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Sample records for acid translocase cd36

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) in the pigeon (Columba livia domestica).

    PubMed

    Xie, P; Zhang, A T; Wang, C; Azzam, M M M; Zou, X T

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in transporting long-chain fatty acids. In the current study, a full-length cDNA of FAT/CD36 was first cloned from the intestine of White King pigeon by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The full-length cDNA of pigeon FAT/CD36 was 2,282 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region of 224 bp, a 3'-untranslated region of 642 bp, and an open reading frame of 1,416 bp encoding a protein of 471 amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 52.7 kDa. Sequence comparison indicated that FAT/CD36 of pigeon had high identity with other avian FAT/CD36. Using quantitative real-time PCR, expression of FAT/CD36 was the greatest in the duodenum at 28 d posthatch, and in the jejunum, the expression of FAT/CD36 at 14 d posthatch was greater than at 8 d but the same as 28 d posthatch. However, in the ileum, expression of FAT/CD36 peaked at embryonic d 15 and 8 d posthatch. The effects of long-chain fatty acids on pigeon FAT/CD36 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mRNA expression were also investigated in vitro. It showed that a low concentration (5 μM) of oleic acid, palmitic acid, and linoleic acid can significantly increase FAT/CD36 and PPARγ mRNA level in pigeon jejunum. However, for linolenic acid or arachidonic acid, the induction of both gene expressions needed a higher concentration (50 μM or 250 μM). Two hundred and 50 μM palmitic acid was shown to suppress FAT/CD36 gene expression. The results suggest that FAT/CD36 may be a representative of intestine development in pigeon, and it could be regulated by long-chain fatty acids via PPARγ pathway.

  2. Rosiglitazone increases fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) but not carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in rat muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Carley R; Holloway, Graham P; Campbell, S E; Yoshida, Yuko; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) alter the expression of genes involved in regulating lipid metabolism. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, induces tissue-specific effects on lipid metabolism; however, its mode of action in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Since fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) was recently identified as a possible regulator of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, we examined in this tissue the effects of rosiglitazone infusion (7 days, 1 mg day−1) on FAT/CD36 mRNA and protein, its plasmalemmal content and fatty acid transport. In addition, in isolated subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria we examined rates of fatty acid oxidation, FAT/CD36 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) protein, and CPTI and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activities. Rosiglitazone did not alter FAT/CD36 mRNA or protein expression, FAT/CD36 plasmalemmal content, or the rate of fatty acid transport into muscle (P > 0.05). In contrast, rosiglitazone increased the rates of fatty acid oxidation in both SS (+21%) and IMF mitochondria (+36%). This was accompanied by concomitant increases in FAT/CD36 in subsarcolemmal (SS) (+43%) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria (+46%), while SS and IMF CPTI protein content, and CPTI submaximal and maximal activities (P > 0.05) were not altered. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were also not altered by rosiglitazone in SS and IMF mitochondria (P > 0.05). These studies provide another example whereby changes in mitochondrial fatty oxidation are associated with concomitant changes in mitochondrial FAT/CD36 independent of any changes in CPTI. Moreover, these studies identify for the first time a mechanism by which rosiglitazone stimulates fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, namely the chronic, subcellular relocation of FAT/CD36 to mitochondria. PMID:18238811

  3. CD36, but not GPR120, is required for efficient fatty acid utilization during endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Mina; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Inoue, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) are an important energy source during exercise. In addition to its role as an energy supply for skeletal muscle, FA may activate signaling pathways that regulate gene expression. FA translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and G protein-coupled receptor GPR120 are long-chain FA receptors. In this study, we investigated the impact of CD36 or GPR120 deletion on energy metabolism during exercise. CD36 has been reported to facilitate cellular transport and oxidation of FA during endurance exercise. We show that CD36 deletion decreased exogenous FA oxidation during exercise, using a combination of (13)C-labeled FA oxidation measurement and indirect calorimetry. In contrast, GPR120 deletion had no observable effect on energy metabolism during exercise. Our results further substantiate that CD36-mediated FA transport plays an essential role in efficient FA oxidation during exercise. PMID:25070011

  4. Insulin and AMPK regulate FA translocase/CD36 plasma membrane recruitment in cardiomyocytes via Rab GAP AS160 and Rab8a Rab GTPase.

    PubMed

    Samovski, Dmitri; Su, Xiong; Xu, Yingcheng; Abumrad, Nada A; Stahl, Philip D

    2012-04-01

    The FA translocase cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) facilitates FA uptake by the myocardium, and its surface recruitment in cardiomyocytes is induced by insulin, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), or contraction. Dysfunction of CD36 trafficking contributes to disordered cardiac FA utilization and promotes progression to disease. The Akt substrate 160 (AS160) Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) is a key regulator of vesicular trafficking, and its activity is modulated via phosphorylation. Our study documents that AS160 mediates insulin or AMPK-stimulated surface translocation of CD36 in cardiomyocytes. Knock-down of AS160 redistributes CD36 to the surface and abrogates its translocation by insulin or the AMPK agonist 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR). Conversely, overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient AS160 mutant (AS160 4P) suppresses the stimulated membrane recruitment of CD36. The AS160 substrate Rab8a GTPase is shown via overexpression and knock-down studies to be specifically involved in insulin/AICAR-induced CD36 membrane recruitment. Our findings directly demonstrate AS160 regulation of CD36 trafficking. In myocytes, the AS160 pathway also mediates the effect of insulin, AMPK, or contraction on surface recruitment of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Thus, AS160 constitutes a point of convergence for coordinating physiological regulation of CD36 and GLUT4 membrane recruitment.

  5. Molecular hydrogen attenuates fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation through downregulating CD36 expression in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that obesity is closely associated with an impaired free fatty acid metabolism as well as with insulin resistance and inflammation. Excessive fatty acid uptake mediated by fatty acid translocase CD36 plays an important role in hepatic steatosis. Molecular hydrogen has been shown to attenuate oxidative stress and improve lipid, glucose and energy metabolism in patients and animal models of hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Methods Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitate-BSA complex after treatment with or without hydrogen for 24 h. The fatty acid uptake was measured by using spectrofluorometry and the lipid content was detected by Oil Red O staining. JNK phosphorylation and CD36 expression were analyzed by Western blot and real-time PCR analyses. Results Pretreatment with hydrogen reduced fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation after palmitate overload in HepG2 cells, which was associated with inhibition of JNK activation. Hydrogen treatment did not alter CD36 mRNA expression but reduced CD36 protein expression. Conclusion Hydrogen inhibits fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation through the downregulation of CD36 at the protein level in hepatic cultured cells, providing insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the hydrogen effects in vivo on lipid metabolism disorders. PMID:23448206

  6. Structural and functional characterization of the mouse fatty acid translocase promoter: activation during adipose differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Teboul, L; Febbraio, M; Gaillard, D; Amri, E Z; Silverstein, R; Grimaldi, P A

    2001-01-01

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is a cell-surface glycoprotein that functions as a receptor/transporter for long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), and interacts with other protein and lipid ligands. FAT/CD36 is expressed by various cell types, including platelets, monocytes/macrophages and endothelial cells, and tissues with an active LCFA metabolism, such as adipose, small intestine and heart. FAT/CD36 expression is induced during adipose cell differentiation and is transcriptionally up-regulated by LCFAs and thiazolidinediones in pre-adipocytes via a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-mediated process. We isolated and analysed the murine FAT/CD36 promoter employing C(2)C(12)N cells directed to differentiate to either adipose or muscle. Transient transfection studies revealed that the 309 bp upstream from the start of exon 1 confer adipose specific activity. Sequence analysis of this DNA fragment revealed the presence of two imperfect direct repeat-1 elements. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay demonstrated that these elements were peroxisome-proliferator-responsive elements (PPREs). Mutagenesis and transfection experiments indicated that both PPREs co-operate to drive strong promoter activity in adipose cells. We conclude that murine FAT/CD36 expression in adipose tissue is dependent upon transcriptional activation via PPARs through binding to two PPREs located at -245 to -233 bp and -120 to -108 bp from the transcription start site. PMID:11716758

  7. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    PubMed

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  8. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal's preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca(2+) imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  9. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  10. Regulation of the subcellular trafficking of CD36, a major determinant of cardiac fatty acid utilization.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Jan F C; Nabben, Miranda; Heather, Lisa C; Bonen, Arend; Luiken, Joost J F P

    2016-10-01

    Myocardial uptake of long-chain fatty acids largely occurs by facilitated diffusion, involving primarily the membrane-associated protein CD36. Other putative fatty acid transporters, such as FABPpm, FATP1 and FATP4, also play a role, but their quantitative contribution is much smaller or their involvement is rather permissive. Besides its sarcolemmal localization, CD36 is also present in intracellular compartments (endosomes). CD36 cycles between both pools via vesicle-mediated trafficking, and the relative distribution between endosomes versus sarcolemma determines the rate of cardiac fatty acid uptake. A net translocation of CD36 to the sarcolemma is induced by various stimuli, in particular hormones like insulin and myocyte contractions, so as to allow a proper coordination of the rate of fatty acid uptake with rapid fluctuations in myocardial energy needs. Furthermore, changes in cardiac fatty acid utilization that occur in both acute and chronic cardiac disease appear to be accompanied by concomitant changes in the sarcolemmal presence of CD36. Studies in various animal and cell models suggest that interventions aimed at modulating the sarcolemmal presence or functioning of CD36 hold promise as therapy to rectify aberrant rates of fatty acid uptake in order to fight cardiac metabolic remodeling and restore proper contractile function. In this review we discuss our current knowledge about the role of CD36 in cardiac fatty acid uptake and metabolism in health and disease with focus on the regulation of the subcellular trafficking of CD36 and its selective modulation as therapeutic approach for cardiac disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:27090938

  11. Role of FAT/CD36 in fatty acid sensing, energy, and glucose homeostasis regulation in DIO and DR rats

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A.; Levin, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) sensing neurons alter their activity utilizing the FA translocator/receptor, FAT/CD36. Depletion of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) CD36 with adeno-associated viral vector expressing CD36 shRNA (AAV CD36 shRNA) leads to redistribution of adipose stores and insulin resistance in outbred rats. This study assessed the requirement of VMH CD36-mediated FA sensing for the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in postnatal day 5 (P5) and P21 selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rats using VMH AAV CD36 shRNA injections. P5 CD36 depletion altered VMH neuronal FA sensing predominantly in DIO rats. After 10 wk on a 45% fat diet, DIO rats injected with VMH AAV CD36 shRNA at P21 ate more and gained more weight than DIO AAV controls, while DR AAV CD36 shRNA-injected rats gained less weight than DR AAV controls. VMH CD36 depletion increased inguinal fat pad weights and leptin levels in DIO and DR rats. Although DR AAV CD36 shRNA-injected rats became as obese as DIO AAV controls, only DIO control and CD36 depleted rats became insulin-resistant on a 45% fat diet. VMH CD36 depletion stunted linear growth in DIO and DR rats. DIO rats injected with AAV CD36 shRNA at P5 had increased fat mass, mostly due to a 45% increase in subcutaneous fat. They were also insulin-resistant with an associated 71% increase of liver triglycerides. These results demonstrate that VMH CD36-mediated FA sensing is a critical factor in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis and fat deposition in DIO and DR rats. PMID:25477422

  12. Adipokines enhance oleic acid-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing CD36 expression.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Raphaela; Lamers, Daniela; Eckel, Jürgen; Sell, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is not only releasing lipids but also various adipokines that are both dysregulated in the obese state and may contribute to obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. We have previously shown that the combination of adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM) and oleic acid (OA) increases proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in a synergistic way. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a component within CM that is responsible for most of the observed effects. In this study, we investigate novel mechanisms that underlie the combined effects of adipokine and oleic acid-induced proliferation of VSMC. Oleic acid leads to significant lipid accumulation in VSMC that is further enhanced by the combined treatment with CM. Accordingly CM stimulates CD36 expression in VSMC while OA is not affecting CD36. Silencing of CD36 was established and prevents lipid accumulation in all tested conditions. CD36 silencing also abrogates CM- and OA-induced proliferation and considerably reduces proliferation induced by the combination of CM and OA. At the same time, VEGF secretion and VEGF-receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) by VSMC was not affected by CD36 silencing. However, VEGF was not able to induce any proliferation in VSMC after CD36 silencing that also blunted VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Finally, combined silencing of CD36 together with a blocking antibody against VEGF prevented most of CMOA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CD36 is mediating CM-induced proliferation of VSMC. Induction of CD36 by adipokines enhances the response of VSMC towards VEGF and OA.

  13. Hyperinsulinemia Enhances Hepatic Expression of the Fatty Acid Transporter Cd36 and Provokes Hepatosteatosis and Hepatic Insulin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Steneberg, Pär; Sykaras, Alexandros G.; Backlund, Fredrik; Straseviciene, Jurate; Söderström, Ingegerd; Edlund, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis is associated with the development of both hepatic insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Hepatic expression of Cd36, a fatty acid transporter, is enhanced in obese and diabetic murine models and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and thus it correlates with hyperinsulinemia, steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we have explored the effect of hyperinsulinemia on hepatic Cd36 expression, development of hepatosteatosis, insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. A 3-week sucrose-enriched diet was sufficient to provoke hyperinsulinemia, hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia in CBA/J mice. The development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in CBA/J mice on a sucrose-enriched diet was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the transcription factor Pparγ and its target gene Cd36 whereas that of genes implicated in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL secretion was unaltered. Additionally, we demonstrate that insulin, in a Pparγ-dependent manner, is sufficient to directly increase Cd36 expression in perfused livers and isolated hepatocytes. Mouse strains that display low insulin levels, i.e. C57BL6/J, and/or lack hepatic Pparγ, i.e. C3H/HeN, do not develop hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, or dysglycemia on a sucrose-enriched diet, suggesting that elevated insulin levels, via enhanced CD36 expression, provoke fatty liver development that in turn leads to hepatic insulin resistance and dysglycemia. Thus, our data provide evidence for a direct role for hyperinsulinemia in stimulating hepatic Cd36 expression and thus the development of hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. PMID:26085100

  14. FAT/CD36 expression alone is insufficient to enhance cellular uptake of oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Eyre, Nicholas S.; Cleland, Leslie G.; Mayrhofer, Graham

    2008-06-06

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is one of several proteins implicated in receptor-mediated uptake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). We have tested whether levels of FAT/CD36 correlate with cellular oleic acid import, using a Tet-Off inducible transfected CHO cell line. Consistent with our previous findings, FAT/CD36 was enriched in lipid raft-derived detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) that also contained caveolin-1, the marker protein of caveolae. Furthermore in transfected cells, plasma membrane FAT/CD36 co-localized extensively with the lipid raft-enriched ganglioside GM1, and partially with a caveolin-1-EGFP fusion protein. Nevertheless, even at high levels of expression, FAT/CD36 did not affect uptake of oleic acid. We propose that the ability of FAT/CD36 to mediate enhanced uptake of LCFAs is dependent on co-expression of other proteins or factors that are lacking in CHO cells.

  15. CD36- and GPR120-mediated Ca2+ Signaling in Human Taste Bud Cells Mediates Differential Responses to Fatty Acids and is Altered in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozdener, Mehmet Hakan; Subramaniam, Selvakumar; Sundaresan, Sinju; Sery, Omar; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims It is important to increase our understanding of gustatory detection of dietary fat and its contribution to fat preference. We studied the roles of the fat taste receptors CD36 and GPR120 and their interactions via Ca2+ signaling in fungiform taste bud cells (TBC). Methods We measured Ca2+ signaling in human TBC, transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against mRNAs encoding CD36 and GPR120 (or control siRNAs). We also studied Ca2+ signaling in TBC from CD36−/− mice and from wild-type lean and obese mice. Additional studies were conducted with mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1 that express GPR120 and stably transfected with human CD36. We measured release of serotonin and GLP-1 from human and mice TBC in response to CD36 and GPR120 activation. Results High concentrations of linoleic acid induced Ca2+ signaling via CD36 and GPR120 in human and mice TBC as well as in STC-1 cells, whereas low concentrations induced Ca2+ signaling via only CD36. Incubation of human and mice fungiform TBC with lineoleic acid downregulated CD36 and upregulated GPR120 in membrane lipid rafts. Obese mice had decreased spontaneous preference for fat. Fungiform TBC from obese mice had reduced Ca2+ and serotonin responses but increased release of GLP1, along with reduced levels of CD36 and increased levels of GPR120 in lipid rafts. Conclusions CD36 and GPR120 have non-overlapping roles in TBC signaling during oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids; these are differentially regulated by obesity. PMID:24412488

  16. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Putri, Mirasari; Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A A; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Yokoyama, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Hiroshi; Abumrad, Nada A; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36(-/-) mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36(-/-) mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue (125)I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue (18)F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36(-/-) mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36(-/-) mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36(-/-) mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation.

  17. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Putri, Mirasari; Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A A; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Yokoyama, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Hiroshi; Abumrad, Nada A; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36(-/-) mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36(-/-) mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue (125)I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue (18)F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36(-/-) mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36(-/-) mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36(-/-) mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. PMID:25596128

  18. The role of CD36 in the regulation of myocardial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ty T; Dyck, Jason R B

    2016-10-01

    Since the heart has one of the highest energy requirements of all organs in the body, it requires a constant and plentiful supply of fuel to function properly. Mitochondrial oxidation of lipids provides a major source of ATP for the heart, and the cellular processes that regulate lipid uptake and utilization are important contributors to maintaining proper myocardial energetic status. Although numerous proteins are coordinately regulated in order to ensure proper fatty acid utilization in the cardiomyocyte, a key first step in this process is the entry of fatty acids into the cell. An important protein involved in the transport of fatty acids into the cardiomyocyte is the plasma membrane-associated protein known as fatty acid translocase (FAT; also known as CD36). While multiple proteins are involved in facilitating fatty acid uptake in the heart, CD36 accounts for approximately 50-70% of the total fatty acid taken up in cardiomyocytes. As such, myocardial metabolism of fatty acids may depend upon proper CD36 function. Consistent with this, changes in CD36 levels/function have been implicated in the alteration of myocardial metabolism in the pathophysiology of certain cardiovascular diseases. As such, a better understanding of the role and function of CD36 in the heart may provide important insights for the development of new treatments for specific cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we review the role of CD36 in myocardial lipid metabolism in the healthy heart and describe how CD36-mediated alterations in lipid metabolism may contribute to cardiovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26995462

  19. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress

    SciTech Connect

    Putri, Mirasari; Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A.A.; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Tsushima, Yoshito; and others

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36{sup −/−} mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue {sup 125}I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue {sup 18}F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36{sup −/−} mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. - Highlights: • We examined the role of CD36 in thermogenesis during cold exposure. • CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit rapid hypothermia after cold exposure during fasting. • Uptake of fatty acid and glucose is impaired in thermogenic tissues during fasting. • Storage of energy substrates is

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids attenuate constitutive and insulin-induced CD36 expression through a suppression of PPAR α/γ activity in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Salerni, Sara; Schiavone, Deborah; Glatz, Jan F; Geng, Yong-Jian; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2011-09-01

    Microvascular dysfunction occurs in insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinaemia. Enhanced uptake of free fatty acids (FFA) and oxidised low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) may lead to oxidative stress and microvascular dysfunction interacting with CD36, a PPARα/γ-regulated scavenger receptor and long-chain FFA transporter. We investigated CD36 expression and CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake before and after insulin treatment in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs), ± different types of fatty acids (FA), including palmitic, oleic, linoleic, arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Insulin (10(-8) and 10(-7) M) time-dependently increased DiI-oxLDL uptake and CD36 surface expression (by 30 ± 13%, p<0.05 vs. untreated control after 24 hours incubation), as assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry, an effect that was potentiated by the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin and reverted by the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 and the PPARα/γ antagonist GW9662. A ≥ 24 hour exposure to 50 μM DHA or EPA, but not other FA, blunted both the constitutive (by 23 ± 3% and 29 ± 2%, respectively, p<0.05 for both) and insulin-induced CD36 expressions (by 45 ± 27 % and 12 ± 3 %, respectively, p<0.05 for both), along with insulin-induced uptake of DiI-oxLDL and the downregulation of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (P-eNOS). At gel shift assays, DHA reverted insulin-induced basal and oxLDL-stimulated transactivation of PPRE and DNA binding of PPARα/γ and NF-κB. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids blunt the increased CD36 expression and activity promoted by high concentrations of insulin. Such mechanisms may be the basis for the use of omega-3 fatty acids in diabetic microvasculopathy. PMID:21727988

  1. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A.; Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M.; Saleem, M.A.; Topham, P.S.

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub −FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub −FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub −FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  2. Technical Report: Triple-Colour Staining Flow Cytometry for Co-Distribution of Thrombospondin Receptor (CD36), Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) and Fetal Haemoglobin (HbF) in Sickle Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Mundee, Y; Bigelow, N C; Davis, B H; Porter, J B

    2001-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell patients (SS) express thrombospondin receptor (CD36), contain ribonucleic acid (RNA, recognised as reticulocytes) and fetal haemoglobin (HbF, defined as F cells) in a higher proportion than RBCs from healthy individuals. The co-distribution of CD36, RNA and HbF on the same RBCs has not been demonstrated due to a lack of detection methods. A triple-colour staining flow cytometry for the co-distribution of CD36, RNA and HbF was developed. The method can simultaneously determine CD36-expressing RBCs (CD36 cells), RNA-bearing RBCs (reticulocytes), HbF-bearing RBCs (F cells), CD36-expressing reticulocytes (CD36 reticulocytes), CD36-expressing-F cells (CD36-F cells), HbF-bearing reticulocytes (F reticulocytes) and CD36-expressing-F reticulocjrtes (CD36-F reticulocytes). Mouse monoclonal antibody against CD36 (MoAb-CD36), antibodagainst mouse-immunoglobulin conjugated to biotin (Ab-Molg-Bi), streptavidin conjugated to rhodamine phycoerythrin (StA-RFE), MoAb against HbF conjugated to Tri-Colour® (MoAb-HbF-TC), Thiazole orange (TO), Glutaraldehyde and Triton X-100 were used. The procedure takes approximately 7 hours. The numbers of CD36 cells, reticulocytes and F cells obtaining from single and triple staining were well correlated and not significantly different. Intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variation percents (%CVs) of the triple-colour staining were less than 10 and 15% respectively. EDTA blood samples stored at 4°C for less than 3 days are suitable. The method trial was then employed on blood samples from SS and healthy individuals. The method is reproducible, objective and applicable for determination of co-distribution of other membrane and intracellular markers in RBCs.

  3. ROS-dependent Syk and Pyk2-mediated STAT1 activation is required for 15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-induced CD36 expression and foam cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Singh, Nikhlesh K.; Traylor, James G.; Orr, A. Wayne; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2014-01-01

    15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), the major 15-lipoxygenase 1/2 (15-LO1/2) metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA), induces CD36 expression through xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and Syk and Pyk2-dependent STAT1 activation. In line with these observations, 15(S)-HETE also induced foam cell formation involving ROS, Syk, Pyk2 and STAT1-mediated CD36 expression. In addition, peritoneal macrophages from Western diet-fed ApoE−/− mice exhibited elevated levels of xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase activities, ROS production, Syk, Pyk2, and STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 expression compared to those from ApoE−/−:12/15-LO−/− mice and these events correlated with increased lipid deposits, macrophage content and lesion progression in the aortic roots. Human atherosclerotic arteries also showed increased 15-LO1 expression, STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 levels as compared to normal arteries. Together, these findings suggest that 12/15-LO metabolites of AA, particularly 12/15(S)-HETE might play a crucial role in atherogenesis by enhancing foam cell formation. PMID:25152235

  4. Greater Transport Efficiencies of the Membrane Fatty Acid Transporters FAT/CD36 and FATP4 Compared with FABPpm and FATP1 and Differential Effects on Fatty Acid Esterification and Oxidation in Rat Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, James G.; Alkhateeb, Hakam; Benton, Carley R.; Lally, James; Nickerson, Jennifer; Han, Xiao-Xia; Wilson, Meredith H.; Jain, Swati S.; Snook, Laelie A.; Glatz, Jan F. C.; Chabowski, Adrian; Luiken, Joost J. F. P.; Bonen, Arend

    2009-01-01

    In selected mammalian tissues, long chain fatty acid transporters (FABPpm, FAT/CD36, FATP1, and FATP4) are co-expressed. There is controversy as to whether they all function as membrane-bound transporters and whether they channel fatty acids to oxidation and/or esterification. Among skeletal muscles, the protein expression of FABPpm, FAT/CD36, and FATP4, but not FATP1, correlated highly with the capacities for oxidative metabolism (r ≥ 0.94), fatty acid oxidation (r ≥ 0.88), and triacylglycerol esterification (r ≥ 0.87). We overexpressed independently FABPpm, FAT/CD36, FATP1, and FATP4, within a normal physiologic range, in rat skeletal muscle, to determine the effects on fatty acid transport and metabolism. Independent overexpression of each fatty acid transporter occurred without altering either the expression or plasmalemmal content of other fatty acid transporters. All transporters increased fatty acid transport, but FAT/CD36 and FATP4 were 2.3- and 1.7-fold more effective than FABPpm and FATP1, respectively. Fatty acid transporters failed to alter the rates of fatty acid esterification into triacylglycerols. In contrast, all transporters increased the rates of long chain fatty acid oxidation, but the effects of FABPpm and FAT/CD36 were 3-fold greater than for FATP1 and FATP4. Thus, fatty acid transporters exhibit different capacities for fatty acid transport and metabolism. In vivo, FAT/CD36 and FATP4 are the most effective fatty acid transporters, whereas FABPpm and FAT/CD36 are key for stimulating fatty acid oxidation. PMID:19380575

  5. Rosiglitazone fails to improve hypertriglyceridemia and glucose tolerance in CD36-deficient BN.SHR4 congenic rat strain.

    PubMed

    Seda, Ondrej; Kazdova, Ludmila; Krenova, Drahomira; Kren, Vladimir

    2003-01-15

    The favorable metabolic effects of thiazolidinediones are supposedly related to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma)-driven changes in lipid metabolism, particularly in free fatty acid (FFA) trafficking. The fatty acid translocase CD36 is one of the proposed PPARgamma targets to mediate this action. We assessed the effect of rosiglitazone (RSG, Avandia) administration in two inbred rat strains, BN/Cub and BN.SHR4 congenic strain, differing in 10 cM proximal segment of chromosome 4. Rats were fed high-sucrose diet with or without RSG for 1 wk. In BN.SHR4, which carries defective Cd36 allele of SHR origin, RSG failed to improve glucose tolerance (assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test), did not lower triglyceridemia, nor induced increases in epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue weights and adipose tissue glucose utilization, effects observed in BN/Cub. On the other hand, the RSG-treated BN.SHR4 showed lower concentrations of FFA and substantial increase in glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle. Altogether, these results support involvement of CD36 in RSG action, suggesting this pharmacogenetic interaction may be of particular importance in CD36-deficient humans.

  6. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis of CD36 Overexpression in HepG2.2.15 Cells to Explore Its Regulatory Role in Metabolism and the Hepatitis B Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Ping; Chen, Zhen; Tang, Ni; Z. Ruan, Xiong; Chen, Yaxi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatocyte-specific DNA virus whose gene expression and replication are closely associated with hepatic metabolic processes. Thus, a potential anti-viral strategy is to target the host metabolic factors necessary for HBV gene expression and replication. Recent studies revealed that fatty acid translocase CD36 is involved in the replication, assembly, storage, and secretion of certain viruses, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the relationship between CD36 and the HBV life cycle remains unclear. Here, we showed, for the first time, that increased CD36 expression enhances HBV replication in HepG2.2.15 cells. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we performed genome-wide sequencing of the mRNA from HepG2.2.15-CD36 overexpression (CD36OE) cells and HepG2.2.15-vector cells using RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq) technology to analyze the differential transcriptomic profile. Our results identified 141 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to CD36 overexpression, including 79 upregulated genes and 62 downregulated genes. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analysis revealed that some of the DEGs were involved in various metabolic processes and the HBV life cycle. The reliability of the RNA-Seq data was confirmed by qPCR analysis. Our findings provide clues to build a link between CD36, host metabolism and the HBV life cycle and identified areas that require further investigation. PMID:27749922

  7. CD36-deficient congenic strains show improved glucose tolerance and distinct shifts in metabolic and transcriptomic profiles.

    PubMed

    Šedová, L; Liška, F; Křenová, D; Kazdová, L; Tremblay, J; Krupková, M; Corbeil, G; Hamet, P; Křen, V; Šeda, O

    2012-07-01

    Deficiency of fatty acid translocase Cd36 has been shown to have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). We have tested the hypothesis that the effects of Cd36 mutation on the features of metabolic syndrome are contextually dependent on genomic background. We have derived two new congenic strains by introgression of limited chromosome 4 regions of SHR origin, both including the defective Cd36 gene, into the genetic background of a highly inbred model of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, polydactylous (PD) rat strain. We subjected standard diet-fed adult males of PD and the congenic PD.SHR4 strains to metabolic, morphometric and transcriptomic profiling. We observed significantly improved glucose tolerance and lower fasting insulin levels in PD.SHR4 congenics than in PD. One of the PD.SHR4 strains showed lower triglyceride concentrations across major lipoprotein fractions combined with higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with the PD progenitor. The hepatic transcriptome assessment revealed a network of genes differentially expressed between PD and PD.SHR4 with significant enrichment by members of the circadian rhythmicity pathway (Arntl (Bmal1), Clock, Nfil3, Per2 and Per3). In summary, the introduction of the chromosome 4 region of SHR origin including defective Cd36 into the PD genetic background resulted in disconnected shifts of metabolic profile along with distinct changes in hepatic transcriptome. The synthesis of the current results with those obtained in other Cd36-deficient strains indicates that the eventual metabolic effect of a deleterious mutation such as that of SHR-derived Cd36 is not absolute, but rather a function of complex interactions between environmental and genomic background, upon which it operates.

  8. Obesity-driven prepartal hepatic lipid accumulation in dairy cows is associated with increased CD36 and SREBP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Prodanović, Radiša; Korićanac, Goran; Vujanac, Ivan; Djordjević, Ana; Pantelić, Marija; Romić, Snježana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Kirovski, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that obesity in dairy cows enhanced expression of proteins involved in hepatic fatty acid uptake and metabolism. Sixteen Holstein-Friesian close-up cows were divided into 2 equal groups based on their body condition score (BCS) as optimal (3.25≤BCS≤3.5) and high (4.0≤BCS≤4.25). Intravenous glucose tolerance test (GTT) and liver biopsies were carried out at day 10 before calving. Blood samples were collected before (basal) and after glucose infusion, and glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels were determined at each sample point. In addition, β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides levels were measured in the basal samples. The liver biopsies were analyzed for total lipid content and protein expression of insulin receptor beta (IRβ), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Basal glucose and insulin were higher in high-BCS cows, which coincided with higher circulating triglycerides and hepatic lipid content. Clearance rate and AUC for NEFA during GTT were higher in optimal-BCS cows. The development of insulin resistance and fatty liver in obese cows was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the IRβ, CD36 and SREBP-1. These results suggest that increased expression of hepatic CD36 and SREBP-1 is relevant in the obesity-driven lipid accumulation in the liver of dairy cows during late gestation. PMID:27473969

  9. The terminal six amino-acids of the carboxy cytoplasmic tail of CD36 contain a functional domain implicated in the binding and capture of oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Malaud, Eric; Hourton, Delphine; Giroux, Louise Marie; Ninio, Ewa; Buckland, Robin; McGregor, John L

    2002-01-01

    CD36, a major adhesion molecule expressed by monocytes/macrophages, plays a key role in the binding and internalization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). This adhesion molecule, a member of an important scavenger receptor family, contains a very short C-terminal cytoplasmic tail that is known to induce intracellular signalling events. However, the domains on the cytoplasmic tail involved in such signal transduction are unknown. In this study, we have investigated the functional components of the cytoplasmic tail by site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional OxLDL and monoclonal antibody (mAb) binding studies. Seven truncated or punctual CD36 constructs, localized in the cytoplasmic tail, were produced by site-directed mutagenesis. Each construct was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. We used a quantitative and a qualitative method, labelling OxLDL with either iodine or rhodamine, to determine the functional importance of the cytoplasmic domains in OxLDL internalization. Results indicate that: (1) a deletion of the last amino-acid (construct K472STOP) significantly reduces, compared with wild-type, the binding, internalization and degradation of OxLDL; (2) truncation of the last six amino-acids (construct R467STOP) significantly reduces OxLDL binding; (3) the above two constructs (K472STOP and R467STOP) showed a reduced rate of OxLDL internalization compared with wild-type; (4) the binding and rate of internalization of an anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody (10/5) was not affected by the above mentioned mutants (K472STOP and R467STOP), compared with wild-type. This study shows, for the first time, a specific site on the CD36 cytoplasmic tail that is critical for the binding, endocytosis and targeting of OxLDL. PMID:12023894

  10. CD36 deficiency attenuates experimental mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the CD36 scavenger receptor family have been implicated as sensors of microbial products that mediate phagocytosis and inflammation in response to a broad range of pathogens. We investigated the role of CD36 in host response to mycobacterial infection. Methods Experimental Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection in Cd36+/+ and Cd36-/- mice, and in vitro co-cultivation of M. tuberculosis, BCG and M. marinum with Cd36+/+ and Cd36-/-murine macrophages. Results Using an in vivo model of BCG infection in Cd36+/+ and Cd36-/- mice, we found that mycobacterial burden in liver and spleen is reduced (83% lower peak splenic colony forming units, p < 0.001), as well as the density of granulomas, and circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in Cd36-/- animals. Intracellular growth of all three mycobacterial species was reduced in Cd36-/- relative to wild type Cd36+/+ macrophages in vitro. This difference was not attributable to alterations in mycobacterial uptake, macrophage viability, rate of macrophage apoptosis, production of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species, TNF or interleukin-10. Using an in vitro model designed to recapitulate cellular events implicated in mycobacterial infection and dissemination in vivo (i.e., phagocytosis of apoptotic macrophages containing mycobacteria), we demonstrated reduced recovery of viable mycobacteria within Cd36-/- macrophages. Conclusions Together, these data indicate that CD36 deficiency confers resistance to mycobacterial infection. This observation is best explained by reduced intracellular survival of mycobacteria in the Cd36-/- macrophage and a role for CD36 in the cellular events involved in granuloma formation that promote early bacterial expansion and dissemination. PMID:20950462

  11. Dietary Lipids Inform the Gut and Brain about Meal Arrival via CD36-Mediated Signal Transduction123

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Abumrad, Nada A

    2015-01-01

    Sensing mechanisms for nutrients, in particular dietary fat, operate in the mouth, brain, and gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in regulating feeding behavior and energy balance. Critical to these regulatory mechanisms are the specialized receptors present on taste buds on the tongue, on neurons in specialized centers in the brain, and on epithelial and enteroendocrine cells in the intestinal mucosa. These receptors recognize nutrients and respond by inducing intracellular signals that trigger release of bioactive compounds that influence other organs and help coordinate the response to the meal. Components of dietary fat that are recognized by these receptors are the long-chain fatty acids that act as ligands for 2 G protein-coupled receptors, GPR40 and GPR120, and the fatty acid (FA) translocase/CD36. Recent evidence that emphasizes the important role of CD36 in orosensory, intestinal, and neuronal sensing of FAs under physiologic conditions is highlighted in the review. How this role intersects with that of GPR120 and GPR40 in the regulation of food preference and energy balance is briefly discussed. PMID:26269236

  12. CD36 Protein Influences Myocardial Ca2+ Homeostasis and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pietka, Terri A.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Kuda, Ondrej; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Dequan; Yamada, Kathryn A.; Yang, Kui; Su, Xiong; Gross, Richard W.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Efimov, Igor R.; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcolemmal CD36 facilitates myocardial fatty acid (FA) uptake, which is markedly reduced in CD36-deficient rodents and humans. CD36 also mediates signal transduction events involving a number of cellular pathways. In taste cells and macrophages, CD36 signaling was recently shown to regulate store-responsive Ca2+ flux and activation of Ca2+-dependent phospholipases A2 that cycle polyunsaturated FA into phospholipids. It is unknown whether CD36 deficiency influences myocardial Ca2+ handling and phospholipid metabolism, which could compromise the heart, typically during stresses. Myocardial function was examined in fed or fasted (18–22 h) CD36−/− and WT mice. Echocardiography and telemetry identified conduction anomalies that were associated with the incidence of sudden death in fasted CD36−/− mice. No anomalies or death occurred in WT mice during fasting. Optical imaging of perfused hearts from fasted CD36−/− mice documented prolongation of Ca2+ transients. Consistent with this, knockdown of CD36 in cardiomyocytes delayed clearance of cytosolic Ca2+. Hearts of CD36−/− mice (fed or fasted) had 3-fold higher SERCA2a and 40% lower phospholamban levels. Phospholamban phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) was enhanced after fasting reflecting increased PKA activity and cAMP levels in CD36−/− hearts. Abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the CD36−/− myocardium associated with increased lysophospholipid content and a higher proportion of 22:6 FA in phospholipids suggests altered phospholipase A2 activity and changes in membrane dynamics. The data support the role of CD36 in coordinating Ca2+ homeostasis and lipid metabolism and the importance of this role during myocardial adaptation to fasting. Potential relevance of the findings to CD36-deficient humans would need to be determined. PMID:23019328

  13. Behavioral characterization of CD36 knockout mice with SHIRPA primary screen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Wang, Wei; Li, Juan; Cheng, Ke; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Deyu; Liang, Zihong; Fang, Liang; Liao, Li; Xie, Peng

    2016-02-15

    CD36 is a member of the class B scavenger receptor family of cell surface proteins, which plays a major role in fatty acid, glucose and lipid metabolism. Besides, CD36 functions as a microglial surface receptor for amyloid beta peptide. Regarding this, we suggest CD36 might also contribute to neuropsychiatric disease. The aim of this study was to achieve a behavioral phenotype of CD36 knockout (CD36(-/-)) mice. We characterized the behavior of CD36(-/-) mice and C57BL/6J mice by subjecting them to a series of tests, which include SHIRPA primary behavioral screen test, 1% sucrose preference test, elevated plus-maze test, open-field test and forced swimming test. The results showed that CD36(-/-) mice traversed more squares, emitted more defecation, exhibited higher tail elevation and had more aggressive behaviors than C57BL/6J mice. The CD36(-/-) mice spent more time and traveled longer distance in periphery zone in the open-field test. Meanwhile, the numbers that CD36(-/-) mice entered in the open arms of elevated plus-maze were reduced. These findings suggest that CD36(-/-) mice present an anxious phenotype and might be involved in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Complete replacement of basic amino acid residues with cysteines in Rickettsia prowazekii ATP/ADP translocase.

    PubMed

    Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Winkler, Herbert H

    2002-09-20

    The ATP/ADP translocase (Tlc) of Rickettsia prowazekii is a basic protein with isoelectric point (pI)=9.84. It is conceivable, therefore, that basic residues in this protein are involved in electrostatic interactions with negatively charged substrates. We tested this hypothesis by individually mutating all basic residues in Tlc to Cys. Unexpectedly, mutations of only 20 out of 51 basic residues resulted in greater than 80% inhibition of transport activity. Moreover, 12 of 51Cys-substitution mutants exhibited higher than wild-type (WT) activity. At least in one case this up-effect was additive and the double mutant Lys422Cys Lys427Cys transported ATP five-fold better than WT protein. Since in these two single mutants and in the corresponding double mutant K(m)'s were similar to that of WT protein, we conclude that Tlc may have evolved a mechanism that limits the transporter's exchange rate and that at least these two basic residues play a key role in that mechanism. Based on the alignment of 16 Tlc homologs, the loss of activity in the mutants poorly correlates with charge conservation within the Tlc family. Also, despite the presence of three positively charged and one negatively charged intramembrane residues, we have failed to identify potential charge pairs (salt bridges) by either charge reversal or charge neutralization approaches. PMID:12225862

  15. Functional roles of membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; McGregor, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are mediated by a number of membrane glycoproteins. On the basis of structural homologies, several families of cell adhesion molecules (integrins, selectins, immunoglobulins, cadherins, leucine-rich glycoproteins) have been established. Since 1991, a new family of CD36-like proteins has been identified. CD36 is a cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a large variety of ligands. CD36 has been implicated in thrombosis, vascular biology, lipid metabolism and atherogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize our present knowledge on this important, multifunctional glycoprotein. PMID:21043590

  16. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle.

  17. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Dimitra K.; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M.; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R.; Pautler, Robia G.; Dirksen, Robert T.; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca2+ store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca2+ binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:26245899

  18. Decreased expression of adipose CD36 and FATP1 are associated with increased plasma nonesterified fatty acids during prolonged fasting in northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The northern elephant seal undergoes a 2-3 month post-weaning fast during which it depends primarily on the oxidation of fatty acids to meet its energetic demands. The concentration of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) increases and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in late-fasted...

  19. Heart CD36 expression is increased in murine models of diabetes and in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwalt, D E; Scheck, S H; Rhinehart-Jones, T

    1995-01-01

    High levels of CD36 expression are found in triglyceride storing and secreting cells such as differentiated adipocytes and mammary secretory epithelial cells and in some capillary endothelial cells. We have found high levels of CD36 in the capillary endothelium of murine adipose tissue and in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Muscle cells themselves were CD36 negative. No CD36 was found in brain endothelium. Cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues are highly oxidative and catabolize long-chain fatty acids as a source of energy while brain tissue does not use long-chain fatty acids for energy production. Since capillary endothelial cell CD36 expression appeared to correlate with parenchymal cell fatty acid utilization and since CD26 has been identified recently as a long-chain fatty acid-binding protein, we examined heart tissue CD36 expression in murine models of insulin-dependent (nonobese diabetic, NOD) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (KKAY). Diabetic NOD and KKAY mice had serum triglyceride levels 2.6- and 4.2-fold higher, respectively, than normal mice and exhibited 7- and 3.5-fold higher levels of heart microsomal CD36, respectively, than control mice. Mice fed a 40% fat diet expressed heart tissue CD36 at a level 3.5-fold higher than those fed a 9% fat diet. These data suggest that endothelial cell CD36 expression is related to parenchymal cell lipid metabolism. Images PMID:7544802

  20. A novel role for the dioxin receptor in fatty acid metabolism and hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Wada, Taira; Febbraio, Maria; He, Jinhan; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Lee, Min Jae; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a PAS domain transcription factor previously known as the “dioxin receptor” or “xenobiotic receptor.” The goal of this study is to determine the endobiotic role of AhR in hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild type, constitutively activated AhR (CA-AhR) transgenic, AhR null (AhR-/-), and fatty acid translocase CD36/FAT null (CD36-/-) mice were used to investigate the role of AhR in steatosis and the involvement of CD36 in the steatotic effect of AhR. The promoters of the mouse and human CD36 genes were cloned and their regulation by AhR was analyzed. Results Activation of AhR induced spontaneous hepatic steatosis characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides. The steatotic effect of AhR is likely due to the combined upregulation of CD36 and fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), suppression of fatty acid oxidation, inhibition of hepatic export of triglycerides, increase in peripheral fat mobilization, and increased hepatic oxidative stress. Promoter analysis established CD36 as a novel transcriptional target of AhR. Activation of AhR in liver cells induced CD36 gene expression and enhanced fatty acid uptake. The steatotic effect of an AhR agonist was inhibited in CD36-/- mice. Conclusions Our study reveals a novel link between AhR-induced steatosis and the expression of CD36. Industrial or military exposures to dioxin and related compounds have been linked to increased prevalence of fatty liver in humans. Results from this study may help to establish AhR and its target CD36 as novel therapeutic and preventive targets for fatty liver disease. PMID:20303349

  1. CD36 Inhibitors Reduce Postprandial Hypertriglyceridemia and Protect against Diabetic Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Geloen, Alain; Helin, Lionel; Geeraert, Benjamine; Malaud, Eric; Holvoet, Paul; Marguerie, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    CD36 is recognized as a lipid and fatty acid receptor and plays an important role in the metabolic syndrome and associated cardiac events. The pleiotropic activity and the multiple molecular associations of this scavenger receptor with membrane associated molecules in different cells and tissues have however questioned its potential as a therapeutic target. The present study shows that it is possible to identify low molecular weight chemicals that can block the CD36 binding and uptake functions. These inhibitors were able to reduce arterial lipid deposition, fatty acid intestinal transit, plasma concentration of triglycerides and glucose, to improve insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance and to reduce the plasma concentration of HbAc1 in different and independent rodent models. Correlation between the anti-CD36 activity of these inhibitors and the known pathophysiological activity of this scavenger receptor in the development of atherosclerosis and diabetes were observed at pharmacological doses. Thus, CD36 might represent an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:22662181

  2. Cluster Differentiating 36 (CD36) Deficiency Attenuates Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Mohamed; Tao, Huan; Fungwe, Thomas V.; Hajri, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Obesity is often associated with a state of oxidative stress and increased lipid deposition in the heart. More importantly, obesity increases lipid influx into the heart and induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to cell toxicity and metabolic dysfunction. Cluster differentiating 36 (CD36) protein is highly expressed in the heart and regulates lipid utilization but its role in obesity-associated oxidative stress is still not clear. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CD36 deficiency on cardiac steatosis, oxidative stress and lipotoxicity associated with obesity. Methods and Results Studies were conducted in control (Lean), obese leptin-deficient (Lepob/ob) and leptin-CD36 double null (Lepob/obCD36-/-) mice. Compared to lean mice, cardiac steatosis, and fatty acid (FA) uptake and oxidation were increased in Lepob/ob mice, while glucose uptake and oxidation was reduced. Moreover, insulin resistance, oxidative stress markers and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production were markedly enhanced. This was associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase expression, and increased membrane-associated p47phox, p67phox and protein kinase C. Silencing CD36 in Lepob/ob mice prevented cardiac steatosis, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose utilization, but reduced FA uptake and oxidation. Moreover, CD36 deficiency reduced NADPH oxidase activity and decreased NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. In isolated cardiomyocytes, CD36 deficiency reduced palmitate-induced ROS production and normalized NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusions CD36 deficiency prevented obesity-associated cardiac steatosis and insulin resistance, and reduced NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. The study demonstrates that CD36 regulates NADPH oxidase activity and mediates FA-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27195707

  3. Molecular basis of CD36 deficiency. Evidence that a 478C-->T substitution (proline90-->serine) in CD36 cDNA accounts for CD36 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, H; Tomiyama, Y; Honda, S; Kosugi, S; Shiraga, M; Nagao, N; Sekiguchi, S; Kanayama, Y; Kurata, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    CD36 deficiency is divided into two subgroups: neither platelets nor monocytes express CD36 (type I deficiency), and monocytes express CD36 in spite of the lack of platelet CD36 (type II deficiency). We have already demonstrated that a 478C-->T substitution (proline90-->serine) in platelet CD36 cDNA predominates in type II deficiency (Kashiwagi, H., S. Honda, Y. Tomiyama, H. Mizutani, H. Take, Y. Honda, S. Kosugi, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa. 1993. Thromb. Haemostasis. 69:481-484). In this study, we revealed that monocyte CD36 cDNA from two type II deficient subjects was heterozygous for C478 and T478 form, while platelet CD36 cDNA of these subjects consisted of only T478 form. In a type I deficient subject, both platelet and monocyte CD36 cDNA showed only T478 form. Expression assay using C478 or T478 form of CD36 cDNA transfected cells revealed that there was an 81-kD precursor form of CD36, and that the maturation of the 81-kD precursor form to the 88-kD mature form of CD36 was markedly impaired by the substitution. The mutated precursor form of CD36 was subsequently degraded in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 478C-->T substitution directly leads to CD36 deficiency via defects in posttranslational modification, and that this substitution is the major defects underlying CD36 deficiency. Images PMID:7533783

  4. The structural basis for CD36 binding by the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Turner, Louise; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Robinson, Carol V.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Higgins, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor involved in fatty acid metabolism, innate immunity and angiogenesis. It interacts with lipoprotein particles and facilitates uptake of long chain fatty acids. It is also the most common target of the PfEMP1 proteins of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, tethering parasite-infected erythrocytes to endothelial receptors. This prevents their destruction by splenic clearance and allows increased parasitaemia. Here we describe the structure of CD36 in complex with long chain fatty acids and a CD36-binding PfEMP1 protein domain. A conserved hydrophobic pocket allows the hugely diverse PfEMP1 protein family to bind to a conserved phenylalanine residue at the membrane distal tip of CD36. This phenylalanine is also required for CD36 to interact with lipoprotein particles. By targeting a site on CD36 that is required for its physiological function, PfEMP1 proteins maintain the ability to tether to the endothelium and avoid splenic clearance. PMID:27667267

  5. CD36 deficiency impairs intestinal lipid secretion and clearance of chylomicrons from the blood

    PubMed Central

    Drover, Victor A.; Ajmal, Mohammad; Nassir, Fatiha; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Nauli, Andromeda M.; Sahoo, Daisy; Tso, Patrick; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2005-01-01

    CD36 mediates the transfer of fatty acids (FAs) across the plasma membranes of muscle and adipose cells, thus playing an important role in regulating peripheral FA metabolism in vivo. In the proximal intestine, CD36 is localized in abundant quantities on the apical surface of epithelial cells, a pattern similar to that of other proteins implicated in the uptake of dietary FAs. To define the role of CD36 in the intestine, we examined FA utilization and lipoprotein secretion by WT and CD36-null mice in response to acute and chronic fat feeding. CD36-null mice given a fat bolus by gavage or fed a high-fat diet accumulated neutral lipid in the proximal intestine, which indicated abnormal lipid processing. Using a model in which mice were equipped with lymph fistulae, we obtained evidence of defective lipoprotein secretion by directly measuring lipid output. The secretion defect appeared to reflect an impaired ability of CD36-null enterocytes to efficiently synthesize triacylglycerols from dietary FAs in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the plasma of intact mice, the reduced intestinal lipid secretion was masked by slow clearance of intestine-derived lipoproteins. The impaired clearance occurred despite normal lipoprotein lipase activity and likely reflected feedback inhibition of the lipase by FAs due to their defective removal from the plasma. We conclude that CD36 is important for both secretion and clearance of intestinal lipoproteins. CD36 deficiency results in hypertriglyceridemia both in the postprandial and fasting states and in humans may constitute a risk factor for diet-induced type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:15841205

  6. CD36 is required for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Kim, In-San

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was induced during myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was localized in multinucleated myotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of myogenic markers is attenuated in CD36 knockdown C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of CD36 significantly inhibited myotube formation during differentiation. -- Abstract: Recently, CD36 has been found to be involved in the cytokine-induced fusion of macrophage. Myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes is required for myogenesis and muscle regeneration. Because a search of gene expression database revealed the attenuation of CD36 expression in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients, the possibility that CD36 could be required for myoblast fusion was investigated. CD36 expression was markedly up-regulated during myoblast differentiation and localized in multinucleated myotubes. Knockdown of endogenous CD36 significantly decreased the expression of myogenic markers as well as myotube formation. These results support the notion that CD36 plays an important role in cell fusion during myogenic differentiation. Our finding will aid the elucidation of the common mechanism governing cell-to-cell fusion in various fusion models.

