmstead. The lesson focuses on the first arboretum in the United States, which was part of Olmstead's plan for Boston's park system, known as the "Emerald…

  14. Lasting Benefits: The Long-Term Legacy of the Assisted Places Scheme for Assisted Place Holders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Sally; Sims, Stuart; Whitty, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The "Assisted Places Scheme" was introduced in 1980 by the Conservative Government to provide a "ladder of opportunity" for academically able students from poor homes. Over the next 17 years, more than 75,000 pupils received means-tested assistance from public funds to attend the most selective and prestigious private schools…

  15. How taking photos increases enjoyment of experiences.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kristin; Zauberman, Gal; Barasch, Alixandra

    2016-08-01

    Experiences are vital to the lives and well-being of people; hence, understanding the factors that amplify or dampen enjoyment of experiences is important. One such factor is photo-taking, which has gone unexamined by prior research even as it has become ubiquitous. We identify engagement as a relevant process that influences whether photo-taking will increase or decrease enjoyment. Across 3 field and 6 lab experiments, we find that taking photos enhances enjoyment of positive experiences across a range of contexts and methodologies. This occurs when photo-taking increases engagement with the experience, which is less likely when the experience itself is already highly engaging, or when photo-taking interferes with the experience. As further evidence of an engagement-based process, we show that photo-taking directs greater visual attention to aspects of the experience one may want to photograph. Lastly, we also find that this greater engagement due to photo-taking results in worse evaluations of negative experiences. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Effectiveness of Urban Shelter-in-Place. III: Commercial Districts

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Chan, Wanyu R.; Nazaroff, William W.; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2007-12-28

    In the event of a toxic chemical release to the atmosphere, shelter-in-place (SIP) is an emergency response option available to protect public health. This paper is the last in a three-part series that examines the effectiveness of SIP at reducing adverse health effects in communities. We model a hypothetical chemical release in an urban area, and consider SIP effectiveness in protecting occupants of commercial buildings. Building air infiltration rates are predicted from empirical data using an existing model. We consider the distribution of building air infiltration rates both with mechanical ventilation systems turned off and with the systems operating. We also consider the effects of chemical sorption to indoor surfaces and nonlinear chemical dose-response relationships. We find that commercial buildings provide effective shelter when ventilation systems are off, but that any delay in turning off ventilation systems can greatly reduce SIP effectiveness. Using a two-zone model, we find that there can be substantial benefit by taking shelter in the inner parts of a building that do not experience direct air exchange with the outdoors. Air infiltration rates vary substantially among buildings and this variation is important in quantifying effectiveness for emergency response. Community-wide health metrics, introduced in the previous papers in this series, can be applied in pre-event planning and to guide real-time emergency response.

  17. Architecture and health care: a place for sociology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daryl; Nettleton, Sarah; Buse, Christina; Prior, Lindsay; Twigg, Julia

    2015-09-01

    Sociologists of health and illness have tended to overlook the architecture and buildings used in health care. This contrasts with medical geographers who have yielded a body of work on the significance of places and spaces in the experience of health and illness. A review of sociological studies of the role of the built environment in the performance of medical practice uncovers an important vein of work, worthy of further study. Through the historically situated example of hospital architecture, this article seeks to tease out substantive and methodological issues that can inform a distinctive sociology of healthcare architecture. Contemporary healthcare buildings manifest design models developed for hotels, shopping malls and homes. These design features are congruent with neoliberal forms of subjectivity in which patients are constituted as consumers and responsibilised citizens. We conclude that an adequate sociology of healthcare architecture necessitates an appreciation of both the construction and experience of buildings, exploring the briefs and plans of their designers, and observing their everyday uses. Combining approaches and methods from the sociology of health and illness and science and technology studies offers potential for a novel research agenda that takes healthcare buildings as its substantive focus.

  18. A Spur to Atavism: Placing Platypus Poison.

    PubMed

    Hobbins, Peter

    2015-11-01

    For over two centuries, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) has been constructed and categorized in multiple ways. An unprecedented mélange of anatomical features and physiological functions, it long remained a systematic quandary. Nevertheless, since 1797, naturalists and biologists have pursued two recurring obsessions. Investigations into platypus reproduction and lactation have focused attention largely upon females of the species. Despite its apparent admixture of avian, reptilian and mammalian characters, the platypus was soon placed as a rudimentary mammal--primitive, naïve and harmless. This article pursues a different taxonomic trajectory, concentrating on a specifically male anatomical development: the crural spur and venom gland on the hind legs. Once the defining characteristic of both the platypus and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), by 1830 this sexed spur had been largely dismissed as inactive and irrelevant. For a creature regularly depicted as a biological outlier, the systematic and evolutionary implications of platypus poison have remained largely overlooked. In Australia, however, sporadic cases of 'spiking' led to consistent homologies being remarked between the platypus crural system and the venom glands of snakes. As with its reproductive reliance upon eggs, possession of an endogenous poison suggested significant reptilian affinities, yet the platypus has rarely been classed as an advanced reptile. Indeed, ongoing uncertainty regarding the biological purpose of the male's spur has ostensibly posed a directional puzzle. As with so many of its traits, however, platypus poison has been consistently described as a redundant remnant, rather than an emergent feature indicating evolutionary advance.

  19. Foam drainage placed on a porous substrate.

    PubMed

    Arjmandi-Tash, O; Kovalchuk, N; Trybala, A; Starov, V

    2015-05-14

    A model for drainage/imbibition of a foam placed on the top of a porous substrate is presented. The equation of liquid imbibition into the porous substrate is coupled with a foam drainage equation at the foam/porous substrate interface. The deduced dimensionless equations are solved using a finite element method. It was found that the kinetics of foam drainage/imbibition depends on three dimensionless numbers and the initial liquid volume fraction. The result shows that there are three different regimes of the process. Each regime starts after initial rapid decrease of a liquid volume fraction at the foam/porous substrate interface: (i) rapid imbibition: the liquid volume fraction inside the foam at the foam/porous substrate interface remains constant close to a final liquid volume fraction; (ii) intermediate imbibition: the liquid volume fraction at the interface with the porous substrate experiences a peak point and imbibition into the porous substrate is slower as compared with the drainage; (iii) slow imbibition: the liquid volume fraction at the foam/porous substrate interface increases to a maximum limiting value and a free liquid layer is formed between the foam and the porous substrate. However, the free liquid layer disappears after some time. The transition points between these three different drainage/imbibition regimes were delineated by introducing two dimensionless numbers.

