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Sample records for acid tga capped

  1. Photo-induced interaction of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots with cyanine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbar, Mostafa F.; Fayed, Tarek A.; Meaz, Talaat M.; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M.

    2016-11-01

    The photo-induced interaction of three different sizes of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) with two monomethine cyanine dyes belonging to the thiazole orange (TO) family has been studied. Positively charged cyanines interact with QDs surface which is negatively charged due to capping agent carboxylate ions. The energy transfer parameters including Stern-Volmer constant, Ksv, number of binding sites, n, quenching sphere radius, r, the critical energy transfer distance, R0, and energy transfer efficiencies, E have been calculated. The effect of structure and the number of aggregating molecules have been studied as a function of CdTe QDs particle size. Combining organic and inorganic semiconductors leads to increase of the effective absorption cross section of the QDs which can be utilized in novel nanoscale designs for light-emitting, photovoltaic and sensor applications. A synthesized triplet emission of the studied dyes was observed using CdTe QDs as donors and this is expected to play a potential role in molecular oxygen sensitization and in photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications.

  2. Photo-induced interaction of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots with cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Abdelbar, Mostafa F; Fayed, Tarek A; Meaz, Talaat M; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M

    2016-11-01

    The photo-induced interaction of three different sizes of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) with two monomethine cyanine dyes belonging to the thiazole orange (TO) family has been studied. Positively charged cyanines interact with QDs surface which is negatively charged due to capping agent carboxylate ions. The energy transfer parameters including Stern-Volmer constant, Ksv, number of binding sites, n, quenching sphere radius, r, the critical energy transfer distance, R0, and energy transfer efficiencies, E have been calculated. The effect of structure and the number of aggregating molecules have been studied as a function of CdTe QDs particle size. Combining organic and inorganic semiconductors leads to increase of the effective absorption cross section of the QDs which can be utilized in novel nanoscale designs for light-emitting, photovoltaic and sensor applications. A synthesized triplet emission of the studied dyes was observed using CdTe QDs as donors and this is expected to play a potential role in molecular oxygen sensitization and in photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications. PMID:27267278

  3. Antibacterial potential of rutin conjugated with thioglycolic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA-CdTe QDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, Devanesan Arul; Rameshkumar, Angappan; Jeyadevi, Ramachandran; Jagadeeswari, Sivanadanam; Nagarajan, Natarajan; Renganathan, Rajalingam; Sivasudha, Thilagar

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots not only act as nanocarrier but also act as stable and resistant natural fluorescent bio markers used in various in vitro and in vivo photolabelling and biological applications. In this study, the antimicrobial potential of TGA-CdTe QDs and commercial phenolics (rutin and caffeine) were investigated against Escherichiacoli. UV absorbance and fluorescence quenching study of TGA-CdTe QDs with rutin and caffeine complex was measured by spectroscopic technique. QDs-rutin conjugate exhibited excellent quenching property due to the -OH groups present in the rutin structure. But the same time caffeine has not conjugated with QDs because of lacking of -OH group in its structure. Photolabelling of E. coli with QDs-rutin and QDs-caffeine complex was analyzed by fluorescent microscopic method. Microbe E. coli cell membrane damage was assessed by atomic force (AFM) and confocal microscopy. Based on the results obtained, it is suggested that QDs-rutin conjugate enhance the antimicrobial activity more than the treatment with QDs, rutin and caffeine alone.

  4. Antibacterial potential of rutin conjugated with thioglycolic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA-CdTe QDs).

    PubMed

    Ananth, Devanesan Arul; Rameshkumar, Angappan; Jeyadevi, Ramachandran; Jagadeeswari, Sivanadanam; Nagarajan, Natarajan; Renganathan, Rajalingam; Sivasudha, Thilagar

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots not only act as nanocarrier but also act as stable and resistant natural fluorescent bio markers used in various in vitro and in vivo photolabelling and biological applications. In this study, the antimicrobial potential of TGA-CdTe QDs and commercial phenolics (rutin and caffeine) were investigated against Escherichiacoli. UV absorbance and fluorescence quenching study of TGA-CdTe QDs with rutin and caffeine complex was measured by spectroscopic technique. QDs-rutin conjugate exhibited excellent quenching property due to the -OH groups present in the rutin structure. But the same time caffeine has not conjugated with QDs because of lacking of -OH group in its structure. Photolabelling of E. coli with QDs-rutin and QDs-caffeine complex was analyzed by fluorescent microscopic method. Microbe E. coli cell membrane damage was assessed by atomic force (AFM) and confocal microscopy. Based on the results obtained, it is suggested that QDs-rutin conjugate enhance the antimicrobial activity more than the treatment with QDs, rutin and caffeine alone. PMID:25544184

  5. Fluorescence Determination of Warfarin Using TGA-capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Human Plasma Samples.

    PubMed

    Dehbozorgi, A; Tashkhourian, J; Zare, S

    2015-11-01

    In this study, some effort has been performed to provide low temperature, less time consuming and facile routes for the synthesis of CdTe quantum dots using ultrasound and water soluble capping agent thioglycolic acid. TGA-capped CdTe quantum dots were characterized through x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. The prepared quantum dots were used for warfarin determination based on the quenching of the fluorescence intensity in aqueous solution. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of quantum dots fluorescence intensity versus the concentration of warfarin was 0.1-160.0 μM, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9996 and a limit of detection of 77.5 nM. There was no interference to coexisting foreign substances. The selectivity of the sensor was also tested and the results show that the developed method possesses a high selectivity for warfarin. PMID:26477838

  6. A Simple Fluorescence Quenching Method for the Determination of Vanillin Using TGA-capped CdTe/ZnS Nanoparticles as Probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhang, Qiaolin; Ding, Yaping; Lu, Yaxiang; Cai, Xiaoyong; Yu, Lurong

    2015-07-01

    Based on the quenching of the fluorescence intensity of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped core-shell CdTe/ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) by vanillin, a novel, simple and rapid method for the determination of vanillin was proposed. In aqueous medium, the functionalized core-shell CdTe/ZnS NPs were successfully synthesized with TGA as the capping ligand. TGA-capped core-shell CdTe/ZnS NPs were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Factors affecting the vanillin detection were investigated, and the optimum conditions were also determined. Under the optimum conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of CdTe/ZnS NPs was linearly proportional to vanillin over a concentration range from 9.4 × 10(-7) to 5.2 × 10(-4) M with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and a detection limit of 2.6 × 10(-7) M. The proposed method was also employed to detect trace vanillin in cookies with satisfactory results. PMID:25911548

  7. Preparation of pH-stimuli-responsive PEG-TGA/TGH-capped CdTe QDs and their application in cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Yang, Dongzhi; Sun, Shian; Zhao, Ziming; Tang, Daoquan

    2015-08-01

    A pH-sensitive and double functional nanoprobe was designed and synthesized in a water-soluble system using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and mercapto-acetohydrazide (TGH) as the stabilizers. TGA is biocompatible because the carboxyl group is easily linked to biological macromolecules. At the same time, the hydrazide on TGH reacts with the aldehyde on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and forms a hydrazone bond. The hydrazone bond ruptured at specific pH values and exhibited pH-stimuli-responsive characteristics. As an optical imaging probe, the PEG-TGA/TGH-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) had high quality, with a fluorescence efficiency of 25-30%, and remained stable for at least five months. This pH-responsive factor can be used for the effective release of CdTe QDs under the acidic interstitial extracellular environment of tumor cells. This allows the prepared pH-stimuli-responsive nanoprobes to show fluorescence signals for use in cancer cell imaging. PMID:25244429

  8. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  9. A rapid and sensitive assay for determination of doxycycline using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Jafari, Marzieh; Zare, Saber

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric sensor for determination of doxycycline based on its interaction with thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA/CdTe QDs) has been developed. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a fast response time of <10s. The results revealed that doxycycline could quench the fluorescence of TGA/CdTe QDs via electron transfer from the QDs to doxycycline through a dynamic quenching mechanism. The sensor permitted determination of doxycycline in a concentration range of 1.9×10(-6)-6.1×10(-5)molL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.1×10(-7)molL(-1). The sensor was applied for determination of doxycycline in honey and human serum samples. PMID:26204505

  10. A rapid and sensitive assay for determination of doxycycline using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Jafari, Marzieh; Zare, Saber

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric sensor for determination of doxycycline based on its interaction with thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA/CdTe QDs) has been developed. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a fast response time of <10 s. The results revealed that doxycycline could quench the fluorescence of TGA/CdTe QDs via electron transfer from the QDs to doxycycline through a dynamic quenching mechanism. The sensor permitted determination of doxycycline in a concentration range of 1.9 × 10-6-6.1 × 10-5 mol L-1 with a detection limit of 1.1 × 10-7 mol L-1. The sensor was applied for determination of doxycycline in honey and human serum samples.

  11. Generalized chemical route to develop fatty acid capped highly dispersed semiconducting metal sulphide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Jayesh D.; Mighri, Frej; Ajji, Abdellah

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Chemical route for the synthesis of OA-capped CdS, ZnS and PbS at low temperature. ► Synthesized nanocrystals via thermolysis of their metal–oleate complexes. ► Size quantized nanocrystals were highly dispersed and stable at room temperature. -- Abstract: This work deals with the synthesis of highly dispersed semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) of cadmium sulphide (CdS), zinc sulphide (ZnS) and lead sulphide (PbS) through a simple and generalized process using oleic acid (OA) as surfactant. To synthesize these NCs, metal–oleate (M–O) complexes were obtained from the reaction at 140 °C between metal acetates and OA in hexanes media. Subsequently, M–O complexes were sulphurized using thioacetamide at the same temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations show that the synthesized products are of nanoscale-size with highly crystalline cubic phase. The optical absorption of OA-capped metal sulphide NCs confirms that their size quantization induced a large shift towards visible region. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of CdS NCs shows a broad band-edge emission with shallow and deep-trap emissions, while PL spectrum of ZnS NCs reveals a broad emission due to defects states on the surface. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that fatty acid monolayers were bound strongly on the nanocrystal surface as a carboxylate and the two oxygen atoms of the carboxylate were coordinated symmetrically to the surface of the NCs. The strong binding between the fatty acid and the NCs surface enhances the stability of NCs colloids. In general, this generalized route has a great potential in developing nanoscale metal sulphides for opto-electronic devices.

  12. Upconversion nanoparticles with a strong acid-resistant capping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Ileana; Estebanez, Nestor; Francés-Soriano, Laura; Liras, Marta; González-Béjar, María; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2016-03-01

    Water-dispersible upconversion nanoparticles (β-NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+, UCNP) coated with a thin shell of a biocompatible copolymer comprising 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulphonsulphonic acid (AMPS), which we will term COP, have been prepared by multidentate grafting. This capping is remarkably resistant to strong acidic conditions as low as pH 2. The additional functionality of the smart UCNP@COP nanosystem has been proved by its association to a well-known photosensitizer (namely, methylene blue, MB). The green-to-red emission ratio of the UC@COP@MB nanohybrid exhibits excellent linear dependence in the 7 to 2 pH range as a consequence of the release of the dye as the pH decreases.Water-dispersible upconversion nanoparticles (β-NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+, UCNP) coated with a thin shell of a biocompatible copolymer comprising 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulphonsulphonic acid (AMPS), which we will term COP, have been prepared by multidentate grafting. This capping is remarkably resistant to strong acidic conditions as low as pH 2. The additional functionality of the smart UCNP@COP nanosystem has been proved by its association to a well-known photosensitizer (namely, methylene blue, MB). The green-to-red emission ratio of the UC@COP@MB nanohybrid exhibits excellent linear dependence in the 7 to 2 pH range as a consequence of the release of the dye as the pH decreases. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional spectra and data of HEMA, AMPS, COP, UCNP@oleate, UCNP@COP, and UCNP@COP@MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06653k

  13. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-01

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times. PMID:26048074

  14. Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of a breadboard trace gas analyzer (TGA) is documented. The TGA is a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system. The gas chromatograph subsystem employs a recirculating hydrogen carrier gas. The recirculation feature minimizes the requirement for transport and storage of large volumes of carrier gas during a mission. The silver-palladium hydrogen separator which permits the removal of the carrier gas and its reuse also decreases vacuum requirements for the mass spectrometer since the mass spectrometer vacuum system need handle only the very low sample pressure, not sample plus carrier. System performance was evaluated with a representative group of compounds.

  15. CdTe amplification nanoplatforms capped with thioglycolic acid for electrochemical aptasensing of ultra-traces of ATP.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Farzin, Leila; Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh; Shanehsaz, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    A "signal off" voltammetric aptasensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of ultra-low levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). For this purpose, a new strategy based on the principle of recognition-induced switching of aptamers from DNA/DNA duplex to DNA/target complex was designed using thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as the signal amplifying nano-platforms. Owing to the small size, high surface-to-volume ratio and good conductivity, quantum dots were immobilized on the electrode surface for signal amplification. In this work, methylene blue (MB) adsorbed to DNA was used as a sensitive redox reporter. The intensity of voltammetric signal of MB was found to decrease linearly upon ATP addition over a concentration range of 0.1nM to 1.6μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9924. Under optimized conditions, the aptasensor was able to selectively detect ATP with a limit of detection of 45pM at 3σ. The results also demonstrated that the QDs-based amplification strategy could be feasible for ATP assay and presented a potential universal method for other small biomolecular aptasensors. PMID:27612836

  16. Regulation of the synthesis of barley aleurone. cap alpha. -amylase by gibberellic acid and calcium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Carbonell, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) and calcium ions on the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase and acid phosphatase by isolated aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. Aleurone layers not previously exposed to GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ show qualitative and quantitative changes in hydrolase production following incubation in either GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ or both. In cubation in H/sub 2/O or CA/sup 2 +/ results in the production of low levels of ..cap alpha..-amylase or acid phosphatase. The addition of GA/sub 3/ to the incubation medium causes 10- to 20-fold increase in the amounts of these enzymes released from the tissue, and addition of CA/sup 2 +/ at 10 millimolar causes a further 8- to 9-fold increase in ..cap alpha..-amylase release and a 75% increase in phosphatase release. Production of ..cap alpha..-amylase isoenzymes is also modified by the levels of GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. ..cap alpha..-amylase 2 is produced under all conditions of incubation, while ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 appears only when layers are incubated in GA/sub 3/ or GA/sub 3/ plus CA/sup 2 +/. The synthesis of ..cap alpha..-amylases 3 and 4 requires the presence of both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis shows that two distinct groups of ..cap alpha..-amylase antigens are present in incubation media of aleurone layers incubated with both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/, while only one group of antigens is found in media of layers incubated in GA/sub 3/ alone. Strontium ions can be substituted for CA/sup 2 +/ in increasing hydrolase production, although higher concentrations of Sr/sup 2 +/ are requried for maximal response. We conclude that GA/sub 3/ is required for the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 and that both GA/sub 3/ and either CA/sup 2 +/ or Sr/sup 2 +/ are required for the production of isoenzymes 3 and 4 of barley aleurone ..cap alpha..-amylase. 22 references, 8

  17. An oleic acid-capped CdSe quantum-dot sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing; Song, J. L.; Deng, W. Q.; Sun, X. W.; Jiang, C. Y.; Lei, W.; Huang, J. H.; Liu, R. S.

    2009-04-13

    In this letter, we report an oleic acid (OA)-capped CdSe quantum-dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) with an improved performance. The TiO{sub 2}/OA-CdSe photoanode in a two-electrode device exhibited a photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 17.5% at 400 nm. At AM1.5G irradiation with 100 mW/cm{sup 2} light intensity, the QDSSCs based on OA-capped CdSe showed a power conversion efficiency of about 1%. The function of OA was to increase QD loading, extend the absorption range and possibly suppress the surface recombination.

  18. High coercivity of oleic acid capped CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Mukta V; Singh, Shashi B; Date, Sadgopal K; Kothari, Deepti; Reddy, V Raghavendra; Gupta, Ajay; Sathe, Vasant; Choudhary, Ram Jane; Kulkarni, Sulabha K

    2009-07-01

    High coercivity (9.47 kOe) has been obtained for oleic acid capped chemically synthesized CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles of crystallite size approximately 20 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the formation of spinel phase in these nanoparticles. Thermal annealing at various temperatures increases the particle size and ultimately shows bulk like properties at particle size approximately 56 nm. The nature of bonding of oleic acid with CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles and amount of oleic acid in the sample is determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogrvimetric analysis, respectively. The Raman analysis suggests that the samples are under strain due to capping molecules. Cation distribution in the sample is studied using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Oleic acid concentration dependent studies show that the amount of capping molecules plays an important role in achieving such a high coercivity. On the basis of above observations, it has been proposed that very high coercivity (9.47 kOe) is the result of the magnetic anisotropy, strain, and disorder of the surface spins developed by covalently bonded oleic acid to the surface of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles. PMID:19522478

  19. Snap-through anti-ignition vent cap for lead acid storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, E.M.; Heiser, J.I.

    1980-11-11

    A vented battery cap is provided which is adapted to engage at least one of a plurality of fill holes in an automotive storage battery or similar lead acid battery and which has pressure release means for venting the combustible gases produced within that storage battery under conditions such as overcharge conditions into the atmosphere. The cap itself is comprised of substantially two portions, a base member which fits into at least one of the fill holes and a top member which snap-fits through the base member. The pressure release means comprises a plurality of extremely narrow slits on both the top and underside of the cap which have widths in the order of 0.003 to 0.005 of an inch. The remainder of the battery cap is tightly sealed to prevent any extraneous leaks of battery gases received from the automotive battery from leaking into the atmosphere. The slits are so constructed to facilitate the safe expulsion of any volume of gas normally produced by an automotive storage battery, while virtually eliminating the likelihood that ignition of gases within the atmosphere will result in explosive consequences either within the battery cap or within the battery itself.

  20. A tandem affinity purification tag of TGA2 for isolation of interacting proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Henrik U; Findling, Simone; Nukarinen, Ella; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging provides a powerful tool for isolating interacting proteins in vivo. TAP-tag purification offers particular advantages for the identification of stimulus-induced protein interactions. Type II bZIP transcription factors (TGA2, TGA5 and TGA6) play key roles in pathways that control salicylic acid, ethylene, xenobiotic and reactive oxylipin signaling. Although proteins interacting with these transcription factors have been identified through genetic and yeast 2-hybrid screening, others are still elusive. We have therefore generated a C-terminal TAP-tag of TGA2 to isolate additional proteins that interact with this transcription factor. Three lines most highly expressing TAP-tagged TGA2 were functional in that they partially complemented reactive oxylipin-responsive gene expression in a tga2 tga5 tga6 triple mutant. TAP-tagged TGA2 in the most strongly overexpressing line was proteolytically less stable than in the other 2 lines. Only this overexpressing line could be used in a 2-step purification process, resulting in isolation of co-purifying bands of larger molecular weight than TGA2. TAP-tagged TGA2 was used to pull down NPR1, a protein known to interact with this transcription factor. Mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides that co-purified with TAP-tagged TGA2. Having generated this TGA2 TAP-tag line will therefore be an asset to researchers interested in stimulus-induced signal transduction processes. PMID:25482810

  1. Fluorescent carbon dots capped with PEG200 and mercaptosuccinic acid.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Helena; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-09-01

    The synthesis and functionalization of carbon nanoparticles with PEG(200) and mercaptosuccinic acid, rendering fluorescent carbon dots, is described. Fluorescent carbon dots (maximum excitation and emission at 320 and 430 nm, respectively) with average dimension 267 nm were obtained. The lifetime decay of the functionalized carbon dots is complex and a three component decay time model originated a good fit with the following lifetimes: τ(1) = 2.71 ns; τ(2) = 7.36 ns; τ(3) = 0.38 ns. The fluorescence intensity of the carbon dots is affected by the solvent, pH (apparent pK(a) of 7.4 ± 0.2) and iodide (Stern-Volmer constant of 78 ± 2 M(-1)). PMID:20352303

  2. Shape-controllable and versatile synthesis of copper nanocrystals with amino acids as capping agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Cheng; Zhao, Fu-Gang; Shao, Wei; Ge, Cong-Wu; Li, Wei-Shi

    2015-05-21

    Thanks to their outstanding properties and a wide range of promising applications, the development of a versatile and convenient preparation method for metallic copper nanocrystals with controllable shape is of primary significance. Different from the literature that utilized a capping agent bearing only one kind of Cu binding functionality, either an amino or a carboxylic unit, for their preparation and shape control, this contribution reports a convenient method to engage both amino and carboxylic binding units at the same time. In this method, natural amino acids have been chosen as capping agents and demonstrated their versatile capabilities for the preparation of both Cu nanoparticles and nanowires. Detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the binding mode between amino acids and the Cu surface is highly dependent on their chemical structures. Interestingly, the produced Cu nanocrystals, exhibited an extraordinarily excellent anti-oxidation power. Furthermore, it was found that the multiple functionalities of amino acids not only have a great impact on the properties of their capped nanocrystals, such as solvent dispersibility, but also provide a convenient route for their further modification and functionalization. PMID:25908551

  3. Preparation of linoleic acid-capped silver nanoparticles and their antimicrobial effect.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Gang, S; Nath, S S; Bhattacharjee, R

    2012-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been prepared through the chemical reduction of silver ions by ethanol using linoleic acid as a stabilising agent. This colloidal solution shows an absorption band in the visible range with an absorption peak at 421 nm. The peaks in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern matches well with the standard values of the face-centred-cubic form of metallic silver. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) micrograph shows a nearly uniform distribution of the particles with an average size of 8 nm. This linoleic acid-capped silver nanoparticles show antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:22559712

  4. Influence of thiol capping on the photoluminescence properties of L-cysteine-, mercaptoethanol- and mercaptopropionic acid-capped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, A; Dhoble, S J; Kher, R S

    2015-11-01

    Mercaptoethanol (ME), mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and L-cysteine (L-Cys) having -SH functional groups were used as surface passivating agents for the wet chemical synthesis of ZnS nanoparticles. The effect of the thiol group on the optical and photoluminescence (PL) properties of ZnS nanoparticles was studied. L-Cysteine-capped ZnS nanoparticles showed the highest PL intensity among the studied capping agents, with a PL emission peak at 455 nm. The PL intensity was found to be dependent on the concentration of Zn(2+) and S(2-) precursors. The effect of buffer on the PL intensity of L-Cys-capped ZnS nanoparticles was also studied. UV/Vis spectra showed blue shifting of the absorption edge. PMID:25683960

  5. Tobacco bZIP transcription factor TGA2.2 and related factor TGA2.1 have distinct roles in plant defense responses and plant development.

    PubMed

    Thurow, Corinna; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Krawczyk, Stefanie; Butterbrodt, Thomas; Nickolov, Kaloian; Gatz, Christiane

    2005-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial internal signaling molecule needed for the induction of plant defense responses upon attack of a variety of pathogens. Basic leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family bind to activating sequence-1 (as-1)-like elements which are SA-responsive cis elements found in promoters of 'immediate early' and 'late' SA-inducible genes. TGA2.2 constitutes the main component of tobacco as-1-binding factor-1 (ASF-1). TGA2.1, which differs from TGA2.2 by being able to activate transcription in yeast, constitutes a minor fraction of the complex. Both proteins interact with NPR1, a protein essential for SA inducibility of 'late' genes. Here we demonstrate using dsRNAi mediated gene silencing that reducing the amount of TGA2.2 and TGA2.1 correlates with a significant decrease in ASF-1 activity and with a decreased inducibility of both 'immediate early' and 'late' genes. In contrast, reducing the amount of TGA2.1 alone had no effect on the expression of these target genes suggesting that TGA2.1 is dispensable for SA-inducible gene expression from the as-1 element. Expression of a TGA2.2 mutant unable to form heterodimers with the endogenous pool of TGA factors led to reduced SA-inducibility of 'immediate early' gene Nt103, indicating that the native leucine zipper is important for the protein to act positively on transcription. Plants with reduced amounts of TGA2.1 developed petal like stamens indicating a regulatory role of TGA2.1 in defining organ identity in tobacco flowers. A model is suggested that unifies conflicting results on the function of tobacco TGA factors with respect to activation of the 'late' PR-1a promoter. PMID:16167899

  6. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. PMID:22410205

  7. Enhancement of anti arthritic effect of quercetin using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots as nanocarrier in adjuvant induced arthritic Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Jeyadevi, R; Sivasudha, T; Rameshkumar, A; Ananth, D Arul; Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Kumaresan, K; Kumar, L Dinesh; Jagadeeswari, S; Renganathan, R

    2013-12-01

    In this present study, we investigated thio glycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA-CdTe QDs) as nano carrier to study the antiarthritic activity of quercetin on adjuvant induced arthritic Wistar rats. The free radical scavenging activity of QDs-QE complex was evaluated by 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion scavenging assays. Fifteen days after adjuvant induction, arthritic rats received QDs-QE complex orally at the dose of 0.2 and 0.4mg/kg daily for 3 weeks. Diclofenac sodium (DF) was used as a reference drug. Administration of QDs-QE complex showed a significant reduction in inflammation and improvement in cartilage regeneration. Treatment with QDs-QE complex significantly (P<0.05) reduced the expressions lipid peroxidation and showed significant (P<0.05) increase in activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) catalase (CAT) levels in paw tissue. C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of experimental animals were also estimated. Histology of hind limb tissue in experimental groups confirmed the complete cartilage regeneration in arthritis induced rats treated with QDs-QE complex. Based on our findings, we suggest that the QDs act as nano carrier for the drugs used in the treatment of various degenerative diseases. PMID:23994749

  8. Abscisic acid, xanthoxin and violaxanthin in the caps of gravistimulated maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Arroyave, N. J.; Sun, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of abscisic acid (ABA), xanthoxin (Xa) and the carotenoid violaxanthin (Va) were investigated in root tips of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit). In roots grown in the dark, Va and ABA were present in relatively high amounts in the root cap and in low amounts in the adjacent terminal 1.5 mm of the root. Xanthoxin was present in equal concentrations in both regions. In roots exposed to light, the ABA distribution was reversed, with relatively low levels in the root cap and high levels in the adjacent 1.5-mm segment. Light also caused a decrease in Va in both regions of the root and an increase in Xa, especially in the cap. In the maize cultivar used for this work, light is necessary for gravitropic curving. This response occurs within the same time frame as the light-induced ABA redistribution as well as the changes in the levels of Va and Xa. These data are consistent with a role for ABA in root gravitropism and support the proposal that Xa may arise from the turnover of Va.

  9. CAP-D3 Promotes Bacterial Clearance in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Repressing Expression of Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; Deutschman, Emily; Kim, Yeojung; West, Gail; Sadler, Tammy; Stylianou, Eleni; Krokowski, Dawid; Hatzoglou, Maria; de la Motte, Carol; Rubin, Brian P.; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Defects in colonic epithelial barrier defenses are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). The proteins that regulate bacterial clearance in the colonic epithelium have not been completely identified. The chromosome-associated protein D3 (dCAP-D3), regulates responses to bacterial infection. We examined whether CAP-D3 promotes bacterial clearance in human colonic epithelium. METHODS Clearance of Salmonella or adherent-invasive Escherichia coli LF82 was assessed by gentamycin protection assays in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells expressing small hairpin RNAs against CAP-D3. We used immunoblot assays to measure levels of CAP-D3 in colonic epithelial cells from patients with UC and healthy individuals (controls). RNA sequencing identified genes activated by CAP-D3. We analyzed the roles of CAP-D3 target genes in bacterial clearance using gentamycin protection and immunofluorescence assays and studies with pharmacologic inhibitors. RESULTS CAP-D3 expression was reduced in colonic epithelial cells from patients with active UC. Reduced CAP-D3 expression decreased autophagy and impaired intracellular bacterial clearance by HT-29 and Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells. Lower levels of CAP-D3 increased transcription of genes encoding SLC7A5 and SLC3A2, whose products heterodimerize to form an amino acid transporter in HT-29 cells following bacterial infection; levels of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 were increased in tissues from patients with UC, compared with controls. Reduced CAP-D3 in HT-29 cells resulted in earlier recruitment of SLC7A5 to Salmonella-containing vacuoles, increased activity of mTORC1, and increased survival of bacteria. Inhibition of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 or mTORC1 activity rescued the bacterial clearance defects of CAP-D3– deficient cells. CONCLUSIONS CAP-D3 downregulates transcription of genes that encode amino acid transporters (SLC7A5 and SLC3A2) to promote bacterial autophagy by colon epithelial cells. Levels of CAP-D3 protein are reduced in patients with

  10. Continuous-flow reactor-based synthesis of carbohydrate and dihydrolipoic acid-capped quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Paola; Kikkeri, Raghavendra; Seeberger, Peter H

    2011-08-01

    A detailed protocol for the large-scale synthesis of carbohydrate and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA)-coated CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS nanoparticles using continuous flow reactors is described here. Three continuous flow microreaction systems, operating at three different temperatures, are used for the synthesis of mannose-, galactose- or DHLA-functionalized quantum dots (QDs). In the first step of synthesis, the CdSe and CdTe nanoparticles are prepared. The size and spectral properties of the CdSe core of the nanoparticles are controlled by adjustment of the residence time and the temperature. As a second step, the zinc sulfide capping under homogenous conditions is carried out at a substantially lower temperature than is required for nanoparticle growth in batch processes. Finally, the trioctylphosphine/oleic acid ligand is effectively replaced with either carbohydrate PEG-thiol moieties or DHLA at 60 °C. This new protocol allows the synthesis of biologically active fluorescent QDs in 4 d. PMID:21799489

  11. Clearance of. cap alpha. -aminoisobutyric acid during in-situ perfusion of the guinea pig placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Kelman, B.J.; Sikov, M.R.

    1983-05-01

    Extensive investigation of the transport of ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB; a nonmetabolized amino acid) has shown that AIB is actively transported from mother to fetus across the hemochorial placenta of the guinea pig. As a step towards clarifying the relative rolls of active and passive movements of amino acids across the placenta, it would be useful to obtain concurrent measurements of transplacental movements of a substance which crosses the placenta rapidly by simple diffusion (water) and of a substance which is actively transported across the placenta (AIB). In our study, placentas from guinea pigs between 59 and 61 days of gestation were perfused in situ through cannulated umbilical vessels with the maternal circulation left intact. Tritiated water and /sup 14/C-AIB were injected into a maternal jugular vein and maternal blood samples were obtained at 1 to 10 minute intervals; perfusate samples were collected sequentially after one pass through the placenta. Clearance of /sup 14/C-AIB from mother to fetus (AIB/sub MF/) and AIB concentrations in placental tissue, maternal plasma, and perfusate were consistent in magnitude with data obtained by other invetigators who have clearly shown an active transport of AIB in the placenta. On the other hand, in this study AIB/sub MF/ ranged from approximately 50% to 96% of the clearance of /sup 3/H-labeled water from mother to fetus (T/sub MF/) and that changes in AIB/sub MF/ correlated closely with changes in T/sub MF/ in all perfusions. Thus, it appears that AIB/sub MF/ closely paralleled T/sub MF/ and these data suggest that a relatively large component of AIB/sub MF/ is of passive origin in the in situ placenta.

  12. A universal strategy for visual chiral recognition of α-amino acids with l-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoxin; Zhou, Fulin; Xu, Chunli; Li, Baoxin

    2016-02-01

    The ability to recognize and quantify the chirality of alpha-amino acids constitutes the basis of many critical areas for specific targeting in drug development and metabolite probing. It is still challenging to conveniently distinguish the enantiomer of amino acids largely due to the lack of a universal and simple strategy. In this work, we report a strategy for the visual recognition of α-amino acids. It is based on the chirality of l-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles (l-TA-capped AuNPs, ca. 13 nm in diameter). All of 19 right-handed α-amino acids can induce a red-to-blue color change of l-TA-capped AuNP solution, whereas all of the left-handed amino acids (except cysteine) cannot. The chiral recognition can be achieved by the naked eye and a simple spectrophotometer. This method does not require complicated chiral modification, and excels through its low-cost, good availability of materials and its simplicity. Another notable feature of this method is its high generality, and this method can discriminate almost all native α-amino acid enantiomers. This versatile method could be potentially used for high-throughput chiral recognition of amino acids. PMID:26759834

  13. 6LiF oleic acid capped nanoparticles entrapment in siloxanes for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Marchi, T.; Gramegna, F.; Cinausero, M.; Quaranta, A.; Palma, M. Dalla

    2016-07-01

    The good light output of siloxane based scintillators as displayed under γ-rays and α particles has been exploited here to obtain clear and reliable response toward thermal neutrons. Sensitization towards thermal neutrons has been pursued by adding 6LiF, in form of nanoparticles. Aiming at the enhancement of compatibility between the inorganic nanoparticles and the low polarity, siloxane based surrounding medium, oleic acid-capped 6LiF nanoparticles have been synthesized by thermal decomposition of Li trifluoroacetate. Thin pellets siloxane scintillator maintained their optical transmittance up to weight load of 2% of 6Li. Thin samples with increasing 6Li concentration and thicker ones with fixed 6Li amount have been prepared and tested with several sources (α, γ-rays, moderated neutrons). Light output as high as 80% of EJ212 under α irradiation was measured with thin samples, and negligible changes have been observed as a result of 6LiF addition. In case of thick samples, severe light loss has been observed, as induced by opacity. Nevertheless, thermal neutrons detection has been assessed and the data have been compared with GS20, based on Li glass, taken as a reference material.

  14. Potent antimicrobial activity of bone cement encapsulating silver nanoparticles capped with oleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Prokopovich, Polina; Köbrick, Mathias; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Perni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Bone cement is widely used in surgical treatments for the fixation for orthopaedic devices. Subsequently, 2–3% of patients undergoing these procedures develop infections that are both a major health risk for patients and a cost for the health service providers; this is also aggravated by the fact that antibiotics are losing efficacy because of the rising resistance of microorganisms to these substances. In this study, oleic acid capped silver nanoparticles (NP) were encapsulated into Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based bone cement samples at various ratios. Antimicrobial activity against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acinetobacter baumannii was exhibited at NP concentrations as low as 0.05% (w/w). Furthermore, the mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of the bone cement containing these NP were assessed to guarantee that such material is safe to be used in orthopaedic surgical practice. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 103B: 273–281, 2015. PMID:24819471

  15. Synthesis and bioactivities of silver nanoparticles capped with 5-Amino-?-resorcylic acid hydrochloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Conjugated and drug loaded silver nanoparticles are getting an increased attention for various biomedical applications. Nanoconjugates showed significant enhancement in biological activity in comparison to free drug molecules. In this perspective, we report the synthesis of bioactive silver capped with 5-Amino-?-resorcylic acid hydrochloride dihydrate (AR). The in vitro antimicrobial (antibacterial, antifungal), enzyme inhibition (xanthine oxidase, urease, carbonic anhydrase, ?-chymotrypsin, cholinesterase) and antioxidant activities of the developed nanostructures was investigated before and after conjugation to silver metal. Results The conjugation of AR to silver was confirmed through FTIR, UV¿vis and TEM techniques. The amount of AR conjugated with silver was characterized through UV¿vis spectroscopy and found to be 9% by weight. The stability of synthesized nanoconjugates against temperature, high salt concentration and pH was found to be good. Nanoconjugates, showed significant synergic enzyme inhibition effect against xanthine and urease enzymes in comparison to standard drugs, pure ligand and silver. Conclusions Our synthesized nanoconjugate was found be to efficient selective xanthine and urease inhibitors in comparison to Ag and AR. On a per weight basis, our nanoconjugates required less amount of AR (about 11 times) for inhibition of these enzymes. PMID:25201390

  16. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-. cap alpha. /sub 2/-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Gejyo, F.; Takagaki, K.; Haupt, H.; Schwick, H.G.; Buergi, W.; Marti, T.; Schaller, J.; Rickli, E.; Brossmer, R.

    1988-02-01

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of approx. = 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% ..cap alpha..-helix, 27% ..beta..-sheet, and 22% ..beta..-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in ..beta..-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the ..cap alpha.. chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response.

  17. Mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots as fluorescence probe for the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2015-11-01

    Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dot (QDs) fluorescent probes were synthesized in aqueous solution and used for the determination of salicylic acid. The interaction between the MPA-capped CdTe QDs and salicylic acid was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and some parameters that could modify the fluorescence were investigated to optimize the measurements. Under optimum conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity of MPA-capped CdTe QDs was linearly proportional to the concentration of salicylic acid in the range of 0.5-40 µg mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination of 0.998, and the limit of detection was 0.15 µg mL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products, and satisfactory results were obtained that were in agreement with both the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and the claimed values. The recovery of the method was in the range 99 ± 3% to 105 ± 9%. The proposed method is simple, rapid, cost effective, highly sensitivity and eminently suitable for the quality control of pharmaceutical preparation. The possible mechanisms for the observed quenching reaction was also discussed. PMID:25683730

  18. Characterizing mixed phosphonic acid ligand capping on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using ligand exchange and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Lisowski, Carmen E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-03-01

    The ligand capping of phosphonic acid functionalized CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) was investigated with a combination of solution and solid-state (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two phosphonic acid ligands were used in the synthesis of the QDs, tetradecylphosphonic acid and ethylphosphonic acid. Both alkyl phosphonic acids showed broad liquid and solid-state (31) P NMR resonances for the bound ligands, indicative of heterogeneous binding to the QD surface. In order to quantify the two ligand populations on the surface, ligand exchange facilitated by phenylphosphonic acid resulted in the displacement of the ethylphosphonic acid and tetradecylphosphonic acid and allowed for quantification of the free ligands using (31) P liquid-state NMR. After washing away the free ligand, two broad resonances were observed in the liquids' (31) P NMR corresponding to the alkyl and aromatic phosphonic acids. The washed samples were analyzed via solid-state (31) P NMR, which confirmed the ligand populations on the surface following the ligand exchange process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26639792

  19. Stimulation of the synthesis of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F/sub 1. cap alpha. / (6-keto-PGF/sub 1. cap alpha. /) by cultured human umbilical veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, B.O.; Johnson, A.R.; Falck, J.R.; Campbell, W.B.

    1986-03-05

    These studies were designed to investigate the synthesis of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in cultured human endothelial cells. The identification of the 15-HETE in these cells was made by UV absorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Specific radioimmunoassays were developed to quantify the synthesized 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE. The release of 15-HETE and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was stimulated by arachidonic acid, histamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. The release of 15-HETE paralleled the release of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and was both concentration-related and time-dependent. Aspirin, ibuprofen and indomethacin inhibited both the formation of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in similar concentrations. These data indicate that agents which stimulate PGI/sub 2/ synthesis also stimulate the synthesis of 15-HETE. Also, they implicate the cyclooxygenase pathway in the synthesis of 6-keto PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in human endothelial cells.

  20. A selective determination of copper ions in water samples based on the fluorescence quenching of thiol-capped CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Nurerk, Piyaluk; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Bunkoed, Opas

    2016-03-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) capped with different stabilizers, i.e. thioglycolic acid (TGA), 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and glutathione (GSH) were investigated as fluorescent probes for the determination of Cu(2+) . The stabilizer was shown to play an important role in both the sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cu(2+) . TGA-capped CdTe QDs showed the highest sensitivity, followed by the MPA and GSH-capped CdTe QDs, respectively. The TGA- and MPA-capped CdTe QDs were not selective for Cu(2+) that was affected by Ag(+) . The GSH-capped CdTe QDs were insensitive to Ag(+) and were used to determine Cu(2+) in water samples. Under optimal conditions, quenching of the fluorescence intensity (F0 /F) increased linearly with the concentration of Cu(2+) over a range of 0.10-4.0 µg/mL and the detection limit was 0.06 µg/mL. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu(2+) in water samples. Good recoveries of 93-104%, with a relative standard deviation of < 6% demonstrated that the developed simple method was accurate and reliable. The quenching mechanisms were also described. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26250550

  1. Chemiluminescence studies between aqueous phase synthesized mercaptosuccinic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots and luminol-H2O2.

    PubMed

    Kaviyarasan, Kulandaivelu; Anandan, Sambandam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Asiri, Abdullah M; Wu, Jerry J

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid capped Cadmium telluride quantum dots have been successfully synthesized via aqueous phase method. The products were well characterized by a number of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, XRD, HRTEM, and a corrected particle size analysis by the statistical treatment of several AFM measurements. Chemiluminescence experiments were performed to explore the resonance energy transfer between chemiluminescence donor (luminol-H2O2 system) and acceptor CdTe QDs. The combination of such donor and acceptor dramatically reduce the fluorescence while compared to pristine CdTe QDs without any exciting light source, which is due to the occurrence of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) processes. PMID:27131144

  2. Chemiluminescence studies between aqueous phase synthesized mercaptosuccinic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots and luminol-H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviyarasan, Kulandaivelu; Anandan, Sambandam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Wu, Jerry J.

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid capped Cadmium telluride quantum dots have been successfully synthesized via aqueous phase method. The products were well characterized by a number of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, XRD, HRTEM, and a corrected particle size analysis by the statistical treatment of several AFM measurements. Chemiluminescence experiments were performed to explore the resonance energy transfer between chemiluminescence donor (luminol-H2O2 system) and acceptor CdTe QDs. The combination of such donor and acceptor dramatically reduce the fluorescence while compared to pristine CdTe QDs without any exciting light source, which is due to the occurrence of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) processes.

  3. Amino acids of the Torpedo marmorata acetylcholine receptor. cap alpha. subunit labeled by a photoaffinity ligand for the acetylcholine binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, M.; Giraudat, J.; Kotzyba-Hibert, F.; Goeldner, M.; Hirth, C.; Chang, J.Y.; Lazure, C.; Chretien, M.; Changeux, J.P.

    1988-04-05

    The acetylcholine-binding sites on the native, membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata were covalently labeled with the photoaffinity reagent (/sup 3/H)-p-(dimethylamino)-benzenediazonium fluoroborate (DDF) in the presence of phencyclidine by employing an energy-transfer photolysis procedure. The ..cap alpha..-chains isolated from receptor-rich membranes photolabeled in the absence or presence of carbamoylcholine were cleaved with CNBr and the radiolabeled fragments purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Amino acid and/or sequence analysis demonstrated that the ..cap alpha..-chain residues Trp-149, Tyr-190, Cys-192, and Cys-193 and an unidentified residue(s) in the segment ..cap alpha.. 31-105 were all labeled by the photoaffinity reagent in an agonist-protectable manner. The labeled amino acids are located within three distinct regions of the large amino-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ..cap alpha..-subunit primary structure and plausibly lie in proximity to one another at the level of the acetylcholine-binding sites in the native receptor. These findings are in accord with models proposed for the transmembrane topology of the ..cap alpha..-chain that assign the amino-terminal segment ..cap alpha.. 1-210 to the synaptic cleft. Furthermore, the results suggest that the four identified (/sup 3/H)DDF-labeled resides, which are conserved in muscle and neuronal ..cap alpha..-chains but not in the other subunits, may be directly involved in agonist binding.

  4. Synthesis, density functional theory, molecular dynamics and electrochemical studies of 3-thiopheneacetic acid-capped gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosibo, Ndabenhle M.; Mdluli, Phumlane S.; Mashazi, Philani N.; Dyan, Busiswa; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Nyokong, Tebello; Tshikhudo, Robert T.; Skepu, Amanda; van der Lingen, Elma

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles capped with a bifunctional ligand, 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3-TAA) were synthesised by borohydride reduction at room temperature. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the particle aggregates and had semi-linear partial linkages that could be attributed to multi-modal binding of the ligand with various gold nanoparticles through the terminal thiolether (-S-) group and oxygen of the carboxylic (-COOH) group. This bimodal interaction led to limited stability of the resultant nanoparticles when tested using highly electrolytic media. To investigate further, density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemical and molecular dynamic calculations were conducted. The energetically favorable binding modes of the ligand to gold nanoparticle surfaces using the Gaussian program were studied. The DFT results showed kinetic stability of Au-3-TAA-Au interactions leading to inter-particle coupling or aggregation. Electrochemical analysis of the resultant nature of the capping agent revealed that 3-thiopheneacetic acid did not form a polymer during the preparation of Au-3-TAA. The cyclic voltammograms of Au-3-TAA nanoparticles coated glassy carbon electrode showed a typical gold character with the oxidation and reduction peaks at 1.4 V and 0.9 V, respectively.

  5. The U.S. Acid rain program: Key insights from the design, operation, and assessment of a Cap-and-Trade program

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, Sam; Schreifels, Jeremy; Stevens, Gabrielle; Witt, Maggie; LaCount, Melanie; Forte, Reynaldo; Smith, Kenon

    2007-08-15

    The authors' 15 years of experience with the Acid Rain Program suggests that for regional or larger-scale air pollution problems, such as acid rain and pollution transport, a well-designed cap-and-trade program can be cost-effective, flexible, and easy to implement with clear benefits that can be sustained into the future. (author)

  6. Multifunctional supramolecular vesicles based on the complex of ferrocenecarboxylic acid capped pillar[5]arene and a galactose derivative for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yincheng; Hou, Chenxi; Ren, Jingli; Xin, Xiaoting; Pei, Yuxin; Lu, Yuchao; Cao, Shoupeng; Pei, Zhichao

    2016-07-21

    Supramolecular vesicles based on the host-guest complexation of ferrocenecarboxylic acid capped pillar[5]arene and a galactose derivative have been constructed, which showed dual-responsiveness and cancer cells targetability resulting from its ferrocenecarboxylic acid units and galactose units, respectively. This work provides a good example for the construction of multifunctional nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery. PMID:27387299

  7. cap alpha. -D-Mannopyranosylmethyl-P-nitrophenyltriazene effects on the degradation and biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharide chains on. cap alpha. /sub 1/-acid glycoprotein by liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Docherty, P.A.; Aronson, N.N. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of ..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosylmethyl-p-nitrophenyltriazene (..cap alpha..-ManMNT) on the degradation and processing of oligosaccharide chains on ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were studied. Addition of the triazene to a perfused liver blocked the complete degradation of endocytosed N-acetyl (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled asialo-AGP and caused the accumulation of Man/sub 2/GlcNAc/sub 1/ fragments in the lysosome-enriched fraction of the liver homogenate. This compound also reduced the reincorporation of lysosomally-derived (/sup 14/C)GlcNAc into newly secreted glycoproteins. Cultured hepatocytes treated with the inhibitor synthesized and secreted fully-glycosylated AGP. However, the N-linked oligosaccharide chains on AGP secreted by the ..cap alpha..-ManMNT-treated hepatocytes remained sensitive to digestion with endoglycosidase H, were resistant to neuraminidase, and consisted of Man/sub 9-7/GlcNAc/sub 2/ structures as analyzed by high resolution Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography. As measured by their resistance to cleavage by endoglycosidase H, the normal processing of all six carbohydrate chains on AGP to the complex form did not completely resume until nearly 24 h after triazene treatment. Since ManMNT is likely to irreversibly inactivate ..cap alpha..-D-mannosidases, the return of AGP to secretory forms with complex chains after 24 h probably resulted from synthesis of new processing enzymes.

  8. Capping Protein Modulates the Dynamic Behavior of Actin Filaments in Response to Phosphatidic Acid in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejie; Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L.; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Xia; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling of actin filament arrays in response to biotic and abiotic stimuli is thought to require precise control over the generation and availability of filament ends. Heterodimeric capping protein (CP) is an abundant filament capper, and its activity is inhibited by membrane signaling phospholipids in vitro. How exactly CP modulates the properties of filament ends in cells and whether its activity is coordinated by phospholipids in vivo is not well understood. By observing directly the dynamic behavior of individual filament ends in the cortical array of living Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells, we dissected the contribution of CP to actin organization and dynamics in response to the signaling phospholipid, phosphatidic acid (PA). Here, we examined three cp knockdown mutants and found that reduced CP levels resulted in more dynamic activity at filament ends, and this significantly enhanced filament-filament annealing and filament elongation from free ends. The cp mutants also exhibited more dense actin filament arrays. Treatment of wild-type cells with exogenous PA phenocopied the actin-based defects in cp mutants, with an increase in the density of filament arrays and enhanced annealing frequency. These cytoskeletal responses to exogenous PA were completely abrogated in cp mutants. Our data provide compelling genetic evidence that the end-capping activity of CP is inhibited by membrane signaling lipids in eukaryotic cells. Specifically, CP acts as a PA biosensor and key transducer of fluxes in membrane signaling phospholipids into changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:22960908

  9. Effects of norflurazon, an inhibitor of carotenogenesis, on abscisic acid and xanthoxin in the caps of gravistimulated maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Sun, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    Maize seeds were germinated in the dark in the presence of the carotenoid synthesis inhibitor norflurazon and the levels of abscisic acid, xanthoxin and total carotenoids were measured in the root cap and in the adjacent 1.5 mm segment. In norflurazon-treated roots abscisic acid levels were markedly reduced, but an increase occurred in the levels of xanthoxin, a compound structurally and physiologically similar to abscisic acid. In the cultivar of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit) used for this work, brief illumination of the root is required for gravitropic curving. Following illumination both control and norflurazon-treated roots showed normal gravitropic curvature; however, the rate of curvature was delayed in norflurazon-treated roots. Our data from norflurazon-treated roots are consistent with a role for xanthoxin in maize root gravitropism. The increase in xanthoxin in the presence of an inhibitor of carotenoid synthesis suggests that xanthoxin and abscisic acid originate, at least in part, via different metabolic pathways.

  10. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  11. Chemical fragmentation by o-iodosobenzoic acid of. cap alpha. -chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n. at tryptophan residues

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, E.A.; Grebenshchikova, O.G.; Prozorovskii, V.N.

    1987-02-10

    The carboxymethylated ..cap alpha..-chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n., which contains four tryptophan residues, was cleaved by o-iodosobenzoic acid. Five fragments were isolated in homogeneous form by means of gel filtration on Sephadex, rechromatography, and high-voltage paper electrophoresis. The molecular weight, amino acid composition, and N-terminal amino acid sequence were determined for all the peptides isolated.

  12. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... and remove the cap. How Much Does It Cost? A cervical cap costs about $70 and should be replaced every year. In addition, there is also the cost of the doctor's visit. Many health insurance plans ...

  13. The Arabidopsis GRAS Protein SCL14 Interacts with Class II TGA Transcription Factors and Is Essential for the Activation of Stress-Inducible Promoters[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fode, Benjamin; Siemsen, Tanja; Thurow, Corinna; Weigel, Ralf; Gatz, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The plant signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and/or xenobiotic chemicals like the auxin mimic 2,4-D induce transcriptional activation of defense- and stress-related genes that contain activation sequence-1 (as-1)–like cis-elements in their promoters. as-1–like sequences are recognized by basic/leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family. Expression of genes related to the SA-dependent defense program systemic acquired resistance requires the TGA-interacting protein NPR1. However, a number of as-1–containing promoters can be activated independently from NPR1. Here, we report the identification of Arabidopsis thaliana SCARECROW-like 14 (SCL14), a member of the GRAS family of regulatory proteins, as a TGA-interacting protein that is required for the activation of TGA-dependent but NPR1-independent SA- and 2,4-D–inducible promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that class II TGA factors TGA2, TGA5, and/or TGA6 are needed to recruit SCL14 to promoters of selected SCL14 target genes identified by whole-genome transcript profiling experiments. The coding regions and the expression profiles of the SCL14-dependent genes imply that they might be involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and possibly endogenous harmful metabolites. Consistently, plants ectopically expressing SCL14 showed increased tolerance to toxic doses of the chemicals isonicotinic acid and 2,4,6-triiodobenzoic acid, whereas the scl14 and the tga2 tga5 tga6 mutants were more susceptible. Hence, the TGA/SCL14 complex seems to be involved in the activation of a general broad-spectrum detoxification network upon challenge of plants with xenobiotics. PMID:18984675

  14. General Detoxification and Stress Responses Are Mediated by Oxidized Lipids through TGA Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Stefan; Hilbert, Beate; Dueckershoff, Katharina; Roitsch, Thomas; Krischke, Markus; Mueller, Martin J.; Berger, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    12-oxo-phytodienoic acid and several phytoprostanes are cyclopentenone oxylipins that are formed via the enzymatic jasmonate pathway and a nonenzymatic, free radical–catalyzed pathway, respectively. Both types of cyclopentenone oxylipins induce the expression of genes related to detoxification, stress responses, and secondary metabolism, a profile clearly distinct from that of the cyclopentanone jasmonic acid. Microarray analyses revealed that 60% of the induction by phytoprostanes and 30% of the induction by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid was dependent on the TGA transcription factors TGA2, TGA5, and TGA6. Moreover, treatment with phytoprostanes and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid inhibited cell division and root growth, a property also shared by jasmonic acid. Besides being potent signals, cyclopentenones and other lipid peroxidation products are reactive electrophiles that can covalently bind to and damage proteins. To this end, we show that at least two of the induced detoxification enzymes efficiently metabolize cyclopentenones in vitro. Accumulation of two of these metabolites was detectable during Pseudomonas infection. The cyclopentenone oxylipin gene induction profile resembles the defense response induced by a variety of lipophilic xenobiotics. Hence, oxidized lipids may activate chemosensory mechanisms of a general broad-spectrum detoxification network involving TGA transcription factors. PMID:18334669

  15. 3,5-Dinitrobenzoic acid-capped upconverting nanocrystals for the selective detection of melamine.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Chanchal; Adusumalli, Venkata N K B; Mahalingam, Venkataramanan

    2014-05-28

    In this Research Article, we report for the first time the use of upconverting nanoparticles to detect melamine up to nanomolar concentration. Detection of melamine is important as it is one of the adulterant in protein rich food products due to its high nitrogen content. In this work, we have shown how the electron deficient 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (DNB)-coated Er/Yb-NaYF4 nanocrystals can specifically bind to electron rich melamine and alter the upconverting property of the nanocrystals. This selective binding led to the quenching of the upconversion emission from the nanocrystals. The high selectivity is verified by the addition of various analytes similar in structure with that of melamine. In addition, the selective quenching of the upconversion emission is reversible with the addition of dilute acid. This process has been repeated for more than five cycles with only a slight decrease in the sensing ability. The study was also extended to real milk samples, where the milk adulterated with melamine quenches the emission intensity of the DNB coated NaYF4:Er/Yb nanocrystals, whereas hardly any change is noted for the unadulterated milk sample. The high robustness and the sharp emission peaks make Er(3+)/Yb(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals a potential melamine sensing material over other organic fluorophores and nanocrystals possessing broad emissions. PMID:24742261

  16. A new, simple, green, and one-pot four-component synthesis of bare and poly(α,γ, L-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Savanović, Igor; Uskoković, Vuk; Škapin, Srečo D.; Bračko, Ines; Jovanović, Uroš; Uskoković, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    A simple and green chemical method has been developed to synthesize stable bare and capped silver nanoparticles based on the reduction of silver ions by glucose and capping by poly(α,γ,L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The use of ammonia during synthesis was avoided. PGA has had a dual role in the synthesis and was used as a capping agent to make the silver nanoparticle more biocompatible and to protect the nanoparticles from agglomerating in the liquid medium. The synthesized PGA-capped silver nanoparticles in the size range 5–45 nm were stable over long periods of time, without signs of precipitation. Morphological examination has shown that the silver nanoparticles had a nearly spherical, multiply twinned structure. The effects of the reaction temperature and the reaction time during the synthesis were investigated too. The biocompatibility of the PGA-capped silver nano-particles is discussed in terms of in vitro toxicity with human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The samples were characterized by UV–Visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and zeta potential measurements. PMID:24062597

  17. Multifunctional PLGA particles containing poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles and ascorbic acid with simultaneous antioxidative and prolonged antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Bračko, Ines; Milenković, Marina; Filipović, Nenad; Nunić, Jana; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2014-01-01

    A water-soluble antioxidant (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) was encapsulated together with poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNpPGA) within a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric matrix and their synergistic effects were studied. The PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles synthesized by a physicochemical method with solvent/non-solvent systems are spherical, have a mean diameter of 775 nm and a narrow size distribution with a polydispersity index of 0.158. The encapsulation efficiency of AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid within PLGA was determined to be >90%. The entire amount of encapsulated ascorbic acid was released in 68 days, and the entire amount of AgNpPGAs was released in 87 days of degradation. The influence of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid on cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, as well as antimicrobial activity against seven different pathogens was investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated good biocompatibility of these PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles. We measured the kinetics of ROS formation in HepG2 cells by a DCFH-DA assay, and found that PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid caused a significant decrease in DCF fluorescence intensity, which was 2-fold lower than that in control cells after a 5h exposure. This indicates that the PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid microspheres either act as scavengers of intracellular ROS and/or reduce their formation. Also, the results of antimicrobial activity of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid obtained by the broth microdilution method showed superior and extended activity of these particles. The samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential and particle size analysis. This paper presents a new approach to the treatment of infection that at the same time offers a very pronounced antioxidant effect. PMID:23988864

  18. Effects of zinc, copper, and lead toxicity on. cap alpha. -aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shafiq-ur-Rehman

    1984-07-01

    The distribution of lead, zinc and copper in the human environment has been recognized as a major toxicological factor. Lead ions have been shown to inhibit the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD), which is involved in the biosynthesis of heme. Copper also has its inhibitory effect on delta-ALAD activity. A study has shown that the delta-ALAD was activated by zinc ions at physiological concentrations. In view of these reports, it was considered worthwhile to study the poisoning effects of lead, zinc and copper on delta-ALAD activity along with the concentrations of these metal ions in the blood. A possible role of Zn/sup + +/, Cu/sup + +/, and Pb/sup + +/ interaction and their influence on delta-ALAD has been explored in the present paper.