  7. Formation of one or more intrachain disulphide bonds is required for the intracellular processing and transport of CD36.

    PubMed Central

    Gruarin, P; Sitia, R; Alessio, M

    1997-01-01

    In monocytes/macrophages, CD36 is thought to have a role as a scavenger receptor, mediating the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and the endocytic uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins and fatty acids. The proposed topology of CD36 predicts that, of ten cysteine residues, six lie in the extracellular domain, whereas four are equally distributed in the two short terminal tails flanking the N-terminal and C-terminal hydrophobic stretches. Here we investigate the formation of intrachain disulphide bonds, on the basis of the assumption that the cysteine residues present in the luminal domains are generally oxidized, whereas those in the cytosol are reduced. As revealed by gel mobility-shift assays, disulphide bonds are present in the extracellular domain of the CD36 molecule. The formation of these bonds is required for the transport of CD36 from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Furthermore reactive thiol groups are present in the CD36 sequence, which upon lysis form an intrachain extra loop as an artifact. This disulphide bond is not formed in either (1) truncated CD36 lacking the two C-terminal cysteine residues or (2) Triton X-100-insoluble wild-type CD36 molecules, suggesting that, in this fraction, the C-terminal thiol groups are modified. PMID:9371725

  8. The Glucotoxicity Protecting Effect of Ezetimibe in Pancreatic Beta Cells via Inhibition of CD36

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of CD36, a fatty acid transporter, has been reported to prevent glucotoxicity and ameliorate high glucose induced beta cell dysfunction. Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor that blocks Niemann Pick C1-like 1 protein, but may exert its effect through suppression of CD36. We attempted to clarify the beneficial effect of ezetimibe on insulin secreting cells and to determine whether this effect is related to change of CD36 expression. mRNA expression of insulin and CD36, intracellular peroxide level and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under normal (5.6 mM) or high glucose (30 mM) condition in INS-1 cells and primary rat islet cells were compared. Changes of the aforementioned factors with treatment with ezetimibe (20 μM) under normal or high glucose condition were also assessed. mRNA expression of insulin was decreased with high glucose, which was reversed by ezetimibe in both INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. CD36 mRNA expression was increased with high glucose, but decreased by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. Three-day treatment with high glucose resulted in an increase in intracellular peroxide level; however, it was decreased by treatment with ezetimibe. Decrease in GSIS by three-day treatment with high glucose was reversed by ezetimibe. Palmitate uptake following exposure to high glucose conditions for three days was significantly elevated, which was reversed by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells. Ezetimibe may prevent glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells through a decrease in fatty acid influx via inhibition of CD36. PMID:27051238

  9. The CD36, CLA-1(CD36L1), and LIMPII (CD36L2) gene family: Cellular distribution, chromosomal location, and genetic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, D.; Vega, M.A.; Dopazo, J.

    1995-01-01

    CD36, CLA-1, and LIMPII are single polypeptide membrane glycoproteins, and the genes encoding them constitute a recently described gene family. In the present paper, a cDNA encoding the human lysosomal membrane protein LIMPII was used to determine its expression pattern in cells of various lineages. Like CLA-1, and in contrast with the restricted expression of CD36, the expression of LIMPII is widespread. Mapping of the human LIMPII and CLA-1 genes (gene symbols CD36L2 and CD36L1, respectively) to specific chromosomes revealed that CLA-1, LIMPII, and CD36 do not form a gene cluster, but are found dispersed on chromosomes 12, 4, and 7, respectively. These data, together with the phylogenetic analysis carried out for the members of this family, indicate that the LIMPII, CIA-1, and CD36 genes diverged early in evolution from an ancestor gene, possibly before the divergence between the arthropods and the vertebrates. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, Hadjer; Plesník, Jiří; Sayed, Amira; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Rouabah, Leila; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-11-01

    Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165). The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29) exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001). We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers. PMID:26556365

  11. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Daoudi, Hadjer; Plesník, Jiří; Sayed, Amira; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Rouabah, Leila; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165). The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29) exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001). We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers. PMID:26556365

  12. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, Hadjer; Plesník, Jiří; Sayed, Amira; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Rouabah, Leila; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-11-04

    Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165). The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29) exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001). We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers.

  13. Interaction of thrombospondin1 and CD36 contributes to obesity-associated podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenpeng; Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Zhou, Qi; Norman, Heather; Zhou, Changcheng; Wang, Shuxia

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with podocyte injury and the development of proteinuria. Elevated plasma free fatty acid is one of the characteristics of obesity and has been linked to podocyte dysfunction. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. In the current study, we examined the effect of saturated free fatty acid (FFA) on human podocyte apoptosis and function in vitro. The mechanism and its in vivo relevance were also determined. We found that FFA treatment induced human podocyte apoptosis and dysfunction, which was associated with increased expression of a matricellular protein-thrombospondin1 (TSP1). FFA stimulated TSP1 expression in podocytes at the transcriptional levels through activation of MAPK pathway. Addition of purified TSP1 to cell culture media induced podocyte apoptosis and dysfunction. Tis effect is though a TGF-β independent mechanism. Moreover, peptide treatment to block TSP1 binding to its receptor-CD36 attenuated FFA induced podocyte apoptosis, suggesting that TSP1/CD36 interaction mediates FFA-induced podocyte apoptosis. Importantly, using a diet-induced obese mouse model, in vivo data demonstrated that obesity-associated podocyte apoptosis and dysfunction were attenuated in TSP1 deficient mice as well as in CD36 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies provide novel evidence that the interaction of TSP1 with its receptor CD36 contributes to obesity--associated podocytopathy.

  14. CD36 genetic variation, fat intake and liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Roman, Sonia; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Fierro, Nora A; Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Panduro, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the association of the CD36 polymorphism (rs1761667) with dietary intake and liver fibrosis (LF) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. METHODS In this study, 73 patients with CHC were recruited. The CD36 genotype (G > A) was determined by a TaqMan real-time PCR system. Dietary assessment was carried out using a three-day food record to register the daily intake of macronutrients. Serum lipids and liver enzymes were measured by a dry chemistry assay. LF evaluated by transient elastography (Fibroscan®) and APRI score was classified as mild LF (F1-F2) and advanced LF (F3-F4). RESULTS Overall, the CD36 genotypic frequencies were AA (30.1%), AG (54.8%), and GG (15.1%), whereas the allelic A and G frequencies were 57.5% and 42.5%, respectively. CHC patients who were carriers of the CD36 AA genotype had a higher intake of calories attributable to total fat and saturated fatty acids than those with the non-AA genotypes. Additionally, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum values were higher in AA genotype carriers compared to non-AA carriers (91.7 IU/L vs 69.8 IU/L, P = 0.02). Moreover, the AA genotype was associated with an increase of 30.23 IU/L of AST (β = 30.23, 95%CI: 9.0-51.46, P = 0.006). Likewise, the AA genotype was associated with advanced LF compared to the AG (OR = 3.60, 95%CI: 1.16-11.15, P = 0.02) or AG + GG genotypes (OR = 3.52, 95%CI: 1.18-10.45, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION This study suggests that the CD36 (rs1761667) AA genotype is associated with higher fat intake and more instances of advanced LF in CHC patients.

  15. CD36 genetic variation, fat intake and liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Roman, Sonia; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Fierro, Nora A; Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Panduro, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the association of the CD36 polymorphism (rs1761667) with dietary intake and liver fibrosis (LF) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. METHODS In this study, 73 patients with CHC were recruited. The CD36 genotype (G > A) was determined by a TaqMan real-time PCR system. Dietary assessment was carried out using a three-day food record to register the daily intake of macronutrients. Serum lipids and liver enzymes were measured by a dry chemistry assay. LF evaluated by transient elastography (Fibroscan®) and APRI score was classified as mild LF (F1-F2) and advanced LF (F3-F4). RESULTS Overall, the CD36 genotypic frequencies were AA (30.1%), AG (54.8%), and GG (15.1%), whereas the allelic A and G frequencies were 57.5% and 42.5%, respectively. CHC patients who were carriers of the CD36 AA genotype had a higher intake of calories attributable to total fat and saturated fatty acids than those with the non-AA genotypes. Additionally, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum values were higher in AA genotype carriers compared to non-AA carriers (91.7 IU/L vs 69.8 IU/L, P = 0.02). Moreover, the AA genotype was associated with an increase of 30.23 IU/L of AST (β = 30.23, 95%CI: 9.0-51.46, P = 0.006). Likewise, the AA genotype was associated with advanced LF compared to the AG (OR = 3.60, 95%CI: 1.16-11.15, P = 0.02) or AG + GG genotypes (OR = 3.52, 95%CI: 1.18-10.45, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION This study suggests that the CD36 (rs1761667) AA genotype is associated with higher fat intake and more instances of advanced LF in CHC patients. PMID:27660673

  16. Innate immunity receptor CD36 promotes cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Laibaik; Zhou, Joan; Zhou, Ping; Pistick, Rose; El Jamal, Sleiman; Younkin, Linda; Pierce, Joseph; Arreguin, Andrea; Anrather, Josef; Younkin, Steven G.; Carlson, George A.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in cerebral arteries, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), occurs both in the setting of Alzheimer’s disease and independent of it, and can cause cerebrovascular insufficiency and cognitive deficits. The mechanisms leading to CAA have not been established, and no therapeutic targets have been identified. We investigated the role of CD36, an innate immunity receptor involved in Aβ trafficking, in the neurovascular dysfunction, cognitive deficits, and amyloid accumulation that occurs in mice expressing the Swedish mutation of the amyloid precursor protein (Tg2576). We found that Tg2576 mice lacking CD36 have a selective reduction in Aβ1-40 and CAA. This reduced vascular amyloid deposition was associated with preservation of the Aβ vascular clearance receptor LRP-1, and protection from the deleterious effects of Aβ on cerebral arterioles. These beneficial vascular effects were reflected by marked improvements in neurovascular regulation and cognitive performance. Our data suggest that CD36 promotes vascular amyloid deposition and the resulting cerebrovascular damage, leading to neurovascular dysfunction and cognitive deficits. These findings identify a previously unrecognized role of CD36 in the mechanisms of vascular amyloid deposition, and suggest that this scavenger receptor is a putative therapeutic target for CAA and related conditions. PMID:23382216

  17. Leishmania amazonensis Engages CD36 to Drive Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kendi; Tong, Mei; Dempsey, Brian; Moore, Kathryn J.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Silverman, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amastigotes manipulate the activity of macrophages to favor their own success. However, very little is known about the role of innate recognition and signaling triggered by amastigotes in this host-parasite interaction. In this work we developed a new infection model in adult Drosophila to take advantage of its superior genetic resources to identify novel host factors limiting Leishmania amazonensis infection. The model is based on the capacity of macrophage-like cells, plasmatocytes, to phagocytose and control the proliferation of parasites injected into adult flies. Using this model, we screened a collection of RNAi-expressing flies for anti-Leishmania defense factors. Notably, we found three CD36-like scavenger receptors that were important for defending against Leishmania infection. Mechanistic studies in mouse macrophages showed that CD36 accumulates specifically at sites where the parasite contacts the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Furthermore, CD36-deficient macrophages were defective in the formation of the large parasitophorous vacuole typical of L. amazonensis infection, a phenotype caused by inefficient fusion with late endosomes and/or lysosomes. These data identify an unprecedented role for CD36 in the biogenesis of the parasitophorous vacuole and further highlight the utility of Drosophila as a model system for dissecting innate immune responses to infection. PMID:27280707

  18. Responses of skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in rat gastrocnemius to hypothyroidism and iodothyronine administration: a putative role for FAT/CD36.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Assunta; De Matteis, Rita; Moreno, Maria; Napolitano, Laura; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Senese, Rosalba; de Lange, Pieter; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-11-15

    Iodothyronines such as triiodothyronine (T(3)) and 3,5-diiodothyronine (T(2)) influence energy expenditure and lipid metabolism. Skeletal muscle contributes significantly to energy homeostasis, and the above iodothyronines are known to act on this tissue. However, little is known about the cellular/molecular events underlying the effects of T(3) and T(2) on skeletal muscle lipid handling. Since FAT/CD36 is involved in the utilization of free fatty acids by skeletal muscle, specifically in their import into that tissue and presumably their oxidation at the mitochondrial level, we hypothesized that related changes in lipid handling and in FAT/CD36 expression and subcellular redistribution would occur due to hypothyroidism and to T(3) or T(2) administration to hypothyroid rats. In gastrocnemius muscles isolated from hypothyroid rats, FAT/CD36 was upregulated (mRNA levels and total tissue, sarcolemmal, and mitochondrial protein levels). Administration of either T(3) or T(2) to hypothyroid rats resulted in 1) little or no change in FAT/CD36 mRNA level, 2) a decreased total FAT/CD36 protein level, and 3) further increases in FAT/CD36 protein level in sarcolemma and mitochondria. Thus, the main effect of each iodothyronine seemed to be exerted at the level of FAT/CD36 cellular distribution. The effect of further increases in FAT/CD36 protein level in sarcolemma and mitochondria was already evident at 1 h after iodothyronine administration. Each iodothyronine increased the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation rate. However, the mechanisms underlying their rapid effects seem to differ; T(2) and T(3) each induce FAT/CD36 translocation to mitochondria, but only T(2) induces increases in carnitine palmitoyl transferase system activity and in the mitochondrial substrate oxidation rate.

  19. A CD36 ectodomain mediates insect pheromone detection via a putative tunnelling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Bargeton, Benoîte; Abuin, Liliane; Bukar, Natalia; Reina, Jaime H; Bartoi, Tudor; Graf, Marion; Ong, Huy; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Masson, Jean-Francois; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    CD36 transmembrane proteins have diverse roles in lipid uptake, cell adhesion and pathogen sensing. Despite numerous in vitro studies, how they act in native cellular contexts is poorly understood. A Drosophila CD36 homologue, sensory neuron membrane protein 1 (SNMP1), was previously shown to facilitate detection of lipid-derived pheromones by their cognate receptors in olfactory cilia. Here we investigate how SNMP1 functions in vivo. Structure-activity dissection demonstrates that SNMP1's ectodomain is essential, but intracellular and transmembrane domains dispensable, for cilia localization and pheromone-evoked responses. SNMP1 can be substituted by mammalian CD36, whose ectodomain can interact with insect pheromones. Homology modelling, using the mammalian LIMP-2 structure as template, reveals a putative tunnel in the SNMP1 ectodomain that is sufficiently large to accommodate pheromone molecules. Amino-acid substitutions predicted to block this tunnel diminish pheromone sensitivity. We propose a model in which SNMP1 funnels hydrophobic pheromones from the extracellular fluid to integral membrane receptors. PMID:27302750

  20. Multiphasic triacylglycerol dynamics in the intact heart during acute in vivo overexpression of CD36

    PubMed Central

    Carley, Andrew N.; Bi, Jian; Wang, Xuerong; Banke, Natasha H.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; O'Donnell, J. Michael; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac triacylglycerol (TAG) stores buffer the intracellular availability of long chain fatty acid (LCFA) that act as nuclear receptor ligands, substrate for lipotoxic derivatives, and high energy-yield fuel. The kinetic characteristics of TAG turnover and homeostatic mechanisms linking uptake and storage dynamics in hearts have until now remained elusive. This work examines TAG pool dynamics in the intact beating heart, under normal conditions and in response to acute gene expression-induced changes in CD36. Dynamic mode 13C NMR elucidated multiple kinetic processes in 13C-palmitate incorporation into TAG: an initial, saturable exponential component and a slower linear rate. Although previous work indicates the linear component to reflect TAG turnover, we hypothesized the saturable exponential to reflect transport of LCFA across the sarcolemma. Thus, we overexpressed the LCFA transporter CD36 through cardiac-specific adenoviral infection in vivo. Within 72 h, CD36 expression was increased 40% in intact hearts, accelerating the exponential phase relative to PBS-infused hearts. TAG turnover also increased with elevations in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and a modest increase in diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), without a significant expansion of the intracellular lipid pools. The results demonstrate a dynamic system of reciprocal gene regulation that couples saturable LCFA uptake across the sarcolemma to TAG synthesis/lipolysis rates. PMID:23099442

  1. A CD36 ectodomain mediates insect pheromone detection via a putative tunnelling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Bargeton, Benoîte; Abuin, Liliane; Bukar, Natalia; Reina, Jaime H.; Bartoi, Tudor; Graf, Marion; Ong, Huy; Ulbrich, Maximilian H.; Masson, Jean-Francois; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    CD36 transmembrane proteins have diverse roles in lipid uptake, cell adhesion and pathogen sensing. Despite numerous in vitro studies, how they act in native cellular contexts is poorly understood. A Drosophila CD36 homologue, sensory neuron membrane protein 1 (SNMP1), was previously shown to facilitate detection of lipid-derived pheromones by their cognate receptors in olfactory cilia. Here we investigate how SNMP1 functions in vivo. Structure–activity dissection demonstrates that SNMP1's ectodomain is essential, but intracellular and transmembrane domains dispensable, for cilia localization and pheromone-evoked responses. SNMP1 can be substituted by mammalian CD36, whose ectodomain can interact with insect pheromones. Homology modelling, using the mammalian LIMP-2 structure as template, reveals a putative tunnel in the SNMP1 ectodomain that is sufficiently large to accommodate pheromone molecules. Amino-acid substitutions predicted to block this tunnel diminish pheromone sensitivity. We propose a model in which SNMP1 funnels hydrophobic pheromones from the extracellular fluid to integral membrane receptors. PMID:27302750

  2. CD36 Polymorphism Is Associated with Protection from Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Kazuya; Ohashi, Jun; Patarapotikul, Jintana; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Naka, Izumi; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2003-01-01

    The human protein CD36 is a major receptor for Plasmodium falciparum–infected erythrocytes and contributes to the pathology of P. falciparum malaria. We performed variation screening of the CD36 gene and examined the possible association between CD36 polymorphisms and the severity of malaria in 475 adult Thai patients with P. falciparum malaria. Accordingly, we identified nine CD36 polymorphisms with a high-frequency (>15%) minor allele. Of these, the frequencies of the −14T→C allele in the upstream promoter region and the −53G→T allele in the downstream promoter region were significantly decreased in patients with cerebral malaria compared to those with mild malaria (P=.016 for −14T→C and P=.050 for −53G→T). The analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the nine common polymorphisms revealed that there are two blocks with strong LD in the CD36 gene and that the −14T→C and −53G→T polymorphisms are within the upstream block of 35 kb from the upstream promoter to exon 8. Further association testing after the second variation screening in the upstream block indicated that the in3(TG)12 (i.e., 12 TG repeats in intron 3) allele is most strongly associated with the reduction in the risk of cerebral malaria (odds ratio 0.59; 95% confidence interval 0.40–0.87; P=.0069). We found, by reverse-transcriptase PCR amplification, that in3(TG)12 is involved in the nonproduction of the variant CD36 transcript that lacks exons 4 and 5. Since exon 5 of the gene is known to encode the ligand-binding domain for P. falciparum–infected erythrocytes, in3(TG)12 itself or a primary variant on the haplotype with in3(TG)12 may be responsible for protection from cerebral malaria in Thailand. Results of the present study suggest that LD mapping has potential for detecting a disease-associated variant on the basis of haplotype blocks. PMID:12506336

  3. The A allele of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) SNP 1761667 associates with decreased lipid taste perception in obese Tunisian women.

    PubMed

    Mrizak, Ines; Šerý, Omar; Plesnik, Jiří; Arfa, Amel; Fekih, Mariem; Bouslema, Ali; Zaouali, Monia; Tabka, Zouhair; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-04-28

    Recent studies have suggested that excessive intake of dietary fat is associated with obesity. Some obese subjects have been reported to exhibit high thresholds for the gustatory detection of lipids via lipid receptors, such as cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). We studied lingual detection thresholds for emulsions containing oleic acid in obese Tunisian women (n 203) using a three-alternative forced choice (3-AFC) method. Genotyping of the TNF-α (rs1800629), IL-6 (rs1800795) and CD36 (rs1761667) genes was performed to associate with lipid taste perception thresholds. The CD36 genotype distribution was as follows: GG (n 42), AG (n 102) and AA (n 59). Women with the CD36 GG genotype exhibited oral detection thresholds for oleic acid that were more than three times lower than those with the CD36 AA genotype. The present study confirms a high threshold of gustatory fat detection in obese women with the CD36 AA genotype, but there is no significant association with the IL-6 and TNF-α gene polymorphisms.

  4. Hepatic fat accumulation and regulation of FAT/CD36: an effect of hepatic irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Martius, Gesa; Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans; Ramadori, Giuliano; Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation is known to induce inflammation and affect fat metabolic pathways. The current study investigates hepatic fat accumulation and fatty acid transportation in a rat model of single dose liver irradiation (25-Gy). Rat livers were selectively irradiated in-vivo (25-Gy), sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Hepatic lipids were studied by colorimetric assays in liver and serum. Intracellular lipids, protein and mRNA were studied by Nile red staining, immunohistology, Western Blot analysis and RT-PCR in liver, respectively. Changes in FAT/CD36 expression were studied in-vitro in a human monocyte cell line U937 after irradiation in presence or absence of infliximab (IFX). Nile Red staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (12-48 h) increase in fat droplets. Accordingly, hepatic triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA) were elevated. An early increase (3-6 h) in the serum level of HDL-C, TG and cholesterol was measured after single dose irradiation followed by a decrease thereafter. Furthermore, expression of the fat transporter protein FAT/CD36 was increased, immunohistochemistry revealed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, apolipoprotein-B100, -C3 and enzymes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase, lipoprotein-lipase, carnitine-palmitoyltransferase, malonyl-CoA-decarboxylase) involved in fat metabolism were induced at 12-24 h. Early activation of the NFkβ pathway (IκBα) by TNF-α was seen, followed by a significant elevation of serum markers for liver damage (AST and GLDH). TNF-α blockage by anti-TNF-α in cell culture (U937) prevented the increase of FAT/CD36 caused by irradiation. Selective liver irradiation is a model for rapid induction of steatosis hepatis and fat accumulation could be triggered by irradiation-induced inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNF-α). PMID:25197426

  5. CD36-related protein in Schistosoma japonicum: candidate mediator of selective cholesteryl ester uptake from high-density lipoprotein for egg maturation.

    PubMed

    Okumura-Noji, Kuniko; Miura, Yutaka; Lu, Rui; Asai, Kiyofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Brindley, Paul J; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2013-03-01

    Familial cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) deficiency is more common in some East Asian populations than elsewhere, suggesting the possibility of a selective advantage of this genetic defect against regional infectious diseases. Historically, infection with the Asian blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum has been endemic in these regions, including Japan. We previously reported that eggs of S. japonicum require cholesteryl ester uptake from normal high-density lipoprotein (HDL) but not from CETP-deficient HDL for their maturation to miracidia, a critical step of the hepatic pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. Herein we show that cholesteryl ester uptake is selective from HDL, and identified CD36-related protein (CD36RP) as a candidate to mediate the reaction. CD36RP was cloned from the adult and the egg developmental stages of S. japonicum, with 1880 bp encoding 506 amino acid residues exhibiting the CD36 domains and two transmembrane regions. Using antibodies against recombinant peptides representing the potential extracellular domains of CD36RP, Western blotting detected a protein with a molecular mass of 82 kDa in the particulate fraction of the adult parasite cells, which was reduced to 62 kDa after N-glycanase treatment. The extracellular domain peptide bound human HDL, as established by immunoblots following nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. Antibodies against the extracellular domain suppressed HDL cholesteryl ester uptake and maturation of the eggs in vitro. CD36RP is a candidate receptor on eggs of S. japonicum that facilitates uptake of HDL cholesteryl ester necessary for egg embryonation and maturation.

  6. CD36 mediates proximal tubular binding and uptake of albumin and is upregulated in proteinuric nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard J; Chana, Ravinder S; Hall, Matthew; Febbraio, Maria; Kennedy, David; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2012-10-01

    Dysregulation of renal tubular protein handling in proteinuria contributes to the development of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the role of CD36 as a novel candidate mediator of albumin binding and endocytosis in the kidney proximal tubule using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, and in nephrotic patient renal biopsy samples. In CD36-transfected opossum kidney proximal tubular cells, both binding and uptake of albumin were substantially enhanced. A specific CD36 inhibitor abrogated this effect, but receptor-associated protein, which blocks megalin-mediated endocytosis of albumin, did not. Mouse proximal tubular cells expressed CD36 and this was absent in CD36 null animals, whereas expression of megalin was equal in these animals. Compared with wild-type mice, CD36 null mice demonstrated a significantly increased urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio and albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Proximal tubular cells expressed increased CD36 when exposed to elevated albumin concentrations in culture medium. Expression of CD36 was studied in renal biopsy tissue obtained from adult patients with heavy proteinuria due to minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Proximal tubular CD36 expression was markedly increased in proteinuric individuals. We conclude that CD36 is a novel mediator influencing binding and uptake of albumin in the proximal tubule that is upregulated in proteinuric renal diseases. CD36 may represent a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy. PMID:22791331

  7. CD36 is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus E1 protein attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun-Jun; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Ma, Lin-Lin; Wu, Zhou-Yi; Jiang, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Jing; Li, Yu-Huan; Han, Yan-Xing; Li, Hu; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yan-Xiang; Song, Dan-Qing; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) is a membrane protein related to lipid metabolism. We show that HCV infection in vitro increased CD36 expression in either surface or soluble form. HCV attachment was facilitated through a direct interaction between CD36 and HCV E1 protein, causing enhanced entry and replication. The HCV co-receptor effect of CD36 was independent of that of SR-BI. CD36 monoclonal antibodies neutralized the effect of CD36 and reduced HCV replication. CD36 inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO), which directly bound CD36 but not SR-BI, significantly interrupted HCV entry, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. SSO’s antiviral effect was seen only in HCV but not in other viruses. SSO in combination with known anti-HCV drugs showed additional inhibition against HCV. SSO was considerably safe in mice. Conclusively, CD36 interacts with HCV E1 and might be a co-receptor specific for HCV entry; thus, CD36 could be a potential drug target against HCV. PMID:26898231

  8. Mitigation of Insulin Resistance by Mangiferin in a Rat Model of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Modulation of CD36 Redistribution in the Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Pan, Yongquan; Chonan, Ritsu; Batey, Robert; Rong, Xianglu; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is one of the prominent active components responsible for the antidiabetic property of many traditional herbs, but its underlying mechanisms of action remain unclear. CD36 in skeletal muscle is known to contribute to the etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake. This study investigated the effect of mangiferin on insulin resistance. The results showed that treatment of Wistar-Kyoto rats with mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) for 7 weeks inhibited chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in plasma insulin concentrations at the baseline and during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. It also suppressed the increases in fasted plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index. Mechanistically, mangiferin neither affected intakes of fructose and chow, and the increase in epididymal and perirenal fat, nor attenuated fructose-induced hypertension. In contrast, mangiferin attenuated fructose-induced acceleration of plasma NEFA clearance during OGTT, and tended to decrease excessive triglyceride accumulation in gastrocnemius. Immunofluorescence staining and subsequent rating of CD36-expressing fibers in gastrocnemius revealed that mangiferin restored fructose-stimulated sarcolemmal CD36 overexpression and decreased intracellular CD36 distribution. In addition, the effects of mangiferin on the parameters associated with insulin resistance and abnormal fatty acid metabolism were absent in the spontaneously hypertensive rats carrying numerous nonfunctional mutations in the CD36 gene. Thus, these results suggest that mangiferin treatment mitigates insulin resistance in a rat model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome by modulating sarcolemmal and intracellular CD36 redistribution in the skeletal muscle.

  9. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz-Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity. PMID:27525284

  10. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz-Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity.

  11. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity. PMID:27525284

  12. Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Jedidi, Iness; Couturier, Martine; Therond, Patrice; Gardes-Albert, Monique; Legrand, Alain; Barouki, Robert; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Aggerbeck, Martine . E-mail: Martine.Aggerbeck@univ-paris5.fr

    2006-12-22

    The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The scavenger receptor CD36 is one major receptor that internalizes oxidized LDL. In differentiated human macrophages, we compared the regulation of CD36 expression by copper-oxidized LDL or their products. Only oxidized derivatives of cholesteryl ester (CEOOH) increased the amount of CD36 mRNA (2.5-fold). Both oxidized LDL and CEOOH treatment increased two to fourfold the transcription of promoters containing peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor responsive elements (PPRE) in the presence of PPAR{alpha} or {gamma}. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assays with nuclear extracts prepared from macrophages treated by either oxidized LDL or CEOOH showed increased binding of PPAR{alpha} to the CD36 gene promoter PPRE. In conclusion, CEOOH present in oxidized LDL increase CD36 gene expression in a pathway involving PPAR{alpha}.

  13. Cancer stem cell-specific scavenger receptor CD36 drives glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Hale, James S.; Otvos, Balint; Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G.; Hitomi, Masahiro; Stoltz, Kevin; Wu, Qiulian; Flavahan, William; Levison, Bruce; Johansen, Mette L.; Schmitt, David; Neltner, Janna M.; Huang, Ping; Ren, Bin; Sloan, Andrew E.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Gladson, Candece L.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Brown, J. Mark; McIntyre, Thomas; Hazen, Stanley L.; Horbinski, Craig; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lathia, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) contains a self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cell (CSC) population which contributes to tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance. While the tumor microenvironment is essential to CSC self-renewal, the mechanisms by which CSCs sense and respond to microenvironmental conditions are poorly understood. Scavenger receptors are a broad class of membrane receptors that are well characterized on immune cells and instrumental in sensing apoptotic cellular debris and modified lipids. Here we provide evidence that CSCs selectively utilize the scavenger receptor CD36 to promote their maintenance using patient-derived CSCs and in vivo xenograft models. We detected CD36 expression in GBM cells in addition to previously described cell types including endothelial cells, macrophages and microglia. CD36 was enriched in CSCs and was able to functionally distinguish self-renewing cells. CD36 was co-expressed with integrin alpha 6 and CD133, previously described CSC markers, and CD36 reduction resulted in concomitant loss of integrin alpha 6 expression, self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity. We confirmed that oxidized phospholipids, ligands of CD36, were present in GBM and found that the proliferation of CSCs, but not non-CSCs, increased with exposure to oxidized low-density lipoprotein. CD36 was an informative biomarker of malignancy and negatively correlated to patient prognosis. These results provide a paradigm for CSCs to thrive by the selective enhanced expression of scavenger receptors, providing survival and metabolic advantages. PMID:24737733

  14. Association of CD36 expression and polymorphism with serum biochemical indices in Cherry Valley duck.

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Li, W G; Zhang, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) plays a crucial role in lipid sensing, innate immunity, atherogenesis, and glycolipid metabolism. This aims of this study were to delineate the CD36 mRNA expression profile in 16 duck tissues using relative quantitative real-time PCR and to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the duck CD36 gene by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA direct sequencing. In addition, this study investigated CD36 gene expression, genetic variation, and their effect on serum biochemical indices in duck. The results showed that CD36 mRNA was expressed in all tissues, and was highly specific to the pituitary and large intestine, and to subcutaneous and abdominal fat. Furthermore, three genotypes of the SNP g.476593 T > C in exon 9 of the duck CD36 gene were identified: MM, MN, and NN. The dominant genotype and allele were MM and M, with frequencies of 0.453 and 0.643, respectively. The genotype distributions deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.05) and achieved moderate levels of polymorphism in ducks. Correlation results showed that CD36 mRNA was significantly negatively correlated with triglycerides (P < 0.05), and significantly positively correlated with total protein, globulin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol (P < 0.01). All serum biochemical indices measured, with the exception of triglycerides, in birds with the NN genotype were significantly higher than those in birds with the MM genotype. These findings demonstrated that CD36 might be an important genetic marker for the selection of lipid metabolism and meat quality traits in ducks. PMID:27323079

  15. Synthetic Amphipathic Helical Peptides Targeting CD36 Attenuate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Alexander V; Wu, Tinghuai; Baranova, Irina N; Birukova, Anna A; Sviridov, Denis; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Patterson, Amy P; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic amphipathic helical peptides (SAHPs) designed as apolipoprotein A-I mimetics are known to bind to class B scavenger receptors (SR-Bs), SR-BI, SR-BII, and CD36, receptors that mediate lipid transport and facilitate pathogen recognition. In this study, we evaluated SAHPs, selected for targeting human CD36, by their ability to attenuate LPS-induced inflammation, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and acute lung injury (ALI). L37pA, which targets CD36 and SR-BI equally, inhibited LPS-induced IL-8 secretion and barrier dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells while reducing lung neutrophil infiltration by 40% in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. A panel of 20 SAHPs was tested in HEK293 cell lines stably transfected with various SR-Bs to identify SAHPs with preferential selectivity toward CD36. Among several SAHPs targeting both SR-BI/BII and CD36 receptors, ELK-B acted predominantly through CD36. Compared with L37pA, 5A, and ELK SAHPs, ELK-B was most effective in reducing the pulmonary barrier dysfunction, neutrophil migration into the lung, and lung inflammation induced by LPS. We conclude that SAHPs with relative selectivity toward CD36 are more potent at inhibiting acute pulmonary inflammation and dysfunction. These data indicate that therapeutic strategies using SAHPs targeting CD36, but not necessarily mimicking all apolipoprotein A-I functions, may be considered a possible new treatment approach for inflammation-induced ALI and pulmonary edema. PMID:27316682

  16. Effects of cAMP modulators on long-chain fatty-acid uptake and utilization by electrically stimulated rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Luiken, J J F P; Willems, J; Coort, S L M; Coumans, W A; Bonen, A; Van Der Vusse, G J; Glatz, J F C

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we established that cellular contractions increase long-chain fatty-acid (FA) uptake by cardiac myocytes. This increase is dependent on the transport function of an 88 kDa membrane FA transporter, FA translocase (FAT/CD36), and, in analogy to skeletal muscle, is likely to involve its translocation from an intracellular pool to the sarcolemma. In the present study, we investigated whether cAMP-dependent signalling is involved in this translocation process. Isoproterenol, dibutyryl-cAMP and the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, amrinone, which markedly raised the intracellular cAMP level, did not affect cellular FA uptake, but influenced the fate of intracellular FAs by directing these to mitochondrial oxidation in electrostimulated cardiac myocytes. The PDE inhibitors 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, milrinone and dipyridamole each significantly stimulated FA uptake as well as intracellular cAMP levels, but these effects were quantitatively unrelated. The stimulatory effects of these PDE inhibitors were antagonized by sulpho- N -succinimidylpalmitate, indicating the involvement of FAT/CD36, albeit that the different PDE inhibitors use different molecular mechanisms to stimulate FAT/CD36-mediated FA uptake. Notably, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and milrinone increased the intrinsic activity of FAT/CD36, possibly through its covalent modification, and dipyridamole induces translocation of FAT/CD36 to the sarcolemma. Elevation of intracellular cGMP, but not of cAMP, by the PDE inhibitor zaprinast did not have any effect on FA uptake and metabolism by cardiac myocytes. The stimulatory effects of PDE inhibitors on cardiac FA uptake should be considered when applying these agents in clinical medicine. PMID:12093365

  17. Genetics of Cd36 and the clustering of multiple cardiovascular risk factors in spontaneous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pravenec, M; Zidek, V; Simakova, M; Kren, V; Krenova, D; Horky, K; Jachymova, M; Mikova, B; Kazdova, L; Aitman, T J; Churchill, P C; Webb, R C; Hingarh, N H; Yang, Y; Wang, J M; Lezin, E M; Kurtz, T W

    1999-06-01

    Disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism have been reported to cluster in patients with essential hypertension and in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). A deletion in the Cd36 gene on chromosome 4 has recently been implicated in defective carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in isolated adipocytes from SHRs. However, the role of Cd36 and chromosome 4 in the control of blood pressure and systemic cardiovascular risk factors in SHRs is unknown. In the SHR. BN-Il6/Npy congenic strain, we have found that transfer of a segment of chromosome 4 (including Cd36) from the Brown Norway (BN) rat onto the SHR background induces reductions in blood pressure and ameliorates dietary-induced glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. These results demonstrate that a single chromosome region can influence a broad spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors involved in the hypertension metabolic syndrome. However, analysis of Cd36 genotypes in the SHR and stroke-prone SHR strains indicates that the deletion variant of Cd36 was not critical to the initial selection for hypertension in the SHR model. Thus, the ability of chromosome 4 to influence multiple cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, may depend on linkage of Cd36 to other genes trapped within the differential segment of the SHR. BN-Il6/Npy strain.

  18. CD36 is expressed in a defined subpopulation of neurons in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, André Machado; Ludwig, Raissa Guimarães; Nagai, Maíra Harume; de Almeida, Tiago Jonas; Watanabe, Hebe Mizuno; Hirata, Marcio Yukio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Papes, Fabio; Malnic, Bettina; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    The sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OSNs) are equipped with a large repertoire of olfactory receptors and the associated signal transduction machinery. In addition to the canonical OSNs, which express odorant receptors (ORs), the epithelium contains specialized subpopulations of sensory neurons that can detect specific information from environmental cues and relay it to relevant neuronal circuitries. Here we describe a subpopulation of mature OSNs in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) which expresses CD36, a multifunctional receptor involved in a series of biological processes, including sensory perception of lipid ligands. The Cd36 expressing neurons coexpress markers of mature OSNs and are dispersed throughout the MOE. Unlike several ORs analyzed in our study, we found frequent coexpression of the OR Olfr287 in these neurons, suggesting that only a specific set of ORs may be coexpressed with CD36 in OSNs. We also show that CD36 is expressed in the cilia of OSNs, indicating a possible role in odorant detection. CD36-deficient mice display no signs of gross changes in the organization of the olfactory epithelium, but show impaired preference for a lipid mixture odor. Our results show that CD36-expressing neurons represent a distinct population of OSNs, which may have specific functions in olfaction. PMID:27145700

  19. Gene encoding the collagen type I and thrombospondin receptor CD36 is located on chromosome 7q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ruiz, E.; Armesilla, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Vega, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The human CD36 is a member of a gene family of structurally related glycoproteins and functions as a receptor for collagen type I and thrombospondin. CD36 also binds to red blood cells infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, the CD36 gene was assigned to chromosome 7 by using the polymerase chain reaction with DNA from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Furthermore, the use of a CD36 genomic probe has allowed the localization of the CD36 locus to the 7q11.2 band by fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with GTG-banding. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  20. The human CD5L/AIM-CD36 axis: A novel autophagy inducer in macrophages that modulates inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Aran, Gemma; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Arias, Lilibeth; Armengol, Carolina; Borràs, Francesc E; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2015-01-01

    CD5L (CD5 molecule-like) is a secreted glycoprotein that participates in host response to bacterial infection. CD5L influences the monocyte inflammatory response to the bacterial surface molecules lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by inhibiting TNF secretion. Here we studied the intracellular events that lead to macrophage TNF inhibition by human CD5L. To accomplish this goal, we performed functional analyses with human monocytic THP1 macrophages, as well as with peripheral blood monocytes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) reversed the inhibitory effect of CD5L on TNF secretion. Among the various PtdIns3K isoforms, our results indicated that CD5L activates PtdIns3K (whose catalytic subunit is termed PIK3C3), a key modulator involved in autophagy. Further analysis revealed a concomitant enhancement of autophagy markers such as cellular LC3-II content, increased LC3 puncta, as well as LC3-LysoTracker Red colocalization. Moreover, electron microscopy showed an increased presence of cytosolic autophagosomes in THP1 macrophages overexpressing CD5L. Besides preventing TNF secretion, CD5L also inhibited IL1B and enhanced IL10 secretion. This macrophage anti-inflammatory pattern of CD5L was reverted upon silencing of autophagy protein ATG7 by siRNA transfection. Additional siRNA experiments in THP1 macrophages indicated that the induction of autophagy mechanisms by CD5L was achieved through cell-surface scavenger receptor CD36, a multiligand receptor expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Our data represent the first evidence that CD36 is involved in autophagy and point to a significant contribution of the CD5L-CD36 axis to the induction of macrophage autophagy.