  20. Differential Connectivity Within the Parahippocampal Place Area

    PubMed Central

    Baldassano, Christopher; Beck, Diane M.; Fei-Fei, Li

    2013-01-01

    The Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA) has traditionally been considered a homogeneous region of interest, but recent evidence from both human studies and animal models has suggested that PPA may be composed of functionally distinct subunits. To investigate this hypothesis, we utilize a functional connectivity measure for fMRI that can estimate connectivity differences at the voxel level. Applying this method to whole-brain data from two experiments, we provide the first direct evidence that anterior and posterior PPA exhibit distinct connectivity patterns, with anterior PPA more strongly connected to regions in the default mode network (including the parieto-medial temporal pathway) and posterior PPA more strongly connected to occipital visual regions. We show that object sensitivity in PPA also has an anterior-posterior gradient, with stronger responses to abstract objects in posterior PPA. These findings cast doubt on the traditional view of PPA as a single coherent region, and suggest that PPA is composed of one subregion specialized for the processing of low-level visual features and object shape, and a separate subregion more involved in memory and scene context. PMID:23507385

  1. Putting sex education in its place.

    PubMed

    Cassell, C

    1981-04-01

    In order to help reduce fears and anxieties regarding the influence of sex education in a public school setting, school and community sexuality educators need to better articulate the difference between formal and structured sex education and non-formal, informal and incidental sex learning. Sex education is only 1 aspect of the sexual learning process. 2 main points have to be clarified for parents and the general public to set the stage for a new way to view the school and community involvement in the sexual learning process: the schools' sexuality education courses constitute only a small portion of the sexual learning process; and sexual learning is not an event for youth only, but a process spanning life. Sex education (the process) connotates an academic setting with a specific curricula taught by a trained instructor, but sexual learning relates to environmental, non-formal incidental learning from a multitude of sources. Studies indicate that teenagers receive about 90% of their contraceptive and sexuality informaation from peers and mass media and that these sources of information are becoming their preferred sources of sex education. What is needed is a way to address and improve the conditions of sexual learning in the community. As home is the ideal environment for primary and positive sexual learning, parents need support in their role as sex educators. Classroom sexuality education curricula in all school settings have a solid place in the process of sexual learning.

  2. Permutations of time and place in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Elkington, Paul T; Friedland, Jon S

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health pandemic. The current depiction of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis life cycle proposes that airborne bacilli are inhaled and phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages, resulting in the formation of a granuloma that ruptures into the airways to reinitiate the infectious cycle. However, this widely proposed model overlooks the fact, established 100 years ago, that the initial site of M tuberculosis implantation is in the lower zones of the lungs, whereas infectious cavitary pulmonary disease develops at the lung apices. The immunological events at these two pulmonary locations are different--cavitation only occurs in the apices and not in the bases. Yet the current conceptual model of tuberculosis renders the immunology of these two temporally and spatially separated events identical. One key consequence is that prevention of primary childhood tuberculosis at the lung bases is regarded as adequate immunological protection, but extensive evidence shows that greater immunity could predispose to immunopathology and transmission at the lung apex. A much greater understanding of time and place in the immunopathological mechanisms underlying human tuberculosis is needed before further pre-exposure vaccination trials can be done.

  3. Take-off mechanics in hummingbirds (Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Tobalske, Bret W; Altshuler, Douglas L; Powers, Donald R

    2004-03-01

    Initiating flight is challenging, and considerable effort has focused on understanding the energetics and aerodynamics of take-off for both machines and animals. For animal flight, the available evidence suggests that birds maximize their initial flight velocity using leg thrust rather than wing flapping. The smallest birds, hummingbirds (Order Apodiformes), are unique in their ability to perform sustained hovering but have proportionally small hindlimbs that could hinder generation of high leg thrust. Understanding the take-off flight of hummingbirds can provide novel insight into the take-off mechanics that will be required for micro-air vehicles. During take-off by hummingbirds, we measured hindlimb forces on a perch mounted with strain gauges and filmed wingbeat kinematics with high-speed video. Whereas other birds obtain 80-90% of their initial flight velocity using leg thrust, the leg contribution in hummingbirds was 59% during autonomous take-off. Unlike other species, hummingbirds beat their wings several times as they thrust using their hindlimbs. In a phylogenetic context, our results show that reduced body and hindlimb size in hummingbirds limits their peak acceleration during leg thrust and, ultimately, their take-off velocity. Previously, the influence of motivational state on take-off flight performance has not been investigated for any one organism. We studied the full range of motivational states by testing performance as the birds took off: (1) to initiate flight autonomously, (2) to escape a startling stimulus or (3) to aggressively chase a conspecific away from a feeder. Motivation affected performance. Escape and aggressive take-off featured decreased hindlimb contribution (46% and 47%, respectively) and increased flight velocity. When escaping, hummingbirds foreshortened their body movement prior to onset of leg thrust and began beating their wings earlier and at higher frequency. Thus, hummingbirds are capable of modulating their leg and