  19. Effect of oleic acid ligand on photophysical, photoconductive and magnetic properties of monodisperse SnO2 quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sirshendu; Das, Kajari; Chakrabarti, Kaushik; De, S K

    2013-03-14

    Oleic acid capped monodisperse SnO(2) quantum dots (QDs) of size 2.7 nm were synthesized by thermal decomposition and oxidation of Sn(II)(oleate) complex in high boiling nonpolar solvent octadecene using oleic acid as a capping agent and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide as an oxidizing agent. FTIR, DSC and TGA were employed to understand the growth of the oleic acid capped SnO(2) QDs through the decomposition of metal fatty acid complex. The surface defect-related luminescence properties of the QDs were demonstrated using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. The oleic acid capping on the QD surface modifies the electronic structure of SnO(2) and generates blue emission. Moreover the surface capping on the QDs diminishes the photocatalytic activity of bare SnO(2) QDs due to absence of surface oxygen and adsorbed hydroxyl group on the surface of the capped QDs. The capping by the long chain ligand oleic acid makes the SnO(2) QDs less conducting. Ligand exchange of the long chain oleic acid (2.5 nm) by the short chain n-butylamine (0.6 nm) increases the current density of SnO(2) around 43 times due to the reduction of the interparticle distance. Ferromagnetic behaviour of oleic acid capped QDs may be ascribed to the defects in the host due to the alteration of the electronic structure owing to the capping. PMID:23258710

  20. Selective colorimetric detection of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) using gallic acid capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Wu, Genhua; Wang, Zhuqing; Ren, Wenzhi; Zhang, Yujie; Shen, Zheyu; Li, Tianhua; Wu, Aiguo

    2016-05-28

    A colorimetric assay is proposed for the selective detection of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) via the aggregation-induced color change of gallic acid capped gold nanoparticles (GA-AuNPs). The AuNPs are characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR). To detect Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) coexisting in a sample, citrate and thiosulfate were applied to mask Cr(vi) for the detection of Cr(iii), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA) was applied to mask Cr(iii) for the detection of Cr(vi). At optimized experimental conditions, the selectivity of these AuNPs-based detection systems is excellent for Cr(iii) and/or Cr(vi) compared with other types of metal ions. The limit of detections (LODs) of a mixture of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi), Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) by eye vision are 1.5, 1.5 and 2 μM, respectively, and those by UV-vis spectroscopy are 0.05, 0.1 and 0.1 μM, respectively. The minimum detectable concentrations for Cr(iii) or Cr(vi) are all below the guideline value set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The applicability of the AuNPs-based colorimetric sensor is also validated by the detection of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) in electroplating wastewater and real water samples with high recoveries. PMID:26606324

  1. Optimization of pyrolysis properties using TGA and cone calorimeter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Hee; Yoon, Kyung-Beom

    2013-04-01

    The present paper describes an optimization work to obtain the properties related to a pyrolysis process in the solid material such as density, specific heat, conductivity of virgin and char, heat of pyrolysis and kinetic parameters used for deciding pyrolysis rate. A repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to obtain the pyrolysis-related properties. In the previous study all properties obtained only using a cone calorimeter but in this paper both the cone calorimeter and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) are used for precisely optimizing the pyrolysis properties. In the TGA test a very small mass is heated up and conduction and heat capacity in the specimen is negligible so kinetic parameters can first be optimized. Other pyrolysis-related properties such as virgin/char specific heat and conductivity and char density are also optimized in the cone calorimeter test with the already decided parameters in the TGA test.

  2. The TGA codons are present in the open reading frame of selenoprotein P cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.E.; Lloyd, R.S.; Read, R.; Burk, R.F. )

    1991-03-11

    The TGA codon in DNA has been shown to direct incorporation of selenocysteine into protein. Several proteins from bacteria and animals contain selenocysteine in their primary structures. Each of the cDNA clones of these selenoproteins contains one TGA codon in the open reading frame which corresponds to the selenocysteine in the protein. A cDNA clone for selenoprotein P (SeP), obtained from a {gamma}ZAP rat liver library, was sequenced by the dideoxy termination method. The correct reading frame was determined by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the amino acid sequence of several peptides from SeP. Using SeP labelled with {sup 75}Se in vivo, the selenocysteine content of the peptides was verified by the collection of carboxymethylated {sup 77}Se-selenocysteine as it eluted from the amino acid analyzer and determination of the radioactivity contained in the collected samples. Ten TGA codons are present in the open reading frame of the cDNA. Peptide fragmentation studies and the deduced sequence indicate that selenium-rich regions are located close to the carboxy terminus. Nine of the 10 selenocysteines are located in the terminal 26% of the sequence with four in the terminal 15 amino acids. The deduced sequence codes for a protein of 385 amino acids. Cleavage of the signal peptide gives the mature protein with 366 amino acids and a calculated mol wt of 41,052 Da. Searches of PIR and SWISSPROT protein databases revealed no similarity with glutathione peroxidase or other selenoproteins.

  3. The addition of red lead to flat plate and tubular valve regulated miners cap lamp lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferg, E. E.; Loyson, P.; Poorun, A.

    The study looked at the use of red lead in the manufacturing of valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) miners cap lamp (MCL) batteries that were made with either flat plate or tubular positive electrodes. A problem with using only grey oxide in the manufacture of thick flat plate or tubular electrodes is the poor conversion of the active material to the desired lead dioxide. The addition of red lead to the initial starting material improves the formation efficiency but is considerably more expensive thereby increasing the cost of manufacturing. The study showed that by carefully controlling the formation conditions in terms of the voltage and temperature of a battery, good capacity performance can be achieved for cells made with flat plate electrodes that contain up to 25% red lead. The small amount of red lead in the active cured material reduces the effect of electrode surface sulphate formation and allows the battery to achieve its rated capacity within the first few cycles. Batteries made with flat plate positive electrodes that contained more that 50% red lead showed good initial capacity but had poor structural active material bonding. The study showed that MCL batteries made with tubular positive electrodes that contained less than 75% red lead resulted in a poorly formed electrode with limited capacity utilization. Pickling and soaking times of the tubular electrodes should be kept at a minimum thereby allowing higher active material utilization during subsequent capacity cycling. The study further showed that it is beneficial to use higher formation rates in order to reduce manufacturing time and to improve the active material characteristics.

  4. Inhibition of cap (m7GpppXm)-dependent endonuclease of influenza virus by 4-substituted 2,4-dioxobutanoic acid compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Tomassini, J; Selnick, H; Davies, M E; Armstrong, M E; Baldwin, J; Bourgeois, M; Hastings, J; Hazuda, D; Lewis, J; McClements, W

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of influenza virus mRNA is primed by capped and methylated (cap 1, m7GpppXm) RNAs which the virus derives by endonucleolytic cleavage from RNA polymerase II transcripts in host cells. The conserved nature of the endonucleolytic processing provides a unique target for the development of antiviral agents for influenza viruses. A series of 4-substituted 2,4-dioxobutanoic acid compounds has been identified as selective inhibitors of this activity in both influenza A and B viruses. These inhibitors exhibited 50% inhibitory concentrations in the range of 0.2 to 29.0 microM for cap-dependent influenza virus transcription and had no effect on the activity of other viral and cellular polymerases when tested at 100- to 500-fold higher concentrations. The compounds did not inhibit the initiation or elongation of influenza virus mRNA synthesis but specifically inhibited the cleavage of capped RNAs by the influenza virus endonuclease and were not inhibitory to the activities of other nucleases. Additionally, the compounds specifically inhibited replication of influenza A and B viruses in cell culture with potencies comparable to the 50% inhibitory concentrations obtained for transcription. Images PMID:7695269

  5. Helix capping.

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R.; Rose, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    Helix-capping motifs are specific patterns of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions found at or near the ends of helices in both proteins and peptides. In an alpha-helix, the first four >N-H groups and last four >C=O groups necessarily lack intrahelical hydrogen bonds. Instead, such groups are often capped by alternative hydrogen bond partners. This review enlarges our earlier hypothesis (Presta LG, Rose GD. 1988. Helix signals in proteins. Science 240:1632-1641) to include hydrophobic capping. A hydrophobic interaction that straddles the helix terminus is always associated with hydrogen-bonded capping. From a global survey among proteins of known structure, seven distinct capping motifs are identified-three at the helix N-terminus and four at the C-terminus. The consensus sequence patterns of these seven motifs, together with results from simple molecular modeling, are used to formulate useful rules of thumb for helix termination. Finally, we examine the role of helix capping as a bridge linking the conformation of secondary structure to supersecondary structure. PMID:9514257

  6. Tga Characteristic and Fabrication of Porous SiC Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Han Ki; Kim, Seon Jin; Park, Yi Hyun

    The long-range aim of this research is to develop porous ceramics with high strength, excellent thermal resistance and chemical stability at high temperature in environmental industry. The Cf/SiC was made by hot pressing method with SiC powder whose particle size is 50nm and less on the average also Al2O3, Y2O3 and SiO2 as additive. The carbon fibers of oxidation property are investigated by TGA for finding out decarburization point. As a result, decarburization point selected the specific temperature of TGA curve and the Cf/SiC composites occurred perfectly decarburization at carbon fibers so the clearly porous SiC ceramics were formed many holes of 3-5µm diameters through length direction by its reaction.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  8. Assessing the Impact of Backbone Length and Capping Agent on the Conformational Preferences of a Model Peptide: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of 2-AMINOISOBUTYRIC Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Kubasik, Matthew A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    2-Aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) is an achiral, α-amino acid having two equivalent methyl groups attached to C_α. Extended Aib oligomers are known to have a strong preference for the adoption of a 310-helical structure in the condensed phase. Here, we have taken a simplifying step and focused on the intrinsic folding propensities of Aib by looking at a series of capped Aib oligomers in the gas phase, free from the influence of solvent molecules and cooled in a supersonic expansion. Resonant two-photon ionization and IR-UV holeburning have been used to record single-conformation UV spectra using the Z-cap as the UV chromophore. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy provides single-conformation IR spectra in the OH stretch and NH stretch regions. Data have been collected on a set of Z-(Aib)n-X oligomers with n = 1, 2, 4, 6 and X = -OH and -OMethyl. The impacts of these capping groups and differences in backbone length have been found to dramatically influence the conformational space accessed by the molecules studied here. Oligomers of n=4 have sufficient backbone length for a full turn of the 310-helix to be formed. Early interpretation of the data collected shows clear spectroscopic markers signaling the onset of 310-helix formation as well as evidence of structures incorporating C7 and C14 hydrogen bonded rings. Toniolo, C.; Bonora, G. M.; Barone, V.; Bavoso, A.; Benedetti, E.; Di Blasio, B.; Grimaldi, P.; Lelj, F.; Pavone, V.; Pedone, C., Conformation of Pleionomers of α-Aminoisobutyric Acid. Macromolecules 1985, 18, 895-902.

  9. Caps Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAPS CAPSULE, 1970

    1970-01-01

    The main article in this issue of ERIC/CAPS' expanded newsletter is based on an interview with the presidents-elect of three national organizations--Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), The American School Counselor Association (ASCA), and the American Personnel and Guidance Association (APGA). They discuss the role of the…

  10. The preparation of CeF{sub 3} nanocluster capped with oleic acid by extraction method and application to lithium grease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Libo; Zhang Ming; Wang Xiaobo; Liu Weimin

    2008-08-04

    CeF{sub 3} nanocluster surface-capped with oleic acid (coded as OA-CeF{sub 3}) were prepared using extraction method. The resulting OA-CeF{sub 3} nanocluster was characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of the OA-CeF{sub 3} nanocluster as an additive in synthetic lithium grease was investigated using a four-ball friction and wear tester. It was found that the as-prepared OA-CeF{sub 3} nanocluster had a broad size distribution, with the average diameter to be about 20 nm, which was confirmed by both the XRD and TEM analytical results. The oleic acid as the capping agent was chemically bonded to the CeF{sub 3} nanocores via strong chemical interaction. The OA-CeF{sub 3} nanocluster as the additive led to an obvious improvement in the antiwear and extreme pressure properties of the synthetic lithium grease. However, the OA-CeF{sub 3} nanocluster as the additive had little effect on the friction-reducing behavior of the lithium grease.

  11. Analysis of vanillic acid in polar ice cores as a biomass burning proxy - preliminary results from the Akademii Nauk Ice Cap in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieman, M. M.; Jimenez, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Fritzsche, D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning influences global climate change and the composition of the atmosphere. The drivers, effects, and climate feedbacks related to fire are poorly understood. Many different proxies have been used to reconstruct past fire frequency from lake sediments and polar ice cores. Reconstruction of historical trends in biomass burning is challenging because of regional variability and the qualitative nature of various proxies. Vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) is a product of the combustion of conifer lignin that is known to occur in biomass burning aerosols. Biomass burning is likely the only significant source of vanillic acid in polar ice. In this study we describe an analytical method for quantifying vanillic acid in polar ice using HPLC with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometric detection. The method has a detection limit of 100 pM and a precision of × 10% at the 100 pM level for analysis of 100 μl of ice melt water. The method was used to analyze more than 1000 discrete samples from the Akademii Nauk ice cap on Severnaya Zemlya in the high Russia Arctic (79°30'N, 97°45'E) (Fritzsche et al., 2002; Fritzsche et al., 2005; Weiler et al., 2005). The samples range in age over the past 2,000 years. The results show a mean vanillic acid concentration of 440 × 710 pM (1σ), with elevated levels during the periods from 300-600 and 1450-1550 C.E.

  12. Mercaptopropionic acid-capped Mn(2+):ZnSe/ZnO quantum dots with both downconversion and upconversion emissions for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingxia; Yao, Yulian; Yang, Kai; Rong, Pengfei; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; An, Xiao; Li, Zhiming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Li, Wanwan

    2014-11-01

    Doped quantum dots (d-dots) can serve as fluorescent biosensors and biolabels for biological applications. Our study describes a synthesis of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped Mn(2+):ZnSe/ZnO d-dots through a facile, cost-efficient hydrothermal route. The as-prepared water-soluble d-dots exhibit strong emission at ca. 580 nm, with a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) as high as 31%, which is the highest value reported to date for such particles prepared via an aqueous route. They also exhibit upconversion emission when excited at 800 nm. With an overall diameter of around 6.7 nm, the d-dots could gain access to the cell nucleus without any surface decoration, demonstrating their promising broad applications as fluorescent labels. PMID:25189675

  13. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  14. Selective transport of Pb2+ and Cd2+ across a phospholipid bilayer by a cyclohexanemonocarboxylic acid-capped 15-crown-5 ether.

    PubMed

    Hamidinia, Shawn A; Steinbaugh, Gregory E; Erdahl, Warren L; Taylor, Richard W; Pfeiffer, Douglas R

    2006-03-01

    A cyclohexanemonocarboxylic acid-capped 15-crown-5 ether was synthesized and found to be effective as an ionophore for Pb2+ and Cd2+, transporting them across a phospholipid bilayer membrane. Transport studies were carried out using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine (POPC) vesicles containing the chelating indicator 2-([2-bis(carboxymethyl)amino-5-methylphenoxy]methyl)-6-methoxy-8-bis(carboxymethyl)aminoquinoline (Quin-2). Data obtained at pH 7.0 using this system, show that the synthetic ionophore transports divalent cations with the selectivity sequence Pb2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+ > Ca2+ > Sr2+. Selectivity factors, based on the ratio of individual initial cation transport rates, are 280 (Pb2+/Ca2+), 62 (Pb2+/Zn2+), 68 (Cd2+/Ca2+), and 16 (Cd2+/Zn2+). Plots of log initial rate versus logM(n+) or log ionophore concentration suggest that Pb2+ and Cd2+ are transported primarily as a 1:1 cation-ionophore complex, but that complexes with other stoichiometries may also be present. The ionophore transports Pb2+ and Cd2+ by a predominantly electrogenic mechanism, based upon an enhanced rate of transport that is produced by agents which dissipate transmembrane potentials. The rate of Pb2+ transport shows a biphasic pH dependence with the maximum occurring at pH approximately 6.5. The high selectivity for Pb2+ and Cd2+ displayed by the cyclohexanecarboxylic acid-capped 15-crown-5 ether suggests potential applications of this ionophore for the treatment of Pb and Cd intoxication, and removal of these heavy metals from wastewater. PMID:16488017

  15. Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

    1988-11-01

    Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

  16. Chemiluminometric determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceutical formulations exploiting photo-activation of GSH-capped CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M K; Ribeiro, D S M; Frigerio, C; Prior, J A V; Santos, J L M; Zagatto, E A G

    2014-11-01

    An automated multi-pumping flow system is proposed for the chemiluminometric determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceutical formulations, relying on the ability of semiconductor nanocrystals to generate short-lived reactive species upon photo-irradiation. A photo-unit based on visible-light-emitting diodes is used to photo-excite cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots capped with glutathione, leading to the generation of radicals that react with luminol under alkaline conditions, yielding the chemiluminescence. Ascorbic acid acts as a radical scavenger, preventing the oxidation of luminol, thus ensuring a concentration-dependent chemiluminescence quenching. After system optimization, a linear working range of 5.0 × 10(-7) to 5.0 × 10(-6) mol/L ascorbic acid (r = 0.9967, n = 5) was attained, with a detection limit of 3.05 × 10(-7) mol/L and a sampling rate of 200/h. The flow system was applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by the reference titrimetric procedure (RD < ± 4.3%, n = 7). PMID:24585556

  17. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  18. Effect of acid or alkaline catalyst and of different capping agents on the optical properties of CdS nanoparticles incorporated within a diureasil hybrid matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Luis F. F. F.; Silva, Carlos J. R.; Kanodarwala, Fehmida K.; Stride, John A.; Pereira, Mario R.

    2015-11-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized using colloidal methods and incorporated within a diureasil hybrid matrix. The surface capping of the CdS NPs by 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) organic ligands during the incorporation of the NPs within the hybrid matrix has been investigated. The matrix is based on poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide) chains grafted to a siliceous skeleton through urea bonds and was produced by sol-gel process. Both alkaline and acidic catalysis of the sol-gel reaction were used to evaluate the effect of each organic ligand on the optical properties of the CdS NPs. The hybrid materials were characterized by absorption, steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). The preservation of the optical properties of the CdS NPs within the diureasil hybrids was dependent on the experimental conditions used. Both organic ligands (APTMS and MPTMS) demonstrated to be crucial in avoiding the increase of size distribution and clustering of the NPs within the hybrid matrix. The use of organic ligands was also shown to influence the level of interaction between the hybrid host and the CdS NPs. The CdS NPs showed large Stokes shifts and long average lifetimes, both in colloidal solution and in the xerogels, due to the origin of the PL emission in surface states. The CdS NPs capped with MPTMS have lower PL lifetimes compared to the other xerogel samples but still larger than the CdS NPs in the original colloidal solution. An increase in PL lifetimes of the NPs after their incorporation within the hybrid matrix is related to interaction between the NPs and the hybrid host matrix.

  19. Synthesis of 2-Mercaptonicotinic Acid-Capped CdSe Quantum Dots and its Application to Spectrofluorometric Determination of Cr(VI) in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Khorashahi, Somayeh; Hosseini, Navid

    2016-05-01

    The CdSe quantum dots (QDs) capped with 2-mercaptonicotinic acid (H2MN) were prepared through a controllable process at 80 °C. The prepared QDs were characterized by XRD, TEM, IR, UV-Vis and fluorescence (FL) techniques. It was found that the QDs were nearly mono-disperse with the diameters in the range of 8-10 nm. These QDs are capable to exhibit strong FL even in concentrated acidic media. They exhibit an enhanced fluorescence in the presence of Cr(VI), which was used for the determination of Cr(VI) in water samples. The linear range was found to be 1 × 10(-7)-6.0 × 10(-6) M with the RSD and DL of 0.92 % and 5 × 10(-8) M, respectively. Except that Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) which can be eliminated through a simple precipitation process, the other co-existent ions present in natural water were not interfered. The recoveries obtained for the added amounts of Cr(VI) were in the range of 96.9-103.2 %, which denote on application of the method, satisfactorily. PMID:26825078

  20. Reusable and Mediator-Free Cholesterol Biosensor Based on Cholesterol Oxidase Immobilized onto TGA-SAM Modified Smart Bio-Chips

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mohammed M.

    2014-01-01

    A reusable and mediator-free cholesterol biosensor based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) was fabricated based on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioglycolic acid (TGA) (covalent enzyme immobilization by dropping method) using bio-chips. Cholesterol was detected with modified bio-chip (Gold/Thioglycolic-acid/Cholesterol-oxidase i.e., Au/TGA/ChOx) by reliable cyclic voltammetric (CV) technique at room conditions. The Au/TGA/ChOx modified bio-chip sensor demonstrates good linearity (1.0 nM to 1.0 mM; R = 0.9935), low-detection limit (∼0.42 nM, SNR∼3), and higher sensitivity (∼74.3 µAµM−1cm−2), lowest-small sample volume (50.0 μL), good stability, and reproducibility. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first statement with a very high sensitivity, low-detection limit, and low-sample volumes are required for cholesterol biosensor using Au/TGA/ChOx-chips assembly. The result of this facile approach was investigated for the biomedical applications for real samples at room conditions with significant assembly (Au/TGA/ChOx) towards the development of selected cholesterol biosensors, which can offer analytical access to a large group of enzymes for wide range of biomedical applications in health-care fields. PMID:24949733

  1. Glassy carbon electrodes sequentially modified by cysteamine-capped gold nanoparticles and poly(amidoamine) dendrimers generation 4.5 for detecting uric acid in human serum without ascorbic acid interference.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Segovia, A S; Banda-Alemán, J A; Gutiérrez-Granados, S; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, F J; Godínez, Luis A; Bustos, E; Manríquez, J

    2014-02-17

    Glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were sequentially modified by cysteamine-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNp@cysteamine) and PAMAM dendrimers generation 4.5 bearing 128-COOH peripheral groups (GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM), in order to explore their capabilities as electrochemical detectors of uric acid (UA) in human serum samples at pH 2. The results showed that concentrations of UA detected by cyclic voltammetry with GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM were comparable (deviation <±10%; limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 1.7×10(-4) and 5.8×10(-4) mg dL(-1), respectively) to those concentrations obtained using the uricase-based enzymatic-colorimetric method. It was also observed that the presence of dendrimers in the GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM system minimizes ascorbic acid (AA) interference during UA oxidation, thus improving the electrocatalytic activity of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:24491759

  2. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Polyimide resins having improved thermo-oxidative stability are provided having aromatic vinyl end-caps. The polyimides are prepared by the reaction of a mixture of monomers comprising (1) a diamine, (2) an ester of tetracarboxylic acid and (3) an aromatic vinyl compound in a molar ratio of 1:2:3 of n: (n + 1):2 when the aromatic vinyl compound contains nitrogen and in a ratio of (n + 1):n:2 when the aromatic vinyl compound does not contain nitrogen, wherein n ranges from about 5 to about 20.

  3. Folic acid-conjugated silica capped gold nanoclusters for targeted fluorescence/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is 2th most common cancer in China, and is still the second most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Successful development of safe and effective nanoprobes for in vivo gastric cancer targeting imaging is a big challenge. This study is aimed to develop folic acid (FA)-conjugated silica coated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) for targeted dual-modal fluorescent and X-ray computed tomography imaging (CT) of in vivo gastric cancer cells. Method AuNCs were prepared, silica was coated on the surface of AuNCs, then folic acid was covalently anchored on the surface of AuNCs, resultant FA-conjugated AuNCs@SiO2 nanoprobes were investigated their cytotoxicity by MTT method, and their targeted ability to FR(+) MGC803 cells and FR(−) GES-1 cells. Nude mice model loaded with MGC803 cells were prepared, prepared nanoprobes were injected into nude mice via tail vein, and then were imaged by fluorescent and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Results FA-conjugated AuNCs@SiO2 nanoprobes exhibited good biocompatibility, and could target actively the FR(+) MGC-803 cells and in vivo gastric cancer tissues with 5 mm in diameter in nude mice models, exhibited excellent red emitting fluorescence imaging and CT imaging. Conclusion The high-performance FA-conjugated AuNCs@SiO2 nanoprobes can target in vivo gastric cancer cells, can be used for fluorescent and CT dual-mode imaging, and may own great potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging of in vivo early gastric cancer and other tumors with FR positive expression in near future. PMID:23718865

  4. Synthesis, Surface Modification and Optical Properties of Thioglycolic Acid-Capped ZnS Quantum Dots for Starch Recognition at Ultralow Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Mahnoush; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad; Ahmadieh, Mahnaz; Mogharei, Azadeh; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    In this research, water-soluble thioglycolic acid-capped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) are synthesized by the chemical precipitation method. The prepared QDs are characterized using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Results revealed that ZnS QDs have a 2.73 nm crystallite size, cubic zinc blende structure, and spherical morphology with a diameter less than 10 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy is performed to determine the presence of low concentrations of starch. Four emission peaks are observed at 348 nm, 387 nm, 422 nm, and 486 nm and their intensities are quenched by increasing concentration of starch. PL intensity variations in the studied concentrations range (0-100 ppm) are best described by a Michaelis-Menten model. The Michaelis constant (K m) for immobilized α-amylase in this system is about 101.07 ppm. This implies a great tendency for the enzyme to hydrolyze the starch as substrate. Finally, the limit of detection is found to be about 6.64 ppm.

  5. Thioglycolic Acid-Capped CdS Quantum Dots Conjugated to α-Amylase as a Fluorescence Probe for Determination of Starch at Low Concentration.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, Mahnoush; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad; Mogharei, Azadeh; Ahmadieh, Mahnaz; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-09-01

    In the present research, water soluble thioglycolic acid-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by chemical precipitation method. The characteristics of prepared quantum dots were determined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The obtained results revealed that CdS QDs have 5.60 nm crystallite size, hexagonal wurtzite structure and spherical morphology with less than 10 nm diameter. The photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was performed in order to study the effect of the presence of starch solutions. Blue emission peaks were positioned at 488 nm and its intensity quenched by increasing the concentration of starch solutions. The result of PL quenches in range of studied concentrations (0-100 ppm) was best described by Michaelis-Menten model. The amount of Michaelis constant (Km) for immobilized α-amylase in this system was about 68.08 ppm which showed a great tendency of enzyme to hydrolyze the starch as substrate. Finally, the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be about 2.24 ppm. PMID:27392974

  6. Polyethylenimine-capped silver nanoclusters as a fluorescence probe for highly sensitive detection of folic acid through a two-step electron-transfer process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Rong; Wang, Zhong Ling; Qu, Fei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-07-16

    A highly sensitive folic acid (FA) detection method based on the fluorescence quenching of polyethylenimine-capped silver nanoclusters (PEI-AgNCs) was put forward. In the sensing system, FA and PEI-AgNCs were brought into close proximity to each other by electrostatic interaction, and a two-step electron-transfer process, in which the electron was transferred from FA to AgNCs through PEI molecule, led to fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence quenching efficiency of PEI-AgNCs was linearly related to the concentration of FA over the range from 0.1 nM to 2.75 μM. Good linear correlation (R(2) = 0.9981) and a detection limit of 0.032 nM were obtained under optimum conditions. Moreover, the proposed method was used for the determination of FA in real samples with satisfactory results, and those coexistent substances could not cause any significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity of AgNCs. Therefore, the proposed research system is of practical significance and application prospects. PMID:24972143

  7. Facts about dextro-Transposition of the Great Arteries (d-TGA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts about dextro-Transposition of the Great Arteries (d-TGA) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... What is dextro-Transposition of the Great Arteries (d-TGA)? Dextro-Transposition (pronounced DECKS-tro trans-poh- ...

  8. Avian serum. cap alpha. /sub 1/-glycoprotein, hemopexin, differing significantly in both amino acid and carbohydrate composition from mammalian (. beta. -glycoprotein) counter parts

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, V.; Trimble, R.B.; Falco, M.D.; Liem, H.H.; Metcalfe, S.A.; Wellner, D.; Muller-Eberhard, U.

    1986-10-21

    The physicochemical characteristics of chicken hemopexin, which can be isolated by heme-agarose affinity chromatography, is compared with representative mammalian hemopexins of rat, rabbit, and human. The avian polypeptide chain appears to be slightly longer (52 kDa) than the human, rat, or rabbit forms (49 kDa), and also the glycoprotein differs from the mammalian hemopexins in being an ..cap alpha../sub 1/-glycoprotein instead of a ..beta../sub 1/-glycoprotein. The distinct electrophoretic mobility probably arises from significant differences in the amino acid composition of the chicken form, which, although lower in serine and particularly in lysine, has a much higher glutamine/glutamate and agrinine content, and also a higher proline, glycine, and histidine content, than the mammalian hemopexins. Compositional analyses and /sup 125/I concanavalin A and /sup 125/I wheat germ agglutinin binding suggest that chicken hemopexin has a mixture of three fucose-free N-linked bi- and triantennary oligosaccharides. In contrast, human hemopexin has give N-linked oligosaccharides and an additional O-linked glycan blocking the N-terminal threonine residue, while the rabbit form has four N-linked oligosaccharides. In keeping with the finding of a simpler carbohydrate structure, the avian hemopexin shows only a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under both nondenaturing and denaturing conditions, whereas the hemopexins of the three mammalian species tested show several bands. In contrast, the isoelectric focusing pattern of chicken hemopexin is very complex, revealing at least nine bands between pH 4.0 and pH band 5.0, while the other hemopexins show a broad smear of multiple ill-defined bands in the same region.Results indicate the hemopexin of avians differs substantially from the hemopexins of mammals, which show a notable similarity with regard to carbohydrate structure and amino acid composition.

  9. Fitting the cervical cap.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, A K; Baker, N N; Haney, S L

    1988-07-01

    The cervical cap is now available for general use by American women. Several steps are necessary to select women who are good candidates for cap usage and to successfully fit the cap. Many women are not good candidates for the cap. The cap is generally not suitable for women who have recently become sexually active or who are first-time contraceptors. Many users are women who cannot use more widely available contraceptives. Successful cap use requires a highly motivated, persistent woman who will correctly insert and remove her cap. The size, shape, length, position and location of the cervix must be assessed by the clinician prior to fitting the cap. The cervix should be visually inspected for lesions or cervicitis and a Pap smear should be taken. After an initial cap is selected, the stability of the cap, gaps between the cap and cervix, areas of uncovered cervix and the adequacy of the suction seal should be assessed. The woman should be taught how to insert and remove the cap. Additionally, she should be instructed to use a backup method of contraception until she is sure that the cap will remain in place during sexual intercourse. Successful cap fitting requires a careful, methodical approach by the clinician and a carefully selected, highly motivated client. This article presents the steps of cervical cap fitting. PMID:3405494

  10. Macromolecular Systems with MSA-Capped CdTe and CdTe/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots as Superselective and Ultrasensitive Optical Sensors for Picric Acid Explosive.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Priyanka; Saikia, Dilip; Adhikary, Nirab Chandra; Sarma, Neelotpal Sen

    2015-11-11

    This work reports the development of highly fluorescent materials for the selective and efficient detection of picric acid explosive in the nanomolar range by fluorescence quenching phenomenon. Poly(vinyl alcohol) grafted polyaniline (PPA) and its nanocomposites with 2-mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (PPA-Q) and with MSA-capped CdTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (PPA-CSQ) are synthesized in a single step free radical polymerization reaction. The thermal stability and photo stability of the polymer increases in the order of PPA < PPA-Q < PPA-CSQ. The polymers show remarkably high selectivity and efficient sensitivity toward picric acid, and the quenching efficiency for PPA-CSQ reaches up to 99%. The detection limits of PPA, PPA-Q, and PPA-CSQ for picric acid are found to be 23, 1.6, and 0.65 nM, respectively, which are remarkably low. The mechanism operating in the quenching phenomenon is proposed to be a combination of a strong inner filter effect and ground state electrostatic interaction between the polymers and picric acid. A portable and cost-effective electronic device for the visual detection of picric acid by the sensory system is successfully fabricated. The device is further employed for quantitative detection of picric acid in real water samples. PMID:26484725

  11. A turn-on highly selective and ultrasensitive determination of copper (II) in an aqueous medium using folic acid capped gold nanoparticles as the probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasimalai, N.; Prabhakarn, A.; John, S. Abraham

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a ‘turn-on’ fluorescent determination of Cu(II) in an aqueous medium using folic acid capped gold nanoparticles (FA-AuNPs) as the probe. The FA-AuNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical method and were characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, HR-TEM, XRD, zeta potential, and DLS techniques. The FA-AuNPs show an absorption maximum at 510 nm and an emission maximum at 780 nm (λex: 510 nm). On adding 10 μM Cu(II), the wine-red color of FA-AuNPs changed to purple and the absorbance at 510 nm decreased. The observed changes were ascribed to the aggregation of AuNPs. This was confirmed by DLS and HR-TEM studies. Interestingly, the emission intensity of FA-AuNPs was enhanced even in the presence of a picomolar concentration of Cu(II). Based on the enhancement of the emission intensity, the concentration of Cu(II) was determined. The FA-AuNPs showed an extreme selectivity towards the determination of 10 nM Cu(II) in the presence of 10 000-fold higher concentration of interferences except EDTA and the carboxylate anion. A good linearity was observed from 10 × 10-9 to 1 × 10-12 M Cu(II), and the detection limit was found to be 50 fM l-1 (S/N = 3). The proposed method was successfully applied to determine Cu(II) in real samples. The results obtained were validated with ICP-AES.

  12. An amplified electrochemiluminescent aptasensor using Au nanoparticles capped by 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid-thiosemicarbazide functionalized C60 nanocomposites as a signal enhancement tag.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng-Nan; Zhang, Xia; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-02-01

    A novel electrochemiluminescent (ECL) signal tag of Au nanoparticles capped by 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid-thiosemicarbazide functionalized C60 nanocomposites (AuNPs/TSC-PTC/C60NPs) was developed for thrombin (TB) aptasensor construction based on the peroxydisulfate/oxygen (S2O8(2-)/O2) system. For signal tag fabrication, the C60 nanoparticles (C60NPs) were prepared and then coated with 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) by π-π stacking interactions. Afterwards, thiosemicarbazide (TSC) was linked with PTCA functionalized C60NPs via amidation for further assembling Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Finally, detection aptamer of thrombin (TBA 2) was labeled on the ECL signal amplification tag of AuNPs/TSC-PTC/C60NPs. Herein, TSC, with the active groups of -NH2 and -SH, was selected and introduced into the ECL S2O8(2-)/O2 system for the first time, which could not only offer the active groups of -SH to absorb AuNPs for TBA 2 anchoring but also remarkably enhance the ECL signal of the S2O8(2-)/O2 system by the formation of TSC-PTC/C60NPs for signal amplification. Meanwhile, the sensing interface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified by AuNPs/graphene (AuNPs/GR) nanocomposites with the large specific surface area and the active sites, followed by immobilization of thiol-terminated thrombin capture aptamer (TBA 1). With the formation of the sandwich-type structure of TBA 1, TB, and TBA 2 signal probes, a desirable enhanced ECL signal was measured in the testing buffer of an S2O8(2-)/O2 solution for detecting TB. The aptasensor exhibited a good linear relationship for TB detection in the range of 1 × 10(-5)-10 nM with a detection limit of 3.3 fM. PMID:25559492

  13. Sensitivity enhancement in the colorimetric detection of lead(II) ion using gallic acid-capped gold nanoparticles: improving size distribution and minimizing interparticle repulsion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Wei; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2010-01-15

    We have developed a colorimetric assay for the highly sensitive and selective detection of Pb(2+) by narrowing the size distribution of gallic acid-capped gold nanoparticles (GA-AuNPs) and minimizing electrostatic repulsion between each GA-AuNP. We unveil that the particle size and size distribution of GA-AuNPs could be controlled by varying the pH of HAuCl(4) with fixed concentrations of HAuCl(4) and GA. When the pH of the precursor solution (i.e., HAuCl(4)) was adjusted from 2.2 to 11.1, the average diameter of GA-AuNPs was decreased from 75.1 nm to 9.3 nm and their size distribution was reduced from 56.6-93.6 nm to 9.0-9.6 nm. The colorimetric sensitivity of the Pb(2+)-induced aggregation of GA-AuNPs could be improved using narrow size distribution of GA-AuNPs. Moreover, further enhancement of the colorimetric sensitivity of GA-AuNPs toward Pb(2+) could be achieved by adding NaClO(4) to minimize electrostatic repulsion between GA-AuNPs, which provide a small energy barrier for Pb(2+) to overcome. Under the optimum conditions (1.0 mM NaClO(4) and 20 mM formic acid at pH 4.5), the selectivity of 9.3 nm GA-AuNPs for Pb(2+) over other metal ions in aqueous solutions is remarkably high, and its minimum detectable concentration for Pb(2+) is 10nM. We demonstrate the practicality of 9.3 nm GA-AuNPs for the determination of Pb(2+) in drinking water. This approach offers several advantages, including simplicity (without temperature control), low cost (no enzyme or DNA), high sensitivity, high selectivity, and a large linear range (10.0-1000.0 nM). PMID:19782557

  14. Human CAP18: a novel antimicrobial lipopolysaccharide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Hirata, M; Balint, R F; Lee, J; Zhong, J; Wright, S C

    1995-01-01

    CAP18 (18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein) is a protein originally identified and purified from rabbit leukocytes on the basis of its capacity to bind and inhibit various activities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report the cloning of human CAP18 and characterize the anti-LPS activity of the C-terminal fragment. Oligonucleotide probes designed from the rabbit CAP18 cDNA were used to identify human CAP18 from a bone marrow cDNA library. The cDNA encodes a protein composed of a 30-amino-acid signal peptide, a 103-amino-acid N-terminal domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain of 37 amino acids homologous to the LPS-binding antimicrobial domain of rabbit CAP18, designated CAP18(104-140). A human CAP18-specific antiserum was generated by using CAP18 expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein. Western blots (immunoblots) with this antiserum showed specific expression of human CAP18 in granulocytes. Synthetic human CAP18(104-140) and a more active truncated fragment, CAP18(104-135), were shown to (i) bind to erythrocytes coated with diverse strains of LPS, (ii) inhibit LPS-induced release of nitric oxide from macrophages, (iii) inhibit LPS-induced generation of tissue factor, and (iv) protect mice from LPS lethality. CAP18(104-140) may have therapeutic utility for conditions associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:7890387

  15. pH-triggered sustained release of arsenic trioxide by polyacrylic acid capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for solid tumor treatment in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuecheng; Liu, Yangyang; Guo, Manman; Fei, Weidong; Zheng, Hongyue; Zhang, Rongrong; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Yinghui; Zheng, Guohua; Li, Fanzhu

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3, ATO), a FDA approved drug for hematologic malignancies, was proved of efficient growth inhibition of cancer cell in vitro or solid tumor in vivo. However, its effect on solid tumor in vivo was hampered by its poor pharmacokinetics and dose-limited toxicity. In this study, a polyacrylic acid capped pH-triggered mesoporous silica nanoparticles was conducted to improve the pharmacokinetics and enhance the antitumor effect of arsenic trioxide. The mesoporous silica nanoparticles loaded with arsenic trioxide was grafted with polyacrylic acid (PAA-ATO-MSN) as a pH-responsive biomaterial on the surface to achieve the release of drug in acidic microenvironment of tumor, instead of burst release action in circulation. The nanoparticles were characterized with uniform grain size (particle sizes of 158.6 ± 1.3 nm and pore sizes of 3.71 nm, respectively), historically comparable drug loading efficiency (11.42 ± 1.75%), pH-responsive and strengthened sustained release features. The cell toxicity of amino groups modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (NH2-MSN) was significantly reduced by capping of polyacrylic acid. In pharmacokinetic studies, the half time (t1/2β) was prolonged by 1.3 times, and the area under curve) was increased by 2.6 times in PAA-ATO-MSN group compared with free arsenic trioxide group. Subsequently, the antitumor efficacy in vitro (SMMC-7721 cell line) and in vivo (H22 xenografts) was remarkably enhanced indicated that PAA-ATO-MSN improved the antitumor effect of the drug. These results suggest that the polyacrylic acid capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (PAA-MSN) will be a promising nanocarrier for improving pharmacokinetic features and enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy of arsenic trioxide. PMID:27059495

  16. Complementary DNA and derived amino acid sequence of the. beta. subunit of human complement protein C8: identification of a close structural and ancestral relationship to the. cap alpha. subunit and C9

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, O.M.Z.; Rao, A.G.; Sodetz, J.M.

    1987-06-16

    A cDNA clone encoding the ..beta.. subunit (M/sub r/ 64,000) of the eighth component of complement (C8) has been isolated from a human liver cDNA library. This clone has a cDNA insert of 1.95 kilobases (kb) and contains the entire ..beta.. sequence (1608 base pairs (bp)). Analysis of total cellular RNA isolated from the hepatoma cell line HepG2 revealed the mRNA for ..beta.. to be approx. 2.5 kb. This is similar to the message size for the ..cap alpha.. subunit of C8 and confirms the existence of different mRNAs for ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... This finding supports genetic evidence that ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. are encoded at different loci. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed several membrane surface seeking segments that may facilitate ..beta.. interaction with target membranes during complement-mediated cytolysis. Determined of the carbohydrate composition indicated 1 or 2 asparagine-linked but no O-linked oligosaccharide chains. Comparison of the ..beta.. sequence to that reported earlier and to that of human C9 revealed a striking homology between all three proteins. For ..beta.. and ..cap alpha.., the overall homology is 33% on the basis of identity and 53% when conserved substitutions are allowed. For ..beta.. and C9, the values are 26% and 47/sup 5/, respectively. All three have a large internal domain that is nearly cysteine free and N- and C-termini that are cysteine-rich and homologous to the low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat and epidermal growth factor type sequences, respectively. The overall homology and similarities in size and structural organization are indicative of a close ancestral relationship. It is concluded that ..cap alpha.., ..beta.. and C9 are members of a family of structurally related proteins that are capable of interacting to produce a hydrophilic to amphiphilic transition and membrane association.

  17. An amplified electrochemiluminescent aptasensor using Au nanoparticles capped by 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid-thiosemicarbazide functionalized C60 nanocomposites as a signal enhancement tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Nan; Zhang, Xia; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    A novel electrochemiluminescent (ECL) signal tag of Au nanoparticles capped by 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid-thiosemicarbazide functionalized C60 nanocomposites (AuNPs/TSC-PTC/C60NPs) was developed for thrombin (TB) aptasensor construction based on the peroxydisulfate/oxygen (S2O82-/O2) system. For signal tag fabrication, the C60 nanoparticles (C60NPs) were prepared and then coated with 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) by π-π stacking interactions. Afterwards, thiosemicarbazide (TSC) was linked with PTCA functionalized C60NPs via amidation for further assembling Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Finally, detection aptamer of thrombin (TBA 2) was labeled on the ECL signal amplification tag of AuNPs/TSC-PTC/C60NPs. Herein, TSC, with the active groups of -NH2 and -SH, was selected and introduced into the ECL S2O82-/O2 system for the first time, which could not only offer the active groups of -SH to absorb AuNPs for TBA 2 anchoring but also remarkably enhance the ECL signal of the S2O82-/O2 system by the formation of TSC-PTC/C60NPs for signal amplification. Meanwhile, the sensing interface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified by AuNPs/graphene (AuNPs/GR) nanocomposites with the large specific surface area and the active sites, followed by immobilization of thiol-terminated thrombin capture aptamer (TBA 1). With the formation of the sandwich-type structure of TBA 1, TB, and TBA 2 signal probes, a desirable enhanced ECL signal was measured in the testing buffer of an S2O82-/O2 solution for detecting TB. The aptasensor exhibited a good linear relationship for TB detection in the range of 1 × 10-5-10 nM with a detection limit of 3.3 fM.A novel electrochemiluminescent (ECL) signal tag of Au nanoparticles capped by 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid-thiosemicarbazide functionalized C60 nanocomposites (AuNPs/TSC-PTC/C60NPs) was developed for thrombin (TB) aptasensor construction based on the peroxydisulfate/oxygen (S2O82-/O2) system. For signal

  18. Health-care cap.

    PubMed

    1996-05-01

    Dallas Avionics agreed to discontinue its cap on HIV-related medical expenses. The Texas company offered employees $1 million worth of lifetime medical benefits, with the exception of HIV-related expenses. Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund intervened, demanding that the cap be removed and the company pay an employee's $82,000 outstanding HIV-related medical bills. According to Lambda, the cap violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). PMID:11363454

  19. From pioneers to team players: TGA transcription factors provide a molecular link between different stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Gatz, Christiane

    2013-02-01

    The plant immune system encompasses an arsenal of defense genes that is activated upon recognition of a pathogen. Appropriate adjustment of gene expression is mediated by multiple interconnected signal transduction cascades that finally control the activity of transcription factors. These sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins act at the interface between the DNA and the regulatory protein network. In 1989, tobacco TGA1a was cloned as the first plant transcription factor. Since then, multiple studies have shown that members of the TGA family play important roles in defense responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens and against chemical stress. Here, we review 22 years of research on TGA factors which have yielded both consistent and conflicting results. PMID:23013435

  20. Correlation between interfacial interactions and mechanical properties of PA-6 doped with surface-capped nano-silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deliang; Liu, Qing; Yu, Laigui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2009-06-01

    The polyamide-6 pellets were mixed with nano-SiO 2 particles surface-capped by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) via a melt blending route. PA-6 composites doped with surface-capped nano-SiO 2 (designated as PAMNS, where AMNS refers to APS surface-capped nano-SiO 2). AMNS and the silica samples (designated as EAMNS) extracted by acid etching from various PAMNS samples containing different concentration of amino functional groups on surface-capped nano-silica surfaces were characterized by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). This aims at revealing the interfacial interaction between AMNS and PA-6 matrix and its effect on the mechanical properties of the filled PA-6 composites. The chemical features and microstructures of the PAMNS composites were analyzed by means of FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively, while their mechanical properties were evaluated using standardized test rigs. Results demonstrate that the surface-modified nano-SiO 2 particles were uniformly dispersed in PA-6 matrix. The residue silica extracted from various PAMNS samples showed characteristic FTIR absorbance peak of PA-6 and had larger weight losses than AMNS, implying that the polymeric matrix was chemically bonded with the nanofiller particles. The interfacial interactions are closely related to the concentration of functional groups in AMNS, and there might exist a critical concentration at which the strongest interfacial interactions could be reached. Beyond the critical concentration of the functional groups in AMNS, the mechanical properties of the filled PA-6 composites tended to decrease to some extent.

  1. EVALUATION OF TGA AS A QUALITY ASSURANCE TOOL FOR SURFACEMODIFIED ZIRCOLOY-4

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Imrich, K.

    2009-09-21

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and coupled Mass Spectroscopy (MS) were evaluated to determine their suitability as a quality assurance tool for surface modified nickel plated zircaloy-4 liner tubes. Samples with 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mils of heat treated nickel plate were tested at 330, 370, and 400 C. Not all of the samples exhibited the expected typical parabolic shaped oxidation curve. The measured weight change was consistent for the as received and 0.2 mil and the 0.4 mil surface modified samples. None of the samples were tested under aggressive enough conditions to consume the surface modified materials during the test duration. Use of the Mass Spectrometer in conjunction with the TGA did not produce valuable data and was only used for the 400 C test series; however, the TGA was valuable. The 0.1 and 0.3 mil surface modified Zr-4 samples exhibited thru surface modified layer cracks which could account for the variation in oxidation behavior. TGA tests for periods up to six hours appear viable as a method to ascertain oxidation behavior for consistent results. Additional testing of samples with known variations in surface modified layer thickness and quality is recommended as part of the QA acceptance testing.

  2. Pyrolysis and gasification of typical components in wastes with macro-TGA.

    PubMed

    Meng, Aihong; Chen, Shen; Long, Yanqiu; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Yanguo; Li, Qinghai

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis and gasification of typical components of solid waste, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectin, starch, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were performed and compared in a macro thermogravimetric analyzer (macro-TGA). Three model biomasses, poplar stem, orange peel and Chinese cabbage, were applied to pyrolysis and gasification simulation by their components based on TG curves. Compared to those from TGA, peaks temperature of the differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves of each samples pyrolysis on macro-TGA delayed 30-55°C due to heat transferring effect. CO2 promoted the thermal decomposition of hemicellulose, lignin, starch, pectin and model biomasses significantly by Boudouard reaction, and enhanced slightly the decomposition of PET. The activation energy (AE) of biomass components pyrolysis on macro-TGA was 167-197 kJ/mol, while that of plastic samples was 185-235 kJ/mol. The activation energy of 351-377 kJ/mol was corresponding to the Boudouard reaction in CO2 gasification. All overlap ratios in pseudo-components simulation were higher than 0.98 to indicate that pseudo-components model could be applied to both pyrolysis and CO2 gasification, and the mass fractions of components derived from pyrolysis and gasification were slightly different but not brought in obvious difference in simulating curves when they were applied across. PMID:26318422

  3. CAPS-DB: a structural classification of helix-capping motifs

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Oliva, Baldomero; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2012-01-01

    The regions of the polypeptide chain immediately preceding or following an α-helix are known as Nt- and Ct cappings, respectively. Cappings play a central role stabilizing α-helices due to lack of intrahelical hydrogen bonds in the first and last turn. Sequence patterns of amino acid type preferences have been derived for cappings but the structural motifs associated to them are still unclassified. CAPS-DB is a database of clusters of structural patterns of different capping types. The clustering algorithm is based in the geometry and the (ϕ–ψ)-space conformation of these regions. CAPS-DB is a relational database that allows the user to search, browse, inspect and retrieve structural data associated to cappings. The contents of CAPS-DB might be of interest to a wide range of scientist covering different areas such as protein design and engineering, structural biology and bioinformatics. The database is accessible at: http://www.bioinsilico.org/CAPSDB. PMID:22021380

  4. Quantitative detection of powdered activated carbon in wastewater treatment plant effluent by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    PubMed

    Krahnstöver, Therese; Plattner, Julia; Wintgens, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    For the elimination of potentially harmful micropollutants, powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption is applied in many wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). This holds the risk of PAC leakage into the WWTP effluent and desorption of contaminants into natural water bodies. In order to assess a potential PAC leakage, PAC concentrations below several mg/L have to be detected in the WWTP effluent. None of the methods that are used for water analysis today are able to differentiate between activated carbon and solid background matrix. Thus, a selective, quantitative and easily applicable method is still needed for the detection of PAC residues in wastewater. In the present study, a method was developed to quantitatively measure the PAC content in wastewater by using filtration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), which is a well-established technique for the distinction between different solid materials. For the sample filtration, quartz filters with a temperature stability up to 950 °C were used. This allowed for sensitive and well reproducible measurements, as the TGA was not affected by the presence of the filter. The sample's mass fractions were calculated by integrating the mass decrease rate obtained by TGA in specific, clearly identifiable peak areas. A two-step TGA heating method consisting of N2 and O2 atmospheres led to a good differentiation between PAC and biological background matrix, thanks to the reduction of peak overlapping. A linear correlation was found between a sample's PAC content and the corresponding peak areas under N2 and O2, the sample volume and the solid mass separated by filtration. Based on these findings, various wastewater samples from different WWTPs were then analyzed by TGA with regard to their PAC content. It was found that, compared to alternative techniques such as measurement of turbidity or total suspended solids, the newly developed TGA method allows for a quantitative and selective detection of PAC concentrations down to 0

  5. CCiCap: Boeing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA announced today its plans to partner with The Boeing Company for the next phase of the agency's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). Called Commercial Crew integrated Capability (CCiCap), the initia...

  6. ROTOR END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1959-02-01

    An improved end cap is described for the cylindrical rotor or bowl of a high-speed centrifugal separator adapted to permit free and efficient continuous counter current flow of gas therethrough for isotope separation. The end cap design provides for securely mounting the same to the hollow central shaft and external wall of the centrifuge. Passageways are incorporated and so arranged as to provide for continuous counter current flow of the light and heavy portions of the gas fed to the centrifuge.