  1. The human CD5L/AIM-CD36 axis: A novel autophagy inducer in macrophages that modulates inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Aran, Gemma; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Arias, Lilibeth; Armengol, Carolina; Borràs, Francesc E; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2015-01-01

    CD5L (CD5 molecule-like) is a secreted glycoprotein that participates in host response to bacterial infection. CD5L influences the monocyte inflammatory response to the bacterial surface molecules lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by inhibiting TNF secretion. Here we studied the intracellular events that lead to macrophage TNF inhibition by human CD5L. To accomplish this goal, we performed functional analyses with human monocytic THP1 macrophages, as well as with peripheral blood monocytes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) reversed the inhibitory effect of CD5L on TNF secretion. Among the various PtdIns3K isoforms, our results indicated that CD5L activates PtdIns3K (whose catalytic subunit is termed PIK3C3), a key modulator involved in autophagy. Further analysis revealed a concomitant enhancement of autophagy markers such as cellular LC3-II content, increased LC3 puncta, as well as LC3-LysoTracker Red colocalization. Moreover, electron microscopy showed an increased presence of cytosolic autophagosomes in THP1 macrophages overexpressing CD5L. Besides preventing TNF secretion, CD5L also inhibited IL1B and enhanced IL10 secretion. This macrophage anti-inflammatory pattern of CD5L was reverted upon silencing of autophagy protein ATG7 by siRNA transfection. Additional siRNA experiments in THP1 macrophages indicated that the induction of autophagy mechanisms by CD5L was achieved through cell-surface scavenger receptor CD36, a multiligand receptor expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Our data represent the first evidence that CD36 is involved in autophagy and point to a significant contribution of the CD5L-CD36 axis to the induction of macrophage autophagy. PMID:25713983

  2. Viral Inhibition of Bacterial Phagocytosis by Human Macrophages: Redundant Role of CD36

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Grace E.; Pounce, Zoe C.; Wallington, Joshua C.; Bastidas-Legarda, Leidy Y.; Nicholas, Ben; Chidomere, Chiamaka; Robinson, Emily C.; Martin, Kirstin; Tocheva, Anna S.; Christodoulides, Myron; Djukanovic, Ratko; Wilkinson, Tom M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are essential to maintaining lung homoeostasis and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-infected lung macrophages downregulate their expression of the scavenger receptor CD36. This receptor has also been shown to be involved in phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a primary agent associated with pneumonia secondary to viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD36 in the effects of viral infection on macrophage phagocytic function. Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were exposed to H3N2 X31 influenza virus, M37 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or UV-irradiated virus. No infection of MDM was seen upon exposure to UV-irradiated virus but incubation with live X31 or M37 resulted in significant levels of viral detection by flow cytometry or RT-PCR respectively. Infection resulted in significantly diminished uptake of S. pneumoniae by MDM and significantly decreased expression of CD36 at both the cell surface and mRNA level. Concurrently, there was a significant increase in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection and we observed a significant decrease in bacterial phagocytosis (p = 0.031) and CD36 gene expression (p = 0.031) by MDM cultured for 24 h in 50IU/ml IFNβ. Knockdown of CD36 by siRNA resulted in decreased phagocytosis, but this was mimicked by transfection reagent alone. When MDM were incubated with CD36 blocking antibodies no effect on phagocytic ability was observed. These data indicate that autologous IFNβ production by virally-infected cells can inhibit bacterial phagocytosis, but that decreased CD36 expression by these cells does not play a major role in this functional deficiency. PMID:27701435

  3. Pathways commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obese adipose tissue: FAT/CD36 modulates differentiation and lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Berger, E; Héraud, S; Mojallal, A; Lequeux, C; Weiss-Gayet, M; Damour, O; Géloën, A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to adipose tissue hypertrophy (increased adipocyte cell size) and hyperplasia (increased cell number). Comparative analyses of gene datasets allowed us to identify 1426 genes which may represent common adipose phenotype in humans and mice. Among them we identified several adipocyte-specific genes dysregulated in obese adipose tissue, involved in either fatty acid storage (acyl CoA synthase ACSL1, hormone-sensitive lipase LIPE, aquaporin 7 AQP7, perilipin PLIN) or cell adhesion (fibronectin FN1, collagens COL1A1, COL1A3, metalloprotein MMP9, or both (scavenger receptor FAT/CD36). Using real-time analysis of cell surface occupancy on xCELLigence system we developed a new method to study lipid uptake and differentiation of mouse 3T3L1 fibroblasts and human adipose stem cells. Both processes are regulated by insulin and fatty acids such as oleic acid. We showed that fatty acid addition to culture media increased the differentiation rate and was required for full differentiation into unilocular adipocytes. Significant activation of lipogenesis, i.e. lipid accumulation, by either insulin or oleic acid was monitored in times ranging from 1 to 24 h, depending on differentiation state, whereas significant effects on adipogenesis, i.e., surperimposed lipid accumulation and gene transcriptional regulations were measured after 3 to 4 d. Combination of selected times for analysis of lipid contents, cell counts, size fractionations, and gene transcriptional regulations showed that FAT/CD36 specific inhibitor AP5258 significantly increased cell survival of oleic acid-treated mouse and human adipocytes, and partially restored the transcriptional response to oleic acid in the presence of insulin through JNK pathway. Taken together, these data open new perspectives to study the molecular mechanisms commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obesity at the level of lipogenesis linked to hypertrophy and adipogenesis linked to hyperplasia. PMID:26257990

  4. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  5. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  6. CD36 gene transfer confers capacity for phagocytosis of cells undergoing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Phagocyte recognition and ingestion of intact cells undergoing apoptosis are key events in this generally important program of cell death. Insufficient phagocyte capacity for apoptotic cells can result in failure to clear dying cells before membrane integrity is lost, resulting in leakage of noxious cell contents and severe tissue damage. However, no means has been available to increase phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. We now report that transfection of the macrophage adhesion molecule CD36 into human Bowes melanoma cells specifically conferred greatly increased capacity to ingest apoptotic neutrophils, lymphocytes, and fibroblasts, comparable to that exhibited by macrophages. Furthermore, when CD36 was transfected into another cell type with limited capacity to take up apoptotic bodies, the monkey COS- 7 cell, similar effects were observed. Therefore, CD36 gene transfer can confer "professional" capacity to ingest apoptotic cells upon "amateur" phagocytes. PMID:7536797

  7. Increased placental fatty acid transporter 6 and binding protein 3 expression and fetal liver lipid accumulation in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Harris, Jessica; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with increased fetal growth and adiposity, which, in part, is determined by transplacental nutrient supply. Trophoblast uptake and intracellular trafficking of lipids are dependent on placental fatty acid transport proteins (FATP), translocase (FAT/CD36), and fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). We hypothesized that maternal obesity in mice leads to increased placental expression of FAT/CD36, FATPs, and FABPs, and lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. C57/BL6J female mice were fed either a control (C; n = 10) or an obesogenic (OB; n = 10) high-fat, high-sugar diet before mating and throughout pregnancy. At E18.5, placentas and fetal livers were collected. Trophoblast plasma membranes (TPM) were isolated from placental homogenates. Expression of FAT/CD36 and FATP (TPM) and FABP (homogenates) was determined by immunoblotting. Gene expression was assessed by RT-quantitative PCR. Sections of fetal livers were stained for Oil Red O, and lipid droplets were quantified. TPM protein expression of FAT/CD36, FATP 2, and FATP 4 was comparable between C and OB groups. Conversely, TPM FATP 6 expression was increased by 35% in OB compared with C placentas without changes in mRNA expression. FABPs 1, 3-5 and PPARγ were expressed in homogenates, and FABP 3 expression increased 27% in OB compared with C placentas; however, no changes were observed in mRNA expression. Lipid droplet accumulation was 10-fold higher in the livers of fetuses from OB compared with C group. We propose that increased lipid transport capacity in obese mice promotes transplacental fatty acid transport and contributes to excess lipid accumulation in the fetal liver.

  8. HIV-1 Nef Impairs Key Functional Activities in Human Macrophages through CD36 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Olivetta, Eleonora; Tirelli, Valentina; Chiozzini, Chiara; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Romano, Ignazio; Arenaccio, Claudia; Sanchez, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages utilize the class A and B scavenger receptors to recognize and perform phagocytosis of invading microbes before a pathogen-specific immune response is generated. HIV-1 Nef protein affects the innate immune system impairing oxidative burst response and phagocytic capacity of macrophages. Our data show that exogenous recombinant myristoylated Nef protein induces a marked CD36 downregulation in monocytes from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (MDMs) differentiated by cytokines and in MDMs contained in a mixed culture obtained expanding PBMCs under Human Erythroid Massive Amplification condition. Under the latter culture condition we identify three main populations after 6 days of expansion: lymphocytes (37.8±14.7%), erythroblasts (46.7±6.1%) and MDMs (15.7±7.5%). The Nef addition to the cell culture significantly downregulates CD36 expression in MDMs, but not in erythroid cells. Furthermore, CD36 inhibition is highly specific since it does not modify the expression levels of other MDM markers such as CD14, CD11c, CD86, CD68, CD206, Toll-like Receptor 2 and Toll-like Receptor 4. Similar results were obtained in MDMs infected with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1-expressing Nef. The reduced CD36 membrane expression is associated with decrease of correspondent CD36 mRNA transcript. Furthermore, Nef-induced CD36 downregulation is linked to both impaired scavenger activity with reduced capability to take up oxidized lipoproteins and to significant decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent beads and GFP-expressing Salmonella tiphymurium. In addition we observed that Nef induces TNF-α release in MDMs. Although these data suggest a possible involvement of TNF-α in mediating Nef activity, our results exclude a possible relationship between Nef-induced TNF-α release and Nef-mediated CD36 downregulation. The present work shows that HIV-1 Nef protein may have a role in the strategies elaborated by HIV-1 to alter pathogen

  9. CD36 Differently Regulates Macrophage Responses to Smooth and Rough Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Biedroń, Rafał; Peruń, Angelika; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern of Gram-negative bacterial infections, and includes smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) chemotypes. Upon activation by LPS through CD14, TLR4/MD-2 heterodimers sequentially induce two waves of intracellular signaling for macrophage activation: the MyD88-dependent pathway from the plasma membrane and, following internalization, the TRIF-dependent pathway from endosomes. We sought to better define the role of scavenger receptors CD36 and CD204/SR-A as accessory LPS receptors that can contribute to pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activation of macrophages. We have found that CD36 differently regulates activation of mouse macrophages by S-LPS versus R-LPS. The ability of CD36 to substitute for CD14 in loading R-LPS, but not S-LPS onto TLR4/MD-2 allows CD14-independent macrophage responses to R-LPS. Conversely, S-LPS, but not R-LPS effectively stimulates CD14 binding to CD36, which favors S-LPS transfer from CD14 onto TLR4/MD-2 under conditions of low CD14 occupancy with S-LPS in serum-free medium. In contrast, in the presence of serum, CD36 reduces S-LPS binding to TLR4/MD-2 and the subsequent MyD88-dependent signaling, by mediating internalization of S-LPS/CD14 complexes. Additionally, CD36 positively regulates activation of TRIF-dependent signaling by both S-LPS and R-LPS, by promoting TLR4/MD-2 endocytosis. In contrast, we have found that SR-A does not function as a S-LPS receptor. Thus, by co-operating with CD14 in both R- and S-LPS loading onto TLR4/MD-2, CD36 can enhance the sensitivity of tissue-resident macrophages in detecting infections by Gram-negative bacteria. However, in later phases, following influx of serum to the infection site, the CD36-mediated negative regulation of MyD88-dependent branch of S-LPS-induced TLR4 signaling might constitute a mechanism to prevent an excessive inflammatory response, while preserving the adjuvant effect of S-LPS for adaptive immunity. PMID

  10. The Nuts and Bolts of Ring-Translocase Structure and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Strycharska, Melania; Berger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Ring-shaped, oligomeric translocases are multisubunit enzymes that couple hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) to directed movement along extended biopolymer substrates. These motors help unwind nucleic acid duplexes, unfold protein chains, and shepherd nucleic acids between cellular and/or viral compartments. Substrates are translocated through a central pore formed by a circular array of catalytic subunits. Cycles of nucleotide binding, hydrolysis, and product release help reposition translocation loops in the pore to direct movement. How NTP turnover allosterically induces these conformational changes, and the extent of mechanistic divergence between motor families, remain outstanding problems. This review examines the current models for ring-translocase function and highlights the fundamental gaps remaining in our understanding of these molecular machines. PMID:21282052

  11. The Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Associates with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase in a Stoichiometric Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Carola S.; Rampelt, Heike; Gebert, Michael; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schrempp, Sandra G.; Kochbeck, Lioba; Guiard, Bernard; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized with amino-terminal signal sequences. The presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex) mediates the import of these preproteins. The essential TIM23 core complex closely cooperates with partner protein complexes like the presequence translocase-associated import motor and the respiratory chain. The inner mitochondrial membrane also contains a large number of metabolite carriers, but their association with preprotein translocases has been controversial. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the TIM23 interactome based on stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. Subsequent biochemical studies on identified partner proteins showed that the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier associates with the membrane-embedded core of the TIM23 complex in a stoichiometric manner, revealing an unexpected connection of mitochondrial protein biogenesis to metabolite transport. Our data indicate that direct TIM23-AAC coupling may support preprotein import into mitochondria when respiratory activity is low. PMID:25124039

  12. CD36 T188G gene polymorphism and severe falciparum malaria in India.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Das, T K; Sahu, U; Das, B P; Kar, S K; Ranjit, M R

    2009-07-01

    Sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes (PE) in the microvasculature contributes directly to the virulence and severe pathology of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The scavenger receptor CD36 appears to play an important role in PE adherence. Recently several mutations in the CD36 gene have been found to be associated with variability in susceptibility to P. falciparum infection in different ethnic populations. We investigated the possible association of T188G CD36 gene polymorphism with severe clinical manifestations of malaria in 95 adult patients with severe malaria admitted to SCB Medical College Hospital, Cuttack, Orissa, India ('severe' group) and 95 ethnically matched controls attending outpatient clinics at primary health centres ('mild' group). The frequency of the wild-type (T188T) allele of the CD36 gene was 0.91 in the 'severe' group and 0.78 in the 'mild' group of patients, while mutant (T188G) allele frequency was 0.09 in the severe group and 0.22 in the mild group. The Hardy-Weinberg equation indicates that the mutant allele is under selection pressure and disease association analysis shows that the presence of the heterozygote mutant allele renders protection against severe malaria (chi(2)=10.67, odds ratio=3.51, 95% CI 1.67-7.36). PMID:19136129

  13. CD36 Is Essential for Regulation of the Host Innate Response to Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin-Mediated Dermonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Castleman, Moriah J; Febbraio, Maria; Hall, Pamela R

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the primary cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) in the United States. α-Hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming toxin secreted by S. aureus and a major contributor to tissue necrosis, prompts recruitment of neutrophils critical for host defense against S. aureus infections. However, the failure to clear apoptotic neutrophils can result in damage to host tissues, suggesting that mechanisms of neutrophil clearance are essential to limiting Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. We hypothesized that CD36, a scavenger receptor which facilitates recognition of apoptosing cells, would play a significant role in regulating Hla-mediated inflammation and tissue injury during S. aureus SSSI. In this study, we show that CD36 on macrophages negatively regulates dermonecrosis caused by Hla-producing S. aureus. This regulation is independent of bacterial burden, as CD36 also limits dermonecrosis caused by intoxication with sterile bacterial supernatant or purified Hla. Dermonecrotic lesions of supernatant intoxicated CD36(-/-) mice are significantly larger, with increased neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β expression, compared with CD36(+/+) (wild-type) mice. Neutrophil depletion of CD36(-/-) mice prevents this phenotype, demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to tissue injury in this model. Furthermore, administration of CD36(+/+) but not CD36(-/-) macrophages near the site of intoxication reduces dermonecrosis, IL-1β production and neutrophil accumulation to levels seen in wild-type mice. This therapeutic effect is reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization in the CD36(+/+) macrophages, supporting a mechanism of action whereby CD36-dependent macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils regulates Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD36 is essential for controlling the host innate response to S. aureus skin infection.

  14. CD36 is essential for regulation of the host innate response to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin-mediated dermonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, Moriah J.; Febbraio, Maria; Hall, Pamela R.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the primary cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) in the USA. Alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming toxin secreted by S. aureus and a major contributor to tissue necrosis, prompts recruitment of neutrophils critical for host defense against S. aureus infections. However, the failure to clear apoptotic neutrophils can result in damage to host tissues, suggesting that mechanisms of neutrophil clearance are essential to limiting Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. We hypothesized that CD36, a scavenger receptor which facilitates recognition of apoptosing cells, would play a significant role in regulating Hla-mediated inflammation and tissue injury during S. aureus SSSI. Here we show that CD36 on macrophages negatively regulates dermonecrosis caused by Hla-producing S. aureus. This regulation is independent of bacterial burden, as CD36 also limits dermonecrosis caused by intoxication with sterile bacterial supernatant or purified Hla. Dermonecrotic lesions of supernatant intoxicated CD36−/− mice are significantly larger, with increased neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β expression, compared to CD36+/+ (wild-type) mice. Neutrophil depletion of CD36−/− mice prevents this phenotype, demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to tissue injury in this model. Furthermore, administration of CD36+/+, but not CD36−/−, macrophages near the site of intoxication reduces dermonecrosis, IL-1β production and neutrophil accumulation to levels seen in wild-type mice. This therapeutic effect is reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization in the CD36+/+ macrophages, supporting a mechanism of action whereby CD36-dependent macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils regulates Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. Together, these data demonstrate that CD36 is essential for controlling the host innate response to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:26223653

  15. Prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 regulation of scavenger receptor CD36 modulates microglial Aβ42 phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Melief, Erica; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Kathleen S; Keene, C Dirk; Montine, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies underline the potential relevance of microglial innate immune activation in Alzheimer disease. Primary mouse microglia that lack prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) show decreased innate immune-mediated neurotoxicity and increased amyloid β (Aβ) peptide phagocytosis, features that were replicated in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that scavenger receptor CD36 is an effector of EP2-regulated Aβ phagocytosis. CD36 expression was 143-fold greater in mouse primary microglia than in primary astrocytes. Three different means of suppressing EP2 signaling increased and an agonist of EP2 decreased CD36 expression in primary wild-type microglia. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR4, and TLR7, but not TLR2 or TLR9, reduced primary microglial CD36 transcription and cell surface CD36 protein and reduced Aβ42 phagocytosis as well. At each step, the effects of innate immune activation on CD36 were reversed by at least 50% by an EP2 antagonist, and this partial rescue of microglia Aβ42 phagocytosis was largely mediated by CD36 activity. Finally, we showed in hippocampus of wild-type mice that innate immune activation suppressed CD36 expression by an EP2-dependent mechanism. Taken together with results of others that found brain clearance of Aβ peptides and behavioral improvements mediated by CD36 in mice, regulation of CD36-mediated Aβ phagocytosis by suppression of EP2 signaling may provide a new approach to suppressing some aspects of Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

  16. OxLDL or TLR2-induced cytokine response is enhanced by oxLDL-independent novel domain on mouse CD36

    PubMed Central

    Xie, ChengHui; Ng, HangPong; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2011-01-01

    OxLDL binding to CD36 is shown to result in macrophage activation and foam cell formation that have been implicated in atherosclerosis. However, CD36 has also been shown to induce inflammatory response to other ligands besides oxLDL. During the course of blocking CD36 oxLDL binding function using anti CD36 antibodies, we have identified a novel domain of CD36 that triggers inflammatory response-independent of oxLDL binding. OxLDL bound to the mouse reporter cell line RAW-Blue induced TNF-α and RANTES mRNA and protein expression. Pretreatment of RAW-Blue cells with an anti-mCD36 mAb, JC63.1, an activating mCD36 mAb, surprisingly did not inhibit oxLDL-induced response. Further, binding of this antibody to CD36 alone induced a pro-inflammatory cytokine response in RAW-Blue cells as well as primary mouse macrophages. The induction of cytokine response was specific only to this antibody and was CD36-dependent, since CD36−/− macrophages failed to induce a similar response. The interaction of the antibody to CD36 led to activation of NF-κB and MAP kinase. Notably, a CD36 peptide blocked oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and macrophage activation. However, the activating mCD36 mAb induced macrophage activation was not inhibited by CD36 peptide. Further, activating mCD36 mAb enhanced oxLDL- or TLR2- or TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses. Collectively, our data provide evidence that activating mCD36 mAb binds to a domain different from the oxLDL-binding domain on mouse CD36, and suggest that interaction at this domain may contribute to oxLDL-independent macrophage inflammatory responses that lead to chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:21281677

  17. Lack of the scavenger receptor CD36 alters microglial phenotypes after neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Faustino, Joel; Woo, Moon-Sook; Derugin, Nikita; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2016-01-01

    The stage of brain development at the time of stroke has a major impact on the pathophysiological mechanisms of ischemic damage, including the neuroinflammatory response. Microglial cells have been shown to contribute to acute and sub-chronic injury in adult stroke models, whereas in neonatal rodents we showed that microglial cells serve as endogenous neuroprotectants early following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), limiting neuroinflammation and injury. In the neonate, microglial depletion or lack of the scavenger receptor CD36 exacerbates injury. In this study we asked if lack of CD36 affects microglial phenotypes after neonatal stroke. Using RT-PCR we characterized the patterns of gene expression in microglia isolated from injured regions following acute tMCAO in postnatal day 10 mice and showed that expression of several pro-inflammatory genes, including Toll-like receptors (TLR), remains largely unaffected in activated microglia in injured regions. Using multiple biochemical assays we demonstrated that lack of CD36 alters several functions of microglia in acutely injured neonatal brain: it further enhances accumulation of the chemokine MCP-1, affects the number of CD11b+/CD45+ cells, along with protein expression of its co-receptor, TLR2, but does not affect accumulation of superoxide in microglia or the cytokines TNFα and IL-1β in injured regions. PMID:26223273

  18. miRNA-133a attenuates lipid accumulation via TR4-CD36 pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    lipid metabolism is the major causes of atherosclerosis. There is increasing evidence that miR-133a plays an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a in macrophages is still unclear. Several lines of evidence indicate that loss of TR4 leads to reduce lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissues, etc, and lesional macrophages-derived TR4 can greatly increase the foam cell formation through increasing the CD36-mediated the uptake of ox-LDL. Interestingly, computational analysis suggests that TR4 may be a target gene of miR-133a. Here, we examined whether miR-133a regulates TR4 expression in ox-LDL-induced mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, thereby affecting lipid accumulation. Using ox-LDL-treatment RAW 264.7 macrophages transfected with miR-133a mimics or inhibitors, we have showed that miR-133a can directly regulate the expression of TR4 in RAW 264.7 cells, thereby attenuates CD36-medide lipid accumulation. Furthermore, our studies suggest an additional explanation for the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a regulation to its functional target, TR4 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Thus, our findings suggest that miR-133a may regulate lipid accumulation in ox-LDL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages via TR4-CD36 pathway.

  19. Reduced uptake of oxidized low density lipoproteins in monocyte-derived macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, S; Kashiwagi, H; Yamashita, S; Nakagawa, T; Kostner, B; Tomiyama, Y; Nakata, A; Ishigami, M; Miyagawa, J; Kameda-Takemura, K

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the physiological roles of CD36 as an oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) receptor, we analyzed the monocyte-derived macrophages from normal and two CD36-deficient subjects, since we identified the molecular abnormalities (Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, Y. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, R. H. Lipsky, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa 1994. Blood. 83:3545-3552; and Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, S. Honda, S. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, N. Nagao, S. Sekiguchi, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa. 1995. J. Clin. Invest. 95:1040-1046). Scatchard analysis of 125I-OxLDL binding showed a linear plot and the maximum binding was lower by approximately 40% in the macrophages from subjects with CD36 deficiency than those from normal controls. Competition studies showed that the uptake of 125I-OxLDL was suppressed by OKM5, an antibody against CD36, by 53% in normal control macrophages, but not in the CD36-deficient macrophages. After incubation with OxLDL for 24 h, cholesteryl ester mass accumulation was reduced by approximately 40% in the macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects than those from normal controls. These results suggest that CD36 is one of the physiological receptors for OxLDL. Since specific binding of OxLDL was only reduced by approximately 40% in spite of the complete deficiency of CD36, several other receptors also may have some role in OxLDL uptake. Further studies will be needed to assess the quantitative role of CD36 in foam cell formation in vivo. Images PMID:7560077

  20. Identification of CD13+CD36+ cells as a common progenitor for erythroid and myeloid lineages in human bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Gao, Zhigang; Zhu, Jianqiong; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify bi-potential precursor cells of erythroid and myeloid development in human bone marrow. Materials and Methods Cells co-expressing CD13 and CD36 (CD13+CD36+) were investigated by analyzing cell surface marker expression during erythroid development (induced with a combination of cytokines plus erythropoietin [EPO]), or myeloid development (induced with the same cocktail of cytokines plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor [G-CSF]) of bone marrow derived CD133 cells in liquid cultures. CD13+CD36+ subsets were also isolated on the 14th day of cultures and further evaluated for their hematopoietic clonogenic capacity in methylcellulose. Results Colony-forming analysis of sorted CD13+CD36+ cells of committed erythroid and myeloid lineages demonstrated that these cells were able to generate erythroid, granulocyte, and mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies. In contrast, CD13+CD36− or CD13−CD36+ cells exclusively committed to granulocyte/monocyte or erythroid colonies, respectively, but failed to form mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies; no colonies were detected in CD13−CD36− cells with lineage-supporting cytokines. In addition, our data confirmed that EPO induced both erythroid and myeloid commitment, while G-CSF only supported the differentiation of the myeloid lineage. Conclusions The present data identify some CD13+CD36+ cells as bi-potential precursors of erythroid and myeloid commitment in normal hematopoiesis. They provide a physiological explanation for the cell identification of myeloid and erythroid lineages observed in hematopoietic diseases. This unique fraction of CD13+CD36+ cells may be useful for further studies on regulating erythroid and myeloid differentiation during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:17588473

  1. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase

    PubMed Central

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2010-01-01

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as “preproteins” carrying aminoterminal, cleavable signal peptides1 and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA2,3. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA2,3. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides4 and chaperones like SecB5,6. Here we reveal that signal peptides have a novel role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. Upon docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, “triggering” that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; then “trapping” that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus and, finally, “secretion” during which trapped mature domains undergo multiple turnovers of translocation in segments7. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  2. Evolutionarily conserved recognition and innate immunity to fungal pathogens by the scavenger receptors SCARF1 and CD36

    PubMed Central

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Colvin, Richard A.; Seung, Edward; Puckett, Lindsay; Tai, Melissa F.; Stewart, Cameron R.; Pukkila-Worley, Read; Hickman, Suzanne E.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Hacohen, Nir; Luster, Andrew D.; El Khoury, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Receptors involved in innate immunity to fungal pathogens have not been fully elucidated. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans receptors CED-1 and C03F11.3, and their mammalian orthologues, the scavenger receptors SCARF1 and CD36, mediate host defense against two prototypic fungal pathogens, Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. CED-1 and C03F11.1 mediated antimicrobial peptide production and were necessary for nematode survival after C. neoformans infection. SCARF1 and CD36 mediated cytokine production and were required for macrophage binding to C. neoformans, and control of the infection in mice. Binding of these pathogens to SCARF1 and CD36 was β-glucan dependent. Thus, CED-1/SCARF1 and C03F11.3/CD36 are β-glucan binding receptors and define an evolutionarily conserved pathway for the innate sensing of fungal pathogens. PMID:19237602

  3. Nrf2, a PPARγ Alternative Pathway to Promote CD36 Expression on Inflammatory Macrophages: Implication for Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Olagnier, David; Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Meunier, Etienne; Lefèvre, Lise; Dardenne, Christophe; Aubouy, Agnès; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Ryffel, Bernhard; Coste, Agnès; Berry, Antoine; Pipy, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    CD36 is the major receptor mediating nonopsonic phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. Its expression on macrophages is mainly controlled by the nuclear receptor PPARγ. Here, we demonstrate that inflammatory processes negatively regulate CD36 expression on human and murine macrophages, and hence decrease Plasmodium clearance directly favoring the worsening of malaria infection. This CD36 downregulation in inflammatory conditions is associated with a failure in the expression and activation of PPARγ. Interestingly, using siRNA mediating knock down of Nrf2 in macrophages or Nrf2- and PPARγ-deficient macrophages, we establish that in inflammatory conditions, the Nrf2 transcription factor controls CD36 expression independently of PPARγ. In these conditions, Nrf2 activators, but not PPARγ ligands, enhance CD36 expression and CD36-mediated Plasmodium phagocytosis. These results were confirmed in human macrophages and in vivo where only Nrf2 activators improve the outcome of severe malaria. Collectively, this report highlights that the Nrf2 transcription factor could be an alternative target to PPARγ in the control of severe malaria through parasite clearance. PMID:21949655

  4. [Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via CD36.].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-Tong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Na-Na; Kang, Li; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Song, Guo-Hua; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2010-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and the underlying mechanisms in ox-LDL-induced macrophage foam-forming process. RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum, and then treated with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L), anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody+ox-LDL and tunicamycin (TM), respectively. After incubation for 24 h, the cells were collected. The cellular lipid accumulation was showed by oil red O staining and the content of cellular total cholesterol was quantified by enzymatic colorimetry. The expression of glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), a molecular marker of ERS, was determined by immunocytochemistry assay. The levels of GRP94 protein, phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in RAW264.7 cells were detected by Western blotting. The results indicated that after incubation with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L) for 24 h, a large amount of lipid droplets were found in the cytoplasm, and the contents of cellular total cholesterol were increased by 2.1, 2.8 and 3.1 folds compared with the control, respectively. Anti-CD36 antibody decreased markedly the cellular lipid accumulation induced by ox-LDL at 100 mg/L. Both ox-LDL and TM, a specific ERS inducer, could up-regulate the protein expression of GRP94 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, p-IRE1 and XBP1, two key components of the unfolded protein response, were also significantly induced by the treatment with ox-LDL. The up-regulations of the three proteins induced by ox-LDL were inhibited significantly when the macrophages were pre-incubated with anti-CD36 antibody. These results suggest that ox-LDL may induce ERS in a dose-dependent way and subsequently activate the unfolded protein response signaling pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages, which is potentially mediated by scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:20945046

  5. A mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract improves fructose consumption-induced insulin resistance in rats: modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and glucose transporter-4

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peng; Yao, Ling; Lin, Xuemei; Gu, Tieguang; Rong, Xianglu; Batey, Robert; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Apple pomace is a by-product of the processing of apple for juice, cider or wine preparation. Rosemary is a herb commonly used as spice and flavoring agent in food processing. Evidence suggests that both apple pomace and rosemary have rich bioactive molecules with numerous metabolic effects. To provide more information for using apple pomace and rosemary as functional foods for management of metabolism-associated disorders, the present study investigated the insulin-sensitizing effect of a mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract (AR). The results showed that treatment with AR (500 mg/kg, daily, by gavage) for 5 weeks attenuated chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in fasting plasma insulin concentration, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index in rats. Mechanistically, AR suppressed fructose-induced acceleration of the clearance of plasma non-esterified fatty acids during oral glucose tolerance test, and decreased excessive triglyceride accumulation and the increased Oil Red O staining area in the gastrocnemius. Furthermore, AR restored fructose-induced overexpression of sarcolemmal CD36 that is known to contribute to etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake, and downregulation of sarcolemmal glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 that is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter. Thus, these results demonstrate that AR improves fructose-induced insulin resistance in rats via modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and GLUT-4. PMID:27725859

  6. Rspo2 suppresses CD36-mediated apoptosis in oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Zewei; Zan, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Pan, Yanyun; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis of macrophages contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. R‑spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of the cysteine‑rich secreted proteins, has been shown to be involved in the oncogenesis of several types of cancer. It has also been found to be abundantly expressed among the four R‑spondin members in macrophages. The present study was performed to determine whether Rspo2 is involved in the ox‑LDL‑induced apoptosis of macrophages. It was identified that Rspo2 inhibited oxLDL‑induced apoptosis in the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activator using flow cytometry. In addition, Rspo2 was observed to suppress oxLDL‑induced ER stress and reactive oxygen species production as demonstrated by western blotting. Furthermore, analysis of the role of Rspo2 in macrophage lipid uptake identified that Rspo2 negatively regulated the Dil‑oxLDL uptake by inhibiting the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)36, through the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)‑γ. The manipulation of Rspo2 had a direct effect on PPAR‑γ nuclear translocation. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rspo2 manipulation led to regulation of the direct binding between PPAR‑γ and CD36. In conclusion, Rspo2 was found to have a negative regulatory effect during oxLDL‑induced macrophage apoptosis by regulating lipid uptake. PMID:27571704

  7. Rspo2 suppresses CD36-mediated apoptosis in oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Zewei; Zan, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Pan, Yanyun; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis of macrophages contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of the cysteine-rich secreted proteins, has been shown to be involved in the oncogenesis of several types of cancer. It has also been found to be abundantly expressed among the four R-spondin members in macrophages. The present study was performed to determine whether Rspo2 is involved in the ox-LDL-induced apoptosis of macrophages. It was identified that Rspo2 inhibited oxLDL-induced apoptosis in the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activator using flow cytometry. In addition, Rspo2 was observed to suppress oxLDL-induced ER stress and reactive oxygen species production as demonstrated by western blotting. Furthermore, analysis of the role of Rspo2 in macrophage lipid uptake identified that Rspo2 negatively regulated the Dil-oxLDL uptake by inhibiting the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)36, through the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. The manipulation of Rspo2 had a direct effect on PPAR-γ nuclear translocation. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rspo2 manipulation led to regulation of the direct binding between PPAR-γ and CD36. In conclusion, Rspo2 was found to have a negative regulatory effect during oxLDL-induced macrophage apoptosis by regulating lipid uptake. PMID:27571704

  8. Inhibition of Glutathione Production Induces Macrophage CD36 Expression and Enhances Cellular-oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Uptake.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Hui; Chen, Yuanli; Sun, Lei; Li, Yan; Ma, Xingzhe; Duan, Shengzhong; Li, Xiaoju; Xiang, Rong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2015-09-01

    The glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidant system has been demonstrated to inhibit atherosclerosis. Macrophage CD36 uptakes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) thereby facilitating foam cell formation and development of atherosclerosis. It remains unknown if GSH can influence macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake directly. Herein we report that treatment of macrophages with l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) decreased cellular GSH production and ratios of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) while increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Associated with decreased GSH levels, macrophage CD36 expression was increased, which resulted in enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake. In contrast, N-acetyl cysteine and antioxidant enzyme (catalase or superoxide dismutase) blocked BSO-induced CD36 expression as well as oxLDL uptake. In vivo, administration of mice with BSO increased CD36 expression in peritoneal macrophages and kidneys. BSO had no effect on CD36 mRNA expression and promoter activity but still induced CD36 protein expression in macrophages lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression, suggesting it induced CD36 expression at the translational level. Indeed, we determined that BSO enhanced CD36 translational efficiency. Taken together, our study demonstrates that cellular GSH levels and GSH/GSSG status can regulate macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake and demonstrate an important anti-atherogenic function of the GSH-dependent antioxidant system by providing a novel molecular mechanism.

  9. Inhibition of Glutathione Production Induces Macrophage CD36 Expression and Enhances Cellular-oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Hui; Chen, Yuanli; Sun, Lei; Li, Yan; Ma, Xingzhe; Duan, Shengzhong; Li, Xiaoju; Xiang, Rong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidant system has been demonstrated to inhibit atherosclerosis. Macrophage CD36 uptakes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) thereby facilitating foam cell formation and development of atherosclerosis. It remains unknown if GSH can influence macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake directly. Herein we report that treatment of macrophages with l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) decreased cellular GSH production and ratios of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) while increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Associated with decreased GSH levels, macrophage CD36 expression was increased, which resulted in enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake. In contrast, N-acetyl cysteine and antioxidant enzyme (catalase or superoxide dismutase) blocked BSO-induced CD36 expression as well as oxLDL uptake. In vivo, administration of mice with BSO increased CD36 expression in peritoneal macrophages and kidneys. BSO had no effect on CD36 mRNA expression and promoter activity but still induced CD36 protein expression in macrophages lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression, suggesting it induced CD36 expression at the translational level. Indeed, we determined that BSO enhanced CD36 translational efficiency. Taken together, our study demonstrates that cellular GSH levels and GSH/GSSG status can regulate macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake and demonstrate an important anti-atherogenic function of the GSH-dependent antioxidant system by providing a novel molecular mechanism. PMID:26187465

  10. Circulating CD36 and fractalkine levels are associated with vulnerable plaque progression in patients with unstable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui Jian; Yang, Ming; Li, Ji Fu; Xue, Li; Chen, Yu Guo; Chen, Wen Qiang

    2014-11-01

    The chemokine, fractalkine, independently enhances the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The present study investigated the combined effects of CD36 and fractalkine on coronary plaque progression in patients with unstable angina pectoris. In the present study, 120 unstable angina pectoris patients undergoing coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound were divided into two groups: an intermediate lesion group (lumen diameter stenosis 50-70%, 80 patients) and a severe lesion group (at least one lesion with lumen diameter stenosis > 70%, 40 patients). The control group consisted of 40 healthy age- and sex-matched subjects. Concentrations of CD36 and fractalkine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Major adverse cardiovascular events were monitored over a 2-year follow up. Intravascular ultrasound showed that patients with severe lesions had more calcified and mixed plaques, and a larger plaque area and plaque burden than patients with intermediate lesions (P < 0.05-0.01). More patients with severe lesions underwent stent deployment (P < 0.05) than those with intermediate lesions. CD36 and fractalkine concentrations were significantly higher in the severe lesion patients (P < 0.05), and both had significant positive correlations (P < 0.05) with the plaque burden of atherosclerotic lesions. Using the matched nested case-control study, we found that CD36 and fractalkine levels were higher in patients with recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events than controls (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CD36 and fractalkine both promote, and might synergistically enhance, the progression of coronary atherosclerotic plaques.

  11. CD36-Dependent 7-Ketocholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages Mediates Progression of Atherosclerosis in Response to Chronic Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Maiseyeu, Andrei; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Villamena, Frederick A.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Harkema, Jack R; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Air pollution exposure has been shown to potentiate plaque progression in humans and animals. Our previous studies have suggested a role for oxidized lipids in mediating adverse vascular effect of air pollution. However, the types of oxidized lipids formed in response to air pollutants and how this occurs and their relevance to atherosclerosis is not fully understood. Objective To investigate the mechanisms by which particulate matter< 2.5μm (PM2.5) induces progression of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Atherosclerosis-prone ApoE−/− or LDLR−/− mice were exposed to filtered air or concentrated ambient PM2.5 using a versatile aerosol concentrator enrichment system for 6 months. PM2.5 increased 7-ketocholesterol (7-KCh), an oxidatively modified form of cholesterol, in plasma IDL/LDL fraction and in aortic plaque concomitant with progression of atherosclerosis and increased CD36 expression in plaque-macrophages from PM2.5-exposed mice. Macrophages isolated from PM2.5-exposed mice displayed increased uptake of oxidized lipids without alterations in their efflux capacity. Consistent with these finding, CD36-positive macrophages displayed a heightened capacity for oxidized lipid uptake. Deficiency of CD36 on hematopoietic cells diminished the effect of air pollution on 7-KCh accumulation, foam cell formation, and atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest a potential role for CD36-mediated abnormal accumulations of oxidized lipids such as 7-KCh in air pollution induced atherosclerosis progression. PMID:25186795

  12. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  13. Association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and risk of coronary atherosclerosis in Egyptian population

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Usama Ahmed; Sabet, Eman A.; Salama, Eman; El Sharawy, Ahmed; Elbadry, Mahmoud I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that CD36 is involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. Associations between rs1761667 polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) are not obvious. Methods We studied the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1761667 of CD36 gene and the risk of coronary atherosclerosis in a case-control study composed of 71 CAD patients and 76 healthy controls by assessment of allele frequencies and genotype distributions using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the allele discrimination technique. Additionally, we detected CD36 expression by flow cytometry. Results The distribution of rs1761667 genotypes between the two groups was significantly different (P<0.001), with the frequency of the AG genotype being significantly higher in the CAD group than in the control group (P<0.001). The expression level of CD36 in the CAD group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.001), with significant differences in the CAD patients with an AG genotype compared with those with an AA and GG genotype (P<0.001). The plasma levels (mg/dL) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the CAD group were much higher than that in the control group (P<0.001). On the other hand, the plasma LDL levels in CAD patients with the AG genotype were remarkably higher than those with the GG and AA genotypes (P=0.046) and AG genotype was significantly more prevalent among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients (P<0.05). After adjusted logistic regression analysis, the AG genotype of rs1761667 was associated with an increased risk of CAD (OR=17.97, 95% CI, 3.19–87.85, P=0.001). Conclusions The AG genotype of the rs1761667 polymorphism in the CD36 gene may be involved in CAD pathogenesis as well as increased body mass index (BMI), T2DM and MetS in the Sohag population of Egypt. PMID:27054101

  14. A novel lipopeptide from skin commensal activates TLR2/CD36-p38 MAPK signaling to increase antibacterial defense against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongqing; Lei, Hu; Li, Zhiheng; Li, Hongquan; Wang, Yue; Lai, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (S.epidermidis) plays important protective roles by directly producing or by stimulating hosts to produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) against pathogenic infections. Although several AMPs from S.epidermidis have been identified, molecules that stimulate hosts to produce AMPs remain largly unknown. Here we demonstrate that a new lipopeptide (named LP01) purified from S.epidermidis culture media has a unique structure with heneicosanoic acid (21 carbons) binding to lysine(11) of a peptide chain. In vitro LP01 increased the expression of β-defensin 2(hBD2) and hBD3 in neonatal human epidermal keratinocytes(NHEK), leading to increased capacity of cell lysates to inhibit the growth of S.aureus. In vivo LP01 induced the expression of mouse β-defensin 4(mBD4) to decrease the survival of local S.aureus in skin and systemic S.aureus survival in liver. The induction of beta-defensins by LP01 was dependent on TLR2 as Tlr2-deficient mice had decreased mBD4. Furthermore, knockdown of CD36 decreased the expression of hBD2 and hBD3, and p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly inhibited the expression of hBDs induced by LP01.Taken together, these findings demonstrate that lipopeptide LP01 from normal commensal S.epidermidis increases antimicrobial peptide hBD2 and hBD3 expression via the activation of TLR2/CD36-p38 MAPK, thus enhancing antimicrobial defense against pathogenic infections.

  15. Low Levels of CD36 in Peripheral Blood Monocytes in Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Martín-Márquez, Beatriz Teresita; Martínez-García, Erika Aurora; Figueroa-Sanchez, Mauricio; Nuñez-Atahualpa, Lourdes; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Sánchez-Hernández, Pedro Ernesto; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Madrigal-Ruiz, Perla Monserrat; Saldaña-Millan, Adan Alberto; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a higher risk for atherosclerosis. There is no clinical information about scavenger receptor CD36 and the development of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between membrane expression of CD36 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in patients with RA. Methods. We included 67 patients with RA from the Rheumatology Department of Hospital Civil “Dr. Juan I. Menchaca,” Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. We evaluated the cIMT, considering subclinical atherosclerosis when >0.6 mm. Since our main objective was to associate the membrane expression of CD36 with subclinical atherosclerosis, other molecules related with cardiovascular risk such as ox-LDL, IL-6, and TNFα were tested. Results. We found low CD36 membrane expression in PBMC from RA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis (P < 0.001). CD36 mean fluorescence intensity had negative correlations with cIMT (r = −0.578, P < 0.001), ox-LDL (r = −0.427, P = 0.05), TNFα (r = −0.729, P < 0.001), and IL-6 (r = −0.822, P < 0.001). Conclusion. RA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis showed low membrane expression of CD36 in PBMC and increased serum proinflammatory cytokines. Further studies are needed to clarify the regulation of CD36 in RA. PMID:25006585

  16. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  17. Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Postischemic Inflammation Are Suppressed in CD36-Null Mice after Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Alexander; Abe, Takato; Hochrainer, Karin; Shimamura, Munehisa; Anrather, Josef; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Zhou, Ping; Iadecola, Costantino

    2008-01-01

    CD36, a class-B scavenger receptor involved in multiple functions, including inflammatory signaling, may also contribute to ischemic brain injury through yet unidentified mechanisms. We investigated whether CD36 participates in the molecular events underlying the inflammatory reaction that accompanies cerebral ischemia and may contribute to the tissue damage. We found that activation of nuclear factor-κB, a transcription factor that coordinates postischemic gene expression, is attenuated in CD36-null mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. The infiltration of neutrophils and the glial reaction induced by cerebral ischemia were suppressed. Treatment with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that contributes to the tissue damage, reduced ischemic brain injury in wild-type mice, but not in CD36 nulls. In contrast to cerebral ischemia, the molecular and cellular inflammatory changes induced by intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-1β were not attenuated in CD36-null mice. The findings unveil a novel role of CD36 in early molecular events leading to nuclear factor-κB activation and postischemic inflammation. Inhibition of CD36 signaling may be a valuable therapeutic approach to counteract the deleterious effects of postischemic inflammation. PMID:18272685

  18. Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse: plausible involvement of lingual CD36[S

    PubMed Central

    Chevrot, Michael; Bernard, Arnaud; Ancel, Déborah; Buttet, Marjorie; Martin, Céline; Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Merlin, Jean-François; Poirier, Hélène; Niot, Isabelle; Khan, Naim Akhtar; Passilly-Degrace, Patricia; Besnard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between orosensory detection of dietary lipids, regulation of fat intake, and body mass index was recently suggested. However, involved mechanisms are poorly understood. Moreover, whether obesity can directly modulate preference for fatty foods remains unknown. To address this question, exploration of the oral lipid sensing system was undertaken in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. By using a combination of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we found that i) the attraction for lipids is decreased in obese mice, ii) this behavioral change has an orosensory origin, iii) it is reversed in calorie-restricted DIO mice, revealing an inverse correlation between fat preference and adipose tissue size, iv) obesity suppresses the lipid-mediated downregulation of the lipid-sensor CD36 in circumvallate papillae, usually found during the refeeding of lean mice, and v) the CD36-dependent signaling cascade controlling the intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) in taste bud cells is decreased in obese mice. Therefore, obesity alters the lipid-sensing system responsible for the oral perception of dietary lipids. This phenomenon seems to take place through a CD36-mediated mechanism, leading to changes in eating behavior. PMID:23840049

  19. CD36/SR-B2-TLR2 Dependent Pathways Enhance Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated Atherosclerosis in the Ldlr KO Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul M; Kennedy, David J; Morton, Richard E; Febbraio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is strong epidemiological association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease but underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Because the human periodontal disease pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), interacts with innate immune receptors Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 2 and CD36/scavenger receptor-B2 (SR-B2), we studied how CD36/SR-B2 and TLR pathways promote Pg-mediated atherosclerosis. Western diet fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr°) mice infected orally with Pg had a significant increase in lesion burden compared with uninfected controls.This increase was entirely CD36/SR-B2-dependent, as there was no significant change in lesion burden between infected and uninfected Cd36o/Ldlro mice [corrected]. Western diet feeding promoted enhanced CD36/SR-B2-dependent IL1β generation and foam cell formation as a result of Pg lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) exposure. CD36/SR-B2 and TLR2 were necessary for inflammasome activation and optimal IL1ß generation, but also resulted in LPS induced lethality (pyroptosis). Modified forms of LDL inhibited Pg-mediated IL1ß generation in a CD36/SR-B2-dependent manner and prevented pyroptosis, but promoted foam cell formation. Our data show that Pg infection in the oral cavity can lead to significant TLR2-CD36/SR-B2 dependent IL1ß release. In the vessel wall, macrophages encountering systemic release of IL1ß, PgLPS and modified LDL have increased lipid uptake, foam cell formation, and release of IL1ß, but because pyroptosis is inhibited, this enables macrophage survival and promotes increased plaque development. These studies may explain increased lesion burden as a result of periodontal disease, and suggest strategies for development of therapeutics.

  20. Selection of an antibody library identifies a pathway to induce immunity by targeting CD36 on steady-state CD8 alpha+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tagliani, Elisa; Guermonprez, Pierre; Sepúlveda, Jorge; López-Bravo, María; Ardavín, Carlos; Amigorena, Sebastian; Benvenuti, Federica; Burrone, Oscar R

    2008-03-01

    Improvement of the strategy to target tumor Ags to dendritic cells (DCs) for immunotherapy requires the identification of the most appropriate ligand/receptor pairing. We screened a library of Ab fragments on mouse DCs to isolate new potential Abs capable of inducing protective immune responses. The screening identified a high-affinity Ab against CD36, a multi-ligand scavenger receptor primarily expressed by the CD8alpha+ subset of conventional DCs. The Ab variable regions were genetically linked to the model Ag OVA and tested in Ag presentation assays in vitro and in vivo. Anti-CD36-OVA was capable of delivering exogenous Ags to the MHC class I and MHC class II processing pathways. In vivo, immunization with anti-CD36-OVA induced robust activation of naive CD4+ and CD8+ Ag-specific T lymphocytes and the differentiation of primed CD8+ T cells into long-term effector CTLs. Vaccination with anti-CD36-OVA elicited humoral and cell-mediated protection from the growth of an Ag-specific tumor. Notably, the relative efficacy of targeting CD11c/CD8alpha+ via CD36 or DEC205 was qualitatively different. Anti-DEC205-OVA was more efficient than anti-CD36-OVA in inducing early events of naive CD8+ T cell activation. In contrast, long-term persistence of effector CTLs was stronger following immunization with anti-CD36-OVA and did not require the addition of exogenous maturation stimuli. The results identify CD36 as a novel potential target for immunotherapy and indicate that the outcome of the immune responses vary by targeting different receptors on CD8alpha+ DCs.