  4. Geobiochemistry: Placing Biochemistry in Its Geochemical Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, E.; Boyer, G. M.; Canovas, P. A., III; Prasad, A.; Dick, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Goals of geobiochemistry include simultaneously evaluating the relative stabilities of microbial cells and minerals, and predicting how the composition of biomolecules can change in response to the progress of geochemical reactions. Recent developments in theoretical geochemistry make it possible to predict standard thermodynamic properties of proteins, nucleotides, lipids, and many metabolites including the constituents of the citric acid cycle, at all temperatures and pressures where life is known to occur, and beyond. Combining these predictions with constraints from geochemical data makes it possible to assess the relative stabilities of biomolecules. Resulting independent predictions of the environmental occurrence of homologous proteins and lipid side-chains can be compared with observations from metagenomic and metalipidomic data to quantify geochemical driving forces that shape the composition of biomolecules. In addition, the energetic costs of generating biomolecules from within a diverse range of habitable environments can be evaluated in terms of prevailing geochemical variables. Comparisons of geochemical bioenergetic calculations across habitats leads to the generalization that the availability of H2 determines the cost of autotrophic biosynthesis relative to the aquatic environment external to microbial cells, and that pH, temperature, pressure, and availability of C, N, P, and S are typically secondary. Increasingly reduced conditions, which are determined by reactions of water with mineral surfaces and mineral assemblages, allow many biosynthetic reactions to shift from costing energy to releasing energy. Protein and lipid synthesis, as well as the reverse citric acid cycle, become energy-releasing processes under these conditions. The resulting energy balances that determine habitability contrast dramatically with assumptions derived from oxic surface conditions, such as those where human biochemistry operates.

  5. Applying the take-grant protection model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    The Take-Grant Protection Model has in the past been used to model multilevel security hierarchies and simple protection systems. The models are extended to include theft of rights and sharing information, and additional security policies are examined. The analysis suggests that in some cases the basic rules of the Take-Grant Protection Model should be augmented to represent the policy properly; when appropriate, such modifications are made and their efforts with respect to the policy and its Take-Grant representation are discussed.

  6. Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart (Tip Sheet)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Heart Diabetes & Your Heart Infographic (English) Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart Diabetes and Heart Disease For ... What you can do now Ask your health care team these questions: What can I do to ...

  7. 76 FR 41486 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Operation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Operation and Maintenance of the Neptune Liquefied Natural Gas Facility off...

  8. 77 FR 23547 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Columbia River Crossing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Part 217 Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Columbia River... Incidental to Columbia River Crossing Project, Washington and Oregon AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Transit Authority (FTA) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), on behalf of the Columbia...

  9. The place of premedication in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Abraham; Kain, Zeev N; Larsson, Peter; Lönnqvist, Per-Arne; Wolf, Andrew R

    2009-09-01

    Behind the multiple arguments for and against the use of premedication, sedative drugs in children is a noble principle that of minimizing psychological trauma related to anesthesia and surgery. However, several confounding factors make it very difficult to reach didactic evidence-based conclusions. One of the key confounding issues is that the nature of expectations and responses for both parent and child vary greatly in different environments around the world. Studies applicable to one culture and to one hospital system (albeit multicultural) may not apply elsewhere. Moreover, the study of hospital-related distress begins at the start of the patient's journey and ends long after hospital discharge; it cannot be focused completely on just the moment of anesthetic induction. Taking an example from actual practice experience, the trauma caused by the actual giving of a premedication to a child who absolutely does not want it and may struggle may not be recorded in a study but could form a significant component of overall effect and later psychological pathology. Clearly, attitudes by health professionals and parents to the practice of routine pediatric premedication, vary considerably, often provoking strong opinions. In this pro-con article we highlight two very different approaches to premedication. It is hoped that this helps the reader to critically re-evaluate a practice, which was universal historically and now in many centers is more selective.

  10. [Effect of amino acid supplements to barley meal on the nitrogen metabolism of growing castrated male swine (20-65 kg live weight)].

    PubMed

    Wecke, C; Gebhardt, G

    1981-03-01

    In 56 N-balance experiments of the influence of differentiated amino acid supplements to coarse barley meal enriched with energy, minerals and additives on the nitrogen metabolism of castrated male pigs, was investigated. The joint supplement of lysine and methionine remained without result in comparison with the sole supplementation of lysine. Only the additional supplementation of threonine resulted in the further improvement of protein utilisation. The results corroborate the effect of the amino acid lysine limiting the performance in barley protein and prove that threonine takes the second place in the sequence of limitation.

  11. Strategy modulates spatial perspective-taking: evidence for dissociable disembodied and embodied routes.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Mark R; Brazier, Mark; Edmonds, Caroline J; Gronholm, Petra C

    2013-01-01

    Previous research provides evidence for a dissociable embodied route to spatial perspective-taking that is under strategic control. The present experiment investigated further the influence of strategy on spatial perspective-taking by assessing whether participants may also elect to employ a separable "disembodied" route loading on inhibitory control mechanisms. Participants (N = 92) undertook both the "own body transformation" (OBT) perspective-taking task, requiring speeded spatial judgments made from the perspective of an observed figure, and a control task measuring ability to inhibit spatially compatible responses in the absence of a figure. Perspective-taking performance was found to be related to performance on the response inhibition control task, in that participants who tended to take longer to adopt a new perspective also tended to show a greater elevation in response times when inhibiting spatially compatible responses. This relationship was restricted to those participants reporting that they adopted the perspective of another by reversing left and right whenever confronted with a front-view figure; it was absent in those participants who reported perspective-taking by mentally transforming their spatial orientation to align with that of the figure. Combined with previously published results, these findings complete a double dissociation between embodied and disembodied routes to spatial perspective-taking, implying that spatial perspective-taking is subject to modulation by strategy, and suggesting that embodied routes to perspective-taking may place minimal demands on domain general executive functions.