  7. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  8. pH and concentration dependence of the optical properties of thiol-capped CdTe nanocrystals in water and D2O.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R; Weigert, F; Lesnyak, V; Leubner, S; Lorenz, T; Behnke, T; Dubavik, A; Joswig, J-O; Resch-Genger, U; Gaponik, N; Eychmüller, A

    2016-07-28

    The optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SC NCs) are largely controlled by their size and surface chemistry, i.e., the chemical composition and thickness of inorganic passivation shells and the chemical nature and number of surface ligands as well as the strength of their bonds to surface atoms. The latter is particularly important for CdTe NCs, which - together with alloyed CdxHg1-xTe - are the only SC NCs that can be prepared in water in high quality without the need for an additional inorganic passivation shell. Aiming at a better understanding of the role of stabilizing ligands for the control of the application-relevant fluorescence features of SC NCs, we assessed the influence of two of the most commonly used monodentate thiol ligands, thioglycolic acid (TGA) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), on the colloidal stability, photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY), and PL decay behavior of a set of CdTe NC colloids. As an indirect measure for the strength of the coordinative bond of the ligands to SC NC surface atoms, the influence of the pH (pD) and the concentration on the PL properties of these colloids was examined in water and D2O and compared to the results from previous dilution studies with a set of thiol-capped Cd1-xHgxTe SC NCs in D2O. As a prerequisite for these studies, the number of surface ligands was determined photometrically at different steps of purification after SC NC synthesis with Ellman's test. Our results demonstrate ligand control of the pH-dependent PL of these SC NCs, with MPA-stabilized CdTe NCs being less prone to luminescence quenching than TGA-capped ones. For both types of CdTe colloids, ligand desorption is more pronounced in H2O compared to D2O, underlining also the role of hydrogen bonding and solvent molecules. PMID:27357335

  9. The F-actin capping proteins of Physarum polycephalum: cap42(a) is very similar, if not identical, to fragmin and is structurally and functionally very homologous to gelsolin; cap42(b) is Physarum actin.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, C; Vandekerckhove, J

    1987-01-01

    We have carried out a primary structure analysis of the F-actin capping proteins of Physarum polycephalum. Cap42(b) was completely sequenced and was found to be identical with Physarum actin. Approximately 88% of the sequence of cap42(a) was determined. Cap42(a) and fragmin were found to be identical by amino acid composition, isoelectric point, mol. wt, elution time on reversed-phase chromatography and amino acid sequence of their tryptic peptides. The available sequence of cap42(a) is greater than 36% homologous with the NH2-terminal 42-kd domain of human gelsolin. A highly homologous region of 16 amino acids is also shared between cap42(a), gelsolin and the Acanthamoeba profilins. Cap42(a) binds two actin molecules in a similar way to gelsolin suggesting a mechanism of F-actin modulation that has been conserved during evolution. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2832154

  10. CAPS Simulation Environment Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Douglas G.; Hoffman, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The final design for an effective Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS) will likely come after a number of competing designs have been simulated and evaluated. Because of the large number of design parameters involved in a system capable of detecting an object, accurately determining its orbit, and diverting the impact threat, a comprehensive simulation environment will be an extremely valuable tool for the CAPS designers. A successful simulation/design tool will aid the user in identifying the critical parameters in the system and eventually allow for automatic optimization of the design once the relationships of the key parameters are understood. A CAPS configuration will consist of space-based detectors whose purpose is to scan the celestial sphere in search of objects likely to make a close approach to Earth and to determine with the greatest possible accuracy the orbits of those objects. Other components of a CAPS configuration may include systems for modifying the orbits of approaching objects, either for the purpose of preventing a collision or for positioning the object into an orbit where it can be studied or used as a mineral resource. The Synergistic Engineering Environment (SEE) is a space-systems design, evaluation, and visualization software tool being leveraged to simulate these aspects of the CAPS study. The long-term goal of the SEE is to provide capabilities to allow the user to build and compare various CAPS designs by running end-to-end simulations that encompass the scanning phase, the orbit determination phase, and the orbit modification phase of a given scenario. Herein, a brief description of the expected simulation phases is provided, the current status and available features of the SEE software system is reported, and examples are shown of how the system is used to build and evaluate a CAPS detection design. Conclusions and the roadmap for future development of the SEE are also presented.

  11. Sensitive and selective determining ascorbic acid and activity of alkaline phosphatase based on electrochemiluminescence of dual-stabilizers-capped CdSe quantum dots in carbon nanotube-nafion composite.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xinli; Kang, Qi; Shen, Dazhong; Zou, Guizheng

    2016-07-01

    Sensitive and selective determining bio-related molecule and enzyme play an important role in designing novel procedure for biological sensing and clinical diagnosis. Herein, we found that dual-stabilizers-capped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in composite film of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Nafion, displaying eye-visible monochromatic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) with fwhm of 37nm, which offers promising ECL signal for detecting ascorbic acid (AA) as well as the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in biological samples. It was also shown that the dual-stabilizers-capped CdSe QDs can preserve their highly passivated surface states with prolonged lifetime of excited states in Nafion mixtures, and facilitate electron-transfer ability of Nafion film along with CNTs. Compared with the QDs/GCE, the ECL intensity is enhanced 1.8 times and triggering potential shifted to lower energy by 0.12V on the CdSe-CNTs-Nafion/GCE. The ECL quenching degree increases with increasing concentration of AA in the range of 0.01-30nM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5pM. The activity of ALP was determined indirectly according to the concentration of AA, generated in the hydrolysis reaction of l-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate sesquimagnesium (AA-P) in the presence of ALP as a catalyst, with an LOD of 1μU/L. The proposed strategy is favorable for developing simple ECL sensor or device with high sensitivity, spectral resolution and less electrochemical interference. PMID:27154663

  12. A Phrygian Cap

    PubMed Central

    van Kamp, Marie-Janne S.; Bouman, Donald E.; Steenvoorde, Pascal; Klaase, Joost M.

    2013-01-01

    A Phrygian cap is a congenital anomaly of the gallbladder with an incidence of 4%. It can simulate a mass in the liver during hepatobiliary imaging and is sometimes mistaken for pathology. A Phrygian cap, however, has no pathological significance and normally causes no symptoms. A case will be presented where a Phrygian cap was found by coincidence during surgery. The patient was operated for colon cancer with liver metastasis in segment V. He underwent a simultaneous right hemicolectomy and wedge resection of the liver lesion. During perioperative inspection, a gallbladder with a folded fundus was seen. This deformity was, in retrospective, detected on the preoperative MRI scan. The patient underwent cholecystectomy to make the wedge resection easier to perform. Otherwise, cholecystectomy for a Phrygian cap is only indicated in case of symptoms. Radiographic imaging can be helpful in narrowing the differential diagnosis. To our knowledge, there is no recent literature about the Phrygian cap and its imaging aspects. Nowadays, multiphase MRI, or multiphase CT in case of MRI contraindication, are the first choices of hepatobiliary imaging. PMID:24019768

  13. Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny C. Servo, Ph.D.

    2004-07-12

    In order to fulfill the objective of Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR), the Department of Energy funds an initiative referred to as the Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP). The over-arching purpose of the CAP is to facilitate transition of the SBIR-funded technology to Phase III defined as private sector investment or receipt of non-sbir dollars to further the commercialization of the technology. Phase III also includes increased sales. This report summarizes the stages involved in the implementation of the Commercialization Assistance Program, a program which has been most successful in fulfilling its objectives.

  14. [Capping strategies in RNA viruses].

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Ferron, François; Imbert, Isabelle; Gluais, Laure; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-04-01

    Most viruses use the mRNA-cap dependent cellular translation machinery to translate their mRNAs into proteins. The addition of a cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA is therefore an essential step for the replication of many virus families. Additionally, the cap protects the viral RNA from degradation by cellular nucleases and prevents viral RNA recognition by innate immunity mechanisms. Viral RNAs acquire their cap structure either by using cellular capping enzymes, by stealing the cap of cellular mRNA in a process named "cap snatching", or using virus-encoded capping enzymes. Many viral enzymes involved in this process have recently been structurally and functionally characterized. These studies have revealed original cap synthesis mechanisms and pave the way towards the development of specific inhibitors bearing antiviral drug potential. PMID:22549871

  15. PVP capped CdS nanoparticles for UV-LED applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram, H.; Selvakumar, D.; Jayavel, R.

    2015-06-24

    Polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates that the nanoparticles are crystallized in cubic phase. The optical properties are characterized by UV-Vis absorption. The morphology of CdS nanoparticles are studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermal behavior of the as prepared nanoparticles has been examined by Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical absorption study of pvp capped CdS reveal a red shift confirms the UV-LED applications.

  16. Polyfluorinated. cap alpha. ,. beta. -unsaturated ketons

    SciTech Connect

    Latypov, R.R.; Belogai, V.D.; Pashkevich, K.I.

    1986-07-10

    The ..cap alpha..,..beta..-unsaturated ketones (..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK), particularly those groups containing fluoroalkyl groups, are of interest as highly reactive compounds having two nonequivalent electrophilic centers. In the present investigation, by boiling polyfluorinated aldehydes with methylketones in glacial acetic acid, they have obtained for the first time the polyfluorinated ..beta..-hydroxy-ketones, the dehydration of which has been used to synthesize the corresponding polyfluorinated ..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK, and their structure and reactions with the nucleophiles NH/sub 3/, PhNH/sub 2/, MeOH have been studied. In the PMR spectra of the ..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK (X)-(XVI) two doublets of triplets are observed at 6.9 and 7.9 ppm, caused by the spin-spin coupling of the olefin protons with the CF/sub 2/ group of the substituent. For ..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK, apart from the cis-trans isomerism relative to the C=C bond, a rotational isomerism is possible, caused by rotation around the C-C single bond. The presence in the IR spectra of absorption bands from nonplanar torsion-deformation vibrations of C-H for a double bond (nu = 975-980 cm/sup -1/) and the high value of the spin-spin coupling constant of the olefin protons (J/sub HH/ = 15 Hz) indicate unambiguously the transconfiguration of the olefin protons.

  17. Guard For Fuse Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    L-shaped guard attached to fuse holder. Guard prevents casual tampering with fuses in electrical junction box or fuse block. Protects fuses from being damaged by handling or by rope or string used to secure them. With fuse-cap guard, only responsible people have access to fuses.

  18. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  19. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information:VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  20. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.3, Longitude 314.4 East (45.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  1. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.2, Longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  2. Syntheses of the Water-Dispersible Glycolic Acid Capped ZnS:Mn Nanocrystals at Different pH Conditions, and Their Aggregation and Luminescence Quenching Effects in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Cheong-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Water-dispersible ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were prepared by capping their surface with polar glycolic acid molecules at three different pH conditions. The produced ZnS:Mn-GA nanocrystals were characterized by XRD, HR-TEM, ICP-AES, and FT-IR spectroscopy. The optical properties were also measured by UV-Visible and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. In the PL spectra, theses ZnS:Mn-GA nanocrystals showed broad emission peaks around 595 nm, and the calculated relative quantum efficiencies against an organic dye standard were in the range from 2.16 to 5.52%. The measured particle size from the HR-TEM images was about 3.7 nm on average, which were also supported by the calculations with the Debye-Scherrer methods. In addition, the surface charges of the nanocrystals were determined by an electrophoretic method, which showed pH dependent charge values of the nanocrytals: +0.88 mV (pH 2), +0.82 mV (pH 7), and -0.59 mV (pH 12) respectively. In addition, the degrees of aggregation of the nanocrystals in aqueous solutions were determined by a hydrodynamic light scattering method. As a result, formations of micrometer size agglomerates for all the ZnS:Mn-GA nanocrystals in water was observed at room temperature. This was probably caused by intermolecular attraction between the capping molecules. In addition, the ZnS:Mn-GA with the negative surface charge was presumed to be suitable for further coordination to a transition metal ion on the surface of the nanocrystal. As a result, fast luminescence quenching was observed after addition of aqueous solution containing Cu2+ ions. PMID:27427703

  3. Identification of a CAP (adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein) homologous gene in Lentinus edodes and its functional complementation of yeast CAP mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, K; Shishido, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1998-04-01

    The adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was originally identified in yeasts as a protein that functions in both signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization. This paper reports the identification of a cDNA and genomic DNA that encodes a CAP homologue from the mushroom Lentinus edodes. The L. edodes cap gene contains eight introns and an ORF encoding a 518 amino acid protein. The L. edodes CAP is 35.5% and 40.9% identical at the amino acid level with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe CAP, respectively. The C-terminal domain shows greater homology (39-46% identity) with yeast CAPs than does the N-terminal domain (27-35% identity). Southern blotting and Northern blotting results suggest that L. edodes cap is a single-copy gene and uniformly expressed. Expression of the L. edodes CAP in both Schiz. pombe and Sacch. cerevisiae complemented defects associated with the loss of the C-terminal domain function of the endogenous CAP. By using a yeast two-hybrid assay, an interaction was demonstrated between the L. edodes CAP and Schiz. pombe actin. This result and the functional complementation test indicate that CAP from L. edodes has a conserved C-terminal domain function. PMID:9579081

  4. Fastener Caps For Electronic Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    Simple devices indicate fasteners disturbed. Lid on fastener cap bent to cover fastener head. Caps then wired together in pairs. Used in place of older paper or plastic tape seals, providing greater security and presenting neater appearance.

  5. Thermal characterization and model free kinetics of aged epoxies and foams using TGA and DSC methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Nissen, April

    2013-10-01

    Two classes of materials, poly(methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) or PMDI foam, and cross-linked epoxy resins, were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to help understand the effects of aging and %E2%80%9Cbake-out%E2%80%9D. The materials were evaluated for mass loss and the onset of decomposition. In some experiments, volatile materials released during heating were analyzed via mass spectroscopy. In all, over twenty materials were evaluated to compare the mass loss and onset temperature for decomposition. Model free kinetic (MFK) measurements, acquired using variable heating rate TGA experiments, were used to calculate the apparent activation energy of thermal decomposition. From these compiled data the effects of aging, bake-out, and sample history on the thermal stability of materials were compared. No significant differences between aged and unaged materials were detected. Bake-out did slightly affect the onset temperature of decomposition but only at the highest bake-out temperatures. Finally, some recommendations for future handling are made.

  6. Signal transduction by Tga3, a novel G protein alpha subunit of Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Susanne; Reithner, Barbara; Scala, Valeria; Peissl, Isabel; Lorito, Matteo; Mach, Robert L

    2005-03-01

    Trichoderma species are used commercially as biocontrol agents against a number of phytopathogenic fungi due to their mycoparasitic characterisitics. The mycoparasitic response is induced when Trichoderma specifically recognizes the presence of the host fungus and transduces the host-derived signals to their respective regulatory targets. We made deletion mutants of the tga3 gene of Trichoderma atroviride, which encodes a novel G protein alpha subunit that belongs to subgroup III of fungal Galpha proteins. Deltatga3 mutants had changes in vegetative growth, conidiation, and conidial germination and reduced intracellular cyclic AMP levels. These mutants were avirulent in direct confrontation assays with Rhizoctonia solani or Botrytis cinerea, and mycoparasitism-related infection structures were not formed. When induced with colloidal chitin or N-acetylglucosamine in liquid culture, the mutants had reduced extracellular chitinase activity even though the chitinase-encoding genes ech42 and nag1 were transcribed at a significantly higher rate than they were in the wild type. Addition of exogenous cyclic AMP did not suppress the altered phenotype or restore mycoparasitic overgrowth, although it did restore the ability to produce the infection structures. Thus, T. atroviride Tga3 has a general role in vegetative growth and can alter mycoparasitism-related characteristics, such as infection structure formation and chitinase gene expression. PMID:15746364

  7. cap alpha. /sub i/-3 cDNA encodes the. cap alpha. subunit of G/sub k/, the stimulatory G protein of receptor-regulated K/sup +/ channels

    SciTech Connect

    Codina, J.; Olate, J.; Abramowitz, J.; Mattera, R.; Cook, R.G.; Birnbaumer, L.

    1988-05-15

    cDNA cloning has identified the presence in the human genome of three genes encoding ..cap alpha.. subunits of pertussis toxin substrates, generically called G/sub i/. They are named ..cap alpha../sub i/-1, ..cap alpha../sub i/-2 and ..cap alpha../sub i/-3. However, none of these genes has been functionally identified with any of the ..cap alpha.. subunits of several possible G proteins, including pertussis toxin-sensitive G/sub p/'s, stimulatory to phospholipase C or A/sub 2/, G/sub i/, inhibitory to adenylyl cyclase, or G/sub k/, stimulatory to a type of K/sup +/ channels. The authors now report the nucleotide sequence and the complete predicted amino acid sequence of human liver ..cap alpha../sub i/-3 and the partial amino acid sequence of proteolytic fragments of the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human erythrocyte G/sub k/. The amino acid sequence of the proteolytic fragment is uniquely encoded by the cDNA of ..cap alpha../sub i/-3, thus identifying it as ..cap alpha../sub k/. The probable identity of ..cap alpha../sub i/-1 with ..cap alpha../sub p/ and possible roles for ..cap alpha../sub i/-2, as well as additional roles for ..cap alpha../sub i/-1 and ..cap alpha../sub i/-3 (..cap alpha../sub k/) are discussed.

  8. Myristoylated. cap alpha. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-11-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the ..cap alpha.. subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (..cap alpha../sub 45/ and ..cap alpha../sub 52/), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (..cap alpha../sub 41/), a 40-kDa protein (..cap alpha../sub 40/), and the 36-kDa ..beta.. subunit. No protein that comigrated with the ..cap alpha.. subunit of G/sup 0/ (unknown function) (..cap alpha../sub 39/) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of (/sup 3/H)myristic acid, ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 40/ contained /sup 3/H label, while the ..beta.. subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein ..beta.. and ..gamma.. subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma..) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with ..cap alpha../sub 41/ , ..cap alpha../sub 40/, and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins.

  9. Designing Smart Charter School Caps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Erin

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, Andrew J. Rotherham proposed a new approach to the contentious issue of charter school caps, the statutory limits on charter school growth in place in several states. Rotherham's proposal, termed "smart charter school caps," called for quality sensitive caps that allow the expansion of high-performing charter schools while also…

  10. Performance of blasting caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Common blasting caps are made from an aluminum shell in the form of a tube which is closed at both ends. One end, which is called the output end, terminates in a principal side or face, and contains a detonating agent which communicates with a means for igniting the detonating agent. The improvement of the present invention is a flat, steel foil bonded to the face in a position which is aligned perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tube.

  11. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  12. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  13. Synthesis of capped TiO2 nanocrystals of controlled shape and their use with MEH-PPV conjugated polymer to develop nanocomposite films for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighri, F.; Duong, Vu Thi Thuy; On, Do Trong; Ajji, A.

    2014-05-01

    This study presents the synthesis details of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) of different shapes (nanospheres, nanorods and nanorhombics) using oleic acid (OA) and oleyl amine (OM) as capping agents. In order to develop nanocomposite thin films for photovoltaic cells, these TiO2 NPs were carefully dispersed in 2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) matrix. The properties of synthesized TiO2 NPs and MEH-PPV/TiO2 nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-Visible spectroscopy, and Photoluminescence technique. It was found that the shape of NPs and the amount of OA and OM surfactants capped on their surface have an effect on their energy bandgap and also on the dispersion quality of MEH-PPV/TiO2 nanocomposites. Even though there was no evidence of chemical bonding between MEH-PPV matrix and TiO2 dispersed NPs, MEH-PPV/TiO2 nanocomposites showed very promising results for light absorption properties and charge transfer at the interface of the conjugated MEH-PPV matrix and TiO2 dispersed NPs, which are two main characteristics for photovoltaic materials.

  14. Synthesis of capped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals of controlled shape and their use with MEH-PPV conjugated polymer to develop nanocomposite films for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mighri, F. E-mail: Thi-Thuy-Duong.vu.1@ulaval.ca; Duong, Vu Thi Thuy E-mail: Thi-Thuy-Duong.vu.1@ulaval.ca; On, Do Trong; Ajji, A.

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the synthesis details of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (NPs) of different shapes (nanospheres, nanorods and nanorhombics) using oleic acid (OA) and oleyl amine (OM) as capping agents. In order to develop nanocomposite thin films for photovoltaic cells, these TiO{sub 2} NPs were carefully dispersed in 2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) matrix. The properties of synthesized TiO{sub 2} NPs and MEH-PPV/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-Visible spectroscopy, and Photoluminescence technique. It was found that the shape of NPs and the amount of OA and OM surfactants capped on their surface have an effect on their energy bandgap and also on the dispersion quality of MEH-PPV/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. Even though there was no evidence of chemical bonding between MEH-PPV matrix and TiO2 dispersed NPs, MEH-PPV/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites showed very promising results for light absorption properties and charge transfer at the interface of the conjugated MEH-PPV matrix and TiO{sub 2} dispersed NPs, which are two main characteristics for photovoltaic materials.

  15. Saltstone Clean Cap Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C

    2005-04-22

    The current operation strategy for using Saltstone Vault 4 to receive 0.2 Ci/gallon salt solution waste involves pouring a clean grout layer over the radioactive grout prior to initiating pour into another cell. This will minimize the radiating surface area and reduce the dose rate at the vault and surrounding area. The Clean Cap will be used to shield about four feet of Saltstone poured into a Z-Area vault cell prior to moving to another cell. The minimum thickness of the Clean Cap layer will be determined by the cesium concentration and resulting dose levels and it is expected to be about one foot thick based on current calculations for 0.1 Ci Saltstone that is produced in the Saltstone process by stabilization of 0.2 Ci salt solution. This report documents experiments performed to identify a formulation for the Clean Cap. Thermal transient calculations, adiabatic temperature rise measurements, pour height, time between pour calculations and shielding calculations were beyond the scope and time limitations of this study. However, data required for shielding calculations (composition and specific gravity) are provided for shielding calculations. The approach used to design a Clean Cap formulation was to produce a slurry from the reference premix (10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash) and domestic water that resembled as closely as possible the properties of the Saltstone slurry. In addition, options were investigated that may offer advantages such as less bleed water and less heat generation. The options with less bleed water required addition of dispersants. The options with lower heat contained more fly ash and less slag. A mix containing 10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash with a water to premix ratio of 0.60 is recommended for the Clean Cap. Although this mix may generate more than 3 volume percent standing water (bleed water), it has rheological, mixing and flow properties that are similar to previously processed Saltstone. The recommended

  16. TGA-DTA and chemical composition study of raw material of Bikaner region for electrical porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tak, S. K.; Shekhawat, M. S.; Mangal, R.

    2013-06-01

    Porcelains are vitrified and a fine grained ceramic product, used either glazed or unglazed and is often manufactured from a tri-axial body mix of clays, quartz and alkaline feldspar. Physical properties associated with porcelain include those of permeability, high strength, hardness, glassiness, durability, whiteness, translucence, resonance, brittleness, high resistance to the passage of electricity, high resistance to thermal shock and high elasticity[1,2]. Porcelain insulators are made from three raw materials; clay; feldspar and quartz. For porcelain manufacture the clay is categorized in two groups; ball clay and kaolin, each of which plays an important role, either in the preparation of the product or in the properties of the finished products. The following research highlights the importance that suits these materials for their contributions to the final properties of the product. Keeping this view a TGA-DTA and chemical composition of these raw materials were observed and these materials are found suitable for production of Electrical Porcelain.

  17. Complex formation of Sn(II) with glycine: An IR, DTA/TGA and DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Galina V.; Petrov, Alexander I.; Staloverova, Natalya A.; Samoilo, Alexander S.; Dergachev, Ilya D.; Shubin, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The novel Sn(Gly)2ṡH2O complex compound has been synthesized and characterized by TGA, IR and Raman spectroscopy. Molecular spectroscopy and ab initio simulation have given the evidence of glycine molecule being coordinated to Sn(II) as bidentate chelating ligand by oxygen atom of carboxyl group and nitrogen atom of amino group. Water molecule is bonded with amino and carboxylic groups by hydrogen bonds in the out sphere. The M06, TPSS, TPSSm, TPSSh and revTPSS density functionals have been tested for calculation of structural and vibrational data. The vibrational assignment of experimental IR and Raman and simulated spectra has been carried out. The TPSS and TPSSm density functionals and Def2-TZVP basis set have provided the most accurate results.

  18. A TGA study on the chlorination reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Min Ku; Choi, Yong Taek; Kang, Kweon Ho; Park, Geun Il

    2015-04-01

    The chlorination reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls were investigated using a home-made thermogravimetric analysis for a hull chlorination (TGA-HC) system. The reproducibility of the TGA-HC system was verified by repeated measurements at an identical condition, which showed only 6.6% of maximum difference. The effect of total flow rate (Q) was investigated for Q of 120 and 240 mL/min, and it was revealed that the reaction rate is not influenced in this condition. Using the Sharp-Hancock plot, the volumetric contraction model was identified as the most suitable model for the Zircaloy-4 chlorination reaction. The influence of chlorine partial pressure was studied at 9.21, 16.9, and 23.4 kPa of Cl2 partial pressure conditions, and it was identified that the reaction rate is proportional to the chlorine partial pressure on the order of (0.669). The effect of reaction temperature was investigated for 300-450 °C, and it was revealed that the chlorination reaction exhibits an activation energy of 26.2 kJ/mol. Using the experimental and fitting results, the reaction rate equation for the Zircaloy-4 chlorination reaction was achieved, but the equation was valid only until the conversion fraction (α) reaches up to (0.60). When α is higher than 0.60, the volumetric contraction model was not applicable. A second-order reaction rate equation was suggested for the 0.6 < α region, although it needs further investigation.

  19. Involvement of DkTGA1 Transcription Factor in Anaerobic Response Leading to Persimmon Fruit Postharvest De-Astringency.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-Gang; Wang, Miao-Miao; Gong, Zi-Yuan; Fang, Fang; Sun, Ning-Jing; Li, Xian; Grierson, Donald; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-01-01

    Persimmon fruit are unique in accumulating proanthocyanidins (tannins) during development, which cause astringency in mature fruit. In 'Mopanshi' persimmon, astringency can be removed by treatment with 95% CO2, which increases the concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde by glycolysis, and precipitates the soluble tannin. A TGA transcription factor, DkTGA1, belonging to the bZIP super family, was isolated from an RNA-seq database and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that DkTGA1 was up-regulated by CO2 treatment, in concert with the removal of astringency from persimmon fruit. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that DkTGA1 had a small (less than 2-fold), but significant effect on the promoters of de-astringency-related genes DkADH1, DkPDC2 and DkPDC3, which encode enzymes catalyzing formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol. A combination of DkTGA1 and a second transcription factor, DkERF9, shown previously to be related to de-astringency, showed additive effects on the activation of the DkPDC2 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that DkERF9, but not DkTGA1, could bind to the DkPDC2 promoter. Thus, although DkTGA1 expression is positively associated with persimmon fruit de-astringency, trans-activation analyses with DkPDC2 indicates it is likely to act by binding indirectly DkPDC2 promoter, might with helps of DkERF9. PMID:27196670

  20. Involvement of DkTGA1 Transcription Factor in Anaerobic Response Leading to Persimmon Fruit Postharvest De-Astringency

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing-gang; Wang, Miao-miao; Gong, Zi-yuan; Fang, Fang; Sun, Ning-jing; Li, Xian; Grierson, Donald; Yin, Xue-ren; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Persimmon fruit are unique in accumulating proanthocyanidins (tannins) during development, which cause astringency in mature fruit. In ‘Mopanshi’ persimmon, astringency can be removed by treatment with 95% CO2, which increases the concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde by glycolysis, and precipitates the soluble tannin. A TGA transcription factor, DkTGA1, belonging to the bZIP super family, was isolated from an RNA-seq database and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that DkTGA1 was up-regulated by CO2 treatment, in concert with the removal of astringency from persimmon fruit. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that DkTGA1 had a small (less than 2-fold), but significant effect on the promoters of de-astringency-related genes DkADH1, DkPDC2 and DkPDC3, which encode enzymes catalyzing formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol. A combination of DkTGA1 and a second transcription factor, DkERF9, shown previously to be related to de-astringency, showed additive effects on the activation of the DkPDC2 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that DkERF9, but not DkTGA1, could bind to the DkPDC2 promoter. Thus, although DkTGA1 expression is positively associated with persimmon fruit de-astringency, trans-activation analyses with DkPDC2 indicates it is likely to act by binding indirectly DkPDC2 promoter, might with helps of DkERF9. PMID:27196670

  1. Characterization of a rabbit cationic protein (CAP18) with lipopolysaccharide-inhibitory activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, M; Shimomura, Y; Yoshida, M; Morgan, J G; Palings, I; Wilson, D; Yen, M H; Wright, S C; Larrick, J W

    1994-01-01

    Cationic antibacterial proteins (CAP) were purified from rabbit granulocytes, and the effects of CAP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tissue factor generation by murine peritoneal macrophages and human blood monocytes were studied. CAP were purified from rabbit peritoneal leukocytes by using as an assay the agglutination of erythrocytes coated with Re-LPS. Two proteins with CAP activity, CAP18 (18 kDa) and CAP7 (7 kDa), were isolated by acid extraction, ethanol precipitation, affinity chromatography, gel filtration, and reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. On the basis of protein sequencing, CAP7 was identified as the C-terminal fragment of CAP18, designated CAP18(106-142). Various forms of LPS (S-LPS, Re-LPS, and lipid A) activate murine macrophages and human blood monocytes to generate tissue factor (tissue thromboplastin). Incubation of LPS for 18 h with partially purified CAP (heparin-Sepharose fraction) inhibited the capacity of LPS to induce tissue factor; however, purified CAP18 inhibited about 75% of the activity of S-LPS after 1 h of incubation. CAP more effectively inhibited S-LPS than Re-LPS or lipid A. Synthetic CAP18(106-142) inhibited LPS-induced tissue factor generation by murine macrophages. CAP18(106-142) has greater LPS-binding and LPS-neutralizing activities than CAP18. We hypothesize that CAP18 and the derivative peptide, CAP18(106-142), bind to LPS and alter the capacity of LPS to initiate disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this regard, CAP may have therapeutic potential for sepsis and endotoxin shock. Images PMID:8132348

  2. Biocompatible and high-performance amino acids-capped MnWO4 nanocasting as a novel non-lanthanide contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kai; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jianhua; Huang, Sa; Li, Zhenhua; Yuan, Qinghai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    -weighted MR imaging capabilities. As an alternative to T2-weighted MRI and CT dual-modality contrast agents, the nanoprobes can provide a positive contrast signal, which prevents confusion with the dark signals from hemorrhage and blood clots. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that a non-lanthanide imaging nanoprobe is applied for CT and T1-weighted MRI simultaneously. Moreover, comparing with gadolinium-based T1-weighted MRI and CT dual-modality contrast agents that were associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), our contrast agents have superior biocompatibility, which is proved by a detailed study of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and in vivo toxicology. Together with excellent dispersibility, high biocompatibility and superior contrast efficacy, these nanoprobes provide detailed and complementary information from dual-modality imaging over traditional single-mode imaging and bring more opportunities to the new generation of non-lanthanide nanoparticulate-based contrast agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of MnWO4 nanoparticles synthesized at pH = 7, 180 °C pH = 9, 180 °C pH = 6, 200 °C with various amino acid molecules as capped agents, survey XPS spectra, FTIR spectrum of glycine capped MnWO4 nanorods, photos of glycine capped MnWO4 nanorods in various solutions including PBS, DMEM cell medium, and FBS, in vivo coronal view CT images of a rat before and after intravenous injection of iobitridol at different timed intervals, in vivo CT imaging of the rat one month after intravenous injection of MnWO4 nanorods, CT values of the heart, liver, spleen and kidney of a rat before and after intravenous administration of MnWO4 nanorods and iobitridol at different time intervals, hematology analysis and blood biochemical assay. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05455a

  3. Nuclear activity of ROXY1, a glutaredoxin interacting with TGA factors, is required for petal development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Shutian; Lauri, Andrea; Ziemann, Mark; Busch, Andrea; Bhave, Mrinal; Zachgo, Sabine

    2009-02-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) have thus far been associated mainly with redox-regulated processes participating in stress responses. However, ROXY1, encoding a GRX, has recently been shown to regulate petal primorida initiation and further petal morphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. ROXY1 belongs to a land plant-specific class of GRXs that has a CC-type active site motif, which deviates from ubiquitously occurring CPYC and CGFS GRXs. Expression studies of yellow fluorescent protein-ROXY1 fusion genes driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter reveal a nucleocytoplasmic distribution of ROXY1. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of ROXY1 is indispensable and thus crucial for its activity in flower development. Yeast two-hybrid screens identified TGA transcription factors as interacting proteins, which was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments showing their nuclear interaction in planta. Overlapping expression patterns of ROXY1 and TGA genes during flower development demonstrate that ROXY1/TGA protein interactions can occur in vivo and support their biological relevance in petal development. Deletion analysis of ROXY1 demonstrates the importance of the C terminus for its functionality and for mediating ROXY1/TGA protein interactions. Phenotypic analysis of the roxy1-2 pan double mutant and an engineered chimeric repressor mutant from PERIANTHIA (PAN), a floral TGA gene, supports a dual role of ROXY1 in petal development. Together, our results show that the ROXY1 protein functions in the nucleus, likely by modifying PAN posttranslationally and thereby regulating its activity in petal primordia initiation. Additionally, ROXY1 affects later petal morphogenesis, probably by modulating other TGA factors that might act redundantly during differentiation of second whorl organs. PMID:19218396

  4. Methods of Measuring Vapor Pressures of Lubricants With Their Additives Using TGA and/or Microbalances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.; Miller, Michael K.; Montoya, Alex F.

    1996-01-01

    The life of a space system may be critically dependent on the lubrication of some of its moving parts. The vapor pressure, the quantity of the available lubricant, the temperature and the exhaust venting conductance passage are important considerations in the selection and application of a lubricant. In addition, the oil additives employed to provide certain properties of low friction, surface tension, antioxidant and load bearing characteristics, are also very important and need to be known with regard to their amounts and vapor pressures. This paper reports on the measurements and analyses carried out to obtain those parameters for two often employed lubricants, the Apiezon(TM)-C and the Krytox(TM) AB. The measurements were made employing an electronic microbalance and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) modified to operate in a vacuum. The results have been compared to other data on these oils when available. The identification of the mass fractions of the additives in the oil and their vapor pressures as a function of the temperature were carried out. These may be used to estimate the lubricant life given its quantity and the system vent exhaust conductance. It was found that the Apiezon(TM)-C has three main components with different rates of evaporation while the Krytox(TM) did not indicate any measurable additive.

  5. Analysis of the combustion and pyrolysis of dried sewage sludge by TGA and MS.

    PubMed

    Magdziarz, Aneta; Werle, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the combustion and pyrolysis processes of three sewage sludge were investigated. The sewage sludge came from three wastewater treatment plants. Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed. The thermal behaviour of studied sewage sludge was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). The samples were heated from ambient temperature to 800 °C at a constant rate 10 °C/min in air (combustion process) and argon flows (pyrolysis process). The thermal profiles presented in form of TG/DTG curves were comparable for studied sludges. All TG/DTG curves were divided into three stages. The main decomposition of sewage sludge during the combustion process took place in the range 180-580 °C with c.a. 70% mass loss. The pyrolysis process occurred in lower temperature but with less mass loss. The evolved gaseous products (H2, CH4, CO2, H2O) from the decomposition of sewage sludge were identified on-line. PMID:24238993

  6. Effects of water washing and torrefaction on the pyrolysis behavior and kinetics of rice husk through TGA and Py-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuping; Dong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water washing and torrefaction on the pyrolysis behavior and kinetics of rice husk were investigated through TGA and Py-GC/MS in this study. Two iso-conversional methods, i.e. Starink and FWO methods were applied for determination of the activation energy of original and pretreated rice husk samples at three different heating rates. It was found that activation energy of water washed rice husk was lower than that of original rice husk. Whereas, the activation energy increased with the increase of torrefaction temperature. The result of Py-GC/MS analysis indicated that both water washing and torrefaction pretreatments decreased the contents of acids, ketones, aldehydes and furans, while significantly increased the contents of sugars, especially levoglucosan. The relative content of released levoglucosan from pyrolysis of rice husk sample with combined water washing and 280°C torrefaction pretreatment is almost 9 times of that from original rice husk, which is about 3%. PMID:26343572

  7. Polar Cap Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows kidney bean-shaped pits, and other pits, formed by erosion in a landscape of frozen carbon dioxide. This images shows one of about a dozen different patterns that are common in various locations across the martian south polar residual cap, an area that has been receiving intense scrutiny by the MGS MOC this year, because it is visible on every orbit and in daylight for most of 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 6.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  8. South Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-337, 21 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 'swiss cheese' pattern of frozen carbon dioxide on the south polar residual cap. Observation of these materials over two Mars years has revealed that the scarps that bound the mesas and small buttes are retreating-the carbon dioxide ice is subliming away-at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per Mars year in some places. The picture covers an area about 900 m (about 900 yards) wide near 87.1oS, 93.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  9. Hats Off to Thinking Caps!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Lynne E.

    2005-01-01

    This document describes a third grade teachers' new twist to get her students' minds motivated for another school year. She purchased some "thinking caps." The purpose of the caps was to help students focus on various academic tasks. The children were thrilled to have a new tool to help them concentrate.

  10. Detecting buried archaeological soils with TGA in an agricultural terrace setting in Northern Calabria, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, K.; Guttmann-Bond, E.; Kluiving, S.; van Leusen, M.

    2012-04-01

    Agricultural terraces are geomorphologic features created by humans. These structures protect farming land by reducing soil erosion, they collect water in their hydrological infrastructure, and preserve crops and vegetation. Their construction could however negatively affect underlying soils and archaeology present in those soils. However, if a terrace is constructed on a hill slope without destroying the underlying soil, the agricultural terrace could create a stable environment in regard to erosion, and preserve the underlying soil and potential archaeological remains in it. In order to detect soils within agricultural terraces in Northern-Calabria, Italy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was performed on exposures of four agricultural terraces, two agricultural fields in a non-terraced setting and five natural geomorphological features. Results are the detection of a buried soil horizon which contains archaeological remains dating from the Hellenistic period 60 cm below the surface of an agricultural terrace, and a buried soil horizon which contains archaeological remains dating from the Hellenistic period at the interface of an agricultural field and a river valley. Both soil horizons were indentified by an increase in organic components, and a decrease in calcium carbonates relative to their surrounding context. Conclusions are that the construction of agricultural terraces and fields does not necessarily lead to the destruction of underlying soils. This could open new doors for archaeological field investigations in agricultural areas in southern Italy. This study was conducted as part of the Raganello Archaeological Project of the Groningen Institute of Archaeology, Rijks Universiteit Groningen, in collaboration with the Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology at the VU University Amsterdam.

  11. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors. PMID:26506285

  12. Refilin holds the cap.

    PubMed

    Gay, Olivia; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Baudier, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    The Refilins (RefilinA and RefilinB) are a novel family of short-lived actin regulatory proteins that are expressed during changes in cellular phenotype such as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). The Refilins promote to the formation of actin- and myosin-rich perinuclear bundles that are characteristic of cellular phenotypic switches. In epithelial cells, RefilinB is up-regulated in response to TGF-β stimulation and function in organization of apical perinuclear actin fibers during early stage of the EMT process1. In fibroblasts, RefilinB stabilizes perinuclear parallel actin bundles which resemble actin cap 2. Refilins bind and modulate the function of Filamin A (FLNA). Upon binding to Refilins, FLNA is capable of assembling actin filaments into parallel bundles, possibly by undergoing conformational changes at the C-terminal. Perinuclear actin structures determine nuclear shape, cell morphology, cell adhesion and possibly cell proliferation and gene regulation. Identifying the role of Refilins in organizing perinuclear actin networks provides additional insight in the process of intracellular mechanotransduction that regulate changes in cellular phenotype such as those observed during EMT. PMID:22446558

  13. Genetics Home Reference: cap myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groote C, de Jonghe P, Marttila M, Laing NG, Pelin K, Wallgren-Pettersson C. Cap disease caused ... E, Wallefeld W, Memo M, Donner K, Laing NG, Marston S, Grönholm M, Wallgren-Pettersson C. Abnormal actin ...

  14. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  15. Researchers dodge UK migration cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2011-03-01

    Research scientists are among those to be prioritized under the UK government's new immigration rules that will impose an annual cap on the number of work visas issued to those from outside the European Union (EU).

  16. Oxidation behaviour of mechanically activated Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} by TGA/DSC/XRPD

    SciTech Connect

    Berbenni, V.; Marini, A

    2003-11-26

    The effect of high energy milling on the solid-state reactions taking place in Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} has been studied. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) have been employed to study the solid-state reaction occurring under air in the temperature range between room temperature (rt) and 1100 deg. C. X-ray Powder Diffractometry (XRPD) has been used to ascertain the chemical nature of the transformations brought into evidence by thermo-analysis.

  17. Production of Extracellular Polysaccharides by CAP Mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans▿

    PubMed Central

    Grijpstra, Jan; Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Wösten, Han; Kamerling, Johannis P.; de Cock, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes meningoencephalitis. The polysaccharide capsule is one of the main virulence factors and consists of two distinct polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and galactoxylomannan (GalXM). How capsular polysaccharides are synthesized, transported, and assembled is largely unknown. Previously, it was shown that mutations in the CAP10, CAP59, CAP60, and CAP64 genes result in an acapsular phenotype. Here, it is shown that these acapsular mutants do secrete GalXM and GXM-like polymers. GXM and GalXM antibodies specifically reacted with whole cells and the growth medium of the wild type and CAP mutants, indicating that the capsule polysaccharides adhere to the cell wall and are shed into the environment. These polysaccharides were purified from the medium, either with or without anion-exchange chromatography. Monosaccharide analysis of polysaccharide fractions by gas-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry showed that wild-type cells secrete both GalXM and GXM. The CAP mutants, on the other hand, were shown to secrete GalXM and GXM-like polymers. Notably, the GalXM polymers were shown to contain glucuronic acid. One-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance confirmed that the CAP mutants secrete GalXM and also showed the presence of O-acetylated polymers. This is the first time it is shown that CAP mutants secrete GXM-like polymers in addition to GalXM. The small amount of this GXM-like polymer, 1 to 5% of the total amount of secreted polysaccharides, may explain the acapsular phenotype. PMID:19542308

  18. Northern Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 13 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on November 26, 2002 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80, Longitude 43.2 East (316.8 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for

  19. Polar Cap Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on June 6, 2003 during the Southern Spring season near the South Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -77.8, Longitude 195 East (165 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  20. Creation of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Polar cap patches, which are islands of enhanced plasma density drifting anti-sunward, are one of the outstanding phenomena in the polar cap F region ionosphere. In the last decade, data from all-sky airglow imagers have been extensively used for better understanding the propagation of patches in the central polar cap region. But still, it has been rather difficult to capture the birth of patches in their generation region near the dayside cusp, because, in most places, the dayside part of the polar cap ionosphere is sunlit even in winter. In Longyearbyen (78.1N, 15.5E), Norway, however, optical observations are possible near the dayside cusp region in a limited period around the winter solstice. This enables us to directly image how polar cap patches are born in the cusp. In this paper, we present a few intervals of daytime optical observations, during which polar cap patches were generated within the field-of-view of an all-sky imager in Longyearbyen. During all the intervals studied here, we identified several signatures of poleward moving auroral forms (PMAF) in the equatorward half of the field-of-view, which are known as ionospheric manifestations of dayside reconnection. Interestingly, patches were directly produced from such poleward moving auroral signatures and propagated poleward along the anti-sunward convection near the cusp. In the literature, Lorentzen et al. (2012) first reported such a direct production of patches from PMAFs. During the current observations, however, we succeeded in tracking the propagation of patches until they reached the poleward edge of the field-of-view of the imager. This confirms that the faint airglow structures produced from PMAFs were actually transported for a long distance towards the central polar cap area; thus, polar cap patches were produced. From this set of observations, we suggest that polar cap patches during moderately disturbed conditions (i.e, non-storm time conditions) can be directly produced by the

  1. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  2. South Polar Cap, Summer 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the south polar cap of Mars as it appeared to the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on April 17, 2000. In winter and early spring, this entire scene would be covered by frost. In summer, the cap shrinks to its minimum size, as shown here. Even though it is summer, observations made by the Viking orbiters in the 1970s showed that the south polar cap remains cold enough that the polar frost (seen here as white) consists of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide freezes at temperatures around -125o C (-193o F). Mid-summer afternoon sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left from about 11.2o above the horizon. Soon the cap will experience sunsets; by June 2000, this pole will be in autumn, and the area covered by frost will begin to grow. Winter will return to the south polar region in December 2000. The polar cap from left to right is about 420 km (260 mi) across.

  3. Polar Cap Formation on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, C. B.; Shaya, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since thermal migration is not an effective mechanism for water transport in the polar regions at the Galilean satellites, some other process must be responsible for the formation of Ganymede's polar caps. It is proposed that Ganymede's polar caps are the optical manifestation of a process that began with the distribution of an ice sheet over the surface of Ganymede. The combined processes of impact gardening and thermal migration led, in regions at latitudes less than 40 to 45 deg., to the burial of some fraction of this ice, the migration of some to the polar caps margins, and a depletion of free ice in the optical surface. At higher latitudes, no process was effective in removing ice from the optical surface, so the remanants of the sheet are visible today.

  4. The Enigmatic Martian Polar Caps

    SciTech Connect

    James, Philip

    2005-08-17

    The Martian polar caps have puzzled astronomers for over a century. Extensive study by many instruments on various spacecraft has resolved many questions but has at the same time created a new generation of puzzles. The polar caps are intimately coupled to the current Martian climate and volatile cycles. They also hold clues to climate variations on a variety of longer time scales. The results of recent missions will be reviewed, and the potential outlook for resolution of the outstanding questions will be examined.

  5. Polar cap formation on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaya, E. J.; Pilcher, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that Ganymede's polar caps are the remnants of a more extensive covering of water ice that formed during a period in which the satellite was geologically active. It is inferred that the initial thickness of this covering was a significant fraction of the gardening depth since the covering formed. This suggests an initial thickness of at least a few meters over heavily cratered regions such as the south polar grooved terrain. The absence of similar polar caps on Callisto apparently reflects the absence of comparable geologic activity in the history of this satellite.

  6. CAP Self-Inventory Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This booklet of Self-Inventory Cards is one of the 14 components of the Career Alert Planning (CAP) program (see note), a set of individualized materials designed to help participants find out about themselves and about the kind of work for which they are suited. In this program, participants become acquainted with occupations that are…

  7. From Blogs to Bottle Caps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edinger, Ted

    2012-01-01

    There is a wonderful community of art educators connecting a once-isolated profession through blogging. Art educators around the world are sharing ideas and communicating with their peers through this amazing resource. In this article, the author describes the bottle cap mural at Tulip Grove Elementary School which was inspired by this exchange of…

  8. Thermal properties of tannin extracted from Anacardium occidentale L. using TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Vinod; Leo, Vincent Vineeth; Prabha, S Sabna; Prabhakumari, C; Potty, V P; Jisha, M S

    2016-01-01

    The chemical nature of the polyphenols of cashew kernel testa has been determined. Testa contains tannins, which present large molecular complexity and has an ancient use as tanning agents. The use of tannins extracted from cashew testa, considered in many places as a waste, grants an extra value to the cashew. In this work we have analysed through high performance liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo gravimetric analysis the average molecular weight, main functional groups and thermal properties of tannins extracted from Anacardium occidentale L. The results of these analyses are compared with the commercial grade tannic acid. The FT-IR spectra showed bands characteristic of C = C, C-C and OH bonds. This important bioactive compound present in the cashew nut kernel testa was suggested as an interesting economical source of antioxidants for use in the food and nutraceutical industry. PMID:26119693

  9. Comparative study on combined co-pyrolysis/gasification of walnut shell and bituminous coal by conventional and congruent-mass thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Fan, Di; Zheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Combined co-pyrolysis/gasification of bituminous coal (BC) and walnut shell (WS) are comparatively studied with both conventional and congruent-mass thermogravimertric analysis (TGA) methods. The results indicate that BC and WS exhibit additivity in the co-pyrolysis step. However, the gasification reactivity of chars in subsequent gasification step exhibits remarkable sample-mass dependence, which causes the illusions in synergy and inhibition effects when conventional TGA tests are conducted. A congruent-mass TGA method has been developed to overcome the limitations of the conventional TGA mode. One of the advantages of this method is that it can reduce to a minimum the effect of sample mass on reactivity. Thus, the degree of synergy or inhibition can be directly estimated from the deviation of the experimental TG curves between the two separated and blended samples. We recommend this method in studying the co-processing behavior between coal and biomass. PMID:26306847

  10. Crystal structure of Bacillus anthracis transpeptidase enzyme CapD.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Richter, S.; Zhang, R.; Anderson, V. J.; Missiakas, D.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-09-04

    Bacillus anthracis elaborates a poly-{gamma}-d-glutamic acid capsule that protects bacilli from phagocytic killing during infection. The enzyme CapD generates amide bonds with peptidoglycan cross-bridges to anchor capsular material within the cell wall envelope of B. anthracis. The capsular biosynthetic pathway is essential for virulence during anthrax infections and can be targeted for anti-infective inhibition with small molecules. Here, we present the crystal structures of the {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase CapD with and without {alpha}-l-Glu-l-Glu dipeptide, a non-hydrolyzable analog of poly-{gamma}-d-glutamic acid, in the active site. Purified CapD displays transpeptidation activity in vitro, and its structure reveals an active site broadly accessible for poly-{gamma}-glutamate binding and processing. Using structural and biochemical information, we derive a mechanistic model for CapD catalysis whereby Pro{sup 427}, Gly{sup 428}, and Gly{sup 429} activate the catalytic residue of the enzyme, Thr{sup 352}, and stabilize an oxyanion hole via main chain amide hydrogen bonds.

  11. Tip cap for a rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofel, W. K.; Tuley, E. N.; Gay, C. H., Jr.; Troeger, R. E.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A replaceable tip cap for attachment to the end of a rotor blade is described. The tip cap includes a plurality of walls defining a compartment which, if desired, can be divided into a plurality of subcompartments. The tip cap can include inlet and outlet holes in walls thereof to permit fluid communication of a cooling fluid there through. Abrasive material can be attached with the radially outer wall of the tip cap.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  17. Dynamic Modeling of an Evapotranspiration Cap

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Steven Piet; Rafael Soto; Gerald Sehlke; Harold Heydt; John Visser

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is scheduled to design and install hundreds of landfill caps/barriers over the next several decades and these caps will have a design life expectancy of up to 1,000 years. Other landfill caps with 30 year design lifetimes are reaching the end of their original design life; the changes to these caps need to be understood to provide a basis for lifetime extension. Defining the attributes that make a successful cap (one that isolates the waste from the environment) is crucial to these efforts. Because cap systems such as landfill caps are dynamic in nature, it is impossible to understand, monitor, and update lifetime predictions without understanding the dynamics of cap degradation, which is most often due to multiple interdependent factors rather than isolated independent events. In an attempt to understand the dynamics of cap degradation, a computer model using system dynamics is being developed to capture the complex behavior of an evapotranspiration cap. The specific objectives of this project are to capture the dynamic, nonlinear feedback loop structures underlying an evapotranspiration cap and, through computer simulation, gain a better understanding of long-term behavior, influencing factors, and, ultimately, long-term cap performance.

  18. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  19. Influence of Chemically Enhanced Diffusion on Cap Dolostones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, T.

    2014-12-01

    Cap dolostones, a globally distributed layer of carbonate rock that sits directly on terminal glacial deposits of the severe Cryogenian ice-age, contain important records of the conditions during the early stage of climatic recovery. Negative carbon isotope signals preserved in the cap are central to discussions of the mechanisms, drivers and time-scale of this interval of extreme climate change. These signals have been attributed to the rapid rise in temperature and acidic ocean conditions predicted to result from huge amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere, which bumped the Earth out of the Snowball state. Questions remain however, because detailed investigations of cap dolostone isotopic variability within individual sedimentary basins show systematic variations that are difficult to explain by temperature effects alone. Furthermore, other influences on cap isotopes have been hypothesized including, the release of massive amounts of methane trapped by the ice and upwelling of deep ocean water with negative signals. This contribution will explore the potential impact of chemically enhanced diffusion (CED) on the carbon isotopic compositions of cap dolostones using a box model. CED is a process by which CO2 gas is transferred to solution via reaction with hydroxide anions. In the modern ocean, rates of CED are thought to be insignificant and CO2 gas transfer is accomplished primarily by diffusion and dissolution, with minimal isotopic fraction. However, in various highly productive lakes, the strong negative isotope fraction of -27 ‰ associated CED impacts the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon. Post-glacial oceans may have been chemically similar to highly productive lakes and initial modeling results indicate that CED could have influenced the carbon isotopic composition of seawater and thus the cap dolostone. Implications for post-glacial oceanic conditions will be discussed.

  20. Influence of surface capping on oxygen reduction catalysis: A case study of 1.7 nm Pt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-06-01

    Organic and polymer capping agents are prevailingly used in the synthesis of metal nanocrystals to render size and shape controls for desirable catalytic properties. A general assumption in the electrocatalysis field is that the capping agents block active sites and hinder catalytic turnover. However there have been a number of experimental results suggesting otherwise. Investigation of the fundamental correlations between the surface capping and the catalytic kinetics of metal nanoparticles is of paramount importance yet still remains challenging in large part due to structural changes induced by capping agent removal or synthesis using different capping agents. Our approach involves a unique catalyst system comprising of 1.7 nm Pt nanoparticles with and without various surface capping. We find that surface capping affects both activity and selectivity of electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. The influences can be positive, neutral or negative. The five capping agents studied fall into three groups. Polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) cappings do not change the onset potential or product selectivity, but increase the catalytic current density. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) cappings do not change the onset potential or product selectivity, but slightly decrease the catalytic current density. Oleylamine (OA) capping significantly decreases the onset potential and the catalytic current density as well as change the product selectivity by favoring a high percentage of 2-electron reduction.

  1. Cap disease due to mutation of the beta-tropomyosin gene (TPM2).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nigel F; Domazetovska, Ana; Waddell, Leigh; Kornberg, Andrew; McLean, Catriona; North, Kathryn N

    2009-05-01

    Cap disease or cap myopathy is a form of congenital myopathy in which peripheral, well-demarcated 'caps' of disorganised thin filaments are seen in muscle fibres. Mutation of the TPM2 gene, that encodes beta-tropomyosin, is the first reported genetic cause. In this paper, we describe a further case of cap disease due to a mutation in TPM2, confirming the importance of this genetic association. This is the first report of cardiac dysfunction due to a mutation in TPM2. Our patient has an identical TPM2 mutation to the first genetically diagnosed cap disease patient, a denovo heterozygous three base pair deletion that removes glutamic acid 139 from the centre of beta-tropomyosin (p.E139del). 2D-gel electrophoresis studies show that the shortened mutant protein incorporates into sarcomeric structures, where it likely imposes a dominant-negative effect to cause muscle weakness. PMID:19345583

  2. Complex formation of Sn(II) with L-cysteine: An IR, DTA/TGA and DFT Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Galina V.; Petrov, Alexander I.; Staloverova, Natalya A.; Shubin, Alexander A.; Dergachev, Ilya D.

    2014-03-01

    The novel complex of Sn(II) with L-cysteine (L-H2Cys) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, TGA and IR spectroscopy. Vibrational assignment and DFT/PBE0/def2-TZVP ab initio simulation give evidence of cysteine molecule being coordinated to Sn(II) as three-dentate chelating N,O,S-donor ligand. The four Perdew density functionals TPSS, PBE0, PBE, TPSSh have been tested to provide consistency of simulated and experimental IR spectra, the best result is provided by unweighted Hartree-Fock density functionals (PBE, TPSS). On the contrary, the Hartree-Fock weighted functionals (PBE0, TPPSh) provide the most accurate geometry optimization. Unharmonic frequencies are obtained via ab initio vibrational self-consistent field (PT2-VSCF) calculations at DFT/TPSS/Def2-TZVP level, the vibrational assignment of IR spectra has been carried out.