  1. Cellular fatty acid uptake: a pathway under construction.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiong; Abumrad, Nada A

    2009-03-01

    Membrane uptake of long-chain fatty acids (FAs) is the first step in cellular FA utilization and a point of metabolic regulation. CD36 facilitates a major fraction of FA uptake by key tissues. This review highlights the contribution of CD36 to pathophysiology in rodents and humans. Novel concepts regarding regulation of CD36-facilitated uptake are discussed (i.e. the role of membrane rafts and caveolae, CD36 recycling between intracellular depots and the membrane, and chemical modifications of the protein that impact its turnover and recruitment). Importantly, CD36 membrane levels and turnover are abnormal in diabetes, resulting in dysfunctional FA utilization. In addition, variants in the CD36 gene were shown recently to influence susceptibility for the metabolic syndrome, which greatly increases the risk of diabetes and heart disease. PMID:19185504

  2. CD36 is not involved in scavenger receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of glycolaldehyde- and methylglyoxal-modified proteins by liver endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajou, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Sakai, Masakazu; Hirata, Kenshiro; Tanaka, Makiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki

    2005-05-01

    Circulating proteins modified by advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are mainly taken up by liver endothelial cells (LECs) via scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis. Endocytic uptake of chemically modified proteins by macrophages and macrophage-derived cells is mediated by class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and CD36. In a previous study using SR-A knockout mice, we demonstrated that SR-A is not involved in endocytic uptake of AGE proteins by LECs [Matsumoto et al. (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 233-240]. The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of CD36 to this process. Glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) and methylglyoxal-modified BSA (MG-BSA) were used as AGE proteins. 125I-GA-BSA and 125I-MG-BSA underwent endocytic degradation by these cells at 37 degrees C, and this process was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptors. However, this endocytic uptake of 125I-GA-BSA by LECs was not inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Similarly, hepatic uptake of (111)In-GA-BSA after its intravenous injection was not significantly attenuated by co-administration of the anti-CD36 antibody. These results clarify that CD36 does not play a significant role in elimination of GA-BSA and MG-BSA from the circulation, suggesting that the receptor involved in endocytic uptake of circulating AGE proteins by LEC is not SR-A or CD36.

  3. CD36 plays an important role in the clearance of oxLDL and associated age-dependent sub-retinal deposits.

    PubMed

    Picard, Emilie; Houssier, Marianne; Bujold, Kim; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Lubell, William; Dorfman, Allison; Racine, Julie; Hardy, Pierre; Febbraio, Maria; Lachapelle, Pierre; Ong, Huy; Sennlaub, Florian; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2010-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) represents the major cause of vision loss in industrialized nations. Laminar deposits in Bruch's membrane (BM) are among the first prominent histopathologic features, along with drusen formation, and have been found to contain oxidized lipids. Increases in concentrations of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in plasma are observed with age and high fat high (HFHC) cholesterol diet. CD36 is the principal receptor implicated in uptake of oxLDL, and is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We determined if CD36 participates in oxLDL uptake in RPE and correspondingly in clearance of sub-retinal deposits. Uptake of oxLDL by RPEin vitro and in vivo was CD36-dependent. CD36 deficiency in mice resulted in age-associated accumulation of oxLDL and sub-retinal BM thickening, despite fed a regular diet. Conversely, treatment of HFHC-fed ApoE null mice with a CD36 agonist, EP80317 (300 μg/kg/day), markedly diminished thickening of BM, and partially preserved (in part) photoreceptor function. In conclusion, our data uncover a new role for CD36 in the clearance of oxidized lipids from BM and in the prevention of age-dependent sub-retinal laminar deposits.

  4. Sebum Free Fatty Acids Enhance the Innate Immune Defense of Human Sebocytes by Upregulating β-Defensin-2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Various sebum free fatty acids (FFAs) have shown antibacterial activity against a broad range of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in the suggestion that they are accountable, at least partially, for the direct antimicrobial activity of the skin surface. In this study, we examined the effects of sebum FFAs on the antimicrobial peptide (AMP)-mediated innate immune defense of human sebocytes. Incubation of lauric acid, palmitic acid, or oleic acid (OA) with human sebocytes dramatically enhanced their expression of human β-defensin (hBD)-2, one of the predominant AMPs found in the skin, whereas remarkable increases in hBD-1, hBD-3, and human cathelicidin LL-37 were not observed. Secreted hBD-2 was detectable by western blotting in the supernatant of sebocyte culture incubated with each FFA, but not with a vehicle control. The supernatant of FFA-incubated sebocyte culture showed antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, whereas the enhanced antimicrobial activity of human sebocytes was neutralized by anti-hBD-2 IgG. In addition, the FFA-induced hBD-2 expression was suppressed by blocking the cluster of differentiation (CD)36 fatty acid translocase on the surface of sebocytes with anti-human CD36 IgG or blocking the NF-κB signaling pathway with BMS-345541, a highly selective inhibitor of inhibitory κB kinase. These data suggest that sebum FFAs upregulate the expression of hBD-2 in human sebocytes, which may enhance the disinfecting activity of the human sebaceous gland. The FFA-induced upregulation of hBD-2 is facilitated by CD36-mediated FFA uptake and NF-κB-mediated transactivation. The upregulation of mouse β-defensin 4, a mouse ortholog for hBD-2, was also observed in the hair follicle sebaceous glands of mouse ear skin after an epicutaneous application of OA, the most hBD-2-inducible FFA tested. This report highlights the potential of using FFAs as a multifunctional antimicrobial therapy agent for acne vulgaris treatment; FFAs may provide direct

  5. Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotein Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells' Function by Activation of CD36-MAPK-TSP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianxiang; He, Zhiqing; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Feng; Ding, Ru; Ren, Yusheng; Jiang, Qijun; Fan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events due to the protective effects on vascular wall and stem cells, which are susceptible to oxidative modifications and then lead to potential pro-atherosclerotic effects. We proposed that oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) might lead to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) dysfunction and investigated underlying mechanisms. Results: ox-HDL was shown to increase apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, but to reduce migration, angiogenesis, and cholesterol efflux of EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB were activated after ox-HDL stimulation, which also upregulated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression without affecting vascular endothelial growth factor. Effects caused by ox-HDL could be significantly attenuated by pretreatment with short hairpin RNA-mediated CD36 knockdown or probucol. Data of in vivo experiments and the inverse correlation of ox-HDL and circulating EPC numbers among patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) or CAD and type 2 diabetes also supported it. Meanwhile, HDL separated from such patients could significantly increase cultured EPC's caspase 3 activity, further supporting our proposal. Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of how ox-HDL would impair EPCs function, which was involved with activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways and proved by not only the inverse relationship between ox-HDL and circulating EPCs in clinic but also pro-apoptotic effects of HDL separated from patients' serum. Conclusion: Activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways contributes to the pathological effects of ox-HDL on EPCs' dysfunction, which might be one of the potential etiological factors responsible for the disturbed neovascularization in chronic ischemic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 308–324. PMID:25313537

  6. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  7. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  8. Dietary supplementation with long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids attenuates obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and increases expression of PPAR gamma in adipose tissue in type 2 diabetic KK-Ay mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of present study was to examine the effect of long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids (LC-MUFAs) with chain lengths longer than 18 (i.e., C20:1 and C22:1 isomers combined) on obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and its molecular mechanisms. Type-2 diabetic KK-Ay mice (n = 20) were randomly assigned to the 7% soybean oil-diet group (control group) and 4% LC-MUFA concentrate-supplemented-diet group (LC-MUFA group). At 8 weeks on the diet, the results showed that plasma, liver and adipose tissue levels of C20:1 and C22:1 isomers increased significantly with LC-MUFA treatment. Supplementation with LC-MUFAs markedly reduced white fat pad weight as well as adipocyte size in the mice. The levels of plasma free fatty acids, insulin, and leptin concentration in the obese diabetic mice of the LC-MUFA group were also decreased as compared with the mice in the soybean oil-diet control group. Dietary LC-MUFAs significantly increased the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), lipoprotein lipase (Lpl), fatty acid transport protein (Fatp), fatty acid translocase/CD36 (Cd36), as well as mRNA expression of genes involved in lipid oxidation such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (Cpt1a) and citrate synthase (Cs), and decreased the mRNA expression of inflammatory marker serum amyloid A 3 (Saa3) in the adipose tissues of diabetic mice. The results suggest that LC-MUFAs may ameliorate obesity-related metabolic dysfunction partly through increased expression of Pparg as well as its target genes, and decreased inflammatory marker expression in white adipose tissue. PMID:23360495

  9. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  10. Mitochondria. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of mitochondrial preprotein translocase.

    PubMed

    Harbauer, Angelika B; Opalińska, Magdalena; Gerbeth, Carolin; Herman, Josip S; Rao, Sanjana; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Schmidt, Oliver; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2014-11-28

    Mitochondria play central roles in cellular energy conversion, metabolism, and apoptosis. Mitochondria import more than 1000 different proteins from the cytosol. It is unknown if the mitochondrial protein import machinery is connected to the cell division cycle. We found that the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 stimulated assembly of the main mitochondrial entry gate, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM), in mitosis. The molecular mechanism involved phosphorylation of the cytosolic precursor of Tom6 by cyclin Clb3-activated Cdk1, leading to enhanced import of Tom6 into mitochondria. Tom6 phosphorylation promoted assembly of the protein import channel Tom40 and import of fusion proteins, thus stimulating the respiratory activity of mitochondria in mitosis. Tom6 phosphorylation provides a direct means for regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in a cell cycle-specific manner.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 is a parasitized erythrocyte receptor for adherence to CD36, thrombospondin, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, D I; Gormely, J A; Ma, C; Howard, R J; Pasloske, B L

    1996-01-01

    Adherence of mature Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes (PRBCs) to microvascular endothelium contributes directly to acute malaria pathology. We affinity purified molecules from detergent extracts of surface-radioiodinated PRBCs using several endothelial cell receptors known to support PRBC adherence, including CD36, thrombospondin (TSP), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). All three host receptors affinity purified P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), a very large malarial protein expressed on the surface of adherent PRBCs. Binding of PfEMP1 to particular host cell receptors correlated with the binding phenotype of the PRBCs from which PfEMP1 was extracted. Preadsorption of PRBC extracts with anti-PfEMP1 antibodies, CD36, or TSP markedly reduced PfEMP1 binding to CD36 or TSP. Mild trypsinization of intact PRBCs of P. falciparum strains shown to express antigenically different PfEMP1 released different (125)I-labeled tryptic fragments of PfEMP1 that bound specifically to CD36 and TSP. In clone C5 and strain MC, these activities resided on different tryptic fragments, but a single tryptic fragment from clone ItG-ICAM bound to both CD36 and TSP. Hence, the CD36- and TSP-binding domains are distinct entities located on a single PfEMP1 molecule. PfEMP1, the malarial variant antigen on infected erythrocytes, is therefore a receptor for CD36, TSP, and ICAM-1. A therapeutic approach to block or reverse adherence of PRBCs to host cell receptors can now be pursued with the identification of PfEMP1 as a malarial receptor for PRBC adherence to host proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8622965

  12. CD36 Upregulation Mediated by Intranasal LV-NRF2 Treatment Mitigates Hypoxia-Induced Progression of Alzheimer's-Like Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Xie, Jing-Wei; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Wang, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: There is extensive evidence that oxidative stress induces cellular dysfunction in the brain and plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Hypoxia increases factors involved in oxidative stress injury and contributes to the onset and progression of AD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major component regulating antioxidant response, is attenuated in the AD brain. Importantly, NRF2 directly regulates the alternative first exons of CD36, an important participant in oxidative and inflammatory processes. To explore the effects of hypoxia-induced deterioration of AD-like pathogenesis and investigate the correlation between hypoxia-induced NRF2 signal alterations and CD36 expression, we examined the NRF2 signaling, CD36, and oxidative stress events in hypoxia-treated APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice brain. Results: We observed that hypoxia treatment increased oxidative stress, exacerbated inflammation, and aggravated learning defects in aged APP/PS1 mice. Microglia from hypoxia-treated mice brain exhibited marked reduction in CD36 expression and inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) degradation. Accordingly, hypoxia treatment caused a decrease in transactivation of NRF2 target genes in the aging mouse brain. Intranasal administration with a lentiviral vector encoding human NRF2 increased CD36 expression, ameliorated the weak antioxidant response triggered by hypoxia, diminished Aβ deposition, and improved spatial memory defects. Innovation: In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that NRF2 intranasal treatment-induced increases of CD36 could enhance Aβ clearance in AD transgenic mouse. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting NRF2-mediated CD36 expression might provide a beneficial intervention for cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in AD progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2208–2230. PMID:24702189

  13. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival. PMID:26777559

  14. Inhibition of mitochondrial carnitine acylcarnitine translocase by hypoglycaemia-inducing substances.

    PubMed

    Beneking, M; Oellerich, M; Binder, L; Choitz, G F; Haeckel, R

    1990-05-01

    The rate of mitochondrial carnitine-carnitine exchange mediated by carnitine acylcarnitine translocase was measured in the presence of the two hypoglycaemia-inducing drugs, 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate and 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid (BM 13.677). Both substances caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the rate of carnitine uptake in guinea pig liver mitochondria. Apparent initial influx rates were decreased by 75% and 80% at a concentration of 2 mmol/l 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate and 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid, respectively. Intraperitoneal injections of 212 mumol 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid or 21 mumol 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate per kg body weight caused a noticeable decrease in blood glucose concentration. A significant fall of the blood ketone body concentration was achieved with 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate or 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid, at dosages of 21 and 255 mumol/l, respectively. Furthermore there was a dose-dependent increase in the plasma free fatty acid concentration in the presence of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate. This increase, however, was much less pronounced with 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid. Metabolic effects of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate are consistent with an inhibition of long-chain fatty acid transport, whereas an additional mechanism of action has to be assumed for 2-(3-phenylpropoxyimino)-butyric acid. PMID:2116497

  15. The Drosophila CD36 Homologue croquemort Is Required to Maintain Immune and Gut Homeostasis during Development and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Aurélien; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an ancient mechanism central to both tissue homeostasis and immune defense. Both the identity of the receptors that mediate bacterial phagocytosis and the nature of the interactions between phagocytosis and other defense mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that Croquemort (Crq), a Drosophila member of the CD36 family of scavenger receptors, is required for microbial phagocytosis and efficient bacterial clearance. Flies mutant for crq are susceptible to environmental microbes during development and succumb to a variety of microbial infections as adults. Crq acts parallel to the Toll and Imd pathways to eliminate bacteria via phagocytosis. crq mutant flies exhibit enhanced and prolonged immune and cytokine induction accompanied by premature gut dysplasia and decreased lifespan. The chronic state of immune activation in crq mutant flies is further regulated by negative regulators of the Imd pathway. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Crq plays a key role in maintaining immune and organismal homeostasis. PMID:27780230

  16. Oxidized Lipoprotein Uptake Through the CD36 Receptor Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaguru, Gopalan; Choi, Ariel R.; Amarnani, Dhanesh; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of oxidized phospholipids/lipoproteins with age is suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. We investigated the effect of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) on human RPE cells. Methods Primary human fetal RPE (hf-RPE) and ARPE-19 cells were treated with different doses of LDL or ox-LDL. Assessment of cell death was measured by lactate dehydrogenase release into the conditioned media. Barrier function of RPE was assayed by measuring transepithelial resistance. Lysosomal accumulation of ox-LDL was determined by immunostaining. Expression of CD36 was determined by RT-PCR; protein blot and function was examined by receptor blocking. NLRP3 inflammasome activation was assessed by RT-PCR, protein blot, caspase-1 fluorescent probe assay, and inhibitor assays. Results Treatment with ox-LDL, but not LDL, for 48 hours caused significant increase in hf-RPE and ARPE-19 (P < 0.001) cell death. Oxidized LDL treatment of hf-RPE cells resulted in a significant decrease in transepithelial resistance (P < 0.001 at 24 hours and P < 0.01 at 48 hours) relative to LDL-treated and control cells. Internalized ox-LDL was targeted to RPE lysosomes. Uptake of ox-LDL but not LDL significantly increased CD36 protein and mRNA levels by more than 2-fold. Reverse transcription PCR, protein blot, and caspase-1 fluorescent probe assay revealed that ox-LDL treatment induced NLRP3 inflammasome when compared with LDL treatment and control. Inhibition of NLRP3 activation using 10 μM isoliquiritigenin significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited ox-LDL induced cytotoxicity. Conclusions These data are consistent with the concept that ox-LDL play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome activation could attenuate RPE degeneration and AMD progression. PMID:27607416

  17. Oily Fish Consumption Modifies the Association between CD36 rs6969989 Polymorphism and Lipid Profiles in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoonjin; Kim, Yangha

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CD36, a class B scavenger receptor, rs6969989 polymorphism with the serum lipid profiles in Korean women, together with their modulation by oily fish consumption. Subjects were participants from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (KoGES), which was initiated in 2001 as a large-scale. A total of 4,210 women aged 39 to 70 were included in this study. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and blood chemical analysis. Dietary intake was analyzed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The minor allele frequency for rs6969989 was found in 12% of this population. Homozygotes minor G allele at the rs6868989 exhibited significantly higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations (P-trend=0.043) and lower fasting glucose (P-trend=0.013) than major allele A carriers. The risk of low HDL-C was significantly lower in homozygotes for the G allele than the A allele carriers (P-trend=0.032). Gene-diet interaction effects between rs6969989 and oily fish intake were significantly associated with the risk of dyslipidemia (P-interaction= 0.004). Subjects with homozygotes minor G allele and high oily fish intake generally had a lower risk of dyslipidemia than did those with major allele homozygotes and low oily fish intake. These findings supported that oily fish consumption may modulate the contributions of CD36 rs6969989 on genetic predisposition to the risk of dyslipidemia. PMID:27752496

  18. Synergically increased expression of CD36, CLA-1 and CD68, but not of SR-A and LOX-1, with the progression to foam cells from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kayo; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kojima, Kyoko; Mikuni, Yoko; Kudo, Mikiko; Mori, Masaki; Fujita, Mineko; Horie, Eiko; Shimazu, Nobuko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2002-01-01

    Several species of scavenger receptors have so far been identified. However, it remains unclear which receptors are more crucial for the foam cell formation and progression. In the present study, we compared five major scavenger receptors (SR-A, CD36, CLA-1, CD68, and LOX-1) in their levels of expression at the different stages of foam cells derived from THP-1 cells. The expression of all scavenger receptors examined was up-regulated by the stimulation with TPA for 48 hours, despite the expressions of SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 being very low before the treatment with TPA. Four to 7 days after the removal of TPA, the levels of CD36, CLA-1 and CD68 were increased significantly. In contrast, the expression of SR-A was suppressed significantly, and no change was observed in that of LOX-1. Furthermore, when the transformed macrophages were incubated with oxidized LDL, in which the uptake of [3H] cholesteryl oleoyl ether-labeled OxLDL was linear up to 7 days after the addition of OxLDL, the expression of CD36, CLA-1 and CD68 were greatly enhanced. This enhancement was more prominent than that without oxidized LDL, and the enhancement was sustained throughout the experimental period. On the other hand, SR-A was not up-regulated, and LOX-1 was down-regulated. We thus propose that CD36, CLA-1 and CD68, but not SR-A and LOX-1, may play crucial roles in the progression of macrophages to foam cells, which is a key step for the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  19. Identification and evaluation of twin-arginine translocase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vasil, Michael L; Tomaras, Andrew P; Pritchard, Arthur E

    2012-12-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (TAT) in some bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contributes to pathogenesis by translocating extracellular virulence determinants across the inner membrane into the periplasm, thereby allowing access to the Xcp (type II) secretory system for further export in Gram-negative organisms, or directly to the outside surface of the cell, as in M. tuberculosis. TAT-mediated secretion appreciably contributes to virulence in both animal and plant models of bacterial infection. Consequently, TAT function is an attractive target for small-molecular-weight compounds that alone or in conjunction with extant antimicrobial agents could become novel therapeutics. The TAT-transported hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of P. aeruginosa and its multiple orthologs produced by the above pathogens can be detected by an accurate and reproducible colorimetric assay using a synthetic substrate that detects phospholipase C activity. Such an assay could be an effective indicator of TAT function. Using carefully constructed recombinant strains to precisely control the expression of PlcH, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to evaluate, in duplicate, >80,000 small-molecular-weight compounds as possible TAT inhibitors. Based on additional TAT-related functional assays, purified PlcH protein inhibition experiments, and repeat experiments of the initial screening assay, 39 compounds were selected from the 122 initial hits. Finally, to evaluate candidate inhibitors for TAT specificity, we developed a TAT titration assay that determines whether inhibition of TAT-mediated secretion can be overcome by increasing the levels of TAT expression. The compounds N-phenyl maleimide and Bay 11-7082 appear to directly affect TAT function based on this approach.

  20. Identification and Evaluation of Twin-Arginine Translocase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Andrew P.; Pritchard, Arthur E.

    2012-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (TAT) in some bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contributes to pathogenesis by translocating extracellular virulence determinants across the inner membrane into the periplasm, thereby allowing access to the Xcp (type II) secretory system for further export in Gram-negative organisms, or directly to the outside surface of the cell, as in M. tuberculosis. TAT-mediated secretion appreciably contributes to virulence in both animal and plant models of bacterial infection. Consequently, TAT function is an attractive target for small-molecular-weight compounds that alone or in conjunction with extant antimicrobial agents could become novel therapeutics. The TAT-transported hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of P. aeruginosa and its multiple orthologs produced by the above pathogens can be detected by an accurate and reproducible colorimetric assay using a synthetic substrate that detects phospholipase C activity. Such an assay could be an effective indicator of TAT function. Using carefully constructed recombinant strains to precisely control the expression of PlcH, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to evaluate, in duplicate, >80,000 small-molecular-weight compounds as possible TAT inhibitors. Based on additional TAT-related functional assays, purified PlcH protein inhibition experiments, and repeat experiments of the initial screening assay, 39 compounds were selected from the 122 initial hits. Finally, to evaluate candidate inhibitors for TAT specificity, we developed a TAT titration assay that determines whether inhibition of TAT-mediated secretion can be overcome by increasing the levels of TAT expression. The compounds N-phenyl maleimide and Bay 11-7082 appear to directly affect TAT function based on this approach. PMID:23006747

  1. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  2. The adenine nucleotide translocase type 1 (ANT1): a new factor in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Sharer, J Daniel

    2005-09-01

    Mitochondrial disorders of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) comprise a growing list of potentially lethal diseases caused by mutations in either mitochondrial (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA). Two such conditions, autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) and Senger's Syndrome, are associated with dysfunction of the heart and muscle-specific isoform of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT1), a nDNA gene product that facilitates transport of ATP and ADP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. AdPEO is a mtDNA deletion disorder broadly characterized by pathology involving the eyes, skeletal muscle, and central nervous system. In addition to ANT1, mutations in at least two other nuclear genes, twinkle and POLG, have been shown to cause mtDNA destabilization associated with adPEO. Senger's syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormalities of skeletal muscle mitochondria, cataracts, and elevated circulatory levels of lactic acid. This syndrome is associated with severe depletion of ANT1, which may be the result of an as yet unidentified ANT1-specific transcriptional or translational processing error. ANT1 has also been associated with a third condition, autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), an adult onset disorder characterized by variable muscle weakness in the face, feet, shoulders, and hips. FSHD patients possess specific DNA deletions on chromosome 4, which appear to cause derepression of several nearby genes, including ANT1. Early development of FSHD may involve mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, possibly associated with overexpression of ANT1. PMID:16203679

  3. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego; Relat, Joana

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  4. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  5. Characterization of an ATP translocase identified in the plant pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ATP/ADP translocases allow for the transport of ATP across a lipid bilayer, which is normally impermeable to this molecule due to its size and charge. These transport proteins appear to be unique to mitochondria, plant plastids, and obligate-intracellular bacteria. Of the bacterial ATP/ADP translo...

  6. 5′-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Eric J; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a 3′–5′ superfamily 1A helicase/translocase involved in a variety of DNA metabolic processes. UvrD can function either as a helicase or only as an single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase. The switch between these activities is controlled in vitro by the UvrD oligomeric state; a monomer has ssDNA translocase activity, whereas at least a dimer is needed for helicase activity. Although a 3′-ssDNA partial duplex provides a high-affinity site for a UvrD monomer, here we show that a monomer also binds with specificity to DNA junctions possessing a 5′-ssDNA flanking region and can initiate translocation from this site. Thus, a 5′-ss–duplex DNA junction can serve as a high-affinity loading site for the monomeric UvrD translocase, whereas a 3′-ss–duplex DNA junction inhibits both translocase and helicase activity of the UvrD monomer. Furthermore, the 2B subdomain of UvrD is important for this junction specificity. This highlights a separation of helicase and translocase function for UvrD and suggests that a monomeric UvrD translocase can be loaded at a 5′-ssDNA junction when translocation activity alone is needed. PMID:20877334

  7. Pharmacogenetic interaction between dexamethasone and Cd36-deficient segment of spontaneously hypertensive rat chromosome 4 affects triacylglycerol and cholesterol distribution into lipoprotein fractions.

    PubMed

    Krupková, Michaela; Sedová, Lucie; Liska, Frantisek; Krenová, Drahomíra; Kren, Vladimír; Seda, Ondrej

    2010-04-16

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is known to induce diabetes and dyslipidemia. We have compared fasting triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations across 20 lipoprotein fractions and glucose tolerance in control (standard diet) and DEX-treated 7-month-old males of two rat strains, Brown Norway (BN) and congenic BN.SHR-(Il6-Cd36)/Cub (BN.SHR4). These two inbred strains differ in a defined segment of chromosome 4, originally transferred from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) including the mutant Cd36 gene, a known target of DEX. Compared to BN, the standard-diet-fed BN.SHR4 showed higher cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations across many lipoprotein fractions, particularly in small VLDL and LDL particles. Total cholesterol was decreased by DEX by more than 21% in BN.SHR4 contrasting with the tendency to increase in BN (strain*DEX interaction p = 0.0017). Similar pattern was observed for triacylglycerol concentrations in LDL. The LDL particle size was significantly reduced by DEX in both strains. Also, while control BN and BN.SHR4 displayed comparable glycaemic profiles during oral glucose tolerance test, we observed a markedly blunted DEX induction of glucose intolerance in BN.SHR4 compared to BN. In summary, we report a pharmacogenetic interaction between limited genomic segment with mutated Cd36 gene and dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and triacylglycerol and cholesterol redistribution into lipoprotein fractions.

  8. Phagocytosis of Cholesteryl Ester Is Amplified in Diabetic Mouse Macrophages and Is Largely Mediated by CD36 and SR-A

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Christopher B.; Hartman, Matthew E.; O'Connor, Jason C.; Chakour, Kenneth S.; Sovari, Ali A.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, which accounts for approximately 75% of all diabetes-related deaths. Here we investigate the link between diabetes and macrophage cholesteryl ester accumulation. When diabetic (db/db) mice are given cholesteryl ester intraperitoneally (IP), peritoneal macrophages (PerMΦs) recovered from these animals showed a 58% increase in intracellular cholesteryl ester accumulation over PerMΦs from heterozygote control (db/+) mice. Notably, PerMΦ fluid-phase endocytosis and large particle phagocytosis was equivalent in db/+and db/db mice. However, IP administration of CD36 and SR-A blocking antibodies led to 37% and 25% reductions in cholesteryl ester accumulation in PerMΦ. Finally, in order to determine if these scavenger receptors (SRs) were part of the mechanism responsible for the increased accumulation of cholesteryl esters observed in the diabetic mouse macrophages, receptor expression was quantified by flow cytometry. Importantly, db/db PerMΦs showed a 43% increase in CD36 expression and an 80% increase in SR-A expression. Taken together, these data indicate that direct cholesteryl ester accumulation in mouse macrophages is mediated by CD36 and SR-A, and the magnitude of accumulation is increased in db/db macrophages due to increased scavenger receptor expression. PMID:17551591

  9. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cells. A group of fats called long-chain fatty acids must be attached to a substance ... the transporter. Without enough functional CACT protein, long-chain fatty acids cannot be transported into mitochondria. As ...

  10. Dietary thylakoids reduce visceral fat mass and increase expression of genes involved in intestinal fatty acid oxidation in high-fat fed rats.

    PubMed

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Montelius, Caroline; Ramachandran, Deepti; Bonn, Britta; Weström, Björn; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Langhans, Wolfgang; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Thylakoids reduce body weight gain and body fat accumulation in rodents. This study investigated whether an enhanced oxidation of dietary fat-derived fatty acids in the intestine contributes to the thylakoid effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with (n = 8) or without thylakoids (n = 8) for 2 wk. Body weight, food intake, and body fat were measured, and intestinal mucosa was collected and analyzed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure gene expression levels of key enzymes involved in fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Another set of thylakoid-treated (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10) went through indirect calorimetry. In the first experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 8) accumulated 25% less visceral fat than controls. Furthermore, fatty acid translocase (Fat/Cd36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a), and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (Hmgcs2) genes were upregulated in the jejunum of the thylakoid-treated group. In the second experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 10) gained 17.5% less weight compared with controls and their respiratory quotient was lower, 0.86 compared with 0.91. Thylakoid-intake resulted in decreased food intake and did not cause steatorrhea. These results suggest that thylakoids stimulated intestinal fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, resulting in an increased ability of the intestine to handle dietary fat. The increased fatty acid oxidation and the resulting reduction in food intake may contribute to the reduced fat accumulation in thylakoid-treated animals.

  11. Dietary thylakoids reduce visceral fat mass and increase expression of genes involved in intestinal fatty acid oxidation in high-fat fed rats.

    PubMed

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Montelius, Caroline; Ramachandran, Deepti; Bonn, Britta; Weström, Björn; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Langhans, Wolfgang; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Thylakoids reduce body weight gain and body fat accumulation in rodents. This study investigated whether an enhanced oxidation of dietary fat-derived fatty acids in the intestine contributes to the thylakoid effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with (n = 8) or without thylakoids (n = 8) for 2 wk. Body weight, food intake, and body fat were measured, and intestinal mucosa was collected and analyzed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure gene expression levels of key enzymes involved in fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Another set of thylakoid-treated (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10) went through indirect calorimetry. In the first experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 8) accumulated 25% less visceral fat than controls. Furthermore, fatty acid translocase (Fat/Cd36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a), and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (Hmgcs2) genes were upregulated in the jejunum of the thylakoid-treated group. In the second experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 10) gained 17.5% less weight compared with controls and their respiratory quotient was lower, 0.86 compared with 0.91. Thylakoid-intake resulted in decreased food intake and did not cause steatorrhea. These results suggest that thylakoids stimulated intestinal fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, resulting in an increased ability of the intestine to handle dietary fat. The increased fatty acid oxidation and the resulting reduction in food intake may contribute to the reduced fat accumulation in thylakoid-treated animals. PMID:27488889

  12. An Outer Mitochondrial Translocase, Tom22, Is Crucial for Inner Mitochondrial Steroidogenic Regulation in Adrenal and Gonadal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Kaur, Jasmeet; Prasad, Manoj; Pawlak, Kevin J.; Marshall, Brendan; Perry, Elizabeth W.; Whittal, Randy M.

    2016-01-01

    After cholesterol is transported into the mitochondria of steroidogenic tissues, the first steroid, pregnenolone, is synthesized in adrenal and gonadal tissues to initiate steroid synthesis by catalyzing the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone, which is mediated by the inner mitochondrial enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2). We report that the mitochondrial translocase Tom22 is essential for metabolic conversion, as its knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) completely ablated progesterone conversion in both steroidogenic mouse Leydig MA-10 and human adrenal NCI cells. Tom22 forms a 500-kDa complex with mitochondrial proteins associated with 3βHSD2. Although the absence of Tom22 did not inhibit mitochondrial import of cytochrome P450scc (cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme) and aldosterone synthase, it did inhibit 3βHSD2 expression. Electron microscopy showed that Tom22 is localized at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), while 3βHSD2 is localized at the inner mitochondrial space (IMS), where it interacts through a specific region with Tom22 with its C-terminal amino acids and a small amino acid segment of Tom22 exposed to the IMS. Therefore, Tom22 is a critical regulator of steroidogenesis, and thus, it is essential for mammalian survival. PMID:26787839

  13. Matrix-mediated canal formation in primmorphs from the sponge Suberites domuncula involves the expression of a CD36 receptor-ligand system.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Thakur, Narsinh L; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Thakur, Archana N; Krasko, Anatoli; Le Pennec, Gaël; Indap, Madhavi M; Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Schröder, Heinz C; Lang, Gerhard; Bringmann, Gerhard

    2004-05-15

    Sponges (Porifera), represent the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum still extant today. Recently, molecular biological studies provided compelling evidence that these animals share basic receptor/ligand systems, especially those involved in bodyplan formation and in immune recognition, with the higher metazoan phyla. An in vitro cell/organ-like culture system, the primmorphs, has been established that consists of proliferating and differentiating cells, but no canals of the aquiferous system. We show that after the transfer of primmorphs from the demosponge Suberites domuncula to a homologous matrix (galectin), canal-like structures are formed in these 3D-cell aggregates. In parallel with the formation of these structures a gene is expressed whose deduced protein falls into the CD36/LIMPII receptor family. The receptor was cloned and found to be strongly expressed after adhesion to the galectin matrix. This process was suppressed if primmorphs were co-incubated with a homologous polypeptide containing the CSVTCG domain, as found in thrombospondin-1 (and related) molecules of vertebrates. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the S. domuncula CD36/LIMPII receptor is localized in the pinacocytes that surround the canals of the sponge. Furthermore, a secondary metabolite from a sponge-associated bacterium was isolated and characterized, the 2-methylthio-1,4-naphthoquinone (MTN). MTN causes inhibition of cell proliferation of vertebrate tumor cells at concentrations of >80 ng/ml. However, doses of only 2 ng are required to potently inhibit angiogenesis in the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. At concentrations of 10 ng/ml this compound was also found to suppress the expression of the S. domuncula CD36/LIMPII; this result is a first indication that this secondary metabolite has a conserved functional activity: the suppression of the formation of the circulation system, from sponges to vertebrates.

  14. Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms and metabolic response to a short-term endurance-training program in a young-adult population.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Gwinn, Tom; Hancock, Dale P; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that CD36 gene variants are associated with an increased prevalence of chronic disease. Although a genetic component to trainability has been proven, no data are available specifically on the influence of CD36 on training response. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1527479 and rs1984112) were assessed for associations with whole-body substrate oxidation, response to a 75-g dextrose oral glucose tolerance test, fasting plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a young healthy cohort, both using cross-sectional analysis and following a 4-week endurance-exercise training program. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cross-sectional data were collected in 34 individuals (age, 22.7 ± 3.5 years), with 17 completing the training program. At baseline, TT SNP carriers at rs1527479 and wild-type GG carriers at rs1984112 were associated with significantly greater whole-body rate of fat oxidation (Fatox) during submaximal exercise (P < 0.05), whilst AA carriers at the same position were associated with elevated triglyceride (TG) levels. A significant genotype × time interaction in Fatox at SNP rs1984112 was identified at rest. Significant genotype × time interactions were present at rs1527479, with TT carriers exhibiting a favourable response to training when compared with C-allele carriers for fasting TG, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In conclusion, cross-sectional assessment identified associations with Fatox and TG. Training response at both SNPs identified "at-risk" genotypes responding favourably to the training stimulus in Fatox, TG, DBP, and MAP. Although these data show potential pleiotropic influence of CD36 SNPs, assessment in a larger cohort is warranted.

  15. Mammalian SRP receptor switches the Sec61 translocase from Sec62 to SRP-dependent translocation.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Bhalchandra; McKenna, Michael; Johnson, Nicholas; High, Stephen; Sinning, Irmgard; Pool, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct pathways deliver secretory proteins to the Sec61 protein translocase in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The canonical pathway requires the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its cognate receptor (SR), and targets ribosome-associated proteins to the Sec translocase. The SRP-independent pathway requires the Sec translocase-associated ER membrane protein Sec62 and can be uncoupled from translation. Here we show that SR switches translocons to SRP-dependent translocation by displacing Sec62. This activity localizes to the charged linker region between the longin and GTPase domains of SRα. Using truncation variants, crosslinking and translocation assays reveals two elements with distinct functions as follows: one rearranges the translocon, displacing Sec62 from Sec61. A second promotes ribosome binding and is conserved between all eukaryotes. These specific regions in SRα reprogramme the Sec translocon and facilitate recruitment of ribosome-nascent chain complexes. Overall, our study identifies an important function of SR, which mechanistically links two seemingly independent modes of translocation. PMID:26634806

  16. RAD54 family translocases counter genotoxic effects of RAD51 in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jennifer M.; Dusad, Kritika; Wright, William Douglass; Grubb, Jennifer; Budke, Brian; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Connell, Philip P.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The RAD54 family DNA translocases have several biochemical activities. One activity, demonstrated previously for the budding yeast translocases, is ATPase-dependent disruption of RAD51-dsDNA binding. This activity is thought to promote dissociation of RAD51 from heteroduplex DNA following strand exchange during homologous recombination. In addition, previous experiments in budding yeast have shown that the same activity of Rad54 removes Rad51 from undamaged sites on chromosomes; mutants lacking Rad54 accumulate nonrepair-associated complexes that can block growth and lead to chromosome loss. Here, we show that human RAD54 also promotes the dissociation of RAD51 from dsDNA and not ssDNA. We also show that translocase depletion in tumor cell lines leads to the accumulation of RAD51 on chromosomes, forming complexes that are not associated with markers of DNA damage. We further show that combined depletion of RAD54L and RAD54B and/or artificial induction of RAD51 overexpression blocks replication and promotes chromosome segregation defects. These results support a model in which RAD54L and RAD54B counteract genome-destabilizing effects of direct binding of RAD51 to dsDNA in human tumor cells. Thus, in addition to having genome-stabilizing DNA repair activity, human RAD51 has genome-destabilizing activity when expressed at high levels, as is the case in many human tumors. PMID:25765654

  17. Mammalian SRP receptor switches the Sec61 translocase from Sec62 to SRP-dependent translocation

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Bhalchandra; McKenna, Michael; Johnson, Nicholas; High, Stephen; Sinning, Irmgard; Pool, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct pathways deliver secretory proteins to the Sec61 protein translocase in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The canonical pathway requires the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its cognate receptor (SR), and targets ribosome-associated proteins to the Sec translocase. The SRP-independent pathway requires the Sec translocase-associated ER membrane protein Sec62 and can be uncoupled from translation. Here we show that SR switches translocons to SRP-dependent translocation by displacing Sec62. This activity localizes to the charged linker region between the longin and GTPase domains of SRα. Using truncation variants, crosslinking and translocation assays reveals two elements with distinct functions as follows: one rearranges the translocon, displacing Sec62 from Sec61. A second promotes ribosome binding and is conserved between all eukaryotes. These specific regions in SRα reprogramme the Sec translocon and facilitate recruitment of ribosome-nascent chain complexes. Overall, our study identifies an important function of SR, which mechanistically links two seemingly independent modes of translocation. PMID:26634806

  18. Migration-induced variation of fatty acid transporters and cellular metabolic intensity in passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Eyster, Kathleen; Swanson, David L

    2015-10-01

    Because lipids are the main fuel supporting avian endurance activity, lipid transport and oxidation capacities may increase during migration. We measured enzyme activities, mRNA expression and protein levels in pectoralis and heart for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolism pathways to investigate whether these pathways were upregulated during migration. We used yellow-rumped (Setophaga coronata) and yellow (S. petechia) warblers and warbling vireos (Vireo gilvus) as study species because they all show migration-induced increases in organismal metabolic capacities. For yellow-rumped warblers, β-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase (HOAD) activities and fatty acid transporter mRNA and/or protein levels were higher during spring than fall in pectoralis and heart, except that fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) protein levels showed the opposite pattern in heart. Lipid transporter protein levels, but not mRNA expression, in pectoralis and heart of warbling vireos were higher either during spring or fall than summer, but this was not true for HOAD activities. For yellow warblers, pectoralis, but not heart, protein levels of lipid transporters were upregulated during migration relative to summer, but this pattern was not evident for mRNA expression or HOAD activity. Finally, muscle and heart citrate synthase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase activities showed little seasonal variation for any species. These data suggest that pectoralis and heart lipid transport and catabolism capacities are often, but not universally, important correlates of elevated organismal metabolic capacity during migration. In contrast, migration-induced variation in cellular metabolic intensity and mitochondrial membrane transport are apparently not common correlates of the migratory phenotype in passerines.

  19. Migration-induced variation of fatty acid transporters and cellular metabolic intensity in passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Eyster, Kathleen; Swanson, David L

    2015-10-01

    Because lipids are the main fuel supporting avian endurance activity, lipid transport and oxidation capacities may increase during migration. We measured enzyme activities, mRNA expression and protein levels in pectoralis and heart for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolism pathways to investigate whether these pathways were upregulated during migration. We used yellow-rumped (Setophaga coronata) and yellow (S. petechia) warblers and warbling vireos (Vireo gilvus) as study species because they all show migration-induced increases in organismal metabolic capacities. For yellow-rumped warblers, β-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase (HOAD) activities and fatty acid transporter mRNA and/or protein levels were higher during spring than fall in pectoralis and heart, except that fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) protein levels showed the opposite pattern in heart. Lipid transporter protein levels, but not mRNA expression, in pectoralis and heart of warbling vireos were higher either during spring or fall than summer, but this was not true for HOAD activities. For yellow warblers, pectoralis, but not heart, protein levels of lipid transporters were upregulated during migration relative to summer, but this pattern was not evident for mRNA expression or HOAD activity. Finally, muscle and heart citrate synthase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase activities showed little seasonal variation for any species. These data suggest that pectoralis and heart lipid transport and catabolism capacities are often, but not universally, important correlates of elevated organismal metabolic capacity during migration. In contrast, migration-induced variation in cellular metabolic intensity and mitochondrial membrane transport are apparently not common correlates of the migratory phenotype in passerines. PMID:26194862

  20. Characterization of an ATP Translocase Identified in the Destructive Plant Pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”▿

    PubMed Central

    Vahling, Cheryl M.; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    ATP/ADP translocases transport ATP across a lipid bilayer, which is normally impermeable to this molecule due to its size and charge. These transport proteins appear to be unique to mitochondria, plant plastids, and obligate intracellular bacteria. All bacterial ATP/ADP translocases characterized thus far have been found in endosymbionts of protozoa or pathogens of higher-order animals, including humans. A putative ATP/ADP translocase was uncovered during the genomic sequencing of the intracellular plant pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,” the causal agent of citrus huanglongbing. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein revealed 12 transmembrane helices and predicted an isoelectric point of 9.4, both of which are characteristic of this family of proteins. The “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” gene (nttA) encoding the translocase was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to enable E. coli to import ATP directly into the cell. Competition assays with the heterologous E. coli system demonstrated that the translocase was highly specific for ATP and ADP but that other nucleotides, if present in high concentrations, could also be taken up and/or block the ability of the translocase to import ATP. In addition, a protein homologous to NttA was identified in “Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum,” the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease. This is the first reported characterization of an ATP translocase from “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,” indicating that some intracellular bacteria of plants also have the potential to import ATP directly from their environment. PMID:19948801

  1. Hypoxia Strongly Affects Mitochondrial Ribosomal Proteins and Translocases, as Shown by Quantitative Proteomics of HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Paula A.; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Jeppesen Edin, Nina F.; Christoffersen, Stine; Krengel, Ute; Pettersen, Erik O.; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and common characteristic of many human tumors. It is a challenge clinically due to the correlation with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Understanding the biochemical response to hypoxia would facilitate the development of novel therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here, we investigate alterations in gene expression in response to hypoxia by quantitative proteome analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with LCMS/MS. Human HeLa cells were kept either in a hypoxic environment or under normoxic conditions. 125 proteins were found to be regulated, with maximum alteration of 18-fold. In particular, three clusters of differentially regulated proteins were identified, showing significant upregulation of glycolysis and downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and translocases. This interaction is likely orchestrated by HIF-1. We also investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cell cycle, which shows accumulation in G1 and a prolonged S phase under these conditions. Implications. This work not only improves our understanding of the response to hypoxia, but also reveals proteins important for malignant progression, which may be targeted in future therapies. PMID:26421188

  2. Rosiglitazone but not losartan prevents Nrf-2 dependent CD36 gene expression up-regulation in an in vivo atherosclerosis model

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Trujillo, Y; Rodriguez-Esparragon, F; Macias-Reyes, A; Caballero-Hidalgo, A; Rodriguez-Perez, Jose C

    2008-01-01

    Background Thiazolidinediones exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative roles and attenuate atherosclerosis by mechanisms partially independent of their metabolizing actions. High doses of angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan (LST) seem to promote fat cell formation by preserving PPARγ activity. Methods C57BL/6J diet-induced atherosclerotic susceptible mice randomly received a normal or a high-fat high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet and were treated with rosiglitazone (RG), LST or a vehicle for 12 weeks. Results HFHC was associated with increased PPARγ gene expression without an over regulation of PPARγ responsive genes, whereas RG and LST treatments were found to maintain PPARγ activity without resulting in increased PPARγ gene expression. A better anti-inflammatory and antioxidant profile in mice treated with RG regarding LST was observed in spite of a similar PPARγ preserved activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that animals under HFHC diet treated with RG showed a significant nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2)-dependent down-regulation of the expression of the CD36 gene. Conclusion The PPARγ agonist RG exerts antioxidant properties that significantly reduced Nrf-2-dependent CD-36 up-regulation in mice under HFHC diet. Because LST treatment was also associated with a preserved PPARγ activity, our data suggests that these RG antioxidant effects are partially independent of its PPARγ metabolizing properties. PMID:18302760

  3. CD36 and Proteoglycan-Mediated Pathways for (n-3) Fatty Acid–Enriched Triglyceride-Rich Particle Blood Clearance in Mouse Models In Vivo and in Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro1,2

    PubMed Central

    Densupsoontorn, Narumon; Carpentier, Yvon A.; Racine, Radjini; Murray, Faith M.; Seo, Toru; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Deckelbaum, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the mechanisms of (n-3) fatty acid–enriched triglyceride-rich particle [(n-3)-TGRP] uptake are not well characterized, we questioned whether (n-3)-TGRP are removed via “nonclassical” pathways, e.g., pathways other than an LDL receptor and/or involving apolipoprotein E (apoE). Chylomicron-sized model (n-3)-TGRP labeled with [3H]cholesteryl ether were injected into wild-type (WT) and CD36 knockout (CD36−/−) mice at low, nonsaturating and high, saturating doses. Blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was determined by calculating fractional catabolic rates. At saturating doses, blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was slower in CD36−/− mice relative to WT mice, suggesting that in part CD36 contributes to (n-3)-TGRP uptake. To further examine the potential nonclassical clearance pathways, peritoneal-elicited macrophages from WT and CD36−/− mice were incubated with (n-3)-TGRP in the presence of apoE, lactoferrin, and/or sodium chlorate. Cellular (n-3)-TGRP uptake was measured to test the roles of apoE-mediated pathways and/or proteoglycans. ApoE-mediated pathways compensated in part for defective (n-3)-TGRP uptake in CD36−/− cells. Lactoferrin decreased (n-3)-TGRP uptake in the presence of apoE. Inhibition of cell proteoglycan synthesis by chlorate reduced (n-3)-TGRP uptake in both groups of macrophages, and chlorate effects were independent of apoE. We conclude that although CD36 is involved, it is not the primary contributor to the blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP. The removal of (n-3)-TGRP likely relies more on nonclassical pathways, such as proteoglycan-mediated pathways. PMID:18203888

  4. Large Multiethnic Candidate Gene Study for C-Reactive Protein Levels: Identification of a Novel Association at CD36 in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jaclyn; Lange, Ethan M.; Li, Jin; Dupuis, Josee; Baumert, Jens; Walston, Jeremy D.; Keating, Brendan J.; Durda, Peter; Fox, Ervin R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Meng, Yan A.; Young, Taylor; Farlow, Deborah N.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Marzi, Carola S.; Larkin, Emma; Martin, Lisa W.; Bis, Joshua C.; Auer, Paul; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Willis, Monte S.; Pankow, James S.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Gross, Myron D.; Lettre, Guillaume; Wilson, James G.; Peters, Ulrike; Koenig, Wolfgang; Tracy, Russell P.; Redline, Susan; Reiner, Alex P.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Lange, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable biomarker of systemic inflammation and a predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Large-scale genetic association studies for CRP have largely focused on individuals of European descent. We sought to uncover novel genetic variants for CRP in a multi-ethnic sample using the ITMAT Broad-CARe (IBC) array, a custom 50,000 SNP gene-centric array having dense coverage of over 2,000 candidate CVD genes. We performed analyses on 7570 African Americans (AA) from the Candidate gene Association Resource (CARe) study and race-combined meta-analyses that included 29,939 additional individuals of European descent from CARe, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and KORA studies. We observed array-wide significance (p<2.2×10−6) for four loci in AA, three of which have been reported previously in individuals of European descent (IL6R, p=2.0×10−6; CRP, p=4.2×10−71; APOE, p=1.6×10−6). The fourth significant locus, CD36 (p=1.6×10−6), was observed at a functional variant (rs3211938) that is extremely rare in individuals of European descent. We replicated the CD36 finding (p=1.8×10−5) in an independent sample of 8041 AA women from WHI; a meta-analysis combining the CARe and WHI AA results at rs3211938 reached genome-wide significance (p=1.5×10−10). In the race-combined meta-analyses, 13 loci reached significance, including ten (CRP, TOMM40/APOE/APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, IL6R, IL1RN, NLRP3, HNF4A and BAZ1B/BCL7B) previously associated with CRP, and one (ARNTL) previously reported to be nominally associated with CRP. Two novel loci were also detected (RPS6KB1, p=2.0×10−6; CD36, p=1.4×10−6). These results highlight both shared and unique genetic risk factors for CRP in AA compared to populations of European descent. PMID:24643644

  5. Degree of oxidation of low density lipoprotein affects expression of CD36 and PPARgamma, but not cytokine production, by human monocyte-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Ian C; Symes, Carole E; Renaudin, Pauline; Nova, Esther; Mesa, Maria Dolores; Boukouvalas, George; Leake, David S; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2003-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) exhibits many atherogenic effects, including the promotion of monocyte recruitment to the arterial endothelium and the induction of scavenger receptor expression. However, while atherosclerosis involves chronic inflammation within the arterial intima, it is unclear whether oxLDL alone provides a direct inflammatory stimulus for monocyte-macrophages. Furthermore, oxLDL is not a single, well-defined entity, but has structural and physical properties which vary according to the degree of oxidation. We tested the hypothesis that the biological effects of oxLDL will vary according to its degree of oxidation and that some species of oxLDL will have atherogenic properties, while other species may be responsible for its inflammatory activity. The atherogenic and inflammatory properties of LDL oxidized to predetermined degrees (mild, moderate and extensive oxidation) were investigated in a single system using human monocyte-derived macrophages. Expression of CD36 mRNA was up-regulated by mildly- and moderately-oxLDL, but not highly-oxLDL. The expression of the transcription factor, proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), which has been proposed to positively regulate the expression of CD36, was increased to the greatest degree by highly-oxLDL. However, the DNA binding activity of PPARgamma was increased only by mildly- and moderately-oxLDL. None of the oxLDL species appeared to be pro-inflammatory towards monocytes, either directly or indirectly through mediators derived from lymphocytes, regardless of the degree of oxidation.