  12. Strategy modulates spatial perspective-taking: evidence for dissociable disembodied and embodied routes

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Mark R.; Brazier, Mark; Edmonds, Caroline J.; Gronholm, Petra C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research provides evidence for a dissociable embodied route to spatial perspective-taking that is under strategic control. The present experiment investigated further the influence of strategy on spatial perspective-taking by assessing whether participants may also elect to employ a separable “disembodied” route loading on inhibitory control mechanisms. Participants (N = 92) undertook both the “own body transformation” (OBT) perspective-taking task, requiring speeded spatial judgments made from the perspective of an observed figure, and a control task measuring ability to inhibit spatially compatible responses in the absence of a figure. Perspective-taking performance was found to be related to performance on the response inhibition control task, in that participants who tended to take longer to adopt a new perspective also tended to show a greater elevation in response times when inhibiting spatially compatible responses. This relationship was restricted to those participants reporting that they adopted the perspective of another by reversing left and right whenever confronted with a front-view figure; it was absent in those participants who reported perspective-taking by mentally transforming their spatial orientation to align with that of the figure. Combined with previously published results, these findings complete a double dissociation between embodied and disembodied routes to spatial perspective-taking, implying that spatial perspective-taking is subject to modulation by strategy, and suggesting that embodied routes to perspective-taking may place minimal demands on domain general executive functions. PMID:23964229

  13. 77 FR 45268 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan AGENCY: National Marine... Dolphin Take Reduction Plan (BDTRP) and its implementing regulations by permanently continuing nighttime... November 1 through April 30. Members of the Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Team (Team) recommended...

  14. 78 FR 70538 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Missile Launch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, U.S. Navy (Navy), to take three species of seals and sea lions... such taking. Regulations governing the taking of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), and California sea lions (Zalophus californianus),...

  15. LRO's Diviner Takes the Eclipse's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the June 15, 2011, total lunar eclipse, LRO's Diviner instrument will take temperature measurements of eclipsed areas of the moon, giving scientists a new look at rock distribution on the su...

  16. 5 CFR 1201.75 - Taking depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES Procedures for Appellate Cases Discovery § 1201.75 Taking depositions. Depositions may be taken by any method agreed upon by the parties. The person providing information is subject to penalties...

  17. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  18. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... complete dose, and they will not work to kill all your disease causing bacteria. Taking partial doses ... dose of the appropriate antibiotic is needed to kill all the harmful bacteria. How safe are antibiotics? ...

  19. The Solar Constant: A Take Home Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, B. G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a method that uses energy from the sun, absorbed by aluminum discs, to melt ice, and allows the determination of the solar constant. The take-home equipment includes Styrofoam cups, a plastic syringe, and aluminum discs. (MLH)

  20. The calculation of take-off run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1934-01-01

    A comparatively simple method of calculating length of take-off run is developed from the assumption of a linear variation in net accelerating force with air speed and it is shown that the error involved is negligible.

  1. Taking Medicines Safely: At Your Doctor's Office

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely At Your Doctor's Office Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Download ... Articles Medicines: Use Them Safely / At Your Doctor's Office / Ask Your Pharmacist / Now, It's Your Turn: How ...

  2. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  3. Take Care of Your Child's Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Topic En español Take Care of Your Child’s Teeth Browse Sections The Basics Overview Tooth Decay ... can cause cavities (holes) in teeth. Is my child at risk for tooth decay? Tooth decay is ...

  4. Taking Statins May Boost Heart Surgery Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking your statin for even one day before cardiac surgery may increase your risk of death after surgery," ... cause-and-effect relationship. SOURCE: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery , news release, March 16, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

  5. Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature

    MedlinePlus

    ... instructions before putting it back in its case. Electronic ear thermometers measure the tympanic temperature (the amount ... a digital thermometer to take a rectal temperature. Electronic ear thermometers aren't recommended for infants younger ...

  6. Removal of salicylic acid on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Xu, Aihua; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Can

    2007-01-02

    It has been found that salicylic acid can be removal effectively at the lower temperature of 140 degrees C on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Under the same condition, the activities for the CWAO of phenol, benzoic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid have been also investigated. The results indicated that, with compared to the very poor activities for phenol and benzoic acid, the activities for salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid were very high, which are attributed to their same intramolecular H-bonding structures. With the role of hard acidity of intramolecular H-bonding, salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid can be adsorbed effectively on the basic center of LaFeO3 catalyst and are easy to take place the total oxidation reaction. However, at temperatures higher than 140 degrees C, the intramolecular H-bonding structure of salicylic acid was destroyed and the activities at 160 and 180 degrees C decreased greatly, which confirms further the key role of intramolecular H-bonding in the CWAO. Moreover, the LaFeO3 catalyst also indicated a superior stability of activity and structure in CWAO of salicylic acid.

  7. How place matters: unpacking technology and power in health and social care.

    PubMed

    Poland, B; Lehoux, P; Holmes, D; Andrews, G

    2005-03-01

    The devolution of care into nontraditional community-based settings has led to a proliferation of sites for health and social care. Despite recent (re)formulations of 'evidence-based' approaches that stress the importance of optimizing interventions to best practice by taking into account the uniqueness of place, there is relatively little guidance in the literature and few attempts to systematically 'unpack' key dimensions of settings most relevant to policy, practice and research. In this paper, we explore how place matters for health and social care. In effect, we propose making place the lens through which to view practice, and not simply an interesting sideline focus. We focus specifically on (a) the emplacement of power relations in health and social care in and across settings; and (b) the pervasive (and often unrecognised) influence of technology on and in place (both 'mundane' and more visible 'high' technologies) as arguably among the most significant and pervasive (and often overlooked) dimensions of place pertinent to health and social care in both traditional (institutional) and nontraditional (community) settings. Drawing on diverse disciplinary literatures, we seek to make visible certain issues and bodies of work that health professionals may not be aware of, and which often remain inaccessible to practitioners and applied researchers on account of their density, complexity, and specialised terminology. In particular, drawing on the rich tradition of cultural studies, we advance the culture of place as a rubric for understanding the complex interrelationship between power, technology, culture, and place. Several fruitful avenues for place-sensitive research of health and social care practice (and its effects) are suggested.