  3. Combustion characteristics of Malaysian oil palm biomass, sub-bituminous coal and their respective blends via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    PubMed

    Idris, Siti Shawalliah; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Ismail, Khudzir

    2012-11-01

    The combustion characteristics of Malaysia oil palm biomass (palm kernel shell (PKS), palm mesocarp fibre (PMF) and empty fruit bunches (EFB)), sub-bituminous coal (Mukah Balingian) and coal/biomass blends via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were investigated. Six weight ratios of coal/biomass blends were prepared and oxidised under dynamic conditions from temperature 25 to 1100°C at four heating rates. The thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that the EFB and PKS evolved additional peak besides drying, devolatilisation and char oxidation steps during combustion. Ignition and burn out temperatures of blends were improved in comparison to coal. No interactions were observed between the coal and biomass during combustion. The apparent activation energy during this process was evaluated using iso-conversional model free kinetics which resulted in highest activation energy during combustion of PKS followed by PMF, EFB and MB coal. Blending oil palm biomass with coal reduces the apparent activation energy value. PMID:22944493

  4. AtTGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought resistance by enhancing nitrate transport and assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Dandan; Min, Donghong; Li, Weiwei; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhou, Yongbin; Li, Liancheng; Chen, Ming; Ma, Youzhi

    2015-02-13

    To cope with environmental stress caused by global climate change and excessive nitrogen application, it is important to improve water and nitrogen use efficiencies in crop plants. It has been reported that higher nitrogen uptake could alleviate the damaging impact of drought stress. However, there is scant evidence to explain how nitrogen uptake affects drought resistance. In this study we observed that bZIP transcription factor AtTGA4 (TGACG motif-binding factor 4) was induced by both drought and low nitrogen stresses, and that overexpression of AtTGA4 simultaneously improved drought resistance and reduced nitrogen starvation in Arabidopsis. Following drought stress there were higher nitrogen and proline contents in transgenic AtTGA4 plants than in wild type controls, and activity of the key enzyme nitrite reductase (NIR) involved in nitrate assimilation processes was also higher. Expressions of the high-affinity nitrate transporter genes NRT2.1 and NRT2.2 and nitrate reductase genes NIA1 and NIA2 in transgenic plants were all higher than in wild type indicating that higher levels of nitrate transport and assimilation activity contributed to enhanced drought resistance of AtTGA4 transgenic plants. Thus genetic transformation with AtTGA4 may provide a new approach to simultaneously improve crop tolerance to drought and low nitrogen stresses. PMID:25596127

  5. Relationship between cap structure and energy gap in capped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shota; Tanikawa, Kousei; Kuwahara, Riichi; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-07-01

    Revealing a universal relation between geometrical structures and electronic properties of capped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is one of the current objectives in nanocarbon community. Here, we investigate the local curvature of capped CNTs and define the cap region by a crossover behavior of the curvature energy versus the number of carbon atoms integrated from the tip to the tube region. Clear correlations among the energy gap of the cap localized states, the curvature energy, the number of carbon atoms in the cap region, and the number of specific carbon clusters are observed. The present analysis opens the way to understand the cap states.

  6. Relationship between cap structure and energy gap in capped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shota; Tanikawa, Kousei; Kuwahara, Riichi; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-07-14

    Revealing a universal relation between geometrical structures and electronic properties of capped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is one of the current objectives in nanocarbon community. Here, we investigate the local curvature of capped CNTs and define the cap region by a crossover behavior of the curvature energy versus the number of carbon atoms integrated from the tip to the tube region. Clear correlations among the energy gap of the cap localized states, the curvature energy, the number of carbon atoms in the cap region, and the number of specific carbon clusters are observed. The present analysis opens the way to understand the cap states. PMID:27421422

  7. Carbohydrate moieties of the. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (. cap alpha. /sub 1/-R): complex type glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Lanier, S.M.; Warren, C.D.; Homcy, C.J.; Graham, R.M.

    1987-05-01

    The binding subunit of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R has been identified as a M/sub r/ = 80,000 peptide in several tissues. Adsorption of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R to a WGA lectin-agarose resin suggests that the receptor protein is glycosylated. In this study, they investigated the nature of the carbohydrate linkage to the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R peptide. The ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 whole cells was photolabeled with /sup 125/I-azido-prazosin, the cells were lysed in the presence of DNAase, and cell membranes were treated with exo- and endoglycohydrolases prior to SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Removal of terminal sialic acid residues by neuraminidase decreased the receptor M/sub r/ by 4000; however ..cap alpha..-mannosidase was without effect indicating complex type glycosylation of the receptor-protein. Similar results were observed for the rat hepatic membrane ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R. After deglycosylation of N-linked carbohydrates at asparagine residues by N-glycanase a specifically labeled peptide at a M/sub r/ = 50,000 was observed in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells. Treatment of photolabeled ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R with endo-..beta..-N-acetylglucosaminidase F or H had no effect. These results indicate that the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-R is heavily glycosylated, the major oligosaccharide moiety being of the complex type, N-linked to asparagine residues and that the peptide backbone has a M/sub r/ < 50,000. By contrast, the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R has a peptide backbone of M/sub r/ = 38,000 and N-linked oligosaccharides of the hybrid type.

  8. Damages Caps in Medical Malpractice Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Leonard J; Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the empirical literature on the effects of damages caps and concludes that the better-designed studies show that damages caps reduce liability insurance premiums. The effects of damages caps on defensive medicine, physicians’ location decisions, and the cost of health care to consumers are less clear. The only study of whether consumers benefit from lower health insurance premiums as a result of damages caps found no impact. Some state courts have based decisions declaring damages caps legislation unconstitutional on the lack of evidence of their effectiveness, thereby ignoring the findings of conflicting research studies or discounting their relevance. Although courts should be cautious in rejecting empirical evidence that caps are effective, legislators should consider whether they benefit consumers enough to justify limiting tort recoveries for those most seriously injured by malpractice. PMID:17517115

  9. Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ananichheva, Maria; Arendt, Anthony; Hagen, Jon-Ove; Hock, Regine; Josberger, Edward G.; Moore, R. Dan; Pfeffer, William Tad; Wolken, Gabriel J.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of future rates of mass loss from mountain glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic focus primarily on projections of changes in the surface mass balance. Current models are not yet capable of making realistic forecasts of changes in losses by calving. Surface mass balance models are forced with downscaled output from climate models driven by forcing scenarios that make assumptions about the future rate of growth of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Thus, mass loss projections vary considerably, depending on the forcing scenario used and the climate model from which climate projections are derived. A new study in which a surface mass balance model is driven by output from ten general circulation models (GCMs) forced by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A1B emissions scenario yields estimates of total mass loss of between 51 and 136 mm sea-level equivalent (SLE) (or 13% to 36% of current glacier volume) by 2100. This implies that there will still be substantial glacier mass in the Arctic in 2100 and that Arctic mountain glaciers and ice caps will continue to influence global sea-level change well into the 22nd century.

  10. Periodicities of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Aoki, T.

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-sky electron multiplier charge-coupled device airglow imager has been operative in Longyearbyen, Norway since October 2011. The imager captures 630.0 nm all-sky images with an exposure time of 4 s, which is about 10 times shorter than that achieved by conventional cooled CCD imagers. This allows us to visualize the structure of polar cap patches without blurring effects and better estimate their periodicities. We present, as one of the first results from the imager, an event of successive appearance of patches on the night of 21 December 2011. A time series of the optical intensity at zenith showed modulations having two distinguished periods, one at 40 min and the other at 5-12 min. One possible explanation is that such a coexistence of two different periodicities is a manifestation of simultaneous occurrence of patch generation processes on the 40 min periodicity was created by large-scale reconfiguration of the dayside convection pattern while the 5-12 min modulations were closely associated with mechanisms driven by pulsed reconnection on the dayside magnetopause. Such a combined effect of multiple patch generation processes may play a role in structuring patches; thus, it would be of particular importance for evaluating the space weather effects in the trans-ionospheric communications environment in the polar cap.

  11. Identification and subcellular localization of a 21-kilodalton molecule using affinity-purified antibodies against. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hazarika, P.; Pardue, R.L.; Earls, R.; Dedman, J.R.

    1987-04-07

    Monospecific antibodies were generated against each of six different peptide sequences derived from rat and human ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (..cap alpha..-TGF). The affinity-purified antibody to the 17 amino acid carboxyl-terminal portion of the molecule proved most useful in detecting ..cap alpha..-TGF. When used in a peptide-based radioimmunoassay, it was possible to measure nanogram quantities of native ..cap alpha..-TGF in conditioned cell culture media. When used to analyze cell lysate, these antibodies specifically recognized a 21-kilodalton protein species. Indirect immunofluorescence localization procedures revealed a high concentration of ..cap alpha..-TCF in a perinuclear ring with a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. These results suggest that a precursor form of ..cap alpha..-TGF has a cellular role beyond that of an autocrine growth factor.

  12. Sequence heterogeneity, multiplicity, and genomic organization of. cap alpha. - and. beta. -tubulin genes in Sea Urchins

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandraki, D.; Ruderman, J.V.

    1981-12-01

    The authors analyzed the multiplicity, heterogeneity, and organization of the genes encoding the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. tubulins in the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus by using cloned complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and genomic tubulin sequences. cDNA clones were constructed by using immature spermatogenic testis polyadenylic acid-containing ribonucleic acid as a template. ..cap alpha.. and ..beta..-tubulin clones were identified by hybrid selection and in vitro translation of the corresponding messenger ribonucleic acids, followed by immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the translation products. The ..cap alpha.. cDNA clone contains a sequence that encodes the 48 C-terminal amino acids of ..cap alpha.. tubulin and 104 base pairs of the 3' nontranslated portion of the messenger ribonucleic acid. The ..beta.. cDNA insertion contains the coding sequence for the 100 C-terminal amino acids of ..beta.. tubulin and 83 base pairs of the 3' noncoding sequence. Hybrid selections performed at different criteria demonstrated the presence of several heterogeneous, closely related tubulin messenger ribonucleic acids, suggesting the existence of heterogeneous ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-tubulin genes. Hybridization analyses indicated that there are at least 9 to 13 sequences for each of the two tubulin gene families per haploid genome. Hybridization of the cDNA probes to both total genomic DNA and cloned germline DNA fragments gave no evidence for close physical linkage of ..cap alpha..-tubulin genes with ..beta..-tubulin genes at the DNA level. In contrast, these experiments indicated that some genes within the same family are clustered.

  13. Ocular injuries from flying bottle caps.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, C

    1993-12-01

    Three cases of serious eye injury are described from flying metal caps of carbonated drink bottles. The injuries occurred while attempting to open the bottle in an unconventional and dangerous way. Though injuries from flying bottle caps have been described before, they have occurred when the bottle exploded. This is the first report of eye injuries caused by bottle caps while opening and are similar to the injuries caused by champagne corks. PMID:8143337

  14. Murein lytic enzyme TgaA of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 modulates dendritic cell maturation through its cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) amidase domain.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Zanoni, Ivan; Balzaretti, Silvia; Miriani, Matteo; Taverniti, Valentina; De Noni, Ivano; Presti, Ilaria; Stuknyte, Milda; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Granucci, Francesca

    2014-09-01

    Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that have evolved close interaction with their host and especially with the host's immune system. The molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions, however, are largely unidentified. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory potential of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75, a bacterium of human intestinal origin commercially used as a probiotic. Particularly, we focused our attention on TgaA, a protein expressed on the outer surface of MIMBb75's cells and homologous to other known bacterial immunoactive proteins. TgaA is a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP). We ran immunological experiments stimulating dendritic cells (DCs) with the B. bifidum MIMBb75 and TgaA, with the result that both the bacterium and the protein activated DCs and triggered interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. In addition, we observed that the heterologous expression of TgaA in Bifidobacterium longum transferred to the bacterium the ability to induce IL-2. Subsequently, immunological experiments performed using two purified recombinant proteins corresponding to the single domains LT and CHAP demonstrated that the CHAP domain is the immune-reactive region of TgaA. Finally, we also showed that TgaA-dependent activation of DCs requires the protein CD14, marginally involves TRIF, and is independent of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MyD88. In conclusion, our study suggests that the bacterial CHAP domain is a novel microbe-associated molecular pattern actively participating in the cross talk mechanisms between bifidobacteria and the host's immune system. PMID:24814791

  15. Dithiocarbamates as capping ligands for water-soluble quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Schnoes, Allison M; Clapp, Aaron R

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the suitability of dithiocarbamate (DTC) species as capping ligands for colloidal CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs). DTC ligands are generated by reacting carbon disulfide (CS(2)) with primary or secondary amines on appropriate precursor molecules. A biphasic exchange procedure efficiently replaces the existing hydrophobic capping ligands on the QD surface with the newly formed DTCs. The reaction conversion is conveniently monitored by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Due to their inherent water solubility and variety of side chain functional groups, we used several amino acids as precursors in this reaction/exchange procedure. The performance of DTC-ligands, as evaluated by the preservation of luminescence and colloidal stability, varied widely among amino precursors. For the best DTC-ligand and QD combinations, the quantum yield of the water-soluble QDs rivaled that of the original hydrophobic-capped QDs dispersed in organic solvents. The mean density of DTC-ligands per nanocrystal was estimated through a mass balance calculation which suggested nearly complete coverage of the available nanocrystal surface. The accessibility of the QD surface was evaluated by self-assembly of His-tagged dye-labeled proteins and peptides using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. DTC-capped QDs were also exposed to cell cultures to evaluate their stability and potential use for biological applications. In general, DTC-capped CdSe-ZnS QDs have many advantages over other water-soluble QD formulations and provide a flexible chemistry for controlling the QD surface functionalization. Despite previous literature reports of DTC-stabilized nanocrystals, this study is the first formal investigation of a biphasic exchange method for generating biocompatible core-shell QDs. PMID:21053924

  16. Purification and characterization of the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shreeve, S.M.; Kerlavage, A.R.; Fraser, C.M.; Mariani, A.P.; Venter, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor (..cap alpha../sub 2/-R) from human platelets has been purified to homogeneity using a four step process. An affinity column was prepared by coupling p-aminoclonidine to CH-Sepharose 4B via the p-NH/sub 2/ group. Digitonin solubilized ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R bound to the affinity matrix were eluted with 100 ..mu..M phentolamine and directly applied to a DEAE-Sepharose column. Bound receptors were eluted with a linear gradient of 0-500 mM NaCl, pooled and chromatographed on HPLC size exclusion columns. Three peaks of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding were eluted from HPLC columns (t = 33, 42, 47 min). Radioiodination of HPLC eluates and analysis by SDS-PAGE indicated that ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding was associated with a 75-85 kDa protein. These data suggest that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R may exist in monomeric and oligomeric forms in the purified state and support previous target size data which indicate that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R exists as a dimer in the native membrane. The pure radioiodinated ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R (77-85 kDa) is a glycoprotein with terminal sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine residues and has a pI of 4.1 on column isoelectric focusing. These data are consistent with those previously reported on the partially purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R. Electron micrographs confirm the oligomeric nature and size of the pure ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R.

  17. Employment of electrochemically synthesized TGA-CdSe quantum dots for Cr(3+) determination in vitamin supplements.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Gustavo C S; de Santana, Éden E A; da Silva, Paulo A B; Freitas, Denilson V; Navarro, Marcelo; Paim, Ana Paula S; Lavorante, André F

    2015-11-01

    The fluorescence quenching of TGA-CdSe quantum dots (QDs) was used for Cr(3+) quantification in vitamin supplements. The QD was electrochemically synthesized, demonstrating high reproducibility with control of particle size, thus making it a clean method, without the presence of reducing agents. Under ideal conditions, with the fluorescence band at 551 nm (excitation 365 nm), the maximum fluorescence quenching was observed at pH 4.0, with a time of 200 s for each data acquisition. Under optimum experimental conditions, linear quenching was observed for Cr(3+) in the range of 25.0-325.0 ng L(-1) (R=0.9996, n=6), a limit of detection of 5.67 ng L(-1), and relative standard deviation of 4.43% (n=10). The recovery test for Cr(3+) quantification in vitamin supplements presented results from 82% to 98%. These Cr(3+) determination results were compared to the same vitamin supplement sample using flame atomic absortion spectrometry (FAAS) method, and no significant differences were observed at 95% confidence level. PMID:26452917

  18. Photodegradation of luminescence in organic-ligand-capped Eu{sup 3+}:LaF{sub 3} nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    King, Gavin G. G.; Taylor, Luke R.; Longdell, Jevon J.; Clarke, David J.; Quilty, J. W.

    2014-01-28

    The luminescence from europium doped lanthanum trifluoride (Eu{sup 3+}:LaF{sub 3}) nano-crystals can be greatly enhanced by capping with β-diketonate organic ligands. Here, we report on photo-stability measurements for the case of nano-crystals capped with thenoyltrifluroacetone (TTA) and compared with those capped with an inactive ligand, oleic acid. With exposure to UV pump light, we observed significant decrease in fluorescence and change in emission spectrum of the TTA-capped nano-particles whilst the fluorescence lifetime remained approximately constant. After a dose of order 70 kJ cm{sup −2}, the luminescence level was similar to that of oleic acid capped nano-crystals. We discuss possible mechanisms.

  19. The cervical cap: a barrier contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Hastings-Tolsma, M T

    1982-01-01

    The cervical cap may eventually prove to be a safe, satisfactory, noninvasive, and nonhormonal contraceptive alternative for women in the US. The cap is currently approved for investigational use only, and is available from a limited number of providers. The Prentif cavity rim cap is the most commonly used and is available in 4 sizes. The soft rubber device is thimble shaped, approximately 1 1/4 inches long, with a narrow groove along the inner surface that creates a suction seal when fitted over the cervix. The inability to match cap and cervical circumferences precisely is a recognized drawback. Theoretically, the cap alone should prevent sperm entry into the uterus, however, the use of a spermicide placed in the dome before insertion is recommended. The cap's effectiveness is not yet documented. Estimates from a 1953 study of 143 users were 92.4/100 women years of use for use effectiveness, and the theoretical effectiveness is believed to be more than 98%. Failures with the cap may result from a variety of reasons, particularly dislodgement. The advantage of the cap over other barrier methods is that it can be inserted any time prior to intercourse and left in place longer. The ideal safety period for placement has not been validated, but a range of 1-7 days has been recommended. The length of time the spermicide remains effective and the cervical effects of prolonged contact are of prime concern. The cap may be used by some women who cannot be properly fitted for a diaphragm due to vaginal or uterine anomalies. Sexual arousal and orgasmic response are reported by some cap users to be more pleasurable with the cap than with the diaphragm. Reported problems with use include discomfort during intercourse and improper fit during some days of the menstrual cycle. Contraindications for use include cervical inconsistencies, infection, allergy to the spermicide or the rubber, and inability to learn proper insertion and removal techniques. Insertion and removal may be

  20. Unbonded capping for concrete masonry units

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, L.K.; Knight, M.L.; Henderson, R.C.; Sneed, W.A. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Due to the manufacturing process, the bearing surfaces of concrete masonry units are often somewhat rough and uneven. Therefore, concrete masonry units must be capped when tested in compression according to ASTM C 140-96, Standard Test Methods of Sampling and Testing Concrete Masonry Units. Capping of concrete masonry units is time consuming and expensive. Several studies of compression tests on concrete cylinders indicate that use of elastic pads in rigid retaining caps give similar compressive strength results to approved capping methods.An unbonded capping system for concrete masonry units similar to that described in ASTM C 1231-93, Standard Practice for Use of Unbonded Caps in Determination of Compressive Strength of Hardened Concrete Cylinders, was developed. The average compressive strength results obtained when using the unbonded capping system ranged from 92--94% of the average compressive strength results obtained when using ASTM C 140-96 approved methods. Further, use of the unbonded capping system was found to increase productivity and substantially reduce testing cost.

  1. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  2. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  3. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  4. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  5. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  6. TgaA, a VirB1-Like Component Belonging to a Putative Type IV Secretion System of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75

    PubMed Central

    Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region. PMID:24951779

  7. Effects of Thioglycolic Acid on in vivo Oocytes Maturation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; Wang, Zhuoran

    2011-01-01

    Background Thioglycolic acid (TGA) is widely used in the hairdressing industry, which mostly caters to women. Recently, TGA has been reported to impair several organs, especially reproductive ones such as testes and ovaries. The reproductive toxicity of TGA on females has become an issue that cannot be neglected. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, superovulated female mice were percutaneously treated with different doses of TGA (37.81, 75.62, and 151.25 mg/kg). The mice were sacrificed to collect ovulated oocytes, whose numbers were counted and compared. Immunofluorescence-stained oocytes were observed under a confocal microscope to investigate the effects of TGA on spindle morphology, distribution of cortical granules (CGs), and parthenogenetic activation. The number of ovulated oocytes was decreased by TGA. The ovulated oocytes in the 151.25 mg/kg TGA group were significantly less than in the control and in the 37.81 mg/kg TGA groups. The ovulated oocytes in the 75.62 mg/kg TGA group were less than in the 37.81 mg/kg dose group. Abnormal spindle configuration in vivo was also induced by TGA. The spindle areas in the 75.62 and 151.25 mg/kg TGA groups were significantly larger than in the control and 37.81 mg/kg TGA groups. The parthenogenetic activation of ovulated oocytes in vitro was inhibited as well. The percentage of activated oocytes in the 75.62 and 151.25 mg/kg TGA groups was significantly lower than in the control and 37.81 mg/kg TGA groups. The percentage in the 151.25 mg/kg TGA group was also less than in the 75.62 mg/kg group. CG distribution was not affected by TGA. Conclusion Mice were percutaneously treated with TGA. Consequently, the number of ovulated oocytes decreased, abnormal spindle configurations were induced, and the parthenogenetic activation of ovulated oocytes was inhibited. CG distribution was not affected. PMID:21909408

  8. Thermal degradation of paper industry wastes from a recovered paper mill using TGA. Characterization and gasification test.

    PubMed

    Arenales Rivera, Jorge; Pérez López, Virginia; Ramos Casado, Raquel; Sánchez Hervás, José-María

    2016-01-01

    In this survey, a refuse derived fuel (RDF) was produced from paper industry wastes through a mechanical treatment (MT). The two main wastes generated from a recovered paper mill were rejects and de-inking sludge, which were produced principally in the pulping and de-inking processes, respectively. This work presents raw wastes characterization, fuel preparation and gasification tests performed in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) gasifier pilot plant. The characterization was carried out by proximate and ultimate analysis. Several blends of pre-conditioned rejects and de-inking sludge were densified by means of pelletizing, studying the energy consumption and its quality properties. Besides, thermal degradation of blends was studied under thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experimental runs were made from 30 to 900°C in nitrogen atmosphere at three heating ranges, β=5, 10 and 20°C/min. Two thermal stages were identified during the thermal degradation, which are linked to cellulose and plastic degradation. In addition, kinetics parameters were estimated by the application of non-isothermal methods: Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Flynn-Ozawa-Wall (FOW) and Coats and Redfern. The activation energy values were about 140-160 kJ/mol and 60-80 kJ/mol for plastic and cellulosic materials, respectively. Regarding waste valorisation, a blend composed of 95% of rejects and 5% of de-inking sludge was selected for gasification tests. The energy consumption during the preparation was recorded and a gasification tests were done to prove the usability of these pellets in a CFB gasifier. The main results were a net calorific value (NCV) of 5 MJ/Nm(3) and a total tar content of 11.44 g/Nm(3) at an equivalence ratio (ER) of 0.3. PMID:26013694

  9. Myc and mRNA capping.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Cowling, Victoria H

    2015-05-01

    c-Myc is upregulated in response to growth factors and transmits the signal to proliferate by altering the gene expression landscape. When genetic alterations result in growth factor-independent c-Myc expression, it can become an oncogene. The majority of human tumour types exhibit a degree of c-Myc deregulation, resulting in unrestrained cell proliferation. c-Myc binds proximal to the promoter region of genes and recruits co-factors including histone acetyltransferases and RNA pol II kinases, which promote transcription. c-Myc also promotes formation of the cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA. The cap is 7-methylguanosine linked to the first transcribed nucleotide of RNA pol II transcripts via a 5' to 5' triphosphate bridge. The cap is added to the first transcribed nucleotide by the capping enzymes, RNGTT and RNMT-RAM. During the early stages of transcription, the capping enzymes are recruited to RNA pol II phosphorylated on Serine-5 of the C-terminal domain. The mRNA cap protects transcripts from degradation during transcription and recruits factors which promote RNA processing including, splicing, export and translation initiation. The proportion of transcripts with a cap structure is increased by elevating c-Myc expression, resulting in increased rates of translation. c-Myc promotes capping by promoting RNA pol II phosphorylation and by upregulating the enzyme SAHH which neutralises the inhibitory bi-product of methylation reactions, SAH. c-Myc-induced capping is required for c-Myc-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation. Targeting capping may represent a new therapeutic opportunity to inhibit c-Myc function in tumours. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. PMID:24681440

  10. Distribution of G/sub o. cap alpha. / mRNA and protein in bovine tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.R.; Tsai, S.C.; Adamik, R.; Angus, C.W.; Van Meurs, K.P.; Czarnecki, S.; Bruckwick, E.C.; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M.

    1987-05-01

    G/sub o..cap alpha../ is a 39 kDa guanyl nucleotide-binding protein similar in structure and function to G/sub s..cap alpha../ and G/sub i..cap alpha../ in the adenylate cyclase complex and transducin (G/sub t..cap alpha../) in the retinal photon receptor system. A bovine retinal cDNA clone, lambdaG09, that encodes the complete amino acid sequence of G/sub o..cap alpha../ has been isolated. Nick-translated lambdaG09 cDNA and a 5' end-labeled oligonucleotide probe complementary to a 24 base sequence unique to G/sub o..cap alpha../ were used as probes for Northern analysis of poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from bovine tissues. A major 4.0 kb mRNA was detected in brain and retina and in lesser amounts in heart. Several smaller mRNAs also hybridized with both probes in these tissues and in liver and lung. G/sub o..cap alpha../ protein was identified using rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against purified bovine G/sub o..cap alpha../ and pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation. Soluble and membrane proteins were incubated with toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD and then separated by gel electrophoresis before transfer to nitrocellulose for immunoreaction and subsequent autoradiography. A radiolabeled and immunoreactive 39 kDa membrane protein was found principally in retina and brain, and to a lesser extent, in heart. Thus, in the tissues examined, distribution of the 4.0 kb mRNA parallels that of the immunoreactive G/sub o..cap alpha../ with relatively small amounts in heart and larger amounts in brain and retina.

  11. Affinity chromatography of alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors (. cap alpha. /sub 2/AR) from pig cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, M.G.; Limbird, L.E.

    1986-03-01

    A high capacity, ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR-selective affinity resin (YOH. ag) has been prepared by coupling yohimbinic acid to diaminodipropylamine agarose with 1,3 dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Unreacted amino groups on the agarose matrix are blocked subsequently by acetylation. One volume of YOH. ag adsorbs 75% of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR from 50 volumes of digitonin-solubilized preparation containing 0.2 pmol ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR/mg protein. Digitonin-solubilized preparations are derived from cholate extracts of porcine cerebral cortex containing approx. 0.075 pmol ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR/mg protein. Adsorption of ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR to YOH. ag is selective and thus is blocked by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. Adsorbed ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR are eluted with 10 ..mu..M phentolamine (20% yield) after removal of non-related proteins with NaCl gradients. Following hydroxylapatite chromatography to concentrate ..cap alpha..''AR and to remove phentolamine, the ..cap alpha..AR is present at 200-400 pmol/mg protein, assayed using sub-saturating concentrations of (/sup 3/H)-yohimbine. (It is estimated that the specific activity of a homogeneous ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR preparation would be 12,000-16,000 pmol/mg protein.) The availability of large quantities of cortical ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR and a resin easily prepared from commercially-supplied reagents suggests that purification of quantities of ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR sufficient for subsequent biochemical studies is feasible.

  12. Self-healable and reversible liposome leakage by citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: probing the initial adsorption/desorption induced lipid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2015-09-01

    We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer.We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04805b

  13. Pediatric burns with snap-cap fireworks.

    PubMed

    Karamanoukian, Raffy L; Kilani, Marwa; Lozano, Daniel; Sundine, Michael; Karamanoukian, Hratch L; Delarosa, Jacob; Behnam, Shahdad; Evans, Gregory R D

    2006-01-01

    Snap-caps are marketed as a relatively safe pyrotechnic (explosive) device for children 8 years and older. Individually, the snap-caps pose very little threat because the amount of explosive compounds contained in each is limited to 1 mg. However, the accidental explosion of numerous snap-caps may cause significant burns. This study highlights a series of pediatric patients who presented with severe second- and third-degree burns as a result of accidental explosion of snap-caps. Seven patients with snap-caps-related injuries were treated at the University of California, San Diego Regional Burn Center from January 1996 to April 1999. Study foci included 1) mode and extent of injury, 2) management, 3) associated morbidity, and 4) functional outcome. Six patients (84%) required hospital admission. Four patients (57%) underwent split-thickness skin grafting to repair mean TBSA burns of 4.1% (range, 2-8%). Three patients (43%) received aggressive management of burns with topical medications and dressing changes. The nature and extent of snap-cap injuries support the contention that snap-caps have the potential to harm children to whom they are marketed. PMID:16566570

  14. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  15. The pharmaceutical vial capping process: Container closure systems, capping equipment, regulatory framework, and seal quality tests.

    PubMed

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Buettiker, Jean-Pierre; Roehl, Holger; Lam, Philippe; Brown, Helen; Luemkemann, Joerg; Adler, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Streubel, Alexander; Mohl, Silke

    2016-02-01

    Parenteral drug products are protected by appropriate primary packaging to protect against environmental factors, including potential microbial contamination during shelf life duration. The most commonly used CCS configuration for parenteral drug products is the glass vial, sealed with a rubber stopper and an aluminum crimp cap. In combination with an adequately designed and controlled aseptic fill/finish processes, a well-designed and characterized capping process is indispensable to ensure product quality and integrity and to minimize rejections during the manufacturing process. In this review, the health authority requirements and expectations related to container closure system quality and container closure integrity are summarized. The pharmaceutical vial, the rubber stopper, and the crimp cap are described. Different capping techniques are critically compared: The most common capping equipment with a rotating capping plate produces the lowest amount of particle. The strength and challenges of methods to control the capping process are discussed. The residual seal force method can characterize the capping process independent of the used capping equipment or CCS. We analyze the root causes of several cosmetic defects associated with the vial capping process. PMID:26654992

  16. Why is the north polar cap on Mars different than the south polar cap?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    One of the most puzzling mysteries about the planet Mars is the hemispherical asymmetry in the polar caps. Every spring the seasonal polar cap of CO2 recedes until the end of summer, when only a small part, the residual polar cap, remains. During the year that Viking observed Mars, the residual polar cap was composed of water ice in the northern hemisphere but was primarily carbon dioxide ice in the southern hemisphere. Scientists have sought to explain this asymmetry by modeling observations of the latitudinal recession of the polar cap and seasonal variations in atmospheric pressure (since the seasonal polar caps are primarily frozen atmosphere, they are directly related to changes in atmospheric mass). These models reproduce most aspects of the observed annual variation in atmospheric pressure fairly accurately. Furthermore, the predicted latitudinal recession of the northern polar cap in the spring agrees well with observations, including the fact that the CO2 ice is predicted to completely sublime away. However, these models all predict that the carbon dioxide ice will also sublime away during the summer in the southern hemisphere, unlike what is observed. This paper will show how the radiative effects of ozone, clouds, airborne dust, light penetration into and through the polar cap, and the dependence of albedo on solar zenith angle affect CO2 ice formation and sublimation, and how they help explain the hemispherical asymmetry in the residual polar caps. These effects have not been studied with prior polar cap models.

  17. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. )

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Stimuli-responsive controlled-release system using quadruplex DNA-capped silica nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cuie; Pu, Fang; Huang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2011-01-01

    A novel proton-fueled molecular gate-like delivery system has been constructed for controlled cargo release using i-motif quadruplex DNA as caps onto pore outlets of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Start from simple conformation changes, the i-motif DNA cap can open and close the pore system in smart response to pH stimulus. Importantly, the opening/closing and delivery protocol is highly reversible and a partial cargo delivery can be easily controlled at will. A pH-switchable nanoreactor has also been developed to validate the potential of our system for on-demand molecular transport. This proof of concept might open the door to a new generation of carrier materials and could also provide a general route to use other functional nucleic acids/peptide nucleic acids as capping agents in the fields of versatile controlled delivery nanodevices. PMID:20965972

  19. Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

  20. Subsea tree cap well choke system

    SciTech Connect

    Bednar, J.M.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus useful in subsea well completions requiring a subsea choke. It comprises: a wellhead connector; a tree flow passage; a tree annulus passage; a tree cap; a choke; and a production line.

  1. Commercial Crew Program CCiCap Partners

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program and its newest Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCap) partners are embracing the American spirit as they advance their integrated rocket and spacecraft design...

  2. Tip cap for a turbine rotor blade

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2014-03-25

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, and a tip cap that includes a row of lugs extending from a bottom side that form dovetail grooves that engage with similar shaped lugs and grooves on a tip end of the spar to secure the tip cap to the spar against radial displacement. The lug on the trailing edge end of the tip cap is aligned perpendicular to a chordwise line of the blade in the trailing edge region in order to minimize stress due to the lugs wanting to bend under high centrifugal loads. A two piece tip cap with lugs at different angles will reduce the bending stress even more.

  3. Textures in south polar ice cap #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Textures of the south polar permanent residual ice cap and polar layered terrains. This 15 x 14 km area image (frame 7306) is centered near 87 degrees south, 341 degrees west.

    Figure caption from Science Magazine

  4. Textures in south polar ice cap #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Textures of the south polar permanent residual ice cap and polar layered terrains. This 30 x 29 km area image (frame 7709) is centered near 87 degrees south, 77 degrees west.

    Figure caption from Science Magazine

  5. Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Russell N.; Senum, Gunnar I.

    1981-01-01

    A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

  6. CCiCap: Sierra Nevada Corporation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA announced today its plans to partner with Sierra Nevada Corp. (SNC) for the next phase of the agency's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). Called Commercial Crew integrated Capability (CCiCap), the...

  7. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  8. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  9. Secondary capping beams for offshore drilling platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Albaugh, E. K.

    1985-08-13

    A pair of I-shaped elongated girders secured to, and extending outwardly from, the capping beams of a four pile platform, to form cantilever secondary capping beams which support modified self-contained drilling rigs of a size and weight normally installed on eight pile platforms. Rig modifications comprise separation of pump and engine packages, a pipe rack extension, and a novel skidding system.

  10. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  11. The effect of polar caps on obliquity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    Rubincam has shown that the Martian obliquity is dependent on the seasonal polar caps. In particular, Rubincam analytically derived this dependence and showed that the change in obliquity is directly proportional to the seasonal polar cap mass. Rubincam concludes that seasonal friction does not appear to have changed Mars' climate significantly. Using a computer model for the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, Haberle et al. have made a convincing case for the possibility of huge polar caps, about 10 times the mass of the current polar caps, that exist for a significant fraction of the planet's history. Since Rubincam showed that the effect of seasonal friction on obliquity is directly proportional to polar cap mass, a scenario with a ten-fold increase in polar cap mass over a significant fraction of the planet's history would result in a secular increase in Mars' obliquity of perhaps 10 degrees. Hence, the Rubincam conclusion of an insignificant contribution to Mars' climate by seasonal friction may be incorrect. Furthermore, if seasonal friction is an important consideration in the obliquity of Mars, this would significantly alter the predictions of past obliquity.

  12. Cap1p attenuates the apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Li, Ming-Bang; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen and its apoptosis is inducible by environmental stress. Based on our previous finding that transcription factor Cap1p was involved in baicalein-induced apoptosis, the present study aimed to further clarify the role of Cap1p in apoptosis by observing the impact of CAP1 deletion on cell fate. It was found that apoptotic stimulation with amphotericin B, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells, caspase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, whereas it decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP level in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. The cell fate was, at least partly, caused by glutathione depletion and attenuation of the expression of the glutathione reductase gene in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, our data suggest that Cap1p participated in the apoptosis of C. albicans by regulating the expression of the glutathione reductase gene and glutathione content. PMID:23517286

  13. The Rabies Virus L Protein Catalyzes mRNA Capping with GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Minako; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The large (L) protein of rabies virus (RABV) plays multiple enzymatic roles in viral RNA synthesis and processing. However, none of its putative enzymatic activities have been directly demonstrated in vitro. In this study, we expressed and purified a recombinant form of the RABV L protein and verified its guanosine 5'-triphosphatase and GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) activities, which are essential for viral mRNA cap formation by the unconventional mechanism. The RABV L protein capped 5'-triphosphorylated but not 5'-diphosphorylated RABV mRNA-start sequences, 5'-AACA(C/U), with GDP to generate the 5'-terminal cap structure G(5')ppp(5')A. The 5'-AAC sequence in the substrate RNAs was found to be strictly essential for RNA capping with the RABV L protein. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis showed that some conserved amino acid residues (G1112, T1170, W1201, H1241, R1242, F1285, and Q1286) in the PRNTase motifs A to E of the RABV L protein are required for cap formation. These findings suggest that the putative PRNTase domain in the RABV L protein catalyzes the rhabdovirus-specific capping reaction involving covalent catalysis of the pRNA transfer to GDP, thus offering this domain as a target for developing anti-viral agents. PMID:27213429

  14. The Rabies Virus L Protein Catalyzes mRNA Capping with GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Minako; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The large (L) protein of rabies virus (RABV) plays multiple enzymatic roles in viral RNA synthesis and processing. However, none of its putative enzymatic activities have been directly demonstrated in vitro. In this study, we expressed and purified a recombinant form of the RABV L protein and verified its guanosine 5′-triphosphatase and GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) activities, which are essential for viral mRNA cap formation by the unconventional mechanism. The RABV L protein capped 5′-triphosphorylated but not 5′-diphosphorylated RABV mRNA-start sequences, 5′-AACA(C/U), with GDP to generate the 5′-terminal cap structure G(5′)ppp(5′)A. The 5′-AAC sequence in the substrate RNAs was found to be strictly essential for RNA capping with the RABV L protein. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis showed that some conserved amino acid residues (G1112, T1170, W1201, H1241, R1242, F1285, and Q1286) in the PRNTase motifs A to E of the RABV L protein are required for cap formation. These findings suggest that the putative PRNTase domain in the RABV L protein catalyzes the rhabdovirus-specific capping reaction involving covalent catalysis of the pRNA transfer to GDP, thus offering this domain as a target for developing anti-viral agents. PMID:27213429

  15. Pyrolysis of oil-plant wastes in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor: Thermochemical behaviors, kinetics, and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbiao; Fan, Xiaotian; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Lin; Yao, Pikai; Yin, Hongchao; Song, Xigeng

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four distinct oil-plant wastes were investigated using TGA and fixed-bed reactor coupled with GC. TGA experiments showed that the pyrolysis behaviors were related to biomass species and heating rates. As the heating rate increased, TG and DTG curves shifted to the higher temperatures, and the comprehensive devolatilization index obviously increased. The remaining chars from TGA experiments were higher than those obtained from the fixed-bed experiments. The crack of tars at high temperatures enhanced the formation of non-condensable gases. During the pyrolysis, C-O and CO2 were the major gases. Chars FTIR showed that the functional groups of O-H, C-H(n), C=O, C-O, and C-C gradually disappeared from 400 °C on. The kinetic parameters were calculated by Coats-Redfern approach. The results manifested that the most appropriate pyrolysis mechanisms were the order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was evident. PMID:26093253

  16. The G protein alpha subunit Tga1 of Trichoderma atroviride is involved in chitinase formation and differential production of antifungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Reithner, Barbara; Brunner, Kurt; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Peissl, Isabel; Seidl, Verena; Krska, Rudolf; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2005-09-01

    Trichoderma mycoparasitism includes recognition, attack, overgrowth and lysis of the host fungus accompanied by morphological changes and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics. Studying the underlying signal transduction pathways, the tga1 gene encoding a Galpha subunit of Trichoderma atroviride P1 was analysed. A Deltatga1 mutant showed continuous sporulation and elevated internal steady-state cAMP levels. tga1 gene deletion resulted in a complete loss of mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum during direct confrontation, although infection structure formation was unaffected. The reduced mycoparasitic abilities were reflected by strongly decreased chitinase activities and reduced nag1 and ech42 gene transcription. Furthermore, production of 6-pentyl-alpha-pyrone and of metabolites with sesquiterpene structure was reduced in the Deltatga1 mutant. Regardless of these deficiencies, the mutant displayed an enhanced growth inhibition of the host fungi by over-producing other low molecular weight antifungal metabolites, suggesting opposite roles of Tga1 in regulating the biosynthesis of different antifungal substances in T. atroviride. PMID:15964222

  17. In Vitro Reconstitution of SARS-Coronavirus mRNA Cap Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Debarnot, Claire; Imbert, Isabelle; Selisko, Barbara; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome expression depends on the synthesis of a set of mRNAs, which presumably are capped at their 5′ end and direct the synthesis of all viral proteins in the infected cell. Sixteen viral non-structural proteins (nsp1 to nsp16) constitute an unusually large replicase complex, which includes two methyltransferases putatively involved in viral mRNA cap formation. The S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent (guanine-N7)-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) activity was recently attributed to nsp14, whereas nsp16 has been predicted to be the AdoMet-dependent (nucleoside-2′O)-methyltransferase. Here, we have reconstituted complete SARS-CoV mRNA cap methylation in vitro. We show that mRNA cap methylation requires a third viral protein, nsp10, which acts as an essential trigger to complete RNA cap-1 formation. The obligate sequence of methylation events is initiated by nsp14, which first methylates capped RNA transcripts to generate cap-0 7MeGpppA-RNAs. The latter are then selectively 2′O-methylated by the 2′O-MTase nsp16 in complex with its activator nsp10 to give rise to cap-1 7MeGpppA2′OMe-RNAs. Furthermore, sensitive in vitro inhibition assays of both activities show that aurintricarboxylic acid, active in SARS-CoV infected cells, targets both MTases with IC50 values in the micromolar range, providing a validated basis for anti-coronavirus drug design. PMID:20421945

  18. 42 CFR 418.309 - Hospice cap amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospice cap amount. 418.309 Section 418.309 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Payment for Hospice Care § 418.309 Hospice cap amount. The hospice cap amount... until October 31 of the following year. (b) Each hospice's cap amount is calculated by the...

  19. Efficient end-capping synthesis of neutral donor-acceptor [2]rotaxanes under additive-free and mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Domoto, Yuya; Sase, Shohei; Goto, Kei

    2014-11-24

    Efficient end-capping synthesis of neutral donor-acceptor (D-A) [2]rotaxanes without loading any catalysts or activating agents was achieved by utilizing high reactivity of a pentacoordinated hydrosilane toward salicylic acid derivatives. As components of [2]rotaxanes, an electron-deficient naphthalenediimide-containing axle with a salicylic acid terminus and several electron-rich bis(naphthocrown) ether macrocycles were employed. End-capping reactions with the pentacoordinated hydrosilane underwent smoothly even at low temperature to afford the corresponding [2]rotaxanes in good yields. A [2]rotaxane containing bis-1,5-(dinaphtho)-38-crown-10 ether as a wheel molecule was synthesized and isolated in 84% yield by the end-capping at -10 °C, presenting the highest yield ever reported for the end-capping synthesis of a neutral D-A [2]rotaxane. It was found that the yields of the [2]rotaxanes in the end-capping reactions were almost parallel to the formation ratios of the corresponding pseudo[2]rotaxanes estimated by utilizing model systems. These results indicate that the end-capping reaction using the pentacoordinated hydrosilane proceeded without perturbing the threading process, and most of the pseudo[2]rotaxanes underwent efficient end-capping reaction even at low temperature. PMID:25284148

  20. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic Co nanoparticles: A comparison study of three different capping surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yu; Lu Xianmao; Mayers, Brian T.; Herricks, Thurston; Xia Younan

    2008-07-15

    This paper compares the performance of three long-chain acids-oleic and elaidic (both olefinic) and stearic (aliphatic)-as a capping agent in the synthesis of magnetic Co nanoparticles. The particles were formed through thermal decomposition of dicobalt octacarbonyl in toluene in the presence of the long-chain acid, and characterized by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and SQUID measurements. Infrared spectra revealed that some of the added olefinic acid was transformed from cis- to trans-configuration (for oleic acid) or from trans- to cis- (for elaidic acid) to facilitate the formation of a densely packed monolayer on the surface of Co nanoparticles. As compared to aliphatic acids, olefinic acids are advantageous for dense packing on small particles with high surface curvatures due to a bent shape of the cis-isomer. The presence of an olefinic acid is able to control particle growth, stabilize the colloidal suspension, and prevent the final product from oxidation by air. Our results indicate that oleic acid, elaidic acid, and a mixture of oleic/stearic acids or elaidic/stearic acids have roughly the same performance in serving as a capping agent for the synthesis of Co nanoparticles with a spherical shape and narrow size distribution. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic Co nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of different capping agents and the effect of their molecular structures on the morphology of Co nanoparticles was analyzed. The transformation between cis- and trans-isomers of olefinic acids was critical to the formation of a densely packed monolayer on the surface of small nanoparticles characterized by high curvatures.

  1. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models;  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36

  2. Thioglycolic acid inhibits mouse oocyte maturation and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration.

    PubMed

    Hou, S Y; Zhang, L; Wu, K; Xia, L

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that thioglycolic acid (TGA) leads to potential reproductive toxicology. To clarify the exact effects of this compound on reproduction, mice oocytes were treated with different TGA doses. At the end of the culture period, the nuclear status of mice oocytes was assessed under an inverted microscope. After immunofluorescence staining, the chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration of oocytes were evaluated. The results indicated that TGA decreases the percentage of first polar body formation but does not influence that of germinal vesicle breakdown. TGA induces abnormal chromosomal arrangement and spindle elongation. In conclusion, TGA inhibits in-vitro maturation of mice oocytes and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration. Furthermore, it probably interferes with biochemical changes that occur during meiosis, resulting in aberrant development. PMID:19022875

  3. O+ transport across the polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, H. A.; Jahn, J.; Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2006-12-01

    The plasma sheet, inner magnetosphere, and high latitude magnetosphere all contain significant amounts of O+ ions during active times. Singly charged oxygen ions unambiguously come from the ionosphere making them an excellent tracer species. As the solar wind dynamic pressure increases, the O+ density in the in the cleft, high altitude polar cap, and plasma sheet also increases. We test the "cleft ion fountain" model, which asserts that O+ ions escape from the cleft, cross the polar cap, and then enter the plasma sheet against a mo of outflows originating from the entire polar cap. We use observations of O+ transport across the polar cap from TIDE polar cap ion outflow measurements. The Tsyganenko magnetic field model, driven with ACE solar wind parameters is used to provide magnetic mapping and organization of the observations. We calculate the distance between the cleft and the foot-points of magnetic field lines mapped from the Polar spacecraft along the noon-midnight meridian. Using the observed outflow speed and magnetic field line length we calculate travel time for the ions. We then plot the distance from the cleft versus the travel time for an entire pass. For O+ this plot is quite linear, and the slope of the line is the average convection speed of the magnetic field lines across the polar cap. The convection speed we determined is consistent with the convection speed measured in the ionosphere. We conclude that O+ ions emanating principally from the cleft are transported across the polar cap, and these O+ ions have access to the ring current and plasma sheet.

  4. Distinct Features of Cap Binding by eIF4E1b Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m7GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α + β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N7 of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N7 position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. PMID:25463438

  5. 75 FR 49527 - Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as Caps Group Acquisition, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as... Adjustment Assistance on June 24, 2010, applicable to workers of Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot..., Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot Group, formerly known as Caps Group Acquisition,...

  6. Simple polyol route to synthesize heptanoic acid coated magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gunay, M.; Kavas, H.; Baykal, A.

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Heptanoic acid@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has been prepared via simple polyol. ► Heptanoic acid used as both surfactant and solvents. ► Magneto polymer composite with adjustable Ea has a potential usage as functional composites. - Abstract: Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared via polyol method by using FeCl{sub 2} as only source of iron. As-prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Crystalline phase was identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the crystallite sizes were calculated as 19.1 ± 1.1 and 22 ± 1.3 nm for uncalcinated and calcinated products from X-ray line profile fitting. The capping of heptanoic acid around Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy, the interaction being via bridging oxygen's of the carboxylate and the nanoparticle surface and also by TG analysis. VSM measurements showed that both samples exhibited typical superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with different Ms values. The ε′ decreases with increasing frequency for both composites and permeability has almost same values for all temperatures at higher frequencies. As synthesized and calcinated samples conductivity increase linearly with the temperature.

  7. Reaction of. cap alpha. ,. cap alpha. ,omega-trihydroperfluoroalkanols with thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Krolevets, A.A.; Ragulin, L.I.; Popov, A.G.

    1987-06-10

    The effect of catalysts on the reaction of thionyl chloride with ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,omega-trihydroperfluoroalkanols was investigated. It was shown that the use of calcium chloride, aluminum chloride, ferric chloride, and magnesium chloride as catalysts makes it possible to obtain polyfluoroalkyl chlorosulfites and bis(polyfluoroalkyl) sulfites with good yields.

  8. Polar cap precursor of nightside auroral oval intensifications using polar cap arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ying; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Lyons, Larry R.; Donovan, Eric F.; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; McWilliams, Kathryn A.; Nishitani, Nozomu

    2015-12-01

    Recent radar and optical observations suggested that localized fast flows in the polar cap precede disturbances within the nightside auroral oval. However, how commonly this connection occurs has been difficult to examine due to limited coverage of radar flow measurements and diffuse and dim nature of airglow patches. Polar cap arcs are also associated with fast flows in the polar cap and appear much brighter than patches, allowing evaluation of the interaction between polar cap structures and nightside aurora more definitively. We have surveyed data during six winter seasons and selected quasi-steady polar cap arcs lasting >1 h. Thirty-four arcs are found, and for the majority (~85%) of them, as they extend equatorward from high latitude, their contact with the nightside auroral poleward boundary is associated with new and substantial intensifications within the oval. These intensifications are localized (< ~1 h magnetic local time (MLT)) and statistically occur within 10 min and ±1 h MLT from the contact. They appear as poleward boundary intensifications in a thick auroral oval or an intensification of the only resolvable arc within a thin oval, and the latter can also exhibit substantial poleward expansion. When radar echoes are available, they corroborate the association of polar cap arcs with localized enhanced antisunward flows. That the observed oval intensifications are major disturbances that only occur after the impingement of polar cap arcs and near the contact longitude suggest that they are triggered by localized fast flows coming from deep in the polar cap.

  9. CAP - JET PROPULSION LABORATORY CONTAMINATION ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Contamination Analysis Program (CAP) is a generalized transient executive analysis computer code which solves realistic mass transport problems in the free molecular flow environment. These transport problems involve mass flux from surface source emission and re-emission, venting, and engine emission. CAP solution capability allows for one-bounce mass reflections if required. CAP was developed to solve thin-film contamination problems in the free molecular flow environment, the intent being to provide a powerful analytic tool for evaluating spacecraft contamination problems. The solution procedure uses an enclosure method based on a lumped-parameter multinodal approach with mass exchange between nodes. Transient solutions are computed by the finite difference Euler method. First-order rate theory is used to represent surface emission and reemission (user care must be taken to insure the problem is appropriate for such behavior), and all surface emission and reflections are assumed diffuse. CAP does not include the effects of post-deposition chemistry or interaction with the ambient atmosphere. CAP reads in a model represented by a multiple-block data stream. CAP allows the user to edit the input data stream and stack sequential editing operations (or cases) in order to make complex changes in behavior (surface temperatures, engine start-up and shut-down, etc.) in a single run if desired. The eight data blocks which make up the input data stream consist of problem control parameters, nodal data (area, temperature, mass, etc.), engine or vent distribution factors (based upon plume definitions), geometric configuration factors (diffuse surface emission), surface capture coefficient tables, source emission rate constant tables, reemission rate constant tables, and partial node to body collapse capability (for deposition rates only). The user must generate this data stream, since neither the problem-specific geometric relationships, the

  10. Multicopy suppressors of temperature-sensitive mutations of yeast mRNA capping enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schwer, B; Shuman, S

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated three Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes-CES1, CES2, and CES3-- that, when present in high copy, suppress the ts growth defect caused by mutations in the CEG1 gene encoding mRNA guanylyltransferase (capping enzyme). Molecular characterization of the capping enzyme suppressor genes reveals the following. CES2 is identical to ESP1, a gene required for proper nuclear division. We show by deletion analysis that the 1573-amino acid ESP1 polypeptide is composed of distinct functional domains. The C-terminal portion of ESP1 is essential for cell growth, but dispensable for CES2 activity. The N-terminal half of ESP1, which is sufficient for CES2 function, displays local sequence similarity to the small subunit of the vaccinia virus RNA capping enzyme. This suggests a basis for suppression by physical or functional interaction between the CES2 domain of ESP1 and the yeast guanylyltransferase. CES1 encodes a novel hydrophilic 915-amino acid protein. The amino acid sequence of CES1 is uninformative, except for its extensive similarity to another yeast gene product of unknown function. The CES1 homologue (designated CES4) is also a multicopy suppressor of capping enzyme ts mutations. Neither CES1 nor CES4 is essential for cell growth, and a double deletion mutant is viable. CES3 corresponds to BUD5, which encodes a putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor. We hypothesize that CES1, CES4, and BUD5 may impact on RNA transactions downstream of cap synthesis that are cap dependent in vivo. PMID:8836740

  11. Identification of a GTP-binding protein. cap alpha. subunit that lacks an apparent ADP-ribosylation site for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Yoshimoto, K.K.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Simon, M.I.

    1988-05-01

    Recent molecular cloning of cDNA for the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine transducin (a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, or G protein) has revealed the presence of two retinal-specific transducins, called T/sub r/ and T/sub c/, which are expressed in rod or cone photoreceptor cells. In a further study of G-protein diversity and signal transduction in the retina, the authors have identified a G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunit, which they refer to as G/sub z/..cap alpha.., by isolating a human retinal cDNA clone that cross-hybridizes at reduced stringency with bovine T/sub r/ ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of G/sub z/..cap alpha.. is 41-67% identical with those of other known G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. However, the 355-residue G/sub z/..cap alpha.. lacks a consensus site for ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin, and its amino acid sequence varies within a number of regions that are strongly conserved among all of the other G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. They suggest that G/sub z/..cap alpha.., which appears to be highly expressed in neural tissues, represents a member of a subfamily of G proteins that mediate signal transduction in pertussis toxin-insensitive systems.

  12. Transmission Through Carbon Nanotubes with Polyhedral Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study electron transport between capped carbon nanotubes and a substrate, and relate this transport to the local density of states in the cap. Our results show that that the transmission probability mimics the behavior of the density of states at all energies except those that correspond to localized states. For a capped carbon nanotube that is not connected to a substrate, the localized states do not couple to the coexisting continuum states. However, close proximity of a substrate causes hybridization between these states. As a result, new transmission paths open from substrate states to nanotube continuum states via the localized states in the cap. We show that the interference between various paths gives rise to transmission antiresonances with the minimum equal to zero at the energy of the localized state. The presence of defects in the tube places close to the cap transforms antiresonances into resonances. Depending on the spatial position of defects, these resonant states are capable of carrying a large current. The results of this paper are of relevance to carbon nanotube based studies on molecular electronics and probe tip applications.

  13. Carbon nanotube cathode with capping carbon nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhao, Dengchao; Pang, Kaige; Pang, Junchao; Liu, Weihua; Liu, Hongzhong; Wang, Xiaoli

    2013-10-01

    Here, we report a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) film capped with a few layer of carbon nanosheet (FLCN) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The square resistance of the VACNT film is significantly reduced from 1500 Ω/□ to 300 Ω/□ when it is capped with carbon nanosheet. The VACNT capped with carbon nanosheet was transferred to an ITO glass substrate in an inverted configuration so that the carbon nanosheet served as a flexible transparent electrode at the bottom and the VACNT roots served as emission tips. Because all of the VACNTs start growing from a flat silicon substrate, the VACNT roots are very neat and uniform in height. A field emission test of the carbon nanosheet-capped VACNT film proved that the CNT roots show better uniformity in field emission and the carbon nanosheet cap could also potentially serve as a flexible transparent electrode, which is highly desired in photo-assisted field emission.