  6. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduce fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Ma, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jia, Ke-Ke; Liu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Rong; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Fructose consumption induces metabolic syndrome to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity to relieve heart injury in metabolic syndrome. But the mechanisms of fructose-induced cardiac injury, and cardioprotective effects of cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol are not completely understood. In this study, fructose-fed rats displayed metabolic syndrome with elevated serum ox-LDL, cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Scavenger receptor CD36, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR6, IL-1R-associated kinase 4/1 (IRAK4/1), nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), drosophila mothers against DPP homolog (Smad) 2/3 phosphorylation and Smad4 were increased in animal and H9c2 cell models. These pathological processes were further evaluated in ox-LDL or fructose-exposed H9c2 cells pretreated with ROS scavenger and CD36 specific inhibitor, or IRAK1/4 inhibitor, and transfected with CD36, NLRP3, or IRAK4/1 siRNA, demonstrating that NLPR3 inflammasome activation through CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling may promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduced cardiac oxidative stress to suppress NLPR3 inflammasome activation and TGF-β/Smads signaling by inhibiting CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling under fructose induction. These results suggest that the blockage of CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation by cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol may protect against fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27270216

  7. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC–Oxa1–Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  8. TatE as a Regular Constituent of Bacterial Twin-arginine Protein Translocases.

    PubMed

    Eimer, Ekaterina; Fröbel, Julia; Blümmel, Anne-Sophie; Müller, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) systems mediate the transmembrane translocation of completely folded proteins that possess a conserved twin-arginine (RR) motif in their signal sequences. Many Tat systems consist of three essential membrane components named TatA, TatB, and TatC. It is not understood why some bacteria, in addition, constitutively express a functional paralog of TatA called TatE. Here we show, in live Escherichia coli cells, that, upon expression of a Tat substrate protein, fluorescently labeled TatE-GFP relocates from a rather uniform distribution in the plasma membrane into a number of discrete clusters. Clustering strictly required an intact RR signal peptide and the presence of the TatABC subunits, suggesting that TatE-GFP associates with functional Tat translocases. In support of this notion, site-specific photo cross-linking revealed interactions of TatE with TatA, TatB, and TatC. The same approach also disclosed a pronounced tendency of TatE and TatA to hetero-oligomerize. Under in vitro conditions, we found that TatE replaces TatA inefficiently. Our collective results are consistent with TatE being a regular constituent of the Tat translocase in E. coli.

  9. YidC, the Escherichia coli homologue of mitochondrial Oxa1p, is a component of the Sec translocase

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Pier A.; Urbanus, Malene L.; Brunner, Josef; de Gier, Jan-Willem L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; van der Does, Chris; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Oudega, Bauke; Luirink, Joen

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, both secretory and inner membrane proteins initially are targeted to the core SecYEG inner membrane translocase. Previous work has also identified the peripherally associated SecA protein as well as the SecD, SecF and YajC inner membrane proteins as components of the translocase. Here, we use a cross-linking approach to show that hydrophilic portions of a co-translationally targeted inner membrane protein (FtsQ) are close to SecA and SecY, suggesting that insertion takes place at the SecA/Y interface. The hydrophobic FtsQ signal anchor sequence contacts both lipids and a novel 60 kDa translocase-associated component that we identify as YidC. YidC is homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxa1p, which has been shown to function in a novel export pathway at the mitochondrial inner membrane. We propose that YidC is involved in the insertion of hydrophobic sequences into the lipid bilayer after initial recognition by the SecAYEG translocase. PMID:10675323

  10. Biosynthesis of the tunicamycins: Translocase-I inhibitors that target the synthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tunicamycins are a group of natural products that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycins established as transition state analogs for hexosamine-1-phosphate:prenol phosphate translocases. Hence, ...

  11. Effect of tachycardia on lipid metabolism and expression of fatty acid transporters in heart ventricles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, B; Harasim, E; Zabielski, P; Chabowski, A; Gorski, J

    2015-10-01

    Tachycardia increases oxidation of the plasma-borne long chain fatty acids in the heart. The aim of the present study was to examine effect of tachycardia on: 1) the total level of free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids in both heart ventricles; 2) (14)C-palmitate incorporation in the lipid fractions; 3) expression of fatty acid and glucose transporters in the ventricles. Tachycardia was induced in anesthetized rats by electrical atrial pacing at the rate of 600/min. Samples of the left (LV) and right (RV) ventricle were taken after 30 and 60 min pacing. The level free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids was determined by means of gas-liquid chromatography and (14)C-palmitate incorporation by liquid scintillation counting, respectively. Expression of fatty acid- and glucose-transporters was determined using Western blot technique. In LV, 30min pacing increased the content of diacylglycerols whereas the content of other lipids remained stable. After 60 min of pacing the levels of the examined lipid fractions did not differ from the respective control values. In RV, the content of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols was reduced both after 30 and 60 min pacing. Tachycardia also affected incorporation of (14)C-palmitate in lipid fractions of goth ventricles. 30 min pacing up-regulated plasmalemmal expression of FAT/CD36 (fatty acid translocase) in both ventricles and reduced its microsomal expression in LV. After 60 min pacing they did not differ from the respective control values. Plasmalemmal expression of FATP-1 (fatty acid transport protein 1) increased and its microsomal expression decreased in RV after 30 min pacing. After 60 min pacing the plasmalemmal FATP-1 expression remained elevated whereas the microsomal expression did not differ from the control value. Pacing did not affect or expression of FABPpm (plasma membrane associated fatty acid binding protein) in either plasma membranes and microsomal

  12. Effect of tachycardia on lipid metabolism and expression of fatty acid transporters in heart ventricles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, B; Harasim, E; Zabielski, P; Chabowski, A; Gorski, J

    2015-10-01

    Tachycardia increases oxidation of the plasma-borne long chain fatty acids in the heart. The aim of the present study was to examine effect of tachycardia on: 1) the total level of free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids in both heart ventricles; 2) (14)C-palmitate incorporation in the lipid fractions; 3) expression of fatty acid and glucose transporters in the ventricles. Tachycardia was induced in anesthetized rats by electrical atrial pacing at the rate of 600/min. Samples of the left (LV) and right (RV) ventricle were taken after 30 and 60 min pacing. The level free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids was determined by means of gas-liquid chromatography and (14)C-palmitate incorporation by liquid scintillation counting, respectively. Expression of fatty acid- and glucose-transporters was determined using Western blot technique. In LV, 30min pacing increased the content of diacylglycerols whereas the content of other lipids remained stable. After 60 min of pacing the levels of the examined lipid fractions did not differ from the respective control values. In RV, the content of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols was reduced both after 30 and 60 min pacing. Tachycardia also affected incorporation of (14)C-palmitate in lipid fractions of goth ventricles. 30 min pacing up-regulated plasmalemmal expression of FAT/CD36 (fatty acid translocase) in both ventricles and reduced its microsomal expression in LV. After 60 min pacing they did not differ from the respective control values. Plasmalemmal expression of FATP-1 (fatty acid transport protein 1) increased and its microsomal expression decreased in RV after 30 min pacing. After 60 min pacing the plasmalemmal FATP-1 expression remained elevated whereas the microsomal expression did not differ from the control value. Pacing did not affect or expression of FABPpm (plasma membrane associated fatty acid binding protein) in either plasma membranes and microsomal

  13. Assembly of the translocase motor onto the preprotein-conducting channel

    PubMed Central

    Karamanou, Spyridoula; Bariami, Vassiliki; Papanikou, Efrosyni; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2008-01-01

    Summary Bacterial protein secretion is catalyzed by the SecYEG protein-conducting channel complexed with the SecA ATPase motor. To gain insight into the SecA-SecYEG interaction we used peptide arrays, thermodynamic quantitation, mutagenesis and functional assays. Our data reveal that: a. SecA binds with low affinity on several, peripheral, exposed SecYEG sites. This largely electrostatic association is modulated by temperature and nucleotides. b. Binding sites cluster in five major binding “regions”: three that are exclusively cytoplasmic and two that reach the periplasm. c. Both the aminoterminal and carboxyterminal regions of SecA participate in binding interactions and share some sites. d. Several of these sites are essential for translocase catalysis. Our data provide residue-level dissection of the SecYEG-SecA interaction. Two models of assembly of SecA on dimeric SecYEG are discussed. PMID:18761620

  14. Genetic variation in CD36, HBA, NOS3 and VCAM1 is associated with chronic haemolysis level in sickle cell anaemia: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Andreia; Dias, Alexandra; Morais, Anabela; Nunes, Baltazar; Ferreira, Emanuel; Picanço, Isabel; Faustino, Paula; Lavinha, João

    2014-03-01

    Chronic haemolysis stands out as one of the hallmarks of sickle cell anaemia, a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive monogenic anaemia. However, the genetic architecture of this sub-phenotype is still poorly understood. Here, we report the results of an association study between haemolysis biomarkers (serum LDH, total bilirubin and reticulocyte count) and the inheritance of 41 genetic variants of ten candidate genes in a series of 99 paediatric SS patients (median current age of 9.9 yr) followed up in two general hospitals in Greater Lisboa area (median follow-up per patient of 5.0 yr). Although in a large number of tests a seemingly significant (i.e. P < 0.05) association was observed, the following ones were confirmed upon correction for multiple comparisons: (i) an increased serum LDH level was associated with haplotype 7 within VCAM1 gene; (ii) a lower total bilirubin was associated with the 3.7-kb deletion at HBA gene, rs2070744_T allele at NOS3 gene, and haplotype 9 within VCAM1 promoter; and (iii) a diminished reticulocyte count was associated with the 3.7-kb deletion at HBA, whereas an increased count was associated with rs1984112_G allele at CD36 gene. On the whole, our findings suggest a complex genetic architecture for the sickle cell anaemia haemolysis process involving multiple pathways, namely control of vascular cell adhesion, NO synthesis and erythrocyte volume and haemoglobinisation.

  15. Plasmodium chabaudi-Infected Erythrocytes Adhere to CD36 and Bind to Microvascular Endothelial Cells in an Organ-Specific Way

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Maria M.; Jarra, William; Hirst, Elizabeth; Patnaik, Pradeep K.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2000-01-01

    Adherence of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum to microvascular endothelial cells (sequestration) is considered to play an important role in parasite virulence and pathogenesis. However, the real importance of sequestration for infection and disease has never been fully assessed. The absence of an appropriate in vivo model for sequestration has been a major barrier. We have examined the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS in mice as a potential model. Erythrocytes infected with this parasite adhere in vitro to purified CD36, a critical endothelium receptor for binding P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. P. c. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes adhere in vitro to endothelial cells in a gamma interferon-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of additional adhesion molecules in the binding process, as is also the case with P. falciparum-infected cells. Furthermore, plasma or sera from infected and hyperimmune mice, respectively, have the ability to block binding of infected erythrocytes to endothelial cells. In vivo, erythrocytes containing mature P. c. chabaudi parasites are sequestered from the peripheral circulation. Sequestration is organ specific, occurring primarily in the liver, although intimate contact between infected erythrocytes and endothelial cells is also observed in the spleen and brain. The results are discussed in the context of the use of this model to study (i) the relationship between endothelial cell activation and the level of sequestration and (ii) the primary function of sequestration in malaria infection. PMID:10858230

  16. A TatABC-Type Tat Translocase Is Required for Unimpaired Aerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Dan; Schmitz, Sabrina; Freudl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria possess a TatABC-type Tat translocase in which each of the three inner membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC performs a mechanistically distinct function. In contrast, low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, use a TatAC-type minimal Tat translocase in which the TatB function is carried out by a bifunctional TatA. In high-GC Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, tatA, tatB, and tatC genes can be identified, suggesting that these organisms, just like E. coli, might use TatABC-type Tat translocases as well. However, since contrary to this view a previous study has suggested that C. glutamicum might in fact use a TatAC translocase with TatB only playing a minor role, we reexamined the requirement of TatB for Tat-dependent protein translocation in this microorganism. Under aerobic conditions, the misassembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein QcrA was identified as a major reason for the severe growth defect of Tat-defective C. glutamicum mutant strains. Furthermore, our results clearly show that TatB, besides TatA and TatC, is strictly required for unimpaired aerobic growth. In addition, TatB was also found to be essential for the secretion of a heterologous Tat-dependent model protein into the C. glutamicum culture supernatant. Together with our finding that expression of the C. glutamicum TatB in an E. coli ΔtatB mutant strain resulted in the formation of an active Tat translocase, our results clearly indicate that a TatABC translocase is used as the physiologically relevant functional unit for Tat-dependent protein translocation in C. glutamicum and, most likely, also in other TatB-containing Actinobacteria. PMID:25837592

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium pathogenicity island 1-encoded type III secretion system translocases mediate intimate attachment to nonphagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Lara-Tejero, María; Galán, Jorge E

    2009-07-01

    Delivery of bacterial proteins into mammalian cells by type III secretion systems (TTSS) is thought to require the intimate association of bacteria with target cells. The molecular bases of this intimate association appear to be different in different bacteria involving TTSS components, as well as surface determinants not associated with TTSS. We show here that the protein translocases SipB, SipC, and SipD of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded TTSS are required for the intimate association of these bacteria with mammalian cells. S. Typhimurium mutant strains lacking any of the translocases were defective for intimate attachment. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that SipD is present on the bacterial surface prior to bacterial contact with host cells. In contrast, SipB and SipC were detected on the bacterial surface only subsequent to bacterial contact with the target cell. We conclude that the coordinated deployment and interaction between the protein translocases mediate the SPI-1 TTSS-dependent intimate association of S. Typhimurium with host cells.

  18. Interaction of divalent metal ions with human translocase of inner membrane of mitochondria Tim23.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yongqiang; Deng, Honghua; Li, Shu Jie

    2016-06-17

    The preprotein translocase of the inner membrane of mitochondria (TIM23 complex) is the main entry gate for proteins of the matrix and the inner membrane. Tim23p, the core component of TIM23 complex, forms the import pore across the inner membrane and exerts a key function in the protein import. However, the interaction of divalent metal ions with Tim23p and the contribution in the interaction of presequence peptide with Tim23p are still unknown. Herein, we investigated the interaction of divalent metal ions with the intermembrane space domain of Tim23p (Tim23IMS) and the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS in presence of Ca(2+) ion by fluorescence spectroscopy in vitro. The static fluorescence quenching indicates the existence of strong binding between divalent metal ions and Tim23IMS. The order of the binding strength is Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), and Co(2+) (from strong to weak). Moreover, the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS is weakened in presence of Ca(2+) ion, which implicates that Ca(2+) ion may play an important role in the protein import by TIM23 complex.

  19. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  20. Substrate-selective repair and restart of replication forks by DNA translocases.

    PubMed

    Bétous, Rémy; Couch, Frank B; Mason, Aaron C; Eichman, Brandt F; Manosas, Maria; Cortez, David

    2013-06-27

    Stalled replication forks are sources of genetic instability. Multiple fork-remodeling enzymes are recruited to stalled forks, but how they work to promote fork restart is poorly understood. By combining ensemble biochemical assays and single-molecule studies with magnetic tweezers, we show that SMARCAL1 branch migration and DNA-annealing activities are directed by the single-stranded DNA-binding protein RPA to selectively regress stalled replication forks caused by blockage to the leading-strand polymerase and to restore normal replication forks with a lagging-strand gap. We unveil the molecular mechanisms by which RPA enforces SMARCAL1 substrate preference. E. coli RecG acts similarly to SMARCAL1 in the presence of E. coli SSB, whereas the highly related human protein ZRANB3 has different substrate preferences. Our findings identify the important substrates of SMARCAL1 in fork repair, suggest that RecG and SMARCAL1 are functional orthologs, and provide a comprehensive model of fork repair by these DNA translocases.

  1. Interaction of divalent metal ions with human translocase of inner membrane of mitochondria Tim23.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yongqiang; Deng, Honghua; Li, Shu Jie

    2016-06-17

    The preprotein translocase of the inner membrane of mitochondria (TIM23 complex) is the main entry gate for proteins of the matrix and the inner membrane. Tim23p, the core component of TIM23 complex, forms the import pore across the inner membrane and exerts a key function in the protein import. However, the interaction of divalent metal ions with Tim23p and the contribution in the interaction of presequence peptide with Tim23p are still unknown. Herein, we investigated the interaction of divalent metal ions with the intermembrane space domain of Tim23p (Tim23IMS) and the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS in presence of Ca(2+) ion by fluorescence spectroscopy in vitro. The static fluorescence quenching indicates the existence of strong binding between divalent metal ions and Tim23IMS. The order of the binding strength is Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), and Co(2+) (from strong to weak). Moreover, the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS is weakened in presence of Ca(2+) ion, which implicates that Ca(2+) ion may play an important role in the protein import by TIM23 complex. PMID:27178215

  2. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Northall, Sarah J.; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  3. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis.

    PubMed

    Northall, Sarah J; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming "Displacement loops" (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  4. Active displacement of RecA filaments by UvrD translocase activity

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Vessela; Chen, Stefanie H.; Molzberger, Eileen T.; Tomko, Eric; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Jia, Haifeng; Ordabayev, Yerdos; Lohman, Timothy M.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The UvrD helicase has been implicated in the disassembly of RecA nucleoprotein filaments in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that UvrD utilizes an active mechanism to remove RecA from the DNA. Efficient RecA removal depends on the availability of DNA binding sites for UvrD and/or the accessibility of the RecA filament ends. The removal of RecA from DNA also requires ATP hydrolysis by the UvrD helicase but not by RecA protein. The RecA-removal activity of UvrD is slowed by RecA variants with enhanced DNA-binding properties. The ATPase rate of UvrD during RecA removal is much slower than the ATPase activity of UvrD when it is functioning either as a translocase or a helicase on DNA in the absence of RecA. Thus, in this context UvrD may operate in a specialized disassembly mode. PMID:25824953

  5. Translocase and major signal peptidase malfunctions affect aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gullón, Sonia; Palomino, Carmen; Navajas, Rosana; Paradela, Alberto; Mellado, Rafael P

    2012-08-31

    Deficiency in the translocase complex (SecG mutant strain) or in the major type I signal peptidase (SipY mutant strain) function in Streptomyces lividans resulted, as expected, in a drastic reduction of secretory protein production and in a bald phenotype. The transcriptional profiling of both strains showed that the expression of a set of genes involved in the morphological differentiation process was down regulated in both mutant strains (bldG, bldN and bldM), whereas bldA and bldH were only down-regulated in the SipY mutant strain. Consistently, low temperature scanning electron microscopy revealed that the disruption of sipY had a more noticeable effect in the growth/morphological aspect of the mycelium than that of secG, suggesting that in the sipY mutant, the blockage of the export process might have more severe consequences than in the secG mutant. In both cases, the likely degradation of the proteins that cannot be secreted might provide nutrients that might be responsible for the lack of induction of the bald cascade, which is thought to be triggered under conditions of nutritional limitation.

  6. The putative oligosaccharide translocase SypK connects biofilm formation with quorum signaling in Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Miyashiro, Tim; Oehlert, Dane; Ray, Valerie A; Visick, Karen L; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Quorum signaling (QS) describes how bacteria can use small signaling molecules (autoinducers) to coordinate group-level behaviors. In Vibrio fischeri, QS is achieved through a complex regulatory network that ultimately controls bioluminescence, motility, and host colonization. We conducted a genetic screen focused on qrr1, which encodes a small regulatory RNA that is necessary for the core quorum-signaling cascade to transduce autoinducer information into cellular responses. We isolated unique mutants with a transposon inserted into one of two genes within the syp locus, which is involved in biofilm formation. We found that overexpression of sypK, which encodes a putative oligosaccharide translocase, is sufficient to activate qrr1, and, in addition, this effect appears to depend on the kinase activity of the sensor LuxQ. Consistent with the established model for QS in V. fischeri, enhanced expression of qrr1 by the overexpression of sypK resulted in reduced bioluminescence and increased motility. Finally, we found that induction of the syp locus by overexpression of sypG was sufficient to activate qrr1 levels. Together, our results show how conditions that promote biofilm formation impact the quorum-signaling network in V. fischeri, and further highlight the integrated nature of the regulatory circuits involved in complex bacterial behaviors. PMID:25257018

  7. The mitochondrial protein import component, TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE17-1, plays a role in defining the timing of germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Law, Simon R; Ivanova, Aneta; van Aken, Olivier; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Uggalla, Vindya; van der Merwe, Margaretha; Duncan, Owen; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James; Murcha, Monika W

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), small gene families encode multiple isoforms for many of the components of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus. There are three isoforms of the TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE17 (Tim17). Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtTim17-1 is only detectable in dry seed. In this study, two independent transfer DNA insertional mutant lines of tim17-1 exhibited a germination-specific phenotype, showing a significant increase in the rate of germination. Microarray analyses revealed that Attim17-1 displayed alterations in the temporal sequence of transcriptomic events during germination, peaking earlier compared with the wild type. Promoter analysis of AtTim17-1 further identified an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element, which binds ABA-responsive transcription factors, acting to repress the expression of AtTim17-1. Attim17-1 dry seeds contained significantly increased levels of ABA and gibberellin, 2- and 5-fold, respectively. These results support the model that mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated in a tight temporal sequence of events during germination and that altering mitochondrial biogenesis feeds back to alter the germination rate, as evidenced by the altered levels of the master regulatory hormones that define germination.

  8. An adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) gene from Apostichopus japonicus; molecular cloning and expression analysis in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Tu, Jie; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Li, Chao-Feng; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) play a vital role in energy metabolism via ADP/ATP exchange in eukaryotic cells. Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) is an important economic species in China. Here, a cDNA representing an ANT gene of A. japonicus was isolated and characterized from respiratory tree and named AjANT. The full-length AjANT cDNA is 1924 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 38 bp, 3'-UTR of 980 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 906 bp encoding a polypeptide of 301 amino acids. The protein contains three homologous repeat Mito_carr domains (Pfam00153). The deduced AjANT protein sequence has 49-81% in comparison to ANT proteins from other individuals. The predicted tertiary structure of AjANT protein is highly similar to animal ANT proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AjANT is closely related to Holothuroidea ANT genes. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AjANT expression is higher in the respiratory tree than in other examined tissues. After thermal stress or LPS challenge, expression of AjANT was significantly fluctuant compared to the control. These results suggested that changes in the expression of ANT gene might be involved in immune defense and in protecting A. japonicus against thermal stress. PMID:26706223

  9. Mitochondrial permeability transition as induced by cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Zazueta, C; Reyes-Vivas, H; Zafra, G; Sánchez, C A; Vera, G; Chávez, E

    1998-04-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is caused by the opening of a transmembrane pore whose chemical nature has not been well established yet. The present work was aimed to further contribute to the knowledge of the membrane entity comprised in the formation of the non-specific channel. The increased permeability was established by analyzing the inability of rat kidney mitochondria to take up and accumulate Ca2+, as well as their failure to build up a transmembrane potential, after the cross-linking of membrane proteins by copper plus ortho-phenanthroline. To identify the cross-linked proteins, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. The results are representative of at least three separate experiments. It is indicated that 30 microM Cu2+ induced the release of 4.3 nmol Ca2+ per mg protein. However, in the presence of 100 microM ortho-phenanthroline only 2 microM Cu2+ was required to attain the total release of the accumulated Ca2+; it should be noted that such a reaction is not inhibited by cyclosporin. The increased permeability corresponds to cross-linking of membrane proteins in which approximately 4 nmol thiol groups per mg protein appear to be involved. Such a linking process is inhibited by carboxyatractyloside. By using the fluorescent probe eosin-5-maleimide the label was found in a cross-linking 60 kDa dimer of two 30 kDa monomers. From the data presented it is concluded that copper-o-phenanthroline induces the intermolecular cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase which in turn is converted to non-specific pore. PMID:9675885

  10. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 4 Is Expressed Within Embryonic Ovaries and Dispensable During Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Ho; Brower, Jeffrey V.; Resnick, James L.; Oh, S. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) facilitates the exchange of adenosine triphosphate across the mitochondrial inner membrane and plays a critical role for bioenergetics in eukaryotes. Mice have 3 Ant paralogs, Ant1 (Slc25a4), Ant2 (Slc25a5), and Ant4 (Slc25a31), which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We previously identified that Ant4 was expressed exclusively in testicular germ cells in adult mice and essential for spermatogenesis and subsequently male fertility. Further investigation into the process of spermatogenesis revealed that Ant4 was particularly highly expressed during meiotic prophase I and indispensable for normal progression of leptotene spermatocytes to the stages thereafter. In contrast, the expression and roles of Ant4 in female germ cells have not previously been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the Ant4 gene is expressed during embryonic ovarian development during which meiotic prophase I occurs. We confirmed embryonic ovary-specific Ant4 expression using a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene. In contrast to male, however, Ant4 null female mice were fertile although the litter size was slightly decreased. They showed apparently normal ovarian development which was morphologically indistinguishable from the control animals. These data indicate that Ant4 is a meiosis-specific gene expressed during both male and female gametogenesis however indispensable only during spermatogenesis and not oogenesis. The differential effects of Ant4 depletion within the processes of male and female gametogenesis may be explained by meiosis-specific inactivation of the X-linked Ant2 gene in male, a somatic paralog of the Ant4 gene. PMID:25031318

  11. Roles of Oxa1-related inner membrane translocases in assembly of respiratory chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fiumera, Heather L.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Fox, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions The wide phylogenetic distribution of Oxa1-related proteins appears to reflect both the central role of assembling energy-transducing membrane complexes, and the range of roles in their assembly that Oxa1-related protein scan be adapted to. In different species, Oxa1 and its isoforms appear to assist in the assembly of several different substrate proteins. Recent work on the bacterial protein YidC strongly indicates that it is capable of functioning alone as a translocase for hydrophilic domains and an insertase for TM domains. Thus it is highly likely that the eukaryotic members of this family found in mitochondria and chloroplasts directly catalyze these reactions in a co- and/or posttranslational way. It is presently unclear how Oxa1 recognizes its substrates and whether additional factors assist in this, beyond its direct interaction with mitochondrial ribosomes, demonstrated in S. cerevisiae. Given the apparent co-translational nature of in vivo Oxa1 dependent translocation of the Cox2 N-terminal domain, a detailed mechanistic study of this most criticalOxa1 function will need to await the development of a true in vitro translation system derived from the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane. However, Oxa1is also capable of assisting post-translational insertion and translocation in isolated mitochondria and Cox18 may post-translationally translocate both in vivo and in vitro its only known substrate, the Cox2 C-terminal domain. Thus, biochemical analysis of some of these functions in proteoliposomes may already be possible, taking advantage of the wide variety of mutant forms of S. cerevisiae Oxa1, to examine distinct activities of the protein. It is clear that interpretation of all genetic and biochemical data on Oxa1 and Cox18 will be far more robust when the structure of both proteins in the membrane will be determined. PMID:18522806

  12. A human pseudoautosomal gene encodes the ANT3 ADP/ATP translocase and escapes X-inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Slim, R. Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif ); Levilliers, J.; Petit, C. ); Luedecke, H.J.; Horsthemke, B. ); Claussen, U. ); Nguyen, V.C. ); Gough, N.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors report that the human ANT3 ADP/ATP translocase gene is [alpha] pseudoautosomal gene located proximal to the GM-CSF receptor a chain gene (CSF2RA). An ANT3-homologous locus, likely corresponding to a pseudogene, maps to chromosome 9. The ANT3 gene is transcribed from the centromere to the telomere and contains in its first intron a CpG island mapped 1300 kb from the telomere. This gene is transcribed from the Y chromosome and from the active and inactive X chromosomes. This gene thus escapes X-inactivation as predicted for genes belonging to the pseudoautosomal region. 61 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of fatty acid transporters and MCT1 in the sebaceous glands of mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Miao; Lee, Shinhye; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The sebaceous glands secrete sebum to protect the epidermis and hairs by the oily products. The glands express several transporters and binding proteins for the production of fatty acids and uptake of their sources. The present immunohistochemical study examined the expression and localization of CD36, MCT1, FATP4, and E-FABP in the sebaceous glands, including the meibomian and preputial glands of mice. CD36 and MCT1 in sebaceous glands were largely co-localized along the plasma membrane of secretory cells, while they were separately expressed in the glandular portion of meibomian and preputial glands. Immunoreactivities for FATP4 and E-FABP appeared diffusely in the cytoplasm of secretory cells. Genetic deletion of CD36 did not affect the immunolocalization of the three other molecules. The sebaceous glands were judged to be useful for analyzing the functions and relation of fatty acid transporters and binding proteins. PMID:27545003

  14. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2011-11-02

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a 'closed' state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an 'open' state that differs by an {approx} 160{sup o} rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme.

  15. Acrolein-induced oxidative stress in NAD(P)H Oxidase Subunit gp91phox knock-out mice and its modulation of NFκB and CD36.

    PubMed

    Yousefipour, Zivar; Zhang, Chelsea; Monfareed, Mahdieh; Walker, James; Newaz, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    An essential component of NAD(P)H, gp91phox, maintains the functionality of the enzyme in producing oxygen radicals. NAD(P)H oxidase plays an important role in oxidative stress but its precise contribution in acrolein-induced toxicity was not explored. We examined the involvement of NAD(P)H oxidase and other oxidant system in acrolein toxicity using gp91phox knockout mice. Male gp91phox knockout (KO) mice (20-25 gm) or wild type (WT) controls were treated with acrolein (0.5 μg/kg; 1 week). Animals were sacrificed and the liver was used to determine biochemical parameters. Knockout mice generated low (1.43 ±.02 pg/μg protein) free radicals as evident in 8-Isoprostane compared with the WT mice (2.19 ± 0.1). Acrolein increased 8-Isoprostane in WT (P<.05) and KO (p<.05) mice. Xanthine Oxidase (XO) activity was higher (p<.05) in KO (0.56 ± 0.06 μ unit/μg protein) than WT mice. Acrolein increased XO in KO mice, but significantly increased it only in WT. Cycloxygenase (COX) activity was not different between WT and KO mice, although acroelin increased COX in WT. Knockout mice exhibited a significantly low (2.1 ± 0.2 μmol/mg protein) total antioxidant status (TAS) compared with the WT (3.5 ± 0.3). Acrolein reduced TAS in both WT and KO mice equally. Baseline NFκB was significantly higher in KO mice, although acrolein increased NFκB in WT but not in KO. CD36 was higher (p<.05) in KO mice than the WT and acrolein increased (p<.05) CD36 further in KO but not in WT mice. These data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase contributes significantly in acrolein-induced oxidative stress. We also suggests that in the absence of NAD(P)H oxidase XO plays a definitive role together with reduced antioxidant ability to compound the toxic effects of acrolein. We propose that in absence of NAD(P)H oxidase a different signaling process may involve that utilizes CD36 besides NFκB.

  16. Tim29 is a novel subunit of the human TIM22 translocase and is involved in complex assembly and stability.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael James; Liem, Michael; Louber, Jade; McKenzie, Matthew; Atukorala, Ishara; Ang, Ching-Seng; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Mathivanan, Suresh; Stojanovski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The TIM22 complex mediates the import of hydrophobic carrier proteins into the mitochondrial inner membrane. While the TIM22 machinery has been well characterised in yeast, the human complex remains poorly characterised. Here, we identify Tim29 (C19orf52) as a novel, metazoan-specific subunit of the human TIM22 complex. The protein is integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane with it's C-terminus exposed to the intermembrane space. Tim29 is required for the stability of the TIM22 complex and functions in the assembly of hTim22. Furthermore, Tim29 contacts the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane, TOM complex, enabling a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic carrier substrates across the aqueous intermembrane space. Identification of Tim29 highlights the significance of analysing mitochondrial import systems across phylogenetic boundaries, which can reveal novel components and mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:27554484

  17. Compartmented coupling of chicken heart mitochondrial creatine kinase to the nucleotide translocase requires the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Suelter, C H

    1987-08-15

    The kinetic coupling of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MiMi-CK) to ADP/ATP translocase in chicken heart mitochondrial preparations is demonstrated. Measuring the MiMi-CK apparent Km value for MgATP2- (at saturating creatine) gives a value of 36 microM when MiMi-CK is coupled to oxidative phosphorylation. This Km value is threefold lower than the Km for enzyme bound to mitoplasts or free in solution. The nucleotide translocase Km value for ADP decreases from 20 to 10 microM in the presence of 50 mM creatine only with intact mitochondria. Similar experiments with mitoplasts do not give decreased Km values. The observed Km differences can be used to calculate the concentration of ATP and ADP under steady-state conditions showing that the observed differences in the kinetic constants accurately reflect the enzyme activities of MiMi-CK under the different conditions. The behavior of the Km values provides evidence for what we term compartmented coupling. Therefore, like the rabbit heart system (S. Erickson-Viitanen, P. Viitanen, P. J. Geiger, W. C. T. Yang, and S. P. Bessman (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 14395-14404) compartmented coupling requires an intact outer mitochondrial membrane. The apparent Km values for normal or compartmentally coupled systems can be used to calculate steady-state values of ATP and ADP by coupling enzyme theory. Hence, the overall kinetic parameters accurately reflect the behavior of the enzymes whether free in solution or in the intermembrane space.

  18. An unexpectedly high degree of specialization and a widespread involvement in sterol metabolism among the C. elegans putative aminophospholipid translocases

    PubMed Central

    Lyssenko, Nicholas N; Miteva, Yana; Gilroy, Simon; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Schlegel, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Background P-type ATPases in subfamily IV are exclusively eukaryotic transmembrane proteins that have been proposed to directly translocate the aminophospholipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of the plasma membrane. Eukaryotic genomes contain many genes encoding members of this subfamily. At present it is unclear why there are so many genes of this kind per organism or what individual roles these genes perform in organism development. Results We have systematically investigated expression and developmental function of the six, tat-1 through 6, subfamily IV P-type ATPase genes encoded in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. tat-5 is the only ubiquitously-expressed essential gene in the group. tat-6 is a poorly-transcribed recent duplicate of tat-5. tat-2 through 4 exhibit tissue-specific developmentally-regulated expression patterns. Strong expression of both tat-2 and tat-4 occurs in the intestine and certain other cells of the alimentary system. The two are also expressed in the uterus, during spermatogenesis and in the fully-formed spermatheca. tat-2 alone is expressed in the pharyngeal gland cells, the excretory system and a few cells of the developing vulva. The expression pattern of tat-3 is almost completely different from those of tat-2 and tat-4. tat-3 expression is detectable in the steroidogenic tissues: the hypodermis and the XXX cells, as well as in most cells of the pharynx (except gland), various tissues of the reproductive system (except uterus and spermatheca) and seam cells. Deletion of tat-1 through 4 individually interferes little or not at all with the regular progression of organism growth and development under normal conditions. However, tat-2 through 4 become essential for reproductive growth during sterol starvation. Conclusion tat-5 likely encodes a housekeeping protein that performs the proposed aminophospholipid translocase function routinely. Although individually

  19. Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Produces an Atherofibrotic Histophenotype During Craniofacial Bone Repair Due to Changes of Immunohistochemical Expression of Erk1/2, p38α/β, Adiponectin and Elevated Presence of Cells Exhibiting B-scavenger Receptor (CD36+).

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Caroline Cristine; Scariot, Juliana Souza Vieira Rafaela; Ribeiro, João Cesar Zielak Geraldo Monteiro; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda; Giovanini, Andrea M Marcaccini Allan Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The platelet-extracellular matrix interaction in platelet rich plasma (PRP) through thrombospondin receptor-CD36 induces the secretion of growth factors responsible for cellular proliferation and differentiation during the repair process. Since CD36 also acts as a class B-scavenger-receptor for development of foam-like cells and mitogen-activated kinases, such as Erk1/2 and p38α/β, are important proteins activated by platelet growth factor, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical presence of CD36, Erk1/2, p38α/β during the bone repair treated and non-treated with PRP and to compare these results with the histomorphometry of repair. Simultaneously, the immunopresence of adiponectin was analyzed, which may contribute to osteogenesis at the same time it inhibits fibrosis and impairs adipogenesis and foam cell formation in the medullary area. An artificial bone defect measuring 5×1 mm was produced in the calvaria of 56 Wistar rats. The defects were randomly treated with autograft, autograft+PRP, PRP alone and sham. The animals were euthanized at 2 and 6 weeks post-surgery. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by non-parametric test Student Newman-Keuls (p<0.05) for histomorphometric and immunohistochemical interpretation. The results revealed that in specimens that received PRP the immunopositivity for Erk1/2, p38α/β and CD36 proteins increased significantly while the immunohistochemical expression of adiponectin decreased simultaneously. There was also an accentuated reduction of bone matrix deposition and increase of the medullary area represented by fibrosis and/or presence of foam-like cells, which exhibited immunophenotype CD36+adiponectin. The findings of this study suggest that PRP acted as an inhibitor of osteogenesis during the craniofacial bone repair and induced a pathological condition that mimics an atherofibrotic condition. PMID:27224555

  20. Characterization of the Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 Recombinase and the DNA Translocase Rdh54*

    PubMed Central

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick; Klein, Hannah L.

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rdh54 protein is a member of the Swi2/Snf2 family of DNA translocases required for meiotic and mitotic recombination and DNA repair. Rdh54 interacts with the general recombinases Rad51 and Dmc1 and promotes D-loop formation with either recombinase. Rdh54 also mediates the removal of Rad51 from undamaged chromatin in mitotic cells, which prevents formation of nonrecombinogenic complexes that can otherwise become toxic for cell growth. To determine which of the mitotic roles of Rdh54 are dependent on Rad51 complex formation, we finely mapped the Rad51 interaction domain in Rdh54, generated N-terminal truncation variants, and characterized their attributes biochemically and in cells. Here, we provide evidence suggesting that the N-terminal region of Rdh54 is not necessary for the response to the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. However, truncation variants missing 75–200 residues at the N terminus are sensitive to Rad51 overexpression. Interestingly, a hybrid protein containing the N-terminal region of Rad54, responsible for Rad51 interaction, fused to the Swi2/Snf2 core of Rdh54 is able to effectively complement the sensitivity to both methyl methanesulfonate and excess Rad51 in rdh54 null cells. Altogether, these results reveal a distinction between damage sensitivity and Rad51 removal with regard to Rdh54 interaction with Rad51. PMID:23798704

  1. Tim29 is a novel subunit of the human TIM22 translocase and is involved in complex assembly and stability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael James; Liem, Michael; Louber, Jade; McKenzie, Matthew; Atukorala, Ishara; Ang, Ching-Seng; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Mathivanan, Suresh; Stojanovski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The TIM22 complex mediates the import of hydrophobic carrier proteins into the mitochondrial inner membrane. While the TIM22 machinery has been well characterised in yeast, the human complex remains poorly characterised. Here, we identify Tim29 (C19orf52) as a novel, metazoan-specific subunit of the human TIM22 complex. The protein is integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane with it’s C-terminus exposed to the intermembrane space. Tim29 is required for the stability of the TIM22 complex and functions in the assembly of hTim22. Furthermore, Tim29 contacts the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane, TOM complex, enabling a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic carrier substrates across the aqueous intermembrane space. Identification of Tim29 highlights the significance of analysing mitochondrial import systems across phylogenetic boundaries, which can reveal novel components and mechanisms in higher organisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17463.001 PMID:27554484

  2. Downregulation of Carnitine Acyl-Carnitine Translocase by miRNAs 132 and 212 Amplifies Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Mufaddal S.; Rabaglia, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Sushant; Shang, Jin; Ilkayeva, Olga; Mynatt, Randall; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Schadt, Eric E.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Keller, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) 132 and 212 are differentially upregulated in response to obesity in two mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes. Here we show the overexpression of miRNAs 132 and 212 enhances insulin secretion (IS) in response to glucose and other secretagogues including nonfuel stimuli. We determined that carnitine acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT; Slc25a20) is a direct target of these miRNAs. CACT is responsible for transporting long-chain acyl-carnitines into the mitochondria for β-oxidation. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CACT in β-cells led to the accumulation of fatty acyl-carnitines and enhanced IS. The addition of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines promoted IS from rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) as well as primary mouse islets. The effect on INS-1 cells was augmented in response to suppression of CACT. A nonhydrolyzable ether analog of palmitoyl-carnitine stimulated IS, showing that β-oxidation of palmitoyl-carnitine is not required for its stimulation of IS. These studies establish a link between miRNA-dependent regulation of CACT and fatty acyl-carnitine–mediated regulation of IS. PMID:24969106

  3. SecY, an integral subunit of the bacterial preprotein translocase, is encoded by a plastid genome.

    PubMed

    Flachmann, R; Michalowski, C B; Löffelhardt, W; Bohnert, H J

    1993-04-01

    Although the paradigm for the acquisition of photosynthetic organelles is the endocytosis of cyanobacteria-like progenitors by heterotrophic protists, details of this evolutionary process are unclear. The small organellar chromosomes are remnants of the larger bacterial genomes with most genes from the endosymbiont's DNA having been either relocated to the protist's nucleus or entirely lost. As a result of those gene transfers, differences exist between plastids from different algal phyla and higher plants. We report here on the retention of a secY gene in cyanelle (= plastid) DNA of the eukaryotic protist Cyanophora paradoxa. This cyanelle secY encodes a functional protein homologous to SecY of Escherichia coli, identified as a subunit of the preprotein translocase complex. Similarity of the cyanelle and E. coli SecY topology, predicted from sequence information, has been confirmed experimentally through SecY-PhoA fusion protein analysis in E. coli. Cyanelle SecY, expressed in an E. coli secY mutant, substituted for the defective prokaryotic SecY. A plastid-encoded gene for a membrane protein functioning in protein transport across plastid membranes is unprecedented in higher plants. From these results we infer that a functional homolog of the prokaryotic preprotein translocation machinery is retained in some plastids.

  4. Changes in the expression of the human adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms condition cellular metabolic/proliferative status

    PubMed Central

    Mampel, Teresa; Viñas, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Human cells express four mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (hANT) isoforms that are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. hANT1 is mainly expressed in terminally differentiated muscle cells; hANT2 is growth-regulated and is upregulated in highly glycolytic and proliferative cells; and hANT3 is considered to be ubiquitous and non-specifically regulated. Here, we studied how the expression of hANT isoforms is regulated by proliferation and in response to metabolic stimuli, and examined the metabolic consequences of their silencing and overexpression. In HeLa and HepG2 cells, expression of hANT3 was upregulated by shifting metabolism towards oxidation or by slowed growth associated with contact inhibition or growth-factor deprivation, indicating that hANT3 expression is highly regulated. Under these conditions, changes in hANT2 mRNA expression were not observed in either HeLa or HepG2 cells, whereas in SGBS preadipocytes (which, unlike HeLa and HepG2 cells, are growth-arrest-sensitive cells), hANT2 mRNA levels decreased. Additionally, overexpression of hANT2 promoted cell growth and glycolysis, whereas silencing of hANT3 decreased cellular ATP levels, limited cell growth and induced a stress-like response. Thus, cancer cells require both hANT2 and hANT3, depending on their proliferation status: hANT2 when proliferation rates are high, and hANT3 when proliferation slows. PMID:26842067

  5. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery.