  8. Toward citizenship science education: what students do to make the world a better place?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesterinen, Veli-Matti; Tolppanen, Sakari; Aksela, Maija

    2016-01-01

    With increased focus on sustainability and socioscientific issues, dealing with issues related to citizenship is now seen as an important element of science education. However, in order to make the world a better place, mere understanding about socioscientific issues is not enough. Action must also be taken. In this study, 35 international gifted students-potential scientists-aged 15-19 were interviewed to investigate what they were doing to make the world a better place. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with focus on students' actions toward a better world, their rationalizations for such actions, and the role of science in the rationalizations. The analysis shows that students consciously take a wide range of actions, and that they see citizenship as a process of constant self-development. The three categories created to highlight the variation in the ways students take action were personally responsible actions, participatory actions, and preparing for future. Although many students saw that science and scientists play a big role in solving especially the environmental problems, most of them also discussed the structural causes for problems, as well as the interplay of social, economic, and political forces. The results indicate that citizenship science education should take the variety of students' actions into consideration, give students the possibility to take individual and participatory action, as well as give students opportunities to get to know and discuss the ways a career in science or engineering can contribute to saving the world.

  9. Ego depletion increases risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Asal, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the availability of self-control resources affects risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. We proposed that risk-taking often occurs from suboptimal decision processes and heuristic information processing (e.g., when a smoker suppresses or neglects information about the health risks of smoking). Research revealed that depleted self-regulation resources are associated with reduced intellectual performance and reduced abilities to regulate spontaneous and automatic responses (e.g., control aggressive responses in the face of frustration). The present studies transferred these ideas to the area of risk-taking. We propose that risk-taking is increased when individuals find themselves in a state of reduced cognitive self-control resources (ego-depletion). Four studies supported these ideas. In Study 1, ego-depleted participants reported higher levels of sensation seeking than non-depleted participants. In Study 2, ego-depleted participants showed higher levels of risk-tolerance in critical road traffic situations than non-depleted participants. In Study 3, we ruled out two alternative explanations for these results: neither cognitive load nor feelings of anger mediated the effect of ego-depletion on risk-taking. Finally, Study 4 clarified the underlying psychological process: ego-depleted participants feel more cognitively exhausted than non-depleted participants and thus are more willing to take risks. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  10. Taking Blame for Other People's Misconduct.

    PubMed

    Willard, Jennifer; Madon, Stephanie; Curran, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Taking blame for another person's misconduct may occur at relatively high rates for less serious crimes. The authors examined individual differences and situational factors related to this phenomenon by surveying college students (n = 213) and men enrolled in substance abuse treatment programs (n = 42). Among college students, conscientiousness and delinquency predicted their likelihood of being in a situation in which it was possible to take the blame for another person's misconduct. Situational factors, including the relationship with the perpetrator, the seriousness of the offense, feelings of responsibility for the offense, and differential consequences between the offender and the blame taker, were associated with college students' decisions to take the blame. Among substance abuse treatment participants, individuals who took the blame for another person's misconduct were more extraverted, reported feeling more loyalty toward the true perpetrator, and indicated more incentives to take the blame than individuals who did not take the blame. Links between theories of helping behavior and situational factors that predict blame taking are discussed.

  11. Psychopathy and Risk Taking among Jailed Inmates

    PubMed Central

    Swogger, Marc T.; Walsh, Zach; Lejuez, C. W.; Kosson, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Several clinical descriptions of psychopathy suggest a link to risk taking; however the empirical basis for this association is not well established. Moreover, it is not clear whether any association between psychopathy and risk taking is specific to psychopathy or reflects shared variance with other externalizing disorders, such as antisocial personality disorder, alcohol use disorders, and drug use disorders. In the present study we aimed to clarify relationships between psychopathy and risky behavior among male county jail inmates using both self-reports of real-world risky behaviors and performance on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), a behavioral measure of risk taking. Findings suggest that associations between externalizing disorders and self-reported risk taking largely reflect shared mechanisms. However, psychopathy appears to account for unique variance in self-reported irresponsible and criminal risk taking beyond that associated with other externalizing disorders. By contrast, none of the disorders were associated with risk taking behavior on the BART, potentially indicating limited clinical utility for the BART in differentiating members of adult offender populations. PMID:20419073

  12. Phonetic Variation in Consonants in Infant-Directed and Adult-Directed Speech: The Case of Regressive Place Assimilation in Word-Final Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, Laura C.; Millett, Amanda L.; McAuley, J. Devin; Bergeson, Tonya R.

    2014-01-01

    Pronunciation variation is under-studied in infant-directed speech, particularly for consonants. Regressive place assimilation involves a word-final alveolar stop taking the place of articulation of a following word-initial consonant. We investigated pronunciation variation in word-final alveolar stop consonants in storybooks read by forty-eight…

  13. Medial entorhinal cortex lesions only partially disrupt hippocampal place cells and hippocampus-dependent place memory

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Jena B; Schlesiger, Magdalene I; Leutgeb, Jill K; Squire, Larry R; Leutgeb, Stefan; Clark, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Entorhinal cortex provides the primary cortical projections to the hippocampus, a brain structure critical for memory. However, it remains unclear how the precise firing patterns of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) cells influence hippocampal physiology and hippocampus-dependent behavior. We found that complete bilateral lesions of MEC resulted in a lower proportion of active hippocampal cells. The remaining active cells had place fields, but with decreased spatial precision and decreased long-term spatial stability. In addition, MEC rats were as impaired at acquiring the watermaze as hippocampus rats, while rats with combined MEC and hippocampal lesions had an even greater deficit. However, MEC rats were not impaired on other hippocampus-dependent tasks, including those in which an object location or context was remembered. Thus, MEC is not necessary for all types of spatial coding, nor for all types of hippocampus-dependent memory, but is necessary for the normal acquisition of place memory. PMID:25437546

  14. Re-inhabiting place in contemporary rural communities: Moving toward a critical pedagogy of place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffling, Lacey D.; Carlone, Heidi B.; Benavides, Aerin

    2017-03-01

    Heather Zimmerman and Jennifer Weible's (Cult Stud Sci Educ, 2016) use of place-based pedagogy in high school science education honors their participants' lived experiences and the rural communities from which they come. They raise an unresolved tension in their findings: Why did the youth in their study, who clearly learned a lot about the local watershed, not feel empowered or knowledgeable enough to propose collective, action-oriented strategies to address the poor quality of the water? We use this tension as a focus point of our response, drawing on one author's (Huffling's) biography and David Gruenewald's (Educ Res 32:3-12, 2003. doi: 10.3102/0013189X032004003) critical pedagogy of place to re-imagine the curriculum that Zimmerman and Weible describe. We provide strategies that align with Gruenewald's (2003) constructs of decolonization and reinhabitation that could promote youths' collective empowerment.

  15. Re-inhabiting place in contemporary rural communities: Moving toward a critical pedagogy of place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffling, Lacey D.; Carlone, Heidi B.; Benavides, Aerin

    2016-12-01

    Heather Zimmerman and Jennifer Weible's (Cult Stud Sci Educ, 2016) use of place-based pedagogy in high school science education honors their participants' lived experiences and the rural communities from which they come. They raise an unresolved tension in their findings: Why did the youth in their study, who clearly learned a lot about the local watershed, not feel empowered or knowledgeable enough to propose collective, action-oriented strategies to address the poor quality of the water? We use this tension as a focus point of our response, drawing on one author's (Huffling's) biography and David Gruenewald's (Educ Res 32:3-12, 2003. doi: 10.3102/0013189X032004003) critical pedagogy of place to re-imagine the curriculum that Zimmerman and Weible describe. We provide strategies that align with Gruenewald's (2003) constructs of decolonization and reinhabitation that could promote youths' collective empowerment.

  16. No place for /h/: an ERP investigation of English fricative place features

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Kevin; Politzer-Ahles, Stephen; Almeida, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The representational format of speech units in long-term memory is a topic of debate. We present novel event-related brain potential evidence from the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) paradigm that is compatible with abstract, non-redundant feature-based models like the Featurally Underspecified Lexicon (FUL). First, we show that the fricatives /s/ and /f/ display an asymmetric pattern of MMN responses, which is predicted if /f/ has a fully specified place of articulation ([Labial]) but /s/ does not ([Coronal], which is lexically underspecified). Second, we show that when /s/ and /h/ are contrasted, no such asymmetric MMN pattern occurs. The lack of asymmetry suggests both that (i) oral and laryngeal articulators are represented distinctly and that (ii) /h/ has no oral place of articulation in long-term memory. The lack of asymmetry between /s/ and /h/ is also in-line with traditional feature-geometric models of lexical representations. PMID:27366758

  17. From grid cells and visual place cells to multimodal place cell: a new robotic architecture.

    PubMed

    Jauffret, Adrien; Cuperlier, Nicolas; Gaussier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a new architecture for the generation of grid cells (GC) was implemented on a real robot. In order to test this model a simple place cell (PC) model merging visual PC activity and GC was developed. GC were first built from a simple "several to one" projection (similar to a modulo operation) performed on a neural field coding for path integration (PI). Robotics experiments raised several practical and theoretical issues. To limit the important angular drift of PI, head direction information was introduced in addition to the robot proprioceptive signal coming from the wheel rotation. Next, a simple associative learning between visual place cells and the neural field coding for the PI has been used to recalibrate the PI and to limit its drift. Finally, the parameters controlling the shape of the PC built from the GC have been studied. Increasing the number of GC obviously improves the shape of the resulting place field. Yet, other parameters such as the discretization factor of PI or the lateral interactions between GC can have an important impact on the place field quality and avoid the need of a very large number of GC. In conclusion, our results show our GC model based on the compression of PI is congruent with neurobiological studies made on rodent. GC firing patterns can be the result of a modulo transformation of PI information. We argue that such a transformation may be a general property of the connectivity from the cortex to the entorhinal cortex. Our model predicts that the effect of similar transformations on other kinds of sensory information (visual, tactile, auditory, etc…) in the entorhinal cortex should be observed. Consequently, a given EC cell should react to non-contiguous input configurations in non-spatial conditions according to the projection from its different inputs.

  18. From grid cells and visual place cells to multimodal place cell: a new robotic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jauffret, Adrien; Cuperlier, Nicolas; Gaussier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a new architecture for the generation of grid cells (GC) was implemented on a real robot. In order to test this model a simple place cell (PC) model merging visual PC activity and GC was developed. GC were first built from a simple “several to one” projection (similar to a modulo operation) performed on a neural field coding for path integration (PI). Robotics experiments raised several practical and theoretical issues. To limit the important angular drift of PI, head direction information was introduced in addition to the robot proprioceptive signal coming from the wheel rotation. Next, a simple associative learning between visual place cells and the neural field coding for the PI has been used to recalibrate the PI and to limit its drift. Finally, the parameters controlling the shape of the PC built from the GC have been studied. Increasing the number of GC obviously improves the shape of the resulting place field. Yet, other parameters such as the discretization factor of PI or the lateral interactions between GC can have an important impact on the place field quality and avoid the need of a very large number of GC. In conclusion, our results show our GC model based on the compression of PI is congruent with neurobiological studies made on rodent. GC firing patterns can be the result of a modulo transformation of PI information. We argue that such a transformation may be a general property of the connectivity from the cortex to the entorhinal cortex. Our model predicts that the effect of similar transformations on other kinds of sensory information (visual, tactile, auditory, etc…) in the entorhinal cortex should be observed. Consequently, a given EC cell should react to non-contiguous input configurations in non-spatial conditions according to the projection from its different inputs. PMID:25904862

  19. Medical Student Debt: What Perspective Should We Take?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Since medical education is expensive, healthcare professional students in many countries must take out loans to pay for their studies. The resultant levels of debt have created concerns at both the beginning and the end of undergraduate education. How should medical educators respond to these concerns? If educators are to look at medical education from the perspective of their students who are most in need, then they should think about this. Educators should think about their response when current or prospective students ask them about mitigating the costs of medical education. This may include questions about working during undergraduate studies, the costs of living in different locations, and the availability of bursaries that offer financial aid to students. Medical students should be encouraged to "think like an investor" when making decisions related to their medical education. Senior medical educators should be well placed to advise them in this regard. PMID:26217478

  20. Sleeping in safe places: an experimental investigation of human sleeping place preferences from an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Spörrle, Matthias; Stich, Jennifer

    2010-08-03

    Although humans spend a third of their life asleep, their choice of sleeping places has so far been little investigated both theoretically and empirically. We address this issue from the perspective of evolutionary psychology. Our basic assumption is that humans have an evolved preference for safe sleeping places, that is, those that promise protection against potential aggressors and nighttime predation. Several testable predictions were derived from this assumption concerning the preferred location of the bed in a sleeping room. Specifically, we predicted that people prefer sleeping places that allow them to view the entrances to the sleeping room (doors and windows) from a distance while remaining concealed from the entrances themselves. To test these hypotheses, 138 participants were asked to arrange a bed and other pieces of furniture on floor plans that were experimentally manipulated with respect to the direction in which the door opened and the presence of a window. In agreement with predictions, participants predominantly positioned the bed in a way that (a) allowed them to see the door, (b) was as distant as possible from the door, and (c) was on the side of the room toward which the door opened. In addition, the positioning of the bed was influenced as predicted by the presence of a window.

  1. A Great Place to Watch the Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In this time of year when Mars is most likely to be covered by global dust storms, NASA's Spirit rover has been experiencing relative calm. In fact, the martian winds have been quite beneficial, clearing dust from the rover's solar panels and increasing the solar energy available for driving to new places and conducting scientific experiments.

    Another thing the martian wind has done is send hundreds of dust devils spinning across the surface of the planet. From Spirit's high perch approximately 90 meters (295 feet) above the surrounding plains, as shown in this image taken from the summit of 'Husband Hill,' three dust devils are clearly visible in the plains of Gusev Crater. Planetary Scientist Ron Greeley of Arizona State University, Tempe, describes the whirling vortices of wind and dust as 'vacuum cleaners' that were first seen in images from the Viking Orbiter in 1985, though their existence was predicted as early as 1964.

    The most prominent dust devil in this image, visible on the left side of the 360-degree panorama, is one of the closest seen by Spirit. It is about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) away from the rover, about 90 meters (295 feet) in diameter at its widest point, and 275 meters (902 feet) tall. Its flux is about 1 kilogram per second, meaning it is picking up about 2 pounds of sediment each second and moving it around.

    The smaller dust devil just to the right of the largest one is 2.5 to 3 kilometers (1.6 to 1.9 miles) away and is churning up about 0.5 kilograms (1 pound) per second. Both are north of the rover's position and are moving in an east-southeast direction. On the right side of the mosaic shown here is a third dust devil.

    Greeley has calculated that if the number and frequency of dust devils Spirit has encountered are similarly spaced throughout Gusev Crater, the crater probably experiences about 90,000 dust devils per martian day, or sol. Collectively, the whirlwinds lift and redeposit an estimated 4.5 million

  2. Etanercept in the treatment of SAPHO syndrome: Which place?

    PubMed

    Abourazzak, Fatima Ezzahra; Hachimi, Hicham; Kadi, Nadira; Berrada, Khadija; Tizniti, Siham; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-09-01

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) is a rare disease combining skin, bone, and joint manifestations. Its treatment remains a debated issue in the absence of a valid therapeutic strategy. The experience with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)-blocking agents is still small but encouraging. This therapy is reserved for refractory cases. The most commonly used agent is infliximab. Only few cases treated by etanercept have been reported in the literature. We report a new case treated by this biologic therapy and discuss its place in the treatment of SAPHO syndrome. A 30-year-old male, with a history of left clavicular osteitis that required surgical bone biopsy to rule out infection and malignancy, was admitted to the rheumatology department because of recurrent anterior chest pain, lower limb arthralgia, and sacroiliac pain. Laboratory findings revealed an inflammatory syndrome. Conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) scan of the sternocostoclavicular region showed sclerosis and hyperostosis of the left clavicle. Right sacroiliitis was diagnosed based on the radiographic findings. Moreover, the patient reported palmoplantar pustulosis, thereby strengthening the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. As conventional treatment based on methotrexate, corticosteroids, and zoledronic acid was not effective, etanercept was initiated with good and rapid clinical and biological improvement. The diagnosis and treatment of SAPHO syndrome are challenging due to the heterogeneity of symptoms and unknown pathogenesis. Etanercept can be an effective therapy, especially in refractory cases. Further studies are needed in order to establish a therapeutic strategy.

  3. Heterogeneous models place the root of the placental mammal phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Claire C; Foster, Peter G; Webb, Andrew E; Pisani, Davide; McInerney, James O; O'Connell, Mary J

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneity among life traits in mammals has resulted in considerable phylogenetic conflict, particularly concerning the position of the placental root. Layered upon this are gene- and lineage-specific variation in amino acid substitution rates and compositional biases. Life trait variations that may impact upon mutational rates are longevity, metabolic rate, body size, and germ line generation time. Over the past 12 years, three main conflicting hypotheses have emerged for the placement of the placental root. These hypotheses place the Atlantogenata (common ancestor of Xenarthra plus Afrotheria), the Afrotheria, or the Xenarthra as the sister group to all other placental mammals. Model adequacy is critical for accurate tree reconstruction and by failing to account for these compositional and character exchange heterogeneities across the tree and data set, previous studies have not provided a strongly supported hypothesis for the placental root. For the first time, models that accommodate both tree and data set heterogeneity have been applied to mammal data. Here, we show the impact of accurate model assignment and the importance of data sets in accommodating model parameters while maintaining the power to reject competing hypotheses. Through these sophisticated methods, we demonstrate the importance of model adequacy, data set power and provide strong support for the Atlantogenata over other competing hypotheses for the position of the placental root.

  4. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Jonas J.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  5. Etanercept in the treatment of SAPHO syndrome: Which place?

    PubMed Central

    Abourazzak, Fatima Ezzahra; Hachimi, Hicham; Kadi, Nadira; Berrada, Khadija; Tizniti, Siham; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) is a rare disease combining skin, bone, and joint manifestations. Its treatment remains a debated issue in the absence of a valid therapeutic strategy. The experience with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)-blocking agents is still small but encouraging. This therapy is reserved for refractory cases. The most commonly used agent is infliximab. Only few cases treated by etanercept have been reported in the literature. We report a new case treated by this biologic therapy and discuss its place in the treatment of SAPHO syndrome. A 30-year-old male, with a history of left clavicular osteitis that required surgical bone biopsy to rule out infection and malignancy, was admitted to the rheumatology department because of recurrent anterior chest pain, lower limb arthralgia, and sacroiliac pain. Laboratory findings revealed an inflammatory syndrome. Conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) scan of the sternocostoclavicular region showed sclerosis and hyperostosis of the left clavicle. Right sacroiliitis was diagnosed based on the radiographic findings. Moreover, the patient reported palmoplantar pustulosis, thereby strengthening the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. As conventional treatment based on methotrexate, corticosteroids, and zoledronic acid was not effective, etanercept was initiated with good and rapid clinical and biological improvement. The diagnosis and treatment of SAPHO syndrome are challenging due to the heterogeneity of symptoms and unknown pathogenesis. Etanercept can be an effective therapy, especially in refractory cases. Further studies are needed in order to establish a therapeutic strategy. PMID:27708894

  6. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was <3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be

  7. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was < 3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be < rmax. Further, the ratio of desired harvest rate to 0.5 x rmax may be a useful metric for ascertaining the applicability of specific requirements of the National Environmental Protection Act.

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY S HARE W ITH W OMEN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY During pregnancy, your baby gets most ... eat and vitamins you take. Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) are an important family of building ...

  9. Evaluation of the structure and acid-base properties of bulk wood by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Q.; Rahiala, H.; Rosenholm, J.B.

    1998-10-15

    The structure of pine wood (Pinus silvestris L.) has been analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy, taking birch wood and the wood components cellulose, hemicellulose (xylan), and lignin as well as previously characterized wood resins as references. The acid-base properties of bulk pine wood were evaluated by comparing the spectra recorded before and after the treatment with various solvents. After the treatment with the probe liquids having only a Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) component, it was found that the LW interactions in pine wood take place without changing the main structure. After treatment with Lewis acid-base active probe liquids, the spectra indicate that, e.g., the intense peak located at {approximately}2936 cm{sup {minus}1} (CH{sub 2} stretch) seems to disappear, suggesting that this peak may be related to Lewis acidity. In addition, after treatment with a Lewis acid, it was found that the intense peak located at {approximately}1657 cm{sup {minus}1} (C{double_bond}C) is shifted, relating to Lewis basicity. With the ratio {approximately}2936/{approximately}1657 cm{sup {minus}1} as a measure of the acid-base properties of bulk wood, a value of about 2.00 indicates that the bulk pine wood is largely acidic. The pH determined supports the evaluation made by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Standardized methods for in-place filter testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, M.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawski, J.

    1997-08-01

    The conference minutes of a US DOE meeting held on in-place filter testing are presented. The purpose of the conference was to transfer technical in-place testing knowledge throughout the DOE complex. Major items discussed included purchase requisitions, in-place testing, instrumentation, and in-place test personnel qualifications and training. Future actions identified by conference attendees centered on establishing complex-wide DOE policies on training, inspection and testing, and filter specifications.

  11. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  12. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  13. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  14. Perirhinal cortex is necessary for acquiring, but not for retrieving object–place paired association

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yong Sang; Lee, Inah

    2010-01-01

    Remembering events frequently involves associating objects and their associated locations in space, and it has been implicated that the areas associated with the hippocampus are important in this function. The current study examined the role of the perirhinal cortex in retrieving familiar object–place paired associates, as well as in acquiring novel ones. Rats were required to visit one of two locations of a radial-arm maze and choose one of the objects (from a pair of different toy objects) exclusively associated with a given arm. Excitotoxic lesions of the perirhinal cortex initially impaired the normal retrieval of object–place paired-associative memories that had been learned presurgically, but the animals relearned gradually to the level of controls. In contrast, when required to associate a novel pair of objects with the same locations of the maze, the same lesioned rats were severely impaired with minimal learning, if any, taking place throughout an extensive testing period. However, the lesioned rats were normal in discriminating two different objects presented in a fixed arm in the maze. The results suggest that the perirhinal cortex is indispensable to forming discrete representations for object–place paired associates. Its role, however, may be compensated for by other structures when familiar object–place paired associative memories need to be retrieved. PMID:20154355

  15. 45 CFR 2102.1 - Times and places of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... place mailed to each member who does not in writing waive such notice. On all matters of official... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Times and places of meetings. 2102.1 Section 2102... AND PROCEDURES OF THE COMMISSION Commission Meetings § 2102.1 Times and places of meetings....

  16. 45 CFR 2102.1 - Times and places of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... place mailed to each member who does not in writing waive such notice. On all matters of official... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Times and places of meetings. 2102.1 Section 2102... AND PROCEDURES OF THE COMMISSION Commission Meetings § 2102.1 Times and places of meetings....

  17. Place, Mobility, and Faculty Life: Mindfulness and Learning through Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Academics move a lot. In this autoethnographic essay, I explore aspects of mobility, rootedness, mindfulness, and learning though my own story of leaving a place I loved for a new place I was drawn to, a place where I have begun the long and uncertain process of building new relationships of attachment. We lead mobile lives, even as we learn to…

  18. The Importance of Physical Place and Lived Topographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streibel, Michael J.

    This paper articulates a framework for thinking about the role of place in human experience. The question of why physical place is important in all experience is dealt with through a review of recent work on the concept of place, including Keith Basso's ethnographic work with the Western Apache on their belief that an enduring sense of place…

  19. Including Historic Places in the Social Studies Curriculum. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Marilyn

    "Teaching with Historic Places" is a program administered by the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places that identifies ways teachers can share the stories that historic places have to tell. The program creates classroom-ready educational materials based on properties that are listed in the National Register of…

  20. 43 CFR 3815.5 - Access to stock watering places.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to stock watering places. 3815.5... Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.5 Access to stock watering places. No watering places shall be inclosed, nor proper and lawful access of stock thereto prevented, nor the watering...