  14. Eddy intrustion of hot plasma into the polar cap and formation of polar-cap arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Gorney, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Under the simple postulate that multiple large scale detachable magnetospheric convection eddies can exist in the vicinity of the convection reversal boundary and in the polar cap, by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or otherwise, it is shown that a number of seemingly disconnected plasma and electric field observations in the polar cap can be organized into a theory of magnetosheath and plasmasheet plasma intrusion into the polar cap. Current theory of inverted V structures then predicts existence of similar, but weaker, structures at the eddy convection reversal boundaries in the polar cap. A possible consequence is that the polar cap auroras are natural offshoots from discrete oval arcs and evidently are formed by similar processes. The two arc systems can occassionally produce an optical image in the form of the theta aurora.

  15. Cap-Independent Translation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Horvilleur, Emilie; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Bastide, Amandine; Piñeiro, David; Pöyry, Tuija A. A.; Willis, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are a heterogeneous group of diseases deriving from blood cells progenitors. Although many genes involved in blood cancers contain internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), there has been only few studies focusing on the role of cap-independent translation in leukemia and lymphomas. Expression of IRES trans-acting factors can also be altered, and interestingly, BCL-ABL1 fusion protein expressed from “Philadelphia” chromosome, found in some types of leukemia, regulates several of them. A mechanism involving c-Myc IRES and cap-independent translation and leading to resistance to chemotherapy in multiple myeloma emphasize the contribution of cap-independent translation in blood cancers and the need for more work to be done to clarify the roles of known IRESes in pathology and response to chemotherapeutics. PMID:26734574

  16. Biocompatibility of a new pulp capping cement

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Dagna, Alberto; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of a new pulp capping material (Biodentine, Septodont) compared with reference pulp capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), ProRoot MTA (Dentsply) and MTA-Angelus (Angelus) by using murine odontoblast cell line and Alamar blue and MTT cytotoxicity tests. Methods The citocompatibility of murine odontoblasts cells (MDPC-23) were evaluated at different times using a 24 Transwell culture plate by Alamar blue test and MTT assay. Results The results were significantly different among the pulp capping materials tested. Biocompatibility was significant different among materials with different composition. Conclusions Biodentine and MTA-based products show lower cytotoxicity varying from calcium hydroxide-based material which present higher citotoxicity. PMID:25002921

  17. Purification and characterization of the glycoprotein hormone. cap alpha. -subunit-like material secreted by HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.S.; Rimerman, R.A.

    1988-08-23

    The protein secreted by HeLa cells that cross-reacts with antiserum developed against the ..cap alpha..-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been purified approximately 30,000-fold from concentrated culture medium by organic solvent fractionation followed by ion exchange, gel filtration, and lectin affinity chromatography. The final preparation had a specific activity (by RIA) of 6.8 x 10/sup 5/ ng of ..cap alpha../mg of protein and appeared homogeneous by electrophoresis on reducing/denaturing polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). Amino acid analysis indicated that HeLa-..cap alpha.. had a composition very similar to that of the urinary hCG ..cap alpha..-subunit. However, comparison of hCG-..cap alpha.. and HeLa-..cap alpha.. demonstrated that the tumor-associated subunit was not identical with its normal counterpart. The purified tumor protein had an apparent molecular weight greater than that of the urinary ..cap alpha..-subunit when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and this difference was even greater when a partially purified preparation was examined by an immunoblot technique (Western). Isoelectric focusing of the HeLa and hCG subunits demonstrated that the tumor protein had a lower pI. Immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis of ..cap alpha..-subunit from HeLa cultures labeled with (/sup 3/H)fucose indicated that the tumor subunit was fucosylated, whereas analysis of hCG-..cap alpha.. hydrosylates by HPLC confirmed previous reports that the placental subunit does not contain fucose. The results indicate that, regardless of whether or not a single ..cap alpha..-subunit gene is being expressed in both normal and neoplastic tissues, posttranslational modifications lead to a highly altered subunit in the tumor. The differences observed may be useful in diagnosing neoplastic vs hyperplastic conditions and may lend insight into the mechanism of ectopic hormone production by tumors.

  18. A nanobody targeting the F-actin capping protein CapG restrains breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Aberrant turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is intimately associated with cancer cell migration and invasion. Frequently however, evidence is circumstantial, and a reliable assessment of the therapeutic significance of a gene product is offset by lack of inhibitors that target biologic properties of a protein, as most conventional drugs do, instead of the corresponding gene. Proteomic studies have demonstrated overexpression of CapG, a constituent of the actin cytoskeleton, in breast cancer. Indirect evidence suggests that CapG is involved in tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. In this study, we used llama-derived CapG single-domain antibodies or nanobodies in a breast cancer metastasis model to address whether inhibition of CapG activity holds therapeutic merit. Methods We raised single-domain antibodies (nanobodies) against human CapG and used these as intrabodies (immunomodulation) after lentiviral transduction of breast cancer cells. Functional characterization of nanobodies was performed to identify which biochemical properties of CapG are perturbed. Orthotopic and tail vein in vivo models of metastasis in nude mice were used to assess cancer cell spreading. Results With G-actin and F-actin binding assays, we identified a CapG nanobody that binds with nanomolar affinity to the first CapG domain. Consequently, CapG interaction with actin monomers or actin filaments is blocked. Intracellular delocalization experiments demonstrated that the nanobody interacts with CapG in the cytoplasmic environment. Expression of the nanobody in breast cancer cells restrained cell migration and Matrigel invasion. Notably, the nanobody prevented formation of lung metastatic lesions in orthotopic xenograft and tail-vein models of metastasis in immunodeficient mice. We showed that CapG nanobodies can be delivered into cancer cells by using bacteria harboring a type III protein secretion system (T3SS). Conclusions CapG inhibition strongly reduces breast cancer

  19. Energetic particles over Io's polar caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    2003-11-01

    We present results obtained from the Galileo satellite's Energetic Particles Detector during its final two encounters in 2001 with Jupiter's moon Io. These encounters returned the first data from just above Io's polar caps. They complement previous low-latitude data and provide a new perspective of Io's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere and ionosphere. The evolution of electron and ion distributions was measured from the upstream region throughout the polar cap traversals. From the time of initial field contact with Io and continuing throughout the encounter these distributions evolve in a manner consistent with adiabatic motion along the Io-Jupiter field line. At encounter all particles develop narrow trapped-like distributions indicative of the creation of a near-Io magnetic bottle caused by an enhancement of field at Io's upstream surface. The measured pitch angle distributions indicate a field enhancement of up to 10%-15% higher than the field observed at Galileo's position. Distribution evolution times agree roughly with particle bounce times on the Io-Jupiter field line. The ion distribution evolution times provide an estimate of ˜3-7 km/s for the field line convection speed across Io's polar caps, a value small (˜10%) compared with the upstream convection speed. Along with these trapped distributions, beams of ions and electrons are observed streaming into Io's polar caps throughout the encounters. The continued observation of ion beams across the polar cap is consistent with their half-bounce times. The data further indicate that the convection speed may vary as the polar cap is traversed. The one exception to the adiabatic particle behavior discussed above is the observation of intense electron beams streaming into Io's polar caps. The polar cap electron beams are similar to those previously measured in Io's wake [, 1996] and apparently originate from the same source. The source has been located at low (˜0.5 RJ) altitudes on the Io-Jupiter field

  20. Valve Cap For An Electric Storage Cell

    DOEpatents

    Verhoog, Roelof; Genton, Alain

    2000-04-18

    The valve cap for an electric storage cell includes a central annular valve seat (23) and a membrane (5) fixed by its peripheral edge and urged against the seat by a piston (10) bearing thereagainst by means of a spring (12), the rear end of said spring (12) bearing on the endwall (8) of a chamber (20) formed in the cap and containing the piston (10) and the spring. A vent (19) puts the chamber (20) into communication with the atmosphere. A central orifice (26, 28) through the piston (10) and the membrane (5), enables gas from within the cell to escape via the top vent (19) when the valve opens.

  1. Steel Foil Improves Performance Of Blasting Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Perry, Ronnie; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1990-01-01

    Blasting caps, which commonly include deep-drawn aluminum cups, give significantly higher initiation performance by application of steel foils on output faces. Steel closures 0.005 in. (0.13 mm) thick more effective than aluminum. Caps with directly bonded steel foil produce fragment velocities of 9,300 ft/s (2.8 km/s) with large craters and unpredictable patterns to such degree that no attempts made to initiate explosions. Useful in military and aerospace applications and in specialized industries as mining and exploration for oil.

  2. Structural basis for m7G recognition and 2'-O-methyl discrimination in capped RNAs by the innate immune receptor RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Devarkar, Swapnil C; Wang, Chen; Miller, Matthew T; Ramanathan, Anand; Jiang, Fuguo; Khan, Abdul G; Patel, Smita S; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-19

    RNAs with 5'-triphosphate (ppp) are detected in the cytoplasm principally by the innate immune receptor Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I), whose activation triggers a Type I IFN response. It is thought that self RNAs like mRNAs are not recognized by RIG-I because 5'ppp is capped by the addition of a 7-methyl guanosine (m7G) (Cap-0) and a 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) group to the 5'-end nucleotide ribose (Cap-1). Here we provide structural and mechanistic basis for exact roles of capping and 2'-O-methylation in evading RIG-I recognition. Surprisingly, Cap-0 and 5'ppp double-stranded (ds) RNAs bind to RIG-I with nearly identical Kd values and activate RIG-I's ATPase and cellular signaling response to similar extents. On the other hand, Cap-0 and 5'ppp single-stranded RNAs did not bind RIG-I and are signaling inactive. Three crystal structures of RIG-I complexes with dsRNAs bearing 5'OH, 5'ppp, and Cap-0 show that RIG-I can accommodate the m7G cap in a cavity created through conformational changes in the helicase-motif IVa without perturbing the ppp interactions. In contrast, Cap-1 modifications abrogate RIG-I signaling through a mechanism involving the H830 residue, which we show is crucial for discriminating between Cap-0 and Cap-1 RNAs. Furthermore, m7G capping works synergistically with 2'-O-methylation to weaken RNA affinity by 200-fold and lower ATPase activity. Interestingly, a single H830A mutation restores both high-affinity binding and signaling activity with 2'-O-methylated dsRNAs. Our work provides new structural insights into the mechanisms of host and viral immune evasion from RIG-I, explaining the complexity of cap structures over evolution. PMID:26733676

  3. Studies of cervical caps: I. Vaginal lesions associated with use of the Vimule cap.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, G S; Kilzer, L H; Coulson, A H; Nakamura, R M; Smith, G C; Bernstein, R; Frezieres, R; Clark, V A; Coan, C

    1982-11-01

    Prior to investigating the contraceptive efficacy of cervical caps, we undertook a preliminary study to evaluate potential side effects of these devices. Women who had not previously used a cap were randomly assigned to wear either a Vimule or Cavity Rim Cap (CRC) for as long as seven days. The Vimule cap caused lesions of the portio vaginalis ranging from erythematous impressions to abrasions and frank lacerations. There was variation in the degree of trauma depending, in part, on the size of the cap and duration of wear. Disruption of the epithelium occurred in eight of twelve Vimule users, but the lesions were sometimes difficult to see owing to their location. CRCs were worn by 20 women. This device sometimes left a "suction ring" on the cervix but did not disrupt the epithelium. Two of three long-term users of the Vimule cap who were also studied had unusual formations of the vaginal mucosa suggesting a proliferative reaction to chronic irritation. It is recommended that all women using a Vimule Cap be carefully re-examined and counseled about further use of the device according to the findings of the examination. PMID:7160179

  4. Role of gold nanoparticles capping density on stability and surface reactivity to design drug delivery platforms.

    PubMed

    Tournebize, Juliana; Boudier, Ariane; Sapin-Minet, Anne; Maincent, Philippe; Leroy, Pierre; Schneider, Raphaël

    2012-11-01

    Five-nanometer sized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) stabilized with citrate ions have been reacted with various amounts of dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) (×28, ×56, ×140, ×222, relative to Au NPs). Ligand exchange between citrate and the dithiol resulted in DHLA-capped Au NPs, whose degree of inertia was found to be related to the density of capping. The results revealed the importance of DHLA coating density to enhance the colloidal stability and modulate the reactivity toward free radicals and proteins of biological relevance. Thus, Au NPs capped with the highest amount of DHLA were found to be the ones that were, first, the most resistant to environmental changes, then characterized by the lowest residual catalytic reactivity of their metallic core, and finally the lowest interacting with proteins through nonspecific adsorption. The physicochemical properties conferred to Au NPs prepared with the ×222 excess should be valuable for further pharmaceutical development of nanoparticle platforms. PMID:23106388

  5. Cap disease caused by heterozygous deletion of the beta-tropomyosin gene TPM2.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; de Jonghe, Peter; Marttila, Minttu; Laing, Nigel G; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2007-06-01

    "Cap myopathy" or "cap disease" is a congenital myopathy characterised by cap-like structures at the periphery of muscle fibres, consisting of disarranged thin filaments with enlarged Z discs. Here we report a deletion in the beta-tropomyosin (TPM2) gene causing cap disease in a 36-year-old male patient with congenital muscle weakness, myopathic facies and respiratory insufficiency. The mutation identified in this patient is an in-frame deletion (c.415_417delGAG) of one codon in exon 4 of TPM2 removing a single glutamate residue (p.Glu139del) from the beta-tropomyosin protein. This is expected to disrupt the seven-amino acid repeat essential for making a coiled coil, and thus to impair tropomyosin-actin interaction. Missense mutations in TPM2 have previously been found to cause rare cases of nemaline myopathy and distal arthrogryposis. This mutation is one not previously described and the first genetic cause identified for cap disease. PMID:17434307

  6. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE I TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.; Miller, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Lambert, D.

    2014-04-22

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further evaluation of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid1, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters for the melter flammability models o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species Prior to startup, a number of improvements and modifications were made to the CEF, including addition of cameras, vessel support temperature measurement, and a

  7. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... collect menstrual flow or to aid artificial insemination. This generic type of device is not...

  8. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... collect menstrual flow or to aid artificial insemination. This generic type of device is not...

  9. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... collect menstrual flow or to aid artificial insemination. This generic type of device is not...

  10. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... collect menstrual flow or to aid artificial insemination. This generic type of device is not...

  11. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... collect menstrual flow or to aid artificial insemination. This generic type of device is not...

  12. Survey of Enabling Technologies for CAPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Koons, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    The enabling technologies required for the development of a viable Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS) can be divided into two principal areas: detection and deflection/orbit modification. With the proper funding levels, many of the technologies needed to support a CAPS architecture could be achievable within the next 15 to 20 years. In fact, many advanced detection technologies are currently in development for future in-space telescope systems such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), formerly known as the Next Generation Space Telescope. It is anticipated that many of the JWST technologies would be available for application for CAPS detection concepts. Deflection/orbit modification technologies are also currently being studied as part of advanced power and propulsion research. However, many of these technologies, such as extremely high-output power systems, advanced propulsion, heat rejection, and directed energy systems, would likely be farther term in availability than many of the detection technologies. Discussed subsequently is a preliminary examination of the main technologies that have been identified as being essential to providing the element functionality defined during the CAPS conceptual study. The detailed requirements for many of the technology areas are still unknown, and many additional technologies will be identified as future in-depth studies are conducted in this area.

  13. Maintaining and Repairing. CAP Job Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This Job Function Booklet (Maintaining and Repairing) is one of the 14 components (see note) of the Career Alert Planning (CAP) program, a set of individualized materials designed to help participants find out about themselves and about the kind of work for which they are suited. In this program, participants become acquainted with occupations…

  14. Science CAP: Curriculum Assistance Program. [Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DEMCO, Inc., Madison, WI.

    Science Curriculum Assistance Program (Science CAP(TM)) is a multimedia package developed to create a model for preserving classroom science activities that can be shared and customized by teachers. This program is designed to assist teachers in preparing classroom science activities for grades five through eight, and to foster an environment of…

  15. Capping blowouts from Iran's 8-year war

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, B. )

    1991-07-01

    Control well blown up by the Iraqi military were a 2 1/2 year legacy left the National Iranian Oil Co. at the end of this long conflict. This final installment of a 2-part series describes capping of the largest wind oil well.

  16. Natural attenuation processes during in situ capping.

    PubMed

    Himmelheber, David W; Pennell, Kurt D; Hughes, Joseph B

    2007-08-01

    Chlorinated solvents are common groundwater contaminants that threaten surface water quality and benthic health when present in groundwater seeps. Aquatic sediments can act as natural biobarriers to detoxify chlorinated solvent plumes via reductive dechlorination. In situ sediment capping, a remedial technique in which clean material is placed at the sediment-water interface, may alter sedimentary natural attenuation processes. This research explores the potential of Anacostia River sediment to naturally attenuate chlorinated solvents under simulated capping conditions. Results of microcosm studies demonstrated that intrinsic dechlorination of dissolved-phase PCE to ethene was possible, with electron donor availability controlling microbial activity. A diverse microbial community was present in the sediment, including multiple Dehalococcoides strains indicated by the amplification of the reductive dehalogenases tceA, vcrA, and bvcA. An upflow column simulating a capped sediment bed subject to PCE-contaminated groundwater seepage lost dechlorination activity with time and only achieved complete dechlorination when microorganisms present in the sediment were provided electron donor. Increases in effluent chloroethene concentrations during the period of biostimulation were attributed to biologically enhanced desorption and the formation of less sorptive dechlorination products. These findings suggest that in situ caps should be designed to account for reductions in natural biobarrier reactivity and for the potential breakthrough of groundwater contaminants. PMID:17822095

  17. Successful treatment of cap polyposis with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Bookman, Ian D; Redston, Mark S; Greenberg, Gordon R

    2004-06-01

    Cap polyposis is a disorder characterized by bloody diarrhea with rectosigmoid polyps covered by a cap of fibropurulent exudate. The pathogenesis is unknown, but histological features suggest that mucosal prolapse may play a role. Drug therapies are usually unsuccessful, and treatment requires sigmoid resection or, if the disease recurs after initial surgical resection, panproctocolectomy. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with characteristic clinical, endoscopic, and histological features of cap polyposis. Investigations included normal anorectal manometry and defecography, without evidence of prolapse. The patient's disease was unresponsive to treatment with mesalamine, antibiotics, lidocaine enemas, and corticosteroids. One infusion of infliximab 5 mg/kg provided dramatic symptomatic improvement but minimal endoscopic or histological change. After 4 infliximab infusions at 8-week intervals, endoscopy of the rectum and sigmoid colon was normal, and biopsies showed complete histological resolution of the inflammatory process. Well-being with normal endoscopy and histology has been maintained at 38 months, without further treatment. It was concluded that infliximab is effective therapy for cap polyposis and avoids the requirement for surgery. No clinical evidence was obtained to support mucosal prolapse as a causative factor, but the response to infliximab suggests a role for tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:15188181

  18. Plasma structuring in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Weber, E.J.; Bishop, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Propagation experiments providing scintillation, total electron content and drift data in the field of view of an all-sky imager near the magnetic polar in Greenland are utilized to investigate the manner in which ionospheric plasma becomes structured within the polar cap. It is found that under IMF Bz southward conditions, large scale ionization patches which are convected through the dayside cusp into the polar cap get continually structured. The structuring occurs through the ExB gradient drift instability process which operates through an interaction between the antisunward plasma convection in the neutral rest frame and large scale plasma density gradients that exist at the edges of the ionization patches. It is shown that with the increase of solar activity the strength of the irregularities integrated through the ionosphere is greatly increased. Under the IMF Bz northward conditions, the plasma structuring occurs around the polar cap arcs in the presence of inhomogeneous electric field or disordered plasma convection. In that case, the irregularity generation is caused by the competing processes of non-linear Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by sheared plasma flows and the gradient drift instability process which operates in the presence of dawn-dusk motion of arc structures. The integrated strength of this class of irregularities also exhibits marked increase with increasing solar activity presumably because the ambient plasma density over the polar cap is enhanced.

  19. 47 CFR 54.507 - Cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... yearly average GDP-CPI is determined, the Wireline Competition Bureau shall publish a public notice in... category one services, the Administrator, at the direction of the Wireline Competition Bureau, shall direct... notwithstanding the annual cap. The Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau, is delegated authority to determine...

  20. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  1. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Tyr-Kinases CapB1 and CapB2 Fused to Their Cognate Modulators CapA1 and CapA2 from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fleurie, Aurore; Béchet, Emmanuelle; Gueguen-Chaignon, Virginie; Freton, Céline; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Moréra, Solange; Grangeasse, Christophe; Nessler, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    A particular class of tyrosine-kinases sharing no structural similarity with eukaryotic tyrosine-kinases has been evidenced in a large array of bacterial species. These bacterial tyrosine-kinases are able to autophosphorylate on a C-terminal tyrosine-rich motif. Their autophosphorylation has been shown to play a crucial role in the biosynthesis or export of capsular polysaccharide. The analysis of the first crystal structure of the staphylococcal tyrosine kinase CapB2 associated with the activating domain of the transmembrane modulator CapA1 had brought conclusive explanation for both the autophosphorylation and activation processes. In order to explain why CapA1 activates CapB2 more efficiently than its cognate transmembrane modulator CapA2, we solved the crystal structure of CapA2B2 and compared it with the previously published structure of CapA1B2. This structural analysis did not provide the expected clues about the activation discrepancy observed between the two modulators. Staphylococcus aureus also encodes for a CapB2 homologue named CapB1 displaying more than 70% sequence similarity and being surprisingly nearly unable to autophosphorylate. We solved the crystal structure of CapA1B1 and carefully compare it with the structure of CapA1B2. The active sites of both proteins are highly conserved and the biochemical characterization of mutant proteins engineered to test the importance of small structural discrepancies identified between the two structures did not explain the inactivity of CapB1. We thus tested if CapB1 could phosphorylate other protein substrates or hydrolyze ATP. However, no activity could be detected in our in vitro assays. Taken together, these data question about the biological role of the homologous protein pairs CapA1/CapB1 and CapA2/CapB2 and we discuss about several possible interpretations. PMID:24146800

  3. An experimental study of the (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH phase diagram using in situ synchrotron XRD and TGA/DSC techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Pei; Fang, Z. Zak; Koopman, Mark; Paramore, James D.; Chandran, K. S. Ravi; Ren, Yang; Lu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen has been investigated for decades as a temporary alloying element to refine the microstructure of Ti-6Al-4V, and is now being used in a novel powder metallurgy method known as "hydrogen sintering and phase transformation". Pseudo-binary phase diagrams of (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH have been studied and developed, but are not well established due to methodological limitations. In this paper, in situ studies of phase transformations during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH alloys were conducted using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The eutectoid phase transformation of β ↔ α + δ was observed in the (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH alloy via in situ synchrotron XRD at 211 °C with a hydrogen concentration of 37.5 at.% (measured using TGA-DSC). The relationships of hydrogen composition to partial pressure and temperature were investigated in the temperature range 450-900°C. Based on these results, a partial pseudo-binary phase diagram of (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH is proposed for hydrogen compositions up to 60 at.% in the temperature range 100-900°C. Using the data collected in real time under controlled parameters of temperature, composition and hydrogen partial pressure, this work characterizes relevant phase transformations and microstructural evolution for practical titanium-hydrogen technologies of Ti-6Al-4V.

  4. Structural Characterisation of Complex Layered Double Hydroxides and TGA-GC-MS Study on Thermal Response and Carbonate Contamination in Nitrate- and Organic-Exchanged Hydrotalcites.

    PubMed

    Conterosito, Eleonora; Palin, Luca; Antonioli, Diego; Viterbo, Davide; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Kolb, Ute; Perioli, Luana; Milanesio, Marco; Gianotti, Valentina

    2015-10-12

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are versatile materials used for intercalating bioactive molecules in the fields of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and cosmetics, with the purpose of protecting them from degradation, enhancing their water solubility to increase bioavailability and improving their pharmacokinetic properties and formulation stability. Moreover, LDHs are used in various technological applications to improve stability and processability. The crystal chemistry of hydrotalcite-like compounds was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)-GC-MS to shed light on the mechanisms involved in ion exchange and absorption of contaminants, mainly carbonate anions. For the first time, ADT allowed a structural model of LDH_NO3 to be obtained from experiment, shedding light on the conformation of nitrate inside LDH and on the loss of crystallinity due to the layer morphology. The ADT analysis of a hybrid LDH sample (LDH_EUS) clearly revealed an increase in defectivity in this material. XRPD demonstrated that the presence of carbonate can influence the intercalation of organic molecules into LDH, since CO3 -contaminated samples tend to adopt d spacings that are approximate multiples of the d spacing of LDH_CO3 . TGA-GC-MS allowed intercalated and surface- adsorbed organic molecules to be distinguished and quantified, the presence and amount of carbonate to be confirmed, especially at low concentrations (<2 wt %), and the different types and strengths of adsorption to be classified with respect to the temperature of elimination. PMID:26269963

  5. Polar Cap Precursor of Nightside Auroral Oval Intensifications Using Polar Cap Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.; Shiokawa, K.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; McWilliams, K. A.; Nishitani, N.

    2015-12-01

    Recent radar and optical observations have revealed that localized fast flows in the polar cap can closely relate to disturbances within the nightside auroral oval. However, how commonly this connection occurs has been difficult to examine due to limited coverage of radar flow measurements and diffuse and dim nature of airglow patches. This question can now be addressed by using polar cap arcs, which are also associated with fast flows and appear much brighter than patches, allowing evaluation of the interaction between polar cap flows and nightside aurora more definitively. Utilizing an array of high-resolution 630.0 nm all-sky imagers, we have selected quasi-steady polar cap arcs lasting >1 h from six winter seasons. Thirty four arcs are found and for the majority (~85%) of them, as they extend equatorward from magnetic pole, their contact with the nightside auroral poleward boundary is associated with new and substantial intensifications within the oval, in contrast to the otherwise quiet oval. These intensifications are localized (<~1 h MLT) and statistically occur within 10 min and ±1 h MLT from the contact. They appear as poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) in a thick auroral oval or an intensification of the only resolvable arc in a thin oval, and the latter can also exhibit substantial poleward expansion. When radar echoes are available, they corroborate the association of polar cap arcs with localized enhanced anti-sunward polar cap flows. That the observed oval intensifications are major disturbances that only occur after and initiate near the impingement of polar cap arcs suggest that they are triggered by localized fast flows coming from deep in the polar cap. Such observation suggests that meso-scale fast flows in the lobe can traverse the open-closed field line boundary through enhanced magnetic reconnection and closely couple with disturbances in the plasma sheet.

  6. Novel amino-acid-based polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube bio-nanocomposites: highly water dispersible carbon nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Bund, Andreas; Cho, Byung Gwon; Lim, Kwon Taek; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2009-06-01

    A well-reproducible and completely green route towards highly water dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) is achieved by a non-invasive, polymer wrapping technique, where the polymer is adsorbed on the MWNT's surface. Simply mixing an amino-acid-based polymer derivative, namely poly methacryloyl β-alanine (PMBA) with purified MWNTs in distilled water resulted in the formation of PMBA-MWNT nanocomposite hybrids. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were further anchored on the polymer-wrapped MWNTs, which were previously sonicated in distilled water, via the hydrogen bonding interaction between the carboxylic acid functional groups present in the polymer-modified MWNTs and the citrate-capped AuNPs. The surface morphologies and chemistries of the hybrids decorated with nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, the composites were also prepared by the in situ free radical polymerization of the monomer, methacryloyl β-alanine (MBA), with MWNTs. Thus functionalized MWNTs were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and TEM. Both methods were effective in the nanotube functionalization and ensured good dispersion and high stability in water over three months. Due to the presence of the high densities of carboxylic acid functionalities on the surface of CNTs, various colloidal nanocrystals can be attached to MWNTs.

  7. Development of an unbonded capping system for clay masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, L.K.; Henderson, R.C.; Sneed, W.A. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    To ascertain if an unbonded capping system was feasible for clay masonry prisms, the compressive strengths of thirty clay masonry prisms capped with an unbonded capping system modeled after ASTM C 1231 were compared with those of thirty masonry prisms capped with ASTM C 67 approved high-strength gypsum cement at the ages of 7 and 28 days. All prisms were constructed by a professional mason using Grade SW, Type FBS cored face brick from the same lot and ASTM C 270 Type S PC-lime mortar. There was no significant difference in mean compressive strength for the two capping methods at either age. In addition, capping with the unbonded capping system was faster and easier. Further, 28-day results obtained using the unbonded capping system had a lower coefficient of variation and higher mean compressive strength than those obtained with high-strength gypsum.

  8. Low flammability cap-sensitive flexible explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Martin G.

    1992-01-14

    A cap-sensitive flexible explosive composition of reduced flammability is provided by incorporating a finely divided, cap-sensitive explosive in a flame resistant polymeric binder system which contains a compatible flame retardant material.

  9. Lithospheric Loading by the Northern Polar CAP on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    1999-03-01

    Loading of the martian lithosphere by the northern polar cap is investigated using elastic and viscoelastic models and constraints from MOLA data and geology. Implications for basement topography, polar cap volume and the gravity field are discussed.

  10. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor secreted by untransformed bovine anterior pituitary cells in culture. II. Identification using a sequence-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kobrin, M.S.; Samsoondar, J.; Kudlow, J.E.

    1986-11-05

    Untransformed bovine anterior pituitary cells cultured in serum-free defined medium secrete an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like peptide with an amino acid composition similar to rat or human ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (..cap alpha..TGF). To further characterize the bovine pituitary ..cap alpha..TGF, it was compared to a human ..cap alpha..TGF partially purified from the conditioned medium of a human melanoma cell line. An anti-..cap alpha..TGF monoclonal antibody, MF9, was produced from hybridomas derived from mice immunized with a 17-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxyl-terminal sequence of rat ..cap alpha..TGF. The hybridoma supernatants were initially screened for the ability to immunoprecipitate /sup 125/I-peptide and then tested for recognition of human ..cap alpha..TGF. Only 2 of 36 antipeptide antibodies recognized the native ..cap alpha..TGF. The binding of /sup 125/I-peptide to MF9 was displaced by human ..cap alpha..TGF but not by EGF. Bovine pituitary ..cap alpha..TGF also displaced the binding of /sup 125/I-peptide to MF9 in a similar manner to human ..cap alpha..TGF. Both iodinated human and bovine pituitary ..cap alpha..TGF were immunoprecipitated by MF9 whereas /sup 125/I-EGF was not. Tryptic digests of both /sup 125/I-..cap alpha..TGFs chromatographed to give a single, indistinguishable peak of iodinated material on a reverse-phase C/sub 18/ high performance liquid chromatography column when eluted with two different solvent systems, suggesting the generation of a single and identical tyrosine-containing tryptic peptide from both ..cap alpha..TGFs. The comparisons of the bovine pituitary and human melanoma ..cap alpha..TGF using a sequence-specific monoclonal antibody and peptide mapping suggest that these ..cap alpha..TGFs are related and that ..cap alpha..TGF production is not limited to transformed or fetal sources.

  11. The cervical cap. An alternate barrier contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Gilbirds, W M; Jonas, H S

    1982-04-01

    The cervical cap is examined as an acceptable addition to barrier method technology. Attention is directed to its history, methodology, contradindications and side effects, effectiveness, and areas of current research. Invention of the modern cervical cap occurred in the mid-1800s. Finch reports that the 1st cervical cap was described in 1838 by Frederick Adolphe Wilde, a German gynecologist. He called it a Cautchuk Pessarium, and each cap was custom made from a wax impression of the woman's cervix. No matter who is credited with the invention of the cap, it remained a widely used method of contraception for the next century although principally employed in Europe. Currently, cervical caps are widely used in England and Central Europe. Use of the cap in the U.S. has been limited by the small amount of data on its demonstrated effectiveness as well as most clinican's belief that the method is too complicated for the "average woman." There are 2 primary types of cervical caps: firm and soft rubber. For the cap to be effective, it must be fitted by trained medical personnel. For maximum effectiveness, it is essential that the cervical cap user master the techniques of self insertion and removal. Most sources recommend that prior to insertion, the cap be approximately 1/3 filled with spermicidal cream or jelly. Whether or not a spermicide is used, the woman assumes a semi-reclining or squatting position. Removal of the cap is facilitated by inserting the index and middle fingers into the vagina and tiling the rim of the cap away from the cervix, thus breaking the suction. The cap can then be easily removed via the inserted fingers. The following conditions contraindicate the use of the cervical cap: cervical erosion or laceration; cervical malformation; Nabothian cysts; inflammation of the adnexa or inability of the woman to place and remove the cap correctly. The only reported side effect of the cap is the presence of a malodorous secretion if the cap is left in place

  12. Agonist-promoted desensitization and phosphorylation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors coupled to stimulation of phosphatidylinositol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Cotecchia, S.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    In the DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 hamster vas deferens smooth muscle cell line the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR) agonist norepinephrine (NE) promotes rapid attenuation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) metabolism which is paralleled by rapid phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR. Cells were labeled by incubation with /sup 32/P/sub i/. Coincubation with NE (100 ..mu..M) significantly increases the rate of /sup 32/P-labeling of both PI and phosphatidic acid. Pretreatment of cells with 100 ..mu..M NE (in the presence of 1 ..mu..M propranolol to prevent ..beta..-AR interactions) results in a drastic attenuation of the NE response on PI metabolism. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR from labeled cells can be solubilized and purified by affinity chromatography on Affigel-A55414 and wheat germ agglutinin agarose chromatography. SDS-PAGE of purified ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR shows a NE-promoted increase in phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 80K ligand binding peptide. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation increases from approx. 1 mol phosphate/mol ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR in the basal condition to approx. 2.5 after NE treatment. Both desensitization and phosphorylation are rapid being maximal within 10-20 min of agonist exposure. These results together with previous findings that phorbol esters promote rapid ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR uncoupling and phosphorylation suggest that receptor phosphorylation is an important mechanism of regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR receptor responsiveness.

  13. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  14. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  15. 47 CFR 61.41 - Price cap requirements generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Price cap requirements generally. 61.41 Section... (CONTINUED) TARIFFS General Rules for Dominant Carriers § 61.41 Price cap requirements generally. (a... companies shall not bar a carrier from electing price cap regulation provided the carrier is...

  16. 47 CFR 61.41 - Price cap requirements generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Price cap requirements generally. 61.41 Section... (CONTINUED) TARIFFS General Rules for Dominant Carriers § 61.41 Price cap requirements generally. (a) Sections 61.42 through 61.49 shall apply as follows: (1) (2) To such price cap local exchange carriers...

  17. 47 CFR 61.41 - Price cap requirements generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Price cap requirements generally. 61.41 Section... (CONTINUED) TARIFFS General Rules for Dominant Carriers § 61.41 Price cap requirements generally. (a) Sections 61.42 through 61.49 shall apply as follows: (1) (2) To such price cap local exchange carriers...

  18. 47 CFR 61.41 - Price cap requirements generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Price cap requirements generally. 61.41 Section... (CONTINUED) TARIFFS General Rules for Dominant Carriers § 61.41 Price cap requirements generally. (a) Sections 61.42 through 61.49 shall apply as follows: (1) (2) To such price cap local exchange carriers...

  19. 49 CFR 230.41 - Flexible staybolts with caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flexible staybolts with caps. 230.41 Section 230... Appurtenances Staybolts § 230.41 Flexible staybolts with caps. (a) General. Flexible staybolts with caps shall... breakage, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) Drilled flexible staybolts. For...

  20. 49 CFR 230.41 - Flexible staybolts with caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flexible staybolts with caps. 230.41 Section 230... Appurtenances Staybolts § 230.41 Flexible staybolts with caps. (a) General. Flexible staybolts with caps shall... breakage, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) Drilled flexible staybolts. For...

  1. 49 CFR 230.41 - Flexible staybolts with caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flexible staybolts with caps. 230.41 Section 230... Appurtenances Staybolts § 230.41 Flexible staybolts with caps. (a) General. Flexible staybolts with caps shall... breakage, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) Drilled flexible staybolts. For...

  2. 49 CFR 230.41 - Flexible staybolts with caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flexible staybolts with caps. 230.41 Section 230... Appurtenances Staybolts § 230.41 Flexible staybolts with caps. (a) General. Flexible staybolts with caps shall... breakage, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) Drilled flexible staybolts. For...

  3. 49 CFR 230.41 - Flexible staybolts with caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flexible staybolts with caps. 230.41 Section 230... Appurtenances Staybolts § 230.41 Flexible staybolts with caps. (a) General. Flexible staybolts with caps shall... breakage, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) Drilled flexible staybolts. For...

  4. A CapG gain-of-function mutant reveals critical structural and functional determinants for actin filament severing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Gibson, Bruce G; Hao, Binghua; Sidhu, Gurjit S; Mishra, Vishnu S; Yarmola, Elena G; Bubb, Michael R; Almo, Steven C; Southwick, Frederick S

    2006-01-01

    CapG is the only member of the gelsolin family unable to sever actin filaments. Changing amino acids 84–91 (severing domain) and 124–137 (WH2-containing segment) simultaneously to the sequences of gelsolin results in a mutant, CapG-sev, capable of severing actin filaments. The gain of severing function does not alter actin filament capping, but is accompanied by a higher affinity for monomeric actin, and the capacity to bind and sequester two actin monomers. Analysis of CapG-sev crystal structure suggests a more loosely folded inactive conformation than gelsolin, with a shorter S1–S2 latch. Calcium binding to S1 opens this latch and S1 becomes separated from a closely interfaced S2–S3 complex by an extended arm consisting of amino acids 118–137. Modeling with F-actin predicts that the length of this WH2-containing arm is critical for severing function, and the addition of a single amino acid (alanine or histidine) eliminates CapG-sev severing activity, confirming this prediction. We conclude that efficient severing utilizes two actin monomer-binding sites, and that the length of the WH2-containing segment is a critical functional determinant for severing. PMID:16977317

  5. The phase composition of Triton's polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them.

  6. The phase composition of Triton's polar caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1993-08-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them.

  7. The polar cap environment of outflowing O(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Peterson, W. K.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Persoon, A.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the core (0-50 eV) and 'energetic' (0-1 keV) ions, plasma waves, and auroral images obtained from Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE-1) and those of electrons, obtained from DE-2, are examined in the context of the polar cap environment. Results indicate the presence of two populations: high-speed (10-30 eV, or higher, streaming energies) polar beams and low-speed (generally less than 10-eV streaming energies) streams. The high-speed polar beams show an auroral connection (i.e., they are observed on or near the field lines threading auroral arcs), while the low-speed streams are on or near the field lines threading the dark polar cap and may be converted from the cleft ion fountain. Compared to the high-speed streams, the low-speed streams are significantly more stable with respect to energy and flux.

  8. The Phase Composition of Triton's Polar Caps.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, N S; Brown, R H

    1993-08-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them. PMID:17757213

  9. Polar cap size metrics study at CCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Raeder, J.; Weimer, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Community-Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) tests space physics models covering space from the Sun's corona to the Earth's ionosphere and makes them available for researchers through a run-on-request capability. The polar cap size and location as observed by global auroral imagers is used as a basis model to study the performance of global MHD simulation models and statistical models of the auroral ionosphere. With good confidence one can assume that auroral emissions are located within the closed magnetic field lines in a narrow region adjacent to the boundary of the open field line region of the polar cap. In this study we are using imager data from POLAR (FUV) for several events from 1997 to 2000 for which reasonable coverage is available. Simulation runs have been performed using the global magnetospheric models BATSRUS (T. Gombosi et al., U. Michigan) and OpenGGCM (J. Raeder, U. New Hampshire) as well as the Weimer (2000,2005) field-aligned current models (D. Weimer, Mission Research Corp.) fed with upstream solar wind data from the ACE or Geotail satellites. In addition to direct field line tracings available from the 3D MHD model outputs, we use field-aligned currents from both MHD models and the Weimer-2K model to determine the polar cap boundary by using the position of the maximum absolute FAC value in 16 local time sectors. We define skill scores that measure the agreement in the polar cap sizes and location between measurements and models as an example of implementations of metrics to track model performance and apply the analysis to a number of storm event days.

  10. South Polar Cap Erosion and Aprons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

    While Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images have shown that the north and south polar cap surfaces are very different from each other, one thing that the two have in common is that they both seem to have been eroded. Erosion in the north appears mostly to come in the form of pits from which ice probably sublimed to vapor and was transported away from the polar cap by wind. Erosion in the south takes on a wider range of possible processes that include collapse, slumping and mass-movement on slopes, and probably sublimation. Among the landforms created by these process on the south polar cap are the 'aprons' that surround mesas and buttes of remnant layers such as the two almost triangular features in the lower quarter of this image. The upper slopes of the two triangular features show a stair-stepped pattern that suggest these hills are layered.

    This image shows part of the south polar residual cap near 86.9oS, 78.5oW, and covers an area approximately 1.2 by 1.0 kilometers (0.7 x 0.6 miles) in size. The image has a resolution of 2.2 meters per pixel. The picture was taken on September 11, 1999.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  11. Morphology of Mars North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Fountain, A.; Kargel, J.; Kouvaris, L.; Lewis, K.; MacAyeal, D.; Pfeffer, T.; Saba, J. L.

    2000-08-01

    The northern ice cap of Mars consists of a parabolic dome centered within 13 km of the pole, plus an arm-like ridge extending from the dome between about 135 and 225 east. Chasma Boreale lies between the dome and the extended ridge. The base of the dome is approximately elliptical with a major axis of 1100 km along the 90 east to 270 east direction and minor axis of 700 km along zero east to 180 deg. The heights of the dome and the extended ridge are respectively 2900 inches and 1700 inches above the surrounding basin. Least-squares fitting of a parabola through height profiles of the dome along longitudes 90 deg to 270 deg and zero deg to 180 deg gives an elliptic-paraboloid equation for the dome: Z(m) = 2800 - [(X-x)2/113.6] - [(Y-y)2/50.3], where X is the 90 deg to 270 deg axis, x = 9.90 km, y = 13.32 km, and the slightly-different fitted heights for the two axes are averaged. The center of the dome is shifted 13.32 km from the pole along zero deg longitude and 9.90 km along 90 deg longitude. Typical mean surface slopes on the ice cap are the order of 1/100 (0.6 deg), A small central portion of the cap, about 100 km by 200 km, extends in elevation about 200 inches above the parabolic shape of the cap. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Mars South Polar Cap 'Fingerprint' Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

    Some portions of the martian south polar residual cap have long, somewhat curved troughs instead of circular pits. These appear to form in a layer of material that may be different than that in which 'swiss cheese' circles and pits form, and none of these features has any analog in the north polar cap or elsewhere on Mars. This picture shows the 'fingerprint' terrain as a series of long, narrow depressions considered to have formed by collapse and widening by sublimation of ice. Unlike the north polar cap, the south polar region stays cold enough in summer to retain frozen carbon dioxide. Viking Orbiter observations during the late 1970s showed that very little water vapor comes off the south polar cap during summer, indicating that any frozen water that might be there remains solid throughout the year.

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image was obtained in early southern spring on August 4, 1999. It shows an area 3 x 5 kilometers (1.9 x 3.1 miles) at a resolution of about 7.3 meters (24 ft) per pixel. Located near 86.0oS, 53.9oW.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  13. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my PMID:26666970

  14. Comparison of Detector Technologies for CAPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockum, Jana L.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, several different detectors are examined for use in a Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS), a conceptual study for a possible future space-based system. Each detector will be examined for its future (25 years or more in the future) ability to find and track near-Earth Objects (NEOs) from a space-based detection platform. Within the CAPS study are several teams of people who each focus on different aspects of the system concept. This study s focus is on detection devices. In particular, evaluations on the following devices have been made: charge-coupled devices (CCDs), charge-injected devices (CIDs), superconducting tunneling junctions (STJs), and transition edge sensors (TESs). These devices can be separated into two main categories; the first category includes detectors that are currently being widely utilized, such as CCDs and CIDs. The second category includes experimental detectors, such as STJs and TESs. After the discussion of the detectors themselves, there will be a section devoted to the explicit use of these detectors with CAPS.

  15. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my. PMID:26666970

  16. Protein synthesis in geostimulated root caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A study is presented of the processes occurring in the root cap of corn which are requisite for the formation of root cap inhibitor and which can be triggered or modulated by both light and gravity. The results of this study indicate the importance of protein synthesis for light-induced gravitropic bending in roots. Root caps in which protein synthesis is prevented are unable to induce downward bending. This suggests that light acts by stimulating proteins which are necessary for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response (downward bending). The turnover of protein with time was also examined in order to determine whether light acts by stimulating the synthesis of unique proteins required for downward growth. It is found that auxin in combination with light allows for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response at least in part through the modification of protein synthesis. It is concluded that unique proteins are stimulated by light and are involved in promoting the downward growth in roots which are responding to gravity.

  17. Lobe cell convection and polar cap precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Su, Y.-J.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.-K.; Parks, G. K.; Carlson, C. W.

    2003-05-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite in 55 dawn-dusk passes are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 34 events of UV image coverage suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation in ˜62% of these cases. However, in some cases where the field signatures are suggestive of lobe cell convection, there is no detectable particle precipitation either in Polar UVI or the FAST data sets. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2000-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ˜59% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of lobe cell events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes during these events.

  18. Lobe Cell Convection and Polar cap Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Su, Y.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.; Parks, G.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-12-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 55 events suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2100-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ~54% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the Tsyganenko [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes.

  19. The nonuniform recession of the south polar cap of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Goguen, J.

    1973-01-01

    The nature of the irregular springtime recession of the Martian polar caps is investigated, with particular reference to the southern polar cap. Our current knowledge about the composition of the caps is outlined, and the historical record of their springtime recession is reviewed. An attempt is made to correlate the irregularities of the recession pattern of the southern polar cap with the features of the terrain revealed by Mariner 9 photography at a time when the southern cap was at its minimum extent. The results are interpreted in terms of the physical and meteorological processes active in the polar regions.

  20. Studies on the chemical synthesis and characterization of lead oxide nanoparticles with different organic capping agents

    SciTech Connect

    Arulmozhi, K. T.; Mythili, N.

    2013-12-15

    Lead oxide (PbO) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using Lead (II) acetate as precursor. The effects of organic capping agents such as Oleic acid, Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) and Cetryl Tri Methyl Butoxide (CTAB) on the size and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Photoluminescence (PL) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to analyse the prepared nanoparticles for their physical, structural and optical properties. The characterization studies reveal that the synthesized PbO nanoparticles had well defined crystalline structure and sizes in the range of 25 nm to 36 nm for capping agents used and 40 nm for pure PbO nanoparticles.

  1. Catalytic pyrolysis of wheat bran for hydrocarbons production in the presence of zeolites and noble-metals by using TGA-FTIR method.

    PubMed

    Lazdovica, K; Liepina, L; Kampars, V

    2016-05-01

    Pyrolysis of wheat bran with or without catalysts was investigated using TGA-FTIR method in order to determine the influence of zeolite and noble metal catalysts on the evolution profile and relative yield of the volatile compounds. The addition of all catalysts decreased the volatile matter of wheat bran from 76.3% to 75.9%, 73.9%, 73.5%, 69.7% and increased the solid residue from 18.0% to 18.4%, 20.4%, 20.8%, 24.6% under the catalyst of ZSM-5, 5% Pd/C, MCM-41, and 5% Pt/C. Noble-metal catalysts had higher activity for deoxygenation of compounds containing carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups than zeolites. Degradation of nitrogen containing compounds atom proceeded better in presence of zeolites. Noble-metal catalysts promoted formation of aromatics and changed the profiles of evolved compounds whereas zeolites advanced formation of aliphatics and olefins. PMID:26874441

  2. Purification, characterization, and immunofluorescence localization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capping protein.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, J F; Cooper, J A

    1992-06-01

    Capping protein binds the barbed ends of actin filaments and nucleates actin filament assembly in vitro. We purified capping protein from Saccharomyces cervisiae. One of the two subunits is the product of the CAP2 gene, which we previously identified as the gene encoding the beta subunit of capping protein based on its sequence similarity to capping protein beta subunits in chicken and Dictyostelium (Amatruda, J. F., J. F. Cannon, K. Tatchell, C. Hug, and J. A. Cooper. 1990. Nature (Lond.) 344:352-354). Yeast capping protein has activity in critical concentration and low-shear viscometry assays consistent with barbed-end capping activity. Like chicken capping protein, yeast capping protein is inhibited by PIP2. By immunofluorescence microscopy yeast capping protein colocalizes with cortical actin spots at the site of bud emergence and at the tips of growing buds and shmoos. In contrast, capping protein does not colocalize with actin cables or with actin rings at the site of cytokinesis. PMID:1315784

  3. Cap buckling as a potential mechanism of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Abdelali, Maria; Reiter, Steven; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Michel; L'Allier, Philippe L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Plaque rupture in atherosclerosis is the primary cause of potentially deadly coronary events, yet about 40% of ruptures occur away from the plaque cap shoulders and cannot be fully explained with the current biomechanical theories. Here, cap buckling is considered as a potential destabilizing factor which increases the propensity of the atherosclerotic plaque to rupture and which may also explain plaque failure away from the cap shoulders. To investigate this phenomenon, quasistatic 2D finite element simulations are performed, considering the salient geometrical and nonlinear material properties of diverse atherosclerotic plaques over the range of physiological loads. The numerical results indicate that buckling may displace the location of the peak von Mises stresses in the deflected caps. Plaque buckling, together with its deleterious effects is further observed experimentally in plaque caps using a physical model of deformable mock coronary arteries with fibroatheroma. Moreover, an analytical approach combining quasistatic equilibrium equations with the Navier-Bresse formulas is used to demonstrate the buckling potential of a simplified arched slender cap under intraluminal pressure and supported by foundations. This analysis shows that plaque caps - calcified, fibrotic or cellular - may buckle in specific undulated shapes once submitted to critical loads. Finally, a preliminary analysis of intravascular ultrasonography recordings of patients with atherosclerotic coronary arteries corroborates the numerical, experimental and theoretical findings and shows that various plaque caps buckle in vivo. By displacing the sites of high stresses in the plaque cap, buckling may explain the atherosclerotic plaque cap rupture at various locations, including cap shoulders. PMID:24491969

  4. What Lies Below a Martian Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger annotated version

    This image (top) taken by the Shallow Radar instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals the layers of ice, sand and dust that make up the north polar ice cap on Mars. It is the most detailed look to date at the insides of this ice cap. The colored map below the radar picture shows the topography of the corresponding Martian terrain (red and white represent higher ground, and green and yellow lower).

    The radar image reveals four never-before-seen thick layers of ice and dust separated by layers of nearly pure ice. According to scientists, these thick ice-free layers represent approximately one-million-year-long cycles of climate change on Mars caused by variations in the planet's tilted axis and its eccentric orbit around the sun. Adding up the entire stack of ice gives an estimated age for the north polar ice cap of about 4 million years a finding that agrees with previous theoretical estimates. The ice cap is about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) thick.

    The radar picture also shows that the boundary between the ice layers and the surface of Mars underneath is relatively flat (bottom white line on the right). This implies that the surface of Mars is not sagging, or bending, under the weight of the ice cap and this, in turn, suggests that the planet's lithosphere, a combination of the crust and the strong parts of the upper mantle, is thicker than previously thought.

    A thicker lithosphere on Mars means that temperatures increase more gradually with depth toward the interior. Temperatures warm enough for water to be liquid are therefore deeper than previously thought. Likewise, if liquid water does exist in aquifers below the surface of Mars, and if there are any organisms living in that water, they would have to be located deeper in the planet.

    The topography data are from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter, which was flown on NASA's Mars Global

  5. Pore Water PAH Transport in Amended Sediment Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidley, P. T.; Kwon, S.; Ghosh, U.

    2009-05-01

    Capping is a common remediation strategy for contaminated sediments that creates a physical barrier between contaminated sediments and the water column. Diffusive flux of contaminants through a sediment cap is small. However, under certain hydrodynamic conditions such as groundwater potential and tidal pumping, groundwater advection can accelerate contaminant transport. Hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be transported through the cap under advective conditions. To better understand PAH migration under these conditions, physical models of sediment caps were evaluated in the laboratory through direct measurement of pore water using solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Contaminated sediment and capping material was obtained from an existing Superfund site that was capped at Eagle Harbor, Washington. A PAH dissolution model linked to an advection-dispersion equation with retardation using published organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) was compared to measured PAHs in the sediment and cap porewater of the physical model.

  6. Characterization of citrate capped gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rajat; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and several other bioflavonoids possess antioxidant property. These biomolecules can reduce the diabetic complications, but metabolize very easily in the body. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a flavonoid may further increase its efficacy. Gold nanoparticle is used by different groups as vehicle for drug delivery, as it is least toxic to human body. Prior to search for the enhanced efficacy, the gold nanoparticle-flavonoid complex should be prepared and well characterized. In this article, we report the interaction of gold nanoparticle with quercetin. The interaction is confirmed by different biophysical techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and cross checked by quantum chemical calculations. These studies indicate that gold clusters are covered by citrate groups, which are hydrogen bonded to the quercetin molecules in the complex. We have also provided evidences how capping is important in stabilizing the gold nanoparticle and further enhances its interaction with other molecules, such as drugs. Our finding also suggests that gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex can pass through the membranes of human red blood cells.

  7. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  8. Effect of anticoagulants on binding and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide by the peptide immunoglobulin conjugate CAP18(106-138)-immunoglobulin G in whole blood.

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, M; Fletcher, M F; Kloczewiak, M; Loiselle, P M; Zanzot, E M; Vermeulen, M W; Warren, H S

    1997-01-01

    The 18-kDa cationic protein CAP18 is an antimicrobial protein isolated from rabbit granulocytes that binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibits many of its biological activities. We covalently coupled a synthetic peptide representing amino acids 106 to 138 of CAP18 to human immunoglobulin G (IgG) by using the heterobifunctional linker N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyidithio)propionate. The ability of CAP18(106-138)-IgG to bind and neutralize LPS in whole blood in the presence and absence of anticoagulants was studied. Both CAP18(106-138) and CAP18(106-138)-IgG significantly suppressed LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production in whole blood in the absence of anticoagulants. EDTA potentiated the ability of CAP18(106-138) and CAP18(106-138)-IgG to decrease LPS-induced TNF production in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, heparin inhibited the ability of CAP18(106-138) and CAP18(106-138)-IgG to suppress LPS-induced TNF production. EDTA also enhanced LPS capture in a fluid-phase binding assay that utilizes magnetic anti-IgG beads to capture CAP18(106-138)-IgG (and bound [3H]LPS) in whole blood. In contrast, heparin inhibited the binding dose dependently. We conclude that CAP18(106-138)-IgG binds to and neutralizes LPS in whole blood in the absence of anticoagulants. Further studies of its protective efficacy in animal models are warranted. Caution should be used in interpreting assays that measure the binding and neutralization of LPS in whole blood in the presence of calcium-binding anticoagulants or heparin. PMID:9169746

  9. Martian Polar Caps: Folding, Faulting, Flowing Glaciers of Multiple Interbedded Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    liquid-soluble salts, water ice containing traces of solid-soluble acids, CO2 ice. This is also nearly the same sequence of highest to lowest melting/dissociation points, but it is different than the sequence of volatility. This geologic-structural interpretation and specific chemical models are amenable to testing by computational means and point the way toward future needed observations, including complete high-resolution imaging of the polar caps, measurement of flow fields (possibly by laser interferometry), mapping of subsurface structures (by radar and/or seismic methods), and determination of composition (by penetrators, drillers, or borers). New lab data are needed on the physical properties of candidate ices.