  6. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery. PMID:26138914

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in CETP, SLC46A1, SLC19A1, CD36, BCMO1, APOA5, and ABCA1 are significant predictors of plasma HDL in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a marker-trait association study we estimated the statistical significance of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 23 candidate genes on HDL levels of two independent Caucasian populations. Each population consisted of men and women and their HDL levels were adjusted for gender and body weight. We used a linear regression model. Selected genes corresponded to folate metabolism, vitamins B-12, A, and E, and cholesterol pathways or lipid metabolism. Methods Extracted DNA from both the Sacramento and Beltsville populations was analyzed using an allele discrimination assay with a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform. The adjusted phenotype, y, was HDL levels adjusted for gender and body weight only statistical analyses were performed using the genotype association and regression modules from the SNP Variation Suite v7. Results Statistically significant SNP (where P values were adjusted for false discovery rate) included: CETP (rs7499892 and rs5882); SLC46A1 (rs37514694; rs739439); SLC19A1 (rs3788199); CD36 (rs3211956); BCMO1 (rs6564851), APOA5 (rs662799), and ABCA1 (rs4149267). Many prior association trends of the SNP with HDL were replicated in our cross-validation study. Significantly, the association of SNP in folate transporters (SLC46A1 rs37514694 and rs739439; SLC19A1 rs3788199) with HDL was identified in our study. Conclusions Given recent literature on the role of niacin in the biogenesis of HDL, focus on status and metabolism of B-vitamins and metabolites of eccentric cleavage of β-carotene with lipid metabolism is exciting for future study. PMID:23656756

  8. Study of Valproic Acid-Enhanced Hepatocyte Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Renin; Chou, Mei-Chia; Hung, Li-Ying; Wang, Mu-En; Hsu, Meng-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used antiepilepsy drugs. However, several side effects, including weight gain and fatty liver, have been reported in patients following VPA treatment. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatic steatosis using FL83B cell line-based in vitro model. Using fluorescent lipid staining technique, we found that VPA enhanced oleic acid- (OLA-) induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes; this may be due to upregulated lipid uptake, triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. Real-time PCR results showed that, following VPA treatment, the expression levels of genes encoding cluster of differentiation 36 (Cd36), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2), and perilipin 2 (Plin2) were increased, that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I a (Cpt1a) was not affected, and those of acetyl-Co A carboxylase α (Acca) and fatty acid synthase (Fasn) were decreased. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analyses, we found that VPA also induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear translocation and increased levels of cell-surface CD36. Based on these results, we propose that VPA may enhance OLA-induced hepatocyte steatosis through the upregulation of PPARγ- and CD36-dependent lipid uptake, TAG synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. PMID:27034954

  9. Macrophage polarisation by fatty acids is PPARgamma-dependent.

    PubMed

    Pararasa, Chatyan; Bailey, Clifford; Griffiths, Helen

    2014-10-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FAs) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of the saturated FA palmitate and unsaturated FA oleate on monocyte phenotype and function. Palmitate increased cell surface expression of integrin CD11b and scavenger receptor CD36 in a concentration-dependent manner with some decrease in mitochondrial reducing capacity at high concentration (300µM). Monocytes incubated with palmitate, but not oleate, showed increased uptake of oxidized LDL and increased adhesion to rat aortic endothelium, particularly at bifurcations. The palmitate-induced increase in CD11b and CD36 expression was associated with increased cellular C16 ceramide and sphingomyelin, loss of reduced glutathione, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased monocyte surface CD11b and CD36 was inhibited by fumonisin B1, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, but not by the superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBap. In contrast, MnTBap prevented the mitochondrial ROS increase and metabolic inhibition due to 300µM palmitate. This study demonstrates that in viable monocytes, palmitate but not oleate increases expression of surface CD11b and CD36. Palmitate increases monocyte adhesion to the aortic wall and promotes uptake of oxidized LDL and this involves de novo ceramide synthesis. We have also explored whether specific dietary fatty acids drive monocyte to macrophage polarisation via metabolic pathways. Here we show that monocytes pre-incubated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate increase production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-6 in response to a phorbol myristate differentiation trigger. This increases mitochondrial superoxide production, reduces dependency on oxidative phosphorylation through ceramide-dependent inhibition of PPARgamma activity and increases TNFa production, again via a mechanism that requires ceramide production. PMID:26461339

  10. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Pasqualini, Renata; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  11. Polarity and charge of the periplasmic loop determine the YidC and sec translocase requirement for the M13 procoat lep protein.

    PubMed

    Soman, Raunak; Yuan, Jijun; Kuhn, Andreas; Dalbey, Ross E

    2014-01-10

    During membrane biogenesis, the M13 procoat protein is inserted into the lipid bilayer in a strictly YidC-dependent manner with both the hydrophobic signal sequence and the membrane anchor sequence promoting translocation of the periplasmic loop via a hairpin mechanism. Here, we find that the translocase requirements can be altered for PClep in a predictable manner by changing the polarity and charge of the peptide region that is translocated across the membrane. When the polarity of the translocated peptide region is lowered and the charged residues in this region are removed, translocation of this loop region occurs largely by a YidC- and Sec-independent mechanism. When the polarity is increased to that of the wild-type procoat protein, the YidC insertase is essential for translocation. Further increasing the polarity, by adding charged residues, switches the insertion pathway to a YidC/Sec mechanism. Conversely, we find that increasing the hydrophobicity of the transmembrane segments of PClep can decrease the translocase requirement for translocation of the peptide chain. This study provides a framework to understand why the YidC and Sec machineries exist in parallel and demonstrates that the YidC insertase has a limited capacity to translocate a peptide chain on its own.

  12. The Oxa1 protein forms a homooligomeric complex and is an essential part of the mitochondrial export translocase in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Nargang, Frank E; Preuss, Marc; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2002-04-12

    The Oxa1 protein is a ubiquitous constituent of the inner membrane of mitochondria. Oxa1 was identified in yeast as a crucial component of the protein export machinery known as the OXA translocase, which facilitates the integration of proteins from the mitochondrial matrix into the inner membrane. We have identified the Neurospora crassa Oxa1 protein which shows a sequence identity of 22% to the yeast homologue. Despite the low level of identity, the function of the homologues is conserved as the N. crassa gene fully complemented a yeast null mutant. Genetic analysis revealed that Oxa1 is essential for viability in N. crassa. Cells propagated under conditions that severely reduce Oxa1 levels grew extremely slowly and were deficient in subunits of complex I and complex IV. Isolation of the Oxa1 complex from N. crassa mitochondria revealed a 170-180-kDa complex that contained exclusively Oxa1. Since the Oxa1 monomer has a molecular weight of 43,000, our data suggest that the OXA translocase consists of a homooligomer most likely containing four Oxa1 subunits.

  13. Trivalent chromium alleviates oleic acid induced steatosis in SMMC-7721 cells by decreasing fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaonan; Hu, Linlin; Fang, Zhijia; Huang, Zhiwei; Shi, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] has been shown as an essential trace element for human health. Previous studies depict that Cr(III) plays important roles in maintaining normal glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas its effect on the hepatic lipid metabolism is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanisms of Cr on hepatic steatosis induced by oleic acid (OA) in human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells. Hepatic steatosis model was co-administered with Cr. Indexes of lipid accumulation were determined and associated genes expression were analyzed. The data showed that OA could induce lipid accumulation and triglyceride (TG) content in SMMC-7721 cells, and significantly increase the expression of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2). This steatosis effect of OA was ameliorated by Cr. The TG accumulation and up-regulation of CD36 and DGAT2 genes followed steatosis induction were inhibited by Cr. After the treatment of Cr, excessive intracellular OA content was also attenuated. Furthermore, Cr still performed inhibitory effect of DGAT2 expression at the presence of DGAT2 agonist or inhibitor, which indicated that the inhibitory effect of Cr on lipogenesis is associated with the downregulation of DGAT2 expression. These findings demonstrate that Cr alleviates hepatic steatosis via suppressing CD36 expression to prevent fatty acid uptake, as well as suppressing DGAT2 expression to inhibit TG synthesis. It suggests that CD36 and DGAT2 might become the novel drug targets for their properties in hepatic steatosis. Most importantly, Cr may be a potential anti-steatosis candidate to offer protective effects against liver damage. PMID:27497686

  14. Structural Investigation of Park’s Nucleotide on Bacterial Translocase MraY: Discovery of Unexpected MraY Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuo-Ting; Chen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Kun; Huang, Lin-Ya; Hu, Chia-Ming; Chang, Yi-Fan; Hsu, Hua-Ting; Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Wu, Ying-Ta; Cheng, Wei-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Systematic structural modifications of the muramic acid, peptide, and nucleotide moieties of Park’s nucleotide were performed to investigate the substrate specificity of B. subtilis MraY (MraYBS). It was found that the simplest analogue of Park’s nucleotide only bearing the first two amino acids, l-alanine-iso-d-glutamic acid, could function as a MraYBS substrate. Also, the acid group attached to the Cα of iso-d-glutamic acid was found to play an important role for substrate activity. Epimerization of the C4-hydroxyl group of muramic acid and modification at the 5-position of the uracil in Park’s nucleotide were both found to dramatically impair their substrate activity. Unexpectedly, structural modifications on the uracil moiety changed the parent molecule from a substrate to an inhibitor, blocking the MraYBS translocation. One unoptimized inhibitor was found to have a Ki value of 4 ± 1 μM against MraYBS, more potent than tunicamycins. PMID:27531195

  15. Co-evolution of segregation guide DNA motifs and the FtsK translocase in bacteria: identification of the atypical Lactococcus lactis KOPS motif

    PubMed Central

    Nolivos, Sophie; Touzain, Fabrice; Pages, Carine; Coddeville, Michele; Rousseau, Philippe; El Karoui, Meriem; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Cornet, François

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria use the global bipolarization of their chromosomes into replichores to control the dynamics and segregation of their genome during the cell cycle. This involves the control of protein activities by recognition of specific short DNA motifs whose orientation along the chromosome is highly skewed. The KOPS motifs act in chromosome segregation by orienting the activity of the FtsK DNA translocase towards the terminal replichore junction. KOPS motifs have been identified in γ-Proteobacteria and in Bacillus subtilis as closely related G-rich octamers. We have identified the KOPS motif of Lactococcus lactis, a model bacteria of the Streptococcaceae family harbouring a compact and low GC% genome. This motif, 5′-GAAGAAG-3, was predicted in silico using the occurrence and skew characteristics of known KOPS motifs. We show that it is specifically recognized by L. lactis FtsK in vitro and controls its activity in vivo. L. lactis KOPS is thus an A-rich heptamer motif. Our results show that KOPS-controlled chromosome segregation is conserved in Streptococcaceae but that KOPS may show important variation in sequence and length between bacterial families. This suggests that FtsK adapts to its host genome by selecting motifs with convenient occurrence frequencies and orientation skews to orient its activity. PMID:22373923

  16. Altered chromatographic behaviour of mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase induced by stabilization of the protein by binding of 6'-O-fluorescein-atractyloside.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vernon R; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2003-01-01

    Atractyloside (ATR) is a high-affinity specific inhibitor of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase (AAT). The binding of a fluorescent derivative, 6'- O -fluorescein-ATR (FATR), to mitochondria has been characterized. The binding constants obtained are in agreement with previously published values for ATR, demonstrating that FATR is a suitable probe of the AAT. AAT inhibited by FATR (FATR-AAT) was solubilized in dodecyl maltoside and purified by two separate ion-exchange chromatography steps at different pHs, which allowed FATR-AAT to be purified to homogeneity. The presence of the bound fluorescent probe enabled the inhibited AAT to be distinguished from the unliganded protein during chromatography, as they were markedly different in their chromatographic behaviour. The purified FATR-AAT was dimeric and in a single major conformation containing 1 mole FATR per mole of AAT dimer. In contrast, uninhibited AAT was monomeric and conformationally unstable. Use of the fluorescent ATR derivative in the development of the protocol enabled the stable dimeric AAT to be monitored directly and purified more effectively. The purification protocol was repeated using non-derivatized ATR, and highly pure AAT was obtained that was devoid of other members of the mitochondrial carrier family. PMID:14498831

  17. SecDF as Part of the Sec-Translocase Facilitates Efficient Secretion of Bacillus cereus Toxins and Cell Wall-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Slamti, Leyla; McKay, Matthew J.; Hegna, Ida K.; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Hassan, Karl A.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Lereclus, Didier; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Molloy, Mark P.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of SecDF in protein secretion in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 by in-depth characterization of a markerless secDF knock out mutant. Deletion of secDF resulted in pleiotropic effects characterized by a moderately slower growth rate, aberrant cell morphology, enhanced susceptibility to xenobiotics, reduced virulence and motility. Most toxins, including food poisoning-associated enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl, and cytotoxin K, as well as phospholipase C were less abundant in the secretome of the ΔsecDF mutant as determined by label-free mass spectrometry. Global transcriptome studies revealed profound transcriptional changes upon deletion of secDF indicating cell envelope stress. Interestingly, the addition of glucose enhanced the described phenotypes. This study shows that SecDF is an important part of the Sec-translocase mediating efficient secretion of virulence factors in the Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen B. cereus, and further supports the notion that B. cereus enterotoxins are secreted by the Sec-system. PMID:25083861

  18. A twin arginine signal peptide and the pH gradient trigger reversible assembly of the thylakoid [Delta]pH/Tat translocase.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroki; Cline, Kenneth

    2002-04-15

    The thylakoid DeltapH-dependent/Tat pathway is a novel system with the remarkable ability to transport tightly folded precursor proteins using a transmembrane DeltapH as the sole energy source. Three known components of the transport machinery exist in two distinct subcomplexes. A cpTatC-Hcf106 complex serves as precursor receptor and a Tha4 complex is required after precursor recognition. Here we report that Tha4 assembles with cpTatC-Hcf106 during the translocation step. Interactions among components were examined by chemical cross-linking of intact thylakoids followed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. cpTatC and Hcf106 were consistently associated under all conditions tested. In contrast, Tha4 was only associated with cpTatC and Hcf106 in the presence of a functional precursor and the DeltapH. Interestingly, a synthetic signal peptide could replace intact precursor in triggering assembly. The association of all three components was transient and dissipated upon the completion of protein translocation. Such an assembly-disassembly cycle could explain how the DeltapH/Tat system can assemble translocases to accommodate folded proteins of varied size. It also explains in part how the system can exist in the membrane without compromising its ion and proton permeability barrier.

  19. A gene on chromosome 11q23 coding for a putative glucose- 6-phosphate translocase is mutated in glycogen-storage disease types Ib and Ic.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-da-Cunha, M; Gerin, I; Chen, Y T; de Barsy, T; de Lonlay, P; Dionisi-Vici, C; Fenske, C D; Lee, P J; Leonard, J V; Maire, I; McConkie-Rosell, A; Schweitzer, S; Vikkula, M; Van Schaftingen, E

    1998-01-01

    Glycogen-storage diseases type I (GSD type I) are due to a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase, an enzymatic system present in the endoplasmic reticulum that plays a crucial role in blood glucose homeostasis. Unlike GSD type Ia, types Ib and Ic are not due to mutations in the phosphohydrolase gene and are clinically characterized by the presence of associated neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. Biochemical evidence indicates the presence of a defect in glucose-6-phosphate (GSD type Ib) or inorganic phosphate (Pi) (GSD type Ic) transport in the microsomes. We have recently cloned a cDNA encoding a putative glucose-6-phosphate translocase. We have now localized the corresponding gene on chromosome 11q23, the region where GSD types Ib and Ic have been mapped. Using SSCP analysis and sequencing, we have screened this gene, for mutations in genomic DNA, from patients from 22 different families who have GSD types Ib and Ic. Of 20 mutations found, 11 result in truncated proteins that are probably nonfunctional. Most other mutations result in substitutions of conserved or semiconserved residues. The two most common mutations (Gly339Cys and 1211-1212 delCT) together constitute approximately 40% of the disease alleles. The fact that the same mutations are found in GSD types Ib and Ic could indicate either that Pi and glucose-6-phosphate are transported in microsomes by the same transporter or that the biochemical assays used to differentiate Pi and glucose-6-phosphate transport defects are not reliable. PMID:9758626

  20. The RECG1 DNA Translocase Is a Key Factor in Recombination Surveillance, Repair, and Segregation of the Mitochondrial DNA in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Le Ret, Monique; Bergdoll, Marc; Bichara, Marc; Dietrich, André

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondria of flowering plants have considerably larger and more complex genomes than the mitochondria of animals or fungi, mostly due to recombination activities that modulate their genomic structures. These activities most probably participate in the repair of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lesions by recombination-dependent processes. Rare ectopic recombination across short repeats generates new genomic configurations that contribute to mtDNA heteroplasmy, which drives rapid evolution of the sequence organization of plant mtDNAs. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana RECG1, an ortholog of the bacterial RecG translocase, is an organellar protein with multiple roles in mtDNA maintenance. RECG1 targets to mitochondria and plastids and can complement a bacterial recG mutant that shows defects in repair and replication control. Characterization of Arabidopsis recG1 mutants showed that RECG1 is required for recombination-dependent repair and for suppression of ectopic recombination in mitochondria, most likely because of its role in recovery of stalled replication forks. The analysis of alternative mitotypes present in a recG1 line and of their segregation following backcross allowed us to build a model to explain how a new stable mtDNA configuration, compatible with normal plant development, can be generated by stoichiometric shift. PMID:26462909

  1. SecDF as part of the Sec-translocase facilitates efficient secretion of Bacillus cereus toxins and cell wall-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Slamti, Leyla; McKay, Matthew J; Hegna, Ida K; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Hassan, Karl A; Paulsen, Ian T; Lereclus, Didier; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Molloy, Mark P; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of SecDF in protein secretion in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 by in-depth characterization of a markerless secDF knock out mutant. Deletion of secDF resulted in pleiotropic effects characterized by a moderately slower growth rate, aberrant cell morphology, enhanced susceptibility to xenobiotics, reduced virulence and motility. Most toxins, including food poisoning-associated enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl, and cytotoxin K, as well as phospholipase C were less abundant in the secretome of the ΔsecDF mutant as determined by label-free mass spectrometry. Global transcriptome studies revealed profound transcriptional changes upon deletion of secDF indicating cell envelope stress. Interestingly, the addition of glucose enhanced the described phenotypes. This study shows that SecDF is an important part of the Sec-translocase mediating efficient secretion of virulence factors in the Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen B. cereus, and further supports the notion that B. cereus enterotoxins are secreted by the Sec-system.

  2. Structure of TatA paralog, TatE, suggests a structurally homogeneous form of Tat protein translocase that transports folded proteins of differing diameter.

    PubMed

    Baglieri, Jacopo; Beck, Daniel; Vasisht, Nishi; Smith, Corinne J; Robinson, Colin

    2012-03-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins across bacterial and plant thylakoid membranes. Most current models for the translocation mechanism propose the coalescence of a substrate-binding TatABC complex with a separate TatA complex. In Escherichia coli, TatA complexes are widely believed to form the translocation pore, and the size variation of TatA has been linked to the transport of differently sized substrates. Here, we show that the TatA paralog TatE can substitute for TatA and support translocation of Tat substrates including AmiA, AmiC, and TorA. However, TatE is found as much smaller, discrete complexes. Gel filtration and blue native electrophoresis suggest sizes between ∼50 and 110 kDa, and single-particle processing of electron micrographs gives size estimates of 70-90 kDa. Three-dimensional models of the two principal TatE complexes show estimated diameters of 6-8 nm and potential clefts or channels of up to 2.5 nm diameter. The ability of TatE to support translocation of the 90-kDa TorA protein suggests alternative translocation models in which single TatA/E complexes do not contribute the bulk of the translocation channel. The homogeneity of both the TatABC and the TatE complexes further suggests that a discrete Tat translocase can translocate a variety of substrates, presumably through the use of a flexible channel. The presence and possible significance of double- or triple-ring TatE forms is discussed.

  3. Three ways in, one way out: water dynamics in the trans-membrane domains of the inner membrane translocase AcrB.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Powered by proton-motive force, the inner membrane translocase AcrB is the engine of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in Escherichia coli. As proton conduction in proteins occurs along hydrogen-bonded networks of polar residues and water molecules, knowledge of the protein-internal water distribution and water-interacting residues allows drawing conclusions to possible pathways of proton conduction. Here, we report a series of 6× 50 ns independent molecular dynamics simulations of asymmetric AcrB embedded in a phospholipid/water environment. Simulating each monomer in its proposed protonation state, we calculated for each trans-membrane domain the average water distribution, identified residues interacting with these waters and quantified each residue's frequency of water hydrogen bond contact. Combining this information we find three possible routes of proton transfer connecting a continuously hydrated region of known key residues in the TMD interior to bulk water by one cytoplasmic and up to three periplasm water channels in monomer B and A. We find that water access of the trans-membrane domains is regulated by four groups of residues in a combination of side chain re-orientations and shifts of trans-membrane helices. Our findings support a proton release event via Arg971 during the C intermediate or in the transition to A, and proton uptake occurring in the A or B state or during a so far unknown intermediate in between B and C where cytoplasmic water access is still possible. Our simulations suggest experimentally testable hypotheses, which have not been investigated so far. PMID:21905112

  4. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim interacts with components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM).

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel O; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated.

  5. Roles of the twin-arginine translocase and associated chaperones in the biogenesis of the electron transport chains of the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Andrew; Hall, Stephen J; Myers, Jonathan D; Mulholland, Francis; Jones, Michael A; Kelly, David J

    2010-10-01

    The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168 uses a complex set of electron transport chains to ensure growth with a variety of electron donors and alternative electron acceptors, some of which are known to be important for host colonization. Many of the key redox proteins essential for electron transfer in this bacterium have N-terminal twin-arginine translocase (TAT) signal sequences that ensure their transport across the cytoplasmic membrane in a folded state. By comparisons of 2D gels of periplasmic extracts, gene fusions and specific enzyme assays in wild-type, tatC mutant and complemented strains, we experimentally verified the TAT dependence of 10 proteins with an N-terminal twin-arginine motif. NrfH, which has a TAT-like motif (LRRKILK), was functional in nitrite reduction in a tatC mutant, and was correctly rejected as a TAT substrate by the tatfind and TatP prediction programs. However, the hydrogenase subunit HydA is also rejected by tatfind, but was shown to be TAT-dependent experimentally. The YedY homologue Cj0379 is the only TAT translocated molybdoenzyme of unknown function in C. jejuni; we show that a cj0379c mutant is deficient in chicken colonization and has a nitrosative stress phenotype, suggestive of a possible role for Cj0379 in the reduction of reactive nitrogen species in the periplasm. Only two potential TAT chaperones, NapD and Cj1514, are encoded in the genome. Surprisingly, despite homology to TorD, Cj1514 was shown to be specifically required for the activity of formate dehydrogenase, not trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, and was designated FdhM. PMID:20688826

  6. Genetic influences on oral fat perception and preference: Presented at the symposium "The Taste for Fat: New Discoveries on the Role of Fat in Sensory Perception, Metabolism, Sensory Pleasure and Beyond" held at the Institute of Food Technologists 2011 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, June 12, 2011.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kathleen L

    2012-03-01

    Research suggests that dietary fat is perceived not only by texture, but also by taste. However, the receptors for chemosensory response to fat have not been identified. We report on 2 genes,TAS2R38 and CD36, that may play a role in fat perception and preference in humans. TAS2R38 is a taste receptor for bitter thiourea compounds, including 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). Nontasters of these compounds tend to be poor at discriminating fat in foods, even though they prefer higher fat versions of these foods. CD36, a fatty acid translocase expressed on multiple cell types including taste cells, plays a critical role in fat preferences in animals. In studies conducted in our laboratory with African-American adults, we identified a variant in the CD36 gene, rs1761667, that predicts oral responses to fat. Individuals who have the A/A genotype at this site tend to find Italian salad dressings creamier than those who have other genotypes at this site. In addition, A/A individuals report higher preferences for added fats, oils, and spreads (for example margarine). Assuming these data are confirmed in other populations, screening for CD36 genotype may provide helpful information to food companies for developing fat-modified products.

  7. ATPase active-site electrostatic interactions control the global conformation of the 100 kDa SecA translocase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dorothy M; Zheng, Haiyan; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John F

    2013-02-27

    SecA is an intensively studied mechanoenzyme that uses ATP hydrolysis to drive processive extrusion of secreted proteins through a protein-conducting channel in the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria. The ATPase motor of SecA is strongly homologous to that in DEAD-box RNA helicases. It remains unclear how local chemical events in its ATPase active site control the overall conformation of an ~100 kDa multidomain enzyme and drive protein transport. In this paper, we use biophysical methods to establish that a single electrostatic charge in the ATPase active site controls the global conformation of SecA. The enzyme undergoes an ATP-modulated endothermic conformational transition (ECT) believed to involve similar structural mechanics to the protein transport reaction. We have characterized the effects of an isosteric glutamate-to-glutamine mutation in the catalytic base, a mutation which mimics the immediate electrostatic consequences of ATP hydrolysis in the active site. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that this mutation facilitates the ECT in Escherichia coli SecA and triggers it completely in Bacillus subtilis SecA. Consistent with the substantial increase in entropy observed in the course of the ECT, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrates that it increases protein backbone dynamics in domain-domain interfaces at remote locations from the ATPase active site. The catalytic glutamate is one of ~250 charged amino acids in SecA, and yet neutralization of its side chain charge is sufficient to trigger a global order-disorder transition in this 100 kDa enzyme. The intricate network of structural interactions mediating this effect couples local electrostatic changes during ATP hydrolysis to global conformational and dynamic changes in SecA. This network forms the foundation of the allosteric mechanochemistry that efficiently harnesses the chemical energy stored in ATP to drive complex mechanical processes. PMID:23167435

  8. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats.

    PubMed

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R; Oliva, María E; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2016-01-28

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats.

  9. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R.; Oliva, María E.; Lombardo, Yolanda B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  10. Genetic Variation of Fatty Acid Oxidation and Obesity, A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Freitag Luglio, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of fat metabolism is an important component of the etiology of obesity as well as individual response to weight loss program. The influence of lipolysis process had receives many attentions in recent decades. Compared to that, fatty acid oxidation which occurred after lipolysis seems to be less exposed. There are limited publications on how fatty acid oxidation influences predisposition to obesity, especially the importance of genetic variations of fatty acid oxidation proteins on development of obesity. The aim of this review is to provide recent knowledge on how polymorphism of genes related fatty acid oxidation is obtained. Studies in human as well as animal model showed that disturbance of genes related fatty acid oxidation process gave impact on body weight and risks to obesity. Several polymorphisms on CD36, CPT, ACS and FABP had been shown to be related to obesity either by regulating enzymatic activity or directly influence fatty acid oxidation process. PMID:27127449

  11. CD36 expression contributes to age induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiac remodeling and impaired cardiac performance in the elderly significantly increase the risk of developing heart disease. Although vascular abnormalities associated with aging contribute to the age-related decline in cardiac function, myocardium-specific events may also be involved. We show th...

  12. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  13. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  14. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  16. Assembly, translocation, and activation of XerCD-dif recombination by FtsK translocase analyzed in real-time by FRET and two-color tethered fluorophore motion.

    PubMed

    May, Peter F J; Zawadzki, Pawel; Sherratt, David J; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Arciszewska, Lidia K

    2015-09-15

    The FtsK dsDNA translocase functions in bacterial chromosome unlinking by activating XerCD-dif recombination in the replication terminus region. To analyze FtsK assembly and translocation, and the subsequent activation of XerCD-dif recombination, we extended the tethered fluorophore motion technique, using two spectrally distinct fluorophores to monitor two effective lengths along the same tethered DNA molecule. We observed that FtsK assembled stepwise on DNA into a single hexamer, and began translocation rapidly (∼ 0.25 s). Without extruding DNA loops, single FtsK hexamers approached XerCD-dif and resided there for ∼ 0.5 s irrespective of whether XerCD-dif was synapsed or unsynapsed. FtsK then dissociated, rather than reversing. Infrequently, FtsK activated XerCD-dif recombination when it encountered a preformed synaptic complex, and dissociated before the completion of recombination, consistent with each FtsK-XerCD-dif encounter activating only one round of recombination.

  17. Derivatives of the cationic plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine amplify protonophorous activity of fatty acids in model membranes and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pustovidko, Antonina V; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I; Severina, Inna I; Simonyan, Ruben A; Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Antonenko, Yuri N; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2013-09-01

    Previously it has been shown by our group that berberine and palmatine, penetrating cations of plant origin, when conjugated with plastoquinone (SkQBerb and SkQPalm), can accumulate in isolated mitochondria or in mitochondria of living cells and effectively protect them from oxidative damage. In the present work, we demonstrate that SkQBerb, SkQPalm, and their analogs lacking the plastoquinone moiety (C10Berb and C10Palm) operate as mitochondria-targeted compounds facilitating protonophorous effect of free fatty acids. These compounds induce proton transport mediated by small concentrations of added fatty acids both in planar and liposomal model lipid membranes. In mitochondria, such an effect can be carried out by endogenous fatty acids and the adenine nucleotide translocase.

  18. Free Fatty Acid Storage in Human Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asem H.; Koutsari, Christina; Mundi, Manpreet; Stegall, Mark D.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Taler, Sandra J.; Nygren, Jonas; Thorell, Anders; Bogachus, Lindsey D.; Turcotte, Lorraine P.; Bernlohr, David; Jensen, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Because direct adipose tissue free fatty acid (FFA) storage may contribute to body fat distribution, we measured FFA (palmitate) storage rates and fatty acid (FA) storage enzymes/proteins in omental and abdominal subcutaneous fat. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Elective surgery patients received a bolus of [1-14C]palmitate followed by omental and abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsies to measure direct FFA storage. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities, CD36, fatty acid-binding protein, and fatty acid transport protein 1 were measured. RESULTS Palmitate tracer storage (dpm/g adipose lipid) and calculated palmitate storage rates were greater in omental than abdominal subcutaneous fat in women (1.2 ± 0.8 vs. 0.7 ± 0.4 μmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, P = 0.005) and men (0.7 ± 0.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.1, P < 0.001), and both were greater in women than men (P < 0.0001). Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue palmitate storage rates correlated with ACS activity (women: r = 0.66, P = 0.001; men: r = 0.70, P = 0.007); in men, CD36 was also independently related to palmitate storage rates. The content/activity of FA storage enzymes/proteins in omental fat was dramatically lower in those with more visceral fat. In women, only omental palmitate storage rates were correlated (r = 0.54, P = 0.03) with ACS activity. CONCLUSIONS Some adipocyte FA storage factors correlate with direct FFA storage, but sex differences in this process in visceral fat do not account for sex differences in visceral fatness. The reduced storage proteins in those with greater visceral fat suggest that the storage factors we measured are not a predominant cause of visceral adipose tissue accumulation. PMID:21810594

  19. Possible Involvement of Palmitate in Pathogenesis of Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Shikama, Yosuke; Kudo, Yasusei; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Funaki, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity and higher concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma. Among FFAs, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), such as palmitate, have been suggested to promote inflammatory responses. Although many epidemiological studies have shown a link between periodontitis and T2D, little is known about the clinical significance of SFAs in periodontitis. In this study, we showed that gingival fibroblasts have cell-surface expression of CD36, which is also known as FAT/fatty acid translocase. Moreover, CD36 expression was increased in gingival fibroblasts of high-fat diet-induced T2D model mice, compared with gingival fibroblasts of mice fed a normal diet. DNA microarray analysis revealed that palmitate increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Consistent with these results, we confirmed that palmitate-induced interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and CXCL1 secretion in HGF, using a cytokine array and ELISA. SFAs, but not an unsaturated fatty acid, oleate, induced IL-8 production. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, significantly suppressed palmitate-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production. Treatment of HGF with a CD36 inhibitor also inhibited palmitate-induced pro-inflammatory responses. Finally, we demonstrated that Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) lipopolysaccharide and heat-killed P.g. augmented palmitate-induced chemokine secretion in HGF. These results suggest a potential link between SFAs in plasma and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  20. Metabolomic analysis reveals decreased skeletal muscle amino acid content and altered fatty acid handling in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Koves, Timothy R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Investigate the effects of obesity and high fat diet (HFD) exposure on fatty acid oxidation and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in skeletal muscle to better characterize energy metabolism. Design and Methods Plasma and skeletal muscle metabolomic profiles were measured from lean and obese males before and after a 5 day HFD in the 4h post-prandial condition. Results At both time points, plasma short-chain acylcarnitine species (SCAC) were higher in the obese subjects, while the amino acids glycine, histidine, methionine, and citrulline were lower in skeletal muscle of obese subjects. Skeletal muscle medium-chain acylcarnitines (MCAC) C6, C8, C10:2, C10:1, C10, and C12:1 increased in obese subjects, but decreased in lean subjects, from Pre- to Post-HFD. Plasma content of C10:1 was also decreased in lean, but increased in the obese subjects from Pre- to Post-HFD. CD36 increased from Pre- to Post-HFD in obese but not lean subjects. Conclusions Lower skeletal muscle amino acid content and accumulation of plasma SCAC in obese subjects could reflect increased anaplerosis for TCA cycle intermediates, while accumulation of MCAC suggests limitations in β-oxidation. These measures may be important markers of or contributors to dysregulated metabolism observed in skeletal muscle of obese humans. PMID:25864501

  1. A novel method for determining peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masashi; Matsumoto, Shun; Okazaki, Airi; Tomita, Kaito; Watanabe, Shiro; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Minato, Daishiro; Matsuya, Yuji; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish an assay method to screen for chemical compounds that stimulate peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation activity in X-linked adrenoleukodystropy (X-ALD) fibroblasts. In this investigation, we used 12-(1-pyrene)dodecanoic acid (pyrene-C12:0), a fluorescent fatty acid analog, as a substrate for fatty acid β-oxidation. When human skin fibroblasts were incubated with pyrene-C12:0, β-oxidation products such as pyrene-C10:0 and pyrene-C8:0 were generated time-dependently. These β-oxidation products were scarcely detected in the fibroblasts from patients with Zellweger syndrome, a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder. In contrast, in fibroblasts with mitochondrial carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency, the β-oxidation products were detected at a level similar to control fibroblasts. These results indicate that the β-oxidation of pyrene-C12:0 takes place in peroxisomes, but not mitochondria, so pyrene-C12:0 is useful for measuring peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation activity. In X-ALD fibroblasts, the β-oxidation activity for pyrene-C12:0 was approximately 40 % of control fibroblasts, which is consistent with previous results using [1-(14)C]lignoceric acid as the substrate. The present study provides a convenient procedure for screening chemical compounds that stimulate the peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation in X-ALD fibroblasts.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: ornithine translocase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... to move a molecule called ornithine within the mitochondria (the energy-producing centers in cells). Specifically, this protein transports ornithine across the inner membrane of mitochondria to the region called the mitochondrial matrix , where ...

  3. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms.

  4. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms. PMID:24767308

  5. Storage rates of circulating free fatty acid into adipose tissue during eating or walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Koutsari, Christina; Mundi, Manpreet S; Ali, Asem H; Jensen, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    We measured subcutaneous adipose tissue free fatty acid (FFA) storage rates in postprandial and walking conditions to better understand the contributions of this pathway to body fat distribution. Palmitate tracers were infused intravenously and fat biopsies collected to measure palmitate storage in upper- (UBSQ) and lower-body subcutaneous (LBSQ) fat in 41 (17 men) and 40 (16 men) volunteers under postprandial and under postabsorptive walking conditions, respectively. Postprandial palmitate storage was greater in women than men in UBSQ (0.50±0.25 vs. 0.33±0.37 μmol⋅kg fat(-1)⋅min(-1); P=0.007) and LBSQ fat (0.37±0.25 vs. 0.22±0.20 μmol⋅kg fat(-1)⋅min(-1); P=0.005); storage rates were significantly greater in UBSQ than LBSQ fat in both sexes. During walking, UBSQ palmitate storage did not differ between sexes, whereas LBSQ storage was greater in women than men (0.40±0.22 vs. 0.25±0.15 μmol⋅kg fat(-1)⋅min(-1); P=0.01). In women only, walking palmitate storage was significantly greater in LBSQ than UBSQ fat. Adipocyte CD36 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) correlated with LBSQ palmitate storage in the postprandial and walking condition, respectively. We conclude that UBSQ fat is the preferred postprandial FFA storage depot for both sexes, whereas walking favors storage in LBSQ fat in women. Transmembrane transport (CD36) and esterification into triglycerides (DGAT) may be rate-limiting steps for LBSQ FFA storage during feeding and exercise.

  6. The Effect of Pueraria Lobata/Rehmannia Glutinosa and Exercise on Fatty Acid Transporters Expression in Ovariectomized Rats Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Hae Min; Kwon, Oran; Lee, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Pueraria lobata/rehmannia glutinosa (PR) and exercise have been receiving a lot of attention from postmenopausal women, as a result of the side effects of estrogen replacement therapy. However, the effects of PR and exercise on fatty acid transporters (FATPs), which play essential role in fatty acid transport, have not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PR and aerobic exercise on FATP1, FABPpm and FAT/CD36 expression in ovariectomized rat skeletal muscles. [Methods] Sixty rats were randomly divided into 6 groups: (1)HSV; high fat diet (HFD)+sedentary+vehicle, (2)HSP; HFD+sedentary+PR, (3)HSH; HFD+sedentary+17β-estradiol, (4)HEV; HFD+exercise+vehicle, (5) HEP; HFD+exercise+PR, (6)HEH; HFD+exercise+17β-estradiol. Exercise consisted of treadmill exercise (1-4th week: 15 m/min for 30 min, 5-8th week: 18 m/min for 40 min, 5 times/week). [Results] Exercise does not alter FATP1 and FAT/CD36 gene levels in soleus and plantaris muscles. In contrast, exercise had main effect on up-regulation of FABPpm mRNA expression in both muscles. However, FABPpm level was not increased by exercise combined with treatments, indicative of no additive effects of PR or hormone on FABPpm gene expression. On the other hand, immunohistochemistry result showed that translocation of FATPs proteins to plasma membrane were higher in PR, exercise groups, and exercise combined with PR groups in both muscles. [Conclusion] These result showed that aerobic exercise and PR may help increase fat-oxidation through the induction of FABPpm, a muscle specific transporter, in OVX rat skeletal muscles. In addition, FABPpm expression is possibly regulated post-transcriptionally in exercise, or pre-translationally in PR. PMID:27757385

  7. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  8. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  9. A functional, genome-wide evaluation of liposensitive yeast identifies the "ARE2 required for viability" (ARV1) gene product as a major component of eukaryotic fatty acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, Kelly V; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B; Repa, Joyce J; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L

    2014-02-14

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the "ARE2 required for viability" (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease.

  10. A Functional, Genome-wide Evaluation of Liposensitive Yeast Identifies the “ARE2 Required for Viability” (ARV1) Gene Product as a Major Component of Eukaryotic Fatty Acid Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Ruggles, Kelly V.; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S.; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A.; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Repa, Joyce J.; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the “ARE2 required for viability” (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease. PMID:24273168

  11. Cilostazol induces mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhu, Liping; Sui, Shaohua; Sun, Caixia; Jiang, Haiping; Ren, Donghui

    2014-05-01

    Cilostazol is a drug licensed for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Its main action is to elevate intracellular levels of cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by inhibiting the activity of type III phosphodiesterase, a cAMP-degrading enzyme. The effects of cilostazol on fatty acid oxidation (FAO) are as yet unknown. In this study, we report that cilostazol can elevate complete FAO and decrease both triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and TAG secretion. This use of cilostazol treatment increases expression of PGC-1α and, subsequently, its target genes, such as ERRα, NOR1, CD36, CPT1, MCAD, and ACO. Expression of these factors is linked to fatty acid β-oxidation but this effect is inhibited by H-89, a specific inhibitor of the PKA/CREB pathway. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α using siRNA abolished the effects of cilostazol in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and TAG metabolism. These findings suggested that the PKA/CREB/PGC-1α pathway plays a critical role in cilostazol-induced fatty acid oxidation and TAG metabolism.

  12. Circulating insulin stimulates fatty acid retention in white adipose tissue via KATP channel activation in the central nervous system only in insulin-sensitive mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Coomans, Claudia P.; Geerling, Janine J.; Guigas, Bruno; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Ouwens, D. Margriet; Pijl, Hanno; Voshol, Peter J.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Havekes, Louis M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is required for the inhibitory effect of insulin on glucose production. Our aim was to determine whether the CNS is also involved in the stimulatory effect of circulating insulin on the tissue-specific retention of fatty acid (FA) from plasma. In wild-type mice, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions stimulated the retention of both plasma triglyceride-derived FA and plasma albumin-bound FA in the various white adipose tissues (WAT) but not in other tissues, including brown adipose tissue (BAT). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin induced a similar pattern of tissue-specific FA partitioning. This effect of ICV insulin administration was not associated with activation of the insulin signaling pathway in adipose tissue. ICV administration of tolbutamide, a KATP channel blocker, considerably reduced (during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions) and even completely blocked (during ICV administration of insulin) WAT-specific retention of FA from plasma. This central effect of insulin was absent in CD36-deficient mice, indicating that CD36 is the predominant FA transporter in insulin-stimulated FA retention by WAT. In diet-induced insulin-resistant mice, these stimulating effects of insulin (circulating or ICV administered) on FA retention in WAT were lost. In conclusion, in insulin-sensitive mice, circulating insulin stimulates tissue-specific partitioning of plasma-derived FA in WAT in part through activation of KATP channels in the CNS. Apparently, circulating insulin stimulates fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in BAT, directly and indirectly through the CNS. PMID:21700834

  13. Detection of atherosclerotic lesions and intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current approaches to the diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis cannot target to lesion-determinant cells in the artery wall. Intimal macrophage infiltration promotes atherosclerotic lesion development by facilitating the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and increasing in...

  14. Ruminant and industrial trans-fatty acid uptake in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Riya; LaVallee, Renee; Maddaford, Thane G; Devaney, Brittany; Bassett, Chantal M C; Edel, Andrea L; Pierce, Grant N

    2016-05-01

    Dietary trans-fats are strongly associated with heart disease. However, the capacity for the tissues of the body, and specifically the heart, to take up trans-fats is unknown. It is also unknown if different trans-fats have different uptake capacities in the heart and other tissues of the body. Diets of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were supplemented for 14weeks with foods that contained 1.5% of the trans-fat elaidic acid or vaccenic acid. Tissues were extracted and frozen in liquid nitrogen, and then lipids were analyzed by gas chromatography for fatty acid content. Isolated cardiomyocytes were also exposed to elaidic or vaccenic acid in cell culture media for 24h. Dietary supplementation with vaccenic or elaidic acid resulted in a 20-fold higher accumulation of these TFAs in fat deposits in the body in comparison to liver. Liver tissue accumulated about twice as much per gram tissue as heart. Similar quantities of both elaidic acid and vaccenic acid were taken up by the tissues. Isolated cardiomyocytes exhibited an unusually large uptake of trans-fat, and this was dependent upon both the concentration and duration of exposure to the trans-fats but not upon the type of trans-fat. Expression levels of CD36 and FATP4 were not significantly changed during dietary interventions or exposure of cells to trans-fats. We conclude that fat, liver and heart (including cardiomyocytes) are all capable of accumulating trans-fat in response to dietary supplementation without changes in fatty acid transport protein expression.

  15. Ruminant and industrial trans-fatty acid uptake in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Riya; LaVallee, Renee; Maddaford, Thane G; Devaney, Brittany; Bassett, Chantal M C; Edel, Andrea L; Pierce, Grant N

    2016-05-01

    Dietary trans-fats are strongly associated with heart disease. However, the capacity for the tissues of the body, and specifically the heart, to take up trans-fats is unknown. It is also unknown if different trans-fats have different uptake capacities in the heart and other tissues of the body. Diets of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were supplemented for 14weeks with foods that contained 1.5% of the trans-fat elaidic acid or vaccenic acid. Tissues were extracted and frozen in liquid nitrogen, and then lipids were analyzed by gas chromatography for fatty acid content. Isolated cardiomyocytes were also exposed to elaidic or vaccenic acid in cell culture media for 24h. Dietary supplementation with vaccenic or elaidic acid resulted in a 20-fold higher accumulation of these TFAs in fat deposits in the body in comparison to liver. Liver tissue accumulated about twice as much per gram tissue as heart. Similar quantities of both elaidic acid and vaccenic acid were taken up by the tissues. Isolated cardiomyocytes exhibited an unusually large uptake of trans-fat, and this was dependent upon both the concentration and duration of exposure to the trans-fats but not upon the type of trans-fat. Expression levels of CD36 and FATP4 were not significantly changed during dietary interventions or exposure of cells to trans-fats. We conclude that fat, liver and heart (including cardiomyocytes) are all capable of accumulating trans-fat in response to dietary supplementation without changes in fatty acid transport protein expression. PMID:27133424

  16. Linoleic acid permeabilizes gastric epithelial cells by increasing connexin 43 levels in the cell membrane via a GPR40- and Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Salas, Daniela P; Delgado-López, Fernando; Lampe, Paul D; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is known to activate G-protein coupled receptors and connexin hemichannels (Cx HCs) but possible interlinks between these two responses remain unexplored. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of action of LA on the membrane permeability mediated by Cx HCs in MKN28 cells. These cells were found to express connexins, GPR40, GPR120, and CD36 receptors. The Cx HC activity of these cells increased after 5 min of treatment with LA or GW9508, an agonist of GPR40/GPR120; or exposure to extracellular divalent cation-free solution (DCFS), known to increase the open probability of Cx HCs, yields an immediate increase in Cx HC activity of similar intensity and additive with LA-induced change. Treatment with a CD36 blocker or transfection with siRNA-GPR120 maintains the LA-induced Cx HC activity. However, cells transfected with siRNA-GPR40 did not show LA-induced Cx HC activity but activity was increased upon exposure to DCFS, confirming the presence of activatable Cx HCs in the cell membrane. Treatment with AKTi (Akt inhibitor) abrogated the LA-induced Cx HC activity. In HeLa cells transfected with Cx43 (HeLa-Cx43), LA induced phosphorylation of surface Cx43 at serine 373 (S373), site for Akt phosphorylation. HeLa-Cx43 but not HeLa-Cx43 cells with a S373A mutation showed a LA-induced Cx HC activity directly related to an increase in cell surface Cx43 levels. Thus, the increase in membrane permeability induced by LA is mediated by an intracellular signaling pathway activated by GPR40 that leads to an increase in membrane levels of Cx43 phosphorylated at serine 373 via Akt.

  17. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD) Extension Study for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Triheptanoin Studies.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase (CPT I or CPT II) Deficiency; Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Long-chain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency; Carnitine-acylcarnitine Translocase (CACT) Deficiency

  19. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  1. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acids are: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan , and valine. Nonessential amino acids "Nonessential" means that our bodies produce an amino ...

  2. Fatty acid binding protein 7 regulates phagocytosis and cytokine production in Kupffer cells during liver injury.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hirofumi; Sawada, Tomoo; Kiyohira, Miwa; Yu, Zhiqian; Nakamura, Keiji; Yasumoto, Yuki; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Ebrahimi, Majid; Islam, Ariful; Sharifi, Kazem; Kawamura, Saki; Kodama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Yui; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Nobuko; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao; Ishikawa, Toshizo; Owada, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are involved in the progression of liver diseases such as hepatitis and liver cancer. Several members of the fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are expressed by tissue macrophages, and FABP7 is localized only in KCs. To clarify the role of FABP7 in the regulation of KC function, we evaluated pathological changes of Fabp7 knockout mice during carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. During liver injury in Fabp7 knockout mice, serum liver enzymes were increased, cytokine expression (tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-β) was decreased in the liver, and the number of KCs in the liver necrotic area was significantly decreased. Interestingly, in the FABP7-deficient KCs, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was impaired, and expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was markedly decreased. In chronic liver injury, Fabp7 knockout mice showed less fibrogenic response to carbon tetrachloride compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, FABP7 is involved in the liver injury process through its regulation of KC phagocytic activity and cytokine production. Such modulation of KC function by FABP7 may provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver diseases.

  3. Apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of all-trans retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, Monica; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Alana, Lide; Vinas, Octavi; Mampel, Teresa . E-mail: tmampel@ub.edu

    2006-06-10

    We examined the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) in HeLa cells. Our results demonstrated that HeLa cells were more sensitive to the anti-proliferative effects of atRA than to its apoptotic effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that caspase inhibition attenuates cell death but does not alter the atRA-dependent reduction in cell proliferation, which suggests that atRA-induced apoptosis is independent of the arrest in cell proliferation. To check whether ANT proteins mediated these atRA effects, we transiently transfected cells with expression vectors encoding for individual ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase 1-3). Our results revealed that ANT1 and ANT3 over-expressing HeLa cells increased their atRA sensitivity. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the different functional activities of ANT isoforms, but also contribute to a better understanding of the properties of atRA as an anti-tumoral agent used in cancer therapy.

  4. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  5. Thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP) promotes the synthesis of medium-chain fatty acids in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, D W; Luo, J; He, Q Y; Wu, M; Shi, H B; Wang, H; Wang, M; Xu, H F; Loor, J J

    2016-04-01

    In nonruminants, thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP) is a crucial protein for cellular de novo lipogenesis. However, the role of THRSP in regulating the synthesis of milk fatty acid composition in goat mammary gland remains unknown. In the present study, we compared gene expression of THRSP among different goat tissues. Results revealed that THRSP had the highest expression in subcutaneous fat, and expression was higher during lactation compared with the dry period. Overexpression of THRSP upregulated the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2), and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM) in goat mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, overexpression of THRSP led to downregulation of thrombospondin receptor (CD36) and had no effect on the expression of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α (ACACA) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor1 (SREBF1). In addition, overexpressing THRSP in vitro resulted in a significant increase in triacylglycerol (TAG) concentration and the concentrations of C12:0 and C14:0. Taken together, these results highlight an important role of THRSP in regulating lipogenesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26851858

  6. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  7. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report has four parts: they discuss acid rain in relation to acid soils, agriculture, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Among findings: modern sources of acid deposition from the atmosphere for all the acid soils in the world, nor even chiefly responsible for those of northern U.S. Agriculture has its problems, but acid precipitation is probably not one of them. More research is needed to determine to what extent acid precipitation is responsible for forest declines and for smaller detrimental effects on forest growth where no damage to the foliage is evident. Many lakes and streams are extremely sensitive to added acids.

  8. Curcumin induces changes in expression of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Dieter; Koerting, Ramona; Nass, Norbert

    2007-02-01

    Curcuminoids, the yellow pigments of curcuma, exhibit anticarcinogenic, antioxidative and hypocholesterolemic activities. To understand the molecular basis for the hypocholesterolemic effects, we examined the effects of curcumin on hepatic gene expression, using the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 as a model system. Curcumin treatment caused an up to sevenfold, concentration-dependent increase in LDL-receptor mRNA, whereas mRNAs of the genes encoding the sterol biosynthetic enzymes HMG CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase were only slightly increased at high curcumin concentrations where cell viability was reduced. Expression of the regulatory SREBP genes was moderately increased, whereas mRNAs of the PPARalpha target genes CD36/fatty acid translocase and fatty acid binding protein 1 were down-regulated. LXRalpha expression and accumulation of mRNA of the LXRalpha target gene ABCg1 were increased at low curcumin concentrations. Although curcumin strongly inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity, an activation of a retinoic acid response element reporter employing secreted alkaline phosphatase was observed. These changes in gene expression are consistent with the proposed hypocholesterolemic effect of curcumin.

  9. Medium-chain fatty acid reduces lipid accumulation by regulating expression of lipid-sensing genes in human liver cells with steatosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baogui; Fu, Jing; Li, Lumin; Gong, Deming; Wen, Xuefang; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Zheling

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of lipids in the liver can lead to cell dysfunction and steatosis, an important factor in pathogenesis causing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The mechanisms related to lipid deposition in the liver, however, remain poorly understood. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) on the lipolysis and expression of lipid-sensing genes in human liver cells with steatosis. A cellular steatosis model, which is suitable to experimentally investigate the impact of fat accumulation in the liver, was established in human normal liver cells (LO2 cells) with a mixture of free fatty acids (oleate/palmitate, 2:1) at 200 μm for 24 h incubation. MCFA was found to down-regulate expression of liver X receptor-α, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, CD 36 and lipoprotein lipase in this cellular model, and have positive effects on adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. These results suggest that MCFA may reduce lipid accumulation by regulating key lipid-sensing genes in human liver cells with steatosis. PMID:26932533

  10. Magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol prevents the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling and the cardiac pathogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  11. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  12. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  13. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  14. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  15. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  16. Clay ingestion enhances intestinal triacylglycerol hydrolysis and non-esterified fatty acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Habold, Caroline; Reichardt, François; Le Maho, Yvon; Angel, Fabielle; Liewig, Nicole; Lignot, Jean-Hervé; Oudart, Hugues

    2009-07-01

    Consumption by animals and humans of earthy materials such as clay is often related to gut pathologies. Our aim was to determine the impact of kaolinite ingestion on glucose and NEFA transport through the intestinal mucosa. The expression of hexose transporters (Na/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1), GLUT2, GLUT5) and of proteins involved in NEFA absorption (fatty acid transporter/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4) and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP)) was measured (1) in rats whose jejunum was perfused with a solution of kaolinite, and (2) in rats who ate spontaneously kaolinite pellets during 7 and 28 d. Also, we determined TAG and glucose absorption in the kaolinite-perfused group, and pancreatic lipase activity, gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats orally administered with kaolinite. Glucose absorption was not affected by kaolinite perfusion or ingestion. However, kaolinite induced a significant increase in intestinal TAG hydrolysis and NEFA absorption. The cytoplasmic expression of L-FABP and FATP4 also increased due to kaolinite ingestion. NEFA may enter the enterocytes via endocytosis mainly since expression of NEFA transporters in the brush-border membrane was not affected by kaolinite. After uptake, rapid binding of NEFA by L-FABP and FATP4 could act as an intracellular NEFA buffer to prevent NEFA efflux. Increased TAG hydrolysis and NEFA absorption may be due to the adsorption properties of clay and also because kaolinite ingestion caused a slowing down of gastric emptying and intestinal transit.

  17. Testosterone Replacement Modulates Cardiac Metabolic Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction by Upregulating PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of testosterone as a metabolic hormone, its effects on myocardial metabolism in the ischemic heart remain unclear. Myocardial ischemia leads to metabolic remodeling, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and cardiac dysfunction. In the present study, the effects of testosterone replacement on the ischemic heart were assessed in a castrated rat myocardial infarction model established by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery 2 weeks after castration. The results of real-time PCR and Western blot analyses showed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) decreased in the ischemic myocardium of castrated rats, compared with the sham-castration group, and the mRNA expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism (the fatty acid translocase CD36, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and glucose transporter-4 also decreased. A decline in ATP levels in the castrated rats was accompanied by increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrosis and impaired cardiac function, compared with the sham-castration group, and these detrimental effects were reversed by testosterone replacement. Taken together, our findings suggest that testosterone can modulate myocardial metabolic remodeling by upregulating PPARα after myocardial infarction, exerting a protective effect on cardiac function. PMID:27413362

  18. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  19. Leptin and insulin modulate nutrient partitioning and weight loss in ob/ob mice through regulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake by adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinqing; Bradbury, Michael W; Berk, Paul D

    2003-09-01

    Leptin treatment of ob/ob mice leads to weight loss appreciably greater than that in pair-fed mice. To test whether this "extra" weight loss is mediated by leptin-induced alterations in nutrient partitioning, the effects in ob/ob mice of subcutaneous leptin infusion (500 ng/h for acid uptake and transporter gene expression were examined. Mice were initially hyperinsulinemic (5.25 +/- 1.57 nmol/L). Plasma insulin decreased by 55 +/- 10% within 8 h of leptin infusion, declining progressively to normal by d 14. The V(max) for saturable adipocyte fatty acid uptake fell from 31.1 +/- 5.6 to 25.2 +/- 4.0 pmol/(s. 50000 cells) (P < 0.05) by 24 h, and to a normal rate (8.0 +/- 0.8 pmol/(s. 50000 cells) by d 21 (P > 0.5 vs. normal C57BL/6J controls). Adipocyte mRNA levels for plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein and fatty acid translocase, putative fatty acid transporters that are up-regulated three- to fourfold in adipocytes from ob/ob mice, had also normalized by d 21. The initial changes in V(max) preceded decreases in food intake and body weight by at least 24 h. In pair-fed mice, insulin levels, V(max) and body weight all declined more slowly than in leptin-treated mice, and all remained significantly elevated compared with normal values at d 21. The data suggest that insulin up-regulates and leptin down-regulates adipocyte fatty acid uptake, leading to alterations in fatty acid partitioning that affect adiposity.

  20. Abolition of mitochondrial substrate-level phosphorylation by itaconic acid produced by LPS-induced Irg1 expression in cells of murine macrophage lineage.

    PubMed

    Németh, Beáta; Doczi, Judit; Csete, Dániel; Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Adams, Daniel; Kiss, Gergely; Nagy, Adam M; Horvath, Gergo; Tretter, Laszlo; Mócsai, Attila; Csépányi-Kömi, Roland; Iordanov, Iordan; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Itaconate is a nonamino organic acid exhibiting antimicrobial effects. It has been recently identified in cells of macrophage lineage as a product of an enzyme encoded by immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1), acting on the citric acid cycle intermediate cis-aconitate. In mitochondria, itaconate can be converted by succinate-coenzyme A (CoA) ligase to itaconyl-CoA at the expense of ATP (or GTP), and is also a weak competitive inhibitor of complex II. Here, we investigated specific bioenergetic effects of increased itaconate production mediated by LPS-induced stimulation of Irg1 in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and RAW-264.7 cells. In rotenone-treated macrophage cells, stimulation by LPS led to impairment in substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) of in situ mitochondria, deduced by a reversal in the directionality of the adenine nucleotide translocase operation. In RAW-264.7 cells, the LPS-induced impairment in SLP was reversed by short-interfering RNA(siRNA)-but not scrambled siRNA-treatment directed against Irg1. LPS dose-dependently inhibited oxygen consumption rates (61-91%) and elevated glycolysis rates (>21%) in BMDM but not RAW-264.7 cells, studied under various metabolic conditions. In isolated mouse liver mitochondria treated with rotenone, itaconate dose-dependently (0.5-2 mM) reversed the operation of adenine nucleotide translocase, implying impairment in SLP, an effect that was partially mimicked by malonate. However, malonate yielded greater ADP-induced depolarizations (3-19%) than itaconate. We postulate that itaconate abolishes SLP due to 1) a "CoA trap" in the form of itaconyl-CoA that negatively affects the upstream supply of succinyl-CoA from the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; 2) depletion of ATP (or GTP), which are required for the thioesterification by succinate-CoA ligase; and 3) inhibition of complex II leading to a buildup of succinate which shifts succinate-CoA ligase equilibrium toward ATP (or GTP) utilization. Our results

  1. Plastids contain a second sec translocase system with essential functions.

    PubMed

    Skalitzky, Courtney A; Martin, Jonathan R; Harwood, Jessica H; Beirne, John J; Adamczyk, Benjamin J; Heck, Gregory R; Cline, Kenneth; Fernandez, Donna E

    2011-01-01

    Proteins that are synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes but function within plastids must be imported and then targeted to one of six plastid locations. Although multiple systems that target proteins to the thylakoid membranes or thylakoid lumen have been identified, a system that can direct the integration of inner envelope membrane proteins from the stroma has not been previously described. Genetics and localization studies were used to show that plastids contain two different Sec systems with distinct functions. Loss-of-function mutations in components of the previously described thylakoid-localized Sec system, designated as SCY1 (At2g18710), SECA1 (At4g01800), and SECE1 (At4g14870) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), result in albino seedlings and sucrose-dependent heterotrophic growth. Loss-of-function mutations in components of the second Sec system, designated as SCY2 (At2g31530) and SECA2 (At1g21650) in Arabidopsis, result in arrest at the globular stage and embryo lethality. Promoter-swap experiments provided evidence that SCY1 and SCY2 are functionally nonredundant and perform different roles in the cell. Finally, chloroplast import and fractionation assays and immunogold localization of SCY2-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in root tissues indicated that SCY2 is part of an envelope-localized Sec system. Our data suggest that SCY2 and SECA2 function in Sec-mediated integration and translocation processes at the inner envelope membrane. PMID:21051552

  2. The Structure of LepA, the Ribosomal Back Translocase

    SciTech Connect

    Evans,R.; Blaha, G.; Bailey, S.; Steitz, T.

    2008-01-01

    LepA is a highly conserved elongation factor that promotes the back translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome during the elongation cycle. We have determined the crystal structure of LepA from Escherichia coli at 2.8- Angstroms resolution. The high degree of sequence identity between LepA and EF-G is reflected in the structural similarity between the individual homologous domains of LepA and EF-G. However, the orientation of domains III and V in LepA differs from their orientations in EF-G. LepA also contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) not found in EF-G that has a previously unobserved protein fold. The high structural similarity between LepA and EF-G enabled us to derive a homology model for LepA bound to the ribosome using a 7.3- Angstroms cryo-EM structure of a complex between EF-G and the 70S ribosome. In this model, the very electrostatically positive CTD of LepA is placed in the direct vicinity of the A site of the large ribosomal subunit, suggesting a possible interaction between the CTD and the back translocated tRNA or 23S rRNA.

  3. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as soybeans, garbanzo beans, and lentils Peanuts, almonds, walnuts, and flaxseeds Animal ...

  4. Glycyrrhetinic acid as inhibitor or amplifier of permeability transition in rat heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Valentina; Brunati, Anna Maria; Fiore, Cristina; Rossi, Carlo Alberto; Salvi, Mauro; Tibaldi, Elena; Palermo, Mario; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GE), a hydrolysis product of glycyrrhizic acid, one of the main constituents of licorice root, is able, depending on its concentration, to prevent or to induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) (a phenomenon related to oxidative stress) in rat heart mitochondria (RHM). In RHM, below a threshold concentration of 7.5 microM, GE prevents oxidative stress and MPT induced by supraphysiological Ca2+ concentrations. Above this concentration, GE induces oxidative stress by interacting with a Fe-S centre of Complex I, thus producing ROS, and amplifies the opening of the transition pore, once again induced by Ca2+. GE also inhibits Ca2+ transport in RHM, thereby preventing the oxidative stress induced by the cation. However, the reduced amount of Ca2+ transported in the matrix is sufficient to predispose adenine nucleotide translocase for pore opening. Comparisons between observed results and the effects of GE in rat liver mitochondria (RLM), in which the drug induces only MPT without exhibiting any protective effect, confirm that it interacts in a different way with RHM, suggesting tissue specificity for its action. The concentration dependence of the opposite effects of GE, in RHM but not RLM, is most probably due to the existence of a different, more complex, pathway by means of which GE reaches its target. It follows that high GE concentrations are necessary to stimulate the oxidative stress capable of inducing MPT, because of the above effect, which prevents the interaction of low concentrations of GE with the Fe-S centre. The reported results also explain the mechanism of apoptosis induction by GE in cardiomyocytes. PMID:17980701

  5. Usnic acid.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K

    2002-12-01

    Since its first isolation in 1844, usnic acid [2,6-diacetyl-7,9-dihydroxy-8,9b-dimethyl-1,3(2H,9bH)-dibenzo-furandione] has become the most extensively studied lichen metabolite and one of the few that is commercially available. Usnic acid is uniquely found in lichens, and is especially abundant in genera such as Alectoria, Cladonia, Usnea, Lecanora, Ramalina and Evernia. Many lichens and extracts containing usnic acid have been utilized for medicinal, perfumery, cosmetic as well as ecological applications. Usnic acid as a pure substance has been formulated in creams, toothpaste, mouthwash, deodorants and sunscreen products, in some cases as an active principle, in others as a preservative. In addition to antimicrobial activity against human and plant pathogens, usnic acid has been shown to exhibit antiviral, antiprotozoal, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. Ecological effects, such as antigrowth, antiherbivore and anti-insect properties, have also been demonstrated. A difference in biological activity has in some cases been observed between the two enantiomeric forms of usnic acid. Recently health food supplements containing usnic acid have been promoted for use in weight reduction, with little scientific support. The emphasis of the current review is on the chemistry and biological activity of usnic acid and its derivatives in addition to rational and ecologically acceptable methods for provision of this natural compound on a large scale.

  6. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  7. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  8. How Acidic Is Carbonic Acid?

    PubMed

    Pines, Dina; Ditkovich, Julia; Mukra, Tzach; Miller, Yifat; Kiefer, Philip M; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Hynes, James T; Pines, Ehud

    2016-03-10

    Carbonic, lactic, and pyruvic acids have been generated in aqueous solution by the transient protonation of their corresponding conjugate bases by a tailor-made photoacid, the 6-hydroxy-1-sulfonate pyrene sodium salt molecule. A particular goal is to establish the pK(a) of carbonic acid H2CO3. The on-contact proton transfer (PT) reaction rate from the optically excited photoacid to the carboxylic bases was derived, with unprecedented precision, from time-correlated single-photon-counting measurements of the fluorescence lifetime of the photoacid in the presence of the proton acceptors. The time-dependent diffusion-assisted PT rate was analyzed using the Szabo-Collins-Kimball equation with a radiation boundary condition. The on-contact PT rates were found to follow the acidity order of the carboxylic acids: the stronger was the acid, the slower was the PT reaction to its conjugate base. The pK(a) of carbonic acid was found to be 3.49 ± 0.05 using both the Marcus and Kiefer-Hynes free energy correlations. This establishes H2CO3 as being 0.37 pK(a) units stronger and about 1 pK(a) unit weaker, respectively, than the physiologically important lactic and pyruvic acids. The considerable acid strength of intact carbonic acid indicates that it is an important protonation agent under physiological conditions. PMID:26862781

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  10. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  11. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The acid rain problem in the northeastern U.S. has been growing in severity and geographical areas affected. Acid rain has damaged, or will result in damage to visibility, physical structures and materials, aquatic life, timber, crops, and soils. The principal causes of acid rain in the northeastern U.S. are sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from large power plants and smelters in the Ohio River Valley. Immediate corrective action and appropriate research are needed to reduce acid precipitation. Short-term programs that will define the rate of environmental deterioration, remaining environmental capacity to resist sudden deterioration, mechanisms of acid rain formation, and costs of various control options must be developed. (3 maps, 13 references, 1 table)

  12. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  13. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  14. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  15. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  16. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  17. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  18. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, substrate transporter translocation, and metabolism in the contracting hyperthyroid rat heart.

    PubMed

    Heather, Lisa C; Cole, Mark A; Atherton, Helen J; Coumans, Will A; Evans, Rhys D; Tyler, Damian J; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Clarke, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones can modify cardiac metabolism via multiple molecular mechanisms, yet their integrated effect on overall substrate metabolism is poorly understood. Here we determined the effect of hyperthyroidism on substrate metabolism in the isolated, perfused, contracting rat heart. Male Wistar rats were injected for 7 d with T(3) (0.2 mg/kg x d ip). Plasma free fatty acids increased by 97%, heart weights increased by 33%, and cardiac rate pressure product, an indicator of contractile function, increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic rates and lactate efflux rates were increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rat hearts, mediated by an increased insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. This was accompanied by a 70% increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and a 100% increase in phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, confirming downstream signaling from AMPK. Fatty acid oxidation rates increased in direct proportion to the increased heart weight and rate pressure product in the hyperthyroid heart, mediated by synchronized changes in mitochondrial enzymes and respiration. Protein levels of the fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), were reduced by 24% but were accompanied by a 19% increase in the sarcolemmal content of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). Thus, the relationship between fatty acid metabolism, cardiac mass, and contractile function was maintained in the hyperthyroid heart, associated with a sarcolemmal reorganization of fatty acid transporters. The combined effects of T(3)-induced AMPK activation and insulin stimulation were associated with increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 localization and glycolytic flux in the hyperthyroid heart. PMID:19940039

  19. Altered Fatty Acid Metabolism-Related Gene Expression in Liver from Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Porras, José Antonio; Aragonès, Gemma; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis and the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to evaluate gene expression of different fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes in morbidly obese (MO) women with NAFLD. Liver expression of key genes related to de novo FA synthesis (LXRα, SREBP1c, ACC1, FAS), FA uptake and transport (PPARγ, CD36, FABP4), FA oxidation (PPARα), and inflammation (IL6, TNFα, CRP, PPARδ) were assessed by RT-qPCR in 127 MO women with normal liver histology (NL, n = 13), simple steatosis (SS, n = 47) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 67). Liver FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MO NAFLD women with both SS and NASH compared to those with NL (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, respectively). Hepatic IL6 and TNFα mRNA expression was higher in NASH than in SS subjects (p = 0.033, p = 0.050, respectively). Interestingly, LXRα, ACC1 and FAS expression had an inverse relation with the grade of steatosis. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. In conclusion, our results indicate that lipogenesis seems to be downregulated in advanced stages of SS, suggesting that, in this type of extreme obesity, the deregulation of the lipogenic pathway might be associated with the severity of steatosis. PMID:25474087

  20. Dietary sunflower oil modulates milk fatty acid composition without major changes in adipose and mammary tissue fatty acid profile or related gene mRNA abundance in sheep.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carrera, T; Frutos, P; Leroux, C; Chilliard, Y; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bernard, L; Toral, P G

    2015-04-01

    There are very few studies in ruminants characterizing mammary and adipose tissue (AT) expression of genes and gene networks for diets causing variations in milk fatty acid (FA) composition without altering milk fat secretion, and even less complementing this information with data on tissue FA profiles. This work was conducted in sheep in order to investigate the response of the mammary gland and the subcutaneous and perirenal AT, in terms of FA profile and mRNA abundance of genes involved in lipid metabolism, to a diet known to modify milk FA composition. Ten lactating Assaf ewes were randomly assigned to two treatments consisting of a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (60 : 40) supplemented with 0 (control diet) or 25 (SO diet) g of sunflower oil/kg of diet dry matter for 7 weeks. Milk composition, including FA profile, was analysed after 48 days on treatments. On day 49, the animals were euthanized and tissue samples were collected to analyse FA and mRNA abundance of 16 candidate genes. Feeding SO did not affect animal performance but modified milk FA composition. Major changes included decreases in the concentration of FA derived from de novo synthesis (e.g. 12:0, 14:0 and 16:0) and increases in that of long-chain FA (e.g. 18:0, c9-18:1, trans-18:1 isomers and c9,t11-CLA); however, they were not accompanied by significant variations in the mRNA abundance of the studied lipogenic genes (i.e. ACACA, FASN, LPL, CD36, FABP3, SCD1 and SCD5) and transcription factors (SREBF1 and PPARG), or in the constituent FA of mammary tissue. Regarding the FA composition of AT, the little influence of SO did not appear to be linked to changes in gene mRNA abundance (decreases of GPAM and SREBF1 in both tissues, and of PPARG in the subcutaneous depot). Similarly, the great variation between AT (higher contents of saturated FA and trans-18:1 isomers in the perirenal, and of cis-18:1, c9,t11-CLA and n-3 PUFA in the subcutaneous AT) could not be related to

  1. Chlorogenic Acid Improves High Fat Diet-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chlorogenic acid (CGA), the most abundant component in coffee, has exhibited many biological activities. The objective of this study is to assess preventive and therapeutic effects of CGA on obesity and obesity-related liver steatosis and insulin resistance. Methods Two sets of experiments were conducted. In set 1, 6-week old C57BL/6 mice were fed a regular chow or high-fat diet (HFD) for 15 weeks with twice intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of CGA (100 mg/kg) or DMSO (carrier solution) per week. In set 2, obese mice (average 50 g) were treated by CGA (100 mg/kg, IP, twice weekly) or DMSO for 6 weeks. Body weight, body composition and food intake were monitored. Blood glucose, insulin and lipid levels were measured at end of the study. Hepatic lipid accumulation and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Additionally, genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation were analyzed by real time PCR. Results CGA significantly blocked the development of diet-induced obesity but did not affect body weight in obese mice. CGA treatment curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Quantitative PCR analysis shows that CGA treatment suppressed hepatic expression Pparγ, Cd36, Fabp4, and Mgat1 gene. CGA treatment also attenuated inflammation in the liver and white adipose tissue accompanied by a decrease in mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and Tnfa, Mcp-1 and Ccr2 encoding inflammatory proteins. Conclusion Our study provides direct evidence in support of CGA as a potent compound in preventing diet-induced obesity and obesity-related metabolic syndrome. Our results suggest that drinking coffee is beneficial in maintaining metabolic homeostasis when on a high fat diet. PMID:25248334

  2. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  3. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  4. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  5. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  6. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  7. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  8. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  9. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  10. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  11. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  12. [Hyaluronic acid].

    PubMed

    Pomarede, N

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronic Acid (HA) is now a leader product in esthetic procedures for the treatment of wrinkles and volumes. The structure of HA, its metabolism, its physiological function are foremost breaking down then its use in aesthetic dermatology: steps of injection, possible side effects, benefits and downsides of the use of HA in aesthetic dermatology.

  13. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  14. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and accumulation of lipid droplets in U937-1 cells incubated with eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Finstad, H S; Drevon, C A; Kulseth, M A; Synstad, A V; Knudsen, E; Kolset, S O

    1998-01-01

    The monocytic cell line U937-1 was cultured in the presence of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5, n-3) (EPA) or oleic acid (18:1, n-9) (OA). EPA caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas OA had no effect. At the highest EPA concentrations, 120 and 240 microM, inhibition of cell proliferation was accompanied by initiation of apoptosis. A concentration of 60 microM EPA caused a 35% reduction in cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis, and was therefore used for further studies. Addition of antioxidants or inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis had no influence on the reduced cell proliferation after EPA treatment. The inhibition required continuous presence of EPA in the incubation medium as the cells resumed a normal proliferation rate when they were placed in EPA-free medium. The inhibition of proliferation was not accompanied by differentiation into macrophage-like cells, as expression of serglycin and the ability to perform respiratory burst was unaffected by EPA. Expression of CD23 mRNA increased when the cells were incubated with EPA, but to a smaller extent than after retinoic acid (RA) or PMA treatment. Furthermore, expression of the monocytic differentiation markers CD36 and CD68 was lower in cells treated with EPA or OA when compared with untreated cells. The cell cycle distribution of U937-1 cells was similar in cells incubated with EPA or PMA, whereas RA-treated cells accumulated in the G1 phase. Side scatter increased in cells incubated with EPA and OA, which was ascribed to an accumulation of lipid droplets after examination of the cells by electron microscopy. The number of droplets per cell was higher in cells exposed to EPA than OA. The cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) increased 5.5- and 15.5-fold after incubation with OA and EPA respectively. No difference in the cellular content of cholesterol compared with untreated cells was observed. The TAG fraction in EPA-treated cells contained high amounts of EPA and docosapentaenoic acid

  15. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  16. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  17. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  18. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ravacci, Graziela Rosa; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Tortelli, Tharcisio Citrângulo; Torrinhas, Raquel Suzana M. M.; Santos, Jéssica Reis; Logullo, Angela Flávia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic genes involved in uptake (CD36), transport (FABP4), and storage (DGAT) of exogenous fatty acids (FA), as well as increased activation of “de novo” FA synthesis (FASN). We further investigate whether this lipogenesis reprogramming might be regulated by mTOR/PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway markers, p70S6 K1, SREBP1, and LIPIN1, as well as an increase in DEPTOR expression (the main inhibitor of the mTOR) was detected in HB4aC5.2. Based on these results, a PPARγ selective antagonist, GW9662, was used to treat both cells lines, and the lipogenic genes remained overexpressed in the HB4aC5.2 but not HB4a cells. DHA treatment inhibited all lipogenic genes (except for FABP4) in both cell lines yet only induced death in the HB4aC5.2 cells, mainly when associated with trastuzumab. Neither trastuzumab nor GW9662 alone was able to induce cell death. In conclusion, oncogenic transformation of breast cells by HER2 overexpression may require a reprogramming of lipogenic genetic that is independent of mTORC1 pathway and PPARγ activity. This reprogramming was inhibited by DHA. PMID:26640797

  19. Postprandial lysophospholipid suppresses hepatic fatty acid oxidation: the molecular link between group 1B phospholipase A2 and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Eric D.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Cash, James G.; Kuhel, David G.; Roja, Juan C.; Magness, Daniel P.; Jandacek, Ronald J.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hui, David Y.

    2010-01-01

    Decrease in fat catabolic rate on consuming a high-fat diet contributes to diet-induced obesity. This study used group 1B phospholipase A2 (Pla2g1b)-deficient mice, which are resistant to hyperglycemia, to test the hypothesis that Pla2g1b and its lipolytic product lysophospholipid suppress hepatic fat utilization and energy metabolism in promoting diet-induced obesity. The metabolic consequences of hypercaloric diet, including body weight gain, energy expenditure, and fatty acid oxidation, were compared between Pla2g1b+/+ and Pla2g1b−/− mice. The Pla2g1b−/− mice displayed normal energy balance when fed chow, but were resistant to obesity when challenged with a hypercaloric diet. Obesity resistance in Pla2g1b−/− mice is due to their ability to maintain elevated energy expenditure and core body temperature when subjected to hypercaloric diet, which was not observed in Pla2g1b+/+ mice. The Pla2g1b−/− mice also displayed increased postprandial hepatic fat utilization due to increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, PPAR-δ, PPAR-γ, cd36/Fat, and Ucp2, which coincided with reduced postprandial plasma lysophospholipid levels. Lysophospholipids produced by Pla2g1b hydrolysis suppress hepatic fat utilization and down-regulate energy expenditure, thereby preventing metabolically beneficial adaptation to a high-fat diet exposure in promoting diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.—Labonté, E. D., Pfluger, P. T., Cash, J. G., Kuhel, D. G., Rojas, J. C., Magness, D. P., Jandacek, R. J., Tschöp, M. H., Hui, D. Y. Postprandial lysophospholipid suppresses hepatic fatty acid oxidation: the molecular link between group 1B phospholipase A2 and diet-induced obesity. PMID:20215528

  20. Effect of the ratios of unsaturated fatty acids on the expressions of genes related to fat and protein in the bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, R; Yan, S M; Qi, L Z; Zhao, Y L

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the different ratios of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) (oleic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid) on the cell viability and triacylglycerol (TAG) content, as well as the mRNA expression of the genes related to lipid and protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). Primary cells were isolated from the mammary glands of Holstein dairy cows and were passaged twice. Afterward, the cells were randomly allocated to six treatments, five UFA-treated groups, and one control group. For all of the treatments, the the fetal bovine serum in the culture solution was replaced with fatty acid-free BSA (1 g/L), and the cells were treated with different ratios of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids (0.75:4:1, 1.5:10:1, 2:13.3:1, 3:20:1, and 4:26.7:1) for 48 h, which were group 1 to group 5. The control culture solution contained only fatty acid-free BSA without UFAs (0 μM). The results indicated that the cell viability was not affected by adding different ratios of UFAs, but the accumulation of TAG was significantly influenced by supplementing with different ratios of UFAs. Adding different ratios of UFAs suppressed the expression of ACACA and FASN but had the opposite effect on the abundances of FABP3 and CD36 mRNA. The expression levels of PPARG, SPEBF1, CSN1S1, and CSN3 mRNA in the BMECs were affected significantly after adding different ratios of UFAs. Our results suggested that groups 1, 2, and 3 (0.75:4:1, 1.5:10:1, and 2:13.3:1) had stronger auxo-action on fat synthesis in the BMECs, where group 3 (2:13.3:1) was the best, followed by group 4 (3:20:1). However, group 5 (4:26.7:1) was the worst. Genes related to protein synthesis in the BMECs were better promoted in groups 2 and 3, and group 3 had the strongest auxo-action, whereas the present study only partly examined the regulation of protein synthesis at the transcriptional level; more studies on translation level are needed in the future

  1. Dietary fatty acid composition changes mitochondrial phospholipids and oxidative capacities in rainbow trout red muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Kraffe, E; Bureau, W; Bureau, D P

    2008-03-01

    Dietary conditioning of juvenile trout changed the acyl chain composition of mitochondrial phospholipids and the oxidative capacities of muscle mitochondria. Trout were fed three diets differing only in fatty acid (FA) composition. The highly unsaturated 22:6 n-3 (DHA) accounted for 0.4, 14, and 30% of fatty acids in Diets 1, 2 and 3. After 10 weeks of growth, the dietary groups differed markedly in FA composition of mitochondrial phospholipids, with significant dietary effects for virtually all FA. Mean mitochondrial DHA levels were 19, 40 and 33% in trout fed Diets 1, 2 and 3. Mitochondrial oxidative capacities changed with diet, while mitochondrial concentrations of cytochromes and of the adenylate nucleotide translocase (nmol mg(1) protein) did not. Mitochondria from fish fed Diet 1 had higher non-phosphorylating (state 4) rates at 5 degrees C than those fed other diets. When phosphorylating (state 3) rates differed between dietary groups, rates at 5 and 15 degrees C were higher for fish fed the more unsaturated diets. Stepwise multiple regressions indicated that FA composition could explain much (42-70%) of the variability of state 4 rates, particularly at 5 degrees C. At 15 degrees C, FA composition explained 16-42% of the variability of states 3 and 4 rates. Similar conclusions were obtained for the complete data set (trout fed diets 1, 2 and 3) and for the data from trout achieving similar growth rates (e.g. those fed Diets 1 and 2). Neither general characteristics of membrane FA, such as % saturates, unsaturation index, n-3, n-6 or n-3/n-6 nor levels of abundant unsaturated FA such as DHA or 18:1(n-9 + n-7), were systematically correlated with mitochondrial capacities even though they differed considerably between trout fed the different diets. Relatively minor FA (20:5n-3, 20:0, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 18:0 and 15:0) showed better correlations with mitochondrial oxidative capacities. This supports the concept that acyl chain composition modulates mitochondrial

  2. Precipitation: its acidic nature.

    PubMed

    Frohliger, J O; Kane, R

    1975-08-01

    A comparison of the free hydrogen ion concentration and the total hydrogen ion concentration of rain samples shows that rain is a weak acid. The weak acid nature of rain casts doubt on the concepts that the acidity of rain is increasing and that these increases are due to strong acids such as sulfuric acid.

  3. Differential regulation of the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes with skeletal muscle type in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kimura, Sayaka; Kitashiro, Ayana; Tsuchii, Nami; Tsuchihashi, Tatsuya; Inui, Mariko; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The regulatory mechanisms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are known to differ among skeletal muscle types in mammals. For example, glycolytic muscles prefer glucose as an energy source, whereas oxidative muscles prefer fatty acids (FA). We herein demonstrated differences in the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the pectoralis major (a glycolytic twitch muscle), adductor superficialis (an oxidative twitch muscle), and adductor profound (a tonic muscle) of 14-day-old chicks. Under ad libitum feeding conditions, the mRNA levels of muscle type phosphofructokinase-1 were markedly lower in the adductor superficialis muscle, suggesting that basal glycolytic activity is very low in this type of muscle. In contrast, high mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36) in the adductor superficialis muscle suggest that FA uptake is high in this type of muscle. The mRNA levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) were significantly higher in the adductor profound muscle than in other muscles, suggesting that basal lipolytic activity is high in this type of muscle. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ and CPT1b were significantly increased in the adductor superficialis muscle, but not in other muscles, after 24h of fasting. Therefore, the availability of FA in the oxidative twitch muscles in growing chickens appears to be upregulated by fasting. Our results suggest that lipid metabolism-related genes are upregulated under both basal and fasting conditions in the adductor superficialis in growing chickens. PMID:26188321

  4. Enhanced expression of Nrf2 in mice attenuates the fatty liver produced by a methionine- and choline-deficient diet

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-06-15

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as an important promoter of the progression of fatty liver diseases. The current study investigates the potential functions of the Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathway, an important hepatic oxidative stress sensor, in a rodent fatty liver model. Mice with no (Nrf2-null), normal (wild type, WT), and enhanced (Keap1 knockdown, K1-kd) expression of Nrf2 were fed a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet or a control diet for 5 days. Compared to WT mice, the MCD diet-caused hepatosteatosis was more severe in the Nrf2-null mice and less in the K1-kd mice. The Nrf2-null mice had lower hepatic glutathione and exhibited more lipid peroxidation, whereas the K1-kd mice had the highest amount of glutathione in the liver and developed the least lipid peroxidation among the three genotypes fed the MCD diet. The Nrf2 signaling pathway was activated by the MCD diet, and the Nrf2-targeted cytoprotective genes Nqo1 and Gst{alpha}1/2 were induced in WT and even more in K1-kd mice. In addition, Nrf2-null mice on both control and MCD diets exhibited altered expression profiles of fatty acid metabolism genes, indicating Nrf2 may influence lipid metabolism in liver. For example, mRNA levels of long chain fatty acid translocase CD36 and the endocrine hormone Fgf21 were higher in livers of Nrf2-null mice and lower in the K1-kd mice than WT mice fed the MCD diet. Taken together, these observations indicate that Nrf2 could decelerate the onset of fatty livers caused by the MCD diet by increasing hepatic antioxidant and detoxification capabilities.

  5. Differential regulation of the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes with skeletal muscle type in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kimura, Sayaka; Kitashiro, Ayana; Tsuchii, Nami; Tsuchihashi, Tatsuya; Inui, Mariko; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The regulatory mechanisms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are known to differ among skeletal muscle types in mammals. For example, glycolytic muscles prefer glucose as an energy source, whereas oxidative muscles prefer fatty acids (FA). We herein demonstrated differences in the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the pectoralis major (a glycolytic twitch muscle), adductor superficialis (an oxidative twitch muscle), and adductor profound (a tonic muscle) of 14-day-old chicks. Under ad libitum feeding conditions, the mRNA levels of muscle type phosphofructokinase-1 were markedly lower in the adductor superficialis muscle, suggesting that basal glycolytic activity is very low in this type of muscle. In contrast, high mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36) in the adductor superficialis muscle suggest that FA uptake is high in this type of muscle. The mRNA levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) were significantly higher in the adductor profound muscle than in other muscles, suggesting that basal lipolytic activity is high in this type of muscle. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ and CPT1b were significantly increased in the adductor superficialis muscle, but not in other muscles, after 24h of fasting. Therefore, the availability of FA in the oxidative twitch muscles in growing chickens appears to be upregulated by fasting. Our results suggest that lipid metabolism-related genes are upregulated under both basal and fasting conditions in the adductor superficialis in growing chickens.

  6. Hepatic PPARγ Is Not Essential for the Rapid Development of Steatosis After Loss of Hepatic GH Signaling, in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Kineman, Rhonda D; Majumdar, Neena; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose

    2016-05-01

    Our group has previously reported de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and hepatic triglyceride content increases in chow-fed male mice within 7 days of hepatocyte-specific GH receptor knockdown (aLivGHRkd). Here, we report that these changes are associated with an increase in hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), consistent with previous reports showing steatosis is associated with an increase in PPARγ expression in mice with congenital loss of hepatic GH signaling. PPARγ is thought to be an important driver of steatosis by enhancing DNL, as well as increasing the uptake and esterification of extrahepatic fatty acids (FAs). In order to determine whether hepatic PPARγ is critical for the rapid development of steatosis in the aLivGHRkd mouse model, we have generated aLivGHRkd mice, with or without PPARγ (ie, adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific double knockout of GHR and PPARγ). Hepatic PPARγ was not required for the rapid increase in liver triglyceride content or FA indexes of DNL (16:0/18:2 and 16:1/16:0). However, loss of hepatic PPARγ blunted the rise in fatty acid translocase/CD36 and monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 expression induced by aLivGHRkd, and this was associated with a reduction in the hepatic content of 18:2. These results suggest that the major role of PPARγ is to enhance pathways critical in uptake and reesterification of extrahepatic FA. Because FAs have been reported to directly increase PPARγ expression, we speculate that in the aLivGHRkd mouse, the FA produced by DNL enhances the expression of PPARγ, which in turn increases extrahepatic FA uptake, thereby further enhancing PPARγ activity and exacerbating steatosis overtime. PMID:26950202

  7. Gut fat signaling and appetite control with special emphasis on the effect of thylakoids from spinach on eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Rebello, C J; O'Neil, C E; Greenway, F L

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic controls of eating are embedded in a neural system that permits an interaction with the environment. The result is an integrated adaptive response that coordinates the internal milieu with the prevailing environment. Securing adequate amounts of fat and optimizing its storage and use has an evolutionary basis. By generating neuronal and endocrine feedback signals, behavior and metabolism could then adapt to fluctuations in food availability. However, in modern society, foods that appeal to the palate are neither in shortage nor are they difficult to procure. These foods can activate brain reward circuitry beyond their evolved 'survival advantage' limits. Many foods high in fat invoke an undeniably pleasurable sensation and could excessively stimulate the brain's reward pathways leading to overeating. However, the high appeal and potential for being eaten in excess notwithstanding, fat has the added distinction of inducing powerful signals in the gut that are transduced to the brain and result in the regulation of appetite. Fatty acids are sensed by G-protein-coupled receptors on enteroendocrine cells which trigger the release of peptides involved in appetite regulation. Lipid sensing may also occur through the fatty acid translocase, CD-36, on enterocytes. Additionally, fat can activate dopaminergic systems affecting reward, to promote an inhibition over eating. Prolonging the presence of fats in the gastrointestinal lumen permits the activation of signaling mechanisms. Thylakoids, found within the chloroplasts of plants, are flattened disc-like membranous vesicles in which the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis occur. By interacting with lipids and delaying fat digestion, thylakoid membranes promote the release of peptides involved in appetite regulation and may influence the reward system. This review explores gut lipid sensing and signaling in the context of appetite regulation. The effects of thylakoid membranes on eating behavior are

  8. Enhanced expression of Nrf2 in mice attenuates the fatty liver produced by a methionine- and choline-deficient diet☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as an important promoter of the progression of fatty liver diseases. The current study investigates the potential functions of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway, an important hepatic oxidative stress sensor, in a rodent fatty liver model. Mice with no (Nrf2-null), normal (wild type, WT), and enhanced (Keap1 knockdown, K1-kd) expression of Nrf2 were fed a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet or a control diet for 5 days. Compared to WT mice, the MCD diet-caused hepatosteatosis was more severe in the Nrf2-null mice and less in the K1-kd mice. The Nrf2-null mice had lower hepatic glutathione and exhibited more lipid peroxidation, whereas the K1-kd mice had the highest amount of glutathione in the liver and developed the least lipid peroxidation among the three genotypes fed the MCD diet. The Nrf2 signaling pathway was activated by the MCD diet, and the Nrf2-targeted cytoprotective genes Nqo1 and Gstα1/2 were induced in WT and even more in K1-kd mice. In addition, Nrf2-null mice on both control and MCD diets exhibited altered expression profiles of fatty acid metabolism genes, indicating Nrf2 may influence lipid metabolism in liver. For example, mRNA levels of long chain fatty acid translocase CD36 and the endocrine hormone Fgf21 were higher in livers of Nrf2-null mice and lower in the K1-kd mice than WT mice fed the MCD diet. Taken together, these observations indicate that Nrf2 could decelerate the onset of fatty livers caused by the MCD diet by increasing hepatic antioxidant and detoxification capabilities. PMID:20350562

  9. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  10. Carbolic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Phenol poisoning; Phenylic acid poisoning; Hydroxybenzene poisoning; Phenic acid poisoning; Benzenol poisoning ... Below are symptoms of carbolic acid poisoning in different parts of the ... urine Decreased urine output No urine output EYES, EARS, ...

  11. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  12. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  13. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  14. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  15. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  16. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  17. Bioconversions of ferulic acid, an hydroxycinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sindhu; Abraham, T Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Ferulic acid is the most abundant hydroxycinnamic acid in the plant world and is ester linked to arabinose, in various plant polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans and pectins. It is a precursor to vanillin, one of the most important aromatic flavor compound used in foods, beverages, pharmaceuticals, and perfumes. This article presents an overview of the various biocatalytic routes, focusing on the relevant biotransformations of ferulic acid using plant sources, microorganisms, and enzymes.

  18. Oral hydroxycitrate supplementation enhances glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I-Shiung; Huang, Shih-Wei; Lu, Hsang-Chu; Wu, Ching-Lin; Chu, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Shin-Da; Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2012-04-01

    Glycogen stored in skeletal muscle is the main fuel for endurance exercise. The present study examined the effects of oral hydroxycitrate (HCA) supplementation on post-meal glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle. Eight healthy male volunteers (aged 22·0 (se 0·3) years) completed a 60-min cycling exercise at 70-75 % VO₂max and received HCA or placebo in a crossover design repeated after a 7 d washout period. They consumed 500 mg HCA or placebo with a high-carbohydrate meal (2 g carbohydrate/kg body weight, 80 % carbohydrate, 8 % fat, 12 % protein) for a 3-h post-exercise recovery. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from vastus lateralis immediately and 3 h after the exercise. We found that HCA supplementation significantly lowered post-meal insulin response with similar glucose level compared to placebo. The rate of glycogen synthesis with the HCA meal was approximately onefold higher than that with the placebo meal. In contrast, GLUT4 protein level after HCA supplementation was significantly decreased below the placebo level, whereas expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36 mRNA was significantly increased above the placebo level. Furthermore, HCA supplementation significantly increased energy reliance on fat oxidation, estimated by the gaseous exchange method. However, no differences were found in circulating NEFA and glycerol levels with the HCA meal compared with the placebo meal. The present study reports the first evidence that HCA supplementation enhanced glycogen synthesis rate in exercised human skeletal muscle and improved post-meal insulin sensitivity. PMID:21824444

  19. Substrate uptake and metabolism are preserved in hypertrophic caveolin-3 knockout hearts

    PubMed Central

    Augustus, Ayanna S.; Buchanan, Jonathan; Addya, Sankar; Rengo, Giuseppe; Pestell, Richard G.; Fortina, Paolo; Koch, Walter J.; Bensadoun, Andre; Abel, E. Dale; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Caveolin-3 (Cav3), the primary protein component of caveolae in muscle cells, regulates numerous signaling pathways including insulin receptor signaling and facilitates free fatty acid (FA) uptake by interacting with several FA transport proteins. We previously reported that Cav3 knockout mice (Cav3KO) develop cardiac hypertrophy with diminished contractile function; however, the effects of Cav3 gene ablation on cardiac substrate utilization are unknown. The present study revealed that the uptake and oxidation of FAs and glucose were normal in hypertrophic Cav3KO hearts. Real-time PCR analysis revealed normal expression of lipid metabolism genes including FA translocase (CD36) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 in Cav3KO hearts. Interestingly, myocardial cAMP content was significantly increased by 42%; however, this had no effect on PKA activity in Cav3KO hearts. Microarray expression analysis revealed a marked increase in the expression of genes involved in receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane, including Rab4a and the expression of WD repeat/FYVE domain containing proteins. We observed a fourfold increase in the expression of cellular retinol binding protein-III and a 3.5-fold increase in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 11, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family involved in the biosynthesis and inactivation of steroid hormones. In summary, a loss of Cav3 in the heart leads to cardiac hypertrophy with normal substrate utilization. Moreover, a loss of Cav3 mRNA altered the expression of several genes not previously linked to cardiac growth and function. Thus we have identified a number of new target genes associated with the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:18552160

  20. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  1. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  2. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  3. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  4. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  5. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  6. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  7. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and ... Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in men, and to prevent or treat osteoporosis ...

  8. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  9. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  10. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do ...