  10. A reaction path study of the catalysis and inhibition of the Bacillus anthracis CapD γ-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Khavrutskii, Ilja V; Legler, Patricia M; Friedlander, Arthur M; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-11-11

    The CapD enzyme of Bacillus anthracis is a γ-glutamyl transpeptidase from the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily that covalently anchors the poly-γ-D-glutamic acid (pDGA) capsule to the peptidoglycan. The capsule hinders phagocytosis of B. anthracis by host cells and is essential for virulence. The role CapD plays in capsule anchoring and remodeling makes the enzyme a promising target for anthrax medical countermeasures. Although the structure of CapD is known, and a covalent inhibitor, capsidin, has been identified, the mechanisms of CapD catalysis and inhibition are poorly understood. Here, we used a computational approach to map out the reaction steps involved in CapD catalysis and inhibition. We found that the rate-limiting step of either CapD catalysis or inhibition was a concerted asynchronous formation of the tetrahedral intermediate with a barrier of 22-23 kcal/mol. However, the mechanisms of these reactions differed for the two amides. The formation of the tetrahedral intermediate with pDGA was substrate-assisted with two proton transfers. In contrast, capsidin formed the tetrahedral intermediate in a conventional way with one proton transfer. Interestingly, capsidin coupled a conformational change in the catalytic residue of the tetrahedral intermediate to stretching of the scissile amide bond. Furthermore, capsidin took advantage of iminol-amide tautomerism of its diacetamide moiety to convert the tetrahedral intermediate to the acetylated CapD. As evidence of the promiscuous nature of CapD, the enzyme cleaved the amide bond of capsidin by attacking it on the opposite side compared to pDGA. PMID:25334088

  11. In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part II-evaluation of sorption materials

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Paul M.; Yates, Brian J.; Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona; Fimmen, Ryan

    2013-08-15

    The function and longevity of traditional, passive, isolation caps can be augmented through the use of more chemically active capping materials which have higher sorptive capacities, ideally rendering metals non-bioavailable. In the case of Hg, active caps also mitigate the rate and extent of methylation. This research examined low cost, readily available, capping materials for their ability to sequester Hg and MeHg. Furthermore, selected capping materials were evaluated to inhibit the methylation of Hg in an incubation study as well as the capacity of a selected capping material to inhibit translocation of Hg and MeHg with respect to ebullition-facilitated contaminant transport in a column study. Results indicated that bauxite had a better capacity for mercury sorption than the other test materials. However, bauxite as well as soil capping materials did not decrease methylation to a significant extent. Materials with larger surface areas, higher organic matter and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) content displayed a larger partitioning coefficient. In the incubation experiments, the presence of a carbon source (lactate), electron acceptor (sulfate) and the appropriate strains of SRB provided the necessary conditions for Hg methylation to occur. The column study showed effectiveness in sequestering Hg and MeHg and retarding transport to the overlying water column; however, disturbances to the soil capping material resulting from gas ebullition negated its effectiveness.

  12. Esterase- and pH-responsive poly(β-amino ester)-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Isurika R; Ferris, Daniel P; Frasconi, Marco; Malin, Dmitry; Strekalova, Elena; Yilmaz, M Deniz; Ambrogio, Michael W; Algaradah, Mohammed M; Hong, Michael P; Chen, Xinqi; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Cryns, Vincent L; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-04-28

    Gating of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with the stimuli-responsive poly(β-amino ester) has been achieved. This hybrid nanocarrier releases doxorubicin (DOX) under acidic conditions or in the presence of porcine liver esterase. The DOX loaded poly(β-amino ester)-capped MSNs reduce cell viability when tested on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. PMID:25820516

  13. Pyrocatechol as a surface capping molecule on rutile TiO 2 (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syres, K. L.; Thomas, A. G.; Cant, D. J. H.; Hardman, S. J. O.; Preobrajenski, A.

    2012-02-01

    A 'cap and dip' method of adsorbing ruthenium di-2,2‧-bipyridyl-4,4‧-dicarboxylic acid diisocyanate (N3 dye) on a rutile TiO2 (110) surface was investigated using pyrocatechol as a capping molecule. This method involves cleaning the rutile surface in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), depositing pyrocatechol onto the surface to 'cap' the adsorption sites, removing from vacuum, 'dipping' in an N3 dye solution and returning to vacuum. Photoemission measurements following the return of the crystal to vacuum suggest that the pyrocatechol keeps the surface free from contamination on exposure to atmosphere. Photoemission spectra also indicate that the pyrocatechol capping molecules are replaced by the N3 dye in solution and that the N3 dye is adsorbed intact on the rutile TiO2 (110) surface. This technique may allow other large molecules, which are thermally unstable to evaporation in UHV, to be easily deposited onto TiO2 surfaces.

  14. Sequestration by IFIT1 Impairs Translation of 2′O-unmethylated Capped RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Livia; Benda, Christian; Holze, Cathleen; Eberl, Christian H.; Mann, Angelika; Kindler, Eveline; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ziebuhr, John; Thiel, Volker; Pichlmair, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Viruses that generate capped RNA lacking 2′O methylation on the first ribose are severely affected by the antiviral activity of Type I interferons. We used proteome-wide affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry to identify human and mouse proteins specifically binding to capped RNA with different methylation states. This analysis, complemented with functional validation experiments, revealed that IFIT1 is the sole interferon-induced protein displaying higher affinity for unmethylated than for methylated capped RNA. IFIT1 tethers a species-specific protein complex consisting of other IFITs to RNA. Pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry as well as in vitro competition assays indicate that IFIT1 sequesters 2′O-unmethylated capped RNA and thereby impairs binding of eukaryotic translation initiation factors to 2′O-unmethylated RNA template, which results in inhibition of translation. The specificity of IFIT1 for 2′O-unmethylated RNA serves as potent antiviral mechanism against viruses lacking 2′O-methyltransferase activity and at the same time allows unperturbed progression of the antiviral program in infected cells. PMID:24098121

  15. IAA transport in corn roots includes the root cap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenstein, K.H. )

    1989-04-01

    In earlier reports we concluded that auxin is the growth regulator that controls gravicurvature in roots and that the redistribution of auxin occurs within the root cap. Since other reports did not detect auxin in the root cap, we attempted to confirm the IAA does move through the cap. Agar blocks containing {sup 3}H-IAA were applied to the cut surface of 5 mm long apical segments of primary roots of corn (mo17xB73). After 30 to 120 min radioactivity (RA) of the cap and root tissue was determined. While segments suspended in water-saturated air accumulated very little RA in the cap, application of 0.5 {mu}1 of dist. water to the cap (=controls) increased RA of the cap dramatically. Application to the cap of 0.5 {mu}1 of sorbitol or the Ca{sup 2+} chelator EGTA reduced cap RA to 46% and 70% respectively compared to water, without affecting uptake. Control root segments gravireacted faster than non-treated or osmoticum or EGTA treated segments. The data indicate that both the degree of hydration and calcium control the amount of auxin moving through the cap.

  16. cap alpha. -2 adrenergic receptor: a radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Unnerstall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    ..cap alpha..-2 adrenergic agents have been shown to influence blood pressure, heart rate and other physiological and behavioral functions through interactions with adrenergic pathways within the central nervous system. Pharmacologically relevant ..cap alpha..-1 adrenergic receptors were biochemically characterized and radiohistochemically analyzed in intact tissue sections of the rat and human central nervous system. The anatomical distribution of the ..cap alpha..-2 receptors, labeled with the agonist (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine, verified the concept that ..cap alpha..-2 receptors are closely associated with adrenergic nerve terminals and that ..cap alpha..-2 agents can influence autonomic and endocrine function through an action in the central nervous system. Since ..cap alpha..-2 agonists can influence sympathetic outflow, ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites were closely analyzed in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracic spinal cord. The transport of putative presynaptic ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites in the rat sciatic nerve was analyzed by light microscopic radiohistochemical techniques. Finally, in intact tissue section of the rat central nervous system, the biochemical characteristics of (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine binding were analyzed. Data were also shown which indicates that the synthetic ..cap alpha..-2 antagonist (/sup 3/H)RX781094 also binds to ..cap alpha..-2 receptors with high-affinity. Further, the distribution of (/sup 3/H)RX781094 binding sites in the rat central nervous system was identical to the distribution seen when using (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine.

  17. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of a diphtheria toxin A-chain gene. Transgenic toxin-expressing plants are viable and have normal aerial parts but agravitropic roots, implying loss of root cap function. Several cell layers are missing from the transgenic root caps, and the remaining cells are abnormal. Although the radial organization of the roots is normal in toxin-expressing plants, the root tips have fewer cytoplasmically dense cells than do wild-type root tips, suggesting that root meristematic activity is lower in transgenic than in wild-type plants. The roots of transgenic plants have more lateral roots and these are, in turn, more highly branched than those of wild-type plants. Thus, root cap ablation alters root architecture both by inhibiting root meristematic activity and by stimulating lateral root initiation. These observations imply that the root caps contain essential components of the signaling system that determines root architecture.

  18. Evaluation of alternative capping layers for EUVL mask ML blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei-yang; Spiller, Eberhard; Gullikson, Eric; Hill, Shannon

    2005-11-01

    The standard silicon (Si) capping layer used for extreme ultra-violet lithography (EUVL) multilayer (ML) mask blanks has some shortcomings, such as low oxidation resistance, low chemical resistance, low etch selectivity in either the SiO2 buffer layer etch to the capping layer or the absorber etch (e.g., TaN) to the capping layer. These performance and process issues with Si capped ML mask blank will reduce the mask lifetime and require tighter process control during EUVL mask fabrication. Alternative capping materials have been investigated for both EUVL optics and for mask applications.1-5 It has been initially demonstrated that Ru capping layers have high oxidation resistance and high mask process margin as compared to Si ML cap. In this paper, we will present a detailed evaluation of Ru and ion beam deposited (IBD) diamond-like-carbon (DLC) for EUVL mask application. Performance evaluations of the DLC mask blank capping layer and Ru capping layer were made in the area of reflectivity performance, shelf-life, and EUV exposure stability. It has been shown that EUV exposure induced capping layer change depends upon the exposure conditions. However, we found that as long as the induced relative change in the ML cap material are the same (e.g., the same amount of oxidation), regardless of exposure time and exposure conditions, the resulting reflectivity change is about the same. In the case of the two capping layer materials we evaluated, the capping surface reaction with active oxygen is the primary cause for the reflectivity degradation.

  19. High-Resolution South Polar Cap Mosaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The layered terrains of the polar regions of Mars are among the most exotic planetary landscapes in our Solar System. The layers exposed in the south polar residual cap, vividly shown in the top view, are thought to contain detailed records of Mars' climate history over the last 100 million years or so. The materials that comprise the south polar layers may include frozen carbon dioxide, water ice, and fine dust. The bottom picture shows complex erosional patterns that have developed on the south polar cap, perhaps by a combination of sublimation, wind erosion, and ground-collapse. Because the south polar terrains are so strange and new to human eyes, no one (yet) has entirely adequate explanations as to what is being seen.

    These images were acquired by the Mars Orbiter Camera aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during the southern spring season in October 1999. Each of these two pictures is a mosaic of many individual MOC images acquired at about 12 m/pixel scale that completely cover the highest latitude (87oS) visible to MOC on each orbital pass over the polar region. Both mosaics cover areas of about 10 x 4 kilometers (6.2 x 2.5 miles) near 87oS, 10oW in the central region of the permanent--or residual--south polar cap. They show features at the scale of a small house. Sunlight illuminates each scene from the left.'Gaps' at the upper and lower right of the second mosaic, above, are areas that were not covered by MOC in October 1999.

  20. More About V-CAP Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1994-01-01

    V-CAP polyimides are processible matrix resins extending continuous-use temperature of composite materials. Under contract to NASA, General Electric used VCAP to fabricate and successfully test hot section of forward exhaust fairing on their F110 engine. Also used in other components of jet engines and airframes, including vanes, fan frames, cowls, and wing panels. Nonaerospace applications include brake linings, bearings, grinding wheels and slip seals, commutators in electric motors, and parts of motors in refrigerator compressors. Future applications include printed-circuit boards and components of nacelles in jet engines.

  1. Eotaxin and Capping Protein in Experimental Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianmin; Akyürek, Levent M.; Fellström, Bengt; Häyry, Pekka; Paul, Leendert C.

    1998-01-01

    Ischemia-induced tissue activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of graft vasculopathy, but the mediators implicated have only partially been characterized. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms involved, syngeneic rat aortic transplants with cold-storage-induced vasculopathy were studied for differentially expressed mRNA transcripts. Vessel segments were exposed to either 1 or 18 hours of cold ischemia, followed by transplantation into syngeneic recipients. After 3 days or 4 weeks, the grafts were removed and total mRNA was isolated and used for differential display to identify modulation of transcript expression related to prolonged storage. Using 15 sets of random primers, 17 polymerase chain reaction products were up-regulated and 2 were down-regulated in grafts exposed to 18 hours of ischemia. Sequencing of these amplicons showed that 6 had a high degree of homology to known sequences whereas 13 had no homology to any of the genes in the database. Two of the differentially displayed amplicons (capping protein and eotaxin) were cloned, re-amplified, and used as probes for Northern blot analysis to confirm their differential expression. Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against capping protein-α and eotaxin confirmed that both proteins are expressed in the media of normal aortas and that there was an increased expression in vessels exposed to prolonged ischemia albeit that the increase at the protein level seemed less compared with changes in transcript expression. Northern blots with RNA from aortic allografts exposed to prolonged ischemic storage also showed increased levels of capping protein and eotaxin mRNA whereas there was a decrease in the relative amount of these transcripts in vessels exposed to balloon denudation, suggesting that the increase after prolonged ischemic exposure is not the result of a nonspecific response to injury. Based on the biological characteristics of capping protein and eotaxin it is

  2. Bactericidal effect of polyethyleneimine capped ZnO nanoparticles on multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria harboring genes of high-pathogenicity island.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Sarwar, Shamila; Singh, Prashantee; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP) were synthesized by alcoholic route using zinc acetate as the precursor material and lithium hydroxide as hydrolyzing agent. Further ZnO-PEI NP (derivative of ZnO-NP) was made in aqueous medium using the capping agent polyethyleneimine (PEI). The nanoparticles were characterized by XRD measurements, TEM and other techniques; the weight % of coating shell in the polymer-capped particles was determined by TGA. ZnO-PEI NP is more soluble in water than the uncapped ZnO-NP, and forms a colloidal suspension in water. PEI-capped ZnO-NP exhibited better antibacterial activity when compared with that of uncapped ZnO-NP against a range of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) Gram-negative bacterial strains harboring genes of high-pathogenicity island. ZnO-NP effectively killed these microorganisms by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and damaging bacterial membrane. ZnO-PEI NP at LD50 dose in combination with tetracycline showed synergistic effect to inhibit tetracycline-resistant Escherichia coli MREC33 growth by 80%. These results open up a new vista in therapeutics to use antibiotics (which have otherwise been rendered useless against MAR bacteria) in combination with minimized dosage of nanoparticles for the more effective control of MAR pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24937133

  3. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenides (ZnS, CdS, and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji -Won

    2015-07-24

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. Furthermore, the capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  4. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenide (ZnS, CdS and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gug Jang, Gyoung; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Meyer, Harry M., III; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won

    2015-08-01

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. The capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of coronavirus RNA capping and methylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2016-02-01

    The 5'-cap structures of eukaryotic mRNAs are important for RNA stability, pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA export, and protein translation. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms for generating their own cap structures with methylation at the N7 position of the capped guanine and the ribose 2'-Oposition of the first nucleotide, which help viral RNAs escape recognition by the host innate immune system. The RNA genomes of coronavirus were identified to have 5'-caps in the early 1980s. However, for decades the RNA capping mechanisms of coronaviruses remained unknown. Since 2003, the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus has drawn increased attention and stimulated numerous studies on the molecular virology of coronaviruses. Here, we review the current understanding of the mechanisms adopted by coronaviruses to produce the 5'-cap structure and methylation modification of viral genomic RNAs. PMID:26847650

  6. CAP binding to B and Z forms of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, M G; Wu, H M; Crothers, D M

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the interaction between the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CAP) and a small DNA fragment containing its specific recognition sequence by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding of CAP to this fragment induces a B to "C-like" change in the CD spectrum, which is different from that observed for non-specific binding. A one-to-one (CAP dimer to DNA) binding stoichiometry was deduced from spectroscopic titration data, as was a non-specific binding site size of 17 bp/dimer. In addition, we have compared the non-specific binding affinity of CAP for the B and Z forms of synthetic DNA copolymers. A slight preference for the B form was found. These results do not support the recent specific suggestion that CAP binds to a left-handed form of DNA (1), but indicate more generally that an optically detectable conformational change takes place in DNA on binding CAP. Images PMID:6344018

  7. Incorporating Wind Generation in Cap and Trade Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, J.; Salerno, E.; Bird, L.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2006-07-01

    Cap and trade programs are increasingly being used to reduce emissions from electricity generation in the United States. Cap and trade programs primarily target emitting generators, but programs have also included renewable generators, such as wind generators. States cite several reasons why they have considered the policy option of including renewable generators in cap and trade programs: to provide an incentive for lower-emitting generation, to achieve emissions reductions in non-capped pollutants, and to gain local economic benefits associated with renewable energy projects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also notes these rationales for considering this policy alternative, and the National Association of Regulatory Commissioners (NARUC) passed a resolution supporting the inclusion of renewable energy in cap and trade programs. This report explores why states consider this policy option, what participation could mean for wind generators, and how wind generation can most effectively be included in state, federal, and regional cap and trade programs.

  8. Casimir Effect in Hemisphere Capped Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the vacuum densities for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling in background of a (2 + 1)-dimensional spacetime corresponding to a cylindrical tube with a hemispherical cap. A complete set of mode functions is constructed and the positive-frequency Wightman function is evaluated for both the cylindrical and hemispherical subspaces. On the base of this, the vacuum expectation values of the field squared and energy-momentum tensor are investigated. The mean field squared and the normal stress are finite on the boundary separating two subspaces, whereas the energy density and the parallel stress diverge as the inverse power of the distance from the boundary. For a conformally coupled field, the vacuum energy density is negative on the cylindrical part of the space. On the hemisphere, it is negative near the top and positive close to the boundary. In the case of minimal coupling the energy density on the cup is negative. On the tube it is positive near the boundary and negative at large distances. Though the geometries of the subspaces are different, the Casimir pressures on the separate sides of the boundary are equal and the net Casimir force vanishes. The results obtained may be applied to capped carbon nanotubes described by an effective field theory in the long-wavelength approximation.

  9. Variability of electrode positions using electrode caps.

    PubMed

    Atcherson, Samuel R; Gould, Herbert Jay; Pousson, Monique A; Prout, Tina M

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the variability of electrode positions for a multi-channel, custom electrode cap placed onto participants' heads without taking scalp measurements. The electrode positions were digitized in a three-dimensional space for 10 young adult participants on three separate occasions. Positional variability was determined for 15 selected electrodes within the three-dimensional preauricular-nasion (PAN) coordinate system and from this system, angular coordinate variability was also determined. The standard deviations of the 15 selected electrodes ranged from 3.0 to 12.7 mm in the PAN system. These data resulted in a variability of 2.0 degrees to 10.4 degrees among the angular coordinates. The measurements indicated slightly greater variability of electrode positions compared to studies when electrodes were placed using scalp measurements. The implication of this study is that the use of electrode caps may not be appropriate when electroencephalographic (EEG) or evoked potential (EP) techniques depend on accurate electrode placement. Additionally, if a longitudinal study is performed, electrode locations should be checked to ensure that they conform with previous sessions. PMID:17929157

  10. Cap-Independent Translational Control of Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Beth; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Translational regulation has been shown to play an important role in cancer and tumor progression. Despite this fact, the role of translational control in cancer is an understudied and under appreciated field, most likely due to the technological hurdles and paucity of methods available to establish that changes in protein levels are due to translational regulation. Tumors are subjected to many adverse stress conditions such as hypoxia or starvation. Under stress conditions, translation is globally downregulated through several different pathways in order to conserve energy and nutrients. Many of the proteins that are synthesized during stress in order to cope with the stress use a non-canonical or cap-independent mechanism of initiation. Tumor cells have utilized these alternative mechanisms of translation initiation to promote survival during tumor progression. This review will specifically discuss the role of cap-independent translation initiation, which relies on an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to recruit the ribosomal subunits internally to the messenger RNA. We will provide an overview of the role of IRES-mediated translation in cancer by discussing the types of genes that use IRESs and the conditions under which these mechanisms of initiation are used. We will specifically focus on three well-studied examples: Apaf-1, p53, and c-Jun, where IRES-mediated translation has been demonstrated to play an important role in tumorigenesis or tumor progression. PMID:27252909

  11. MFTF-. cap alpha. + T progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.D.

    1985-04-01

    Early in FY 1983, several upgrades of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) were proposed to the fusion community. The one most favorably received was designated MFTF-..cap alpha..+T. The engineering design of this device, guided by LLNL, has been a principal activity of the Fusion Engineering Design Center during FY 1983. This interim progress report represents a snapshot of the device design, which was begun in FY 1983 and will continue for several years. The report is organized as a complete design description. Because it is an interim report, some parts are incomplete; they will be supplied as the design study proceeds. As described in this report, MFTF-..cap alpha..+T uses existing facilities, many MFTF-B components, and a number of innovations to improve on the physics parameters of MFTF-B. It burns deuterium-tritium and has a central-cell Q of 2, a wall loading GAMMA/sub n/ of 2 MW/m/sup 2/ (with a central-cell insert module), and an availability of 10%. The machine is fully shielded, allows hands-on maintenance of components outside the vacuum vessel 24 h after shutdown, and has provisions for repair of all operating components.

  12. Acoustic Monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction The monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap is important economically, tactically, and strategically. In the scenario of ice cap retreat, new paths of commerce open, e.g. waterways from Northern Europe to the Far East. Where ship-going commerce is conducted, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard have always stood guard and been prepared to assist from acts of nature and of man. It is imperative that in addition to measuring the ice from satellites, e.g. Icesat, that we have an ability to measure the ice extent, its thickness, and roughness. These parameters play an important part in the modeling of the ice and the processes that control its growth or shrinking and its thickness. The proposed system consists of three subsystems. The first subsystem is an acoustic source, the second is an array of geophones and the third is a system to supply energy and transmit the results back to the analysis laboratory. The subsystems are described below. We conclude with a plan on how to tackle this project and the payoff to the ice cap modeler and hence the users, i.e. commerce and defense. System Two historically tested methods to generate a large amplitude multi-frequency sound source include explosives and air guns. A new method developed and tested by the University of Texas, ARL is a combustive Sound Source [Wilson, et al., 1995]. The combustive sound source is a submerged combustion chamber that is filled with the byproducts of the electrolysis of sea water, i.e. Hydrogen and Oxygen, an explosive mixture which is ignited via a spark. Thus, no additional compressors, gases, or explosives need to be transported to the Arctic to generate an acoustic pulse capable of the sediment and the ice. The second subsystem would be geophones capable of listening in the O(10 Hz) range and transmitting that data back to the laboratory. Thus two single arrays of geophones arranged orthogonal to each other with a range of 1000's of kilometers and a combustive sound source where the two

  13. Preform spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Jamie T.; Driver, Howard D.; van Breugel, Sjef; Jenkins, Thomas B.; Bakhuis, Jan Willem; Billen, Andrew J.; Riahi, Amir

    2011-07-12

    A spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade. The spar cap may include multiple preform components. The multiple preform components may be planar sheets having a swept shape with a first end and a second end. The multiple preform components may be joined by mating the first end of a first preform component to the second end of a next preform component, forming the spar cap.

  14. Microfine toe caps: an innovative and cost-saving solution.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Rebecca; Wigg, Jane

    2015-04-01

    This article discusses the use of Microfine toe caps (Haddenham, UK) for the treatment of digit swelling. It will discuss the indications and contraindications of the device and offers some case studies where toe caps have been used in clinical practice. The use of the Microfine toe cap offers an alternative to toe bandaging, has many different applications and can be safe and time-saving to apply when used appropriately following a full and holistic assessment. PMID:25950395

  15. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  16. Gravistimulation-induced changes in current patterns around root caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the electric current patterns around the root cap of corn following gravistimulation were determined using a vibrating probe. A transient increase in upward current in the cap was found following stimulation. The response began with a time lag similar to the presentation time, and was limited to the area of the root cap lateral to the statocytes. A physiological response as rapid as that reported by Behrens et al. (1985) was not observed.

  17. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles modified by salicylic acid and arginine: Structure, surface properties and photocatalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Youzhi; Wei, Bing; Guo, Jiaxin; Jiao, Weizhou; Zhang, Zhaohan; Zhang, Qiaoling

    2016-02-01

    In this study, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were surface-modified with salicylic acid (SA) and arginine (Arg) using an environmentally friendly and convenient method, and the bonding structure, surface properties and degradation efficiency of p-nitrophenol (PNP) were investigated. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), water contact angle (WCA) measurements, ζ-potentiometric analysis, UV/visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed to evaluate the modification effect. The degradation rates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that bidentate or bridging bonds are most likely formed between SA/Arg and TiO2 surface. Surface modification with SA, Arg, or both can improve the lipophilic properties and decrease the zeta potential, and also result in a red shift of the absorption wavelength. TiO2 nanoparticles modified by Arg or both SA and Arg show a large specific surface area and pore volume. Further, degradation experiments under visible light show that Arg modification is most efficient. This simple and versatile synthetic method to produce TiO2 nanoparticles surface-modified with various organic capping agents can be used for novel multifunctional photocatalysts as required for various applications in energy saving and environmental protection.

  18. The size of the EB cap determines instantaneous microtubule stability

    PubMed Central

    Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I; Holmes, David; Surrey, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The function of microtubules relies on their ability to switch between phases of growth and shrinkage. A nucleotide-dependent stabilising cap at microtubule ends is thought to be lost before this switch can occur; however, the nature and size of this protective cap are unknown. Using a microfluidics-assisted multi-colour TIRF microscopy assay with close-to-nm and sub-second precision, we measured the sizes of the stabilizing cap of individual microtubules. We find that the protective caps are formed by the extended binding regions of EB proteins. Cap lengths vary considerably and longer caps are more stable. Nevertheless, the trigger of instability lies in a short region at the end of the cap, as a quantitative model of cap stability demonstrates. Our study establishes the spatial and kinetic characteristics of the protective cap and provides an insight into the molecular mechanism by which its loss leads to the switch from microtubule growth to shrinkage. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13470.001 PMID:27050486

  19. Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Adsorption properties of. cap alpha. -modification of boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilova, T.B.; Kiselev, A.V.; Parshina, I.V.; Roshchina, T.M.

    1986-11-01

    The adsorption properties of four samples of ..cap alpha..-BN were studied by means of gas chromatography. The particles of ..cap alpha..-BN particles, according to data obtained by electron microscopy, have the shape of thin platelets. A sample of ..cap alpha..-BN prepared from magnesium polyboride was found to be the most nearly homogeneous adsorbent. For a number of n-alkanes, benzene, and alkylbenzenes, data have been obtained on the retention volumes (Henry constants) and the differential heats of adsorption for surface coverages approaching zero. These thermodynamic data on the adsorption showed that ..cap alpha..-BN, like graphitized thermal carbon black, is a nonspecific adsorbent.

  1. [A case of cap polyposis complicated with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Song, Limhwa; Jhun, Byung Woo; Park, Jihyeon; Kim, Damin; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Jae Jun; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-11-25

    An optimal treatment for cap polyposis has not been established. Several treatment approaches, including anti-inflammatory agents, antibiotics, immunomodulators, and endoscopic therapy have been described. Surgical resection of the affected colon and rectum may be indicated for patients with persistent disease. Repeat surgery is indicated in cases of recurrence after surgery. However, symptomatic polyposis may still recur, and spontaneous resolution of cap polyposis is possible. We report a case of recurrent cap polyposis complicated with retroperitoneal fibrosis after inadequate low anterior resection with a positive resection margin. Surgical approaches for the treatment of cap polyposis should be carefully considered before treatment. PMID:22113045

  2. Design and Performance of Capping Layers for EUV Multilayer Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Nuygen, N; Alameda, J; Robinson, J C; Malinowski, M; Gullikson, E; Aquila, A; Tarrio, C; Grantham, S

    2003-03-10

    The reflectance stability of multilayer coatings for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) in a commercial tool environment is of uttermost importance to ensure continuous exposures with minimum maintenance cost. We have made substantial progress in designing the protective capping layer coatings, understanding their performance and estimating their lifetimes based on accelerated electron beam and EUV exposure studies. Our current capping layer coatings have about 40 times longer lifetimes than Si-capped multilayer optics. Nevertheless, the lifetime of current Ru-capped multilayers is too short to satisfy commercial tool requirements and further improvements are essential.

  3. Anisotropic. cap alpha. -emission of on-line separated isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.; Vandeplassche, D.; van Walle, E.; Severijns, N.; Van Haverbeke, J.; Vanneste, L.

    1987-12-10

    The technical realization of particle detection at very low temperatures (4K) has made it possible to study for the first time the anisotropic ..cap alpha..-decay of oriented nuclei which have been produced, separated and implanted on line. The measured ..cap alpha..-angular distributions reveal surprising new results on nuclear aspects as well as in solid state physics. The nuclear structure information from these data questions the older ..cap alpha..-decay theoretical interpretation and urges for a reaxamination of the earliest work on anisotropic ..cap alpha..-decay.

  4. Cloning of a complementary DNA encoding an 80 kilodalton nuclear cap binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, N; Ohno, M; Kangawa, K; Tokoro, Y; Shimura, Y

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that the monomethylated cap structure plays important roles in nuclear events. The cap structure has been implicated in the enhancement of pre-mRNA splicing. More recently, this structure has also been suggested to facilitate RNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. We have previously identified and purified an 80kD Nuclear Cap Binding Protein (NCBP) from a HeLa cell nuclear extract, which could possibly mediate these nuclear activities. In this report, we describe cloning of complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding NCBP. The partial protein sequences of NCBP were determined, and the full-length cDNA of NCBP was isolated from HeLa cDNA libraries. This cDNA encoded an open reading frame of 790 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 91,734 daltons, which contained most of the determined protein sequences. However, the protein sequence had no significant homology to any known proteins. Transfection experiments demonstrated that the epitope-tagged NCBP, transiently expressed in HeLa cells, was localized exclusively in the nucleoplasm. Similar experiments using a truncated NCBP cDNA indicated that this nuclear localization activity is conferred by the N-terminal 70 amino-acid region. Images PMID:7937105

  5. Investigation on thermochemical behaviour of low rank Malaysian coal, oil palm biomass and their blends during pyrolysis via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    PubMed

    Idris, Siti Shawalliah; Abd Rahman, Norazah; Ismail, Khudzir; Alias, Azil Bahari; Abd Rashid, Zulkifli; Aris, Mohd Jindra

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the behaviour of Malaysian sub-bituminous coal (Mukah Balingian), oil palm biomass (empty fruit bunches (EFB), kernel shell (PKS) and mesocarp fibre (PMF)) and their respective blends during pyrolysis using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coal/palm biomass blends were prepared at six different weight ratios and experiments were carried out under dynamic conditions using nitrogen as inert gas at various heating rates to ramp the temperature from 25 degrees C to 900 degrees C. The derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) results show that thermal decomposition of EFB, PMF and PKS exhibit one, two and three distinct evolution profiles, respectively. Apparently, the thermal profiles of the coal/oil palm biomass blends appear to correlate with the percentage of biomass added in the blends, thus, suggesting lack of interaction between the coal and palm biomass. First-order reaction model were used to determine the kinetics parameters for the pyrolysis of coal, palm biomass and their respective blends. PMID:20153633

  6. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) and derivatives are critical to the defense response against necrotrophic pathogens. Several reports demonstrate that SA limits nematode reproduction. Results Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN: Heterodera glycines) are investigated. We demonstrate that overexpression of three of thirty-one Arabidoposis genes in transgenic soybean roots of composite plants decreased the number of cysts formed by SCN to less than 50% of those found on control roots, namely AtNPR1(33%), AtTGA2 (38%), and AtPR-5 (38%). Three additional Arabidopsis genes decreased the number of SCN cysts by 40% or more: AtACBP3 (53% of the control value), AtACD2 (55%), and AtCM-3 (57%). Other genes having less or no effect included AtEDS5 (77%), AtNDR1 (82%), AtEDS1 (107%), and AtPR-1 (80%), as compared to control. Overexpression of AtDND1 greatly increased susceptibility as indicated by a large increase in the number of SCN cysts (175% of control). Conclusions Knowledge of the pathogen defense system gained from studies of the model system, Arabidopsis, can be directly translated to soybean through direct overexpression of Arabidopsis genes. When the genes, AtNPR1, AtGA2, and AtPR-5, encoding specific components involved in SA regulation, synthesis, and signaling, are overexpressed in soybean roots, resistance to SCN is enhanced. This demonstrates functional compatibility of some Arabidopsis genes with soybean and identifies genes that may be used to engineer resistance to nematodes. PMID:24739302

  7. Actin filament barbed-end capping activity in neutrophil lysates: the role of capping protein-beta 2.

    PubMed

    DiNubile, M J; Cassimeris, L; Joyce, M; Zigmond, S H

    1995-12-01

    A barbed-end capping activity was found in high speed supernates of neutrophils lysed in submicromolar calcium. In dilute supernate (> or = 100-fold dilution of cytoplasm), this activity accounted for most of the inhibition of barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin from spectrin-F-actin seeds. Pointed-end elongation from gelsolin-capped F-actin seeds was not inhibited at comparable concentrations of supernate, thus excluding actin monomer sequestration as a cause of the observed inhibition. Most of the capping activity was due to capping protein-beta 2 (a homologue of cap Z). Thus, while immunoadsorption of > or = 95% of the gelsolin in the supernate did not decrease capping activity, immunoadsorption of capping protein-beta 2 reduced capping activity proportionally to the amount of capping protein-beta 2 adsorbed. Depletion of > 90% of capping protein-beta 2 from the supernate removed 90% of its capping activity. The functional properties of the capping activity were defined. The dissociation constant for binding to barbed ends (determined by steady state and kinetic analyses) was approximately 1-2 nM; the on-rate of capping was between 7 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; and the off-rate was approximately 2 x 10(-3) s-1. The concentration of capper free in the intact cell (determined by adsorption of supernate with spectrin-actin seeds) was estimated to be approximately 1-2 microM. Thus, there appeared to be enough high affinity capper to cap all the barbed ends in vivo. Nevertheless, immediately after lysis with detergent, neutrophils contained sites that nucleate barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin. These barbed ends subsequently become capped with a time course and concentration dependence similar to that of spectrin-F-actin seeds in high speed supernates. These observations suggest that, despite the excess of high affinity capper, some ends either are not capped in vivo or are transiently uncapped upon lysis and dilution. PMID:8590796

  8. Cytocompatibility and antibacterial properties of capping materials.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Arciola, Carla Renata; Beltrami, Riccardo; Monaco, Annachiara; Dagna, Alberto; Lombardini, Marco; Visai, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), and Biodentine (Septodont). To evaluate antimicrobial activity, materials were challenged in vitro with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus sanguis in the agar disc diffusion test. Cytocompatibility of the assayed materials towards rat MDPC-23 cells was evaluated at different times by both MTT and apoptosis assays. Results significantly differed among the different materials tested. Both bacterial growth inhibition halos and cytocompatibility performances were significantly different among materials with different composition. MTA-based products showed lower cytotoxicity and valuable antibacterial activity, different from calcium hydroxide-based materials, which exhibited not only higher antibacterial activity but also higher cytotoxicity. PMID:24959601

  9. Cytocompatibility and Antibacterial Properties of Capping Materials

    PubMed Central

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Monaco, Annachiara; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), and Biodentine (Septodont). To evaluate antimicrobial activity, materials were challenged in vitro with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus sanguis in the agar disc diffusion test. Cytocompatibility of the assayed materials towards rat MDPC-23 cells was evaluated at different times by both MTT and apoptosis assays. Results significantly differed among the different materials tested. Both bacterial growth inhibition halos and cytocompatibility performances were significantly different among materials with different composition. MTA-based products showed lower cytotoxicity and valuable antibacterial activity, different from calcium hydroxide-based materials, which exhibited not only higher antibacterial activity but also higher cytotoxicity. PMID:24959601

  10. Pulsar gamma rays from polar cap regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Romani, Roger W.

    1992-01-01

    The production is studied of pulsar gamma rays by energetic electrons flowing in the open field region above pulsar polar caps. The propagation was followed of curvature radiation from primary electrons, as well as hard synchrotron radiation generated by secondary pairs, through the pulsar magnetosphere for vacuum dipole open field geometries. Using data from radio and optical observations, models were constructed for the specific geometries and viewing angles appropriate to particular pulsars. These detailed models produce normalized spectra above 10 MeV, pulse profiles, beaming fractions and phase resolved spectra appropriate for direct comparison with COS-B and GRO data. Models are given for the Crab, Vela, and other potentially detectable pulsars; general agreement with existing data is good, although perturbations to the simplified models are needed for close matches. The calculations were extended to the millisecond pulsar range, which allows the production of predictions for the flux and spectra of populations of recycled pulsars and search strategies are pointed out.

  11. Microscopic reversal behavior of magnetically capped nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C. M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Hellwig, O.; Menzel, A.; Radu, F.; Makarov, D.; Albrecht, M.; Goncharov, A.; Schrefl, T.; Schlotter, W. F.; Rick, R.; Luening, J.

    2010-02-01

    The magnetic switching behavior of Co/Pd multilayer-capped nanospheres is investigated by x-ray spectro-holography. Images of the magnetic state of individual nanocaps are recorded as a function of externally applied magnetic field and the angle under which the field is applied, pertaining to magnetic data storage applications with patterned, tilted, and perpendicular storage media. Dispersed nanospheres with different coverage in the submonolayer regime are investigated simultaneously in a multiplexed experiment. In clustered nanosphere arrangements, we find that individual switching events are influenced by dipolar magnetostatic interactions. Micromagnetic simulations of the switching behavior complement the experimental observations, corroborating the influence of thermal activation processes and magnetostatic interactions in this system. Such magnetostatic interactions could lead to undesired cross-talk between bits in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording applications.

  12. Glaciers and ice caps outside Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, Marin; Wolken, G.; Burgess, D.; Cogley, J.G.; Copland, L.; Thomson, L.; Arendt, A.; Wouters, B.; Kohler, J.; Andreassen, L.M.; O'Neel, Shad; Pelto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps cover an area of over 400 000 km2 in the Arctic, and are a major influence on global sea level (Gardner et al. 2011, 2013; Jacob et al. 2012). They gain mass by snow accumulation and lose mass by meltwater runoff. Where they terminate in water (ocean or lake), they also lose mass by iceberg calving. The climatic mass balance (Bclim, the difference between annual snow accumulation and annual meltwater runoff) is a widely used index of how glaciers respond to climate variability and change. The total mass balance (ΔM) is defined as the difference between annual snow accumulation and annual mass losses (by iceberg calving plus runoff).

  13. Interannual variability of Mars' south polar CAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. B.; Malolepszy, K. M.; Martin, L. J.

    1987-08-01

    Published observational data on the seasonal recession of the south polar cap on Mars (covering the period 1903-1977) are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed statistically. The basic data set (photographic observations obtained at Lowell Observatory) of Fischbacher et al. (1960) and James and Lumme (1982) and the reduction procedures described by Baum and Martin (1973) are employed, and Viking data from 1977 are used for comparison; the early onset (relative to the mean) of the 1956 recession is characterized in detail. A list of photographically documented large dust storms is provided, and it is suggested that in years with early spring storms, recession may be slower than in years without such storms.

  14. Lanthanide clusters with azide capping ligands.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian F; Emge, Thomas J; Brennan, John G

    2013-05-20

    Weakly binding azide ligands have been used as surface caps in the synthesis of lanthanide oxo and selenido clusters. Addition of NaN3 and Na2O to in situ prepared solutions of Ln(SePh)3 in pyridine results in the formation of (py)18Sm6Na2O2(N3)16 or (py)10Ln6O2(N3)12(SePh)2 (Ln = Ho, Er), with the Sm and Er compounds characterized by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Attempts to prepare chalcogenido derivatives by ligand-based redox reactions using elemental Se were successful in the preparation of (py)10Er6O2(SeSe)2(N3)10, a diselenido cluster having crystallographic disorder due to some site sharing of both SeSe and N3 ligands. These compounds all detonate when heated. PMID:23639142

  15. Fundamentals of successful monitoring, reporting, and verification under a cap-and-trade program

    SciTech Connect

    John Schakenbach; Robert Vollaro; Reynaldo Forte

    2006-11-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed and implemented the Acid Rain Program (ARP), and NOx Budget Trading Programs (NBTP) using several fundamental monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) elements: (1) compliance assurance through incentives and automatic penalties; (2) strong quality assurance (QA); (3) collaborative approach with a petition process; (4) standardized electronic reporting; (5) compliance flexibility for low-emitting sources; (6) complete emissions data record required; (7) centralized administration; (8) level playing field; (9) publicly available data; (10) performance-based approach; and (11) reducing conflicts of interest. Each of these elements is discussed in the context of the authors' experience under two U.S. cap-and-trade programs and their potential application to other cap and-trade programs. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget found that the Acid Rain Program has accounted for the largest quantified human health benefits of any federal regulatory program implemented in the last 10 yr, with annual benefits exceeding costs by {gt} 40 to 1. The authors believe that the elements described in this paper greatly contributed to this success. EPA has used the ARP fundamental elements as a model for other cap-and-trade programs, including the NBTP, which went into effect in 2003, and the recently published Clean Air Interstate Rule and Clean Air Mercury Rule. The authors believe that using these fundamental elements to develop and implement the MRV portion of their cap-and-trade programs has resulted in public confidence in the programs, highly accurate and complete emissions data, and a high compliance rate. 2 refs.

  16. Diagenetic capping of carbonate reservoir facies

    SciTech Connect

    Lighty, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The diagenetic model proposed involves the effect of submarine cementation on previously lithified carbonates, such as submerged relict shelf-margin buildups (e.g., drowned reefs, ooid shoals) or previously subaerially exposed formations (e.g., dune ridges) that were submerged by later sea level rise. These deposits generally have pronounced topographic relief (visible on seismic), good reservoir geometries, and high internal porosity of either primary or secondary origin. Petrologic studies on examples of both of these situations, a submerged early Holocene barrier reef off Florida and a 175-km (110-m) long submerged Pleistocene eolian ridge in the Bahamas, show that their exposed surface and uppermost facies (0.1 m, or 0.3 ft, below top) are further infilled and cemented, creating an extensively lithified, low porosity/low permeability zone or diagenetic cap rock. Quantitative mineralogic studies of occluding cements reveal an exponential reduction in porosity while moving upward into the seal zone. Submarine cements effectively infill and form a surficial permeability barrier that acts to impede further diagenesis and porosity reduction within underlying potential reservoir facies. To form this diagenetic seal only requires that the original carbonate buildup be resubmerged for some brief period of time prior to subsequent burial by sediments. If buildup accumulation later resumes without intermediate sediment burial, a common stratigraphic situation, the diagenetic seal would represent a disconformity separating two similar facies. The early formation of a diagenetic cap rock lends support to models of early hydrocarbon migration and emplacement. Prediction and recognition of submarine diagenetic seals will aid in exploration and development of obvious buildup reservoirs as well as subtle intraformational traps.

  17. [Clinical symptoms and circumastances of acute poisonings with fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and panther cap (Amanita pantherina)].

    PubMed

    Łukasik-Głebocka, Magdalena; Druzdz, Artur; Naskret, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Mushroom poisonings in Poland are quite common, especially in summer and autumn, but fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and panther cap (Amanita pantherina) are rather rare cause of these intoxications. Fly agaric is a cause of deliberate poisoning, whereas panther cap poisoning also happens accidentally. The main toxins of these two mushrooms are ibotenic acid (pantherine, agarine), muscimol, muscazone and muscaridine. The other bioactive substances are stizolobic and stizolobinic acids and aminodicarboxyethylthiopropanoic acids. All these compounds are responsible for diverse picture of intoxication. An analysis of patients with Amanita muscaria and Amanita pantherina poisoning hospitalized in the Poznan Departament of Toxicology revealed that symptoms occurred after 30 minutes to 2 hours with vomiting, hallucinations, restlessness, increased psychomotor drive and central nervous system depression. Other antycholinergic symptoms like tachycardia and increased blood pressure, mydriasis, dry and red skin were seen only in a few cases. Acute respiratory failure was the most dangerous symptom observed in the course of poisoning. PMID:22010435

  18. Structure and luminescence of the. cap alpha. -LnNb/sub 3/O/sub 9/-type rare earth niobates

    SciTech Connect

    Torardi, C.C.; Brixner, L.H.; Foris, C.M.

    1985-07-01

    ..cap alpha..-LnNb/sub 3/O/sub 9/ (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) compounds have been prepared hydrothermally from acidic solutions. In comparison to the previously reported orthorhombic ..beta.. modifications, ..cap alpha..-LnNb/sub 3/O/sub 9/ compounds are monoclinic. The structure of ..cap alpha..-PrNb/sub 3/O/sub 9/ was determined with a = 5.3784(6), b = 7.602(2), c = 16.344(2) A, and ..beta.. = 92.21(1)/sup 0/, space group Ps/sub 1//c. It is built of double and single chains of cornershared NbO/sub 6/ octahedra extended along the b axis. Praseodymium atoms reside in tunnels along the b axis and are in eight-coordination with oxygen. All ..cap alpha..-LnNb/sub 3/O/sub 9/ compounds can be irreversibly converted to the ..beta.. modification by heating in air to 1200/sup 0/C. The X-ray excited luminescence of Sm-, Eu-, Tb-, and Dy-doped ..cap alpha..-LaNb/sub 3/O/sub 9/ is also reported. 11 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Devon island ice cap: core stratigraphy and paleoclimate.

    PubMed

    Koerner, R M

    1977-04-01

    Valuable paleoclimatic information can be gained by studying the distribution of melt layers in deep ice cores. A profile representing the percentage of ice in melt layers in a core drilled from the Devon Island ice cap plotted against both time and depth shows that the ice cap has experienced a period of very warm summers since 1925, following a period of colder summers between about 1600 and 1925. The earlier period was coldest between 1680 and 1730. There is a high correlation between the melt-layer ice percentage and the mass balance of the ice cap. The relation between them suggests that the ice cap mass balance was zero (accumulation equaled ablation) during the colder period but is negative in the present warmer one. There is no firm evidence of a present cooling trend in the summer conditions on the ice cap. A comparison with the melt-layer ice percentage in cores from the other major Canadian Arctic ice caps shows that the variation of summer conditions found for the Devon Island ice cap is representative for all the large ice caps for about 90 percent of the time. There is also a good correlation between melt-layer percentage and summer sea-ice conditions in the archipelago. This suggests that the search for the northwest passage was influenced by changing climate, with the 19th-century peak of the often tragic exploration coinciding with a period of very cold summers. PMID:17733504

  20. Pioneer Profile: William G. Cap'n Bill' Vinal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford

    1988-01-01

    A biographical sketch of William G. "Cap'n Bill" Vinal is presented, followed by an interview with Dr. Phyllis Ford about her experiences as a student of Cap'n Bill. He was the great teacher who seized every moment, showed up unexpectedly at conventions, and helped people feel okay, even when they made mistakes. (JMM)

  1. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  2. 47 CFR 52.109 - Permanent cap on number reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permanent cap on number reservations. 52.109... (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.109 Permanent cap on number reservations. (a) A Responsible Organization may have in reserve status, at any one time, either 2000 toll free numbers or 7.5 percent of...

  3. 20 CFR 606.20 - Cap on tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cap on tax credit reduction. 606.20 Section 606.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.20 Cap on tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (f)...

  4. 20 CFR 606.20 - Cap on tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cap on tax credit reduction. 606.20 Section 606.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.20 Cap on tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (f)...

  5. 20 CFR 606.20 - Cap on tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cap on tax credit reduction. 606.20 Section 606.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.20 Cap on tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (f)...

  6. 20 CFR 606.20 - Cap on tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cap on tax credit reduction. 606.20 Section 606.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.20 Cap on tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (f)...

  7. 20 CFR 606.20 - Cap on tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cap on tax credit reduction. 606.20 Section 606.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.20 Cap on tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (f)...

  8. A Hybrid Density Functional Study of Capped Silicon Carbide Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Kapil; Ray, Asok

    2011-03-01

    A systematic study of fullerene hemisphere capped finite SiC nanotubes of type 1 using cluster approximation is presented. Nanotubes (3,3) and (5,0) are capped by C20 -fullerene hemisphere(C10) and (5,5) and (9,0) are capped by C60 -fullerene hemisphere (C30) . Geometries of the tubes have been spin optimized using the functional B3LYP, 3-21G* basis set and the GAUSSIAN 03 software. The study indicates that fullerene capping of a SiC nanotube changes the electronic and geometric structure properties of SiC nanotubes. For example, the binding energy per atom for infinite nanotube (5,5) is 4.993eV whereas the same nanotube with C- and Si-caps has the binding energy per atom of 5.989eV and 4.812eV, respectively. C-capped nanotubes are energetically more preferable compared to Si-capped. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of the capped nanotubes are significantly lower compared to those of infinite nanotubes. This work is supported by the Welch Foundation, Houston, Texas (Grant No. Y-1525).

  9. Multiplicity of 5′ Cap Structures Present on Short RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Taoka, Masato; de Hoon, Michiel; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Isobe, Toshiaki; Carninci, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Most RNA molecules are co- or post-transcriptionally modified to alter their chemical and functional properties to assist in their ultimate biological function. Among these modifications, the addition of 5′ cap structure has been found to regulate turnover and localization. Here we report a study of the cap structure of human short (<200 nt) RNAs (sRNAs), using sequencing of cDNA libraries prepared by enzymatic pretreatment of the sRNAs with cap sensitive-specificity, thin layer chromatographic (TLC) analyses of isolated cap structures and mass spectrometric analyses for validation of TLC analyses. Processed versions of snoRNAs and tRNAs sequences of less than 50 nt were observed in capped sRNA libraries, indicating additional processing and recapping of these annotated sRNAs biotypes. We report for the first time 2,7 dimethylguanosine in human sRNAs cap structures and surprisingly we find multiple type 0 cap structures (mGpppC, 7mGpppG, GpppG, GpppA, and 7mGpppA) in RNA length fractions shorter than 50 nt. Finally, we find the presence of additional uncharacterized cap structures that wait determination by the creation of needed reference compounds to be used in TLC analyses. These studies suggest the existence of novel biochemical pathways leading to the processing of primary and sRNAs and the modifications of their RNA 5′ ends with a spectrum of chemical modifications. PMID:25079783

  10. IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Roberts, J.; Paller, M.; Reible, D.

    2010-09-02

    Active capping is a relatively new approach for treating contaminated sediments. It involves applying chemically reactive amendments to the sediment surface. The main role of active caps is to stabilize contaminants in contaminated sediments, lower the bioavailable pool of contaminants, and reduce the release of contaminants to the water column. Metals are common contaminants in many marine and fresh water environments as a result of industrial and military activities. The mobile, soluble forms of metals are generally considered toxic. Induced chemical precipitation of these metals can shift toxic metals from the aqueous phase to a solid, precipitated phase which is often less bioavailable. This approach can be achieved through application of sequestering agents such as rock phosphates, organoclays, zeolites, clay minerals, and biopolymers (e.g., chitosan) in active capping technology. Active capping holds great potential for a more permanent solution that avoids residual risks resulting from contaminant migration through the cap or breaching of the cap. In addition to identifying superior active capping agents, research is needed to optimize application techniques, application rates, and amendment combinations that maximize sequestration of contaminants. A selected set of active capping treatment technologies has been demonstrated at a few sites, including a field demonstration at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. This demonstration has provided useful information on the effects of sequestering agents on metal immobilization, bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance to mechanical disturbance.

  11. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of molten glass. Knowing the temperature profile within a cold cap will help determine its characteristics and relate them to the rate of glass production. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Since a direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed where the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. To correlate the temperature distribution to microstructures within the cold cap, microstructures were identified of individual feed samples that were heat treated to set temperatures between 400°C and 1200°C and quenched. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was then established by correlating cold-cap regions with the feed samples of nearly identical structures and was compared with the temperature profile from a mathematical model.

  12. Determining surface elevation change of small ice caps on Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, D. P.; Schenk, A.; Csatho, B. M.; Nagarajan, S.; Briner, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Among the hundreds of small ice caps that dot the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet, several (such as Sukkertoppen, North Ice Cap, and Flade Isbrink) have been flown multiple times by the NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM). Although highly resolved, these flights cover only a small portion of each ice cap surface. In this work we introduce ICESat as a complementary sensor to estimate surface elevation change over a larger area. Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change detection (SERAC) is a method that has been successfully applied to several cases where fusion of multisensory data is required to reconstruct surface topography. The method is based on fitting analytical functions to laser points within repeat tracks or cross-over areas and provides high resolution, precise changes in surface topography along with a rigorous error estimate of the reconstructed elevation changes. In this study we apply SERAC to precisely reconstruct surface change for multiple ice caps using ATM and ICESat data through multiple time epochs. Small ice caps that surround the Greenland ice sheet reside at relatively low elevation and respond quickly to climate forcing. Moreover, dynamic thinning processes are comparatively limited in the ice caps when compared to the ice sheet proper. Small ice caps and alpine glaciers and expected to provide the largest contribution to eustatic sea-level rise over the coming century. There is therefore an urgent need to develop and maintain an inventory of small ice cap mass balance, especially those that surround the large ice sheets.

  13. ERIC/CAPS-Expanding Counselor Choice. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R.; Bleuer, Jeanne C.

    The Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) is a national information network designed to provide users with ready access to education literature. One of the clearinghouses is the ERIC Counseling and Personnel Services Clearinghouse (CAPS). Established at The University of Michigan in 1966, CAPS was one of the original ERIC clearinghouses.…

  14. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  15. A Cost and Performance System (CAPS) in a Federal agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huseonia, W. F.; Penton, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    Cost and Performance System (CAPS) is an automated system used from the planning phase through implementation to analysis and documentation. Data is retrievable or available for analysis of cost versus performance anomalies. CAPS provides a uniform system across intra- and international elements. A common system is recommended throughout an entire cost or profit center. Data can be easily accumulated and aggregated into higher levels of tracking and reporting of cost and performance.The level and quality of performance or productivity is indicated in the CAPS model and its process. The CAPS model provides the necessary decision information and insight to the principal investigator/project engineer for a successful project management experience. CAPS provides all levels of management with the appropriate detailed level of data.

  16. Substorm Bulge/Surge Controlled by Polar Cap Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Nishimura, T.; Zou, Y.; Gallardo-Lacourt, B.; Donovan, E.; Shiokawa, K.; Nicolls, M. J.; Chen, S.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Nishitani, N.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence that localized channels of enhanced polar cap flow drive plasma sheet/auroral oval flow channels, auroral poleward boundary intensifications and streamers, and substorm onset. Evidence has also indicated that a persistence of such flow channels after substorm onset may enhance post-onset auroral poleward expansion and activity. Here, we combine auroral imager and radar observations to show evidence that polar-cap flow channels can directly feed the substorm bulge westward motion, i.e., the westward traveling surge, and its poleward expansion well into the pre-existing polar cap. By taking advantage of the capability of tracing polar cap arcs and patches over long distances with red line imaging, we are able to trace flow features that strongly affect the substorm bulge across the polar cap for up to ~1-1.5 hr prior to their impacting and affecting the substorm bulge.

  17. Gossypol-Capped Mitoxantrone-Loaded Mesoporous SiO2 NPs for the Cooperative Controlled Release of Two Anti-Cancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Heleg-Shabtai, Vered; Aizen, Ruth; Sharon, Etery; Sohn, Yang Sung; Trifonov, Alexander; Enkin, Natalie; Freage, Lina; Nechushtai, Rachel; Willner, Itamar

    2016-06-15

    Mesoporous SiO2 nanoparticles, MP-SiO2 NPs, are functionalized with the boronic acid ligand units. The pores of the MP-SiO2 NPs are loaded with the anticancer drug mitoxantrone, and the pores are capped with the anticancer drug gossypol. The resulting two-drug-functionalized MP-SiO2 NPs provide a potential stimuli-responsive anticancer drug carrier for cooperative chemotherapeutic treatment. In vitro experiments reveal that the MP-SiO2 NPs are unlocked under environmental conditions present in cancer cells, e.g., acidic pH and lactic acid overexpressed in cancer cells. The effective unlocking of the capping units under these conditions is attributed to the acidic hydrolysis of the boronate ester capping units and to the cooperative separation of the boronate ester bridges by the lactate ligand. The gossypol-capped mitoxantrone-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs reveals preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells and cooperative chemotherapeutic activities toward the cancer cells. The MCF-10A epithelial breast cells and the malignant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells treated with the gossypol-capped mitoxantrone-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs revealed after a time-interval of 5 days a cell death of ca. 8% and 60%, respectively. Also, the gossypol-capped mitoxantrone-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs revealed superior cancer-cell death (ca. 60%) as compared to control carriers consisting of β-cyclodextrin-capped mitoxantrone-loaded (ca. 40%) under similar loading of the mitoxantrone drug. The drugs-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs reveal impressive long-term stabilities. PMID:27186957

  18. Non-methane hydrocarbon emissions from vehicle fuel caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart A.; Yu, Yungdae; Jia, Chunrong; Godwin, Christopher

    Vehicles emit non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) from a number of sources, including missing, worn or improperly tightened fuel caps. Inspection and maintenance programs and the On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system will detect some of these deficiencies, however, even properly tightened caps will emit NMHCs due to permeation, diffusion, cracks and gaps in seals, and failures of pressure-relief mechanisms. These emissions have not been previously quantified. In this study, in-use emissions from fuel caps were measured in 213 tests on vehicles of varying age and condition over several seasons, including cold and warm temperatures. Diffusion/permeation models are presented to complement the experimental work. NMHC emissions from fuel caps were detected from all vehicles, of which benzene constituted 2.5%. Emissions averaged 2.0 mg h -1 (median=0.5 mg h -1), and the distribution of emission rates was highly skewed by a small number of vehicles with much higher emissions, e.g., the 90th, 95th and maximum percentile values were 2.7, 5.0, and 62.7 mg h -1, respectively. Emission rates increased substantially if the fuel cap was loose, in hot weather, and with vehicle age and mileage. Overall, emissions from properly functioning caps are small relative to running and refueling losses, though they may be significant if the gas cap is defective or loose. Further reductions in emissions may be achieved by using new low-torque cap designs, improved elastomers, properly tightening fuel caps, and replacing old caps.

  19. 30 CFR 250.1157 - How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? 250.1157 Section 250.1157 Mineral Resources... do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? (a... from each completion in an oil reservoir that is known to have an associated gas cap. (2) To...

  20. Structural basis for m7G recognition and 2′-O-methyl discrimination in capped RNAs by the innate immune receptor RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Devarkar, Swapnil C.; Wang, Chen; Miller, Matthew T.; Ramanathan, Anand; Jiang, Fuguo; Khan, Abdul G.; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RNAs with 5′-triphosphate (ppp) are detected in the cytoplasm principally by the innate immune receptor Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I), whose activation triggers a Type I IFN response. It is thought that self RNAs like mRNAs are not recognized by RIG-I because 5′ppp is capped by the addition of a 7-methyl guanosine (m7G) (Cap-0) and a 2′-O-methyl (2′-OMe) group to the 5′-end nucleotide ribose (Cap-1). Here we provide structural and mechanistic basis for exact roles of capping and 2′-O-methylation in evading RIG-I recognition. Surprisingly, Cap-0 and 5′ppp double-stranded (ds) RNAs bind to RIG-I with nearly identical Kd values and activate RIG-I’s ATPase and cellular signaling response to similar extents. On the other hand, Cap-0 and 5′ppp single-stranded RNAs did not bind RIG-I and are signaling inactive. Three crystal structures of RIG-I complexes with dsRNAs bearing 5′OH, 5′ppp, and Cap-0 show that RIG-I can accommodate the m7G cap in a cavity created through conformational changes in the helicase-motif IVa without perturbing the ppp interactions. In contrast, Cap-1 modifications abrogate RIG-I signaling through a mechanism involving the H830 residue, which we show is crucial for discriminating between Cap-0 and Cap-1 RNAs. Furthermore, m7G capping works synergistically with 2′-O-methylation to weaken RNA affinity by 200-fold and lower ATPase activity. Interestingly, a single H830A mutation restores both high-affinity binding and signaling activity with 2′-O-methylated dsRNAs. Our work provides new structural insights into the mechanisms of host and viral immune evasion from RIG-I, explaining the complexity of cap structures over evolution. PMID:26733676

  1. cap alpha. -skeletal and. cap alpha. -cardiac actin genes are coexpressed in adult human skeletal muscle and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, P.; Ponte, P.; Blau, H.; Kedes, L.

    1983-11-01

    The authors determined the actin isotypes encoded by 30 actin cDNA clones previously isolated from an adult human muscle cDNA library. Using 3' untranslated region probes, derived from ..cap alpha.. skeletal, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin cDNAs and from an ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genomic clone, they showed that 28 of the cDNAs correspond to ..cap alpha..-skeletal actin transcripts. Unexpectedly, however, the remaining two cDNA clones proved to derive from ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that the two skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin cDNAs are derived from transcripts of the cloned ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin gene. Comparison of total actin mRNA levels in adult skeletal muscle and adult heart revealed that the steady-state levels in skeletal muscle are about twofold greater, per microgram of total cellular RNA, than those in heart. Thus, in skeletal muscle and in heart, both of the sarcomeric actin mRNA isotypes are quite abundant transcripts. They conclude that ..cap alpha..-skeletal and ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genes are coexpressed as an actin pair in human adult striated muscles. Since the smooth-muscle actins (aortic and stomach) and the cytoplasmic actins (..beta.. and ..gamma..) are known to be coexpressed in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells, respectively, they postulate that coexpression of actin pairs may be a common feature of mammalian actin gene expression in all tissues.

  2. EPA'S FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF INNOVATIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RISK MANAGEMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on capping technologies is directed at assessing the effectiveness of innovative capping materials, factors that control contaminant release at the sediment-water interface, installation of cap, resuspension mechanism, and gas ebullition. U.S. EPA's Land Remediation and ...

  3. Myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy is regulated through dual phosphorylation and acetylation of the actin capping protein CapZ.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Warren, Chad M; Li, Jieli; McKinsey, Timothy A; Russell, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    The mechanotransduction signaling pathways initiated in heart muscle by increased mechanical loading are known to lead to long-term transcriptional changes and hypertrophy, but the rapid events for adaptation at the sarcomeric level are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that actin filament assembly during cardiomyocyte growth is regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs) of CapZβ1. In rapidly hypertrophying neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) stimulated by phenylephrine (PE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) of CapZβ1 revealed a shift toward more negative charge. Consistent with this, mass spectrometry identified CapZβ1 phosphorylation on serine-204 and acetylation on lysine-199, two residues which are near the actin binding surface of CapZβ1. Ectopic expression of dominant negative PKCɛ (dnPKCɛ) in NRVMs blunted the PE-induced increase in CapZ dynamics, as evidenced by the kinetic constant (Kfrap) of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and concomitantly reduced phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1. Furthermore, inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) increased lysine-199 acetylation on CapZβ1, which increased Kfrap of CapZ and stimulated actin dynamics. Finally, we show that PE treatment of NRVMs results in decreased binding of HDAC3 to myofibrils, suggesting a signal-dependent mechanism for the regulation of sarcomere-associated CapZβ1 acetylation. Taken together, this dual regulation through phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1 provides a novel model for the regulation of myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27185186

  4. TOPO-capped silver selenide nanoparticles and their incorporation into polymer nanofibers using electrospinning technique

    SciTech Connect

    More, D.S.; Moloto, M.J.; Moloto, N.; Matabola, K.P.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles produced spherical particles with sizes 12 nm (180 °C) and 27 nm (200 °C). • Higher temperature produced increased particle size (∼75 nm) and changed in shape. • Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles (0.2–0.6%) added into PVP (35–45%) to yield reduced fiber beading. • Polymer nanofibers electrospun at 11–20 kV produced fiber diameters of 425–461 nm. • Optical properties in the fibers were observed due to the Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles loaded. - Abstract: Electrospinning is the most common technique for fabricating polymer fibers as well as nanoparticles embedded polymer fibers. Silver selenide nanoparticles were synthesized using tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) as solvent and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as capping environment. Silver selenide was prepared by reacting silver nitrate and selenium with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) to form TOP–Ag and TOP–Se solutions. Both absorption and emission spectra signify the formation of nanoparticles as well as the TEM which revealed spherical particles with an average particle size of 22 nm. The polymer, PVP used was prepared at concentrations ranging from (35 to 45 wt%) and the TOPO-capped silver selenide nanoparticles (0.2 and 0.6 wt%) were incorporated into them and electrospun by varying the voltage from 11 to 20 kV. The SEM images of the Ag{sub 2}Se/PVP composite fibers revealed the fibers of diameters with average values of 425 and 461 nm. The X-ray diffraction results show peaks which were identified due to α-Ag{sub 2}Se body centered cubic compound. The sharp peak observed for all the samples at 2θ = 44.5 suggest the presence of Ag in the face centered cubic which can be attributed to higher concentration of silver nitrate used with molar ratio of selenium to silver and the abundance of silver in the silver selenide crystal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the

  5. Structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cet1-Ceg1 mRNA Capping Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meigang; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-05-04

    The 5{prime} guanine-N7 cap is the first cotranscriptional modification of messenger RNA. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the first two steps in capping are catalyzed by the RNA triphosphatase Cet1 and RNA guanylyltransferase Ceg1, which form a complex that is directly recruited to phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAP IIo), primarily via contacts between RNAP IIo and Ceg1. A 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cet1-Ceg1 revealed a 176 kDa heterotetrameric complex composed of one Cet1 homodimer that associates with two Ceg1 molecules via interactions between the Ceg1 oligonucleotide binding domain and an extended Cet1 WAQKW amino acid motif. The WAQKW motif is followed by a flexible linker that would allow Ceg1 to achieve conformational changes required for capping while maintaining interactions with both Cet1 and RNAP IIo. The impact of mutations as assessed through genetic analysis in S. cerevisiae is consonant with contacts observed in the Cet1-Ceg1 structure.

  6. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Gerlach, Piotr; Rosenthal, Maria; Gaudon, Stephanie; Coscia, Francesca; Günther, Stephan; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5′ end by an endonuclease (EN) domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively), but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase. PMID:27304209

  7. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Juan; Gerlach, Piotr; Rosenthal, Maria; Gaudon, Stephanie; Coscia, Francesca; Günther, Stephan; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5' end by an endonuclease (EN) domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively), but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase. PMID:27304209

  8. Synthesis of N-hydroxycinnamides capped with a naturally occurring moiety as inhibitors of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Ching-Chow; Chao, Shi-Wei; Lee, Shoei-Sheng; Hsu, Fen-Lin; Lu, Yeh-Lin; Hung, Ming-Fang; Chang, Chung-I

    2010-04-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are regarded as promising therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. All reported HDAC inhibitors contain three pharmacophoric features: a zinc-chelating group, a hydrophobic linker, and a hydrophobic cap for surface recognition. In this study we investigated the effectiveness of osthole, a hydrophobic Chinese herbal compound, as the surface recognition cap in hydroxamate-based compounds as inhibitors of HDAC. Nine novel osthole-based N-hydroxycinnamides were synthesized and screened for enzyme inhibition activity. Compounds 9 d, 9 e, 9 g exhibited inhibitory activities (IC(50)=24.5, 20.0, 19.6 nM) against nuclear HDACs in HeLa cells comparable to that of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; IC(50)=24.5 nM), a potent inhibitor clinically used for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). While compounds 9 d and 9 e showed SAHA-like activity towards HDAC1 and HDAC6, compound 9 g was more selective for HDAC1. Compound 9 d exhibited the best cellular effect, which was comparable to that of SAHA, of enhancing acetylation of either alpha-tubulin or histone H3. Molecular docking analysis showed that the osthole moiety of compound 9 d may interact with the same hydrophobic surface pocket exploited by SAHA and it may be modified to provide class-specific selectivity. These results suggest that osthole is an effective hydrophobic cap when incorporated into N-hydroxycinnamide-derived HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20209563

  9. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Derek R; Schweiger, Michael J; Riley, Brian J; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric glass melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of the molten glass. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Because direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed in which the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a simulated high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was established by correlating microstructures of cold-cap regions with heat-treated feed samples of nearly identical structures at known temperatures. This temperature profile was compared with a mathematically simulated profile generated by a cold-cap model that has been developed to assess the rate of glass production in a melter. PMID:26111202

  10. Trafficking of. cap alpha. -L-fucosidase in lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    DiCioccio, R.A.; Brown, K.S.

    1987-05-01

    The quantity of ..cap alpha..-L-fucosidase in human serum is determined by heredity. The mechanism controlling levels of the enzyme in serum is unknown. To investigate this, lymphoid cell lines derived from individuals with either low, intermediate or high ..cap alpha..-L-fucosidase in serum were established. Steady state levels of extracellular ..cap alpha..-L-fucosidase protein and activity overlapped among the cell lines. Thus, in vivo serum phenotypes of ..cap alpha..-L-fucosidase are not adequately expressed in this system. ..cap alpha..-L-Fucosidase was also metabolically labelled with /sup 35/S-methionine, immunoprecipitated, and examined by SDS-PAGE. Cells pulse-labelled from 0.25-2 h had a major intracellular form of enzyme (Mr = 58,000). Cells pulsed for 1.5 h and chased for 21 h with unlabeled methionine had an intracellular form of Mr = 60,000 and an extracellular form of Mr = 62,000. Cells treated with chloroquine had only the 58,000-form both intra- and extra-cellularly. Moreover, chloroquine did not effect the quantitative distribution of ..cap alpha..-L-fucosidase between cells and medium. In fibroblasts, chloroquine enhanced the secretion of newly made lysosomal enzymes and blocked the processing of intercellular enzyme forms from a higher to a lower molecular mass. Thus, there are trafficking differences between ..cap alpha..-L-fucosidase in lymphoid cells and lysosomal enzymes in fibroblasts. This suggests that alternative targeting mechanisms for lysosomal enzymes exist in these cells.

  11. Native Grasses as a Management Alternative on Vegetated Closure Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwit, Charles; Collins, Beverly

    2008-06-01

    Capped waste sites often are vegetated with commercial turf grasses to increase evapotranspiration and prevent erosion and possible exposure of the barrier. Fertilizer, frequent watering, and mowing may be required to establish the turf grass and prevent invasion by trees and shrubs. Oldfield vegetation of grasses and forbs is a possible sustainable alternative to turf grass communities. To determine if oldfield vegetation can establish on caps, we (1) compared establishment of a dominant oldfield grass and a commercial turf grass under different combinations of new closure cap management: spring or summer planting and presence or absence of amendments to alleviate drought (watering, mulch) or increase soil fertility (fertilizer, lime, a nitrogen-fixing legume); (2) surveyed existing caps to determine if oldfield species establish naturally; and (3) performed a greenhouse experiment to compare growth of two native grasses under low and amended (added water, soil nutrients) conditions. Both the commercial grass and oldfield species established under new cap conditions; fertilizer, water, and mulch improved vegetation establishment in spring or summer, but legumes decreased grass cover. In the greenhouse, both native grasses grew best with amendments; however, substantial stem and root length were obtained with no fertilizer and only once-weekly watering. Existing vegetated caps supported planted grasses and naturally established oldfield species. Overall, the results indicate native grasses can establish on new caps and oldfields can serve as a management model; further work is needed to determine the management strategy to maintain herbaceous vegetation and slow woody species invasion.

  12. Variations of the polar cap potential measured during magnetospheric substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, D.R.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I. )

    1992-04-01

    Measurements of the polar cap potential drop and size have been obtained during magnetospheric substorms. Using double-prove electric field measurements on the DE 2 satellite, 148 measurements have been obtained at random times preceding, during, and after 64 substorms. The polar cap potentials are graphed as a function of the difference between the time of the polar cap measurement and the time of the expansion onset of the corresponding substorm. The ratios of the auroral electrojet (AE) indices and the potential are also determined. The results show that on the average the polar cap potential starts to increase at 1.5 hours before onset. However, on a case-by-case basis there are substantial variations from the average, as polar cap potentials over 1,200 kV were measured as early as 1 hour before substorm onset and values as low as 40 kV were observed during the expansion phase. The size of the polar cap ranged from 23{degree} to 38{degree} invariant latitude at the time of onset, and had an average value of 31{degree}. The AE/{Phi}{sub PC} ratio is nearly constant before and after substorms, but decreases slightly during the substorm growth phase and increases greatly during the expansion phase. This increase is most likely due to a higher conductivity and westward electric field within the electrojet during expansion, which causes AE to increase without a corresponding change in the polar cap potential.

  13. Electro-bioremediation of contaminated sediment by electrode enhanced capping.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Reible, Danny

    2015-05-15

    In-situ capping often eliminates or slows natural degradation of hydrocarbon due to the reducing conditions in the sediments. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate a reactive capping technique, an electrode enhanced cap, to produce favorable conditions for hydrocarbon degradation and evaluate this reactive capping technique for contaminated sediment remediation. Two graphite electrodes were placed horizontally at different layers in a cap and connected to external power of 2 V. Redox potentials increased and pH decreased around the anode. Phenanthrene concentration decreased and PAH degradation genes increased in the vicinity of the anode. Phenanthrene concentrations at 0-1 cm sediment beneath the anode decreased to ∼50% of initial concentration over ∼70 days, while phenanthrene levels in control reactor kept unchanged. A degradation model of electrode enhanced capping was developed to simulate reaction-diffusion processes, and model results show that a reaction-dominated region was created in the vicinity of the anode. Although the degradation dominated region was thin, transport processes in a sediment cap environment are typically sufficiently slow to allow this layer to serve as a permeable reactive barrier for hydrocarbon decontamination. PMID:25819321

  14. Effect of electrode cap on measured cortical motor threshold.

    PubMed

    Julkunen, Petro; Säisänen, Laura; Sarasti, Maria; Könönen, Mervi

    2009-01-30

    We investigated the role of electrode cap use in the determination of the cortical motor threshold (MT), and the resulting changes in the recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs). We also tested whether the induced changes in determined MT could be corrected via previously introduced correction method. Sixteen healthy subjects were studied. Navigated TMS was used for mapping the optimal representation area of the thenar musculature in the primary motor cortex and individual MTs were determined with and without the use of the electrode cap. A mathematical correction was utilized to compensate for the effect of electrode cap in the MTs. Individual MEPs were also measured. We observed a significant (p<0.05) increase in the determined MTs attributable to the use of the electrode cap. At the group level this difference was reduced significantly (p<0.01) by the use of the correction method. However, at the individual level the efficiency of the correction was poor. The MEP-amplitudes were not affected whether measured with or without the electrode cap. The electrode cap affects significantly the cortical MT measured as stimulation intensity making the comparison of MTs difficult with other studies not having used an electrode cap. PMID:18801386

  15. Conventional and unconventional mechanisms for capping viral mRNA.

    PubMed

    Decroly, Etienne; Ferron, François; Lescar, Julien; Canard, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell, capping of mRNA 5' ends is an essential structural modification that allows efficient mRNA translation, directs pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export from the nucleus, limits mRNA degradation by cellular 5'-3' exonucleases and allows recognition of foreign RNAs (including viral transcripts) as 'non-self'. However, viruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their RNA 5' ends with either a covalently attached peptide or a cap moiety (7-methyl-Gppp, in which p is a phosphate group) that is indistinguishable from cellular mRNA cap structures. Viral RNA caps can be stolen from cellular mRNAs or synthesized using either a host- or virus-encoded capping apparatus, and these capping assemblies exhibit a wide diversity in organization, structure and mechanism. Here, we review the strategies used by viruses of eukaryotic cells to produce functional mRNA 5'-caps and escape innate immunity. PMID:22138959

  16. CAP modulates acetylcholine release at the myoneural junction

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Potian, Joseph G.; Baskaran, Padmamalini; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are non-selective cation channel proteins that are expressed throughout the body. Previous studies demonstrated the expression of TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), capsaicin (CAP) receptor, in sensory neurons. Recently, we reported TRPV1 expression in mouse motor nerve terminals [MNTs; (Thyagarajan et al., 2009)], where we observed that CAP protected MNTs from botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A). Phrenic nerve diaphragm nerve muscle preparations (NMP) isolated from isoflurane anesthetized adult mice were analyzed for twitch tension, spontaneous (mEPCs) and nerve stimulus evoked (EPCs) acetylcholine release. When acutely applied to isolated NMP, CAP produced a concentration-dependent decline of twitch tension and produced a significant decline in the amplitude of EPCs and quantal content without any effect on the mEPCs. The suppression of nerve stimulus evoked acetylcholine release by CAP was antagonized by capsazepine (CPZ), a TRPV1 antagonist. CAP did not suppress phrenic nerve stimulus evoked acetylcholine release in TRPV1 knockout mice. Also, CAP treatment, in vitro, interfered with the localization of adapter protein 2 in cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. Wortmannin, (WMN; non-selective phosphoinositol kinase inhibitor), mimicked the effects of CAP by inhibiting the acetylcholine exocytosis. Our data suggest that TRPV1 proteins expressed at the MNT are coupled to the exo-endocytic mechanisms to regulate neuromuscular functions. PMID:25446918

  17. Long-timescale dynamics of thiol capped Au nanoparticle clusters at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Madhumita; Datta, Alokmay

    2014-04-01

    A two-dimensional network of thiol-capped Au nanoparticle (AuNP) clusters is self-organized on a Stearic Acid (amphiphilic fatty acid) Langmuir monolayer on water surface. The AuNP clusters are found to form a pattern of connected and enclosed microspaces in the stearic acid template. The network features can be controlled by changing the surface pressure of the monolayer during compression. The two-dimensional dynamics of this network has been studied over a long timescale using Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM). The dynamics is very slow, indicating the stability of the network system, and is essentially driven by the tendency to lower the number of nodes or joints in the network.

  18. Innovation under cap-and-trade programs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Margaret R

    2012-03-27

    Policies incentivizing the private sector to reach its innovative potential in "clean" technologies are likely to play a key role in achieving climate stabilization. This article explores the relationship between innovation and cap-and-trade programs (CTPs)--the world's most prominent climate policy instrument--through empirical evidence drawn from successful CTPs for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide control. The article shows that before trading began for these CTPs, analysts overestimated the value of allowances in a pattern suggestive of the frequent a priori overestimation of the compliance costs of regulation. When lower-than-expected allowance prices were observed, in part because of the unexpected range of abatement approaches used in the lead-up to trading, emissions sources chose to bank allowances in significant numbers and reassess abatement approaches going forward. In addition, commercially oriented inventive activity declined for emissions-reducing technologies with a wide range of costs and technical characteristics, dropping from peaks before the establishment of CTPs to nadirs a few years into trading. This finding is consistent with innovators deciding during trading that their research and development investments should be reduced, based on assessments of future market conditions under the relevant CTPs. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and their implications for innovation and climate policy. PMID:22411797

  19. Innovation under cap-and-trade programs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Margaret R.

    2012-01-01

    Policies incentivizing the private sector to reach its innovative potential in “clean” technologies are likely to play a key role in achieving climate stabilization. This article explores the relationship between innovation and cap-and-trade programs (CTPs)—the world's most prominent climate policy instrument—through empirical evidence drawn from successful CTPs for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide control. The article shows that before trading began for these CTPs, analysts overestimated the value of allowances in a pattern suggestive of the frequent a priori overestimation of the compliance costs of regulation. When lower-than-expected allowance prices were observed, in part because of the unexpected range of abatement approaches used in the lead-up to trading, emissions sources chose to bank allowances in significant numbers and reassess abatement approaches going forward. In addition, commercially oriented inventive activity declined for emissions-reducing technologies with a wide range of costs and technical characteristics, dropping from peaks before the establishment of CTPs to nadirs a few years into trading. This finding is consistent with innovators deciding during trading that their research and development investments should be reduced, based on assessments of future market conditions under the relevant CTPs. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and their implications for innovation and climate policy. PMID:22411797

  20. Cochlear implantation in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bacciu, Andrea; Ormitti, Francesca; Pasanisi, Enrico; Vincenti, Vincenzo; Zanetti, Diego; Bacciu, Salvatore

    2010-08-01

    Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD) is an exceptionally rare brain stem and cerebellar malformation characterized by ventral pontine hypoplasia, vaulted pontine tegmentum, hypoplasia of the vermis, subtotal absence of middle cerebellar peduncles, lateralized course of the superior cerebellar peduncles, and absence or alteration of the inferior olivary nucleus. The main clinical features are multiple cranial neurophaties and ataxia. Sensorineural hearing loss of varying severity is almost always present. To date, 14 cases of PTCD have been reported in the literature. We present a child with PTCD and profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation. To the best of our knowledge, cochlear implantation in PTCD has not been previously reported. Functional outcome was assessed using the Speech Perception Categories and the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale. At 22 months' postoperative evaluation, the patient who was placed into speech perception category 0 (no detection of speech) preoperatively progressed to category 3 (beginning word identification). Before implantation, the child had connected speech unintelligible. At the last follow-up, she had connected speech intelligible to a listener who has little experience of a deaf person's speech. Cochlear implantation allowed this child to improve her quality of life, increasing her self-confidence, independence, and social integration. PMID:20627414

  1. Numerical modeling of experimental human fibrous cap delamination.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiaochang; Davis, Lindsey A; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Fibrous cap delamination is a critical process during the rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, which often leads to severe life-threatening clinical consequences such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this study a finite element modeling and simulation approach is presented that enables the study of fibrous cap delamination experiments for the purpose of understanding the fibrous cap delamination process. A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate delamination of the fibrous cap from the underlying plaque tissue. A viscoelastic anisotropic (VA) model for the bulk arterial material behavior is extended from existing studies so that the hysteresis phenomenon observed in the fibrous cap delamination experiments can be captured. A finite element model is developed for the fibrous cap delamination experiments, in which arterial layers (including the fibrous cap and the underlying plaque tissue) are represented by solid elements based on the VA model and the fibrous cap-underlying plaque tissue interface is characterized by interfacial CZM elements. In the CZM, the delamination process is governed by an exponential traction-separation law which utilizes critical energy release rates obtained directly from the fibrous cap delamination experiments. A set of VA model parameter values and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with one set of experimental measurements. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for other sets of experimental measurements are obtained and good agreement between simulation predictions and experimental measurements is observed. Results of this study demonstrate the applicability of the viscoelastic anisotropic model and the CZM approach for the simulation of diseased arterial tissue failure processes. PMID:26897094

  2. Cap structures as diagnostic indicators of silcrete origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullyott, J. Stewart; Nash, David J.; Huggett, Jennifer M.

    2015-07-01

    Cap structures within silcretes have long been used as a diagnostic indicator of pedogenic silicification. However, a growing number of studies of the micromorphology of non-pedogenic silcretes indicate that this may no longer be appropriate. This paper presents the first systematic investigation of the micro-fabric, geochemistry and mineralogy of cap structures in groundwater silcretes, through an analysis of conglomeratic varieties (puddingstones) from the southern UK. Our results suggest that cap structures in groundwater silcretes fall within a spectrum of types, related to the degree of sorting in the inter-gravel host sediment. At one end of this spectrum are well-defined caps within otherwise well-sorted, overgrowth-dominated silcretes. These caps exhibit a grain-supported fabric, are cemented by micro- and/or cryptocrystalline silica, and contain floating silt-sized quartz and Ti-oxide grains. We propose that these structures developed mainly as a result of in-washing of fine sediments that were subsequently silicified. At the other end of the spectrum are silcretes with caps defined by concentrations of Ti-oxide grains, as opposed to cement type and grain size. These formed mainly as a result of the remobilisation and precipitation of Ti during the silicification of gravels containing interstitial clay-rich sandy sediment. Between these end-members are silcretes with cap structures formed by a combination of in-washing and redistribution of fines plus some local remobilisation of Ti. Overall, the cap structures in this study exhibit a simple micromorphology, lacking the alternating Ti- and silica-rich lamellae typical of pedogenic silcrete. We conclude that the presence of cap structures alone should not be considered diagnostic of pedogenic silicification unless accompanied by other indicators such as a differentiated profile and abundant, complex, way-up structures within the micro-fabric.

  3. Palmer Quest: A Feasible Nuclear Fission "Vision Mission" to the Mars Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Beegle, L. W.; Nakagawa, R.; Elliott, J. O.; Matthews, J. B.; Coleman, M. L.; Hecht, M. H.; Ivaniov, A. B.; Head, J. W.; Milkovich, S.

    2005-01-01

    We are engaged in a NASA Vision Mission study, called Palmer Quest after the American Antarctic explorer Nathaniel Palmer, to assess the presence of life and evaluate the habitability of the basal domain of the Mars polar caps. We address this goal through four objectives: 1. Determine the presence of amino acids, nutrients, and geochemical heterogeneity in the ice sheet. 2. Quantify and characterize the provenance of the amino acids in Mars ice. 3. Assess the stratification of outcropped units for indications of habitable zones. 4. Determine the accumulation of ice, mineralogic material, and amino acids in Mars ice caps over the present epoch. Because of the defined scientific goal for the vision mission, the Palmer Quest focus is astrobiological; however, the results of the study make us optimistic that aggressive multi-platform in-situ missions that address a wide range of objectives, such as climate change, can be supported by variations of the approach used on this mission. Mission Overview: The Palmer Quest baseline

  4. Size tunable elemental copper nanoparticles: extracellular synthesis by thermoanaerobic bacteria and capping molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Gresback, Ryan G.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jellison, Jr, Gerald Earle; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji Won

    2014-11-10

    Bimodal sized elemental copper (Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from inexpensive oxidized copper salts by an extracellular metal-reduction process using anaerobic Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 bacteria in aqueous solution. The bacteria nucleate NPs outside of the cell, and they control the Cu2+ reduction rate to form uniform crystallites with an average diameter of 1.75 0.46 m after 3-day incubation. To control the size and enhance air stability of Cu NPs, the reaction mixtures were supplemented with nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelator, and the surfactant capping agents oleic acid, oleylamine, ascorbic acid, or L-cysteine. Time-dependent UV-visible absorption measurements and XPS studies indicated well-suspended, bimodal colloidal Cu NPs (70 150 and 5 10 nm) with extended air-stability up to 300 min and stable Cu NP films surfaces with 14% oxidation after 20 days. FTIR spectroscopy suggested that these capping agents were effectively adsorbed on the NP surface providing oxidation resistance in aqueous and dry conditions. Compared to previously reported Cu NP syntheses, this biological process substantially reduced the requirement for hazardous organic solvents and chemical reducing agents, while reducing the levels of Cu oxide impurities in the product. This process was highly reproducible and scalable from 0.01 to 1-L batches.

  5. Size tunable elemental copper nanoparticles: extracellular synthesis by thermoanaerobic bacteria and capping molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Gresback, Ryan G.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jellison, Jr, Gerald Earle; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Graham, David E.; et al

    2014-11-10

    Bimodal sized elemental copper (Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from inexpensive oxidized copper salts by an extracellular metal-reduction process using anaerobic Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 bacteria in aqueous solution. The bacteria nucleate NPs outside of the cell, and they control the Cu2+ reduction rate to form uniform crystallites with an average diameter of 1.75 0.46 m after 3-day incubation. To control the size and enhance air stability of Cu NPs, the reaction mixtures were supplemented with nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelator, and the surfactant capping agents oleic acid, oleylamine, ascorbic acid, or L-cysteine. Time-dependent UV-visible absorption measurements and XPS studies indicatedmore » well-suspended, bimodal colloidal Cu NPs (70 150 and 5 10 nm) with extended air-stability up to 300 min and stable Cu NP films surfaces with 14% oxidation after 20 days. FTIR spectroscopy suggested that these capping agents were effectively adsorbed on the NP surface providing oxidation resistance in aqueous and dry conditions. Compared to previously reported Cu NP syntheses, this biological process substantially reduced the requirement for hazardous organic solvents and chemical reducing agents, while reducing the levels of Cu oxide impurities in the product. This process was highly reproducible and scalable from 0.01 to 1-L batches.« less

  6. Alteration of skin hydration and its barrier function by vehicle and permeation enhancers: a study using TGA, FTIR, TEWL and drug permeation as markers.

    PubMed

    Shah, D K; Khandavilli, S; Panchagnula, R

    2008-09-01

    Vehicles and permeation enhancers (PEs) used in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) of a drug can affect skin hydration, integrity and permeation of the solute administered. This investigation was designed to study the effect of the most commonly used vehicles and PEs on rat skin hydration, barrier function and permeation of an amphiphilic drug, imipramine hydrochloride (IMH). An array of well-established techniques were used to confirm the findings of the study. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to determine changes in skin hydration. Alteration of the stratum corneum (SC) structure was investigated using FTIR studies. To monitor the barrier function alteration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement and permeation studies were performed. Our findings indicate that with hydration, there was an increase in the bound water content of the skin, and pseudoequilibrium of hydration (a drastic decrease in hydration rate) was achieved at around 12 h. Hydration increased the ratio between amide-I and amide-II peaks in FTIR and reduced the C-H stretching peak area. Both propylene glycol (PG) and ethanol (EtOH) dehydrated skin, with the latter showing a predominant effect. Furthermore, it was confirmed that PG and EtOH decreased the bound water content due to alteration in the protein domains and extraction of SC lipids, respectively. The effect of hydration on the SC was found to be similar to that reported for temperature. Permeation studies revealed that the dehydration caused by vehicles decreased IMH flux, whereas the flux was enhanced by PEs. The role of partition was predominant for the permeation of IMH through dehydrated skin. A synergistic effect was observed for PG and menthol in the enhancement of IMH. Further findings provided strong evidence that PG affects protein domains and EtOH extracts lipids from the bilayer. Both PG and EtOH, with or without PEs, increased TEWL. Initial TEWL was well

  7. Apparatus and method for cooling a combustor cap

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Washam, Roy Marshall; Wu, Chunyang

    2014-04-29

    A combustor includes an end cap having a perforated downstream plate and a combustion chamber downstream of the downstream plate. A plenum is in fluid communication with the downstream plate and supplies a cooling medium to the combustion chamber through the perforations in the downstream plate. A method for cooling a combustor includes flowing a cooling medium into a combustor end cap and impinging the cooling medium on a downstream plate in the combustor end cap. The method further includes flowing the cooling medium into a combustion chamber through perforations in the downstream plate.

  8. The hemispherical asymmetry of the residual polar caps on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1991-01-01

    A model of the polar caps of Mars was created which allows: (1) for light penetration into the cap; (2) ice albedo to vary with age, latitude, hemisphere, dust content, and solar zenith angle; and (3) for diurnal variability. The model includes the radiative effects of clouds and dust, and heat transport as represented by a thermal wind. The model reproduces polar cap regression data very well, including the survival of CO2 frost at the south pole and reproduces the general trend in the Viking Lander pressure data.

  9. Congenital bilobed gallbladder with phrygian cap presenting as calculus cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Kannan, N S; Kannan, Usha; Babu, C P Ganesh

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of congenital bilobed gall bladder is 1 in 3000 to 4000. A Phrygian cap is a congenital abnormality of the gallbladder with an incidence of 4%. Preferred mode of diagnosis for Phrygian cap is cholescintigraphy and multi phase MRI, as Ultrasonography and CT are not always conclusive. The estimated prevalence of gallstone disease in India has been reported as 2% to 29%. A case of bilobed gall bladder with Phrygian cap in both the lobes and pigment gallstone in one of the lobes presenting as calculus cholecystitis is reported for its rarity and difficulty in arriving at correct preoperaive diagnosis. PMID:25302235

  10. Space fabrication demonstration system composite beam cap fabricator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A detailed design for a prototype, composite beam cap fabricator was established. Inputs to this design included functional tests and system operating requirements. All required materials were procured, detail parts were fabricated, and one composite beam cap forming machine was assembled. The machine was demonstrated as a stand-alone system. Two 12-foot-long beam cap members were fabricated from laminates graphite/polysulfane or an equivalent material. One of these members, which as structurally tested in axial compression, failed at 490 pounds.

  11. Congenital Bilobed Gallbladder with Phrygian Cap Presenting as Calculus Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Usha; Babu, C.P. Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of congenital bilobed gall bladder is 1 in 3000 to 4000. A Phrygian cap is a congenital abnormality of the gallbladder with an incidence of 4%. Preferred mode of diagnosis for Phrygian cap is cholescintigraphy and multi phase MRI, as Ultrasonography and CT are not always conclusive. The estimated prevalence of gallstone disease in India has been reported as 2% to 29%. A case of bilobed gall bladder with Phrygian cap in both the lobes and pigment gallstone in one of the lobes presenting as calculus cholecystitis is reported for its rarity and difficulty in arriving at correct preoperaive diagnosis PMID:25302235

  12. Oxidation resistance of Ru-capped EUV multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Dai, Z; Nelson, E J; Wall, M A; Alameda, J; Nguyen, N; Baker, S; Robinson, J C; Taylor, J S; Clift, M; Aquila, A; Gullikson, E M; Edwards, N G

    2005-02-23

    Differently prepared Ru-capping layers, deposited on Mo/Si EUV multilayers, have been characterized using a suite of metrologies to establish their baseline structural, optical, and surface properties in as-deposited state. Same capping layer structures were tested for their thermal stability and oxidation resistance. Post-mortem characterization identified changes due to accelerated tests. The best performing Ru-capping layer structure was studied in detail with transmission electron microscopy to identify the grain microstructure and texture. This information is essential for modeling and performance optimization of EUVL multilayers.

  13. Biomolecularly capped uniformly sized nanocrystalline materials: glutathione-capped ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Martínez, Claudia L.; Nguyen, Liem; Kho, Richard; Bae, Weon; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Klimov, Victor; Mehra, Rajesh K.

    1999-09-01

    Micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeasts form CdS to detoxify toxic cadmium ions. Frequently, CdS particles formed in yeasts and bacteria were found to be associated with specific biomolecules. It was later determined that these biomolecules were present at the surface of CdS. This coating caused a restriction in the growth of CdS particles and resulted in the formation of nanometre-sized semiconductors (NCs) that exhibited typical quantum confinement properties. Glutathione and related phytochelatin peptides were shown to be the biomolecules that capped CdS nanocrystallites synthesized by yeasts Candida glabrata and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Although early studies showed the existence of specific biochemical pathways for the synthesis of biomolecularly capped CdS NCs, these NCs could be formed in vitro under appropriate conditions. We have recently shown that cysteine and cysteine-containing peptides such as glutathione and phytochelatins can be used in vitro to dictate the formation of discrete sizes of CdS and ZnS nanocrystals. We have evolved protocols for the synthesis of ZnS or CdS nanocrystals within a narrow size distribution range. These procedures involve three steps: (1) formation of metallo-complexes of cysteine or cysteine-containing peptides, (2) introduction of stoichiometric amounts of inorganic sulfide into the metallo-complexes to initiate the formation of nanocrystallites and finally (3) size-selective precipitation of NCs with ethanol in the presence of Na+. The resulting NCs were characterized by optical spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction. HRTEM showed that the diameter of the ZnS-glutathione nanocrystals was 3.45+/-0.5 nm. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction analyses indicated ZnS-glutathione to be hexagonal. Photocatalytic studies suggest that glutathione-capped ZnS nanocrystals prepared by our procedure are highly efficient in degrading a test model

  14. Preparation and Properties of Nanoparticles of Calcium Phosphates With Various Ca/P Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Bonevich, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at preparing and studying the properties of nanoparticles of calcium phosphate (nCaP) with Ca/P ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.67 using a spray-drying technique. Micro-structural analyses suggested that the nCaPs with Ca/P ratios of 1.67 to 1.33 were nano-sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) containing varying amounts of acid phosphate and carbonate. The nCaP with Ca/P ratio of 1 contained only nano-sized low crystalline dicalcium phosphate (DCP). BET measurements of the nCaPs showed specific surface areas of (12 ± 2 to 50 ± 1) m2/g, corresponding to estimated equivalent spherical diameters of (38 to 172) nm. However, dynamic light scattering measurements revealed much larger particles of (380 ± 49 to 768 ± 111) nm, owing to agglomeration of the smaller primary nano particles as revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermodynamic solubility measurements showed that the nCaPs with Ca/P ratio of 1.33 – 1.67 all have similar solubility behavior. The materials were more soluble than the crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) at pH greater than about 4.7, and more soluble than β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and DCP at pH above 5.5. Their solubility approached that of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) at about pH 7. These nCaPs, which cannot be readily prepared by other currently available methods for nanoparticle preparation, have potential biomedical applications. PMID:21037948

  15. The barber's pole worm CAP protein superfamily--A basis for fundamental discovery and biotechnology advances.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Namitha; Young, Neil D; Jabbar, Abdul; Korhonen, Pasi K; Koehler, Anson V; Amani, Parisa; Hall, Ross S; Sternberg, Paul W; Jex, Aaron R; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-12-01

    Parasitic worm proteins that belong to the cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) superfamily are proposed to play key roles in the infection process and the modulation of immune responses in host animals. However, there is limited information on these proteins for most socio-economically important worms. Here, we review the CAP protein superfamily of Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm), a highly significant parasitic roundworm (order Strongylida) of small ruminants. To do this, we mined genome and transcriptomic datasets, predicted and curated full-length amino acid sequences (n=45), undertook systematic phylogenetic analyses of these data and investigated transcription throughout the life cycle of H. contortus. We inferred functions for selected Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs (including vap-1, vap-2, scl-5 and lon-1) based on genetic networking and by integrating data and published information, and were able to infer that a subset of orthologs and their interaction partners play pivotal roles in growth and development via the insulin-like and/or the TGF-beta signalling pathways. The identification of the important and conserved growth regulator LON-1 led us to appraise the three-dimensional structure of this CAP protein by comparative modelling. This model revealed the presence of different topological moieties on the canonical fold of the CAP domain, which coincide with an overall charge separation as indicated by the electrostatic surface potential map. These observations suggest the existence of separate sites for effector binding and receptor interactions, and thus support the proposal that these worm molecules act in similar ways as venoms act as ligands for chemokine receptors or G protein-coupled receptor effectors. In conclusion, this review should guide future molecular studies of these molecules, and could support the development of novel interventions against haemonchosis. PMID:26239368

  16. Steric course of the hydration of D-gluco-octenitol catalyzed by a. cap alpha. -glucosidases and by trehalase

    SciTech Connect

    Weiser, W.; Lehmann, J.; Chiba, S.; Matsui, H.; Brewer, C.F.; Hehre, E.J.

    1988-04-05

    Crystalline Aspergillus niger ..cap alpha..-glucosidase and highly purified preparations of rice ..cap alpha..-glucosidase II and Trichoderma reesei trehalase were found to catalyze the hydration of (2-/sup 2/H)-D-gluco-octenitol, i.e., (Z)-3,7-anhydrol-1,2-dideoxy-(2-/sup 2/H)-D-gluco-oct-2-enitol, to yield 1,2-dideoxy-(2-/sup 2/H)-D-gluco-octulose. In each case, the stereochemistry of the reaction was elucidated by examining the newly formed centers of asymmetry at C-2 and C-3 of the hydration product. The C-1 to C-3 fragment of each isolated (2-/sup 2/H)-D-gluco-octulose product was recovered as (2-/sup 2/H) propionic acid and identified by its positive optical rotatory dispersion as the S isomer, showing that each enzyme had protonated the octenitol (at C-2) from above its re face. /sup 1/H NMR spectra of enzyme/D-gluco-octenitol digests in D/sub 2/O showed that the ..cap alpha..-anomer of (2-/sup 2/H)-D-gluco-octulose was exclusively produced by each ..cap alpha..-glucosidase, whereas the ..beta..-anomer was formed by action of the trehalase. The trans hydration catalyzed by the ..cap alpha..-glucosidases was found to be very strongly inhibited by the substrate; the cis hydration reaction catalyzed by the trehalase showed no such inhibition. Special importance is attached to the finding that in hydrating octenitol each enzyme creates a product of the same anomeric form as in hydrolyzing an ..cap alpha..-D-glucosidic substrate. This result adds substantially to the growing evidence that individual glycosylases create the configuration of their reaction products by a means that is independent of donor substrate configuration, that is, by a means other than retaining or inverting substrate configuration.

  17. Photodissociation of thioglycolic acid studied by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, Andrew R.; Blumling, Daniel E.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L. Jr.

    2011-01-14

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies were employed to study the photodissociation of both the neutral (HS-CH{sub 2}-COOH) and doubly deprotonated ({sup -}S-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) forms of thioglycolic acid (TGA), a common surface-passivating ligand used in the aqueous synthesis and organization of semiconducting nanostructures. Room temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated strong absorption by the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} excited states at 250 nm and 185 nm, respectively. The spectrum also contained a weaker absorption band that extended to approximately 550 nm, which was assigned to the {pi}{sub CO}{sup *}(leftarrow)n{sub O} transition. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was performed on TGA using 400 nm excitation and a white-light continuum probe to provide the temporally and spectrally resolved data. Both forms of TGA underwent a photoinduced dissociation from the excited state to form an {alpha}-thiol-substituted acyl radical ({alpha}-TAR, S-CH{sub 2}-CO). For the acidic form of TGA, radical formation occurred with an apparent time constant of 60 {+-} 5 fs; subsequent unimolecular decay took 400 {+-} 60 fs. Similar kinetics were observed for the deprotonated form of TGA (70 {+-} 10 fs radical formation; 420 {+-} 40 fs decay). The production of the {alpha}-TAR was corroborated by the observation of its characteristic optical absorption. Time-resolved data indicated that the photoinduced dissociation of TGA via cleavage of the C-OH bond occurred rapidly ({<=}100 fs). The prevalence of TGA in aqueous semiconducting nanoparticles makes its absorption in the visible spectral region and subsequent dissociation key to understanding the behavior of nanoscale systems.

  18. Fast-flowing outlet glaciers on Svalbard ice caps

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdeswell, J.A. ); Collin, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Four well-defined outlet glaciers are present on the 2510 km{sup 2} cap of Vestfonna in Nordaustlandet, Svalbard. Airborne radio echo sounding and aerial-photograph and satellite-image analysis methods are used to analyze the morphology and dynamics of the ice cap and its component outlet glaciers. The heavily crevassed outlets form linear depressions in the ice-cap surface and flow an order of magnitude faster than the ridges of uncrevassed ice between them. Ice flow on the ridges is accounted for by internal deformation alone, whereas rates of outlet glacier flow require basal motion. One outlet has recently switched into and out of a faster mode of flow. Rapid terminal advance, a change from longitudinal compression to tension, and thinning in the upper basin indicate surge behavior. Observed outlet glacier discharge is significantly greater than current inputs of mass of the ice cap, indicating that present rates of flow cannot be sustained under the contemporary climate.

  19. 6. Detail of pilaster cap. Aug. 10, 1936. Joseph Hill, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of pilaster cap. Aug. 10, 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from small photo taken by survey member. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  20. Wind blade spar cap and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Mohamed, Mansour H.

    2008-05-27

    A wind blade spar cap for strengthening a wind blade including an integral, unitary three-dimensional woven material having a first end and a second end, corresponding to a root end of the blade and a tip end of the blade, wherein the material tapers in width from the first to the second end while maintaining a constant thickness and decreasing weight therebetween, the cap being capable of being affixed to the blade for providing increased strength with controlled variation in weight from the root end to the tip end based upon the tapered width of the material thereof. The present inventions also include the method of making the wind blade spar cap and a wind blade including the wind blade spar cap.

  1. 51. VIEW SHOWING THE POURING OF CAP ON PIER 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. VIEW SHOWING THE POURING OF CAP ON PIER 7, LOOKING WEST FROM BARGE, December 22, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  2. Mechanical capping of silica nanotubes for encapsulation of molecules.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaeeun; Bai, Xia; Suh, Junghun; Lee, Sang Bok; Son, Sang Jun

    2009-11-01

    Multifunctional silica nanotubes (SNTs) are being widely used for many biomedical applications due to their structural benefits. Controlling the structure of the open end of an SNT is a crucial step for drug/gene delivery and for fabrication of multifunctional SNTs. We developed a mechanical capsulation method to fabricate caps at the ends of SNTs. A thin layer of malleable capping materials (Au, Ag, PLGA) was deposited onto the surface of an SNT-grown AAO template. Capped SNTs were then obtained by hammering with alumina microbeads. For a proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrated dye-encapsulated SNTs without any chemical functionalizations. Since a mechanical approach is free of the issue of chemical compatibility between cargo molecules and capping materials, the method can provide an effective platform for the preparation of smart multifunctional nanotubes for biomedical applications. PMID:19824675

  3. 16. PIER CAP DETAIL, SHOWING EXPANSION AND FIXED BEARING SHOES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. PIER CAP DETAIL, SHOWING EXPANSION AND FIXED BEARING SHOES, BOTTOM CHORD / END POST CONNECTION AND CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK. VIEW TO WEST. - Holbrook Bridge, Spanning Little Colorado River at AZ 77, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  4. 16. Top of missile, missile cap collar at center, cables ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Top of missile, missile cap collar at center, cables at left and right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  5. 11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH FLOOR WAREHOUSE SPACE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Becker-Hazelton Company Warehouse, 280 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  6. Idealized model of polar cap currents, fields, and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    During periods of northward Bz, the electric field applied to the magnetosphere is generally opposite to that occurring during southward Bz and complicated patterns of convection result, showing some features reversed in comparison with the southward Bz case. A study is conducted of a simple generalization of early work on idealized convection models, which allows for coexistence of sunward convection over the central polar cap and antisunward convection elsewhere in the cap. The present model, valid for By approximately 0, has a four-cell convection pattern and is based on the combination of ionospheric current conservation with a relation between parallel auroral currents and parallel potential drops. Global magnetospheric issues involving, e.g., reconnection are not considered. The central result of this paper is an expression giving the parallel potential drop for polar cap auroras (with By approximately 0) in terms of the polar cap convection field profile.

  7. A modified electrode cap for EEG recordings in MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Baumann, S B; Noll, D C

    1999-12-01

    A stretchable electrode cap containing 64 electrodes was modified to make it compatible for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Metallic components were individually tested for magnetic susceptibility, and those that perturbed a free-swinging magnet or moved in a strong magnetic field were replaced with non-ferromagnetic components. Studies with a phantom indicate that placement of the cables carrying signals from the cap to the amplifiers can significantly affect MR image quality. Anatomical and functional images obtained with the modified electrode cap show modest signal loss, but not enough to substantially interfere with the low-noise images required for fMRI. The cap enables faster application of large arrays of electrodes in conjunction with MRI studies, and thus makes combined EEG/fMRI studies more practical, especially those with EEG source localization as one of the goals. PMID:10616125

  8. Isolation of a complete circular virus genome sequence from an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract sample.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanna, Zachary R.; Runckel, Charles; Fuchs, Jerome; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Mindell, David P.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.; Dumbacher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a circular virus isolated from samples of an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract. The genome is 2,152 bp in length and is most similar (30 to 44.5% amino acid identity) to the genome sequences of other single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) circular viruses belonging to the gemycircularvirus group.

  9. Recent Advances in Pulp Capping Materials: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Asma; E., Soujanya; Nandakumar; Pratapkumar; Sambashivarao

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis has shifted from the “doomed” organ concept of an exposed pulp to one of hope and recovery. The era of vital-pulp therapy has been greatly enhanced with the introduction of various pulp capping materials. The aim of this article is to summarize and discuss about the various and newer pulp capping materials used for protection of the dentin-pulp complex. PMID:24596805

  10. Novel Multipin Electrode Cap System for Dry Electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, P; Pedrosa, P; Griebel, S; Fonseca, C; Vaz, F; Supriyanto, E; Zanow, F; Haueisen, J

    2015-09-01

    Current usage of electroencephalography (EEG) is limited to laboratory environments. Self-application of a multichannel wet EEG caps is practically impossible, since the application of state-of-the-art wet EEG sensors requires trained laboratory staff. We propose a novel EEG cap system with multipin dry electrodes overcoming this problem. We describe the design of a novel 24-pin dry electrode made from polyurethane and coated with Ag/AgCl. A textile cap system holds 97 of these dry electrodes. An EEG study with 20 volunteers compares the 97-channel dry EEG cap with a conventional 128-channel wet EEG cap for resting state EEG, alpha activity, eye blink artifacts and checkerboard pattern reversal visual evoked potentials. All volunteers report a good cap fit and good wearing comfort. Average impedances are below 150 kΩ for 92 out of 97 dry electrodes, enabling recording with standard EEG amplifiers. No significant differences are observed between wet and dry power spectral densities for all EEG bands. No significant differences are observed between the wet and dry global field power time courses of visual evoked potentials. The 2D interpolated topographic maps show significant differences of 3.52 and 0.44% of the map areas for the N75 and N145 VEP components, respectively. For the P100 component, no significant differences are observed. Dry multipin electrodes integrated in a textile EEG cap overcome the principle limitations of wet electrodes, allow rapid application of EEG multichannel caps by non-trained persons, and thus enable new fields of application for multichannel EEG acquisition. PMID:25998854

  11. Protein and carotenoid synthesis and turnover in gravistimulated root caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    In certain cultivars of corn gravitropic bending occurs only after the root cap, the site of gravity perception, is exposed to light. Light appears to trigger or to remove some block in the gravity translation process. Using light sensitive cultivars of corn, it was shown that light affects various processes in the cap. The roles of these light-induced processes in gravitropic bending in roots were studied.

  12. Density functional study of condensation in capped capillaries.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshin, P; Savva, N; Kalliadasis, S

    2015-07-15

    We study liquid adsorption in narrow rectangular capped capillaries formed by capping two parallel planar walls (a slit pore) with a third wall orthogonal to the two planar walls. The most important transition in confined fluids is arguably condensation, where the pore becomes filled with the liquid phase which is metastable in the bulk. Depending on the temperature T, the condensation in capped capillaries can be first-order (at T≤Tcw) or continuous (at T>Tcw), where Tcw is the capillary wetting temperature. At T>Tcw, the capping wall can adsorb mesoscopic amounts of metastable under-condensed liquid. The onset of condensation is then manifested by the continuous unbinding of the interface between the liquid adsorbed on the capping wall and the gas filling the rest of the capillary volume. In wide capped capillaries there may be a remnant of wedge filling transition, which is manifested by the adsorption of liquid drops in the corners. Our classical statistical mechanical treatment predicts a possibility of three-phase coexistence between gas, corner drops and liquid slabs adsorbed on the capping wall. In sufficiently wide capillaries we find that thick prewetting films of finite length may be nucleated at the capping wall below the boundary of the prewetting transition. Prewetting then proceeds in a continuous manner manifested by the unbinding interface between the thick and thin films adsorbed on the side walls. Our analysis is based on a detailed numerical investigation of the density functional theory for the fluid equilibria for a number of illustrative case studies. PMID:26086161

  13. Density functional study of condensation in capped capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Savva, N.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2015-07-01

    We study liquid adsorption in narrow rectangular capped capillaries formed by capping two parallel planar walls (a slit pore) with a third wall orthogonal to the two planar walls. The most important transition in confined fluids is arguably condensation, where the pore becomes filled with the liquid phase which is metastable in the bulk. Depending on the temperature T, the condensation in capped capillaries can be first-order (at T≤slant {{T}\\text{cw}} ) or continuous (at T\\gt {{T}\\text{cw}} ), where {{T}\\text{cw}} is the capillary wetting temperature. At T \\gt {{T}\\text{cw}} , the capping wall can adsorb mesoscopic amounts of metastable under-condensed liquid. The onset of condensation is then manifested by the continuous unbinding of the interface between the liquid adsorbed on the capping wall and the gas filling the rest of the capillary volume. In wide capped capillaries there may be a remnant of wedge filling transition, which is manifested by the adsorption of liquid drops in the corners. Our classical statistical mechanical treatment predicts a possibility of three-phase coexistence between gas, corner drops and liquid slabs adsorbed on the capping wall. In sufficiently wide capillaries we find that thick prewetting films of finite length may be nucleated at the capping wall below the boundary of the prewetting transition. Prewetting then proceeds in a continuous manner manifested by the unbinding interface between the thick and thin films adsorbed on the side walls. Our analysis is based on a detailed numerical investigation of the density functional theory for the fluid equilibria for a number of illustrative case studies.

  14. RNA methyltransferases involved in 5′ cap biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Byszewska, Magdalena; Śmietański, Mirosław; Purta, Elżbieta; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes and viruses that infect them, the 5′ end of mRNA molecules, and also many other functionally important RNAs, are modified to form a so-called cap structure that is important for interactions of these RNAs with many nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. The RNA cap has multiple roles in gene expression, including enhancement of RNA stability, splicing, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and translation initiation. Apart from guanosine addition to the 5′ end in the most typical cap structure common to transcripts produced by RNA polymerase II (in particular mRNA), essentially all cap modifications are due to methylation. The complexity of the cap structure and its formation can range from just a single methylation of the unprocessed 5′ end of the primary transcript, as in mammalian U6 and 7SK, mouse B2, and plant U3 RNAs, to an elaborate m7Gpppm6,6AmpAmpCmpm3Um structure at the 5′ end of processed RNA in trypanosomes, which are formed by as many as 8 methylation reactions. While all enzymes responsible for methylation of the cap structure characterized to date were found to belong to the same evolutionarily related and structurally similar Rossmann Fold Methyltransferase superfamily, that uses the same methyl group donor, S-adenosylmethionine; the enzymes also exhibit interesting differences that are responsible for their distinct functions. This review focuses on the evolutionary classification of enzymes responsible for cap methylation in RNA, with a focus on the sequence relationships and structural similarities and dissimilarities that provide the basis for understanding the mechanism of biosynthesis of different caps in cellular and viral RNAs. Particular attention is paid to the similarities and differences between methyltransferases from human cells and from human pathogens that may be helpful in the development of antiviral and antiparasitic drugs. PMID:25626080

  15. Molecular-Weight-Controlled, End-Capped Polybenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Novel molecular-weight-controlled end-capped poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's) prepared by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides. Polymers prepared at various molecular weights by upsetting stoichiometry of monomers and end-capped with monohydroxybenzimidazole. Exhibit favorable physical and mechanical properties, improved solubility in polar aprotic solvents and better compression moldability. Potential applications as adhesives, coatings, films, fibers, membranes, moldings, and composite matrix resins.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of the putative polysaccharide biosynthesis protein (CapD) of Enterococcus faecium U0317.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Spiess, Meike; Wobser, Dominique; Rodriguez, Marta; Blum, Hubert E; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial species produce capsular polysaccharides that contribute to disease pathogenesis through evasion of the host innate immune system and are also involved in inhibiting leukocyte killing. In the present study, we identified a gene in Enterococcus faecium U0317 with homologies to the polysaccharide biosynthesis protein CapD that is made up of 336 amino acids and putatively catalyzes N-linked glycosylation. A capD deletion mutant was constructed and complemented by homologous recombination that was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. The mutant revealed different growth behavior and morphological changes compared to wild-type by scanning electron microscopy, also the capD mutant showed a strong hydrophobicity and that was reversed in the reconstituted mutant. For further characterization and functional analyses, in-vitro cell culture and in-vivo a mouse infection models were used. Antibodies directed against alpha lipotechoic acid (αLTA) and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (αPpiC), effectively mediated the opsonophagocytic killing in the capD knock-out mutant, while this activity was not observed in the wild-type and reconstituted mutant. By comparison more than 2-fold decrease was seen in mutant colonization and adherence to both T24 and Caco2 cells. However, a significant higher bacterial colonization was observed in capD mutant during bacteremia in the animal model, while virulence in a mouse UTI (urinary tract infection) model, there were no obvious differences. Further studies are needed to elucidate the function of capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene clusters and its involvement in the disease pathogenesis with the aim to develop targeted therapies to treat multidrug-resistant E. faecium infections. PMID:26611826

  17. Controlling Surface Ligand Density and Core Size of Alkanethiolate-Capped Pd Nanoparticles and Their Effects on Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gavia, Diego J.; Shon, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    This article presents systematic investigations on the relationship between the catalytic property and the surface ligand density/core size of thiolate ligand-capped Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs). The systematic variations in the two-phase synthesis of PdNPs generated from sodium S-dodecylthiosulfate were performed. The resulting PdNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and 1H NMR and UV–vis spectroscopy. The decrease in the molar equivalent of sodium S-dodecylthiosulfate (Bunte salts) resulted in the formation of nanoparticles with lower surface ligand density and larger particle core size. A decrease in the molar equivalent of tetra-n-octylammonium bromide or an increase in reaction temperature generated nanoparticles with higher surface ligand density and smaller particle core size. As the molar equivalent of NaBH4 decreased, the particle core size increased. The catalysis studies on various PdNPs with different surface ligand density and average core size showed a strong correlation between the PdNP composition and the turnover frequency (TOF) of the isomerization of allyl alcohol. Optimized “good” PdNPs with lower surface ligand coverage and larger core size catalyzed the isomerization of various allyl alcohols to carbonyl analogues with high activity and selectivity. PMID:22924990

  18. Active capping technology: a new environmental remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zhu, Meng-Ying; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yu, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Fang; Yang, Zhong-Zhu; Shen, Liu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The management and treatment of contaminated sediment is a worldwide problem and poses major technical and economic challenges. Nowadays, various attempts have been committed to investigating a cost-effective way in contaminated sediment restoration. Among the remediation options, in situ capping turns out to be a less expensive, less disruptive, and more durable approach. However, by using the low adsorption capacity materials, traditional caps do not always fulfill the reduction of risks that can be destructive for human health, ecosystem, and even natural resources. Active caps, therefore, are designed to employ active materials (activated carbon, apatite, zeolite, organoclay, etc.) to strengthen their adsorption and degradation capacity. The active capping technology promises to be a permanent and cost-efficient solution to contaminated sediments. This paper provides a review on the types of active materials and the ways of these active materials employed in recent active capping studies. Cap design considerations including site-specific conditions, diffusion/advection, erosive forces, and active material selection that should be noticed in an eligible remediation project are also presented. PMID:26762937

  19. Effects of Atmospheric Dust on Residual South Polar Cap Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrv, B. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Martian polar caps have been studied from the time of Herschel. Neither polar cap normally disappears in summer. The Residual North Polar Cap (portion that remains through summer) is composed of a mixture of water ice and dust, and its interannual stability is due to its low sublimation rate at the summer temperatures in the North Polar Region. The Residual South Polar Cap (RSPC) is more enigmatic, surviving the relatively hot perihelic summer season despite being composed of much more volatile CO2. It is able to do so because of its unusually high albedo, which is larger than that of other bright regions in the seasonal cap (e.g. Mountains of Mitchel). The proximity of the albedo of the RSPC to the critical albedo for stability raises the question of whether the RSPC exists in every Martian year. The ground based record is somewhat ambivalent. Douglass and Lowell reported that RSPC suddenly vanished at Ls=297deg in 1894 and did not reappear until Ls=0deg [1], and Kuiper reported that it disappeared in 1956 [2]; but both observations were questioned by contemporaries, who tended to attribute them to obscuring dust. Barker [3] reported a large amount of water vapor over the south polar cap in 1969 that could be attributed to exposure of near surface water ice during partial removal of the CO2 in the RSPC in 1969.

  20. Regulation of phytochrome message abundance in root caps of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. M.; Pao, L. I.; Feldman, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    In many cultivars of maize (Zea mays L.) red light affects root development via the photomorphogenetic pigment phytochrome. The site of perception for the light is the root cap. In the maize cultivar Merit, we investigated phytochrome-mediated events in the cap. We established that the message encoded by the phyA1 gene was most abundant in dark-grown tissue and was asymmetrically distributed in the root cap, with greatest expression in the cells which make up the central columella core of the cap. Phytochrome message was negatively autoregulated in a specific region within the root cap. This autoregulation was sensitive to very-low-fluence red light, and thus was characterized as a phytochrome-mediated, very-low-fluence event. The kinetics of message reaccumulation in the dark were also examined and compared to the kinetics of the light requirement for root gravitropism in this cultivar. Similarly, the degree of autoregulation present in two other maize cultivars with different light requirements for gravitropic sensitivity was investigated. It appears that the Merit cultivar expresses a condition of hypersensitivity to phytochrome-mediated light regulation in root tissues. We conclude that phytochrome regulates many activities within the cap, but the degree to which these activities share common phytochrome-mediated steps is not known.

  1. In vitro antibacterial activity of different pulp capping materials

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Dagna, Alberto; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct pulp capping involves the application of a dental material to seal communications between the exposed pulp and the oral cavity (mechanical and carious pulp exposures) in an attempt to act as a barrier, protect the dental pulp complex and preserve its vitality. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by the agar disc diffusion test, the antimicrobial activity of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), Biodentine (Septodont). Material and Methods Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity by the agar disc diffusion test of different pulp capping materials. Paper disks were impregnated whit each pulp capping materials and placed onto culture agar-plates pre-adsorbed with bacterial cells and further incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The growth inhibition zones around each pulp capping materials were recorded and compared for each bacterial strain. Results For the investigation of the antibacterial properties the ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various materials. Tukey test showed that MTA-based materials induced lower growth inhibition zones. Conclusions MTA-based products show a discrete antibacterial activity varying from calcium hydroxide-based materials which present an higher antibacterial activity. Key words:Agar disc diffusion test, antimicrobial activity, calcium hydroxide, MTA, pulp capping materials. PMID:26644833

  2. Tetrazoles: Unique Capping Ligands and Precursors for Nanostructured Materials.

    PubMed

    Voitekhovich, Sergei V; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2015-11-18

    Capping agents play an important role in the colloidal synthesis of nanomaterials because they control the nucleation and growth of particles, as well as their chemical and colloidal stability. During recent years tetrazole derivatives have proven to be advanced capping ligands for the stabilization of semiconductor and metal nanoparticles. Tetrazole-capped nanoparticles can be prepared by solution-phase or solventless single precursor approaches using metal derivatives of tetrazoles. The solventless thermolysis of metal tetrazolates can produce both individual semiconductor nanocrystals and nanostructured metal monolithic foams displaying low densities and high surface areas. Alternatively, highly porous nanoparticle 3D assemblies are achieved through the controllable aggregation of tetrazole-capped particles in solutions. This approach allows for the preparation of non-ordered hybrid structures consisting of different building blocks, such as mixed semiconductor and metal nanoparticle-based (aero)gels with tunable compositions. Another unique property of tetrazoles is their complete thermal decomposition, forming only gaseous products, which is employed in the fabrication of organic-free semiconductor films from tetrazole-capped nanoparticles. After deposition and subsequent thermal treatment these films exhibit significantly improved electrical transport. The synthetic availability and advances in the functionalization of tetrazoles necessitate further design and study of tetrazole-capped nanoparticles for various applications. PMID:26395565

  3. Cortical and cap sedimentation in gravitropic Equisetum roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridge, R. W.; Sack, F. D.

    1992-01-01

    Although the rootcap is required for gravitropic sensing, various classical and contemporary data raise the question of whether additional sensing occurs away from the cap in roots. Roots of Equisetum hyemale L. (horsetail) were examined by light and electron microscopy to determine which cell components were distributed with respect to gravity both in and away from the rootcap. Adventitious roots from stem cuttings were gravitropic in a vertical orientation or if reoriented to the horizontal. Obvious amyloplast sedimentation was found in vertical and in reoriented roots 1) in cells in the center of the rootcap and 2) in young, elongating cortical cells located in two to three layers outside the endodermis. These cortical amyloplasts were smaller than cap amyloplasts and, unlike central cap amyloplasts, were occasionally found in the top of the cell. The nucleus was also sedimented on top of the amyloplasts in both cell types, both in vertical and in reoriented roots. Sedimentation of both organelles ceased as cortical cells elongated further or as cap cells became peripheral in location. In both cell types with sedimentation, endoplasmic reticulum was located in the cell periphery, but showed no obvious enrichment near the lower part of the cell in vertical roots. This is the first modern report of sedimentation away from the cap in roots, and it provides structural evidence that gravitropic sensing may not be confined to the cap in all roots.

  4. Neoproterozoic cap-dolostone deposition in stratified glacial meltwater plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Zhengrong; Raub, Timothy D.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Evans, David A. D.

    2014-10-01

    Neoproterozoic cap carbonates host distinctive geochemical and sedimentological features that reflect prevailing conditions in the aftermath of Snowball Earth. Interpretation of these features has remained contentious, with hypotheses hinging upon timescale and synchronicity of deposition, and whether or not geochemical signatures of cap carbonates represent those of a well-mixed ocean. Here we present new high-resolution Sr and Mg isotope results from basal Ediacaran cap dolostones in South Australia and Mongolia. Least-altered Sr and Mg isotope compositions of carbonates are identified through a novel incremental leaching technique that monitors the purity of a carbonate sample and the effects of diagenesis. These data can be explained by the formation of these cap dolostones involving two chemically distinct solutions, a glacial meltwater plume enriched in radiogenic Sr, and a saline ocean residue with relatively lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Model simulations suggest that these water bodies remained dynamically stratified during part of cap-dolostone deposition, most likely lasting for ∼8 thousand years. Our results can potentially reconcile previous conflicts between timescales estimated from physical mixing models and paleomagnetic constraints. Geochemical data from cap carbonates used to interpret the nature of Snowball Earth and its aftermath should be recast in terms of a chemically distinct meltwater plume.

  5. Cap homeostasis is independent of poly(A) tail length

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Daniel L.; Oman, Kenji M.; Dougherty, Julie A.; Mukherjee, Chandrama; Bundschuh, Ralf; Schoenberg, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cap homeostasis is a cyclical process of decapping and recapping that maintains the cap on a subset of the cytoplasmic transcriptome. Interfering with cytoplasmic capping results in the redistribution of target transcripts from polysomes to non-translating mRNPs, where they accumulate in an uncapped but nonetheless stable form. It is generally thought that decapping is preceded by shortening of the poly(A) tail to a length that can no longer support translation. Therefore recapped target transcripts would either have to undergo cytoplasmic polyadenylation or retain a reasonably long poly(A) tail if they are to return to the translating pool. In cells that are inhibited for cytoplasmic capping there is no change in the overall distribution of poly(A) lengths or in the elution profile of oligo(dT)-bound targets. Poly(A) tail lengths were similar for target mRNAs on polysomes or in non-translating mRNPs, and the presence of polyadenylated uncapped mRNA in mRNPs was confirmed by separation into capped and uncapped pools prior to assay. Finally, in silico analysis of cytoplasmic capping targets revealed significant correlations with genes encoding transcripts with uridylated or multiply modified 3′ ends, and genes possessing multiple 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) generated by alternative cleavage and polyadenylation. PMID:26673707

  6. Model-observation comparison study of multiple polar cap arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Valladares, C. E.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Crain, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative model-observation comparison of multiple polar cap arcs has been conducted by using a time-dependent theoretical model of polar cap arcs. In particular, the electrodynamical features of multiple polar cap arcs with various spacings are simulated and the results are compared with the images obtained from the All-Sky Intensified Photometer at Qaanaaq. The results show that the observed and simulated arcs are quite similar, both spatially and temporally. The results support the theory proposed by Zhu et al. [1993a, 1994b] that the structure of polar cap arcs is mainly determined by the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling processes and that the spacing of multiple polar cap arcs is closely related to the hardness of the primary magnetospheric precipitation. It is found that for the multiple polar cap arcs with both narrow and wide spacings, the associated field-aligned currents are mainly closed by Pedersen currents. It is also found that a hard precipitation can lead to a highly structured secondary arc because of the nonlinear M-I coupling processes.

  7. General RNA binding proteins render translation cap dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Svitkin, Y V; Ovchinnikov, L P; Dreyfuss, G; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is relatively independent of the presence of the mRNA m7G cap structure and the cap binding protein, eIF-4E. In addition, initiation occurs frequently at spurious internal sites. Here we show that a critical parameter which contributes to cap-dependent translation is the amount of general RNA binding proteins in the extract. Addition of several general RNA binding proteins, such as hnRNP A1, La autoantigen, pyrimidine tract binding protein (hnRNP I/PTB) and the major core protein of cytoplasmic mRNP (p50), rendered translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cap dependent. These proteins drastically inhibited the translation of an uncapped mRNA, but had no effect on translation of a capped mRNA. Based on these and other results, we suggest that one function of general mRNA binding proteins in the cytoplasm is to promote ribosome binding by a 5' end, cap-mediated mechanism, and prevent spurious initiations at aberrant translation start sites. Images PMID:9003790

  8. Response of northern winter polar cap to auroral substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The three-phase substorm sequence has been generally accepted and is often tied to the Dungey cycle. Although previous studies have mostly agreed on the increase and decrease in the polar cap area during an episode of substorm, there are disparate views on when the polar cap starts to contract relative to substorm onset. Here we address this conflict using high-resolution (~1-3 min) snapshot global auroral images from the ultraviolet imager on board the Polar spacecraft. On the basis of 28 auroral substorm events, all observed in the Northern Hemispheric winter, it is found that the polar cap inflated prior to onset in all events and it attained the largest area ~6 min prior to the substorm expansion phase onset, while the dayside polar cap area remained steady around the onset. The onset of nightside polar cap deflation is found to be attributed to intensifications of aurora on the poleward edge of the nightside oval, mostly in the midnight sector. Although this result supports the loading-unloading and reconnection substorm models, it is not clear if the initial polar cap deflation and the substorm expansion are parts of the same process.

  9. The root cap: a short story of life and death.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, Robert P; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-09-01

    Over 130 years ago, Charles Darwin recognized that sensory functions in the root tip influence directional root growth. Modern plant biology has unravelled that many of the functions that Darwin attributed to the root tip are actually accomplished by a particular organ-the root cap. The root cap surrounds and protects the meristematic stem cells at the growing root tip. Due to this vanguard position, the root cap is predisposed to receive and transmit environmental information to the root proper. In contrast to other plant organs, the root cap shows a rapid turnover of short-lived cells regulated by an intricate balance of cell generation, differentiation, and degeneration. Thanks to these particular features, the root cap is an excellent developmental model system, in which generation, differentiation, and degeneration of cells can be investigated in a conveniently compact spatial and temporal frame. In this review, we give an overview of the current knowledge and concepts of root cap biology, focusing on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:26068468

  10. A decision tool for selecting trench cap designs

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, G.B.; Stone, J.J.; Lane, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    A computer based prototype decision support system (PDSS) is being developed to assist the risk manager in selecting an appropriate trench cap design for waste disposal sites. The selection of the {open_quote}best{close_quote} design among feasible alternatives requires consideration of multiple and often conflicting objectives. The methodology used in the selection process consists of: selecting and parameterizing decision variables using data, simulation models, or expert opinion; selecting feasible trench cap design alternatives; ordering the decision variables and ranking the design alternatives. The decision model is based on multi-objective decision theory and uses a unique approach to order the decision variables and rank the design alternatives. Trench cap designs are evaluated based on federal regulations, hydrologic performance, cover stability and cost. Four trench cap designs, which were monitored for a four year period at Hill Air Force Base in Utah, are used to demonstrate the application of the PDSS and evaluate the results of the decision model. The results of the PDSS, using both data and simulations, illustrate the relative advantages of each of the cap designs and which cap is the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} alternative for a given set of criteria and a particular importance order of those decision criteria.

  11. Crystal Structure of Serine Racemase that Produces Neurotransmitter caps">d-Serine for Stimulation of the NMDA Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masaru

    caps">d-Serine is an endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-caps">d-aspartate receptor and is involved in excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Mammalian pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent serine racemase, which is localized in the mammalian brain, catalyzes the racemization of caps">l-serine to yield caps">d-serine and vice versa. We have determined the structures of three forms of the mammalian enzyme homolog from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Lys57 and Ser82 located on the protein and solvent sides, respectively, with respect to the cofactor plane, are acid-base catalysts that shuttle protons to the substrate. The modified enzyme, which has a unique lysino-caps">d-alanyl residue at the active site, also binds the substrate serine in the active site, suggesting that the lysino-caps">d-alanyl residue acts as a catalytic base in the same manner as Lys57 of the wild type enzyme.

  12. Nanocrystals self-assembled in superlattices directed by the solvent-organic capping interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmaschio, Cleocir José; da Silveira Firmiano, Edney Geraldo; Pinheiro, Antonio Narcisio; Sobrinho, Diego Guedes; Farias de Moura, André; Leite, Edson Roberto

    2013-05-01

    . The entangled organic chain in the NC surface offsets the limitations of the faceted NCs, improving the assembly quality, allowing the NC assembly to approach the formation of a hard sphere model, resulting in a FCC close-packed structure. Furthermore, the low interaction of chloroform with the capping layer reduces the shrinkage effect during the solvent evaporation preserving the array in the final self-assembled structure. Molecular dynamics simulations with soft potentials supported the conclusion that hexane interacts with the organic capping ligand, increasing the apparent radius of each NC and stabilizing the colloidal suspension, whereas chloroform is partially removed from the capping layer during the aggregation process, forming an array of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the molecular dynamic simulation model, synthesis of ZrO2 directly in oleic acid and the influence of organic solvents on the self-assembly. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00883e

  13. Auxin and ethylene interactions control mitotic activity of the quiescent centre, root cap size, and pattern of cap cell differentiation in maize.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Georgina; Barlow, Peter W; Feldman, Lewis J; Cassab, Gladys I

    2005-06-01

    Root caps (RCs) are the terminal tissues of higher plant roots. In the present study the factors controlling RC size, shape and structure were examined. It was found that this control involves interactions between the RC and an adjacent population of slowly dividing cells, the quiescent centre, QC. Using the polar auxin transport inhibitor 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), the effects of QC activation on RC gene expression and border cell release was characterized. Ethylene was found to regulate RC size and cell differentiation, since its addition, or the inhibition of its synthesis, affected RC development. The stimulation of cell division in the QC following NPA treatment was reversed by ethylene, and quiescence was re-established. Moreover, inhibition of both ethylene synthesis and auxin polar transport triggered a new pattern of cell division in the root epidermis and led to the appearance of supernumerary epidermal cell files with cap-like characteristics. The data suggest that the QC ensures an ordered internal distribution of auxin, and thereby regulates not only the planes of growth and division in both the root apex proper and the RC meristem, but also regulates cell fate in the RC. Ethylene appears to regulate the auxin redistribution system that resides in the RC. Experiments with Arabidopsis roots also reveal that ethylene plays an important role in regulating the auxin sink, and consequently cell fate in the RC. PMID:16010724

  14. Differential distributions of the Ca2+ -dependent activator protein for secretion family proteins (CAPS2 and CAPS1) in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Itakura, Makoto; Kozaki, Shunji; Sekine, Yukiko; Takahashi, Masami; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2006-04-20

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS/Cadps) family consists of two members, CAPS1 and CAPS2, and plays an important role in secretory granule exocytosis. It has been shown that CAPS1 regulates catecholamine release from neuroendocrine cells, whereas CAPS2 is involved in the release of two neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), from parallel fibers of cerebellar granule cells. Although both CAPS proteins are expressed predominantly in the brain, their cellular and regional distributions in the brain are largely unknown. In this study we analyzed the immunohistochemical distributions of the CAPS family proteins in the mouse brain. In most areas of the embryonic nervous system CAPS1 and CAPS2 proteins were complementarily expressed. In the postnatal brain, CAPS1 was widespread at different levels. On the other hand, CAPS2 was localized to distinct cell types and fibers of various brain regions, including the olfactory bulb, cerebrum, hippocampal formation, thalamus, mesencephalic tegmentum, cerebellum, medulla, and spinal cord, except for some regions that overlapped with CAPS1. These CAPS2 cellular distribution patterns had the marked feature of coinciding with those of BDNF in various brain regions. Immunolabels for CAPS2 were also colocalized with those for some proteins related to exocytosis (VAMP and SNAP-25) and endocytosis (Dynamin I) in the cell soma and processes of the mesencephalic tegmentum and cerebellum, suggesting that these proteins might be involved in the dynamics of CAPS2-associated vesicles, although their colocalization on vesicles remains elusive. These results demonstrate that the CAPS family proteins are involved in the secretion of different secretory substances in developing and postnatal brains, and that CAPS2 is probably involved in BDNF secretion in many brain areas. PMID:16506193

  15. Do Differences in Chemical Composition of Stem and Cap of Amanita muscaria Fruiting Bodies Correlate with Topsoil Type?

    PubMed Central

    Deja, Stanisław; Wieczorek, Piotr P.; Halama, Marek; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Kafarski, Paweł; Poliwoda, Anna; Młynarz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) was investigated using a 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach. The caps and stems were studied separately, revealing different metabolic compositions. Additionally, multivariate data analyses of the fungal basidiomata and the type of soil were performed. Compared to the stems, A. muscaria caps exhibited higher concentrations of isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, aspartate, asparagine, threonine, lipids (mainly free fatty acids), choline, glycerophosphocholine (GPC), acetate, adenosine, uridine, 4-aminobutyrate, 6-hydroxynicotinate, quinolinate, UDP-carbohydrate and glycerol. Conversely, they exhibited lower concentrations of formate, fumarate, trehalose, α- and β-glucose. Six metabolites, malate, succinate, gluconate, N-acetylated compounds (NAC), tyrosine and phenylalanine, were detected in whole A. muscaria fruiting bodies but did not show significant differences in their levels between caps and stems (P value>0.05 and/or OPLS-DA loading correlation coefficient <0.4). This methodology allowed for the differentiation between the fruiting bodies of A. muscaria from mineral and mineral-organic topsoil. Moreover, the metabolomic approach and multivariate tools enabled to ascribe the basidiomata of fly agaric to the type of topsoil. Obtained results revealed that stems metabolome is more dependent on the topsoil type than caps. The correlation between metabolites and topsoil contents together with its properties exhibited mutual dependences. PMID:25437454

  16. Do differences in chemical composition of stem and cap of Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies correlate with topsoil type?

    PubMed

    Deja, Stanisław; Wieczorek, Piotr P; Halama, Marek; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Kafarski, Paweł; Poliwoda, Anna; Młynarz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) was investigated using a 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach. The caps and stems were studied separately, revealing different metabolic compositions. Additionally, multivariate data analyses of the fungal basidiomata and the type of soil were performed. Compared to the stems, A. muscaria caps exhibited higher concentrations of isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, aspartate, asparagine, threonine, lipids (mainly free fatty acids), choline, glycerophosphocholine (GPC), acetate, adenosine, uridine, 4-aminobutyrate, 6-hydroxynicotinate, quinolinate, UDP-carbohydrate and glycerol. Conversely, they exhibited lower concentrations of formate, fumarate, trehalose, α- and β-glucose. Six metabolites, malate, succinate, gluconate, N-acetylated compounds (NAC), tyrosine and phenylalanine, were detected in whole A. muscaria fruiting bodies but did not show significant differences in their levels between caps and stems (P value>0.05 and/or OPLS-DA loading correlation coefficient <0.4). This methodology allowed for the differentiation between the fruiting bodies of A. muscaria from mineral and mineral-organic topsoil. Moreover, the metabolomic approach and multivariate tools enabled to ascribe the basidiomata of fly agaric to the type of topsoil. Obtained results revealed that stems metabolome is more dependent on the topsoil type than caps. The correlation between metabolites and topsoil contents together with its properties exhibited mutual dependences. PMID:25437454

  17. Landscape Evolution and the Reincarnation of the Southern Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Zuber, M. T.

    2006-10-01

    Given the present rate of erosion on the southern residual ice cap, it is unlikely that any part of the cap is older than a few centuries. Unless we're lucky, why is there a residual cap present today for us to observe? We propose a solution involving constant destruction and renewal of the cap.

  18. Synthesis of water soluble glycine capped silver nanoparticles and their surface selective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agasti, Nityananda; Singh, Vinay K.; Kaushik, N.K.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles at ambient reaction conditions. • Glycine as stabilizing agent for silver nanoparticles. • Surface selective interaction of glycine with silver nanoparticles. • Glycine concentration influences crystalinity and optical property of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles has been an area of significant interest because of their wide range of applications. In the present study, we have successfully synthesized water soluble silver nanoparticles assisted by small amino acid glycine. The method is primarily based on reduction of AgNO{sub 3} with NaBH{sub 4} in aqueous solution under atmospheric air in the presence of glycine. UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X–ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques used for characterization of resulting silver nanoparticles demonstrated that, glycine is an effective capping agent to stabilize silver nanoparticles. Surface selective interaction of glycine on (1 1 1) face of silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The optical property and crystalline behavior of silver nanoparticles were found to be sensitive to concentration of glycine. X–ray diffraction studies ascertained the phase specific interaction of glycine on silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were of diameter 60 nm. We thus demonstrated an efficient synthetic method for synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles capped by amino acid under mild reaction conditions with excellent reproducibility.

  19. Reductant and sequence effects on the morphology and catalytic activity of peptide-capped Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Beverly D; Li, Yue; Swihart, Mark T; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-04-29

    The use of peptides as capping ligands for materials synthesis has been widely explored. The ambient conditions of bio-inspired syntheses using molecules such as peptides represent an attractive route for controlling the morphology and activity of nanomaterials. Although various reductants can be used in such syntheses, no comprehensive comparison of the same bio-based ligand with different reductants has been reported. In this contribution, peptides AuBP1, AuBP2, and Pd4 are used in the synthesis of Au nanoparticles. The reductant strength is varied by using three different reducing agents: NaBH4, hydrazine, and ascorbic acid. These changes in reductant produce significant morphological differences in the final particles. The weakest reductant, ascorbic acid, yields large, globular nanoparticles with rough surfaces, whereas the strongest reductant, NaBH4, yields small, spherical, smooth nanomaterials. Studies of 4-nitrophenol reduction using the Au nanoparticles as catalysts reveal a decrease in activation energy for the large, globular, rough materials relative to the small, spherical, smooth materials. These studies demonstrate that modifying the reductant is a simple way to control the activity of peptide-capped nanoparticles. PMID:25839335

  20. Effects of titanium surface anodization with CaP incorporation on human osteoblastic response.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Natássia Cristina Martins; Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; Mendonça, Daniela Baccelli Silveira; Cooper, Lyndon; Mendonça, Gustavo; Dechichi, Paula

    2013-05-01

    In this study we investigated whether anodization with calcium phosphate (CaP) incorporation (Vulcano®) enhances growth factors' secretion, osteoblast-specific gene expression, and cell viability, when compared to acid etched surfaces (Porous®) and machined surfaces (Screw®) after 3 and 7days. Results showed significant cell viability for Porous and Vulcano at day 7, when compared with Screw (p=0.005). At the same time point, significant differences regarding runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) expression were found for all surfaces (p<0.05), but with greater fold induction for Porous and Vulcano. The secretion of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was not significantly affected by surface treatment in any experimental time (p>0.05). Although no significant correlation was found for growth factors' secretion and Runx2 expression, a significant positive correlation between this gene and ALP/BSP expression showed that their strong association is independent on the type of surface. The incorporation of CaP affected the biological parameters evaluated similar to surfaces just acid etched. The results presented here support the observations that roughness also may play an important role in determining cell response. PMID:23498218

  1. Geochemical evolution of a fractured zone in the cap rock of an underground carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialle, S.; Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Assessment and management of environmental risks associated with underground storage of CO2 in geological systems is essential for the commercial deployment of this technology. A major risk is leakage of the CO2 from its storage reservoir, through wellbores, and along faults and fractures in the cap rock. The geochemical reactions likely to take place as CO2 leaks through a damage zone and their impact on cap rock integrity still need to be better understood and quantified. Should CO2 leakage occur, geochemical reactions would govern the environmental impact on shallow groundwater aquifers and could provide an indication of the leak prior to surface-based monitoring techniques. We used the reactive transport code TOUGH2/TOUGHREACT to model a leakage scenario through a fractured cap rock. Since geochemical reactions will strongly depend upon the local hydrodynamics of the CO2 leak, the first step of the study is to provide an appropriate physical representation of fluid flow through the system. Typically, for a low porosity rock formation, a fault/damaged zone system is composed of a core of low permeability and a damage zone with second-order fractures whose density decreases with distance from the fault core. Permeability is thus increased along the fault plane and laterally decreases down to the permeability value of the undamaged cap rock. Appropriate scaling relationships (e.g., and analytical expression of for permeability as a function of fracture aperture and fracture density), effective physical parameters as well as constitutive relationships are carefully chosen to model the fractured system, treated as an equivalent porous medium. The cap rock is initially saturated with brine (salinity of 0.15 in mass fraction) and due to overpressure in the lower storage reservoir, CO2 migrates through the damage zone. Geochemical reactions involve both salt precipitation due to the partitioning of H2O and CO2 between liquid and gas phases as well as well reactions

  2. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of dinucleotide mRNA cap analog containing propargyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Muthian; Charles, Irudaya; Kore, Anilkumar R

    2016-03-15

    The first example of the synthesis of new dinucleotide cap analog containing propargyl group such as m(7,3'-)(O)(-propargyl)G[5']ppp[5']G is reported. The effect of propargyl cap analog with standard cap was evaluated with respect to their capping efficiency, in vitro T7 RNA polymerase transcription efficiency, and translation activity using cultured HeLa cells. It is noteworthy that propargyl cap analog outperforms standard cap by 3.1 fold in terms of translational properties. The propargyl cap analog forms a more stable complex with translation initiation factor eIF4E based on the molecular modeling studies. PMID:26899596

  3. Cassini multi-instrument assessment of Saturn's polar cap boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinks, S. L.; Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.; Yeoman, T. K.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Gurnett, D. A.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Morooka, M.; Wahlund, J.-E.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of the polar cap boundary in Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere through a multi-instrument assessment of various Cassini in situ data sets gathered between 2006 and 2009. We identify 48 polar cap crossings where the polar cap boundary can be clearly observed in the step in upper cutoff of auroral hiss emissions from the plasma wave data, a sudden increase in electron density, an anisotropy of energetic electrons along the magnetic field, and an increase in incidence of higher-energy electrons from the low-energy electron spectrometer measurements as we move equatorward from the pole. We determine the average level of coincidence of the polar cap boundary identified in the various in situ data sets to be 0.34° ± 0.05° colatitude. The average location of the boundary in the southern (northern) hemisphere is found to be at 15.6° (13.3°) colatitude. In both hemispheres we identify a consistent equatorward offset between the poleward edge of the auroral upward directed field-aligned current region of ~1.5-1.8° colatitude to the corresponding polar cap boundary. We identify atypical observations in the boundary region, including observations of approximately hourly periodicities in the auroral hiss emissions close to the pole. We suggest that the position of the southern polar cap boundary is somewhat ordered by the southern planetary period oscillation phase but that it cannot account for the boundary's full latitudinal variability. We find no clear evidence of any ordering of the northern polar cap boundary location with the northern planetary period magnetic field oscillation phase.

  4. Polar cap auroral arcs: Observations, theories, and a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    This thesis reports the results of probably the most completely documented study of auroras near the polar cap boundary performed to date. Three fully instrumented rockets flew into the morning sector of the polar cap, complemented on the ground by a digital all-sky camera and incoherent scatter radar. Additionally, DMSP satellite passes over the polar cap bracketed the launches. We use these data to address two main issues: (1) the relationship between the state of the magnetosphere and the formation of polar cap arcs, and (2) the character of the current systems associated with polar cap arcs. The data indicate that in a decaying magnetosphere sun-aligned arcs erupt into the polar cap at high velocity from regions of enhanced brightness in the auroral oval. Two bright polar cap arcs formed in this manner in the region sampled by the rockets. The most equatorward of the arcs, sampled by two of the rockets during its lifetime, erupted into a region already characterized by strong sunward convection. The most poleward, however, which formed after the rockets had passed, pushed into a region where anti-sunward convection pertained less than two minutes earlier. It is likely that the boundary between sunward and anti-sunward convection shifted poleward so that sunward convection pertained at this arc as well. One of the payloads measured, with high resolution, both E and {delta}B as well as energetic particle flux. This permitted an in-depth study of the current systems flown through. The correlation between {delta}E and {delta}B is classic, both fields indicating upward field-aligned currents in virtually every region of enhanced electron precipitation. However, the currents deduced from the electrons do not agree in magnitude with those deduced from the fields. The conclusion is that for arcs embedded in a region of low {Sigma}{sub P} a current composed of upward thermal electrons flows concurrently with the precipitating electrons.

  5. A study of auroral activity in the nightside polar cap

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.

    1989-01-01

    Using various ground observations at South Pole, Antarctica (invariant magnetic latitude -74{degree}) and its conjugate point, Frobisher Bay, Canada, the author has studied the following aspects of nightside polar cap auroral activity: the appearance and disappearance of polar cap auroras (diffuse and discrete) associated with substorms and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) variations; auroral optical emission line intensities; and the seasonal variation of auroral conjugacy. The observations show that the polar cap auroras usually fade away before the expansive phase of a substorm and bright auroral arcs reach high latitude (-74{degree}) near the recovery phase. Just before the auroras fade away the discrete polar cap auroral arcs, which are usually on the poleward boundary of the diffuse aurora, intensify for 1 to 2 minutes. The observations also indicate the IMF may have stronger control over polar cap auroral activity than do substorms. A search for energy spectral variation of precipitating electrons using the intensities of 630.0 nm (0) and 427 nm (N{sub 2}{sup +}) auroral emission lines reveals no dramatic changes in the energy spectrum; instead, the data show possible atmospheric scattering and geometric effects on the photometric measurements while the bright auroral arc is moving into the polar cap. The conjugate observations show that the stormtime auroral electrojet current, which is associated with the bright auroral arc, in most cases reaches higher (lower) latitudes in the winter (summer) hemisphere. An asymmetric plasma sheet (with respect to the neutral sheet) is proposed, which expands deeper into the winter lobe, under a tilted geomagnetic dipole. Accordingly, the winter polar cap would have smaller area and the auroral electrojet would be at higher latitude.

  6. Hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids with removable caps as photoresponsive nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chi; West, Kevin R; Scherman, Oren A

    2016-04-21

    The fabrication, characterisation and controlled cargo release of hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids (HMRCs), which are assembled by utilising host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are described. CB[8] is employed as a supramolecular linker to 'stick' the viologen functionalised paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto an azobenzene functionalised hollow mesoporous silica core. The formed HMRCs are photoresponsive and can be reversibly disassembled upon light irradiation, endowing them with an ability to release loaded cargo under photocontrol. While the assembled HMRCs retain cargo inside their cavity, disassembled particles with their iron oxide nanoparticle 'caps' removed will release the loaded cargo through the mesoporous shell of the hollow silica colloids. A model system using a boronic acid derivative as the cargo in the HMRCs and Alizarin Red salt as a sensor for the released boronic acid is demonstrated. PMID:27010833

  7. Hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids with removable caps as photoresponsive nanocontainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chi; West, Kevin R.; Scherman, Oren A.

    2016-04-01

    The fabrication, characterisation and controlled cargo release of hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids (HMRCs), which are assembled by utilising host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are described. CB[8] is employed as a supramolecular linker to `stick' the viologen functionalised paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto an azobenzene functionalised hollow mesoporous silica core. The formed HMRCs are photoresponsive and can be reversibly disassembled upon light irradiation, endowing them with an ability to release loaded cargo under photocontrol. While the assembled HMRCs retain cargo inside their cavity, disassembled particles with their iron oxide nanoparticle `caps' removed will release the loaded cargo through the mesoporous shell of the hollow silica colloids. A model system using a boronic acid derivative as the cargo in the HMRCs and Alizarin Red salt as a sensor for the released boronic acid is demonstrated.The fabrication, characterisation and controlled cargo release of hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids (HMRCs), which are assembled by utilising host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are described. CB[8] is employed as a supramolecular linker to `stick' the viologen functionalised paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto an azobenzene functionalised hollow mesoporous silica core. The formed HMRCs are photoresponsive and can be reversibly disassembled upon light irradiation, endowing them with an ability to release loaded cargo under photocontrol. While the assembled HMRCs retain cargo inside their cavity, disassembled particles with their iron oxide nanoparticle `caps' removed will release the loaded cargo through the mesoporous shell of the hollow silica colloids. A model system using a boronic acid derivative as the cargo in the HMRCs and Alizarin Red salt as a sensor for the released boronic acid is demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01016D

  8. Relationship among Lepista species determined by CAPS and RAPD.

    PubMed

    Stott, Karen; Desmerger, Christophe; Holford, Paul

    2005-02-01

    To determine the relationship of Australian members of the genus Lepista with those from other parts of the world, genetic variation of isolates representing 27 accessions was assayed by cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). CAPS and RAPD identified eight and seven groups, respectively. CAPS Groups 1 and 2 and RAPD Group 1 consisted of French and Australian accessions classified as morphospecies L. nuda. CAPS Group 3 and RAPD Groups 2 and 2A consisted of mostly Australian isolates identified as L. sordida var. sordida or L. sordida var. umbonata. Isolates earlier identified as morphospecies L. sp. were also placed in CAPS Group 3 and RAPD Group 2A indicating that these isolates are L. sordida var. sordida. In addition, three smaller groups were distinguished. A French isolate of L. sordida var. sordida was placed in distinctly separate CAPS and RAPD groups to Australian L. sordida var. sordida Groups 4,4 respectively. A French isolate of L. sordida var. aianthina was placed in CAPS and RAPD Groups 3,3. An accession of L. saeva was placed in CAPS Group 6 and RAPD Group 5, separate from other isolates. RAPD Groups 6 and 7 consist, respectively, of Greek and American accessions of L. nuda that were only distantly related to the Australian and French accessions of this morphospecies: CAPS also separated these isolates from each other and from all other isolates. The data suggest that the classification of morphospecies and varieties within Lepista cannot be determined on the basis of morphology alone. The Greek and American accessions of L. nuda are separated from the French and Australian accessions and may not be L. nuda. Similarly, the Australian accessions currently classified as L. sordida var. sordida together with the accessions of L. sordida var. umbonata are distinct from the French accessions of L. sordida var. sordida suggesting that Australian isolates may represent a new species or variety. Further

  9. Parametric study of propeller boss cap fins for container ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang-Seop; Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Dong-Myung; Kang, Chung-Gil; Kim, Soo-Young

    2014-06-01

    The global price of oil, which is both finite and limited in quantity, has been rising steadily because of the increasing requirements for energy in both developing and developed countries. Furthermore, regulations have been strengthened across all industries to address global warming. Many studies of hull resistance, propulsion and operation of ships have been performed to reduce fuel consumption and emissions. This study examined the design parameters of the propeller boss cap fin (PBCF) and hub cap for 6,000TEU container ships to improve the propulsion efficiency. The design parameters of PBCF have been selected based on the geometrical shape. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis with a propeller open water (POW) test was performed to check the validity of CFD analysis. The design of experiment (DOE) case was selected as a full factorial design, and the experiment was analyzed by POW and CFD analysis. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to determine the correlation among design parameters. Four design alternatives of PBCF were selected from the DOE. The shape of a propeller hub cap was selected as a divergent shape, and the divergent angle was determined by the DOE. Four design alternatives of PBCF were attached to the divergent hub cap, and the POW was estimated by CFD. As a result, the divergent hub cap with PBCF has a negative effect on the POW, which is induced by an increase in torque coefficient. A POW test and cavitation test were performed with a divergent hub cap with PBCF to verify the CFD result. The POW test result showed that the open water efficiency was increased approximately 2% with a divergent hub cap compared to a normal cap. The POW test result was similar to the CFD result, and the divergent hub cap with the PBCF models showed lower open water efficiency. This was attributed to an increase in the torque coefficient just like the CFD results. A cavitation test was performed using the 2 models selected. The test result showed

  10. Peptide-capped nanoparticles for catalysis and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Beverly D.

    Nature possesses methods for the formation and manipulation of inorganic materials with controlled size, shape, and compositions. Biomolecules, such as peptides, are known to be responsible for the generation of such inorganic materials on the nanoscale, where the enhanced properties can be exploited for various applications. Pd nanoparticles, capped with the Pd-specific Pd4 peptide (TSNAVHPTLRHL), were found to be active catalysts for Stille coupling, where the debated mechanism of oxidative addition was explored. Furthermore, the same Pd4-capped nanoparticles were found to be active in Suzuki coupling, another C-C coupling reaction that undergoes catalysis following a similar mechanism. Other considerations with peptide-capped metal catalysis involved the role of the reductant and the subsequent effects on morphology and reactivity, as seen by use of Au nanoparticles capped with a library of peptides. The role of the reductant was studied using varied reductants and was found to directly affect the catalytic activity. Additionally, such Au and Ag materials-binding peptides were expanded to generate multi-domain biomolecules capable of metal-specific binding and nanoparticle assembly. Such in-depth studies of peptide-capped nanomaterials and their uses in catalysis and assembly is important for optimized functionality and application.

  11. Functional end-capped conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, V.; Farina, H.; Ortenzi, Marco A.

    2016-05-01

    Methacrylate-terminated Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymers with controlled degree of polymerization were successfully prepared by direct oxidative polycondensation between Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and a cross-linkable methacrylate end-capper monomer, obtained via Friedel Crafts acylation starting from EDOT and Methacryloyl chloride. The new polymer was synthesized in order to overcome the well-known technical problems of PEDOT, i.e. difficult processability and patterning, due to its poor solubility in common organic and inorganic solvents. The chemical structure and the degree of polymerization of the end-capped polymers were determined by 1H NMR spectra. A new synthesis of Methacrylate end-capped PEDOT with controlled degree of polymerization, soluble in common organic and chlorinated solvents and with improved conductivity, 210 S/cm, was performed. This method includes: direct oxidative polycondensation of 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in the presence of a cross-linkable end-capper, i.e. Methacrylate end-capped EDOT prepared via Friedel Crafts acylation with Methacryloyl chloride and oxidant species, i.e. ferric sulfate. Furthermore, the oxidative polycondensation of EDOT monomer and Methacrylate end-capped EDOT in the presence of Sulfonated Polyethersulfone (SPES)- characterized by different degree of Sulfonation (DS)- as dopant agent was performed, leading to functional end-capped conducting PEDOT, easy to process and pattern, with conductivity of 210 S/cm, 50 S/cm higher than the one of commercial PEDOT.

  12. One-dimensional cold cap model for melters with bubblers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pokorny, Richard; Hilliard, Zachary J.; Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Guillen, Donna P.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-28

    The rate of glass production during vitrification in an all-electrical melter greatly impacts the cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization. The feed is charged to the melter on the top of the molten glass, where it forms a layer of reacting and melting material, called the cold cap. During the final stages of the batch-to-glass conversion process, gases evolved from reactions produce primary foam, the growth and collapse of which controls the glass production rate. The mathematical model of the cold cap was revised to include functional representation of primary foam behavior and to account for themore » dry cold cap surface. The melting rate is computed as a response to the dependence of the primary foam collapse temperature on the heating rate and melter operating conditions, including the effect of bubbling on the cold cap bottom and top surface temperatures. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data from laboratory-scale and pilot-scale melter studies. Lastly, the cold cap model will become part of the full three-dimensional mathematical model of the waste glass melter.« less

  13. Testing the Expanding-Contracting Polar Cap Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirelis, T.; Keller, M. R.; Smith, D.; Barnes, R. J.; Talaat, E. R.; Newell, P. T.; Baker, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The expanding-contracting polar cap (ECPC) paradigm is tested. Under the ECPC paradigm ionospheric convection in the polar cap is driven by the combined effects of dayside merging and nightside reconnection, as opposed to being mapped down from higher altitudes. The ECPC paradigm is tested by separately examining convection when the polar cap is expanding versus contracting. The open magnetic flux is estimated from SuperDARN observations of the convection reversal boundary (CRB) made simultaneously at different local times. (Sotirelis et al. [2005] established the CRB as a proxy for the Open-Closed Boundary (OCB).) The correlation of the ionospheric convection potential with solar wind/IMF driving is indeed found to depend on whether the polar cap is expanding or contracting. Specifically, when the polar cap is expanding, ionospheric convection correlates best (0.86) with the most recent 10 minutes of solar wind/IMF driving (versus 0.57 for contracting). When contracting, convection correlates best (0.87) with 90-minute averages of solar wind/IMF driving (versus 0.51 for expanding). This is consistent with ECPC expectations.

  14. Is Vitamin C Beneficial to Patients with CAP?

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Li, Guoping

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly and children. Vitamin C is known as a physiological antioxidant, regulating innate immune system in the lung. Vitamin C has been used to prevent and treat CAP. However, the use of vitamin C for preventing and treating CAP has been a subject of controversy. We aim to review the most significant findings about vitamin C supplementation in patients with pneumonia based on literature from the PubMed. First, we reviewed recent advances about the role of oxidative stress in CAP. Oxidative stress is a crucial component of the host defense system and inflammatory response. However, excessive oxidative stress can cause a systemic inflammatory response leading to tissue damage. The degree of oxidative stress has been associated with the severity of CAP. Vitamin C is beneficial to the host defense system by regulating the innate immunity in the lungs. We also discuss the prophylactic use of vitamin C for pneumonia. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the pneumonia risk in patients with vitamin C deficiency. However, it is not beneficial for prophylactic use of vitamin C to prevent pneumonia in the well-nourished population. Finally, we summarize the effect of vitamin C on mechanical ventilation used during respiratory failure. Administration of vitamin C decreases the duration of mechanical ventilation by decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:27363830

  15. DEAD ZONE IN THE POLAR-CAP ACCELERATOR OF PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-01-10

    We study plasma flows above pulsar polar caps using time-dependent simulations of plasma particles in the self-consistent electric field. The flow behavior is controlled by the dimensionless parameter {alpha} = j/c{rho}{sub GJ}, where j is the electric current density and {rho}{sub GJ} is the Goldreich-Julian charge density. The region of the polar cap where 0 < {alpha} < 1 is a {sup d}ead zone{sup -}in this zone, particle acceleration is inefficient and pair creation is not expected even for young, rapidly rotating pulsars. Pulsars with polar caps near the rotation axis are predicted to have a hollow-cone structure of radio emission, as the dead zone occupies the central part of the polar cap. Our results apply to charge-separated flows of electrons (j < 0) or ions (j > 0). In the latter case, we consider the possibility of a mixed flow consisting of different ion species, and observe the development of two-stream instability. The dead zone at the polar cap is essential for the development of an outer gap near the null surface {rho}{sub GJ} = 0.

  16. One-dimensional cold cap model for melters with bubblers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hilliard, Zachary J.; Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Guillen, Donna P.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-28

    The rate of glass production during vitrification in an all-electrical melter greatly impacts the cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization. The feed is charged to the melter on the top of the molten glass, where it forms a layer of reacting and melting material, called the cold cap. During the final stages of the batch-to-glass conversion process, gases evolved from reactions produce primary foam, the growth and collapse of which controls the glass production rate. The mathematical model of the cold cap was revised to include functional representation of primary foam behavior and to account for the dry cold cap surface. The melting rate is computed as a response to the dependence of the primary foam collapse temperature on the heating rate and melter operating conditions, including the effect of bubbling on the cold cap bottom and top surface temperatures. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data from laboratory-scale and pilot-scale melter studies. Lastly, the cold cap model will become part of the full three-dimensional mathematical model of the waste glass melter.

  17. Structural microtubule cap: stability, catastrophe, rescue, and third state.

    PubMed Central

    Jánosi, Imre M; Chrétien, Denis; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Microtubules polymerize from GTP-liganded tubulin dimers, but are essentially made of GDP-liganded tubulin. We investigate the tug-of-war resulting from the fact that GDP-liganded tubulin favors a curved configuration, but is forced to remain in a straight one when part of a microtubule. We point out that near the end of a microtubule, the proximity of the end shifts the balance in this tug-of-war, with some protofilament bending as result. This somewhat relaxes the microtubule lattice near its end, resulting in a structural cap. This structural cap thus is a simple mechanical consequence of two well-established facts: protofilaments made of GDP-liganded tubulin have intrinsic curvature, and microtubules are elastic, made from material that can yield to forces, in casu its own intrinsic forces. We explore possible properties of this structural cap, and demonstrate 1) how it allows both polymerization from GTP-liganded tubulin and rapid depolymerization in its absence; 2) how rescue can occur; 3) how a third, meta-stable intermediate state is possible and can explain some experimental results; and 4) how the tapered tips observed at polymerizing microtubule ends are stabilized during growth, though unable to accommodate a lateral cap. This scenario thus supports the widely accepted GTP-cap model by suggesting a stabilizing mechanism that explains the many aspects of dynamic instability. PMID:12202357

  18. Effect of organic acids on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on peptide functionalized nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Barati, Danial; Walters, Joshua D; Shariati, Seyed Ramin Pajoum; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2015-05-12

    Carboxylate-rich organic acids play an important role in controlling the growth of apatite crystals and the extent of mineralization in the natural bone. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of organic acids on calcium phosphate (CaP) nucleation on nanofiber microsheets functionalized with a glutamic acid peptide and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on the CaP-nucleated microsheets. High molecular weight poly(dl-lactide) (DL-PLA) was mixed with low molecular weight L-PLA conjugated with Glu-Glu-Gly-Gly-Cys peptide, and the mixture was electrospun to generate aligned nanofiber microsheets. The nanofiber microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid (mSBF) supplemented with different organic acids for nucleation and growth of CaP crystals on the nanofibers. Organic acids included citric acid (CA), hydroxycitric acid (HCA), tartaric acid (TART), malic acid (MA), ascorbic acid (AsA), and salicylic acid (SalA). HCA microsheets had the highest CaP content at 240 ± 10% followed by TART and CA with 225 ± 8% and 225 ± 10%, respectively. The Ca/P ratio and percent crystallinity of the nucleated CaP in TART microsheets was closest to that of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. The extent of CaP nucleation and growth on the nanofiber microsheets depended on the acidic strength and number of hydrogen-bonding hydroxyl groups of the organic acids. Compressive modulus and degradation of the CaP nucleated microsheets were related to percent crystallinity and CaP content. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs seeded on the microsheets and cultured in osteogenic medium increased only for those microsheets nucleated with CaP by incubation in CA or AsA-supplemented mSBF. Further, only CA microsheets stimulated bone nodule formation by the seeded hMSCs. PMID:25879768

  19. 30 CFR 250.1157 - How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? 250.1157 Section 250.1157 Mineral Resources... reservoir with an associated gas cap? (a) You must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor: (1) Before producing gas-cap gas from each completion in an oil reservoir that is known to have...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1157 - How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? 250.1157 Section 250.1157 Mineral Resources... Production § 250.1157 How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an... producing gas-cap gas from each completion in an oil reservoir that is known to have an associated gas...