  11. Mixed Acid Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.A.

    1999-10-26

    Several non-thermal processes have been developed to destroy organic waste compounds using chemicals with high oxidation potentials. These efforts have focused on developing technologies that work at low temperatures, relative to incineration, to overcome many of the regulatory issues associated with obtaining permits for waste incinerators. One such technique with great flexibility is mixed acid oxidation. Mixed acid oxidation, developed at the Savannah River Site, uses a mixture of an oxidant (nitric acid) and a carrier acid (phosphoric acid). The carrier acid acts as a non-volatile holding medium for the somewhat volatile oxidant. The combination of acids allows appreciable amounts of the concentrated oxidant to remain in the carrier acid well above the oxidant''s normal boiling point.

  12. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  13. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  14. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  15. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  16. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  17. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  18. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  19. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  1. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  5. [Safety of folic acid].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Wolters, Maike; Hahn, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Improving dietary folate intake is a central public health goal. However, critical voices have become louder warning of too high intake of folic acid. Safety concerns of a high folic acid exposure are usually limited to synthetic folic acid contained in drugs and food supplements. Against this background, the present article focuses on two matters: (a) How do the absorption and metabolism of synthetic folic acid differ from that of other folates? (b) How has the longterm safety of folic acid to be judged, especially regarding the risk of colorectal cancer, autism, asthma, impaired immune defence, masking vitamin B12 deficiency and interactions with the methotrexate metabolism?

  6. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  7. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  8. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  9. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  10. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  11. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  12. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  13. Well acidizing compositions and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B. L.

    1980-12-23

    Gelled acidic compositions suitable for matrix acidizing or fracture acidizing of subterranean formations are provided comprising water, a water-dispersible polymeric viscosifier such as a polymer of acrylamide, an acid, and a polyphenolic material such as lignite.

  14. Bile acids but not acidic acids induce Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Gai, Zhibo; Song, Xiaoming; Jia, Xinyong; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Bile acids (BAs) refluxing into the esophagus contribute to esophageal injury, which results in BE and subsequent EAC. We developed two animal models to test the role of BAs in the pathogenesis of BE. We surgically generated BA reflux, with or without gastric acid, in rats. In a second experiment, we fed animals separately with BAs and gastric acid. Pathologic changes were examined and the expression of Muc2 and Cdx2 in BE tissue was tested by immunostaining. Inflammatory factors in the plasma, as well as differentiation genes in BE were examined through highly sensitive ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that BAs are sufficient for the induction of esophagitis and Barrett's-like metaplasia in the esophagus. Overexpression of inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-α was observed both in animals fed with BAs and surgically generated BA reflux. Furthermore, elevated levels of Cdx2, Muc2, Bmp4, Kit19, and Tff2 (differentiation genes in BE) were found in BA-treated rats. In conclusion, BAs, but not gastric acid, are a major causative factor for BE. We confirmed that BAs contribute to the development of BE by inducing the inflammatory response in the esophagus. Inhibiting BAs may be a promising therapy for BE.

  15. Lowbush blueberries inhibit scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A expression and attenuate foam cell formation in ApoE-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries have recently been reported to reduce atherosclerotic lesion progression in apoE deficient (apoE-/-) mice. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine whether blueberries altered scavenger receptors expression and foam cell fo...

  16. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  17. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  18. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  19. Enzymatic gallic acid esterification.

    PubMed

    Weetal, H H

    1985-02-01

    Gallic acid esters of n-propyl and amyl alcohols have been produced by enzymatic synthesis in organic solvents using immobilized tannase. Studies indicate that maximum esterification of gallic acid occurs with amyl alcohol. The enzyme shows broad alcohol specificity. However, the enzyme exhibits absolute specificity for the acid portion of the ester. Studies were carried out on K(m), V(max), pH, and temperature optima.

  20. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  1. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  2. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  3. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  4. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  5. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  6. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perfluoroalkyl acids(PFAAs) area a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perflurinated carbon backbone (4-12in length) and a acidic functional moiety (Carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and have numerous industr...

  7. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test if you have had or are about to have certain types of chemotherapy. Rapid weight loss, which may occur with such treatments, can increase the amount of uric acid in ...

  8. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  9. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  11. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  12. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat skin conditions that involve scaling or overgrowth of skin ... water for 15 minutes.Do not apply topical salicylic acid to skin that is broken, red, swollen, irritated, or infected. ...

  13. Uric acid and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feig, Daniel I

    2011-09-01

    A link between serum uric acid and the development of hypertension was first hypothesized in the 1870s. Although numerous epidemiologic studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested an association, relatively little attention was paid to it until recently. Animal models have suggested a two-step pathogenesis by which uric acid initially activates the renin angiotensin system and suppresses nitric oxide, leading to uric acid-dependent increase in systemic vascular resistance, followed by a uric acid-mediated vasculopathy, involving renal afferent arterioles, resulting in a late sodium-sensitive hypertension. Initial clinical trials in young patients have supported these mechanisms in young patients but do not yet support pharmacologic reduction of serum uric acid as first-line therapy for hypertension.

  14. Biosynthesis of pulcherriminic acid

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. Candida pulcherrima was grown on a complex medium to which various compounds had been added to determine their effect on the biosynthesis of pulcherriminic acid. Most of the pulcherriminic acid synthesized by C. pulcherrima PRL2019 was derived from the l-[1-14C]leucine added to the medium. 2. The cyclic dipeptide of l-leucine (cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl) was shown, by trapping experiments involving cycloleucyl-leucyl isomers, to be synthesized by strain PRL2019. Cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl was derived from l-leucine and was converted into pulcherriminic acid. Cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl was a precursor of pulcherriminic acid in strain PRL2007 also. 3. The results supported the hypothesis that pulcherriminic acid is derived from l-leucine and that cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl is an intermediate in the biosynthesis. PMID:5837792

  15. Dietary Lipid Levels Influence Lipid Deposition in the Liver of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea) by Regulating Lipoprotein Receptors, Fatty Acid Uptake and Triacylglycerol Synthesis and Catabolism at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Liao, Kai; Wang, Tianjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation has been observed in fish fed a high-lipid diet. However, no information is available on the mechanism by which dietary lipid levels comprehensively regulate lipid transport, uptake, synthesis and catabolism in fish. Therefore, the present study aimed to gain further insight into how dietary lipids affect lipid deposition in the liver of large yellow croaker(Larimichthys crocea). Fish (150.00±4.95 g) were fed a diet with a low (6%), moderate (12%, the control diet) or high (18%) crude lipid content for 10 weeks. Growth performance, plasma biochemical indexes, lipid contents and gene expression related to lipid deposition, including lipoprotein assembly and clearance, fatty acid uptake and triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism, were assessed. Growth performance was not significantly affected. However, the hepato-somatic and viscera-somatic indexes as well as plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly increased in fish fed the high-lipid diet. In the livers of fish fed the high-lipid diet, the expression of genes related to lipoprotein clearance (LDLR) and fatty acid uptake (FABP11) was significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein assembly (apoB100), triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism (DGAT2, CPT I) was significantly down-regulated compared with fish fed the control diet, and hepatic lipid deposition increased. In fish fed the low-lipid diet, the expression of genes associated with lipoprotein assembly and clearance (apoB100, LDLR, LRP-1), fatty acid uptake (CD36, FATP1, FABP3) and triacylglycerol synthesis (FAS) was significantly increased, whereas the expression of triacylglycerol catabolism related genes (ATGL, CPT I) was reduced compared with fish fed the control diet. However, hepatic lipid content in fish fed the low-lipid diet decreased mainly due to low dietary lipid intake. In summary, findings of this study provide molecular

  16. Dietary Lipid Levels Influence Lipid Deposition in the Liver of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea) by Regulating Lipoprotein Receptors, Fatty Acid Uptake and Triacylglycerol Synthesis and Catabolism at the Transcriptional Level.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Liao, Kai; Wang, Tianjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation has been observed in fish fed a high-lipid diet. However, no information is available on the mechanism by which dietary lipid levels comprehensively regulate lipid transport, uptake, synthesis and catabolism in fish. Therefore, the present study aimed to gain further insight into how dietary lipids affect lipid deposition in the liver of large yellow croaker(Larimichthys crocea). Fish (150.00±4.95 g) were fed a diet with a low (6%), moderate (12%, the control diet) or high (18%) crude lipid content for 10 weeks. Growth performance, plasma biochemical indexes, lipid contents and gene expression related to lipid deposition, including lipoprotein assembly and clearance, fatty acid uptake and triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism, were assessed. Growth performance was not significantly affected. However, the hepato-somatic and viscera-somatic indexes as well as plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly increased in fish fed the high-lipid diet. In the livers of fish fed the high-lipid diet, the expression of genes related to lipoprotein clearance (LDLR) and fatty acid uptake (FABP11) was significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein assembly (apoB100), triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism (DGAT2, CPT I) was significantly down-regulated compared with fish fed the control diet, and hepatic lipid deposition increased. In fish fed the low-lipid diet, the expression of genes associated with lipoprotein assembly and clearance (apoB100, LDLR, LRP-1), fatty acid uptake (CD36, FATP1, FABP3) and triacylglycerol synthesis (FAS) was significantly increased, whereas the expression of triacylglycerol catabolism related genes (ATGL, CPT I) was reduced compared with fish fed the control diet. However, hepatic lipid content in fish fed the low-lipid diet decreased mainly due to low dietary lipid intake. In summary, findings of this study provide molecular

  17. Total syntheses of cis-cyclopropane fatty acids: dihydromalvalic acid, dihydrosterculic acid, lactobacillic acid, and 9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sayali; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-12-14

    cis-Cyclopropane fatty acids (cis-CFAs) are widespread constituents of the seed oils of subtropical plants, membrane components of bacteria and protozoa, and the fats and phospholipids of animals. We describe a systematic approach to the synthesis of enantiomeric pairs of four cis-CFAs: cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid, lactobacillic acid, dihydromalvalic acid, and dihydrosterculic acid. The approach commences with Rh2(OAc)4-catalyzed cyclopropenation of 1-octyne and 1-decyne, and hinges on the preparative scale chromatographic resolution of racemic 2-alkylcycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylic acids using a homochiral Evan's auxiliary. Saturation of the individual diastereomeric N-cycloprop-2-ene-1-carbonylacyloxazolidines, followed by elaboration to alkylcyclopropylmethylsulfones, allowed Julia-Kocienski olefination with various ω-aldehyde-esters. Finally, saponification and diimide reduction afforded the individual cis-CFA enantiomers. PMID:25321346

  18. Gluconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G

    2007-01-01

    Gluconic acid, the oxidation product of glucose, is a mild neither caustic nor corrosive, non toxic and readily biodegradable organic acid of great interest for many applications. As a multifunctional carbonic acid belonging to the bulk chemicals and due to its physiological and chemical characteristics, gluconic acid itself, its salts (e.g. alkali metal salts, in especially sodium gluconate) and the gluconolactone form have found extensively versatile uses in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, construction and other industries. Present review article presents the comprehensive information of patent bibliography for the production of gluconic acid and compares the advantages and disadvantages of known processes. Numerous manufacturing processes are described in the international bibliography and patent literature of the last 100 years for the production of gluconic acid from glucose, including chemical and electrochemical catalysis, enzymatic biocatalysis by free or immobilized enzymes in specialized enzyme bioreactors as well as discontinuous and continuous fermentation processes using free growing or immobilized cells of various microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast-like fungi and fungi. Alternatively, new superior fermentation processes have been developed and extensively described for the continuous and discontinuous production of gluconic acid by isolated strains of yeast-like mold Aureobasidium pullulans, offering numerous advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi processes.

  19. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  20. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  1. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  2. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  3. Understanding Acid Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2015-10-01

    The concentration of hydrogen ions is regulated in biologic solutions. There are currently 3 recognized approaches to assess changes in acid base status. First is the traditional Henderson-Hasselbalch approach, also called the physiologic approach, which uses the relationship between HCO3(-) and Pco2; the second is the standard base excess approach based on the Van Slyke equation. The third approach is the quantitative or Stewart approach, which uses the strong ion difference and the total weak acids. This article explores the origins of the current concepts framing the existing methods to analyze acid base balance.

  4. Acid rain and soil.

    PubMed

    vanLoon, G W

    1984-08-01

    A summary of important chemical properties of soil is given and the way in which acid rain may affect these properties is discussed. Acid rain may suppress microbiological decomposition and nitrification processes, thus influencing the nutrient status of soils. It has also been found that soil organic matter is less soluble in more acid solutions. Changed nutrient availability patterns are predicted in a low pH environment and enhanced leaching of essential elements from the soil exchange complex has been observed. Increased solubility of potentially toxic elements such as aluminium may also occur from soils which have been exposed to acidified rainfall.

  5. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  6. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as other nutrients, are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by the Food and Nutrition Board ... level that is thought to ensure enough nutrition. Dietary Reference Intakes for pantothenic acid: Age 0 to 6 months: ...

  7. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  8. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  9. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider ...

  10. Nitric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms from swallowing nitric acid may include: Abdominal pain - severe Burns to skin or mouth Drooling Fever Mouth pain - severe Rapid drop in blood pressure (shock) Throat swelling, which leads to breathing difficulty ...

  11. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated. PMID:27189091

  12. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  13. Hyaluronic acid fillers.

    PubMed

    Monheit, Gary D; Coleman, Kyle M

    2006-01-01

    Although hyaluronic acids are a relatively new treatment for facial lines and wrinkles, they have provided numerous advances in the area of cosmetic surgery. This article discusses the inherent properties of hyaluronic acid fillers that make them ideal for treatment of facial lines. It encompasses a review of the current literature on U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved hyaluronic acid fillers and the role that each of these fillers currently has in facial cosmetics. This article also discusses the potential pitfalls and adverse effects that can be associated with using hyaluronic acids for filling facial lines. Finally, it serves as an overview of current techniques for clinical assessment of patients as well as administration and treatment of facial lines and wrinkles.

  14. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Borax poisoning ... The main symptoms of boric acid poisoning are blue-green vomit, diarrhea, and a bright red rash on the skin. Other symptoms may include: Blisters Collapse Coma Convulsions Drowsiness ...

  15. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  16. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin that result from exposure to sunlight and can develop into skin cancer) of the ... acid will make your skin very sensitive to sunlight (likely to get sunburn). Avoid exposure of treated ...

  17. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  18. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  19. Folic acid in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... a regular supply of the vitamin in the foods you eat. ... vitamins have been added to the food. Many foods are now fortified with folic acid. Some of these are enriched breads, cereals, flours, ...

  20. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the treatment of epilepsy, and to treat bipolar disorder and migraines. I have been taking valproic acid ... that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual problems and difficulty getting pregnant. ...

  1. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The ... level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. ...

  2. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... more easily than natural food folate. Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Folic acid reduces the risk for spina ... g., orange juice and green vegetables). Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Spina bifida and anencephaly are neural tube ...

  3. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin or eyes, you may have: Blisters Burns Pain Vision loss Hydrofluoric acid poisoning can have ... urine tests Camera down the throat to see burns in the esophagus and the stomach (endoscopy) Fluids ...

  4. Unraveling the Fanconi anaemia-DNA repair connection through DNA helicase and translocase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L H

    2005-08-16

    How the Fanconi anaemia (FA) chromosome stability pathway functions to cope with interstrand crosslinks and other DNA lesions has been elusive, even after FANCD1 proved to be BRCA2, a partner of Rad51 in homologous recombination. The identification and characterization of two new Fanconi proteins having helicase motifs, FANCM and FANCJ/BRIP1/BACH1, implicates the FANC nuclear core complex as a participant in recognizing or processing damaged DNA, and the BRIP1 helicase as acting independently of this complex.

  5. Plastids Contain a Second Sec Translocase System with Essential Functions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Skalitzky, Courtney A.; Martin, Jonathan R.; Harwood, Jessica H.; Beirne, John J.; Adamczyk, Benjamin J.; Heck, Gregory R.; Cline, Kenneth; Fernandez, Donna E.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins that are synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes but function within plastids must be imported and then targeted to one of six plastid locations. Although multiple systems that target proteins to the thylakoid membranes or thylakoid lumen have been identified, a system that can direct the integration of inner envelope membrane proteins from the stroma has not been previously described. Genetics and localization studies were used to show that plastids contain two different Sec systems with distinct functions. Loss-of-function mutations in components of the previously described thylakoid-localized Sec system, designated as SCY1 (At2g18710), SECA1 (At4g01800), and SECE1 (At4g14870) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), result in albino seedlings and sucrose-dependent heterotrophic growth. Loss-of-function mutations in components of the second Sec system, designated as SCY2 (At2g31530) and SECA2 (At1g21650) in Arabidopsis, result in arrest at the globular stage and embryo lethality. Promoter-swap experiments provided evidence that SCY1 and SCY2 are functionally nonredundant and perform different roles in the cell. Finally, chloroplast import and fractionation assays and immunogold localization of SCY2-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in root tissues indicated that SCY2 is part of an envelope-localized Sec system. Our data suggest that SCY2 and SECA2 function in Sec-mediated integration and translocation processes at the inner envelope membrane. PMID:21051552

  6. Unique Photobleaching Phenomena of the Twin-Arginine Translocase Respiratory Enzyme Chaperone DmsD

    PubMed Central

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Leach, Thorin G.H.; Chan, Catherine S.; Winstone, Tara M.L.; Ladner, Carol L.; Sarfo, Kwabena J.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    DmsD is a chaperone of the redox enzyme maturation protein family specifically required for biogenesis of DMSO reductase in Escherichia coli. It exists in multiple folding forms, all of which are capable of binding its known substrate, the twin-arginine leader sequence of the DmsA catalytic subunit. It is important for maturation of the reductase and targeting to the cytoplasmic membrane for translocation. Here, we demonstrate that DmsD exhibits an irreversible photobleaching phenomenon upon 280 nm excitation irradiation. The phenomenon is due to quenching of the tryptophan residues in DmsD and is dependent on its folding and conformation. We also show that a tryptophan residue involved in DmsA signal peptide binding (W87) is important for photobleaching of DmsD. Mutation of W87, or binding of the DmsA twin-arginine signal peptide to DmsD in the pocket that includes W72, W80, and W91 significantly affects the degree of photobleaching. This study highlights the advantage of a photobleaching phenomenon to study protein folding and conformation changes within a protein that was once considered unusable in fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24497893

  7. Transport through recycling endosomes requires EHD1 recruitment by a phosphatidylserine translocase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoken; Uchida, Yasunori; Wang, Jiao; Matsudaira, Tatsuyuki; Nakagawa, Takatoshi; Kishimoto, Takuma; Mukai, Kojiro; Inaba, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Molday, Robert S; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    P4-ATPases translocate aminophospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), to the cytosolic leaflet of membranes. PS is highly enriched in recycling endosomes (REs) and is essential for endosomal membrane traffic. Here, we show that PS flipping by an RE-localized P4-ATPase is required for the recruitment of the membrane fission protein EHD1. Depletion of ATP8A1 impaired the asymmetric transbilayer distribution of PS in REs, dissociated EHD1 from REs, and generated aberrant endosomal tubules that appear resistant to fission. EHD1 did not show membrane localization in cells defective in PS synthesis. ATP8A2, a tissue-specific ATP8A1 paralogue, is associated with a neurodegenerative disease (CAMRQ). ATP8A2, but not the disease-causative ATP8A2 mutant, rescued the endosomal defects in ATP8A1-depleted cells. Primary neurons from Atp8a2−/− mice showed a reduced level of transferrin receptors at the cell surface compared to Atp8a2+/+ mice. These findings demonstrate the role of P4-ATPase in membrane fission and give insight into the molecular basis of CAMRQ. PMID:25595798

  8. Topological studies on the twin-arginine translocase component TatC.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Jana; Standar, Kerstin; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Brüser, Thomas

    2004-05-15

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system can translocate folded proteins across biological membranes. Among the known Tat-system components in Escherichia coli, TatC is the only protein with multiple trans-membrane domains. TatC is important for translocon interactions with Tat substrates. The knowledge of its membrane topology is therefore crucial for the understanding of substrate binding and translocon function. Recently, based on active PhoA reporter fusions to the second predicted cytoplasmic loop of TatC, a topology with four trans-membrane domains has been suggested, calling in silico predictions of six trans-membrane domains into question. Here we report studies with translational fusions of TatC to the topological marker enzymes PhoA and LacZ which provide strong evidence for a six-trans-membrane domain topology. The stop transfer capacity of the fourth trans-membrane domain was found to be strongly influenced by the succeeding cytoplasmic domain. The presence of linker sequences at PhoA-fusion sites of the cytoplasmic domain induced PhoA leakage. In the case of one tested fusion (S185-PhoA), the stop-transfer efficiency was already low due to the negative charge in the center of the fourth trans-membrane domain (E170). The results point to the importance of cytoplasmic loops for the stabilization of stop-transfer sequences and revoke evidence for only four trans-membrane domains of TatC. PMID:15135537

  9. Raw coffee based dietary supplements contain carboxyatractyligenin derivatives inhibiting mitochondrial adenine-nucleotide-translocase.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roman; Fromme, Tobias; Beusch, Anja; Lang, Tatjana; Klingenspor, Martin; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Capsules, powders and tablets containing raw coffee extract are advertised to the consumer as antioxidant rich dietary supplements as part of a healthy diet. We isolated carboxyatractyligenin (4), 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin (6) and 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside (8) from green coffee and found strong inhibitory effects on phosphorylating respiration in isolated mitochondria similar to the effects of the known phytotoxin carboxyatractyloside. LC-MS/MS analysis of commercial green coffee based dietary supplements revealed the occurrence of carboxyatractyligenin, 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin in concentrations up to 4.0, 5.7, and 41.6μmol/g, respectively. These data might help to gain first insight into potential physiological side-effects of green coffee containing dietary supplement.

  10. Proton transfer is rate-limiting for translocation of precursor proteins by the Escherichia coli translocase.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Wickner, W

    1991-01-01

    The protonmotive force stimulates translocation in vivo, in crude in vitro reactions, and in a purified, reconstituted reaction. Translocation activity is a function of the pH at the inner face of the membrane. Both the transmembrane pH gradient and the transmembrane electrical potential stimulate translocation. A late-stage translocation intermediate of the proOmpA preprotein completes its translocation in the absence of ATP when a protonmotive force is imposed. This completion of translocation is retarded by a factor of greater than 3 in deuterium oxide relative to water, demonstrating that translocation involves proton-transfer reactions in rate-limiting steps. Images PMID:1826054

  11. PICH: a DNA translocase specially adapted for processing anaphase bridge DNA.

    PubMed

    Biebricher, Andreas; Hirano, Seiki; Enzlin, Jacqueline H; Wiechens, Nicola; Streicher, Werner W; Huttner, Diana; Wang, Lily H-C; Nigg, Erich A; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Liu, Ying; Peterman, Erwin; Wuite, Gijs J L; Hickson, Ian D

    2013-09-12

    The Plk1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) protein localizes to ultrafine anaphase bridges (UFBs) in mitosis alongside a complex of DNA repair proteins, including the Bloom's syndrome protein (BLM). However, very little is known about the function of PICH or how it is recruited to UFBs. Using a combination of microfluidics, fluorescence microscopy, and optical tweezers, we have defined the properties of PICH in an in vitro model of an anaphase bridge. We show that PICH binds with a remarkably high affinity to duplex DNA, resulting in ATP-dependent protein translocation and extension of the DNA. Most strikingly, the affinity of PICH for binding DNA increases with tension-induced DNA stretching, which mimics the effect of the mitotic spindle on a UFB. PICH binding also appears to diminish force-induced DNA melting. We propose a model in which PICH recognizes and stabilizes DNA under tension during anaphase, thereby facilitating the resolution of entangled sister chromatids. PMID:23973328

  12. Kinetics of Precursor Interactions with the Bacterial Tat Translocase Detected by Real-time FRET*

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Neal; Bageshwar, Umesh K.; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports fully folded and assembled proteins across the inner membrane into the periplasmic space. Traditionally, in vitro protein translocation studies have been performed using gel-based transport assays. This technique suffers from low time resolution, and often, an inability to distinguish between different steps in a continuously occurring translocation process. To address these limitations, we have developed an in vitro FRET-based assay that reports on an early step in the Tat translocation process in real-time. The natural Tat substrate pre-SufI was labeled with Alexa532 (donor), and the fluorescent protein mCherry (acceptor) was fused to the C terminus of TatB or TatC. The colored Tat proteins were easily visible during purification, enabling identification of a highly active inverted membrane vesicle (IMV) fraction yielding transport rates with NADH almost an order of magnitude faster than previously reported. When pre-SufI was bound to the translocon, FRET was observed for both Tat proteins. FRET was diminished upon addition of nonfluorescent pre-SufI, indicating that the initial binding step is reversible. When the membranes were energized with NADH, the FRET signal was lost after a short delay. These data suggest a model in which a Tat cargo initially associates with the TatBC complex, and an electric field gradient is required for the cargo to proceed to the next stage of transport. This cargo migration away from the TatBC complex requires a significant fraction of the total transport time. PMID:22315217

  13. Effect of Cargo Size and Shape on the Transport Efficiency of the Bacterial Tat Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Neal; Bageshwar, Umesh; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tat machinery translocates fully-folded and oligomeric substrates. The passage of large, bulky cargos across an ion-tight membrane suggests the need to match pore and cargo size, and therefore that Tat transport efficiency may depend on both cargo size and shape. A series of cargos of different sizes and shapes were generated using the natural Tat substrate pre-SufI as a base. Four (of 17) cargos transported with significant (>20% of wild-type) efficiencies. These results indicate that cargo size and shape significantly influences Tat transportability. PMID:23422074

  14. Portable nucleic acid thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Almassian, David R; Cockrell, Lisa M; Nelson, William M

    2013-11-21

    A nucleic acid thermal cycler is considered to be portable if it is under ten pounds, easily carried by one individual, and battery powered. Nucleic acid amplification includes both polymerase chain reaction (e.g. PCR, RT-PCR) and isothermal amplification (e.g. RPA, HDA, LAMP, NASBA, RCA, ICAN, SMART, SDA). There are valuable applications for portable nucleic acid thermocyclers in fields that include clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, and veterinary testing. A system that is portable allows for the distributed detection of targets at the point of care and a reduction of the time from sample to answer. The designer of a portable nucleic acid thermocycler must carefully consider both thermal control and the detection of amplification. In addition to thermal control and detection, the designer may consider the integration of a sample preparation subsystem with the nucleic acid thermocycler. There are a variety of technologies that can achieve accurate thermal control and the detection of nucleic acid amplification. Important evaluation criteria for each technology include maturity, power requirements, cost, sensitivity, speed, and manufacturability. Ultimately the needs of a particular market will lead to user requirements that drive the decision between available technologies.

  15. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  16. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  17. Utilization of acid tars

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A.F.; Denisova, T.L.; Aminov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly produced acid tar (FPAT), obtained as refinery waste in treating petroleum oils with sulfuric acid and oleum, contains 80% or more sulfuric acid. Of such tars, pond acid tars, which contain up to 80% neutral petroleum products and sulfonated resins, are more stable, and have found applications in the production of binders for paving materials. In this article the authors are presenting results obtained in a study of the composition and reactivity of FPAT and its stability in storage in blends with asphalts obtained in deasphalting operations, and the possibility of using the FPAT in road construction has been examined. In this work, wastes were used which were obtained in treating the oils T-750, KhF-12, I-8A, and MS-14. Data on the change in group chemical composition of FPAT are shown, and the acidity, viscosity, needle penetration, and softening point of acid tars obtained from different grades of oils are plotted as functions of the storage time. It is also shown that the fresh and hardened FPATs differ in their solubilities in various solvents.

  18. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  19. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  20. Discovery of essential fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat was recognized as a good source of energy and fat-soluble vitamins by the first part of the 20th century, but fatty acids were not considered to be essential nutrients because they could be synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. This well-established view was challenged in 1929 by George and Mildred Burr who reported that dietary fatty acid was required to prevent a deficiency disease that occurred in rats fed a fat-free diet. They concluded that fatty acids were essential nutrients and showed that linoleic acid prevented the disease and is an essential fatty acid. The Burrs surmised that other unsaturated fatty acids were essential and subsequently demonstrated that linolenic acid, the omega-3 fatty acid analog of linoleic acid, is also an essential fatty acid. The discovery of essential fatty acids was a paradigm-changing finding, and it is now considered to be one of the landmark discoveries in lipid research. PMID:25339684

  1. Boric acid catalyzed chemoselective esterification of alpha-hydroxycarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Houston, Todd A; Wilkinson, Brendan L; Blanchfield, Joanne T

    2004-03-01

    Boric acid catalyzes the selective esterification of alpha-hydroxycarboxylic acids without causing significant esterification to occur with other carboxylic acids. The procedure is simple, high-yielding, and applicable to the esterification of alpha-hydroxy carboxylates in the presence of other carboxylic acids including beta-hydroxyacids within the same molecule. [reaction: see text

  2. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  3. Similar changes in muscle lipid metabolism are induced by chronic high-fructose feeding and high-fat feeding in C57BL/J6 mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-Yao; Ren, Lu-Ping; Chen, Shu-Chun; Wang, Chao; Liu, Na; Wei, Li-Min; Li, Fan; Sun, Wen; Peng, Lan-Bo; Tang, Yong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of high fructose and high fat feeding on muscle lipid metabolism and to illustrate the mechanisms by which the two different dietary factors induce muscle lipid accumulation. C57BL/J6 mice were fed either a standard, high-fructose (HFru) or high-fat diet. After 16 weeks feeding, mice were killed and plasma triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels were detected. In addition, muscle TG and long chain acyl CoA (LCACoA) content was determined, glucose tolerance was evaluated and the protein content of fatty acid translocase CD36 (FATCD36) in muscle was measured. Mitochondrial oxidative function in the muscle was evaluated by estimating the activity of oxidative enzymes, namely cytochrome oxidase (COx), citrate synthase (CS) and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD), and the muscle protein content of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-1 and proliferator-activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1α was determined. Finally, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) gene expression and fatty acid synthase (FAS) protein content were determined in muscle tissues. After 16 weeks, plasma TG and FFA levels were significantly increased in both the HFru and HF groups. In addition, mice in both groups exhibited significant increases in muscle TG and LCACoA content. Compared with mice fed the standard diet (control group), those in the HFru and HF groups developed glucose intolerance and exhibited increased FATCD36 protein levels, enzyme activity related to fatty acid utilization in the mitochondria and protein expressions of CPT-1, COX-1 and PGC-1α in muscle tissue. Finally, mice in both the HFru and HF groups exhibited increase SREBP-1c expression and FAS protein content. In conclusion, high fructose and high fat feeding lead to similar changes in muscle lipid metabolism in C57BL/J6 mice. Lipid accumulation in the muscle may be associated with increased expression

  4. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  5. Analysis of Bile Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J.; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi

    Bile acids constitute a large family of steroids in vertebrates, normally formed from cholesterol and carrying a carboxyl group in a side-chain of variable length. Bile alcohols, also formed from cholesterol, have similar structures as bile acids, except for the absence of a carboxyl group in the steroid skeleton. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and/or bile alcohols is of major importance for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, both from quantitative and regulatory points of view (Chiang, 2004; Kalaany and Mangelsdorf, 2006; Moore, Kato, Xie, et al., 2006; Scotti, Gilardi, Godio, et al., 2007). Appropriately conjugated bile acids and bile alcohols (also referred to as bile salts) are secreted in bile and serve vital functions in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble compounds (Hofmann, 2007). Reliable analytical methods are required for studies of the functions and pathophysiological importance of the variety of bile acids and bile alcohols present in living organisms. When combined with genetic and proteomic studies, analysis of these small molecules (in today's terminology: metabolomics, steroidomics, sterolomics, cholanoidomics, etc.) will lead to a deeper understanding of the integrated metabolic processes in lipid metabolism.

  6. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  7. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Nekimken, Howard L.; Carey, W. Patrick; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

  8. Acid sludge utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, M.

    1980-09-01

    The Peak Oil Company of Tampa, Florida, in cooperation with the United States Department of Energy, has completed an initial study for the incorporation of acid-sludge derived from the rerefining of used lubricating oil into a useful and salable building material. Both bricks and paving materials have been produced using a formulation developed by Peak. Equipment has been designed and constructed for the specific purpose of preparing emulsions containing the acid-sludge, which is a vital ingredient in the final formulation. Testing of products obtained from these initial efforts shows that the acid in the sludge has been effectively neutralized and that heavy metals are not leached from the bricks or paving material in normal testing. While some properties of the building materials that incorporate the acid-sludge by-product are below standards for clay and shale brick, uses are defined for the product as is, and there is some promise of eventual production of building materials that meet all specifications for competitive materials. Initial cost estimations are encouraging, indicating that a profit can be derived by converting a hazardous and noxious by-product of rerefining to a construction material. Acid-sludge has presented a complex and costly disposal problem to the industry resulting in a serious depletion in the capacity for rerefining used lubricating oil.

  9. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  10. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  11. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  12. DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID AND ARACHIDONIC ACID PREVENT ESSENTIAL FATTY ACID DEFICIENCY AND HEPATIC STEATOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Meisel, Jonathan A.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Fallon, Erica M.; Gura, Kathleen M.; Nose, Vania; Bistrian, Bruce R.; Puder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Essential fatty acids are important for growth, development, and physiologic function. Alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid are the precursors of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid, respectively, and have traditionally been considered the essential fatty acids. However, we hypothesized that docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid can function as the essential fatty acids. Methods Using a murine model of essential fatty acid deficiency and consequent hepatic steatosis, we provided mice with varying amounts of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids to determine whether exclusive supplementation of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids could prevent essential fatty acid deficiency and inhibit or attenuate hepatic steatosis. Results Mice supplemented with docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids at 2.1% or 4.2% of their calories for 19 days had normal liver histology and no biochemical evidence of essential fatty acid deficiency, which persisted when observed after 9 weeks. Conclusion Supplementation of sufficient amounts of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids alone without alpha-linolenic and linoleic acids meets essential fatty acid requirements and prevents hepatic steatosis in a murine model. PMID:22038210

  13. Biodegradation of cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Saldick, J

    1974-12-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO(2) and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand.

  14. Exposures to acidic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Spengler, J D; Keeler, G J; Koutrakis, P; Ryan, P B; Raizenne, M; Franklin, C A

    1989-02-01

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosols in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. Measurements made in Kingston, TN, and Steubenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 times during summer months. Periods of elevated acidic aerosols occur less frequently in winter months. The H+ determined during episodic conditions in southern Ontario indicates that respiratory tract deposition can exceed the effects level reported in clinical studies. Observed 12-hr H+ concentrations exceeded 550 nmole/m3 (approximately 27 micrograms/m3 H2SO4). The maximum estimated 1-hr concentration exceeded 1500 nmole/m3 for H+ ions. At these concentrations, an active child might receive more than 2000 nmole of H+ ion in 12 hr and in excess of 900 nmole during the hour when H2SO4 exceeded 50 micrograms/m3.

  15. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  16. Calorimetry of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Rozners, Eriks; Pilch, Daniel S; Egli, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This unit describes the application of calorimetry to characterize the thermodynamics of nucleic acids, specifically, the two major calorimetric methodologies that are currently employed: differential scanning (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DSC is used to study thermally induced order-disorder transitions in nucleic acids. A DSC instrument measures, as a function of temperature (T), the excess heat capacity (C(p)(ex)) of a nucleic acid solution relative to the same amount of buffer solution. From a single curve of C(p)(ex) versus T, one can derive the following information: the transition enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), free energy (ΔG), and heat capacity (ΔCp); the state of the transition (two-state versus multistate); and the average size of the molecule that melts as a single thermodynamic entity (e.g., the duplex). ITC is used to study the hybridization of nucleic acid molecules at constant temperature. In an ITC experiment, small aliquots of a titrant nucleic acid solution (strand 1) are added to an analyte nucleic acid solution (strand 2), and the released heat is monitored. ITC yields the stoichiometry of the association reaction (n), the enthalpy of association (ΔH), the equilibrium association constant (K), and thus the free energy of association (ΔG). Once ΔH and ΔG are known, ΔS can also be derived. Repetition of the ITC experiment at a number of different temperatures yields the ΔCp for the association reaction from the temperature dependence of ΔH.

  17. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  18. Acid Precipitation; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, J.W.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This publication, Acid Precipitation (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipitation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. Information on the following subjects is included within the scope of this publication, but all subjects may not appear in each issue: Pollution sources and pollution control technology; atmospheric transport and chemistry; terrestrial transport and chemistry; aquatic transport and chemistry; biological effects; corrosive effects; and socioeconomics, policy, and legislation.

  19. Whither acid rain?

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, P

    2001-04-01

    Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  20. NITRIC ACID PICKLING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Boller, E.R.; Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-19

    An improved process is described for the treatment of metallic uranium surfaces preparatory to being given hot dip coatings. The process consists in first pickling the uraniunn surInce with aqueous 50% to 70% nitric acid, at 60 to 70 deg C, for about 5 minutes, rinsing the acid solution from the uranium article, promptly drying and then passing it through a molten alkali-metal halide flux consisting of 42% LiCl, 53% KCla and 5% NaCl into a molten metal bath consisting of 85 parts by weight of zinc and 15 parts by weight of aluminum

  1. Fatty acids of Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Levin, R A

    1971-12-01

    Fatty acid spectra were made on Thiobacillus thiooxidans cultures both in the presence and absence of organic compounds. Small additions of glucose or acetate had no significant effect either on growth or fatty acid content. The addition of biotin had no stimulatory effect but did result in slight quantitative changes in the fatty acid spectrum. The predominant fatty acid was a C(19) cyclopropane acid.

  2. Fatty Acids of Thiobacillus thiooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    Fatty acid spectra were made on Thiobacillus thiooxidans cultures both in the presence and absence of organic compounds. Small additions of glucose or acetate had no significant effect either on growth or fatty acid content. The addition of biotin had no stimulatory effect but did result in slight quantitative changes in the fatty acid spectrum. The predominant fatty acid was a C19 cyclopropane acid. PMID:4945206

  3. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  4. Lactic acid bacterial cell factories for gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Cao, Yusheng

    2010-11-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid that is widely present in organisms. Several important physiological functions of gamma-aminobutyric acid have been characterized, such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic effects, and tranquilizer effects. Many microorganisms can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid including bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Among them, gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria have been a focus of research in recent years, because lactic acid bacteria possess special physiological activities and are generally regarded as safe. They have been extensively used in food industry. The production of lactic acid bacterial gamma-aminobutyric acid is safe and eco-friendly, and this provides the possibility of production of new naturally fermented health-oriented products enriched in gamma-aminobutyric acid. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing species of lactic acid bacteria and their isolation sources, the methods for screening of the strains and increasing their production, the enzymatic properties of glutamate decarboxylases and the relative fundamental research are reviewed in this article. And the potential applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria were also referred to.

  5. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  6. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  7. STIM1 regulates calcium signaling in taste bud cells and preference for fat in mice.

    PubMed

    Dramane, Gado; Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Hichami, Aziz; Vögtle, Timo; Akpona, Simon; Chouabe, Christophe; Sadou, Hassimi; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Besnard, Philippe; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying oro-gustatory detection of dietary fat is critical for the prevention and treatment of obesity. The lipid-binding glycoprotein CD36, which is expressed by circumvallate papillae (CVP) of the mouse tongue, has been implicated in oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids. Here, we demonstrate that stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), a sensor of Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmic reticulum, mediates fatty acid-induced Ca(2+) signaling in the mouse tongue and fat preference. We showed that linoleic acid (LA) induced the production of arachidonic acid (AA) and lysophosphatidylcholine (Lyso-PC) by activating multiple phospholipase A2 isoforms via CD36. This activation triggered Ca(2+) influx in CD36-positive taste bud cells (TBCs) purified from mouse CVP. LA also induced the production of Ca(2+) influx factor (CIF). STIM1 was found to regulate LA-induced CIF production and the opening of multiple store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channels. Furthermore, CD36-positive TBCs from Stim1-/- mice failed to release serotonin, and Stim1-/- mice lost the spontaneous preference for fat that was observed in wild-type animals. Our results suggest that fatty acid-induced Ca(2+) signaling, regulated by STIM1 via CD36, might be implicated in oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids and the spontaneous preference for fat. PMID:22546859

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid and lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an important component of membrane phospholipids in the retina, and brain, and accumulates rapidly in these tissues during early infancy. DHA is present in human milk, but the amount varies considerably and is largely dependent on maternal diet. This article reviews dat...

  9. Orphenadrinium picrate picric acid

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Hemamalini, Madhukar; Siddaraju, B. P.; Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound N,N-dimethyl-2-[(2-methyl­phen­yl)phenyl­meth­oxy]ethanaminium picrate picric acid, C18H24NO+·C6H2N3O7 −·C6H3N3O7, contains one orphenadrinium cation, one picrate anion and one picric acid mol­ecule. In the orphenadrine cation, the two aromatic rings form a dihedral angle of 70.30 (7)°. There is an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond in the picric acid mol­ecule, which generates an S(6) ring motif. In the crystal structure, the orphenadrine cations, picrate anions and picric acid mol­ecules are connected by strong inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, π⋯π inter­actions between the benzene rings of cations and anions [centroid–centroid distance = 3.5603 (9) Å] and weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:21580426

  10. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  11. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  12. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  13. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  14. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  15. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  16. Targeting tumor acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main features of solid tumors is extracellular acidity, which correlates with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. We introduced novel approach in targeting of acidic tumors, and translocation of cell-impermeable cargo molecules across cellular membrane. Our approach is based on main principle of insertion and folding of a polypeptide in lipid bilayer of membrane. We have identified family of pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs), which are capable spontaneous insertion and folding in membrane at mild acidic conditions. The affinity of peptides of pHLIP family to membrane at low pH is several times higher than at neutral pH. The process of peptides folding occurs within milliseconds. The energy released in a result of folding (about 2 kcal/mol) could be used to move polar cargo across a membrane, which is a novel concept in drug delivery. pHLIP peptides could be considered as a pH-sensitive single peptide molecular transporters and conjugated with imaging probes for fluorescence, MR, PET and SPECT imaging, they represent a novel in vivo marker of acidity. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 and GM073857 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  17. Spermatotoxicity of dichloroacetic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular toxicity of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a disinfection byproduct of drinking water, was evaluated in adult male rats given both single and multiple (up to 14 d) oral doses. Delayed spermiation and altered resorption of residual bodies were observed in rats given sin...

  18. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; van de Loo, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  19. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  20. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  1. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by...

  2. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by...

  3. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by...

  4. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  5. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations.

  6. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  7. Acid diffusion through polyaniline membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Su, T.M.; Huang, S.C.; Conklin, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    Polyaniline membranes in the undoped (base) and doped (acid) forms are studied for their utility as pervaporation membranes. The separation of water from mixtures of propionic acid, acetic acid and formic acid have been demonstrated from various feed compositions. Doped polyaniline displays an enhanced selectivity of water over these organic acids as compared with undoped polyaniline. For as-cast polyaniline membranes a diffusion coefficient (D) on the order of 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/sec has been determined for the flux of protons through the membranes using hydrochloric acid.

  8. Treatment of Bile Acid Amidation Defects with Glycocholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heubi, James E.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Jha, Pinky; Buckley, Donna; Zhang, Wujuan; Rosenthal, Philip; Potter, Carol; Horslen, Simon; Suskind, David

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid amidation defects were predicted to present with fat/fat soluble vitamin malabsorption with minimal cholestasis. We identified and treated 5 patients (1 male/4 females) from 4 families with defective bile acid amidation due to a genetically confirmed deficiency in bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyl transferase (BAAT) with the conjugated bile acid, glycocholic acid (GCA). Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry analysis of urine and bile at baseline revealed predominantly unconjugated cholic acid and absence of the usual glycine and taurine conjugated primary bile acids. Treatment with 15 mg/kg GCA resulted in total duodenal bile acid concentrations of 23.3 ± 19.1 mmol/L (mean ± SD) and 63.5 ± 4.0% of the bile acids were secreted in bile in the conjugated form of which GCA represented 59.6 ± 9.3% of the total biliary bile acids. Unconjugated cholic acid continued to be present in high concentrations in bile because of partial intestinal deconjugation of orally administered GCA. Serum total bile acid concentrations did not significantly differ between pretreatment and post-treatment samples and serum contained predominantly unconjugated cholic acid. These findings confirmed efficient intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction and biliary secretion of the administered GCA. Oral tolerance tests for vitamin D2 (1000 IU vitamin D2/kg) and tocopherol (100 IU/kg tocopherol acetate) demonstrated improvement in fat-soluble vitamin absorption after GCA treatment. Growth improved in 3/3 growth-delayed prepubertal patients. Conclusions: Oral glycocholic acid therapy is safe and effective in improving growth and fat-soluble vitamin absorption in children and adolescents with inborn errors of bile acid metabolism due to amidation defects. PMID:25163551

  9. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis. PMID:27349116

  10. NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) results on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) was mandated by Congress in 1980 to study the effects of acid rain. The results of 10 years of research on the effect of acid deposition and ozone on forests, particularly high elevation spruce and fir, southern pines, eastern hardwoods and western conifers, will be published this year.

  11. Acid Earth--The Global Threat of Acid Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, John

    Acid pollution is a major international problem, but the debate it has elicited has often clouded the distinction between myth and facts. This publication attempts to concerning the acid pollution situation. This publication attempts to identify available facts. It is the first global review of the problem of acid pollution and the first to…

  12. Usnic acid controls the acidity tolerance of lichens.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René

    2008-11-01

    The hypotheses were tested that, firstly, lichens producing the dibenzofuran usnic acid colonize substrates characterized by specific pH ranges, secondly, this preferred pH is in a range where soluble usnic acid and its corresponding anion occur in similar concentrations, and thirdly, usnic acid makes lichens vulnerable to acidity. Lichens with usnic acid prefer an ambient pH range between 3.5 and 5.5 with an optimum between 4.0 and 4.5. This optimum is close to the pK(a1) value of usnic acid of 4.4. Below this optimum pH, dissolved SO(2) reduces the chlorophyll fluorescence yield more in lichens with than without their natural content of usnic acid. This suggests that usnic acid influences the acidity tolerance of lichens. The putative mechanism of the limited acidity tolerance of usnic acid-containing lichens is the acidification of the cytosol by molecules of protonated usnic acid shuttling protons through the plasma membrane at an apoplastic pH

  13. College Chemistry Students' Mental Models of Acids and Acid Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to characterize the mental models of acids and acid strength expressed by advanced college chemistry students when engaged in prediction, explanation, and justification tasks that asked them to rank chemical compounds based on their relative acid strength. For that purpose we completed a qualitative research…

  14. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  15. [Progress in glucaric acid].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuying; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Glucaric acid (GA) is derived from glucose and commonly used in chemical industry. It is also considered as one of the "Top value-added chemicals from biomass" as carbohydrate monomers to produce various synthetic polymers and bioenergy. The demand for GA in food manufacture is increasing. GA has also attracted public attentions due to its therapeutic uses such as regulating hormones, increasing the immune function and reducing the risks of cancers. Currently GA is produced by chemical oxidation. Research on production of GA via microbial synthesis is still at preliminary stage. We reviewed the advances of glucaric acid applications, preparation and quantification methods. The prospects on production of GA by microbial fermentation were also discussed. PMID:26380405

  16. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  17. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent. PMID:3758667

  18. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent.

  19. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  20. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A; Halo, Tiffany L; Merkel, Timothy J; Rische, Clayton H; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A; Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2015-03-31

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies.