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Sample records for acid translocase cd36

  1. Rosiglitazone increases fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) but not carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in rat muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Carley R; Holloway, Graham P; Campbell, S E; Yoshida, Yuko; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) alter the expression of genes involved in regulating lipid metabolism. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, induces tissue-specific effects on lipid metabolism; however, its mode of action in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Since fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) was recently identified as a possible regulator of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, we examined in this tissue the effects of rosiglitazone infusion (7 days, 1 mg day−1) on FAT/CD36 mRNA and protein, its plasmalemmal content and fatty acid transport. In addition, in isolated subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria we examined rates of fatty acid oxidation, FAT/CD36 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) protein, and CPTI and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activities. Rosiglitazone did not alter FAT/CD36 mRNA or protein expression, FAT/CD36 plasmalemmal content, or the rate of fatty acid transport into muscle (P > 0.05). In contrast, rosiglitazone increased the rates of fatty acid oxidation in both SS (+21%) and IMF mitochondria (+36%). This was accompanied by concomitant increases in FAT/CD36 in subsarcolemmal (SS) (+43%) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria (+46%), while SS and IMF CPTI protein content, and CPTI submaximal and maximal activities (P > 0.05) were not altered. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were also not altered by rosiglitazone in SS and IMF mitochondria (P > 0.05). These studies provide another example whereby changes in mitochondrial fatty oxidation are associated with concomitant changes in mitochondrial FAT/CD36 independent of any changes in CPTI. Moreover, these studies identify for the first time a mechanism by which rosiglitazone stimulates fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, namely the chronic, subcellular relocation of FAT/CD36 to mitochondria. PMID:18238811

  2. Mitochondrial long chain fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid translocase/CD36 content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I activity in human skeletal muscle during aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham P; Bezaire, Veronic; Heigenhauser, George J F; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Bonen, Arend; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid transport is a rate-limiting step in long chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation. In rat skeletal muscle, the transport of LCFA at the level of mitochondria is regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) activity and the content of malonyl-CoA (M-CoA); however, this relationship is not consistently observed in humans. Recently, fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36 was identified on mitochondria isolated from rat and human skeletal muscle and found to be involved in LCFA oxidation. The present study investigated the effects of exercise (120 min of cycling at ∼60% V̇O2peak) on CPTI palmitoyl-CoA and M-CoA kinetics, and on the presence and functional significance of FAT/CD36 on skeletal muscle mitochondria. Whole body fat oxidation rates progressively increased during exercise (P < 0.05), and concomitantly M-CoA inhibition of CPTI was progressively attenuated. Compared to rest, 120 min of cycling reduced (P < 0.05) the inhibition of 0.7, 2, 5 and 10 μm M-CoA by 16%, 21%, 30% and 34%, respectively. Whole body fat oxidation and palmitate oxidation rates in isolated mitochondria progressively increased (P < 0.05) during exercise, and were positively correlated (r = 0.78). Mitochondrial FAT/CD36 protein increased by 63% (P < 0.05) during exercise and was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates at all time points (r= 0.41). However, the strongest (P < 0.05) correlation was observed following 120 min of cycling (r= 0.63). Importantly, the addition of sulfo-N-succimidyloleate, a specific inhibitor of FAT/CD36, reduced mitochondrial palmitate oxidation to ∼20%, indicating FAT/CD36 is functionally significant with respect to LCFA oxidation. We hypothesize that exercise-induced increases in fatty acid oxidation occur as a result of an increased ability to transport LCFA into mitochondria. We further suggest that decreased CPTI M-CoA sensitivity and increased mitochondrial FAT/CD36 protein are both

  3. Elevated free fatty acid uptake via CD36 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Aritro; Li, Irene; Roberts, Lewis R.; Chan, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and the factors influencing HCC progression are poorly understood. Here we reveal that HCC progression via induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is closely associated with the expression of CD36/fatty acid translocase and elevated free fatty acid (FFA) levels. Although obesity is manifested as elevated FFA levels, the degree of EMT was not associated with the body mass index of the patients, highlighting the specific roles of CD36 and FFA uptake. Treatment of human liver cancer cell lines with FFAs exacerbated the EMT phenotype, whereas chemical inhibition of CD36 mitigated these effects. Furthermore, the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways were activated upon FFA treatment, potentially acting as upstream activators of the EMT program. These results provide the first direct evidence associating CD36 and elevated FFAs with HCC progression. PMID:26424075

  4. Free Fatty Acid Uptake in Humans With CD36 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hames, Kazanna C.; Vella, Adrian; Kemp, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models have demonstrated that CD36 facilitates cell membrane free fatty acid (FFA) transport, but its role in human metabolism is not well understood. We measured heart, liver, adipose (three depots), and muscle (truncal postural and thigh locomotive) FFA uptake using [11C]palmitate positron emission tomography (PET) scans in a family of five carrying the Pro90Ser CD36 mutation (2 homozygotes had no CD36) and matched control volunteers. PET scans were done under conditions of suppressed and slightly increased palmitate concentrations. During suppressed palmitate conditions, muscle and adipose palmitate uptake were markedly reduced in homozygotes but not heterozygotes for the Pro90Ser CD36 mutation, whereas when palmitate concentration was slightly increased, uptake in muscle and adipose did not differ between control subjects and homozygous family members. Hepatic FFA uptake was similar in all participants regardless of palmitate concentrations, whereas myocardial FFA uptake was diminished in the Pro90Ser homozygotes during both suppressed and increased palmitate conditions. We conclude that CD36 1) facilitates FFA transport into muscle and adipose tissue in humans when extracellular concentrations are reduced but not when they are modestly elevated, 2) is not rate limiting for hepatic FFA uptake, and 3) is needed for normal cardiac FFA uptake over a range of FFA concentrations from low to slightly elevated. PMID:24917573

  5. Opposite regulation of CD36 ubiquitination by fatty acids and insulin: effects on fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill; Su, Xiong; El-Maghrabi, Raafat; Stahl, Philip D; Abumrad, Nada A

    2008-05-16

    FAT/CD36 is a membrane scavenger receptor that facilitates long chain fatty acid uptake by muscle. Acute increases in membrane CD36 and fatty acid uptake have been reported in response to insulin and contraction. In this study we have explored protein ubiquitination as one potential mechanism for the regulation of CD36 level. CD36 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) or HEK 293 cells was found to be polyubiquitinated via a process involving both lysines 48 and 63 of ubiquitin. Using CHO cells expressing the insulin receptor (CHO/hIR) and CD36, it is shown that addition of insulin (100 nm, 10 and 30 min) significantly reduced CD36 ubiquitination. In contrast, ubiquitination was strongly enhanced by fatty acids (200 microm palmitate or oleate, 2 h). Similarly, endogenous CD36 in C2C12 myotubes was ubiquitinated, and this was enhanced by oleic acid treatment, which also reduced total CD36 protein in cell lysates. Insulin reduced CD36 ubiquitination, increased CD36 protein, and inhibited the opposite effects of fatty acids on both parameters. These changes were paralleled by changes in fatty acid uptake, which could be blocked by the CD36 inhibitor sulfosuccinimidyl oleate. Mutation of the two lysine residues in the carboxyl-terminal tail of CD36 markedly attenuated ubiquitination of the protein expressed in CHO cells and was associated with increased CD36 level and enhanced oleate uptake and incorporation into triglycerides. In conclusion, fatty acids and insulin induce opposite alterations in CD36 ubiquitination, modulating CD36 level and fatty acid uptake. Altered CD36 turnover may contribute to abnormal fatty acid uptake in the insulin-resistant muscle. PMID:18353783

  6. CD36 Binds Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) in a Mechanism Dependent upon Fatty Acid Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Anthony G.; Chen, Alexander N.; Paz, Miguel A.; Hung, Justin P.; Hamilton, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25555908

  7. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  8. Structure-Function of CD36 and Importance of Fatty Acid Signal Transduction in Fat Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Kuda, Ondrej; Samovski, Dmitri; Abumrad, Nada A

    2015-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor that functions in high affinity tissue uptake of long chain fatty acids (FA) and contributes under excessive fat supply to lipid accumulation and metabolic dysfunction. This review describes recent evidence regarding the CD36 FA binding site and a potential mechanism for FA transfer. It also presents the view that CD36 and FA signaling coordinate fat utilization based on newly identified CD36 actions that involve oral fat perception, intestinal fat absorption, secretion of the peptides cholecystokinin and secretin, regulation of hepatic lipoprotein output, activation of beta oxidation by muscle and regulation of the production of the FA derived bioactive eicosanoids. Thus abnormalities of fat metabolism and the associated pathology might involve dysfunction of CD36-mediated signal transduction in addition to the changes of FA uptake. PMID:24850384

  9. Regulation of the subcellular trafficking of CD36, a major determinant of cardiac fatty acid utilization.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Jan F C; Nabben, Miranda; Heather, Lisa C; Bonen, Arend; Luiken, Joost J F P

    2016-10-01

    Myocardial uptake of long-chain fatty acids largely occurs by facilitated diffusion, involving primarily the membrane-associated protein CD36. Other putative fatty acid transporters, such as FABPpm, FATP1 and FATP4, also play a role, but their quantitative contribution is much smaller or their involvement is rather permissive. Besides its sarcolemmal localization, CD36 is also present in intracellular compartments (endosomes). CD36 cycles between both pools via vesicle-mediated trafficking, and the relative distribution between endosomes versus sarcolemma determines the rate of cardiac fatty acid uptake. A net translocation of CD36 to the sarcolemma is induced by various stimuli, in particular hormones like insulin and myocyte contractions, so as to allow a proper coordination of the rate of fatty acid uptake with rapid fluctuations in myocardial energy needs. Furthermore, changes in cardiac fatty acid utilization that occur in both acute and chronic cardiac disease appear to be accompanied by concomitant changes in the sarcolemmal presence of CD36. Studies in various animal and cell models suggest that interventions aimed at modulating the sarcolemmal presence or functioning of CD36 hold promise as therapy to rectify aberrant rates of fatty acid uptake in order to fight cardiac metabolic remodeling and restore proper contractile function. In this review we discuss our current knowledge about the role of CD36 in cardiac fatty acid uptake and metabolism in health and disease with focus on the regulation of the subcellular trafficking of CD36 and its selective modulation as therapeutic approach for cardiac disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:27090938

  10. Role of FAT/CD36 in fatty acid sensing, energy, and glucose homeostasis regulation in DIO and DR rats.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Levin, Barry E

    2015-02-01

    Hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) sensing neurons alter their activity utilizing the FA translocator/receptor, FAT/CD36. Depletion of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) CD36 with adeno-associated viral vector expressing CD36 shRNA (AAV CD36 shRNA) leads to redistribution of adipose stores and insulin resistance in outbred rats. This study assessed the requirement of VMH CD36-mediated FA sensing for the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in postnatal day 5 (P5) and P21 selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rats using VMH AAV CD36 shRNA injections. P5 CD36 depletion altered VMH neuronal FA sensing predominantly in DIO rats. After 10 wk on a 45% fat diet, DIO rats injected with VMH AAV CD36 shRNA at P21 ate more and gained more weight than DIO AAV controls, while DR AAV CD36 shRNA-injected rats gained less weight than DR AAV controls. VMH CD36 depletion increased inguinal fat pad weights and leptin levels in DIO and DR rats. Although DR AAV CD36 shRNA-injected rats became as obese as DIO AAV controls, only DIO control and CD36 depleted rats became insulin-resistant on a 45% fat diet. VMH CD36 depletion stunted linear growth in DIO and DR rats. DIO rats injected with AAV CD36 shRNA at P5 had increased fat mass, mostly due to a 45% increase in subcutaneous fat. They were also insulin-resistant with an associated 71% increase of liver triglycerides. These results demonstrate that VMH CD36-mediated FA sensing is a critical factor in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis and fat deposition in DIO and DR rats. PMID:25477422

  11. Activation of AMPKα2 Is Not Required for Mitochondrial FAT/CD36 Accumulation during Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia; Whitfield, Jamie; Jain, Swati S; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to induce the translocation of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), a fatty acid transport protein, to both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. While previous studies have examined signals involved in the induction of FAT/CD36 translocation to sarcolemmal membranes, to date the signaling events responsible for FAT/CD36 accumulation on mitochondrial membranes have not been investigated. In the current study muscle contraction rapidly increased FAT/CD36 on plasma membranes (7.5 minutes), while in contrast, FAT/CD36 only increased on mitochondrial membranes after 22.5 minutes of muscle contraction, a response that was exercise-intensity dependent. Considering that previous research has shown that AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 is not required for FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane, we investigated whether AMPK α2 signaling is necessary for mitochondrial FAT/CD36 accumulation. Administration of 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) induced AMPK phosphorylation, and resulted in FAT/CD36 accumulation on SS mitochondria, suggesting AMPK signaling may mediate this response. However, SS mitochondrial FAT/CD36 increased following acute treadmill running in both wild-type (WT) and AMPKα 2 kinase dead (KD) mice. These data suggest that AMPK signaling is not required for SS mitochondrial FAT/CD36 accumulation. The current data also implicates alternative signaling pathways that are exercise-intensity dependent, as IMF mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content only occurred at a higher power output. Taken altogether the current data suggests that activation of AMPK signaling is sufficient but not required for exercise-induced accumulation in mitochondrial FAT/CD36. PMID:25965390

  12. Hyperinsulinemia Enhances Hepatic Expression of the Fatty Acid Transporter Cd36 and Provokes Hepatosteatosis and Hepatic Insulin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Steneberg, Pär; Sykaras, Alexandros G.; Backlund, Fredrik; Straseviciene, Jurate; Söderström, Ingegerd; Edlund, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis is associated with the development of both hepatic insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Hepatic expression of Cd36, a fatty acid transporter, is enhanced in obese and diabetic murine models and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and thus it correlates with hyperinsulinemia, steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we have explored the effect of hyperinsulinemia on hepatic Cd36 expression, development of hepatosteatosis, insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. A 3-week sucrose-enriched diet was sufficient to provoke hyperinsulinemia, hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia in CBA/J mice. The development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in CBA/J mice on a sucrose-enriched diet was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the transcription factor Pparγ and its target gene Cd36 whereas that of genes implicated in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL secretion was unaltered. Additionally, we demonstrate that insulin, in a Pparγ-dependent manner, is sufficient to directly increase Cd36 expression in perfused livers and isolated hepatocytes. Mouse strains that display low insulin levels, i.e. C57BL6/J, and/or lack hepatic Pparγ, i.e. C3H/HeN, do not develop hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, or dysglycemia on a sucrose-enriched diet, suggesting that elevated insulin levels, via enhanced CD36 expression, provoke fatty liver development that in turn leads to hepatic insulin resistance and dysglycemia. Thus, our data provide evidence for a direct role for hyperinsulinemia in stimulating hepatic Cd36 expression and thus the development of hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. PMID:26085100

  13. CD36- and GPR120-mediated Ca2+ Signaling in Human Taste Bud Cells Mediates Differential Responses to Fatty Acids and is Altered in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozdener, Mehmet Hakan; Subramaniam, Selvakumar; Sundaresan, Sinju; Sery, Omar; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims It is important to increase our understanding of gustatory detection of dietary fat and its contribution to fat preference. We studied the roles of the fat taste receptors CD36 and GPR120 and their interactions via Ca2+ signaling in fungiform taste bud cells (TBC). Methods We measured Ca2+ signaling in human TBC, transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against mRNAs encoding CD36 and GPR120 (or control siRNAs). We also studied Ca2+ signaling in TBC from CD36−/− mice and from wild-type lean and obese mice. Additional studies were conducted with mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1 that express GPR120 and stably transfected with human CD36. We measured release of serotonin and GLP-1 from human and mice TBC in response to CD36 and GPR120 activation. Results High concentrations of linoleic acid induced Ca2+ signaling via CD36 and GPR120 in human and mice TBC as well as in STC-1 cells, whereas low concentrations induced Ca2+ signaling via only CD36. Incubation of human and mice fungiform TBC with lineoleic acid downregulated CD36 and upregulated GPR120 in membrane lipid rafts. Obese mice had decreased spontaneous preference for fat. Fungiform TBC from obese mice had reduced Ca2+ and serotonin responses but increased release of GLP1, along with reduced levels of CD36 and increased levels of GPR120 in lipid rafts. Conclusions CD36 and GPR120 have non-overlapping roles in TBC signaling during oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids; these are differentially regulated by obesity. PMID:24412488

  14. FAT/CD36 expression alone is insufficient to enhance cellular uptake of oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Eyre, Nicholas S.; Cleland, Leslie G.; Mayrhofer, Graham

    2008-06-06

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is one of several proteins implicated in receptor-mediated uptake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). We have tested whether levels of FAT/CD36 correlate with cellular oleic acid import, using a Tet-Off inducible transfected CHO cell line. Consistent with our previous findings, FAT/CD36 was enriched in lipid raft-derived detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) that also contained caveolin-1, the marker protein of caveolae. Furthermore in transfected cells, plasma membrane FAT/CD36 co-localized extensively with the lipid raft-enriched ganglioside GM1, and partially with a caveolin-1-EGFP fusion protein. Nevertheless, even at high levels of expression, FAT/CD36 did not affect uptake of oleic acid. We propose that the ability of FAT/CD36 to mediate enhanced uptake of LCFAs is dependent on co-expression of other proteins or factors that are lacking in CHO cells.

  15. Hepatocyte-Specific Disruption of CD36 Attenuates Fatty Liver and Improves Insulin Sensitivity in HFD-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Camella G; Tran, Jennifer L; Erion, Derek M; Vera, Nicholas B; Febbraio, Maria; Weiss, Ethan J

    2016-02-01

    CD36/FAT (fatty acid translocase) is associated with human and murine nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but it has been unclear whether it is simply a marker or whether it directly contributes to disease pathogenesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2L mice) have increased circulating free fatty acids (FAs), dramatically increased hepatic CD36 expression and profound fatty liver. To investigate the role of elevated CD36 in the development of fatty liver, we studied two models of hepatic steatosis, a genetic model (JAK2L mice) and a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis model. We deleted Cd36 specifically in hepatocytes of JAK2L mice to generate double knockouts and from wild-type mice to generate CD36L single-knockout mice. Hepatic Cd36 disruption in JAK2L livers significantly improved steatosis by lowering triglyceride, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester content. The largest differences in liver triglycerides were in species comprised of oleic acid (C18:1). Reduction in liver lipids correlated with an improvement in the inflammatory markers that were elevated in JAK2L mice, namely aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase. Cd36 deletion in mice on HFD (CD36L-HFD) reduced liver lipid content and decreased hepatic 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-FA uptake as compared with CON-HFD. Additionally, CD36L-HFD mice had improved whole-body insulin sensitivity and reduced liver and serum inflammatory markers. Therefore, CD36 directly contributes to development of fatty liver under conditions of elevated free FAs by modulating the rate of FA uptake by hepatocytes. In HFD-fed animals, disruption of hepatic Cd36 protects against associated systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26650570

  16. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Putri, Mirasari; Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A A; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Yokoyama, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Hiroshi; Abumrad, Nada A; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36(-/-) mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36(-/-) mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue (125)I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue (18)F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36(-/-) mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36(-/-) mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36(-/-) mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. PMID:25596128

  17. The role of CD36 in the regulation of myocardial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ty T; Dyck, Jason R B

    2016-10-01

    Since the heart has one of the highest energy requirements of all organs in the body, it requires a constant and plentiful supply of fuel to function properly. Mitochondrial oxidation of lipids provides a major source of ATP for the heart, and the cellular processes that regulate lipid uptake and utilization are important contributors to maintaining proper myocardial energetic status. Although numerous proteins are coordinately regulated in order to ensure proper fatty acid utilization in the cardiomyocyte, a key first step in this process is the entry of fatty acids into the cell. An important protein involved in the transport of fatty acids into the cardiomyocyte is the plasma membrane-associated protein known as fatty acid translocase (FAT; also known as CD36). While multiple proteins are involved in facilitating fatty acid uptake in the heart, CD36 accounts for approximately 50-70% of the total fatty acid taken up in cardiomyocytes. As such, myocardial metabolism of fatty acids may depend upon proper CD36 function. Consistent with this, changes in CD36 levels/function have been implicated in the alteration of myocardial metabolism in the pathophysiology of certain cardiovascular diseases. As such, a better understanding of the role and function of CD36 in the heart may provide important insights for the development of new treatments for specific cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we review the role of CD36 in myocardial lipid metabolism in the healthy heart and describe how CD36-mediated alterations in lipid metabolism may contribute to cardiovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26995462

  18. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress

    SciTech Connect

    Putri, Mirasari; Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A.A.; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Tsushima, Yoshito; and others

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36{sup −/−} mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue {sup 125}I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue {sup 18}F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36{sup −/−} mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. - Highlights: • We examined the role of CD36 in thermogenesis during cold exposure. • CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit rapid hypothermia after cold exposure during fasting. • Uptake of fatty acid and glucose is impaired in thermogenic tissues during fasting. • Storage of energy substrates is

  19. Hematopoietic Cell–Restricted Deletion of CD36 Reduces High-Fat Diet–Induced Macrophage Infiltration and Improves Insulin Signaling in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Hayley T.; Kowalski, Greg; Kennedy, David J.; Risis, Steve; Zaffino, Lee A.; Watson, Nadine; Kanellakis, Peter; Watt, Matthew J.; Bobik, Alex; Bonen, Arend; Febbraio, Maria; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Febbraio, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fatty acid translocase and scavenger receptor CD36 is important in the recognition and uptake of lipids. Accordingly, we hypothesized that it plays a role in saturated fatty acid–induced macrophage lipid accumulation and proinflammatory activation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In vitro, the effect of CD36 inhibition and deletion in lipid-induced macrophage inflammation was assessed using the putative CD36 inhibitor, sulfosuccinimidyl oleate (SSO), and bone marrow–derived macrophages from mice with (CD36KO) or without (wild-type) global deletion of CD36. To investigate whether deletion of macrophage CD36 would improve insulin sensitivity in vivo, wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from CD36KO or wild-type mice and then fed a standard or high-fat diet (HFD) for 20 weeks. RESULTS SSO treatment markedly reduced saturated fatty acid–induced lipid accumulation and inflammation in RAW264.7 macrophages. Mice harboring CD36-specific deletion in hematopoietic-derived cells (HSC CD36KO) fed an HFD displayed improved insulin signaling and reduced macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue compared with wild-type mice, but this did not translate into protection against HFD-induced whole-body insulin resistance. Contrary to our hypothesis and our results using SSO in RAW264.7 macrophages, neither saturated fatty acid–induced lipid accumulation nor inflammation was reduced when comparing CD36KO with wild-type bone marrow–derived macrophages. CONCLUSIONS Although CD36 does not appear important in saturated fatty acid–induced macrophage lipid accumulation, our study uncovers a novel role for CD36 in the migration of proinflammatory phagocytes to adipose tissue in obesity, with a concomitant improvement in insulin action. PMID:21378177

  20. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A.; Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M.; Saleem, M.A.; Topham, P.S.

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub −FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub −FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub −FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  1. ROS-dependent Syk and Pyk2-mediated STAT1 activation is required for 15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-induced CD36 expression and foam cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Singh, Nikhlesh K.; Traylor, James G.; Orr, A. Wayne; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2014-01-01

    15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), the major 15-lipoxygenase 1/2 (15-LO1/2) metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA), induces CD36 expression through xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and Syk and Pyk2-dependent STAT1 activation. In line with these observations, 15(S)-HETE also induced foam cell formation involving ROS, Syk, Pyk2 and STAT1-mediated CD36 expression. In addition, peritoneal macrophages from Western diet-fed ApoE−/− mice exhibited elevated levels of xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase activities, ROS production, Syk, Pyk2, and STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 expression compared to those from ApoE−/−:12/15-LO−/− mice and these events correlated with increased lipid deposits, macrophage content and lesion progression in the aortic roots. Human atherosclerotic arteries also showed increased 15-LO1 expression, STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 levels as compared to normal arteries. Together, these findings suggest that 12/15-LO metabolites of AA, particularly 12/15(S)-HETE might play a crucial role in atherogenesis by enhancing foam cell formation. PMID:25152235

  2. Palmitic acid interferes with energy metabolism balance by adversely switching the SIRT1-CD36-fatty acid pathway to the PKC zeta-GLUT4-glucose pathway in cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yeh-Peng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Shen, Chia-Yao; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, V Vijaya; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic regulation is inextricably linked with cardiac function. Fatty acid metabolism is a significant mechanism for creating energy for the heart. However, cardiomyocytes are able to switch the fatty acids or glucose, depending on different situations, such as ischemia or anoxia. Lipotoxicity in obesity causes impairments in energy metabolism and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. We utilized the treatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells palmitic acid (PA) as a model for hyperlipidemia to investigate the signaling mechanisms involved in these processes. Our results show PA induces time- and dose-dependent lipotoxicity in H9c2 cells. Moreover, PA enhances cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and reduces glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) pathway protein levels following a short period of treatment, but cells switch from CD36 back to the GLUT4 pathway after during long-term exposure to PA. As sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) play important roles in CD36 and GLUT4 translocation, we used the SIRT1 activator resveratrol and si-PKCζ to identify the switches in metabolism. Although PA reduced CD36 and increased GLUT4 metabolic pathway proteins, when we pretreated cells with resveratrol to activate SIRT1 or transfected si-PKCζ, both were able to significantly increase CD36 metabolic pathway proteins and reduce GLUT4 pathway proteins. High-fat diets affect energy metabolism pathways in both normal and aging rats and involve switching the energy source from the CD36 pathway to GLUT4. In conclusion, PA and high-fat diets cause lipotoxicity in vivo and in vitro and adversely switch the energy source from the CD36 pathway to the GLUT4 pathway. PMID:27133433

  3. CD36 gene deletion reduces fat preference and intake but not post-oral fat conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A; Ackroff, K; Abumrad, N A

    2007-11-01

    Several findings suggest the existence of a "fatty" taste, and the CD36 fatty acid translocase is a candidate taste receptor. The present study compared fat preference and acceptance in CD36 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice using nutritive (triglyceride and fatty acid) and nonnutritive (Sefa Soyate oil) emulsions. In two-bottle tests (24 h/day) naive KO mice, unlike WT mice, displayed little or no preference for dilute soybean oil, linoleic acid, or Sefa Soyate emulsions. At high concentrations (2.5-20%), KO mice developed significant soybean oil preferences, although they consumed less oil than WT mice. The postoral actions of fat likely conditioned these preferences. KO mice, like WT mice, learned to prefer a flavored solution paired with intragastric soybean oil infusions. These findings support CD36 mediation of a gustatory component to fat preference but demonstrate that it is not essential for fat-conditioned flavor preferences. The finding that oil-naive KO mice failed to prefer a nonnutritive oil, assumed to provide texture rather than taste cues, requires explanation. Finally, CD36 deletion decreased fat consumption and enhanced the ability of the mice to compensate for the calories provided by their optional fat intake. PMID:17804586

  4. Molecular basis of human CD36 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis may be important for the prevention and treatment of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of CD36 gene structure, splicing, and mutations and the molecular, metabolic, and clinical consequences of these phenomena. PMID:17673938

  5. Molecular Basis of Human CD36 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis may be important for the prevention and treatment of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of CD36 gene structure, splicing, and mutations and the molecular, metabolic, and clinical consequences of these phenomena. PMID:17673938

  6. Associations between orosensory perception of oleic acid, the common single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs1761667 and rs1527483) in the CD36 gene, and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) tasting.

    PubMed

    Melis, Melania; Sollai, Giorgia; Muroni, Patrizia; Crnjar, Roberto; Barbarossa, Iole Tomassini

    2015-03-01

    Orosensory perception of dietary fat varies in individuals, thus influencing nutritional status. Several studies associated fat detection and preference with CD36 or 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity. Other studies have not confirmed the latter association. We analyzed the relationship between orosensory perception of oleic acid, two CD36 variants, and PROP tasting. Thresholds of oleic acid perception were assessed in 64 subjects using a modification of the three-alternative forced-choice procedure. Subjects were classified for PROP taster status and genotyped for TAS2R38 and CD36 (SNPs: rs1761667 and rs1527483). Subjects homozygous for GG of the rs1761667 polymorphism showed higher sensitivity to oleic acid than AA subjects. The capability to detect oleic acid was directly associated with TAS2R38 or PROP responsiveness. PROP non-tasters had a lower papilla density than tasters, and those with genotype GG of the rs1761667 polymorphism had lower oleic acid thresholds than PROP non-tasters with genotype AA. In conclusion, results showed a direct association between orosensory perception of oleic acid and PROP tasting or rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36, which play a significant role in PROP non-tasters, given their low number of taste papillae. Characterization of individual capability to detect fatty acids may have important nutritional implications by explaining variations in human fat preferences. PMID:25803547

  7. Associations between Orosensory Perception of Oleic Acid, the Common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (rs1761667 and rs1527483) in the CD36 Gene, and 6-n-Propylthiouracil (PROP) Tasting

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Melania; Sollai, Giorgia; Muroni, Patrizia; Crnjar, Roberto; Tomassini Barbarossa, Iole

    2015-01-01

    Orosensory perception of dietary fat varies in individuals, thus influencing nutritional status. Several studies associated fat detection and preference with CD36 or 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity. Other studies have not confirmed the latter association. We analyzed the relationship between orosensory perception of oleic acid, two CD36 variants, and PROP tasting. Thresholds of oleic acid perception were assessed in 64 subjects using a modification of the three-alternative forced-choice procedure. Subjects were classified for PROP taster status and genotyped for TAS2R38 and CD36 (SNPs: rs1761667 and rs1527483). Subjects homozygous for GG of the rs1761667 polymorphism showed higher sensitivity to oleic acid than AA subjects. The capability to detect oleic acid was directly associated with TAS2R38 or PROP responsiveness. PROP non-tasters had a lower papilla density than tasters, and those with genotype GG of the rs1761667 polymorphism had lower oleic acid thresholds than PROP non-tasters with genotype AA. In conclusion, results showed a direct association between orosensory perception of oleic acid and PROP tasting or rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36, which play a significant role in PROP non-tasters, given their low number of taste papillae. Characterization of individual capability to detect fatty acids may have important nutritional implications by explaining variations in human fat preferences. PMID:25803547

  8. Obesity-driven prepartal hepatic lipid accumulation in dairy cows is associated with increased CD36 and SREBP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Prodanović, Radiša; Korićanac, Goran; Vujanac, Ivan; Djordjević, Ana; Pantelić, Marija; Romić, Snježana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Kirovski, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that obesity in dairy cows enhanced expression of proteins involved in hepatic fatty acid uptake and metabolism. Sixteen Holstein-Friesian close-up cows were divided into 2 equal groups based on their body condition score (BCS) as optimal (3.25≤BCS≤3.5) and high (4.0≤BCS≤4.25). Intravenous glucose tolerance test (GTT) and liver biopsies were carried out at day 10 before calving. Blood samples were collected before (basal) and after glucose infusion, and glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels were determined at each sample point. In addition, β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides levels were measured in the basal samples. The liver biopsies were analyzed for total lipid content and protein expression of insulin receptor beta (IRβ), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Basal glucose and insulin were higher in high-BCS cows, which coincided with higher circulating triglycerides and hepatic lipid content. Clearance rate and AUC for NEFA during GTT were higher in optimal-BCS cows. The development of insulin resistance and fatty liver in obese cows was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the IRβ, CD36 and SREBP-1. These results suggest that increased expression of hepatic CD36 and SREBP-1 is relevant in the obesity-driven lipid accumulation in the liver of dairy cows during late gestation. PMID:27473969

  9. Dietary Lipids Inform the Gut and Brain about Meal Arrival via CD36-Mediated Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Abumrad, Nada A

    2015-10-01

    Sensing mechanisms for nutrients, in particular dietary fat, operate in the mouth, brain, and gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in regulating feeding behavior and energy balance. Critical to these regulatory mechanisms are the specialized receptors present on taste buds on the tongue, on neurons in specialized centers in the brain, and on epithelial and enteroendocrine cells in the intestinal mucosa. These receptors recognize nutrients and respond by inducing intracellular signals that trigger release of bioactive compounds that influence other organs and help coordinate the response to the meal. Components of dietary fat that are recognized by these receptors are the long-chain fatty acids that act as ligands for 2 G protein-coupled receptors, GPR40 and GPR120, and the fatty acid (FA) translocase/CD36. Recent evidence that emphasizes the important role of CD36 in orosensory, intestinal, and neuronal sensing of FAs under physiologic conditions is highlighted in the review. How this role intersects with that of GPR120 and GPR40 in the regulation of food preference and energy balance is briefly discussed. PMID:26269236

  10. The anti-TNF-α antibody infliximab inhibits the expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 in a selective hepatic-radiation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Wolff, Hendrik A; Malik, Ihtzaz A

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1-3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6-12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6-12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  11. The Anti-TNF-α Antibody Infliximab Inhibits the Expression of Fat-Transporter-Protein FAT/CD36 in a Selective Hepatic-Radiation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Malik, Ihtzaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1–3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6–12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6–12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  12. CD36 deficiency attenuates experimental mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the CD36 scavenger receptor family have been implicated as sensors of microbial products that mediate phagocytosis and inflammation in response to a broad range of pathogens. We investigated the role of CD36 in host response to mycobacterial infection. Methods Experimental Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection in Cd36+/+ and Cd36-/- mice, and in vitro co-cultivation of M. tuberculosis, BCG and M. marinum with Cd36+/+ and Cd36-/-murine macrophages. Results Using an in vivo model of BCG infection in Cd36+/+ and Cd36-/- mice, we found that mycobacterial burden in liver and spleen is reduced (83% lower peak splenic colony forming units, p < 0.001), as well as the density of granulomas, and circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in Cd36-/- animals. Intracellular growth of all three mycobacterial species was reduced in Cd36-/- relative to wild type Cd36+/+ macrophages in vitro. This difference was not attributable to alterations in mycobacterial uptake, macrophage viability, rate of macrophage apoptosis, production of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species, TNF or interleukin-10. Using an in vitro model designed to recapitulate cellular events implicated in mycobacterial infection and dissemination in vivo (i.e., phagocytosis of apoptotic macrophages containing mycobacteria), we demonstrated reduced recovery of viable mycobacteria within Cd36-/- macrophages. Conclusions Together, these data indicate that CD36 deficiency confers resistance to mycobacterial infection. This observation is best explained by reduced intracellular survival of mycobacteria in the Cd36-/- macrophage and a role for CD36 in the cellular events involved in granuloma formation that promote early bacterial expansion and dissemination. PMID:20950462

  13. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:26245899

  14. Functional roles of membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; McGregor, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are mediated by a number of membrane glycoproteins. On the basis of structural homologies, several families of cell adhesion molecules (integrins, selectins, immunoglobulins, cadherins, leucine-rich glycoproteins) have been established. Since 1991, a new family of CD36-like proteins has been identified. CD36 is a cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a large variety of ligands. CD36 has been implicated in thrombosis, vascular biology, lipid metabolism and atherogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize our present knowledge on this important, multifunctional glycoprotein. PMID:21043590

  15. Rapamycin-mediated CD36 translational suppression contributes to alleviation of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Yan, Yong; Hu, Lin; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Ping; Moorhead, John F; Varghese, Zac; Chen, Yaxi; Ruan, Xiong Z

    2014-04-25

    Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-specific inhibitor, has the effect of anti-lipid deposition on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the mechanisms with which rapamycin alleviates hepatic steatosis are not fully disclosed. CD36 is known to facilitate long-chain fatty acid uptake and contribute to NAFLD progression. Hepatic CD36 expression is closely associated with hepatic steatosis, while mTOR pathway is involved in CD36 translational control. This study was undertaken to investigate whether rapamycin alleviates hepatic steatosis via the inhibition of mTOR pathway-dependent CD36 translation. Human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate and C57BL/6J mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) to induce hepatic steatosis. Hepatic CD36 protein expression was significantly increased with lipid accumulation in palmitate-treated HepG2 cells or HFD-fed C57BL/6J mice. Rapamycin reduced hepatic steatosis and CD36 protein expression, but it had no influence on CD36 mRNA expression. Rapamycin had no effect on CD36 protein stability, but it significantly decreased CD36 translational efficiency. We further confirmed that rapamycin inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream translational regulators including p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). This study demonstrates that rapamycin inhibits hepatic CD36 translational efficiency through the mTOR pathway, resulting in reduction of CD36 protein expression and alleviation of hepatic steatosis. PMID:24685479

  16. Decreased expression of adipose CD36 and FATP1 are associated with increased plasma nonesterified fatty acids during prolonged fasting in northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The northern elephant seal undergoes a 2-3 month post-weaning fast during which it depends primarily on the oxidation of fatty acids to meet its energetic demands. The concentration of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) increases and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in late-fasted...

  17. A single aldehyde group can serve as a structural element for recognition by transmembrane protein CD36.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Amitsuka, Takahiko; Okahashi, Tatsuya; Kozai, Yuki; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2016-07-01

    Transmembrane protein CD36 is considered to bind its distinct ligands such as long-chain fatty acids primarily by recognizing their terminal carboxyl moiety. In this study, we provide evidence that long-chain fatty aldehydes, such as oleic aldehyde, can be recognized by CD36. We suggest that a single aldehyde group may also serve as one of the structural elements recognizable by CD36. PMID:26923548

  18. A novel role for the dioxin receptor in fatty acid metabolism and hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Wada, Taira; Febbraio, Maria; He, Jinhan; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Lee, Min Jae; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a PAS domain transcription factor previously known as the “dioxin receptor” or “xenobiotic receptor.” The goal of this study is to determine the endobiotic role of AhR in hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild type, constitutively activated AhR (CA-AhR) transgenic, AhR null (AhR-/-), and fatty acid translocase CD36/FAT null (CD36-/-) mice were used to investigate the role of AhR in steatosis and the involvement of CD36 in the steatotic effect of AhR. The promoters of the mouse and human CD36 genes were cloned and their regulation by AhR was analyzed. Results Activation of AhR induced spontaneous hepatic steatosis characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides. The steatotic effect of AhR is likely due to the combined upregulation of CD36 and fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), suppression of fatty acid oxidation, inhibition of hepatic export of triglycerides, increase in peripheral fat mobilization, and increased hepatic oxidative stress. Promoter analysis established CD36 as a novel transcriptional target of AhR. Activation of AhR in liver cells induced CD36 gene expression and enhanced fatty acid uptake. The steatotic effect of an AhR agonist was inhibited in CD36-/- mice. Conclusions Our study reveals a novel link between AhR-induced steatosis and the expression of CD36. Industrial or military exposures to dioxin and related compounds have been linked to increased prevalence of fatty liver in humans. Results from this study may help to establish AhR and its target CD36 as novel therapeutic and preventive targets for fatty liver disease. PMID:20303349

  19. Cluster Differentiating 36 (CD36) Deficiency Attenuates Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Mohamed; Tao, Huan; Fungwe, Thomas V.; Hajri, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Obesity is often associated with a state of oxidative stress and increased lipid deposition in the heart. More importantly, obesity increases lipid influx into the heart and induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to cell toxicity and metabolic dysfunction. Cluster differentiating 36 (CD36) protein is highly expressed in the heart and regulates lipid utilization but its role in obesity-associated oxidative stress is still not clear. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CD36 deficiency on cardiac steatosis, oxidative stress and lipotoxicity associated with obesity. Methods and Results Studies were conducted in control (Lean), obese leptin-deficient (Lepob/ob) and leptin-CD36 double null (Lepob/obCD36-/-) mice. Compared to lean mice, cardiac steatosis, and fatty acid (FA) uptake and oxidation were increased in Lepob/ob mice, while glucose uptake and oxidation was reduced. Moreover, insulin resistance, oxidative stress markers and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production were markedly enhanced. This was associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase expression, and increased membrane-associated p47phox, p67phox and protein kinase C. Silencing CD36 in Lepob/ob mice prevented cardiac steatosis, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose utilization, but reduced FA uptake and oxidation. Moreover, CD36 deficiency reduced NADPH oxidase activity and decreased NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. In isolated cardiomyocytes, CD36 deficiency reduced palmitate-induced ROS production and normalized NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusions CD36 deficiency prevented obesity-associated cardiac steatosis and insulin resistance, and reduced NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. The study demonstrates that CD36 regulates NADPH oxidase activity and mediates FA-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27195707

  20. CD36 actions in the heart: Lipids, calcium, inflammation, repair and more?

    PubMed

    Abumrad, Nada A; Goldberg, Ira J

    2016-10-01

    CD36 is a multifunctional immuno-metabolic receptor with many ligands. One of its physiological functions in the heart is the high-affinity uptake of long-chain fatty acids (FAs) from albumin and triglyceride rich lipoproteins. CD36 deletion markedly reduces myocardial FA uptake in rodents and humans. The protein is expressed on endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes and at both sites is likely to contribute to FA uptake by the myocardium. CD36 also transduces intracellular signaling events that influence how the FA is utilized and mediate metabolic effects of FA in the heart. CD36 transduced signaling regulates AMPK activation in a way that adjusts oxidation to FA uptake. It also impacts remodeling of myocardial phospholipids and eicosanoid production, effects exerted via influencing intracellular calcium (iCa(2+)) and the activation of phospholipases. Under excessive FA supply CD36 contributes to lipid accumulation, inflammation and dysfunction. However, it is also important for myocardial repair after injury via its contribution to immune cell clearance of apoptotic cells. This review describes recent progress regarding the multiple actions of CD36 in the heart and highlights those areas requiring future investigation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:27004753

  1. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) and CD36 Protein Expression: THE DUAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES OF PROGESTERONE.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Wenwen; Chen, Yuanli; Li, Yan; Sun, Lei; Liu, Ying; Liu, Mengyang; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaoju; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2016-07-15

    Progesterone or its analog, one of components of hormone replacement therapy, may attenuate the cardioprotective effects of estrogen. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Expression of CD36, a receptor for oxidized LDL (oxLDL) that enhances macrophage/foam cell formation, is activated by the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). CD36 also functions as a fatty acid transporter to influence fatty acid metabolism and the pathophysiological status of several diseases. In this study, we determined that progesterone induced macrophage CD36 expression, which is related to progesterone receptor (PR) activity. Progesterone enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake in a CD36-dependent manner. Mechanistically, progesterone increased PPARγ expression and PPARγ promoter activity in a PR-dependent manner and the binding of PR with the progesterone response element in the PPARγ promoter. Specific deletion of macrophage PPARγ (MφPPARγ KO) expression in mice abolished progesterone-induced macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL accumulation. We also determined that, associated with gestation and increased serum progesterone levels, CD36 and PPARγ expression in mouse adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and peritoneal macrophages were substantially activated. Taken together, our study demonstrates that progesterone can play dual pathophysiological roles by activating PPARγ expression, in which progesterone increases macrophage CD36 expression and oxLDL accumulation, a negative effect on atherosclerosis, and enhances the PPARγ-CD36 pathway in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, a protective effect on pregnancy. PMID:27226602

  2. CD36 is required for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Kim, In-San

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was induced during myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was localized in multinucleated myotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of myogenic markers is attenuated in CD36 knockdown C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of CD36 significantly inhibited myotube formation during differentiation. -- Abstract: Recently, CD36 has been found to be involved in the cytokine-induced fusion of macrophage. Myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes is required for myogenesis and muscle regeneration. Because a search of gene expression database revealed the attenuation of CD36 expression in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients, the possibility that CD36 could be required for myoblast fusion was investigated. CD36 expression was markedly up-regulated during myoblast differentiation and localized in multinucleated myotubes. Knockdown of endogenous CD36 significantly decreased the expression of myogenic markers as well as myotube formation. These results support the notion that CD36 plays an important role in cell fusion during myogenic differentiation. Our finding will aid the elucidation of the common mechanism governing cell-to-cell fusion in various fusion models.

  3. Structure of LIMP-2 provides functional insights with implications for SR-BI and CD36.

    PubMed

    Neculai, Dante; Schwake, Michael; Ravichandran, Mani; Zunke, Friederike; Collins, Richard F; Peters, Judith; Neculai, Mirela; Plumb, Jonathan; Loppnau, Peter; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Seitova, Alma; Trimble, William S; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2013-12-01

    Members of the CD36 superfamily of scavenger receptor proteins are important regulators of lipid metabolism and innate immunity. They recognize normal and modified lipoproteins, as well as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The family consists of three members: SR-BI (which delivers cholesterol to the liver and steroidogenic organs and is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus), LIMP-2/LGP85 (which mediates lysosomal delivery of β-glucocerebrosidase and serves as a receptor for enterovirus 71 and coxsackieviruses) and CD36 (a fatty-acid transporter and receptor for phagocytosis of effete cells and Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes). Notably, CD36 is also a receptor for modified lipoproteins and β-amyloid, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of Alzheimer's disease. Despite their prominent roles in health and disease, understanding the function and abnormalities of the CD36 family members has been hampered by the paucity of information about their structure. Here we determine the crystal structure of LIMP-2 and infer, by homology modelling, the structure of SR-BI and CD36. LIMP-2 shows a helical bundle where β-glucocerebrosidase binds, and where ligands are most likely to bind to SR-BI and CD36. Remarkably, the crystal structure also shows the existence of a large cavity that traverses the entire length of the molecule. Mutagenesis of SR-BI indicates that the cavity serves as a tunnel through which cholesterol(esters) are delivered from the bound lipoprotein to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. We provide evidence supporting a model whereby lipidic constituents of the ligands attached to the receptor surface are handed off to the membrane through the tunnel, accounting for the selective lipid transfer characteristic of SR-BI and CD36. PMID:24162852

  4. Multipartite control of the DNA translocase, Mfd

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Abigail J.; Pernstich, Christian; Savery, Nigel J.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleic acid helicases and translocases play essential roles in many aspects of DNA and RNA biology. In order to ensure that these proteins act only in specific contexts, their activity is often regulated by intramolecular contacts and interaction with partner proteins. We have studied the bacterial Mfd protein, which is an ATP-dependent DNA translocase that relocates or displaces transcription ECs in a variety of cellular contexts. When bound to RNAP, Mfd exhibits robust ATPase and DNA translocase activities, but when released from its substrate these activities are repressed by autoinhibitory interdomain contacts. In this work, we have identified an interface within the Mfd protein that is important for regulating the activity of the protein, and whose disruption permits Mfd to act indiscriminately at transcription complexes that lack the usual determinants of Mfd specificity. Our results indicate that regulation of Mfd occurs through multiple nodes, and that activation of Mfd may be a multi-stage process. PMID:22904071

  5. Metabolic Syndrome is linked to Chromosome 7q21 and associated with genetic variants in CD36 and GNAT3 in Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Farook, VS; Puppala, S; Schneider, J; Fowler, SP; Chittoor, G; Dyer, TD; Allayee, H; Cole, SA; Arya, R; Black, MH; Curran, JE; Almasy, L; Buchanan, TA; Jenkinson, CP; Lehman, DM; Watanabe, RM; Blangero, J; Duggirala, R

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) has been rising alarmingly worldwide, including in the United States, but knowledge on specific genetic determinants of MS is very limited. Therefore, we planned to identify the genetic determinants of MS as defined by National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATPIII) criteria. We performed linkage screen for MS using data from 692 Mexican Americans, who participated in the San Antonio Family Diabetes/Gallbladder Study (SAFDGS). We found strong evidence for linkage of MS on chromosome 7q (LOD = 3.6, empirical P = 6.0 × 10−5), between markers D7S2212 and D7S821. In addition, six chromosomal regions exhibited potential evidence for linkage (LOD ≥ 1.2) with MS. Further, we examined 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the fatty acid translocase (FAT or CD36, 18 SNPs) gene and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha transducing 3 (GNAT3, 11 SNPs) gene, located within the 1-LOD support interval region for their association with MS and its related traits. Several SNPs were associated with MS and its related traits. Remarkably, rs11760281 in GNAT3 and rs1194197 near CD36 exhibited the strongest associations with MS (P = 0.0003, relative risk [RR] = 1.6 and P = 0.004, RR = 1.7 respectively) and several other related traits. These two variants explained about 18% of the MS linkage evidence on chromosome 7q21, and together conferred approximately 3-fold increase in MS risk (RR = 2.7). In conclusion, our linkage and subsequent association studies implicate a region on chromosome 7q21 to influence MS in Mexican Americans. PMID:22456541

  6. Refractory platelet transfusion in a patient with CD36 deficiency due to pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Lin; Shen, Wei-Dong; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Xin-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Type I CD36 deficiency is defined by the absence of CD36 on both platelets and monocytes. Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is characterized by a false reduction in the number of platelets in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated blood. Here we report a rare case of concomitant CD36 deficiency and PTCP. The patient was a 7-year-old boy who suffered comminuted fractures of the left humeral condyle. In the pre-operative examination, he was found to have thrombopenia and assumed to have idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. After immunotherapy and platelet transfusion, the platelet count remained low, suggesting that the patient was refractory to platelet transfusion. Serum was collected for the detection of platelet antibodies, and antibodies against CD36 were found. Flow cytometry verified the absence of CD36 on both the platelets and monocytes of this patient. However, the platelet count was normal when capillary blood smears were analysed; in addition, platelet coagulation was noted under the microscope when EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood was used. The patient underwent surgery without platelet transfusion and recovered uneventfully. PMID:21143025

  7. The Glucotoxicity Protecting Effect of Ezetimibe in Pancreatic Beta Cells via Inhibition of CD36

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of CD36, a fatty acid transporter, has been reported to prevent glucotoxicity and ameliorate high glucose induced beta cell dysfunction. Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor that blocks Niemann Pick C1-like 1 protein, but may exert its effect through suppression of CD36. We attempted to clarify the beneficial effect of ezetimibe on insulin secreting cells and to determine whether this effect is related to change of CD36 expression. mRNA expression of insulin and CD36, intracellular peroxide level and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under normal (5.6 mM) or high glucose (30 mM) condition in INS-1 cells and primary rat islet cells were compared. Changes of the aforementioned factors with treatment with ezetimibe (20 μM) under normal or high glucose condition were also assessed. mRNA expression of insulin was decreased with high glucose, which was reversed by ezetimibe in both INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. CD36 mRNA expression was increased with high glucose, but decreased by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. Three-day treatment with high glucose resulted in an increase in intracellular peroxide level; however, it was decreased by treatment with ezetimibe. Decrease in GSIS by three-day treatment with high glucose was reversed by ezetimibe. Palmitate uptake following exposure to high glucose conditions for three days was significantly elevated, which was reversed by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells. Ezetimibe may prevent glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells through a decrease in fatty acid influx via inhibition of CD36. PMID:27051238

  8. The Glucotoxicity Protecting Effect of Ezetimibe in Pancreatic Beta Cells via Inhibition of CD36.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Sung; Moon, Jun Sung; Kim, Yong-Woon; Won, Kyu Chang; Lee, Hyoung Woo

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of CD36, a fatty acid transporter, has been reported to prevent glucotoxicity and ameliorate high glucose induced beta cell dysfunction. Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor that blocks Niemann Pick C1-like 1 protein, but may exert its effect through suppression of CD36. We attempted to clarify the beneficial effect of ezetimibe on insulin secreting cells and to determine whether this effect is related to change of CD36 expression. mRNA expression of insulin and CD36, intracellular peroxide level and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under normal (5.6 mM) or high glucose (30 mM) condition in INS-1 cells and primary rat islet cells were compared. Changes of the aforementioned factors with treatment with ezetimibe (20 μM) under normal or high glucose condition were also assessed. mRNA expression of insulin was decreased with high glucose, which was reversed by ezetimibe in both INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. CD36 mRNA expression was increased with high glucose, but decreased by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. Three-day treatment with high glucose resulted in an increase in intracellular peroxide level; however, it was decreased by treatment with ezetimibe. Decrease in GSIS by three-day treatment with high glucose was reversed by ezetimibe. Palmitate uptake following exposure to high glucose conditions for three days was significantly elevated, which was reversed by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells. Ezetimibe may prevent glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells through a decrease in fatty acid influx via inhibition of CD36. PMID:27051238

  9. The CD36, CLA-1(CD36L1), and LIMPII (CD36L2) gene family: Cellular distribution, chromosomal location, and genetic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, D.; Vega, M.A.; Dopazo, J.

    1995-01-01

    CD36, CLA-1, and LIMPII are single polypeptide membrane glycoproteins, and the genes encoding them constitute a recently described gene family. In the present paper, a cDNA encoding the human lysosomal membrane protein LIMPII was used to determine its expression pattern in cells of various lineages. Like CLA-1, and in contrast with the restricted expression of CD36, the expression of LIMPII is widespread. Mapping of the human LIMPII and CLA-1 genes (gene symbols CD36L2 and CD36L1, respectively) to specific chromosomes revealed that CLA-1, LIMPII, and CD36 do not form a gene cluster, but are found dispersed on chromosomes 12, 4, and 7, respectively. These data, together with the phylogenetic analysis carried out for the members of this family, indicate that the LIMPII, CIA-1, and CD36 genes diverged early in evolution from an ancestor gene, possibly before the divergence between the arthropods and the vertebrates. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, Hadjer; Plesník, Jiří; Sayed, Amira; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Rouabah, Leila; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-11-01

    Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165). The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29) exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001). We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers. PMID:26556365

  11. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Daoudi, Hadjer; Plesník, Jiří; Sayed, Amira; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Rouabah, Leila; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165). The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29) exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001). We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers. PMID:26556365

  12. CD36 deletion improves recovery from spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Scott A.; Andres, Kariena R.; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    CD36 is a pleiotropic receptor involved in several pathophysiological conditions, including cerebral ischemia, neurovascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis, and recent reports implicate its involvement in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response (ERSR). We hypothesized that CD36 signaling contributes to the inflammation and microvascular dysfunction following spinal cord injury. Following contusive injury, CD36−/− mice demonstrated improved hindlimb functional recovery and greater white matter sparing than CD36+/+ mice. CD36−/− mice exhibited a reduced macrophage, but not neutrophil, infiltration into the injury epicenter. Fewer infiltrating macrophages were either apoptotic or positive for the ERSR marker, phospho-ATF4. CD36−/− mice also exhibited significant improvements in injury heterodomain vascularity and function. These microvessels accumulated less of the oxidized lipid product 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4HNE) and exhibited a reduced ERSR, as detected by vascular phospho-ATF4, CHOP and CHAC-1 expression. In cultured primary endothelial cells, deletion of CD36 diminished 4HNE-induced phospho-ATF4 and CHOP expression. A reduction in phospho-eIF2α and subsequent increase in KDEL-positive, ER-localized proteins suggest that 4HNE-CD36 signaling facilitates the detection of misfolded proteins upstream of eIF2α phosphorylation, ultimately leading to CHOP-induced apoptosis. We conclude that CD36 deletion modestly, but significantly, improves functional recovery from spinal cord injury by enhancing vascular function and reducing macrophage infiltration. These phenotypes may, in part, stem from reduced ER stress-induced cell death within endothelial and macrophage cells following injury. PMID:24690303

  13. An essential role for a CD36-related receptor in pheromone detection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard; Vannice, Kirsten S; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2007-11-01

    The CD36 family of transmembrane receptors is present across metazoans and has been implicated biochemically in lipid binding and transport. Several CD36 proteins function in the immune system as scavenger receptors for bacterial pathogens and seem to act as cofactors for Toll-like receptors by facilitating recognition of bacterially derived lipids. Here we show that a Drosophila melanogaster CD36 homologue, Sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMP), is expressed in a population of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) implicated in pheromone detection. SNMP is essential for the electrophysiological responses of OSNs expressing the receptor OR67d to (Z)-11-octadecenyl acetate (cis-vaccenyl acetate, cVA), a volatile male-specific fatty-acid-derived pheromone that regulates sexual and social aggregation behaviours. SNMP is also required for the activation of the moth pheromone receptor HR13 by its lipid-derived pheromone ligand (Z)-11-hexadecenal, but is dispensable for the responses of the conventional odorant receptor OR22a to its short hydrocarbon fruit ester ligands. Finally, we show that SNMP is required for responses of OR67d to cVA when ectopically expressed in OSNs not normally activated by pheromones. Because mammalian CD36 binds fatty acids, we suggest that SNMP acts in concert with odorant receptors to capture pheromone molecules on the surface of olfactory dendrites. Our work identifies an unanticipated cofactor for odorant receptors that is likely to have a widespread role in insect pheromone detection. Moreover, these results define a unifying model for CD36 function, coupling recognition of lipid-based extracellular ligands to signalling receptors in both pheromonal communication and pathogen recognition through the innate immune system. PMID:17943085

  14. Association of CD36 gene polymorphisms with echo- and electrocardiographic parameters in patients with early onset coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rac, Michal; Sagasz-Tysiewicz, Dagmara; Krzystolik, Andrzej; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Olszewska, Maria; Dawid, Grażyna; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction CD36 plays an important role in long-chain fatty acid homeostasis in skeletal muscle and the myocardium. CD36 deficiency may lead to reduced myocardial uptake of long-chain fatty acid. Therefore, different mutations of the CD36 gene may contribute to the clinical heterogeneity of cardiac hypertrophy. Material and methods The objective of the study was to investigate whether there is an association between the sequence changes in CD36 and echocardiographic and electrocardiographic parameters in Caucasian patients with early onset coronary artery disease. The study group comprised 100 patients. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed in all patients. Amplicons of exons 4 to 6 including fragments of introns were studied using the denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography technique. Results IVS3-6TC (rs3173798) heterozygotes had impaired left ventricle diastolic function. 573GA heterozygotes (rs5956) had higher frequency of pseudonormal left ventricular diastolic function and it was confirmed by the increase in wave A’ in the tissue Doppler. 591AT genotype was associated with borderline higher posterior wall end-diastolic thickness and lower E/A ratio. These results are consistent with electrocardiography parameters which could reflect left ventricular hypertrophy (higher RV5(6) and RV5(6) + SV1(2) parameters, depressed ST segments and tendency to longer Qtc II interval) in 591AT heterozygotes. Conclusions Detected variant alleles of CD36 may be associated with features of left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function. PMID:24049523

  15. Leishmania amazonensis Engages CD36 to Drive Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kendi; Tong, Mei; Dempsey, Brian; Moore, Kathryn J.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Silverman, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amastigotes manipulate the activity of macrophages to favor their own success. However, very little is known about the role of innate recognition and signaling triggered by amastigotes in this host-parasite interaction. In this work we developed a new infection model in adult Drosophila to take advantage of its superior genetic resources to identify novel host factors limiting Leishmania amazonensis infection. The model is based on the capacity of macrophage-like cells, plasmatocytes, to phagocytose and control the proliferation of parasites injected into adult flies. Using this model, we screened a collection of RNAi-expressing flies for anti-Leishmania defense factors. Notably, we found three CD36-like scavenger receptors that were important for defending against Leishmania infection. Mechanistic studies in mouse macrophages showed that CD36 accumulates specifically at sites where the parasite contacts the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Furthermore, CD36-deficient macrophages were defective in the formation of the large parasitophorous vacuole typical of L. amazonensis infection, a phenotype caused by inefficient fusion with late endosomes and/or lysosomes. These data identify an unprecedented role for CD36 in the biogenesis of the parasitophorous vacuole and further highlight the utility of Drosophila as a model system for dissecting innate immune responses to infection. PMID:27280707

  16. A CD36 ectodomain mediates insect pheromone detection via a putative tunnelling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Bargeton, Benoîte; Abuin, Liliane; Bukar, Natalia; Reina, Jaime H.; Bartoi, Tudor; Graf, Marion; Ong, Huy; Ulbrich, Maximilian H.; Masson, Jean-Francois; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    CD36 transmembrane proteins have diverse roles in lipid uptake, cell adhesion and pathogen sensing. Despite numerous in vitro studies, how they act in native cellular contexts is poorly understood. A Drosophila CD36 homologue, sensory neuron membrane protein 1 (SNMP1), was previously shown to facilitate detection of lipid-derived pheromones by their cognate receptors in olfactory cilia. Here we investigate how SNMP1 functions in vivo. Structure–activity dissection demonstrates that SNMP1's ectodomain is essential, but intracellular and transmembrane domains dispensable, for cilia localization and pheromone-evoked responses. SNMP1 can be substituted by mammalian CD36, whose ectodomain can interact with insect pheromones. Homology modelling, using the mammalian LIMP-2 structure as template, reveals a putative tunnel in the SNMP1 ectodomain that is sufficiently large to accommodate pheromone molecules. Amino-acid substitutions predicted to block this tunnel diminish pheromone sensitivity. We propose a model in which SNMP1 funnels hydrophobic pheromones from the extracellular fluid to integral membrane receptors. PMID:27302750

  17. A CD36 ectodomain mediates insect pheromone detection via a putative tunnelling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Bargeton, Benoîte; Abuin, Liliane; Bukar, Natalia; Reina, Jaime H; Bartoi, Tudor; Graf, Marion; Ong, Huy; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Masson, Jean-Francois; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    CD36 transmembrane proteins have diverse roles in lipid uptake, cell adhesion and pathogen sensing. Despite numerous in vitro studies, how they act in native cellular contexts is poorly understood. A Drosophila CD36 homologue, sensory neuron membrane protein 1 (SNMP1), was previously shown to facilitate detection of lipid-derived pheromones by their cognate receptors in olfactory cilia. Here we investigate how SNMP1 functions in vivo. Structure-activity dissection demonstrates that SNMP1's ectodomain is essential, but intracellular and transmembrane domains dispensable, for cilia localization and pheromone-evoked responses. SNMP1 can be substituted by mammalian CD36, whose ectodomain can interact with insect pheromones. Homology modelling, using the mammalian LIMP-2 structure as template, reveals a putative tunnel in the SNMP1 ectodomain that is sufficiently large to accommodate pheromone molecules. Amino-acid substitutions predicted to block this tunnel diminish pheromone sensitivity. We propose a model in which SNMP1 funnels hydrophobic pheromones from the extracellular fluid to integral membrane receptors. PMID:27302750

  18. The A allele of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) SNP 1761667 associates with decreased lipid taste perception in obese Tunisian women.

    PubMed

    Mrizak, Ines; Šerý, Omar; Plesnik, Jiří; Arfa, Amel; Fekih, Mariem; Bouslema, Ali; Zaouali, Monia; Tabka, Zouhair; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-04-28

    Recent studies have suggested that excessive intake of dietary fat is associated with obesity. Some obese subjects have been reported to exhibit high thresholds for the gustatory detection of lipids via lipid receptors, such as cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). We studied lingual detection thresholds for emulsions containing oleic acid in obese Tunisian women (n 203) using a three-alternative forced choice (3-AFC) method. Genotyping of the TNF-α (rs1800629), IL-6 (rs1800795) and CD36 (rs1761667) genes was performed to associate with lipid taste perception thresholds. The CD36 genotype distribution was as follows: GG (n 42), AG (n 102) and AA (n 59). Women with the CD36 GG genotype exhibited oral detection thresholds for oleic acid that were more than three times lower than those with the CD36 AA genotype. The present study confirms a high threshold of gustatory fat detection in obese women with the CD36 AA genotype, but there is no significant association with the IL-6 and TNF-α gene polymorphisms. PMID:25822988

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis infected macrophages upregulate CD36 expression via ERK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong-Yu; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jian-Xia; He, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yi-Long; Ge, Bao-Xue; Luo, Li-Jun

    2016-09-01

    CD36, a scavenger receptor, plays an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis through its interaction with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, Pg) has been shown to promote macrophage-derived foam cell formation by affecting the expression of CD36. However, the regulatory role of CD36 in macrophages infected with Pg remains largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the molecular mechanism of Pg induced CD36 expression in macrophages. Our results showed that Pg promoted ox-LDL uptake by macrophages and the formation of foam cells. Pg infection increased CD36 mRNA and protein levels in ox-LDL-untreated macrophages. Moreover, small interferon RNA (siRNA) targeting CD36 significantly reduced foam cell formation induced by Pg. Additionally, Pg stimulated nuclear translocation of p65, which directly bound to the promoters of CD36 to facilitate its transcription. Inhibition of p65, NF-κB or ERK1/2 blocked Pg-induced CD36 production; whereas, overexpression of NF-κB subunits p65 and p50 upregulated CD36. Furthermore, Ras inhibitors significantly attenuated ERK1/2 activation and CD36 expression. Taken together, the data indicated that stimulation of the ERK/NF-κB pathway by Pg led to transactivation of the CD36 promoters, thereby upregulating CD36 expression in the infected macrophages. These findings may help design new treatment strategies in atherosclerosis. PMID:27234131

  20. Role of Human CD36 in Bacterial Recognition, Phagocytosis and Pathogen-Induced C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) - Mediated Signaling 1

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Irina N.; Kurlander, Roger; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Chen, Zhigang; Remaley, Alan T.; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P.; Eggerman, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Scavenger receptor CD36 mediates Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis and initiates TLR2/6-signaling. We analyzed the role of CD36 in the uptake and TLR-independent signaling of various bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, S. aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Expression of human CD36 in HeLa cells increased the uptake of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria compared with the control mock-transfected cells. Bacterial adhesion was associated with pathogen phagocytosis. Upon CD36-transfection, HEK293 cells, which demonstrate no TLR2/4 expression, acquired LPS responsiveness as assessed by IL-8 production. The cells demonstrated a marked 5- to 15-fold increase in cytokine release upon exposure to Gram-negative bacteria, while the increase was much smaller (1.5- to 3-fold) with Gram-positive bacteria and lipotechoic acid. CD36 down-regulation utilizing CD36 small interfering RNA reduced cytokine release by 40%–50% in human fibroblasts induced by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as LPS. Of all MAP kinase signaling cascade inhibitors tested, only the inhibitor of JNK, a stress activated protein kinase, potently blocked E. coli/LPS-stimulated cytokine production. NF-κB inhibitors were ineffective, indicating direct TLR-independent signaling. JNK activation was confirmed by Western blot analyses of phosphorylated JKN1/2 products. Synthetic amphipathic peptides with an α-helical motif were shown to be efficient inhibitors of E. coli- and LPS-induced IL-8 secretion as well as JNK1/2 activation/phosphorylation in CD36-overexpressing cells. These results indicate that CD36 functions as a phagocytic receptor for a variety of bacteria and mediates signaling induced by Gram-negative bacteria and LPS via a JNK-mediated signaling pathway in a TLR2/4-independent manner. PMID:18981136

  1. CD36 mediates proximal tubular binding and uptake of albumin and is upregulated in proteinuric nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard J; Chana, Ravinder S; Hall, Matthew; Febbraio, Maria; Kennedy, David; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2012-10-01

    Dysregulation of renal tubular protein handling in proteinuria contributes to the development of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the role of CD36 as a novel candidate mediator of albumin binding and endocytosis in the kidney proximal tubule using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, and in nephrotic patient renal biopsy samples. In CD36-transfected opossum kidney proximal tubular cells, both binding and uptake of albumin were substantially enhanced. A specific CD36 inhibitor abrogated this effect, but receptor-associated protein, which blocks megalin-mediated endocytosis of albumin, did not. Mouse proximal tubular cells expressed CD36 and this was absent in CD36 null animals, whereas expression of megalin was equal in these animals. Compared with wild-type mice, CD36 null mice demonstrated a significantly increased urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio and albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Proximal tubular cells expressed increased CD36 when exposed to elevated albumin concentrations in culture medium. Expression of CD36 was studied in renal biopsy tissue obtained from adult patients with heavy proteinuria due to minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Proximal tubular CD36 expression was markedly increased in proteinuric individuals. We conclude that CD36 is a novel mediator influencing binding and uptake of albumin in the proximal tubule that is upregulated in proteinuric renal diseases. CD36 may represent a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy. PMID:22791331

  2. Developmental expression and immune role of the class B scavenger receptor cd36 in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Xu, Yanping; Wang, Ying; Wei, Shulei; Feng, Dong; Huang, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Shicui; Liu, Zhenhui

    2016-07-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the scavenger receptor class B family which plays crucial roles in innate immunity. Although CD36 is widely documented in mammals, the study of its functions in fish is still limited. Here we report the identification of a zebrafish cd36 homologue. Zebrafish cd36 has a higher gene expression in the tissues of intestine and liver but very low in kidney and swim bladder. We find cd36 mRNA is maternally expressed and is mainly restricted to the intestine, branchial arches and regions around the lips after the segmentation stage during embryogenesis. Functionally, the recombinant Cd36 corresponding to the large extracellular loop is capable of binding both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that zebrafish Cd36 is a microbial-binding molecule. The study expands our knowledge of the function of scavenger receptor molecules in fish innate immune process. PMID:26915754

  3. CD36 is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus E1 protein attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun-Jun; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Ma, Lin-Lin; Wu, Zhou-Yi; Jiang, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Jing; Li, Yu-Huan; Han, Yan-Xing; Li, Hu; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yan-Xiang; Song, Dan-Qing; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) is a membrane protein related to lipid metabolism. We show that HCV infection in vitro increased CD36 expression in either surface or soluble form. HCV attachment was facilitated through a direct interaction between CD36 and HCV E1 protein, causing enhanced entry and replication. The HCV co-receptor effect of CD36 was independent of that of SR-BI. CD36 monoclonal antibodies neutralized the effect of CD36 and reduced HCV replication. CD36 inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO), which directly bound CD36 but not SR-BI, significantly interrupted HCV entry, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. SSO’s antiviral effect was seen only in HCV but not in other viruses. SSO in combination with known anti-HCV drugs showed additional inhibition against HCV. SSO was considerably safe in mice. Conclusively, CD36 interacts with HCV E1 and might be a co-receptor specific for HCV entry; thus, CD36 could be a potential drug target against HCV. PMID:26898231

  4. Ca2+ signaling in taste bud cells and spontaneous preference for fat: unresolved roles of CD36 and GPR120.

    PubMed

    Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Selvakumar, Subramaniam; Sadou, Hassimi; Besnard, Philippe; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Recent compelling evidences from rodent and human studies raise the possibility for an additional sixth taste modality devoted to oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids. Understanding the mechanisms underlying oro-gustatory detection of dietary fat is critical for the prevention and treatment of obesity. A number of studies have suggested that lingual CD36, a glycoprotein, highly expressed by circumvallate papillae of the tongue, is implicated in the perception of dietary fat taste. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important signaling molecules for many aspects of cellular functions. It has been shown that these receptors, particularly GPR120, are also involved in lipid taste perception. We have shown that dietary long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), in CD36-positive taste bud cells (TBC), induce increases in free intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, [Ca(2+)]i, by recruiting Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pool via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate production, followed by Ca(2+) influx via opening of store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channels. GPR120 is also coupled to increases in [Ca(2+)]i by dietary fatty acids. We observed that stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), a sensor of Ca(2+) depletion in the ER, mediated fatty acid-induced Ca(2+) signaling and spontaneous preference for fat in the mouse. In this review article, we discuss the recent advances and unresolved roles of CD36 and GPR120 in lipid taste signaling in taste bud cells. PMID:23774298

  5. Increased hepatic Fatty Acid uptake and esterification contribute to tetracycline-induced steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Chae-Hyeon; Lee, Kang-Yo; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tetracycline induces microvesicular steatosis, which has a poor long-term prognosis and a higher risk of steatohepatitis development compared with macrovesicular steatosis. Recent gene expression studies indicated that tetracycline treatment affects the expression of many genes associated with fatty acid transport and esterification. In this study, we investigated the role of fatty acid transport and esterification in tetracycline-induced steatosis. Intracellular lipid accumulation and the protein expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT or CD36) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2 were increased in both mouse liver and HepG2 cells treated with tetracycline at 50 mg/kg (intraperitoneal injection, i.p.) and 100 μM, respectively. Tetracycline increased the cellular uptake of boron-dipyrromethene-labeled C16 fatty acid, which was abolished by CD36 RNA interference. Oleate-induced cellular lipid accumulation was further enhanced by co-incubation with tetracycline. Tetracycline downregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, which negatively regulated DGAT2 expression. U0126, a specific ERK inhibitor, also increased DGAT2 expression and cellular lipid accumulation. DGAT1 and 2 knock-down with specific small interfering (si)-RNA completely abrogated the steatogenic effect of tetracycline in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our data showed that tetracycline induces lipid accumulation by facilitating fatty acid transport and triglyceride esterification by upregulating CD36 and DGAT2, respectively. PMID:25745068

  6. Multimolecular signaling complexes enable Syk-mediated signaling of CD36 internalization.

    PubMed

    Heit, Bryan; Kim, Hani; Cosío, Gabriela; Castaño, Diana; Collins, Richard; Lowell, Clifford A; Kain, Kevin C; Trimble, William S; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-02-25

    CD36 is a versatile receptor known to play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis, the pathogenesis of malaria, and the removal of apoptotic cells. Remarkably, the short cytosolically exposed regions of CD36 lack identifiable motifs, which has hampered elucidation of its mode of signaling. Using a combination of phosphoprotein isolation, mass spectrometry, superresolution imaging, and gene silencing, we have determined that the receptor induces ligand internalization through a heteromeric complex consisting of CD36, β1 and/or β2 integrins, and the tetraspanins CD9 and/or CD81. This receptor complex serves to link CD36 to the adaptor FcRγ, which bears an immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif. By coupling to FcRγ, CD36 is able to engage Src-family kinases and Syk, which in turn drives the internalization of CD36 and its bound ligands. PMID:23395392

  7. The thrombospondin-1 receptor CD36 is an important mediator of ovarian angiogenesis and folliculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian angiogenesis is a complex process that is regulated by a balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. Physiological processes within the ovary, such as folliculogenesis, ovulation, and luteal formation are dependent upon adequate vascularization and anything that disrupts normal angiogenic processes may result in ovarian dysfunction, and possibly infertility. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) receptor CD36 in mediating ovarian angiogenesis and regulating ovarian function. Methods The role of CD36 was evaluated in granulosa cells in vitro and ovarian morphology and protein expression were determined in wild type and CD36 null mice. Results In vitro, CD36 inhibition increased granulosa cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Granulosa cells in which CD36 was knocked down also exhibited an increase in expression of survival and angiogenic proteins. Ovaries from CD36 null mice were hypervascularized, with increased expression of pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR-2. Ovaries from CD36 null mice contained an increase in the numbers of pre-ovulatory follicles and decreased numbers of corpora lutea. CD36 null mice also had fewer number of offspring compared to wild type controls. Conclusions The results from this study demonstrate that CD36 is integral to the regulation of ovarian angiogenesis by TSP-1 and the expression of these family members may be useful in the control of ovarian vascular disorders. PMID:24628875

  8. Mitigation of Insulin Resistance by Mangiferin in a Rat Model of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Modulation of CD36 Redistribution in the Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Pan, Yongquan; Chonan, Ritsu; Batey, Robert; Rong, Xianglu; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is one of the prominent active components responsible for the antidiabetic property of many traditional herbs, but its underlying mechanisms of action remain unclear. CD36 in skeletal muscle is known to contribute to the etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake. This study investigated the effect of mangiferin on insulin resistance. The results showed that treatment of Wistar-Kyoto rats with mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) for 7 weeks inhibited chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in plasma insulin concentrations at the baseline and during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. It also suppressed the increases in fasted plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index. Mechanistically, mangiferin neither affected intakes of fructose and chow, and the increase in epididymal and perirenal fat, nor attenuated fructose-induced hypertension. In contrast, mangiferin attenuated fructose-induced acceleration of plasma NEFA clearance during OGTT, and tended to decrease excessive triglyceride accumulation in gastrocnemius. Immunofluorescence staining and subsequent rating of CD36-expressing fibers in gastrocnemius revealed that mangiferin restored fructose-stimulated sarcolemmal CD36 overexpression and decreased intracellular CD36 distribution. In addition, the effects of mangiferin on the parameters associated with insulin resistance and abnormal fatty acid metabolism were absent in the spontaneously hypertensive rats carrying numerous nonfunctional mutations in the CD36 gene. Thus, these results suggest that mangiferin treatment mitigates insulin resistance in a rat model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome by modulating sarcolemmal and intracellular CD36 redistribution in the skeletal muscle. PMID:26498906

  9. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity. PMID:27525284

  10. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz-Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity. PMID:27525284

  11. RECOMBINANT CD36 INHIBITS OXLDL-INDUCED ICAM-1-DEPENDENT MONOCYTE ADHESION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key event in atherosclerosis is the interaction between monocytes and endothelial cells. Binding of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to CD36 on endothelial cells results in activation and subsequent monocyte adhesion. In this study, a recombinant soluble CD36 molecule was expressed to deli...

  12. Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Jedidi, Iness; Couturier, Martine; Therond, Patrice; Gardes-Albert, Monique; Legrand, Alain; Barouki, Robert; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Aggerbeck, Martine . E-mail: Martine.Aggerbeck@univ-paris5.fr

    2006-12-22

    The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The scavenger receptor CD36 is one major receptor that internalizes oxidized LDL. In differentiated human macrophages, we compared the regulation of CD36 expression by copper-oxidized LDL or their products. Only oxidized derivatives of cholesteryl ester (CEOOH) increased the amount of CD36 mRNA (2.5-fold). Both oxidized LDL and CEOOH treatment increased two to fourfold the transcription of promoters containing peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor responsive elements (PPRE) in the presence of PPAR{alpha} or {gamma}. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assays with nuclear extracts prepared from macrophages treated by either oxidized LDL or CEOOH showed increased binding of PPAR{alpha} to the CD36 gene promoter PPRE. In conclusion, CEOOH present in oxidized LDL increase CD36 gene expression in a pathway involving PPAR{alpha}.

  13. CD36 deficiency blunts effects of diet on regulatory T cells in murine gonadal adipose tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Geys, Lotte; Vranckx, Christine; Lijnen, Henri Roger; Scroyen, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The effect of cluster of differentiation (CD)36 on regulatory T cells (Treg) was investigated in gonadal (GN) adipose tissues and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of wild-type (WT) and CD36 deficient (CD36(-/-)) mice kept on standard fat (SFD, lean) or on high fat diet (HFD, obese). GN adipose tissue mass was smaller, but MLN size larger for obese CD36(-/-) versus obese WT mice. Overall, the reduction of Treg cells in GN adipose tissue and MLN after a HFD is much more prominent in WT than CD36(-/-) mice. Moreover, CD36(-/-) mice may be protected against obesity-related chronic inflammation. PMID:26344897

  14. Cancer stem cell-specific scavenger receptor CD36 drives glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Hale, James S.; Otvos, Balint; Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G.; Hitomi, Masahiro; Stoltz, Kevin; Wu, Qiulian; Flavahan, William; Levison, Bruce; Johansen, Mette L.; Schmitt, David; Neltner, Janna M.; Huang, Ping; Ren, Bin; Sloan, Andrew E.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Gladson, Candece L.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Brown, J. Mark; McIntyre, Thomas; Hazen, Stanley L.; Horbinski, Craig; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lathia, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) contains a self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cell (CSC) population which contributes to tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance. While the tumor microenvironment is essential to CSC self-renewal, the mechanisms by which CSCs sense and respond to microenvironmental conditions are poorly understood. Scavenger receptors are a broad class of membrane receptors that are well characterized on immune cells and instrumental in sensing apoptotic cellular debris and modified lipids. Here we provide evidence that CSCs selectively utilize the scavenger receptor CD36 to promote their maintenance using patient-derived CSCs and in vivo xenograft models. We detected CD36 expression in GBM cells in addition to previously described cell types including endothelial cells, macrophages and microglia. CD36 was enriched in CSCs and was able to functionally distinguish self-renewing cells. CD36 was co-expressed with integrin alpha 6 and CD133, previously described CSC markers, and CD36 reduction resulted in concomitant loss of integrin alpha 6 expression, self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity. We confirmed that oxidized phospholipids, ligands of CD36, were present in GBM and found that the proliferation of CSCs, but not non-CSCs, increased with exposure to oxidized low-density lipoprotein. CD36 was an informative biomarker of malignancy and negatively correlated to patient prognosis. These results provide a paradigm for CSCs to thrive by the selective enhanced expression of scavenger receptors, providing survival and metabolic advantages. PMID:24737733

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Mediate p300-dependent STAT1 Protein Interaction with Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ in CD36 Protein Expression and Foam Cell Formation.

    PubMed

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2015-12-18

    Previously, we have demonstrated that 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid (15(S)-HETE) induces CD36 expression involving STAT1. Many studies have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ mediates CD36 expression. Therefore, we asked the question whether these transcriptional factors interact with each other in the regulation of CD36 expression by 15(S)-HETE. Here, we show that STAT1 interacts with PPARγ in the induction of CD36 expression and foam cell formation by 15(S)-HETE. In addition, using molecular biological approaches such as EMSA, supershift EMSA, ChIP, re-ChIP, and promoter-reporter gene assays, we demonstrate that the STAT1 and PPARγ complex binds to the STAT-binding site at -107 nucleotides in the CD36 promoter and enhances its activity. Furthermore, the interaction of STAT1 with PPARγ depends on STAT1 acetylation, which is mediated by p300. In addition, our findings show that reactive oxygen species-dependent Syk and Pyk2 stimulation is required for p300 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Together, these results demonstrate that an interaction between STAT1, p300, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ is required for 15(S)-HETE-induced CD36 expression, oxidized low density lipoprotein uptake, and foam cell formation, critical events underlying the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26504087

  16. CD36 as a therapeutic target for endothelial dysfunction in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sunghee

    2012-01-01

    Stroke pathology involves multifactorial pro-death responses, including inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular dysfunction, and activation of necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The interruption of a single specific pathway in defined stroke model systems has not been sufficient to address the multifactorial nature of stroke-induced injuries in the human population. CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor that functions in regulating normal physiological and pathological functions. CD36 pathways are activated by several distinct ligands. Convergence of these pathways results in inflammatory responses and endothelial dysfunction, which may be an underlying cause of cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. The current review describes receptor CD36-ligand interactions relevant to endothelial function and discusses how targeting CD36 may have therapeutic utility in stroke. PMID:22574985

  17. Effects of cAMP modulators on long-chain fatty-acid uptake and utilization by electrically stimulated rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Luiken, J J F P; Willems, J; Coort, S L M; Coumans, W A; Bonen, A; Van Der Vusse, G J; Glatz, J F C

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we established that cellular contractions increase long-chain fatty-acid (FA) uptake by cardiac myocytes. This increase is dependent on the transport function of an 88 kDa membrane FA transporter, FA translocase (FAT/CD36), and, in analogy to skeletal muscle, is likely to involve its translocation from an intracellular pool to the sarcolemma. In the present study, we investigated whether cAMP-dependent signalling is involved in this translocation process. Isoproterenol, dibutyryl-cAMP and the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, amrinone, which markedly raised the intracellular cAMP level, did not affect cellular FA uptake, but influenced the fate of intracellular FAs by directing these to mitochondrial oxidation in electrostimulated cardiac myocytes. The PDE inhibitors 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, milrinone and dipyridamole each significantly stimulated FA uptake as well as intracellular cAMP levels, but these effects were quantitatively unrelated. The stimulatory effects of these PDE inhibitors were antagonized by sulpho- N -succinimidylpalmitate, indicating the involvement of FAT/CD36, albeit that the different PDE inhibitors use different molecular mechanisms to stimulate FAT/CD36-mediated FA uptake. Notably, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and milrinone increased the intrinsic activity of FAT/CD36, possibly through its covalent modification, and dipyridamole induces translocation of FAT/CD36 to the sarcolemma. Elevation of intracellular cGMP, but not of cAMP, by the PDE inhibitor zaprinast did not have any effect on FA uptake and metabolism by cardiac myocytes. The stimulatory effects of PDE inhibitors on cardiac FA uptake should be considered when applying these agents in clinical medicine. PMID:12093365

  18. Association of CD36 expression and polymorphism with serum biochemical indices in Cherry Valley duck.

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Li, W G; Zhang, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) plays a crucial role in lipid sensing, innate immunity, atherogenesis, and glycolipid metabolism. This aims of this study were to delineate the CD36 mRNA expression profile in 16 duck tissues using relative quantitative real-time PCR and to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the duck CD36 gene by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA direct sequencing. In addition, this study investigated CD36 gene expression, genetic variation, and their effect on serum biochemical indices in duck. The results showed that CD36 mRNA was expressed in all tissues, and was highly specific to the pituitary and large intestine, and to subcutaneous and abdominal fat. Furthermore, three genotypes of the SNP g.476593 T > C in exon 9 of the duck CD36 gene were identified: MM, MN, and NN. The dominant genotype and allele were MM and M, with frequencies of 0.453 and 0.643, respectively. The genotype distributions deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.05) and achieved moderate levels of polymorphism in ducks. Correlation results showed that CD36 mRNA was significantly negatively correlated with triglycerides (P < 0.05), and significantly positively correlated with total protein, globulin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol (P < 0.01). All serum biochemical indices measured, with the exception of triglycerides, in birds with the NN genotype were significantly higher than those in birds with the MM genotype. These findings demonstrated that CD36 might be an important genetic marker for the selection of lipid metabolism and meat quality traits in ducks. PMID:27323079

  19. Synthetic Amphipathic Helical Peptides Targeting CD36 Attenuate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Alexander V; Wu, Tinghuai; Baranova, Irina N; Birukova, Anna A; Sviridov, Denis; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Patterson, Amy P; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic amphipathic helical peptides (SAHPs) designed as apolipoprotein A-I mimetics are known to bind to class B scavenger receptors (SR-Bs), SR-BI, SR-BII, and CD36, receptors that mediate lipid transport and facilitate pathogen recognition. In this study, we evaluated SAHPs, selected for targeting human CD36, by their ability to attenuate LPS-induced inflammation, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and acute lung injury (ALI). L37pA, which targets CD36 and SR-BI equally, inhibited LPS-induced IL-8 secretion and barrier dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells while reducing lung neutrophil infiltration by 40% in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. A panel of 20 SAHPs was tested in HEK293 cell lines stably transfected with various SR-Bs to identify SAHPs with preferential selectivity toward CD36. Among several SAHPs targeting both SR-BI/BII and CD36 receptors, ELK-B acted predominantly through CD36. Compared with L37pA, 5A, and ELK SAHPs, ELK-B was most effective in reducing the pulmonary barrier dysfunction, neutrophil migration into the lung, and lung inflammation induced by LPS. We conclude that SAHPs with relative selectivity toward CD36 are more potent at inhibiting acute pulmonary inflammation and dysfunction. These data indicate that therapeutic strategies using SAHPs targeting CD36, but not necessarily mimicking all apolipoprotein A-I functions, may be considered a possible new treatment approach for inflammation-induced ALI and pulmonary edema. PMID:27316682

  20. Gene encoding the collagen type I and thrombospondin receptor CD36 is located on chromosome 7q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ruiz, E.; Armesilla, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Vega, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The human CD36 is a member of a gene family of structurally related glycoproteins and functions as a receptor for collagen type I and thrombospondin. CD36 also binds to red blood cells infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, the CD36 gene was assigned to chromosome 7 by using the polymerase chain reaction with DNA from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Furthermore, the use of a CD36 genomic probe has allowed the localization of the CD36 locus to the 7q11.2 band by fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with GTG-banding. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  1. CD36 is expressed in a defined subpopulation of neurons in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Xavier, André Machado; Ludwig, Raissa Guimarães; Nagai, Maíra Harume; de Almeida, Tiago Jonas; Watanabe, Hebe Mizuno; Hirata, Marcio Yukio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Papes, Fabio; Malnic, Bettina; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    The sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OSNs) are equipped with a large repertoire of olfactory receptors and the associated signal transduction machinery. In addition to the canonical OSNs, which express odorant receptors (ORs), the epithelium contains specialized subpopulations of sensory neurons that can detect specific information from environmental cues and relay it to relevant neuronal circuitries. Here we describe a subpopulation of mature OSNs in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) which expresses CD36, a multifunctional receptor involved in a series of biological processes, including sensory perception of lipid ligands. The Cd36 expressing neurons coexpress markers of mature OSNs and are dispersed throughout the MOE. Unlike several ORs analyzed in our study, we found frequent coexpression of the OR Olfr287 in these neurons, suggesting that only a specific set of ORs may be coexpressed with CD36 in OSNs. We also show that CD36 is expressed in the cilia of OSNs, indicating a possible role in odorant detection. CD36-deficient mice display no signs of gross changes in the organization of the olfactory epithelium, but show impaired preference for a lipid mixture odor. Our results show that CD36-expressing neurons represent a distinct population of OSNs, which may have specific functions in olfaction. PMID:27145700

  2. CD36 is expressed in a defined subpopulation of neurons in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, André Machado; Ludwig, Raissa Guimarães; Nagai, Maíra Harume; de Almeida, Tiago Jonas; Watanabe, Hebe Mizuno; Hirata, Marcio Yukio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Papes, Fabio; Malnic, Bettina; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    The sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OSNs) are equipped with a large repertoire of olfactory receptors and the associated signal transduction machinery. In addition to the canonical OSNs, which express odorant receptors (ORs), the epithelium contains specialized subpopulations of sensory neurons that can detect specific information from environmental cues and relay it to relevant neuronal circuitries. Here we describe a subpopulation of mature OSNs in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) which expresses CD36, a multifunctional receptor involved in a series of biological processes, including sensory perception of lipid ligands. The Cd36 expressing neurons coexpress markers of mature OSNs and are dispersed throughout the MOE. Unlike several ORs analyzed in our study, we found frequent coexpression of the OR Olfr287 in these neurons, suggesting that only a specific set of ORs may be coexpressed with CD36 in OSNs. We also show that CD36 is expressed in the cilia of OSNs, indicating a possible role in odorant detection. CD36-deficient mice display no signs of gross changes in the organization of the olfactory epithelium, but show impaired preference for a lipid mixture odor. Our results show that CD36-expressing neurons represent a distinct population of OSNs, which may have specific functions in olfaction. PMID:27145700

  3. The human CD5L/AIM-CD36 axis: A novel autophagy inducer in macrophages that modulates inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Aran, Gemma; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Arias, Lilibeth; Armengol, Carolina; Borràs, Francesc E; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2015-01-01

    CD5L (CD5 molecule-like) is a secreted glycoprotein that participates in host response to bacterial infection. CD5L influences the monocyte inflammatory response to the bacterial surface molecules lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by inhibiting TNF secretion. Here we studied the intracellular events that lead to macrophage TNF inhibition by human CD5L. To accomplish this goal, we performed functional analyses with human monocytic THP1 macrophages, as well as with peripheral blood monocytes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) reversed the inhibitory effect of CD5L on TNF secretion. Among the various PtdIns3K isoforms, our results indicated that CD5L activates PtdIns3K (whose catalytic subunit is termed PIK3C3), a key modulator involved in autophagy. Further analysis revealed a concomitant enhancement of autophagy markers such as cellular LC3-II content, increased LC3 puncta, as well as LC3-LysoTracker Red colocalization. Moreover, electron microscopy showed an increased presence of cytosolic autophagosomes in THP1 macrophages overexpressing CD5L. Besides preventing TNF secretion, CD5L also inhibited IL1B and enhanced IL10 secretion. This macrophage anti-inflammatory pattern of CD5L was reverted upon silencing of autophagy protein ATG7 by siRNA transfection. Additional siRNA experiments in THP1 macrophages indicated that the induction of autophagy mechanisms by CD5L was achieved through cell-surface scavenger receptor CD36, a multiligand receptor expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Our data represent the first evidence that CD36 is involved in autophagy and point to a significant contribution of the CD5L-CD36 axis to the induction of macrophage autophagy. PMID:25713983

  4. CD36 Participates in PrP106–126-Induced Activation of Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rongrong; Shi, Fushan; Lu, Yun; Zhang, Siming; Yin, Xiaomin; Zhou, Xiangmei; Zhao, Deming

    2012-01-01

    Microglial activation is a characteristic feature of the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The molecular mechanisms that underlie prion-induced microglial activation are not very well understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of the class B scavenger receptor CD36 in microglial activation induced by neurotoxic prion protein (PrP) fragment 106–126 (PrP106–126). We first examined the time course of CD36 mRNA expression upon exposure to PrP106–126 in BV2 microglia. We then analyzed different parameters of microglial activation in PrP106–126-treated cells in the presence or not of anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The cells were first incubated for 1 h with CD36 monoclonal antibody to block the CD36 receptor, and were then treated with neurotoxic prion peptides PrP106–126. The results showed that PrP106–126 treatment led to a rapid yet transitory increase in the mRNA expression of CD36, upregulated mRNA and protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), increased iNOS expression and nitric oxide (NO) production, stimulated the activation of NF-κB and caspase-1, and elevated Fyn activity. The blockade of CD36 had no effect on PrP106–126-stimulated NF-κB activation and TNF-α protein release, abrogated the PrP106–126-induced iNOS stimulation, downregulated IL-1β and IL-6 expression at both mRNA and protein levels as well as TNF-α mRNA expression, decreased NO production and Fyn phosphorylation, reduced caspase-1 cleavage induced by moderate PrP106–126 –treatment, but had no effect on caspase-1 activation after treatment with a high concentration of PrP106–126. Together, these results suggest that CD36 is involved in PrP106–126-induced microglial activation and that the participation of CD36 in the interaction between PrP106–126 and microglia may be mediated by Src tyrosine kinases. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the activation of microglia by neurotoxic prion

  5. Pathways commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obese adipose tissue: FAT/CD36 modulates differentiation and lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, E; Héraud, S; Mojallal, A; Lequeux, C; Weiss-Gayet, M; Damour, O; Géloën, A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to adipose tissue hypertrophy (increased adipocyte cell size) and hyperplasia (increased cell number). Comparative analyses of gene datasets allowed us to identify 1426 genes which may represent common adipose phenotype in humans and mice. Among them we identified several adipocyte-specific genes dysregulated in obese adipose tissue, involved in either fatty acid storage (acyl CoA synthase ACSL1, hormone-sensitive lipase LIPE, aquaporin 7 AQP7, perilipin PLIN) or cell adhesion (fibronectin FN1, collagens COL1A1, COL1A3, metalloprotein MMP9, or both (scavenger receptor FAT/CD36). Using real-time analysis of cell surface occupancy on xCELLigence system we developed a new method to study lipid uptake and differentiation of mouse 3T3L1 fibroblasts and human adipose stem cells. Both processes are regulated by insulin and fatty acids such as oleic acid. We showed that fatty acid addition to culture media increased the differentiation rate and was required for full differentiation into unilocular adipocytes. Significant activation of lipogenesis, i.e. lipid accumulation, by either insulin or oleic acid was monitored in times ranging from 1 to 24 h, depending on differentiation state, whereas significant effects on adipogenesis, i.e., surperimposed lipid accumulation and gene transcriptional regulations were measured after 3 to 4 d. Combination of selected times for analysis of lipid contents, cell counts, size fractionations, and gene transcriptional regulations showed that FAT/CD36 specific inhibitor AP5258 significantly increased cell survival of oleic acid-treated mouse and human adipocytes, and partially restored the transcriptional response to oleic acid in the presence of insulin through JNK pathway. Taken together, these data open new perspectives to study the molecular mechanisms commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obesity at the level of lipogenesis linked to hypertrophy and adipogenesis linked to hyperplasia. PMID:26257990

  6. Pathways commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obese adipose tissue: FAT/CD36 modulates differentiation and lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Berger, E; Héraud, S; Mojallal, A; Lequeux, C; Weiss-Gayet, M; Damour, O; Géloën, A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to adipose tissue hypertrophy (increased adipocyte cell size) and hyperplasia (increased cell number). Comparative analyses of gene datasets allowed us to identify 1426 genes which may represent common adipose phenotype in humans and mice. Among them we identified several adipocyte-specific genes dysregulated in obese adipose tissue, involved in either fatty acid storage (acyl CoA synthase ACSL1, hormone-sensitive lipase LIPE, aquaporin 7 AQP7, perilipin PLIN) or cell adhesion (fibronectin FN1, collagens COL1A1, COL1A3, metalloprotein MMP9, or both (scavenger receptor FAT/CD36). Using real-time analysis of cell surface occupancy on xCELLigence system we developed a new method to study lipid uptake and differentiation of mouse 3T3L1 fibroblasts and human adipose stem cells. Both processes are regulated by insulin and fatty acids such as oleic acid. We showed that fatty acid addition to culture media increased the differentiation rate and was required for full differentiation into unilocular adipocytes. Significant activation of lipogenesis, i.e. lipid accumulation, by either insulin or oleic acid was monitored in times ranging from 1 to 24 h, depending on differentiation state, whereas significant effects on adipogenesis, i.e., surperimposed lipid accumulation and gene transcriptional regulations were measured after 3 to 4 d. Combination of selected times for analysis of lipid contents, cell counts, size fractionations, and gene transcriptional regulations showed that FAT/CD36 specific inhibitor AP5258 significantly increased cell survival of oleic acid-treated mouse and human adipocytes, and partially restored the transcriptional response to oleic acid in the presence of insulin through JNK pathway. Taken together, these data open new perspectives to study the molecular mechanisms commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obesity at the level of lipogenesis linked to hypertrophy and adipogenesis linked to hyperplasia. PMID:26257990

  7. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  8. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  9. The Role of CD36 in the Effect of Arginine in Atherosclerotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wei, Jianming; Pan, Lijian; Shi, Yijun; Lin, Haihong; Gong, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arginine in the development of atherosclerosis in rats fed a high-fat diet supplemented with arginine and to evaluate the role of CD36 in this process. Material/Methods A total of 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control group, fat diet group, simvastatin group, and arginine group. They were fed for 12 weeks and were then sacrificed. Immunohistochemical CD36 expression and pathology was investigated in the aorta; CD36 expression in mononuclear cells was detected by Western blot and RT-PCR. Results The thickness of the aortal intima, media, and I/M significantly decreased in the arginine group rats compared with those in the fat diet group (P<0.05). CD36 expression was up-regulated in rats in the fat diet group compared with the control group and was down-regulated in rats in the arginine group compared with rats in the fat diet group. Conclusions The addition of arginine has a significant effect on reducing rat atherosclerosis development, which may be attributed to both the down-regulation of CD36 expression in rat aortic endothelial and blood mononuclear cells and the NO pathway. PMID:26003171

  10. Increased placental fatty acid transporter 6 and binding protein 3 expression and fetal liver lipid accumulation in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Harris, Jessica; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with increased fetal growth and adiposity, which, in part, is determined by transplacental nutrient supply. Trophoblast uptake and intracellular trafficking of lipids are dependent on placental fatty acid transport proteins (FATP), translocase (FAT/CD36), and fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). We hypothesized that maternal obesity in mice leads to increased placental expression of FAT/CD36, FATPs, and FABPs, and lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. C57/BL6J female mice were fed either a control (C; n = 10) or an obesogenic (OB; n = 10) high-fat, high-sugar diet before mating and throughout pregnancy. At E18.5, placentas and fetal livers were collected. Trophoblast plasma membranes (TPM) were isolated from placental homogenates. Expression of FAT/CD36 and FATP (TPM) and FABP (homogenates) was determined by immunoblotting. Gene expression was assessed by RT-quantitative PCR. Sections of fetal livers were stained for Oil Red O, and lipid droplets were quantified. TPM protein expression of FAT/CD36, FATP 2, and FATP 4 was comparable between C and OB groups. Conversely, TPM FATP 6 expression was increased by 35% in OB compared with C placentas without changes in mRNA expression. FABPs 1, 3-5 and PPARγ were expressed in homogenates, and FABP 3 expression increased 27% in OB compared with C placentas; however, no changes were observed in mRNA expression. Lipid droplet accumulation was 10-fold higher in the livers of fetuses from OB compared with C group. We propose that increased lipid transport capacity in obese mice promotes transplacental fatty acid transport and contributes to excess lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. PMID:26491104

  11. Commentary on Myers et al.: Growing role of the innate immunity receptor CD36 in central nervous system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bonilla, Lidia; Park, Laibaik; Iadecola, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Activation of innate immunity by sterile inflammation has emerged as a key event in selected CNS diseases, with a defining impact on all stages of the pathological process. Due to its multiple functions and assembly with other pattern recognition receptors, the innate immunity receptor CD36 has been implicated in a wide variety of brain pathologies, ranging from acute brain injury to neurodegeneration. However, the role of CD36 is complex involving both tissue destruction, related mainly to oxidative stress and inflammation, and beneficial reparative effects due to the involvement of CD36 in tissue repair and reorganization. A recent paper of Meyer at al. provided novel evidence for a role of CD36 also in spinal cord trauma, a condition in which the effect of CD36 was found to be univocally deleterious. This commentary will provide a brief overview of the pathobiology of CD36 and its expanding role in diseases of the brain and spinal cord. PMID:25157902

  12. Formulation, characteristics and antiatherogenic bioactivities of CD36-targeted epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Nie, Shufang; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Sennoune, Souad R; Wang, Shu

    2016-04-01

    Intimal macrophages are determinant cells for atherosclerotic lesion formation by releasing inflammatory factors and taking up oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) via scavenger receptors, primarily the CD36 receptor. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has a potential to decrease cholesterol accumulation and inflammatory responses in macrophages. We made EGCG-loaded nanoparticles (Enano) using phosphatidylcholine, kolliphor HS15, alpha-tocopherol acetate and EGCG. 1-(Palmitoyl)-2-(5-keto-6-octene-dioyl) phosphatidylcholine (KOdiA-PC), a CD36-targeted ligand found on oxLDL, was incorporated on the surface of Enano to make ligand-Enano (L-Enano). The objectives of this study are to deliver EGCG to macrophages via CD36-targeted L-Enano and to determine its antiatherogenic bioactivities. The optimized nanoparticles obtained in our study were spherical and around 108 nm in diameter, and had about 10% of EGCG loading capacity and 96% of EGCG encapsulation efficiency. Compared to Enano, CD36-targeted L-Enano had significantly higher binding affinity to and uptake by macrophages at the same pattern as oxLDL. CD36-targeted L-Enano dramatically improved EGCG stability, increased macrophage EGCG content, delivered EGCG to macrophage cytosol and avoided lysosomes. L-Enano significantly decreased macrophage mRNA levels and protein secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, but did not significantly change macrophage cholesterol content. The innovative CD36-targeted nanoparticles may facilitate targeted delivery of diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic compounds to intimal macrophages for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis with enhanced efficacy and decreased side effects. PMID:27012617

  13. Expression of CD36 by Olfactory Receptor Cells and Its Abundance on the Epithelial Surface in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Fushiki, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane protein that is involved in the recognition of certain amphiphilic molecules such as polar lipids in various tissues and body fluids. So far, CD36 homologues in insects have been demonstrated to be present on the surface of olfactory dendrites and to participate in the perception of exogenous compounds. However, little is known about the relationship between CD36 and mammalian olfaction. Indeed, the detection of only CD36 mRNA in the mouse olfactory epithelium has been reported to date. In the present study, to provide potential pieces of evidence for the involvement of CD36 in mammalian olfactory perception, we extensively investigated the localisation of this protein in the mouse olfactory mucosa. In situ hybridisation analysis using antisense oligonucleotides to CD36 mRNA detected aggregated signals within the deeper epithelial layer of olfactory mucosa. The mRNA signals were also detected consistently in the superficial layer of the olfactory epithelium, which is occupied by supporting cells. Immunostaining with an anti-CD36 polyclonal antibody revealed that CD36 localises in the somata and dendrites of distinct olfactory receptor cells and that it occurs abundantly on the olfactory epithelial surface. However, immunoreactive CD36 was rarely detectable in the nerve bundles running in the lamina propria of olfactory mucosa, the axons forming the olfactory nerve layer in the outermost layer of the bulb and axon terminals in the glomeruli. We also obtained electron microscopic evidence for the association of CD36 protein with olfactory cilia. Altogether, we suggest that CD36 plays a role in the mammalian olfaction. In addition, signals for CD36 protein were also detected on or around the microvilli of olfactory supporting cells and the cilia of nasal respiratory epithelium, suggesting a role for this protein other than olfaction in the nasal cavity. PMID:26186589

  14. Two distinct genes for ADP/ATP translocase are expressed at the mRNA level in adult human liver

    SciTech Connect

    Houldsworth, J.; Attardi, G.

    1988-01-01

    Several clones hybridizing with a bovine ADP/ATP translocase cDNA were isolated from an adult human liver cDNA library in the vector pEX1. DNA sequence analysis revealed that these clones encode two distinct forms of translocase. In particular, two clones specifying the COOH-end-proximal five-sixths of the protein exhibit a 9% amino acid sequence divergence and totally dissimilar 3' untranslated regions. One of these cDNAs is nearly identical in sequence to an ADP/ATP translocase clone (hp2F1) recently isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library with three amino acid changes and a few differences in the 3' untranslated region. Another clone isolated from the pEX1 library contains a reading frame encoding the remaining, NH/sub 2/-end-proximal, 37 amino acids of the translocase. This sequence differs significantly (14% amino acid sequence divergence) from the corresponding segment of hp2F1, and the 5' untranslated regions of the two clones are totally dissimilar. RNA transfer hybridization experiments utilizing the clones isolated from the pEX1 library revealed the presence in HeLa cells of three distinct mRNA species. The pattern of hybridization and the sizes of these mRNAs suggest a greater complexity of organization and expression of the ADP/ATP translocase genes in human cells than indicated by the analysis of the cDNA clones.

  15. Preliminary studies on CD36 gene in type 2 diabetic patients from north India

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Sunaina; Agrawal, C.G.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Banerjee, Monisha

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: The greater tendency to diabetes in Indians may be due to genetic factors in addition to environment and diet. CD36, a class B scavenger cell surface receptor mediates internalization of oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) leading to the formation of macrophage foam cells. CD36 deficiency is related to phenotypic expression of the metabolic syndrome, frequently associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases resulting in raised levels of glucose thereby contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Therefore, the association of human CD36 gene mutation to T2DM needs investigation. We undertook this study to investigate CD36 gene status in north Indian subjects by screening for the deletion of exons 3, 4 and 5 and certain polymorphisms. Methods: Clinical characteristics were compared between 300 T2DM patients and 100 healthy controls. Deletion analysis was carried out for exons 3, 4 and 5 of CD36 gene in 300 T2DM patients using PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis. Genotype analysis for two polymorphisms 478C>T and delAC in exons 4 and 5 respectively was carried out using PCR-RFLP method. Results: Biochemical parameters such as fasting and post-prandial glucose levels, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and blood pressure were slightly raised in the T2DM patients when compared with controls with lowered HDL-cholesterol. No exonic deletion was observed in the 300 patients and 100 controls screened. All individuals were found to be homozygous (CC and -/-) for the two polymorphisms studied. Interpretation & conclusions: Although no exonic deletion was found in T2DM patients, our study suggests that all 15 exons need to be screened for mutations which lead to CD36 deficiency. Genotyping studies of the two SNPs in the CD36 gene confirmed the absence of exons 4 and 5 deletion. This is perhaps the first report from India suggesting that CD36 is one of the several important genes that need to be explored in relation to T2DM. PMID:21808142

  16. CD36 Differently Regulates Macrophage Responses to Smooth and Rough Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Biedroń, Rafał; Peruń, Angelika; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern of Gram-negative bacterial infections, and includes smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) chemotypes. Upon activation by LPS through CD14, TLR4/MD-2 heterodimers sequentially induce two waves of intracellular signaling for macrophage activation: the MyD88-dependent pathway from the plasma membrane and, following internalization, the TRIF-dependent pathway from endosomes. We sought to better define the role of scavenger receptors CD36 and CD204/SR-A as accessory LPS receptors that can contribute to pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activation of macrophages. We have found that CD36 differently regulates activation of mouse macrophages by S-LPS versus R-LPS. The ability of CD36 to substitute for CD14 in loading R-LPS, but not S-LPS onto TLR4/MD-2 allows CD14-independent macrophage responses to R-LPS. Conversely, S-LPS, but not R-LPS effectively stimulates CD14 binding to CD36, which favors S-LPS transfer from CD14 onto TLR4/MD-2 under conditions of low CD14 occupancy with S-LPS in serum-free medium. In contrast, in the presence of serum, CD36 reduces S-LPS binding to TLR4/MD-2 and the subsequent MyD88-dependent signaling, by mediating internalization of S-LPS/CD14 complexes. Additionally, CD36 positively regulates activation of TRIF-dependent signaling by both S-LPS and R-LPS, by promoting TLR4/MD-2 endocytosis. In contrast, we have found that SR-A does not function as a S-LPS receptor. Thus, by co-operating with CD14 in both R- and S-LPS loading onto TLR4/MD-2, CD36 can enhance the sensitivity of tissue-resident macrophages in detecting infections by Gram-negative bacteria. However, in later phases, following influx of serum to the infection site, the CD36-mediated negative regulation of MyD88-dependent branch of S-LPS-induced TLR4 signaling might constitute a mechanism to prevent an excessive inflammatory response, while preserving the adjuvant effect of S-LPS for adaptive immunity. PMID

  17. CD36 Differently Regulates Macrophage Responses to Smooth and Rough Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Biedroń, Rafał; Peruń, Angelika; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern of Gram-negative bacterial infections, and includes smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) chemotypes. Upon activation by LPS through CD14, TLR4/MD-2 heterodimers sequentially induce two waves of intracellular signaling for macrophage activation: the MyD88-dependent pathway from the plasma membrane and, following internalization, the TRIF-dependent pathway from endosomes. We sought to better define the role of scavenger receptors CD36 and CD204/SR-A as accessory LPS receptors that can contribute to pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activation of macrophages. We have found that CD36 differently regulates activation of mouse macrophages by S-LPS versus R-LPS. The ability of CD36 to substitute for CD14 in loading R-LPS, but not S-LPS onto TLR4/MD-2 allows CD14-independent macrophage responses to R-LPS. Conversely, S-LPS, but not R-LPS effectively stimulates CD14 binding to CD36, which favors S-LPS transfer from CD14 onto TLR4/MD-2 under conditions of low CD14 occupancy with S-LPS in serum-free medium. In contrast, in the presence of serum, CD36 reduces S-LPS binding to TLR4/MD-2 and the subsequent MyD88-dependent signaling, by mediating internalization of S-LPS/CD14 complexes. Additionally, CD36 positively regulates activation of TRIF-dependent signaling by both S-LPS and R-LPS, by promoting TLR4/MD-2 endocytosis. In contrast, we have found that SR-A does not function as a S-LPS receptor. Thus, by co-operating with CD14 in both R- and S-LPS loading onto TLR4/MD-2, CD36 can enhance the sensitivity of tissue-resident macrophages in detecting infections by Gram-negative bacteria. However, in later phases, following influx of serum to the infection site, the CD36-mediated negative regulation of MyD88-dependent branch of S-LPS-induced TLR4 signaling might constitute a mechanism to prevent an excessive inflammatory response, while preserving the adjuvant effect of S-LPS for adaptive immunity. PMID

  18. Platelet CD36 mediates interactions with endothelial cell–derived microparticles and contributes to thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunima; Li, Wei; Febbraio, Maria; Espinola, Ricardo G.; McCrae, Keith R.; Cockrell, Erin; Silverstein, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor that binds multiple ligands, including phosphatidyl serine (PS). Although CD36– mice do not have a bleeding diathesis, we show here that they do have significantly prolonged thrombotic occlusion times in response to FeCl3-induced vascular injury. Because cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are generated in response to vascular injury and circulate in patients with prothrombotic diseases, we hypothesized that PS exposed on their surfaces could be an endogenous CD36 ligand that transmits an activating signal to platelets. We found that MPs prepared from human ECs, monocytes, or platelets or isolated from blood of normal subjects bound to platelets. Binding was not observed with platelets from CD36– donors and was inhibited by an anti-CD36 antibody or by blockade of exposed PS by annexin V or anti-PS IgM. Preincubation of platelets with MPs led to CD36-dependent augmentation of platelet activation in response to low doses of ADP, as assessed by measuring α2bβ3 activation, P-selectin expression, and aggregation. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of murine carotid thrombi from CD36– mice showed a significant decrement in endothelial antigen accumulation, which suggests that CD36 plays a role in MP recruitment into thrombi. These results provide what we believe to be a novel role for CD36 in thrombosis. PMID:18431509

  19. Increased hepatic CD36 expression with age is associated with enhanced susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Sung, Miranda My; Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Kloosterhuis, Niels J; Miquilena-Colina, Maria Eugenia; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Febbraio, Maria; Jacobs, René L; de Bruin, Alain; Vinciguerra, Manlio; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Hofker, Marten H; Dyck, Jason Rb; Koonen, Debby P Y

    2014-04-01

    CD36 has been associated with obesity and diabetes in human liver diseases, however, its role in age-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Therefore, liver biopsies were collected from individuals with histologically normal livers (n=30), and from patients diagnosed with simple steatosis (NAS; n=26). Patients were divided into two groups according to age and liver biopsy samples were immunostained for CD36. NAFLD parameters were examined in young (12-week) and middle-aged (52-week) C57BL/6J mice, some fed with chow-diet and some fed with low-fat (LFD; 10% kcal fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal fat) for 12-weeks. CD36 expression was positively associated with age in individuals with normal livers but not in NAS patients. However, CD36 was predominantly located at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes in aged NAS patients as compared to young. In chow-fed mice, aging, despite an increase in hepatic CD36 expression, was not associated with the development of NAFLD. However, middle-aged mice did exhibit the development of HFD-induced NAFLD, mediated by an increase of CD36 on the membrane. Enhanced CD36-mediated hepatic fat uptake may contribute to an accelerated progression of NAFLD in mice and humans. Therapies to prevent the increase in CD36 expression and/or CD36 from anchoring at the membrane may prevent the development of NAFLD. PMID:24751397

  20. CD36 Is Essential for Regulation of the Host Innate Response to Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin-Mediated Dermonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Castleman, Moriah J; Febbraio, Maria; Hall, Pamela R

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the primary cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) in the United States. α-Hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming toxin secreted by S. aureus and a major contributor to tissue necrosis, prompts recruitment of neutrophils critical for host defense against S. aureus infections. However, the failure to clear apoptotic neutrophils can result in damage to host tissues, suggesting that mechanisms of neutrophil clearance are essential to limiting Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. We hypothesized that CD36, a scavenger receptor which facilitates recognition of apoptosing cells, would play a significant role in regulating Hla-mediated inflammation and tissue injury during S. aureus SSSI. In this study, we show that CD36 on macrophages negatively regulates dermonecrosis caused by Hla-producing S. aureus. This regulation is independent of bacterial burden, as CD36 also limits dermonecrosis caused by intoxication with sterile bacterial supernatant or purified Hla. Dermonecrotic lesions of supernatant intoxicated CD36(-/-) mice are significantly larger, with increased neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β expression, compared with CD36(+/+) (wild-type) mice. Neutrophil depletion of CD36(-/-) mice prevents this phenotype, demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to tissue injury in this model. Furthermore, administration of CD36(+/+) but not CD36(-/-) macrophages near the site of intoxication reduces dermonecrosis, IL-1β production and neutrophil accumulation to levels seen in wild-type mice. This therapeutic effect is reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization in the CD36(+/+) macrophages, supporting a mechanism of action whereby CD36-dependent macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils regulates Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD36 is essential for controlling the host innate response to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:26223653

  1. Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2 Regulation of Scavenger Receptor CD36 Modulates Microglial Aβ42 Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Melief, Erica; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies underline the potential relevance of microglial innate immune activation in Alzheimer disease. Primary mouse microglia that lack prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) show decreased innate immune-mediated neurotoxicity and increased amyloid β (Aβ) peptide phagocytosis, features that were replicated in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that scavenger receptor CD36 is an effector of EP2-regulated Aβ phagocytosis. CD36 expression was 143-fold greater in mouse primary microglia than in primary astrocytes. Three different means of suppressing EP2 signaling increased and an agonist of EP2 decreased CD36 expression in primary wild-type microglia. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR4, and TLR7, but not TLR2 or TLR9, reduced primary microglial CD36 transcription and cell surface CD36 protein and reduced Aβ42 phagocytosis as well. At each step, the effects of innate immune activation on CD36 were reversed by at least 50% by an EP2 antagonist, and this partial rescue of microglia Aβ42 phagocytosis was largely mediated by CD36 activity. Finally, we showed in hippocampus of wild-type mice that innate immune activation suppressed CD36 expression by an EP2-dependent mechanism. Taken together with results of others that found brain clearance of Aβ peptides and behavioral improvements mediated by CD36 in mice, regulation of CD36-mediated Aβ phagocytosis by suppression of EP2 signaling may provide a new approach to suppressing some aspects of Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. PMID:25452117

  2. Exosome poly-ubiquitin inhibits platelet activation, downregulates CD36, and inhibits pro-atherothombotic cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Srikanthan, Sowmya; Li, Wei; Silverstein, Roy L.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Activated platelets shed microparticles from plasma membranes, but also release smaller exosomes from internal compartments. While microparticles participate in athero-thrombosis, little is known of exosomes in this process. Materials & Methods Ex vivo biochemical experiments with human platelets and exosomes, and FeCl3-induced murine carotid artery thrombosis. Results Both microparticles and exosomes were abundant in human plasma. Platelet-derived exosomes suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation and reduced adhesion to collagen-coated microfluidic channels at high shear. Injected exosomes inhibited occlusive thrombosis in FeCl3-damaged murine carotid arteries. Control platelets infused into irradiated, thrombocytopenic mice reconstituted thrombosis in damaged carotid arteries, but failed to do so after prior ex vivo incubation with exosomes. CD36 promotes platelet activation, and exosomes dramatically reduced platelet CD36. CD36 is also expressed by macrophages where it binds and internalizes oxidized LDL and microparticles, supplying lipid to promote foam cell formation. Platelet exosomes inhibited oxidized-LDL binding and cholesterol loading into macrophages. Exosomes were not competitive CD36 ligands, but instead sharply reduced total macrophage CD36 content. Exosomal proteins, in contrast to microparticle or cellular proteins, were highly adducted by ubiquitin. Exosomes enhanced ubiquitination of cellular proteins, including CD36, and blockade of proteosome proteolysis with MG-132 rescued CD36 expression. Recombinant unanchored K48 poly-ubiquitin behaved similarly to exosomes, inhibiting platelet function, macrophage CD36 expression, and macrophage particle uptake. Conclusions Platelet-derived exosomes inhibit athero-thrombotic processes by reducing CD36-dependent lipid loading of macrophages and by suppressing platelet thrombosis. Exosomes increase protein ubiquitination, and enhance proteasome degradation of CD36. PMID:25163645

  3. OxLDL or TLR2-induced cytokine response is enhanced by oxLDL-independent novel domain on mouse CD36

    PubMed Central

    Xie, ChengHui; Ng, HangPong; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2011-01-01

    OxLDL binding to CD36 is shown to result in macrophage activation and foam cell formation that have been implicated in atherosclerosis. However, CD36 has also been shown to induce inflammatory response to other ligands besides oxLDL. During the course of blocking CD36 oxLDL binding function using anti CD36 antibodies, we have identified a novel domain of CD36 that triggers inflammatory response-independent of oxLDL binding. OxLDL bound to the mouse reporter cell line RAW-Blue induced TNF-α and RANTES mRNA and protein expression. Pretreatment of RAW-Blue cells with an anti-mCD36 mAb, JC63.1, an activating mCD36 mAb, surprisingly did not inhibit oxLDL-induced response. Further, binding of this antibody to CD36 alone induced a pro-inflammatory cytokine response in RAW-Blue cells as well as primary mouse macrophages. The induction of cytokine response was specific only to this antibody and was CD36-dependent, since CD36−/− macrophages failed to induce a similar response. The interaction of the antibody to CD36 led to activation of NF-κB and MAP kinase. Notably, a CD36 peptide blocked oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and macrophage activation. However, the activating mCD36 mAb induced macrophage activation was not inhibited by CD36 peptide. Further, activating mCD36 mAb enhanced oxLDL- or TLR2- or TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses. Collectively, our data provide evidence that activating mCD36 mAb binds to a domain different from the oxLDL-binding domain on mouse CD36, and suggest that interaction at this domain may contribute to oxLDL-independent macrophage inflammatory responses that lead to chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:21281677

  4. The Nuts and Bolts of Ring-Translocase Structure and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Strycharska, Melania; Berger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Ring-shaped, oligomeric translocases are multisubunit enzymes that couple hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) to directed movement along extended biopolymer substrates. These motors help unwind nucleic acid duplexes, unfold protein chains, and shepherd nucleic acids between cellular and/or viral compartments. Substrates are translocated through a central pore formed by a circular array of catalytic subunits. Cycles of nucleotide binding, hydrolysis, and product release help reposition translocation loops in the pore to direct movement. How NTP turnover allosterically induces these conformational changes, and the extent of mechanistic divergence between motor families, remain outstanding problems. This review examines the current models for ring-translocase function and highlights the fundamental gaps remaining in our understanding of these molecular machines. PMID:21282052

  5. The Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Associates with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase in a Stoichiometric Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Carola S.; Rampelt, Heike; Gebert, Michael; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schrempp, Sandra G.; Kochbeck, Lioba; Guiard, Bernard; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized with amino-terminal signal sequences. The presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex) mediates the import of these preproteins. The essential TIM23 core complex closely cooperates with partner protein complexes like the presequence translocase-associated import motor and the respiratory chain. The inner mitochondrial membrane also contains a large number of metabolite carriers, but their association with preprotein translocases has been controversial. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the TIM23 interactome based on stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. Subsequent biochemical studies on identified partner proteins showed that the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier associates with the membrane-embedded core of the TIM23 complex in a stoichiometric manner, revealing an unexpected connection of mitochondrial protein biogenesis to metabolite transport. Our data indicate that direct TIM23-AAC coupling may support preprotein import into mitochondria when respiratory activity is low. PMID:25124039

  6. miRNA-133a attenuates lipid accumulation via TR4-CD36 pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    lipid metabolism is the major causes of atherosclerosis. There is increasing evidence that miR-133a plays an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a in macrophages is still unclear. Several lines of evidence indicate that loss of TR4 leads to reduce lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissues, etc, and lesional macrophages-derived TR4 can greatly increase the foam cell formation through increasing the CD36-mediated the uptake of ox-LDL. Interestingly, computational analysis suggests that TR4 may be a target gene of miR-133a. Here, we examined whether miR-133a regulates TR4 expression in ox-LDL-induced mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, thereby affecting lipid accumulation. Using ox-LDL-treatment RAW 264.7 macrophages transfected with miR-133a mimics or inhibitors, we have showed that miR-133a can directly regulate the expression of TR4 in RAW 264.7 cells, thereby attenuates CD36-medide lipid accumulation. Furthermore, our studies suggest an additional explanation for the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a regulation to its functional target, TR4 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Thus, our findings suggest that miR-133a may regulate lipid accumulation in ox-LDL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages via TR4-CD36 pathway. PMID:27109382

  7. CD36 haplotypes are associated with lipid profile in normal-weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia is a common metabolic disorder that may result from abnormalities in the synthesis, processing and catabolism of lipoprotein particles. Disorders of lipoprotein concentrations and elevated concentration of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) are risk factors in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). CD36 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and polymorphisms in the CD36 gene are related to cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is an association between genotypes and haplotypes of five polymorphisms in the CD36 gene with lipid levels in young normal-weight subjects. Methods A total of 232 unrelated subjects with normal-weight of 18 to 25 years old (157 women and 75 men) were randomly selected. The lipid profile and glucose levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. Genotyping of the polymorphisms -33137A/G (rs1984112), -31118G/A (rs1761667), -22674 T/C (rs2151916), 27645 Ins/Del (rs3840546) and 30294G/C (rs1049673) in the CD36 receptor gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism, linkage disequilibrium analysis among the five polymorphisms and an analysis of haplotype were estimated. Results HDL-C levels was lower in men than in women (P = 0.03). However, the median oxLDL levels in men was higher than in women (P = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C and glucose (P > 0.05). HDL-C levels were lower in the subjects with TC genotype of polymorphism -22674 T/C (P = 0.04), but the carriers of TT genotype had lower oxLDL levels (P = 0.01). LDL-C levels were higher in young carriers of CC genotype for 30294G/C polymorphism than non-carriers (P = 0.03). The subjects carrying the AATDC haplotype had 3.2 times presumably higher risk of LDL-C > 100 mg/dL than the carrying the AGTIG haplotype (P = 0.02), whereas the subjects carrying the AATIC haplotype had 2.0 times presumably

  8. Oxidised LDL up-regulate CD36 expression by the Nrf2 pathway in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Archivio, Massimo; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Filesi, Carmela; Varì, Rosaria; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Sernicola, Leonardo; Santangelo, Carmela; Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2008-06-25

    The effect of oxLDL on CD36 expression has been assessed in preadipocytes induced to differentiate. Novel evidence is provided that oxLDL induce a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-independent CD36 overexpression, by up-regulating nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The nuclear translocation of Nrf2 appeared to depend on PKC pathway activation. In adipocytes, the CD36 up-regulation may indicate a compensation mechanism to meet the demand of excess oxLDL and oxidised lipids in blood, reducing the risk of atherogenesis. Besides strengthening the hypothesis that oxLDL can contribute to the onset of insulin-resistance, data herein presented highlight the significance of oxLDL-induced CD36 overexpression within the cellular defence response. PMID:18514070

  9. Human scavenger protein AIM increases foam cell formation and CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake.

    PubMed

    Amézaga, Núria; Sanjurjo, Lucía; Julve, Josep; Aran, Gemma; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Bastos-Amador, Patricia; Armengol, Carolina; Vilella, Ramon; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Borràs, Francesc E; Valledor, Annabel F; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2014-03-01

    AIM is expressed by macrophages in response to agonists of the nuclear receptors LXR/RXR. In mice, it acts as an atherogenic factor by protecting macrophages from the apoptotic effects of oxidized lipids. In humans, it is detected in atherosclerotic lesions, but no role related to atherosclerosis has been reported. This study aimed to investigate whether the role of hAIM extends beyond inhibiting oxidized lipid-induced apoptosis. To accomplish this goal, functional analysis with human monocytic THP1 cells and macrophages differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes were performed. It was found that hAIM reduced oxLDL-induced macrophage apoptosis and increased macrophage adhesion to endothelial ICAM-1 by enhancing LFA-1 expression. Furthermore, hAIM increased foam cell formation, as shown by Oil Red O and Nile Red staining, as well as quantification of cholesterol content. This was not a result of decreased reverse cholesterol transport, as hAIM did not affect the efflux significantly from [(3)H] Cholesterol-laden macrophages driven by plasma, apoA-I, or HDL2 acceptors. Rather, flow cytometry studies indicated that hAIM increased macrophage endocytosis of fluorescent oxLDL, which correlated with an increase in the expression of the oxLDLR CD36. Moreover, hAIM bound to oxLDL in ELISA and enhanced the capacity of HEK-293 cells expressing CD36 to endocytose oxLDL, as studied using immunofluorescence microscopy, suggesting that hAIM serves to facilitate CD36-mediated uptake of oxLDL. Our data represent the first evidence that hAIM is involved in macrophage survival, adhesion, and foam cell formation and suggest a significant contribution to atherosclerosis-related mechanisms in the macrophage. PMID:24295828

  10. [Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via CD36.].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-Tong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Na-Na; Kang, Li; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Song, Guo-Hua; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2010-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and the underlying mechanisms in ox-LDL-induced macrophage foam-forming process. RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum, and then treated with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L), anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody+ox-LDL and tunicamycin (TM), respectively. After incubation for 24 h, the cells were collected. The cellular lipid accumulation was showed by oil red O staining and the content of cellular total cholesterol was quantified by enzymatic colorimetry. The expression of glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), a molecular marker of ERS, was determined by immunocytochemistry assay. The levels of GRP94 protein, phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in RAW264.7 cells were detected by Western blotting. The results indicated that after incubation with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L) for 24 h, a large amount of lipid droplets were found in the cytoplasm, and the contents of cellular total cholesterol were increased by 2.1, 2.8 and 3.1 folds compared with the control, respectively. Anti-CD36 antibody decreased markedly the cellular lipid accumulation induced by ox-LDL at 100 mg/L. Both ox-LDL and TM, a specific ERS inducer, could up-regulate the protein expression of GRP94 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, p-IRE1 and XBP1, two key components of the unfolded protein response, were also significantly induced by the treatment with ox-LDL. The up-regulations of the three proteins induced by ox-LDL were inhibited significantly when the macrophages were pre-incubated with anti-CD36 antibody. These results suggest that ox-LDL may induce ERS in a dose-dependent way and subsequently activate the unfolded protein response signaling pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages, which is potentially mediated by scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:20945046

  11. DNA mechanics as a tool to probe helicase and translocase activity.

    PubMed

    Lionnet, Timothée; Dawid, Alexandre; Bigot, Sarah; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A; Heslot, François; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Helicases and translocases are proteins that use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move along or pump nucleic acid substrates. Single molecule manipulation has proved to be a powerful tool to investigate the mechanochemistry of these motors. Here we first describe the basic mechanical properties of DNA unraveled by single molecule manipulation techniques. Then we demonstrate how the knowledge of these properties has been used to design single molecule assays to address the enzymatic mechanisms of different translocases. We report on four single molecule manipulation systems addressing the mechanism of different helicases using specifically designed DNA substrates: UvrD enzyme activity detection on a stretched nicked DNA molecule, HCV NS3 helicase unwinding of a RNA hairpin under tension, the observation of RecBCD helicase/nuclease forward and backward motion, and T7 gp4 helicase mediated opening of a synthetic DNA replication fork. We then discuss experiments on two dsDNA translocases: the RuvAB motor studied on its natural substrate, the Holliday junction, and the chromosome-segregation motor FtsK, showing its unusual coupling to DNA supercoiling. PMID:16935884

  12. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase.

    PubMed

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Economou, Anastassios

    2009-11-19

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as 'preproteins' carrying amino-terminal, cleavable signal peptides and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides and chaperones like SecB. Here we show that signal peptides have a new role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. On docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, 'triggering' that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; second, 'trapping' that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus; and third, 'secretion' during which trapped mature domains undergo several turnovers of translocation in segments. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  13. Dependence of Brown Adipose Tissue Function on CD36-Mediated Coenzyme Q Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Courtney M.; Kazantzis, Melissa; Wang, Jinshan; Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Quinlan, Casey L.; Ng, Ryan; Jastroch, Martin; Benjamin, Daniel I.; Nie, Biao; Herber, Candice; Ngoc Van, An-Angela; Park, Michael J.; Yun, Dawee; Chan, Karen; Yu, Angela; Vuong, Peter; Febbraio, Maria; Nomura, Daniel; Napoli, Joseph; Brand, Martin D.; Stahl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Brown adipose tissue (BAT) possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ). While cells mostly synthesize CoQ endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function is not well understood. Here we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective non-shivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis. PMID:25620701

  14. Dependence of brown adipose tissue function on CD36-mediated coenzyme Q uptake.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Courtney M; Kazantzis, Melissa; Wang, Jinshan; Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Goncalves, Renata L S; Quinlan, Casey L; Ng, Ryan; Jastroch, Martin; Benjamin, Daniel I; Nie, Biao; Herber, Candice; Van, An-Angela Ngoc; Park, Michael J; Yun, Dawee; Chan, Karen; Yu, Angela; Vuong, Peter; Febbraio, Maria; Nomura, Daniel K; Napoli, Joseph L; Brand, Martin D; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ). While cells synthesize CoQ mostly endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function are not well understood. Here, we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective nonshivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis. PMID:25620701

  15. Inhibition of Glutathione Production Induces Macrophage CD36 Expression and Enhances Cellular-oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Uptake.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Hui; Chen, Yuanli; Sun, Lei; Li, Yan; Ma, Xingzhe; Duan, Shengzhong; Li, Xiaoju; Xiang, Rong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2015-09-01

    The glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidant system has been demonstrated to inhibit atherosclerosis. Macrophage CD36 uptakes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) thereby facilitating foam cell formation and development of atherosclerosis. It remains unknown if GSH can influence macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake directly. Herein we report that treatment of macrophages with l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) decreased cellular GSH production and ratios of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) while increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Associated with decreased GSH levels, macrophage CD36 expression was increased, which resulted in enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake. In contrast, N-acetyl cysteine and antioxidant enzyme (catalase or superoxide dismutase) blocked BSO-induced CD36 expression as well as oxLDL uptake. In vivo, administration of mice with BSO increased CD36 expression in peritoneal macrophages and kidneys. BSO had no effect on CD36 mRNA expression and promoter activity but still induced CD36 protein expression in macrophages lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression, suggesting it induced CD36 expression at the translational level. Indeed, we determined that BSO enhanced CD36 translational efficiency. Taken together, our study demonstrates that cellular GSH levels and GSH/GSSG status can regulate macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL uptake and demonstrate an important anti-atherogenic function of the GSH-dependent antioxidant system by providing a novel molecular mechanism. PMID:26187465

  16. Rosiglitazone-induced CD36 up-regulation resolves inflammation by PPARγ and 5-LO-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Iván; Cuartero, María I; Pradillo, Jesús M; de la Parra, Juan; Pérez-Ruiz, Alberto; Corbí, Angel; Ricote, Mercedes; Hamilton, John A; Sobrado, Mónica; Vivancos, José; Nombela, Florentino; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, María A

    2014-04-01

    PPARγ-achieved neuroprotection in experimental stroke has been explained by the inhibition of inflammatory genes, an action in which 5-LO, Alox5, is involved. In addition, PPARγ is known to promote the expression of CD36, a scavenger receptor that binds lipoproteins and mediates bacterial recognition and also phagocytosis. As phagocytic clearance of neutrophils is a requisite for resolution of the inflammatory response, PPARγ-induced CD36 expression might help to limit inflammatory tissue injury in stroke, an effect in which 5-LO might also be involved. Homogenates, sections, and cellular suspensions were prepared from brains of WT and Alox5(-/-) mice exposed to distal pMCAO. BMMs were obtained from Lys-M Cre(+) PPARγ(f/f) and Lys-M Cre(-) PPARγ(f/f) mice. Stereological counting of double-immunofluorescence-labeled brain sections and FACS analysis of cell suspensions was performed. In vivo and in vitro phagocytosis of neutrophils by microglia/macrophages was analyzed. PPARγ activation with RSG induced CD36 expression in resident microglia. This process was mediated by the 5-LO gene, which is induced in neurons by PPARγ activation and at least by one of its products--LXA4--which induced CD36 independently of PPARγ. Moreover, CD36 expression helped resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis, concomitantly to neuroprotection. Based on these findings, in addition to a direct modulation by PPARγ, we propose in brain a paracrine model by which products generated by neuronal 5-LO, such as LXA4, increase the microglial expression of CD36 and promote tissue repair in pathologies with an inflammatory component, such as stroke. PMID:24338629

  17. Thrombospondin cooperates with CD36 and the vitronectin receptor in macrophage recognition of neutrophils undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Savill, J; Hogg, N; Ren, Y; Haslett, C

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the cell surface recognition mechanisms used by human monocyte-derived macrophages (M phi) in phagocytosis of intact aging human neutrophils (PMNs) undergoing apoptosis. This study shows that the adhesive protein thrombospondin (TSP) was present in the interaction, both associated with the M phi surface and in solution at a mean concentration of 0.59 micrograms/ml. The interaction was inhibited by treatment of M phi (but not aged PMN) with cycloheximide, but could be "rescued" by replenishment with exogenous TSP. Under control conditions, M phi recognition of aged PMNs was specifically potentiated by purified platelet TSP at 5 micrograms/ml, present either in the interaction or if preincubated with either cell type, suggesting that TSP might act as a "molecular bridge" between the two cell types. In support, both aged PMN and M phi were found to adhere to TSP, and phagocytosis of aged PMN was specifically inhibited by (a) excess soluble TSP; (b) antibodies to TSP that also inhibit TSP-mediated adhesion to aged PMN; and (c) down-regulation of M phi receptors for TSP by plating M phi on TSP-coated surfaces. Furthermore, inhibition with mAbs/Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide of the candidate M phi receptors for TSP, CD36, and alpha v beta 3 exerted synergistic effects on both M phi recognition of aged PMN and M phi adhesion to TSP, indicating that "two point" adhesion of TSP to these M phi structures is involved in phagocytosis of aged PMN. Our findings indicate newly defined roles for TSP and CD36 in phagocytic clearance of senescent neutrophils, which may limit inflammatory tissue injury and promote resolution. Images PMID:1383273

  18. CD36 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling pathways and mediates the internalization of Escherichia coli in cooperation with TLR4 in goat mammary gland epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Duoyao; Luo, Jun; Chen, Dekun; Xu, Huifen; Shi, Huaiping; Jing, Xiaoqi; Zang, Wenjuan

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor CD36 is involved in pathogen recognition, phagocytosis, and pathogen-induced signaling. This study investigated the relationship between CD36 and TLR4 in modifying lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced signaling pathways and mediating Escherichia coli (E. coli) endocytosis in primary goat mammary epithelial cells (pGMECs). The manipulation of CD36 expression significantly influenced TLR4 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) mRNA expression in pGMECs stimulated with LPS for 12 h. NF-κB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was regulated by the manipulation of CD36 expression in LPS-induced pGMECs. However, CD36-mediated AP-1 activation occurred primarily through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (c-JNK). Adaptor proteins and proinflammatory cytokines were also involved in these signaling pathways and acted by regulating CD36 expression in LPS-stimulated cells. Moreover, CD36 cooperated with TLR4 in TLR4-mediated phagocytosis following E. coli simulation, but this complex was not induced by LPS treatment. Our study is the first to illuminate CD36 as a scavenger receptor in ruminants. Additionally, this study indicates that CD36 plays a vital role in the LPS-induced activation of downstream signaling cascades and mediates E. coli phagocytosis via TLR4 in pGMECs, which offers a novel treatment strategy for mastitis. PMID:26976286

  19. Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency, clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; Bakker, J A; Waterham, H R; Wanders, R J A

    2004-01-01

    The carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is one of the components of the carnitine cycle. The carnitine cycle is necessary to shuttle long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the intramitochondrial space where mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids takes place. The oxidation of fatty acids yields acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) units, which may either be degraded to CO(2) and H(2)O in the citric acid cycle to produce ATP or converted into ketone bodies which occurs in liver and kidneys. Metabolic consequences of a defective CACT are hypoketotic hypoglycaemia under fasting conditions, hyperammonemia, elevated creatine kinase and transaminases, dicarboxylic aciduria, very low free carnitine and an abnormal acylcarnitine profile with marked elevation of the long-chain acylcarnitines. Clinical signs and symptoms in CACT deficient patients, are a combination of energy depletion and endogenous toxicity. The predominantly affected organs are brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and liver, leading to neurological abnormalities, cardiomyopathy and arrythmias, skeletal muscle damage and liver dysfunction. Most patients become symptomatic in the neonatal period with a rapidly progressive deterioration and a high mortality rate. However, presentations at a later age with a milder phenotype have also been reported. The therapeutic approach is the same as in other long-chain fatty acid disorders and includes intravenous glucose (+/- insulin) administration to maximally inhibit lipolysis and subsequent fatty acid oxidation during the acute deterioration, along with other measures such as ammonia detoxification, depending on the clinical features. Long-term strategy consists of avoidance of fasting with frequent meals and a special diet with restriction of long-chain fatty acids. Due to the extremely low free carnitine concentrations, carnitine supplementation is often needed. Acylcarnitine profiling in plasma is the assay of choice for the diagnosis at a metabolite level

  20. Reduced CD36-dependent tissue sequestration of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes is detrimental to malaria parasite growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fonager, Jannik; Pasini, Erica M.; Braks, Joanna A.M.; Klop, Onny; Ramesar, Jai; Remarque, Edmond J.; Vroegrijk, Irene O.C.M.; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Thomas, Alan W.; Khan, Shahid M.; Mann, Matthias; Kocken, Clemens H.M.; Janse, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence of parasite-infected red blood cells (irbc) to the vascular endothelium of organs plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The prevailing hypothesis of why irbc adhere and sequester in tissues is that this acts as a mechanism of avoiding spleen-mediated clearance. Irbc of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei ANKA sequester in a fashion analogous to P. falciparum by adhering to the host receptor CD36. To experimentally determine the significance of sequestration for parasite growth, we generated a mutant P. berghei ANKA parasite with a reduced CD36-mediated adherence. Although the cognate parasite ligand binding to CD36 is unknown, we show that nonsequestering parasites have reduced growth and we provide evidence that in addition to avoiding spleen removal, other factors related to CD36-mediated sequestration are beneficial for parasite growth. These results reveal for the first time the importance of sequestration to a malaria infection, with implications for the development of strategies aimed at reducing pathology by inhibiting tissue sequestration. PMID:22184632

  1. Effects of homocysteine on adipocyte differentiation and CD36 gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mentese, Ahmet; Alver, Ahmet; Sumer, Aysegul; Demir, Selim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of homocysteine (Hcy), a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, stroke and obesity, on expression of CD36 that regulates uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) by adipocytes and differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells to adipocytes. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, and density of triglycerides were measured with Oil Red O staining. The expression levels of CD36 were analyzed using SYBR green assay by quantitative RT-PCR. Our results showed that the addition of Hcy inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in a dose-dependent manner without a significant cell toxicity (p < 0.05). Percentage CD36 gene expression increased in the Hcy treatment groups, but not statistically significantly (p > 0.05) compared to differentiated adipocytes. Hcy reduced adipocyte differentiation, but had no effect on the expression level of CD36 in vitro conditions. The effect of Hcy on uptake and clearance of Ox-LDL by adipose tissue now needs to be investigated in vivo. PMID:26691520

  2. Biochemical isolation of a membrane microdomain from resting platelets highly enriched in the plasma membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed Central

    Dorahy, D J; Lincz, L F; Meldrum, C J; Burns, G F

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a Triton X-100-insoluble fraction isolated from lysates of platelets by flotation in sucrose gradients. Transmission electron microscopy of the insoluble material revealed a heterogeneous population of vesicles ranging in size from 20 to 1000 nm, and Western blot analyses of platelet lysates for the caveolae structural coat protein, caveolin/VIP21, were negative. Biochemical characterization of the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction showed it to be cholesterol-rich, greatly and specifically enriched in the plasma membrane glycoprotein CD36, and also to contain Src and the Src-related kinase, Lyn. CD36 within this fraction is shown to be palmitoylated, but the fraction itself is not generally enriched in palmitoylated platelet proteins. These results suggest that this fraction represents caveolin-negative, CD36-rich microdomains in the resting platelet membrane. CD36 can form associations with certain Src-related kinases and can signal to activate platelets. These results suggest the possibility that such microdomains are implicated in platelet activation. PMID:8870650

  3. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  4. CD36 Is a Novel Serum Amyloid A (SAA) Receptor Mediating SAA Binding and SAA-induced Signaling in Human and Rodent Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Irina N.; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Kurlander, Roger; Chen, Zhigang; Fu, Dong; Arias, Irwin M.; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P.; Eggerman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. This study provides experimental evidence that CD36, a phagocyte class B scavenger receptor, functions as a novel SAA receptor mediating SAA proinflammatory activity. The uptake of Alexa Fluor® 488 SAA as well as of other well established CD36 ligands was increased 5–10-fold in HeLa cells stably transfected with CD36 when compared with mock-transfected cells. Unlike other apolipoproteins that bind to CD36, only SAA induced a 10–50-fold increase of interleukin-8 secretion in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control cells. SAA-mediated effects were thermolabile, inhibitable by anti-SAA antibody, and also neutralized by association with high density lipoprotein but not by association with bovine serum albumin. SAA-induced cell activation was inhibited by a CD36 peptide based on the CD36 hexarelin-binding site but not by a peptide based on the thrombospondin-1-binding site. A pronounced reduction (up to 60–75%) of SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was observed in cd36−/− rat macrophages and Kupffer cells when compared with wild type rat cells. The results of the MAPK phosphorylation assay as well as of the studies with NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors revealed that two MAPKs, JNK and to a lesser extent ERK1/2, primarily contribute to elevated cytokine production in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In macrophages, four signaling pathways involving NF-κB and three MAPKs all appeared to contribute to SAA-induced cytokine release. These observations indicate that CD36 is a receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion predominantly through JNK- and ERK1/2-mediated signaling. PMID:20075072

  5. Association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and risk of coronary atherosclerosis in Egyptian population

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Usama Ahmed; Sabet, Eman A.; Salama, Eman; El Sharawy, Ahmed; Elbadry, Mahmoud I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that CD36 is involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. Associations between rs1761667 polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) are not obvious. Methods We studied the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1761667 of CD36 gene and the risk of coronary atherosclerosis in a case-control study composed of 71 CAD patients and 76 healthy controls by assessment of allele frequencies and genotype distributions using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the allele discrimination technique. Additionally, we detected CD36 expression by flow cytometry. Results The distribution of rs1761667 genotypes between the two groups was significantly different (P<0.001), with the frequency of the AG genotype being significantly higher in the CAD group than in the control group (P<0.001). The expression level of CD36 in the CAD group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.001), with significant differences in the CAD patients with an AG genotype compared with those with an AA and GG genotype (P<0.001). The plasma levels (mg/dL) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the CAD group were much higher than that in the control group (P<0.001). On the other hand, the plasma LDL levels in CAD patients with the AG genotype were remarkably higher than those with the GG and AA genotypes (P=0.046) and AG genotype was significantly more prevalent among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients (P<0.05). After adjusted logistic regression analysis, the AG genotype of rs1761667 was associated with an increased risk of CAD (OR=17.97, 95% CI, 3.19–87.85, P=0.001). Conclusions The AG genotype of the rs1761667 polymorphism in the CD36 gene may be involved in CAD pathogenesis as well as increased body mass index (BMI), T2DM and MetS in the Sohag population of Egypt. PMID:27054101

  6. Circulating CD36 and oxLDL levels are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) results from a combination of abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism, oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and susceptibility to thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is the major cause of CVD. CD36 has been shown to play a critical role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions by its capacity to bind and promote endocytosis of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and is implicated in the formation of foam cells. The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether there is an association of sCD36 and oxLDL levels with cardiovascular risk factors in young subjects. Methods A total of 188 subjects, 18 to 25 years old, 133 normal-weight and 55 obese subjects from the state of Guerrero, Mexico were recruited in the study. The lipid profile and glucose levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA) for oxLDL and sCD36 were performed. Statistical analyses of data were performed with Wilcoxon- Mann Whitney and chi-square tests as well as with multinomial regression. Results TC, LDL-C, TG, oxLDL and sCD36 levels were higher in obese subjects than in normal-weight controls, as well as, monocyte and platelet counts (P < 0.05). Obese subjects had 5.8 times higher risk of sCD36 in the third tertil (>97.8 ng/mL) than normal-weight controls (P = 0.014), and 7.4 times higher risk of oxLDL levels in third tertile (>48 U/L) than control group. The subjects with hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, fasting impaired LDL-C had a higher risk of oxLDL levels in the third tertile (>48 U/L) than the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions Circulating CD36 and oxLDL levels are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in young subjects and may be potential early markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD). PMID:24766787

  7. Low Levels of CD36 in Peripheral Blood Monocytes in Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Martín-Márquez, Beatriz Teresita; Martínez-García, Erika Aurora; Figueroa-Sanchez, Mauricio; Nuñez-Atahualpa, Lourdes; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Sánchez-Hernández, Pedro Ernesto; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Madrigal-Ruiz, Perla Monserrat; Saldaña-Millan, Adan Alberto; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a higher risk for atherosclerosis. There is no clinical information about scavenger receptor CD36 and the development of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between membrane expression of CD36 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in patients with RA. Methods. We included 67 patients with RA from the Rheumatology Department of Hospital Civil “Dr. Juan I. Menchaca,” Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. We evaluated the cIMT, considering subclinical atherosclerosis when >0.6 mm. Since our main objective was to associate the membrane expression of CD36 with subclinical atherosclerosis, other molecules related with cardiovascular risk such as ox-LDL, IL-6, and TNFα were tested. Results. We found low CD36 membrane expression in PBMC from RA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis (P < 0.001). CD36 mean fluorescence intensity had negative correlations with cIMT (r = −0.578, P < 0.001), ox-LDL (r = −0.427, P = 0.05), TNFα (r = −0.729, P < 0.001), and IL-6 (r = −0.822, P < 0.001). Conclusion. RA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis showed low membrane expression of CD36 in PBMC and increased serum proinflammatory cytokines. Further studies are needed to clarify the regulation of CD36 in RA. PMID:25006585

  8. Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Postischemic Inflammation Are Suppressed in CD36-Null Mice after Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Alexander; Abe, Takato; Hochrainer, Karin; Shimamura, Munehisa; Anrather, Josef; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Zhou, Ping; Iadecola, Costantino

    2008-01-01

    CD36, a class-B scavenger receptor involved in multiple functions, including inflammatory signaling, may also contribute to ischemic brain injury through yet unidentified mechanisms. We investigated whether CD36 participates in the molecular events underlying the inflammatory reaction that accompanies cerebral ischemia and may contribute to the tissue damage. We found that activation of nuclear factor-κB, a transcription factor that coordinates postischemic gene expression, is attenuated in CD36-null mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. The infiltration of neutrophils and the glial reaction induced by cerebral ischemia were suppressed. Treatment with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that contributes to the tissue damage, reduced ischemic brain injury in wild-type mice, but not in CD36 nulls. In contrast to cerebral ischemia, the molecular and cellular inflammatory changes induced by intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-1β were not attenuated in CD36-null mice. The findings unveil a novel role of CD36 in early molecular events leading to nuclear factor-κB activation and postischemic inflammation. Inhibition of CD36 signaling may be a valuable therapeutic approach to counteract the deleterious effects of postischemic inflammation. PMID:18272685

  9. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  10. Antagonism of scavenger receptor CD36 by 5A peptide prevents chronic kidney disease progression in mice independent of blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Carolina P; Bocharov, Alexander V; Baranova, Irina N; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Huang, Yuning G; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Hu, Xuzhen; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Mullick, Adam E; Patterson, Amy P; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Scavenger receptor CD36 participates in lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways important for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Few pharmacological agents are available to slow the progression of CKD. However, apolipoprotein A-I-mimetic peptide 5A antagonizes CD36 in vitro. To test the efficacy of 5A, and to test the role of CD36 during CKD, we compared wild-type to CD36 knockout mice and wild-type mice treated with 5A, in a progressive CKD model that resembles human disease. Knockout and 5A-treated wild-type mice were protected from CKD progression without changes in blood pressure and had reductions in cardiovascular risk surrogate markers that are associated with CKD. Treatment with 5A did not further protect CD36 knockout mice from CKD progression, implicating CD36 as its main site of action. In a separate model of kidney fibrosis, 5A-treated wild-type mice had less macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Peptide 5A exerted anti-inflammatory effects in the kidney and decreased renal expression of inflammasome genes. Thus, CD36 is a new therapeutic target for CKD and its associated cardiovascular risk factors. Peptide 5A may be a promising new agent to slow CKD progression. PMID:26994575

  11. The macrophage pattern recognition scavenger receptors SR-A and CD36 protect against microbial induced pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffery L.; de Villiers, Willem J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives and design Microbial products can act via stress-induced signaling cascades to link dysregulated endogenous microbiota to immune activation (e.g., macrophages) and pregnancy loss. Our previous studies demonstrated that mice deficient in the macrophage pattern recognition scavenger receptors, SR-A and CD36, are more susceptible to inflammatory complications including gut leakiness and experimental colitis. We hypothesized that bacterial penetration of the maternal mucosal surfaces and replication in embryonic fluids compromise the fetal status and can result in miscarriage. Materials and methods Eighty pregnant ICR and SR-A/CD36-deficient mice were injected via tail vein or intraperitoneally with commensal bacteria (Streptococcus cricetus and/or Actinobacillus sp.) or sham controls. Dams were monitored daily for physical distress, pain and abortion. Results Dams injected with single dose bacterial inoculum did not develop clinical symptoms. Day old pups injected with bacteria developed internal focal abscesses, lost weight but recovered after 1 week. Dams receiving a second bacterial inoculum delivered dead fetuses. However, SR-A/CD36-deficnet dams demonstrated 100% fetal death via aborted fetuses, and significant up-regulation of the proinflammatory markers (IL-6, serum Amyloid A) 24–74 h after single inoculum. Conclusions These data indicate that macrophage scavenger receptors are required for the fetal protection against microbial attack and support that maternal transfer of innate immunity contributes to this protection. PMID:20711846

  12. Bacterial Origin of a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Harsman, Anke; Niemann, Moritz; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Burmann, Björn M.; Hiller, Sebastian; Meisinger, Chris; Schneider, André; Wagner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are of bacterial ancestry and have to import most of their proteins from the cytosol. This process is mediated by Tom40, an essential protein that forms the protein-translocating pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Tom40 is conserved in virtually all eukaryotes, but its evolutionary origin is unclear because bacterial orthologues have not been identified so far. Recently, it was shown that the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei lacks a conventional Tom40 and instead employs the archaic translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (ATOM), a protein that shows similarities to both eukaryotic Tom40 and bacterial protein translocases of the Omp85 family. Here we present electrophysiological single channel data showing that ATOM forms a hydrophilic pore of large conductance and high open probability. Moreover, ATOM channels exhibit a preference for the passage of cationic molecules consistent with the idea that it may translocate unfolded proteins targeted by positively charged N-terminal presequences. This is further supported by the fact that the addition of a presequence peptide induces transient pore closure. An in-depth comparison of these single channel properties with those of other protein translocases reveals that ATOM closely resembles bacterial-type protein export channels rather than eukaryotic Tom40. Our results support the idea that ATOM represents an evolutionary intermediate between a bacterial Omp85-like protein export machinery and the conventional Tom40 that is found in mitochondria of other eukaryotes. PMID:22778261

  13. CD36/SR-B2-TLR2 Dependent Pathways Enhance Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated Atherosclerosis in the Ldlr KO Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul M; Kennedy, David J; Morton, Richard E; Febbraio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is strong epidemiological association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease but underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Because the human periodontal disease pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), interacts with innate immune receptors Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 2 and CD36/scavenger receptor-B2 (SR-B2), we studied how CD36/SR-B2 and TLR pathways promote Pg-mediated atherosclerosis. Western diet fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr°) mice infected orally with Pg had a significant increase in lesion burden compared with uninfected controls.This increase was entirely CD36/SR-B2-dependent, as there was no significant change in lesion burden between infected and uninfected Cd36o/Ldlro mice [corrected]. Western diet feeding promoted enhanced CD36/SR-B2-dependent IL1β generation and foam cell formation as a result of Pg lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) exposure. CD36/SR-B2 and TLR2 were necessary for inflammasome activation and optimal IL1ß generation, but also resulted in LPS induced lethality (pyroptosis). Modified forms of LDL inhibited Pg-mediated IL1ß generation in a CD36/SR-B2-dependent manner and prevented pyroptosis, but promoted foam cell formation. Our data show that Pg infection in the oral cavity can lead to significant TLR2-CD36/SR-B2 dependent IL1ß release. In the vessel wall, macrophages encountering systemic release of IL1ß, PgLPS and modified LDL have increased lipid uptake, foam cell formation, and release of IL1ß, but because pyroptosis is inhibited, this enables macrophage survival and promotes increased plaque development. These studies may explain increased lesion burden as a result of periodontal disease, and suggest strategies for development of therapeutics. PMID:25938460

  14. Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotein Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells' Function by Activation of CD36-MAPK-TSP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianxiang; He, Zhiqing; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Feng; Ding, Ru; Ren, Yusheng; Jiang, Qijun; Fan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events due to the protective effects on vascular wall and stem cells, which are susceptible to oxidative modifications and then lead to potential pro-atherosclerotic effects. We proposed that oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) might lead to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) dysfunction and investigated underlying mechanisms. Results: ox-HDL was shown to increase apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, but to reduce migration, angiogenesis, and cholesterol efflux of EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB were activated after ox-HDL stimulation, which also upregulated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression without affecting vascular endothelial growth factor. Effects caused by ox-HDL could be significantly attenuated by pretreatment with short hairpin RNA-mediated CD36 knockdown or probucol. Data of in vivo experiments and the inverse correlation of ox-HDL and circulating EPC numbers among patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) or CAD and type 2 diabetes also supported it. Meanwhile, HDL separated from such patients could significantly increase cultured EPC's caspase 3 activity, further supporting our proposal. Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of how ox-HDL would impair EPCs function, which was involved with activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways and proved by not only the inverse relationship between ox-HDL and circulating EPCs in clinic but also pro-apoptotic effects of HDL separated from patients' serum. Conclusion: Activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways contributes to the pathological effects of ox-HDL on EPCs' dysfunction, which might be one of the potential etiological factors responsible for the disturbed neovascularization in chronic ischemic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 308–324. PMID:25313537

  15. Dietary supplementation with long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids attenuates obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and increases expression of PPAR gamma in adipose tissue in type 2 diabetic KK-Ay mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of present study was to examine the effect of long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids (LC-MUFAs) with chain lengths longer than 18 (i.e., C20:1 and C22:1 isomers combined) on obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and its molecular mechanisms. Type-2 diabetic KK-Ay mice (n = 20) were randomly assigned to the 7% soybean oil-diet group (control group) and 4% LC-MUFA concentrate-supplemented-diet group (LC-MUFA group). At 8 weeks on the diet, the results showed that plasma, liver and adipose tissue levels of C20:1 and C22:1 isomers increased significantly with LC-MUFA treatment. Supplementation with LC-MUFAs markedly reduced white fat pad weight as well as adipocyte size in the mice. The levels of plasma free fatty acids, insulin, and leptin concentration in the obese diabetic mice of the LC-MUFA group were also decreased as compared with the mice in the soybean oil-diet control group. Dietary LC-MUFAs significantly increased the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), lipoprotein lipase (Lpl), fatty acid transport protein (Fatp), fatty acid translocase/CD36 (Cd36), as well as mRNA expression of genes involved in lipid oxidation such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (Cpt1a) and citrate synthase (Cs), and decreased the mRNA expression of inflammatory marker serum amyloid A 3 (Saa3) in the adipose tissues of diabetic mice. The results suggest that LC-MUFAs may ameliorate obesity-related metabolic dysfunction partly through increased expression of Pparg as well as its target genes, and decreased inflammatory marker expression in white adipose tissue. PMID:23360495

  16. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  17. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival. PMID:26777559

  18. CD36/SR-B2-TLR2 Dependent Pathways Enhance Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated Atherosclerosis in the Ldlr KO Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paul M.; Kennedy, David J.; Morton, Richard E.; Febbraio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is strong epidemiological association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease but underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Because the human periodontal disease pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), interacts with innate immune receptors Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 2 and CD36/scavenger receptor-B2 (SR-B2), we studied how CD36/SR-B2 and TLR pathways promote Pg-mediated atherosclerosis. Western diet fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr°) mice infected orally with Pg had a significant increase in lesion burden compared with uninfected controls. This increase was entirely CD36/SR-B2-dependent, as there was no significant change in lesion burden between infected and uninfected Ldlr° mice. Western diet feeding promoted enhanced CD36/SR-B2-dependent IL1β generation and foam cell formation as a result of Pg lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) exposure. CD36/SR-B2 and TLR2 were necessary for inflammasome activation and optimal IL1ß generation, but also resulted in LPS induced lethality (pyroptosis). Modified forms of LDL inhibited Pg-mediated IL1ß generation in a CD36/SR-B2-dependent manner and prevented pyroptosis, but promoted foam cell formation. Our data show that Pg infection in the oral cavity can lead to significant TLR2-CD36/SR-B2 dependent IL1ß release. In the vessel wall, macrophages encountering systemic release of IL1ß, PgLPS and modified LDL have increased lipid uptake, foam cell formation, and release of IL1ß, but because pyroptosis is inhibited, this enables macrophage survival and promotes increased plaque development. These studies may explain increased lesion burden as a result of periodontal disease, and suggest strategies for development of therapeutics. PMID:25938460

  19. Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte adhesion to C32 cells via CD36 is inhibited by antibodies to modified band 3.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, N J; Targett, G A; Hall, B S

    1996-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte-infected erythrocytes are characterized by their ability to sequester in the microvasculature of various organs, primarily the spleen and bone marrow. This phenomenon is thought to play a critical role in the development and survival of the sexual stages. Little is known, however, about ligands on the gametocyte-infected erythrocyte. Infection of erythrocytes with mature asexual stages of P. falciparum (trophozoites and schizonts) has been shown to induce modification of the erythrocyte anion transporter, band 3, and this has been linked to the acquisition of an adherent phenotype. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that immature gametocyte-infected erythrocytes also express modified band 3. In vitro binding assays demonstrate that gametocyte-infected erythrocytes of the 3D7 strain utilize this surface receptor for adhesion to C32 amelanotic melanoma cells via the host cell receptor CD36 (platelet glycoprotein IIIb). Adhesion of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes to CD36-transfected CHO cells is also dependent on modified band 3. However, modified band 3 does not mediate adhesion of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes to intercellular adhesion molecule 1, a second host receptor for gametocytes expressed on C32 cells. PMID:8926098

  20. Murine malaria parasite sequestration: CD36 is the major receptor, but cerebral pathology is unlinked to sequestration.

    PubMed

    Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J; Cunha-Rodrigues, Margarida; Ramesar, Jai; Büscher, Philippe; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens; Voshol, Peter J; den Boer, Marion A M; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Febbraio, Maria; Mota, Maria M; Waters, Andrew P

    2005-08-01

    Sequestration of malaria-parasite-infected erythrocytes in the microvasculature of organs is thought to be a significant cause of pathology. Cerebral malaria (CM) is a major complication of Plasmodium falciparum infections, and PfEMP1-mediated sequestration of infected red blood cells has been considered to be the major feature leading to CM-related pathology. We report a system for the real-time in vivo imaging of sequestration using transgenic luciferase-expressing parasites of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. These studies revealed that: (i) as expected, lung tissue is a major site, but, unexpectedly, adipose tissue contributes significantly to sequestration, and (ii) the class II scavenger-receptor CD36 to which PfEMP1 can bind is also the major receptor for P. berghei sequestration, indicating a role for alternative parasite ligands, because orthologues of PfEMP1 are absent from rodent malaria parasites, and, importantly, (iii) cerebral complications still develop in the absence of CD36-mediated sequestration, dissociating parasite sequestration from CM-associated pathology. Real-time in vivo imaging of parasitic processes may be used to evaluate the molecular basis of pathology and develop strategies to prevent pathology. PMID:16051702

  1. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  2. Inhibition of Macrophage CD36 Expression and Cellular Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Accumulation by Tamoxifen: A PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR)γ-DEPENDENT MECHANISM.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Jiang, Meixiu; Chen, Yuanli; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Wenwen; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Yan; Duan, Shengzhong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2016-08-12

    Macrophage CD36 binds and internalizes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to facilitate foam cell formation. CD36 expression is activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Tamoxifen, an anti-breast cancer medicine, has demonstrated pleiotropic functions including cardioprotection with unfully elucidated mechanisms. In this study, we determined that treatment of ApoE-deficient mice with tamoxifen reduced atherosclerosis, which was associated with decreased CD36 and PPARγ expression in lesion areas. At the cellular level, we observed that tamoxifen inhibited CD36 protein expression in human THP-1 monocytes, THP-1/PMA macrophages, and human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Associated with decreased CD36 protein expression, tamoxifen reduced cellular oxLDL accumulation in a CD36-dependent manner. At the transcriptional level, tamoxifen decreased CD36 mRNA expression, promoter activity, and the binding of the PPARγ response element in CD36 promoter to PPARγ protein. Tamoxifen blocked ligand-induced PPARγ nuclear translocation and CD36 expression, but it increased PPARγ phosphorylation, which was due to that tamoxifen-activated ERK1/2. Furthermore, deficiency of PPARγ expression in macrophages abolished the inhibitory effect of tamoxifen on CD36 expression or cellular oxLDL accumulation both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, our study demonstrates that tamoxifen inhibits CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL accumulation by inactivating the PPARγ signaling pathway, and the inhibition of macrophage CD36 expression can be attributed to the anti-atherogenic properties of tamoxifen. PMID:27358406

  3. Parasite Burden and CD36-Mediated Sequestration Are Determinants of Acute Lung Injury in an Experimental Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Lovegrove, Fiona E.; Gharib, Sina A.; Peña-Castillo, Lourdes; Patel, Samir N.; Ruzinski, John T.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Although acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication of severe malaria, little is known about the underlying molecular basis of lung dysfunction. Animal models have provided powerful insights into the pathogenesis of severe malaria syndromes such as cerebral malaria (CM); however, no model of malaria-induced lung injury has been definitively established. This study used bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), histopathology and gene expression analysis to examine the development of ALI in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). BAL fluid of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice revealed a significant increase in IgM and total protein prior to the development of CM, indicating disruption of the alveolar–capillary membrane barrier—the physiological hallmark of ALI. In contrast to sepsis-induced ALI, BAL fluid cell counts remained constant with no infiltration of neutrophils. Histopathology showed septal inflammation without cellular transmigration into the alveolar spaces. Microarray analysis of lung tissue from PbA-infected mice identified a significant up-regulation of expressed genes associated with the gene ontology categories of defense and immune response. Severity of malaria-induced ALI varied in a panel of inbred mouse strains, and development of ALI correlated with peripheral parasite burden but not CM susceptibility. Cd36−/− mice, which have decreased parasite lung sequestration, were relatively protected from ALI. In summary, parasite burden and CD36-mediated sequestration in the lung are primary determinants of ALI in experimental murine malaria. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of mouse strains to malaria-induced ALI and CM suggests that distinct genetic determinants may regulate susceptibility to these two important causes of malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18483551

  4. Maternal obesity upregulates fatty acid and glucose transporters and increases expression of enzymes mediating fatty acid biosynthesis in fetal adipose tissue depots.

    PubMed

    Long, N M; Rule, D C; Zhu, M J; Nathanielsz, P W; Ford, S P

    2012-07-01

    Maternal nutrient restriction leads to alteration in fetal adipose tissue, and offspring from obese mothers have an increased risk of developing obesity. We hypothesized that maternal obesity increases fetal adipogenesis. Multiparous ewes (Columbia/Rambouillet cross 3 to 5 yr of age) carrying twins were assigned to a diet of 100% (Control; CON; n = 4) or 150% (Obese; OB, n = 7) of NRC maintenance requirements from 60 d before conception until necropsy on d 135 of gestation. Maternal and fetal plasma were collected and stored at -80°C for glucose and hormone analyses. Fetal measurements were made at necropsy, and perirenal, pericardial, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were collected from 7 male twin fetuses per group and snap frozen at -80°C. Protein and mRNA expression of fatty acid translocase [cluster of differentiation (CD) 36], fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) 1 and 4, insulin-sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT-4), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACC) was evaluated. Fetal weight was similar, but fetal carcass weight (FCW) was reduced (P < 0.05) in OB versus CON fetuses. Pericardial and perirenal adipose tissue weights were increased (P < 0.05) as a percentage of FCW in OB versus CON fetuses, as was subcutaneous fat thickness (P < 0.001). Average adipocyte diameter was greater (P < 0.01) in the perirenal fat and the pericardial fat (P = 0.06) in OB fetuses compared with CON fetuses. Maternal plasma showed no difference (P > 0.05) in glucose or other hormones, fetal plasma glucose was similar (P = 0.42), and cortisol, IGF-1, and thyroxine were reduced (P ≤ 0.05) in OB fetuses compared with CON fetuses. Protein and mRNA expression of CD 36, FATP 1 and 4, and GLUT-4 were increased (P ≤ 0.05) in all fetal adipose depots in OB versus CON fetuses. The mRNA expression of FASN and ACC was increased (P < 0.05) in OB vs. CON fetuses in all 3 fetal adipose tissue depots. Fatty acid concentrations were increased (P = 0.01) in the

  5. Clonal Variants of Plasmodium falciparum Exhibit a Narrow Range of Rolling Velocities to Host Receptor CD36 under Dynamic Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Herricks, Thurston; Avril, Marion; Janes, Joel; Smith, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) has been implicated in the virulence of malaria infection. Cytoadhesive interactions are mediated by the protein family of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). The PfEMP1 family is under strong antibody and binding selection, resulting in extensive sequence and size variation of the extracellular domains. Here, we investigated cytoadhesion of pRBCs to CD36, a common receptor of P. falciparum field isolates, under dynamic flow conditions. Isogeneic parasites, predominantly expressing single PfEMP1 variants, were evaluated for binding to recombinant CD36 under dynamic flow conditions using microfluidic devices. We tested if PfEMP1 size (number of extracellular domains) or sequence variation affected the pRBC-CD36 interaction. Our analysis showed that clonal parasite variants varied ∼5-fold in CD36 rolling velocity despite extensive PfEMP1 sequence polymorphism. In addition, adherent pRBCs exhibited a characteristic hysteresis in rolling velocity at microvascular flow rates, which was accompanied by changes in pRBC shape and may represent important adaptations that favor stable binding. PMID:24014767

  6. Oxidized LDL activates blood platelets through CD36/NOX2–mediated inhibition of the cGMP/protein kinase G signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Magwenzi, Simbarashe; Woodward, Casey; Wraith, Katie S.; Aburima, Ahmed; Raslan, Zaher; Jones, Huw; McNeil, Catriona; Wheatcroft, Stephen; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Febbriao, Maria; Kearney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes unregulated platelet activation in dyslipidemic disorders. Although oxLDL stimulates activatory signaling, it is unclear how these events drive accelerated thrombosis. Here, we describe a mechanism for oxLDL-mediated platelet hyperactivity that requires generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under arterial flow, oxLDL triggered sustained generation of platelet intracellular ROS, which was blocked by CD36 inhibitors, mimicked by CD36-specific oxidized phospholipids, and ablated in CD36−/− murine platelets. oxLDL-induced ROS generation was blocked by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) inhibitor, gp91ds-tat, and absent in NOX2−/− mice. The synthesis of ROS by oxLDL/CD36 required Src-family kinases and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation and activation of NOX2. In functional assays, oxLDL abolished guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated signaling and inhibited platelet aggregation and arrest under flow. This was prevented by either pharmacologic inhibition of NOX2 in human platelets or genetic ablation of NOX2 in murine platelets. Platelets from hyperlipidemic mice were also found to have a diminished sensitivity to cGMP when tested ex vivo, a phenotype that was corrected by infusion of gp91ds-tat into the mice. This study demonstrates that oxLDL and hyperlipidemia stimulate the generation of NOX2-derived ROS through a CD36-PKC pathway and may promote platelet hyperactivity through modulation of cGMP signaling. PMID:25710879

  7. A subset of bacterial inner membrane proteins integrated by the twin-arginine translocase.

    PubMed

    Hatzixanthis, Kostas; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2003-09-01

    A group of bacterial exported proteins are synthesized with N-terminal signal peptides containing a SRRxFLK 'twin-arginine' amino acid motif. Proteins bearing twin-arginine signal peptides are targeted post-translationally to the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system which transports folded substrates across the inner membrane. In Escherichia coli, most integral inner membrane proteins are assembled by a co-translational process directed by SRP/FtsY, the SecYEG translocase, and YidC. In this work we define a novel class of integral membrane proteins assembled by a Tat-dependent mechanism. We show that at least five E. coli Tat substrate proteins contain hydrophobic C-terminal transmembrane helices (or 'C-tails'). Fusions between the identified transmembrane C-tails and the exclusively Tat-dependent reporter proteins TorA and SufI render the resultant chimeras membrane-bound. Export-linked signal peptide processing and membrane integration of the chimeras is shown to be both Tat-dependent and YidC-independent. It is proposed that the mechanism of membrane integration of proteins by the Tat system is fundamentally distinct from that employed for other bacterial inner membrane proteins. PMID:12940994

  8. Peptide Probes Reveal a Hydrophobic Steric Ratchet in the Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen Translocase.

    PubMed

    Colby, Jennifer M; Krantz, Bryan A

    2015-11-01

    Anthrax toxin is a tripartite virulence factor produced by Bacillus anthracis during infection. Under acidic endosomal pH conditions, the toxin's protective antigen (PA) component forms a transmembrane channel in host cells. The PA channel then translocates its two enzyme components, lethal factor and edema factor, into the host cytosol under the proton motive force. Protein translocation under a proton motive force is catalyzed by a series of nonspecific polypeptide binding sites, called clamps. A 10-residue guest/host peptide model system, KKKKKXXSXX, was used to functionally probe polypeptide-clamp interactions within wild-type PA channels. The guest residues were Thr, Ala, Leu, Phe, Tyr, and Trp. In steady-state translocation experiments, the channel blocked most tightly with peptides that had increasing amounts of nonpolar surface area. Cooperative peptide binding was observed in the Trp-containing peptide sequence but not the other tested sequences. Trp substitutions into a flexible, uncharged linker between the lethal factor amino-terminal domain and diphtheria toxin A chain expedited translocation. Therefore, peptide-clamp sites in translocase channels can sense large steric features (like tryptophan) in peptides, and while these steric interactions may make a peptide translocate poorly, in the context of folded domains, they can make the protein translocate more rapidly presumably via a hydrophobic steric ratchet mechanism. PMID:26363343

  9. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of a yeast mitochondrial preprotein translocase.

    PubMed

    Model, Kirstin; Meisinger, Chris; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-11-28

    The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex is the main entry gate for proteins imported into mitochondria. We determined the structure of the native, unstained approximately 550-kDa core-Tom20 complex from Saccharomycescerevisiae by cryo-electron microscopy at 18-A resolution. The complex is triangular, measuring 145 A on edge, and has near-3-fold symmetry. Its bulk is made up of three globular approximately 50-A domains. Three elliptical pores on the c-face merge into one central approximately 70-A cavity with a cage-like assembly on the opposite t-face. Nitrilotriacetic acid-gold labeling indicates that three Tom22 subunits in the TOM complex are located at the perimeter of the complex near the interface of the globular domains. We assign Tom22, which controls complex assembly, to three peripheral protrusions on the c-face, while the Tom20 subunit is tentatively assigned to the central protrusion on this surface. Based on our three-dimensional map, we propose a model of transient interactions and functional dynamics of the TOM assembly. PMID:18706915

  10. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  11. Coupling of mitochondrial import and export translocases by receptor-mediated supercomplex formation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Zerbes, Ralf M; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A; Wirth, Christophe; Ellenrieder, Lars; Thornton, Nicolas; Kutik, Stephan; Wiese, Sebastian; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Zufall, Nicole; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Guiard, Bernard; Hunte, Carola; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane harbors two protein translocases that are essential for cell viability: the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). The precursors of β-barrel proteins use both translocases-TOM for import to the intermembrane space and SAM for export into the outer membrane. It is unknown if the translocases cooperate and where the β-barrel of newly imported proteins is formed. We established a position-specific assay for monitoring β-barrel formation in vivo and in organello and demonstrated that the β-barrel was formed and membrane inserted while the precursor was bound to SAM. β-barrel formation was inhibited by SAM mutants and, unexpectedly, by mutants of the central import receptor, Tom22. We show that the cytosolic domain of Tom22 links TOM and SAM into a supercomplex, facilitating precursor transfer on the intermembrane space side. Our study reveals receptor-mediated coupling of import and export translocases as a means of precursor channeling. PMID:23911324

  12. The SNMP/CD36 gene family in Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera: Drosophila melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, Apis mellifera, and Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Zachary; Vogt, Richard G

    2008-04-01

    Sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) are membrane bound proteins initially identified in olfactory receptor neurons of Lepidoptera and are thought to play a role in odor detection; SNMPs belong to a larger gene family characterized by the human protein CD36. We have identified 12-14 candidate SNMP/CD36 homologs from each of the genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (Diptera), eight candidate homologs from Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera), and 15 from Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera). Analysis (sequence similarity and intron locations) suggests that the insect SNMP/CD36 genes fall into three major groups. Group 1 includes the previously characterized D. melanogaster emp (epithelial membrane protein). Group 2 includes the previously characterized D. melanogaster croquemort, ninaD, santa maria, and peste. Group 3 genes include the SNMPs, which fall into two subgroups referred to as SNMP1 and SNMP2. D. melanogaster SNMP1 (CG7000) shares both significant sequence similarity and five of its six intron insertion sites with the lepidopteran Bombyx mori SNMP1. The topological conservation of this gene family within the three major holometabolous lineages indicates that it predates the coleopteran and hymenoptera/dipera/lepidoptera split 300+ million years ago. The current state of knowledge of the characterized insect members of this gene family is discussed. PMID:18342246

  13. Analysis of human CD36 gene sequence alterations in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein-binding region using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Suchy, Janina; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Safranow, Krzysztof; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Olszewska, Maria; Garanty-Bogacka, Barbara; Rać, Michał; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2010-08-01

    Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) has been employed as a prescreening tool to reduce the amount of DNA sequencing. It could be a simple and cost-effective screening method for mutations and polymorphisms in exons 4, 5, and 6 of the CD36 gene, which encode the protein region responsible for the removal of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Genomic DNA was isolated from 306 Caucasian infants of Polish origin. Six single-nucleotide substitutions were detected by DHPLC and confirmed by direct sequencing. The A591T, G550A, and C572T alterations have not been described so far. Each of two nonsynonymous substitutions (Asp184Asn, Pro191Leu) was found in one subject (0.2% minor allele frequency). The results suggest that nonsynonymous alterations in the analyzed CD36 region are rare in Caucasians. DHPLC is a specific and cost-effective technique that may prove to be particularly useful for the identification of polymorphisms and mutations in the CD36 gene. PMID:20722468

  14. Identification and Evaluation of Twin-Arginine Translocase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Andrew P.; Pritchard, Arthur E.

    2012-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (TAT) in some bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contributes to pathogenesis by translocating extracellular virulence determinants across the inner membrane into the periplasm, thereby allowing access to the Xcp (type II) secretory system for further export in Gram-negative organisms, or directly to the outside surface of the cell, as in M. tuberculosis. TAT-mediated secretion appreciably contributes to virulence in both animal and plant models of bacterial infection. Consequently, TAT function is an attractive target for small-molecular-weight compounds that alone or in conjunction with extant antimicrobial agents could become novel therapeutics. The TAT-transported hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of P. aeruginosa and its multiple orthologs produced by the above pathogens can be detected by an accurate and reproducible colorimetric assay using a synthetic substrate that detects phospholipase C activity. Such an assay could be an effective indicator of TAT function. Using carefully constructed recombinant strains to precisely control the expression of PlcH, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to evaluate, in duplicate, >80,000 small-molecular-weight compounds as possible TAT inhibitors. Based on additional TAT-related functional assays, purified PlcH protein inhibition experiments, and repeat experiments of the initial screening assay, 39 compounds were selected from the 122 initial hits. Finally, to evaluate candidate inhibitors for TAT specificity, we developed a TAT titration assay that determines whether inhibition of TAT-mediated secretion can be overcome by increasing the levels of TAT expression. The compounds N-phenyl maleimide and Bay 11-7082 appear to directly affect TAT function based on this approach. PMID:23006747

  15. Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 form a complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Console, Lara; Giangregorio, Nicola; Indiveri, Cesare; Tonazzi, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 are members of the carnitine system, which are responsible of the regulation of the mitochondrial CoA/acyl-CoA ratio and of supplying substrates for the ß-oxidation to mitochondria. This study, using cross-Linking reagent, Blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation followed by detection with immunoblotting, shows conclusive evidence about the interaction between carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase supporting the channeling of acylcarnitines and carnitine at level of the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24898781

  16. Two Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Paralogues Involved in Cell Proliferation and Spermatogenesis in the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Jouraku, Akiya; Nakakura, Takayo; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Hideto; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4) and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4) is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for meiotic progression in the spermatocytes. Here, we report that silkworms harbor two ANT paralogues, the homeostatic paralogue (BmANTI1) and the testis-specific paralogue (BmANTI2). The BmANTI2 protein has an N-terminal extension in which the positions of lysine residues in the amino acid sequence are distributed as in human ANT4. An expression analysis showed that BmANTI2 transcripts were restricted to the testis, suggesting the protein has a role in the progression of spermatogenesis. By contrast, BmANTI1 was expressed in all tissues tested, suggesting it has an important role in homeostasis. We also observed that cultured silkworm cells required BmANTI1 for proliferation. The ANTI1 protein of the lepidopteran Plutella xylostella (PxANTI1), but not those of other insect species (or PxANTI2), restored cell proliferation in BmANTI1-knockdown cells suggesting that ANTI1 has similar energy metabolism functions across the Lepidoptera. Our results suggest that BmANTI2 is evolutionarily divergent from BmANTI1 and has developed a specific role in spermatogenesis similar to that of mammalian ANT4. PMID:25742135

  17. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego; Relat, Joana

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  18. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  19. Synthetic peptides target ATP translocase of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ to block ATP uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As an obligate intracellular pathogen, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) may act as an “energy parasite” by importing ATP from its host’s cells. We previously demonstrated that the Las translocase NttA (gb|ACX71867.1) is functional in Escherichia coli and enables the direct import of ATP/ADP...

  20. Characterization of an ATP translocase identified in the plant pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ATP/ADP translocases allow for the transport of ATP across a lipid bilayer, which is normally impermeable to this molecule due to its size and charge. These transport proteins appear to be unique to mitochondria, plant plastids, and obligate-intracellular bacteria. Of the bacterial ATP/ADP translo...

  1. Mitochondrial presequence translocase: switching between TOM tethering and motor recruitment involves Tim21 and Tim17.

    PubMed

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Lind, Maria; Frazier, Ann E; Dudek, Jan; Meisinger, Chris; Geissler, Andreas; Sickmann, Albert; Meyer, Helmut E; Truscott, Kaye N; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Rehling, Peter

    2005-03-25

    The presequence translocase of the inner mitochondrial membrane (TIM23 complex) operates at a central junction of protein import. It accepts preproteins from the outer membrane TOM complex and directs them to inner membrane insertion or, in cooperation with the presequence translocase-associated motor (PAM), to the matrix. Little is known of how the TIM23 complex coordinates these tasks. We have identified Tim21 (YGR033c) that interacts with the TOM complex. Tim21 is specific for a TIM23 form that cooperates with TOM and promotes inner membrane insertion. Protein translocation into the matrix requires a switch to a Tim21-free, PAM bound presequence translocase. Tim17 is crucial for the switch by performing two separable functions: promotion of inner membrane insertion and binding of Pam18 to form the functional TIM-PAM complex. Thus, the presequence translocase is not a static complex but switches between TOM tethering and PAM binding in a reaction cycle involving Tim21 and Tim17. PMID:15797382

  2. 5'-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Eric J; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M

    2010-11-17

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a 3'-5' superfamily 1A helicase/translocase involved in a variety of DNA metabolic processes. UvrD can function either as a helicase or only as an single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase. The switch between these activities is controlled in vitro by the UvrD oligomeric state; a monomer has ssDNA translocase activity, whereas at least a dimer is needed for helicase activity. Although a 3'-ssDNA partial duplex provides a high-affinity site for a UvrD monomer, here we show that a monomer also binds with specificity to DNA junctions possessing a 5'-ssDNA flanking region and can initiate translocation from this site. Thus, a 5'-ss-duplex DNA junction can serve as a high-affinity loading site for the monomeric UvrD translocase, whereas a 3'-ss-duplex DNA junction inhibits both translocase and helicase activity of the UvrD monomer. Furthermore, the 2B subdomain of UvrD is important for this junction specificity. This highlights a separation of helicase and translocase function for UvrD and suggests that a monomeric UvrD translocase can be loaded at a 5'-ssDNA junction when translocation activity alone is needed. PMID:20877334

  3. 5′-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Eric J; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a 3′–5′ superfamily 1A helicase/translocase involved in a variety of DNA metabolic processes. UvrD can function either as a helicase or only as an single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase. The switch between these activities is controlled in vitro by the UvrD oligomeric state; a monomer has ssDNA translocase activity, whereas at least a dimer is needed for helicase activity. Although a 3′-ssDNA partial duplex provides a high-affinity site for a UvrD monomer, here we show that a monomer also binds with specificity to DNA junctions possessing a 5′-ssDNA flanking region and can initiate translocation from this site. Thus, a 5′-ss–duplex DNA junction can serve as a high-affinity loading site for the monomeric UvrD translocase, whereas a 3′-ss–duplex DNA junction inhibits both translocase and helicase activity of the UvrD monomer. Furthermore, the 2B subdomain of UvrD is important for this junction specificity. This highlights a separation of helicase and translocase function for UvrD and suggests that a monomeric UvrD translocase can be loaded at a 5′-ssDNA junction when translocation activity alone is needed. PMID:20877334

  4. Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms and metabolic response to a short-term endurance-training program in a young-adult population.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Gwinn, Tom; Hancock, Dale P; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that CD36 gene variants are associated with an increased prevalence of chronic disease. Although a genetic component to trainability has been proven, no data are available specifically on the influence of CD36 on training response. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1527479 and rs1984112) were assessed for associations with whole-body substrate oxidation, response to a 75-g dextrose oral glucose tolerance test, fasting plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a young healthy cohort, both using cross-sectional analysis and following a 4-week endurance-exercise training program. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cross-sectional data were collected in 34 individuals (age, 22.7 ± 3.5 years), with 17 completing the training program. At baseline, TT SNP carriers at rs1527479 and wild-type GG carriers at rs1984112 were associated with significantly greater whole-body rate of fat oxidation (Fatox) during submaximal exercise (P < 0.05), whilst AA carriers at the same position were associated with elevated triglyceride (TG) levels. A significant genotype × time interaction in Fatox at SNP rs1984112 was identified at rest. Significant genotype × time interactions were present at rs1527479, with TT carriers exhibiting a favourable response to training when compared with C-allele carriers for fasting TG, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In conclusion, cross-sectional assessment identified associations with Fatox and TG. Training response at both SNPs identified "at-risk" genotypes responding favourably to the training stimulus in Fatox, TG, DBP, and MAP. Although these data show potential pleiotropic influence of CD36 SNPs, assessment in a larger cohort is warranted. PMID:26830498

  5. Association of thrombospondin-1 with the actin cytoskeleton of human thrombin-activated platelets through an alphaIIbbeta3- or CD36-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Saumet, Anne; Jesus, Nando de; Legrand, Chantal; Dubernard, Véronique

    2002-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an adhesive glycoprotein which, when secreted from alpha-granules of activated platelets, can bind to the cell surface and participate in platelet aggregate formation. In this study, we show that thrombin activation leads to the rapid and specific association of a large amount of secreted alpha-granular TSP-1 with the actin cytoskeleton. This cytoskeletal association of TSP-1 was correlated with platelet secretion, but not aggregation, and was inhibited by cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Association of TSP-1 with the actin cytoskeleton was mediated by membrane receptors, as shown by using MAII, a TSP-1-specific monoclonal antibody that inhibited both TSP-1 surface binding to activated platelets and cytoskeletal association. TSP-1 and its potential membrane receptors, e.g. alphaIIbbeta3 integrin, CD36 and CD47, concomitantly associated with the actin cytoskeleton. However, studies on platelets from a patient with type I Glanzmann's thrombasthenia lacking alphaIIbbeta3 and another with barely detectable CD36 showed normal TSP-1 surface expression and association with the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, no involvement of CD47 in TSP-1 association with the actin cytoskeleton could be inferred from experiments with control platelets using the function-blocking anti-CD47 antibody B6H12. Finally, assembly of signalling complexes, as observed through translocation of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and kinases to the actin cytoskeleton, was found to occur in concert with cytoskeletal association of TSP-1, in control platelets as well as in thrombasthenic and CD36-deficient platelets. Our results imply a role for the actin cytoskeleton in the membrane-surface expression process of TSP-1 molecules and suggest a possible coupling of TSP-1 receptors to signalling events occurring independently of alphaIIbbeta3 or CD36. These results provide new insights into the link between surface-bound TSP-1 and the contractile actin

  6. Identification of mammalian TOM22 as a subunit of the preprotein translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Suzuki, H; Tsuneoka, M; Maeda, M; Iwamoto, R; Hasuwa, H; Shida, S; Takahashi, T; Sakaguchi, M; Endo, T; Miura, Y; Mekada, E; Mihara, K

    2000-10-13

    A mitochondrial outer membrane protein of approximately 22 kDa (1C9-2) was purified from Vero cells assessing immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody, and the cDNA was cloned based on the partial amino acid sequence of the trypsin-digested fragments. 1C9-2 had 19-20% sequence identity to fungal Tom22, a component of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane (the TOM complex) with receptor and organizer functions. Despite such a low sequence identity, both shared a remarkable structural similarity in the hydrophobicity profile, membrane topology in the Ncyt-Cin orientation through a transmembrane domain in the middle of the molecule, and the abundant acidic amino acid residues in the N-terminal domain. The antibodies against 1C9-2 inhibited the import of a matrix-targeted preprotein into isolated mitochondria. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of digitonin-solubilized outer membranes revealed that 1C9-2 is firmly associated with TOM40 in the approximately 400-kDa complex, with a size and composition similar to those of the fungal TOM core complex. Furthermore, 1C9-2 complemented the defects of growth and mitochondrial protein import in Deltatom22 yeast cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 1C9-2 is a functional homologue of fungal Tom22 and functions as a component of the TOM complex. PMID:10900208

  7. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cells. A group of fats called long-chain fatty acids must be attached to a substance ... the transporter. Without enough functional CACT protein, long-chain fatty acids cannot be transported into mitochondria. As ...

  8. CD36 and Proteoglycan-Mediated Pathways for (n-3) Fatty Acid–Enriched Triglyceride-Rich Particle Blood Clearance in Mouse Models In Vivo and in Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro1,2

    PubMed Central

    Densupsoontorn, Narumon; Carpentier, Yvon A.; Racine, Radjini; Murray, Faith M.; Seo, Toru; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Deckelbaum, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the mechanisms of (n-3) fatty acid–enriched triglyceride-rich particle [(n-3)-TGRP] uptake are not well characterized, we questioned whether (n-3)-TGRP are removed via “nonclassical” pathways, e.g., pathways other than an LDL receptor and/or involving apolipoprotein E (apoE). Chylomicron-sized model (n-3)-TGRP labeled with [3H]cholesteryl ether were injected into wild-type (WT) and CD36 knockout (CD36−/−) mice at low, nonsaturating and high, saturating doses. Blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was determined by calculating fractional catabolic rates. At saturating doses, blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was slower in CD36−/− mice relative to WT mice, suggesting that in part CD36 contributes to (n-3)-TGRP uptake. To further examine the potential nonclassical clearance pathways, peritoneal-elicited macrophages from WT and CD36−/− mice were incubated with (n-3)-TGRP in the presence of apoE, lactoferrin, and/or sodium chlorate. Cellular (n-3)-TGRP uptake was measured to test the roles of apoE-mediated pathways and/or proteoglycans. ApoE-mediated pathways compensated in part for defective (n-3)-TGRP uptake in CD36−/− cells. Lactoferrin decreased (n-3)-TGRP uptake in the presence of apoE. Inhibition of cell proteoglycan synthesis by chlorate reduced (n-3)-TGRP uptake in both groups of macrophages, and chlorate effects were independent of apoE. We conclude that although CD36 is involved, it is not the primary contributor to the blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP. The removal of (n-3)-TGRP likely relies more on nonclassical pathways, such as proteoglycan-mediated pathways. PMID:18203888

  9. Polymorphism of the CD36 Gene and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Manifested at a Young Age.

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Suchy, Janina; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Kurlapska, Agnieszka; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rać, Michał; Sagasz-Tysiewicz, Dagmara; Krzystolik, Andrzej; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Olszewska, Maria; Krupa, Beata; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates potential associations between CD36 gene variants and the presence of risk factors in Caucasians with coronary artery disease (CAD) manifested at a young age. The study group consisted of 90 patients; the men were ≤ 50 years old and the women were ≤ 55 years old. Amplicons of exons 4 and 5 including fragments of introns were analyzed by DHPLC. Two polymorphisms were found: IVS3-6 T/C (rs3173798) and IVS4-10 G/A (rs3211892). The C allele of the IVS3-6 T/C polymorphism was associated with higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes, higher hsCRP, lower Lp(a) serum concentrations, and younger age at myocardial infarction. The A allele of the IVS4-10 G/A polymorphism was associated with older age of myocardial infarction and higher white blood cell count. The functional role of CD36 polymorphisms in CAD development needs further research. PMID:22113854

  10. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase are involved in the mitochondrial synthesis and export of acylcarnitines.

    PubMed

    Violante, Sara; Ijlst, Lodewijk; Te Brinke, Heleen; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Ventura, Fátima V; Houten, Sander M

    2013-05-01

    Acylcarnitines are commonly used in the diagnosis of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation disorders (mFAODs). It is generally assumed that this plasma acylcarnitine profile reflects the mitochondrial accumulation of acyl-CoAs. The identity of the enzymes and the mitochondrial and plasmalemmal transporters involved in the synthesis and export of these metabolites have remained undefined. We used lentiviral shRNA to knock down the expression of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) in control and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2)-, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT)-, and plasmalemmal carnitine transporter (OCTN2)-deficient human fibroblasts. These cell lines, including mock-transduced controls, were loaded with decanoic acid and carnitine, followed by the measurement of the acylcarnitine profile in the extracellular medium. In control fibroblasts, MCAD knockdown markedly increased the production of octanoylcarnitine (3-fold, P<0.01). OCTN2-deficient cell lines also showed extracellular accumulation of octanoylcarnitine (2.8-fold, P<0.01), suggesting that the cellular export of acylcarnitines does not depend on OCTN2. In contrast, in CPT2- and CACT-deficient cells, the accumulation of octanoylcarnitine in the medium did not significantly increase in the MCAD knockdown. Similar results were obtained using pharmacological inhibition of CPT2 in fibroblasts from MCAD-deficient individuals. This shows that CPT2 and CACT are crucial for mitochondrial acylcarnitine formation and export to the extracellular fluids in mFAOD. PMID:23322164

  11. An Outer Mitochondrial Translocase, Tom22, Is Crucial for Inner Mitochondrial Steroidogenic Regulation in Adrenal and Gonadal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Kaur, Jasmeet; Prasad, Manoj; Pawlak, Kevin J.; Marshall, Brendan; Perry, Elizabeth W.; Whittal, Randy M.

    2016-01-01

    After cholesterol is transported into the mitochondria of steroidogenic tissues, the first steroid, pregnenolone, is synthesized in adrenal and gonadal tissues to initiate steroid synthesis by catalyzing the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone, which is mediated by the inner mitochondrial enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2). We report that the mitochondrial translocase Tom22 is essential for metabolic conversion, as its knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) completely ablated progesterone conversion in both steroidogenic mouse Leydig MA-10 and human adrenal NCI cells. Tom22 forms a 500-kDa complex with mitochondrial proteins associated with 3βHSD2. Although the absence of Tom22 did not inhibit mitochondrial import of cytochrome P450scc (cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme) and aldosterone synthase, it did inhibit 3βHSD2 expression. Electron microscopy showed that Tom22 is localized at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), while 3βHSD2 is localized at the inner mitochondrial space (IMS), where it interacts through a specific region with Tom22 with its C-terminal amino acids and a small amino acid segment of Tom22 exposed to the IMS. Therefore, Tom22 is a critical regulator of steroidogenesis, and thus, it is essential for mammalian survival. PMID:26787839

  12. An Outer Mitochondrial Translocase, Tom22, Is Crucial for Inner Mitochondrial Steroidogenic Regulation in Adrenal and Gonadal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Kaur, Jasmeet; Prasad, Manoj; Pawlak, Kevin J; Marshall, Brendan; Perry, Elizabeth W; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2016-03-01

    After cholesterol is transported into the mitochondria of steroidogenic tissues, the first steroid, pregnenolone, is synthesized in adrenal and gonadal tissues to initiate steroid synthesis by catalyzing the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone, which is mediated by the inner mitochondrial enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2). We report that the mitochondrial translocase Tom22 is essential for metabolic conversion, as its knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) completely ablated progesterone conversion in both steroidogenic mouse Leydig MA-10 and human adrenal NCI cells. Tom22 forms a 500-kDa complex with mitochondrial proteins associated with 3βHSD2. Although the absence of Tom22 did not inhibit mitochondrial import of cytochrome P450scc (cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme) and aldosterone synthase, it did inhibit 3βHSD2 expression. Electron microscopy showed that Tom22 is localized at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), while 3βHSD2 is localized at the inner mitochondrial space (IMS), where it interacts through a specific region with Tom22 with its C-terminal amino acids and a small amino acid segment of Tom22 exposed to the IMS. Therefore, Tom22 is a critical regulator of steroidogenesis, and thus, it is essential for mammalian survival. PMID:26787839

  13. Large Multiethnic Candidate Gene Study for C-Reactive Protein Levels: Identification of a Novel Association at CD36 in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jaclyn; Lange, Ethan M.; Li, Jin; Dupuis, Josee; Baumert, Jens; Walston, Jeremy D.; Keating, Brendan J.; Durda, Peter; Fox, Ervin R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Meng, Yan A.; Young, Taylor; Farlow, Deborah N.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Marzi, Carola S.; Larkin, Emma; Martin, Lisa W.; Bis, Joshua C.; Auer, Paul; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Willis, Monte S.; Pankow, James S.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Gross, Myron D.; Lettre, Guillaume; Wilson, James G.; Peters, Ulrike; Koenig, Wolfgang; Tracy, Russell P.; Redline, Susan; Reiner, Alex P.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Lange, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable biomarker of systemic inflammation and a predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Large-scale genetic association studies for CRP have largely focused on individuals of European descent. We sought to uncover novel genetic variants for CRP in a multi-ethnic sample using the ITMAT Broad-CARe (IBC) array, a custom 50,000 SNP gene-centric array having dense coverage of over 2,000 candidate CVD genes. We performed analyses on 7570 African Americans (AA) from the Candidate gene Association Resource (CARe) study and race-combined meta-analyses that included 29,939 additional individuals of European descent from CARe, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and KORA studies. We observed array-wide significance (p<2.2×10−6) for four loci in AA, three of which have been reported previously in individuals of European descent (IL6R, p=2.0×10−6; CRP, p=4.2×10−71; APOE, p=1.6×10−6). The fourth significant locus, CD36 (p=1.6×10−6), was observed at a functional variant (rs3211938) that is extremely rare in individuals of European descent. We replicated the CD36 finding (p=1.8×10−5) in an independent sample of 8041 AA women from WHI; a meta-analysis combining the CARe and WHI AA results at rs3211938 reached genome-wide significance (p=1.5×10−10). In the race-combined meta-analyses, 13 loci reached significance, including ten (CRP, TOMM40/APOE/APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, IL6R, IL1RN, NLRP3, HNF4A and BAZ1B/BCL7B) previously associated with CRP, and one (ARNTL) previously reported to be nominally associated with CRP. Two novel loci were also detected (RPS6KB1, p=2.0×10−6; CD36, p=1.4×10−6). These results highlight both shared and unique genetic risk factors for CRP in AA compared to populations of European descent. PMID:24643644

  14. Large multiethnic Candidate Gene Study for C-reactive protein levels: identification of a novel association at CD36 in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jaclyn; Lange, Ethan M; Li, Jin; Dupuis, Josee; Baumert, Jens; Walston, Jeremy D; Keating, Brendan J; Durda, Peter; Fox, Ervin R; Palmer, Cameron D; Meng, Yan A; Young, Taylor; Farlow, Deborah N; Schnabel, Renate B; Marzi, Carola S; Larkin, Emma; Martin, Lisa W; Bis, Joshua C; Auer, Paul; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Gabriel, Stacey B; Willis, Monte S; Pankow, James S; Papanicolaou, George J; Rotter, Jerome I; Ballantyne, Christie M; Gross, Myron D; Lettre, Guillaume; Wilson, James G; Peters, Ulrike; Koenig, Wolfgang; Tracy, Russell P; Redline, Susan; Reiner, Alex P; Benjamin, Emelia J; Lange, Leslie A

    2014-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable biomarker of systemic inflammation and a predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Large-scale genetic association studies for CRP have largely focused on individuals of European descent. We sought to uncover novel genetic variants for CRP in a multiethnic sample using the ITMAT Broad-CARe (IBC) array, a custom 50,000 SNP gene-centric array having dense coverage of over 2,000 candidate CVD genes. We performed analyses on 7,570 African Americans (AA) from the Candidate gene Association Resource (CARe) study and race-combined meta-analyses that included 29,939 additional individuals of European descent from CARe, the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and KORA studies. We observed array-wide significance (p < 2.2 × 10(-6)) for four loci in AA, three of which have been reported previously in individuals of European descent (IL6R, p = 2.0 × 10(-6); CRP, p = 4.2 × 10(-71); APOE, p = 1.6 × 10(-6)). The fourth significant locus, CD36 (p = 1.6 × 10(-6)), was observed at a functional variant (rs3211938) that is extremely rare in individuals of European descent. We replicated the CD36 finding (p = 1.8 × 10(-5)) in an independent sample of 8,041 AA women from WHI; a meta-analysis combining the CARe and WHI AA results at rs3211938 reached genome-wide significance (p = 1.5 × 10(-10)). In the race-combined meta-analyses, 13 loci reached significance, including ten (CRP, TOMM40/APOE/APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, IL6R, IL1RN, NLRP3, HNF4A and BAZ1B/BCL7B) previously associated with CRP, and one (ARNTL) previously reported to be nominally associated with CRP. Two novel loci were also detected (RPS6KB1, p = 2.0 × 10(-6); CD36, p = 1.4 × 10(-6)). These results highlight both shared and unique genetic risk factors for CRP in AA compared to populations of European descent. PMID:24643644

  15. RAD54 family translocases counter genotoxic effects of RAD51 in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jennifer M.; Dusad, Kritika; Wright, William Douglass; Grubb, Jennifer; Budke, Brian; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Connell, Philip P.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The RAD54 family DNA translocases have several biochemical activities. One activity, demonstrated previously for the budding yeast translocases, is ATPase-dependent disruption of RAD51-dsDNA binding. This activity is thought to promote dissociation of RAD51 from heteroduplex DNA following strand exchange during homologous recombination. In addition, previous experiments in budding yeast have shown that the same activity of Rad54 removes Rad51 from undamaged sites on chromosomes; mutants lacking Rad54 accumulate nonrepair-associated complexes that can block growth and lead to chromosome loss. Here, we show that human RAD54 also promotes the dissociation of RAD51 from dsDNA and not ssDNA. We also show that translocase depletion in tumor cell lines leads to the accumulation of RAD51 on chromosomes, forming complexes that are not associated with markers of DNA damage. We further show that combined depletion of RAD54L and RAD54B and/or artificial induction of RAD51 overexpression blocks replication and promotes chromosome segregation defects. These results support a model in which RAD54L and RAD54B counteract genome-destabilizing effects of direct binding of RAD51 to dsDNA in human tumor cells. Thus, in addition to having genome-stabilizing DNA repair activity, human RAD51 has genome-destabilizing activity when expressed at high levels, as is the case in many human tumors. PMID:25765654

  16. RAD54 family translocases counter genotoxic effects of RAD51 in human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jennifer M; Dusad, Kritika; Wright, William Douglass; Grubb, Jennifer; Budke, Brian; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Connell, Philip P; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Bishop, Douglas K

    2015-03-31

    The RAD54 family DNA translocases have several biochemical activities. One activity, demonstrated previously for the budding yeast translocases, is ATPase-dependent disruption of RAD51-dsDNA binding. This activity is thought to promote dissociation of RAD51 from heteroduplex DNA following strand exchange during homologous recombination. In addition, previous experiments in budding yeast have shown that the same activity of Rad54 removes Rad51 from undamaged sites on chromosomes; mutants lacking Rad54 accumulate nonrepair-associated complexes that can block growth and lead to chromosome loss. Here, we show that human RAD54 also promotes the dissociation of RAD51 from dsDNA and not ssDNA. We also show that translocase depletion in tumor cell lines leads to the accumulation of RAD51 on chromosomes, forming complexes that are not associated with markers of DNA damage. We further show that combined depletion of RAD54L and RAD54B and/or artificial induction of RAD51 overexpression blocks replication and promotes chromosome segregation defects. These results support a model in which RAD54L and RAD54B counteract genome-destabilizing effects of direct binding of RAD51 to dsDNA in human tumor cells. Thus, in addition to having genome-stabilizing DNA repair activity, human RAD51 has genome-destabilizing activity when expressed at high levels, as is the case in many human tumors. PMID:25765654

  17. Tom22 is a multifunctional organizer of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase.

    PubMed

    van Wilpe, S; Ryan, M T; Hill, K; Maarse, A C; Meisinger, C; Brix, J; Dekker, P J; Moczko, M; Wagner, R; Meijer, M; Guiard, B; Hönlinger, A; Pfanner, N

    1999-09-30

    Mitochondrial preproteins are imported by a multisubunit translocase of the outer membrane (TOM), including receptor proteins and a general import pore. The central receptor Tom22 binds preproteins through both its cytosolic domain and its intermembrane space domain and is stably associated with the channel protein Tom40 (refs 11-13). Here we report the unexpected observation that a yeast strain can survive without Tom22, although it is strongly reduced in growth and the import of mitochondrial proteins. Tom22 is a multifunctional protein that is required for the higher-level organization of the TOM machinery. In the absence of Tom22, the translocase dissociates into core complexes, representing the basic import units, but lacks a tight control of channel gating. The single membrane anchor of Tom22 is required for a stable interaction between the core complexes, whereas its cytosolic domain serves as docking point for the peripheral receptors Tom20 and Tom70. Thus a preprotein translocase can combine receptor functions with distinct organizing roles in a multidomain protein. PMID:10519552

  18. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduce fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Ma, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jia, Ke-Ke; Liu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Rong; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Fructose consumption induces metabolic syndrome to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity to relieve heart injury in metabolic syndrome. But the mechanisms of fructose-induced cardiac injury, and cardioprotective effects of cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol are not completely understood. In this study, fructose-fed rats displayed metabolic syndrome with elevated serum ox-LDL, cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Scavenger receptor CD36, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR6, IL-1R-associated kinase 4/1 (IRAK4/1), nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), drosophila mothers against DPP homolog (Smad) 2/3 phosphorylation and Smad4 were increased in animal and H9c2 cell models. These pathological processes were further evaluated in ox-LDL or fructose-exposed H9c2 cells pretreated with ROS scavenger and CD36 specific inhibitor, or IRAK1/4 inhibitor, and transfected with CD36, NLRP3, or IRAK4/1 siRNA, demonstrating that NLPR3 inflammasome activation through CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling may promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduced cardiac oxidative stress to suppress NLPR3 inflammasome activation and TGF-β/Smads signaling by inhibiting CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling under fructose induction. These results suggest that the blockage of CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation by cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol may protect against fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27270216

  19. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduce fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Ma, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jia, Ke-Ke; Liu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Rong; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Fructose consumption induces metabolic syndrome to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity to relieve heart injury in metabolic syndrome. But the mechanisms of fructose-induced cardiac injury, and cardioprotective effects of cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol are not completely understood. In this study, fructose-fed rats displayed metabolic syndrome with elevated serum ox-LDL, cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Scavenger receptor CD36, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR6, IL-1R-associated kinase 4/1 (IRAK4/1), nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), drosophila mothers against DPP homolog (Smad) 2/3 phosphorylation and Smad4 were increased in animal and H9c2 cell models. These pathological processes were further evaluated in ox-LDL or fructose-exposed H9c2 cells pretreated with ROS scavenger and CD36 specific inhibitor, or IRAK1/4 inhibitor, and transfected with CD36, NLRP3, or IRAK4/1 siRNA, demonstrating that NLPR3 inflammasome activation through CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling may promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduced cardiac oxidative stress to suppress NLPR3 inflammasome activation and TGF-β/Smads signaling by inhibiting CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling under fructose induction. These results suggest that the blockage of CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation by cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol may protect against fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27270216

  20. Hypoxia Strongly Affects Mitochondrial Ribosomal Proteins and Translocases, as Shown by Quantitative Proteomics of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Paula A; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Jeppesen Edin, Nina F; Christoffersen, Stine; Krengel, Ute; Pettersen, Erik O; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and common characteristic of many human tumors. It is a challenge clinically due to the correlation with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Understanding the biochemical response to hypoxia would facilitate the development of novel therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here, we investigate alterations in gene expression in response to hypoxia by quantitative proteome analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with LCMS/MS. Human HeLa cells were kept either in a hypoxic environment or under normoxic conditions. 125 proteins were found to be regulated, with maximum alteration of 18-fold. In particular, three clusters of differentially regulated proteins were identified, showing significant upregulation of glycolysis and downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and translocases. This interaction is likely orchestrated by HIF-1. We also investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cell cycle, which shows accumulation in G1 and a prolonged S phase under these conditions. Implications. This work not only improves our understanding of the response to hypoxia, but also reveals proteins important for malignant progression, which may be targeted in future therapies. PMID:26421188

  1. Characterization of an ATP Translocase Identified in the Destructive Plant Pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”▿

    PubMed Central

    Vahling, Cheryl M.; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    ATP/ADP translocases transport ATP across a lipid bilayer, which is normally impermeable to this molecule due to its size and charge. These transport proteins appear to be unique to mitochondria, plant plastids, and obligate intracellular bacteria. All bacterial ATP/ADP translocases characterized thus far have been found in endosymbionts of protozoa or pathogens of higher-order animals, including humans. A putative ATP/ADP translocase was uncovered during the genomic sequencing of the intracellular plant pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,” the causal agent of citrus huanglongbing. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein revealed 12 transmembrane helices and predicted an isoelectric point of 9.4, both of which are characteristic of this family of proteins. The “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” gene (nttA) encoding the translocase was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to enable E. coli to import ATP directly into the cell. Competition assays with the heterologous E. coli system demonstrated that the translocase was highly specific for ATP and ADP but that other nucleotides, if present in high concentrations, could also be taken up and/or block the ability of the translocase to import ATP. In addition, a protein homologous to NttA was identified in “Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum,” the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease. This is the first reported characterization of an ATP translocase from “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,” indicating that some intracellular bacteria of plants also have the potential to import ATP directly from their environment. PMID:19948801

  2. Diversity of O-Antigen Repeat Unit Structures Can Account for the Substantial Sequence Variation of Wzx Translocases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yaoqin

    2014-01-01

    The most common system for synthesis of cell surface polysaccharides is the Wzx/Wzy-dependent pathway, which involves synthesis, on the cytoplasmic face of the cell membrane, of repeat units, which are then translocated to the periplasmic face by a Wzx translocase and then polymerized by Wzy to generate the polysaccharide. One such polysaccharide is O antigen, which is incorporated into lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The O antigen is extremely variable, with over 186 forms in Escherichia coli. Wzx proteins are also very diverse, but they have been thought to be specific only for the first sugar of the repeat units. However, recent studies demonstrated examples in which Wzx translocases have considerable preference for their native repeat unit, showing that specificity can extend well beyond the first sugar. These results appear to be in conflict with the early conclusions, but they involved specificity for side branch residues and could be a special case. Here we take six Wzx translocases that were critical in the earlier studies on the importance of the first sugar and assess their ability to translocate the Escherichia coli O16 and O111 repeat units. We use gene replacements to optimize maintenance of expression level and show that under these conditions the native translocases are the most effective for their native repeat unit, being, respectively, 64-fold and 4-fold more effective than the next best. We conclude that Wzx translocases are commonly adapted to their native repeat unit, which provides an explanation for the great diversity of wzx genes. PMID:24532778

  3. Hepatic fatty acid uptake is regulated by the sphingolipid acyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jae; Park, Joo-Won; Merrill, Alfred H; Storch, Judith; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2014-12-01

    Ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mice cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain (C22-C24) ceramides resulting in significant alterations in the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. We now demonstrate that hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) levels are reduced in the liver but not in the adipose tissue or skeletal muscle of the CerS2 null mouse, both before and after feeding with a high fat diet (HFD), where no weight gain was observed and large hepatic nodules appeared. Uptake of both BODIPY-palmitate and [VH]-palmitate was also abrogated in the hepa- tocytes and liver. The role of a number of key proteins involved in fatty acid uptake was examined, including FATP5, CD36/FAT, FABPpm and cytoplasmic FABP1. Levels of FATP5 and FABP1 were decreased in the CerS2 null mouse liver, whereas CD36/FAT levels were significantly elevated and CD36/FAT was also mislocalized upon insulin treatment. Moreover, treatment of hepatocytes with C22-C24-ceramides down-regulated CD36/FAT levels. Infection of CerS2 null mice with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-CerS2 restored normal TG levels and corrected the mislocalization of CD36/FAT, but had no effect on the intracellular localization or levels of FATP5 or FABP1. Together, these results demonstrate that hepatic fatty acid uptake via CD36/FAT can be regulated by altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. PMID:25241943

  4. Role of the twin-arginine translocase (tat) system in iron uptake in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Kiran B; Birlingmair, Jacob; Wilkinson, Brian J; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K

    2015-02-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (Tat) complex is a unique system that translocates folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. In this study, the Tat transporter system in Listeria monocytogenes was characterized to determine the role of Tat in the iron uptake pathway. A putative tatAC operon, containing conserved Fur-binding sequences in the promoter region, has been predicted to encode Tat-translocase components. Another operon, fepCAB, with a putative Fur-binding sequence in the promoter, close to TatAC, was identified in the complementary strands of L. monocytogenes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that the listerial Fur-repressor binds to the promoter of the tatAC operon, suggesting that tat is under Fur regulation. Using a heterologous system in a reporter assay, FepB was translocated across the membrane. Mutations in tatC and fepB were constructed to determine the roles of Tat and FepB, respectively. In a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, the fepB and tatC mutants were found to have reduced levels of ferric reductase activities compared with those of the isogenic parent strain. Although ferric reductase activity has been demonstrated in Listeria, a conventional ferric reductase encoding sequence does not appear to be present in its genome. Hence, we propose that fepB encodes a ferric reductase enzyme, which is translocated by the Tat-translocase system onto the bacterial cell surface, and plays an important role in the reductive iron uptake process in L. monocytogenes. PMID:25416690

  5. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Korotkov, Sergey M.

    2016-01-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  6. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M

    2016-06-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) 'c' conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca(2+)-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25-75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca(2+). The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca(2+) alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca(2+)-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in 'm' conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript "To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria" (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  7. Genetic variation in CD36, HBA, NOS3 and VCAM1 is associated with chronic haemolysis level in sickle cell anaemia: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Andreia; Dias, Alexandra; Morais, Anabela; Nunes, Baltazar; Ferreira, Emanuel; Picanço, Isabel; Faustino, Paula; Lavinha, João

    2014-03-01

    Chronic haemolysis stands out as one of the hallmarks of sickle cell anaemia, a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive monogenic anaemia. However, the genetic architecture of this sub-phenotype is still poorly understood. Here, we report the results of an association study between haemolysis biomarkers (serum LDH, total bilirubin and reticulocyte count) and the inheritance of 41 genetic variants of ten candidate genes in a series of 99 paediatric SS patients (median current age of 9.9 yr) followed up in two general hospitals in Greater Lisboa area (median follow-up per patient of 5.0 yr). Although in a large number of tests a seemingly significant (i.e. P < 0.05) association was observed, the following ones were confirmed upon correction for multiple comparisons: (i) an increased serum LDH level was associated with haplotype 7 within VCAM1 gene; (ii) a lower total bilirubin was associated with the 3.7-kb deletion at HBA gene, rs2070744_T allele at NOS3 gene, and haplotype 9 within VCAM1 promoter; and (iii) a diminished reticulocyte count was associated with the 3.7-kb deletion at HBA, whereas an increased count was associated with rs1984112_G allele at CD36 gene. On the whole, our findings suggest a complex genetic architecture for the sickle cell anaemia haemolysis process involving multiple pathways, namely control of vascular cell adhesion, NO synthesis and erythrocyte volume and haemoglobinisation. PMID:24168396

  8. Swi2/Snf2-related translocases prevent accumulation of toxic Rad51 complexes during mitotic growth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parisha P.; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Epshtein, Anastasiya; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Klein, Hannah L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purified DNA translocases Rdh54 and Rad54 can dissociate complexes formed by eukaryotic RecA-like recombinases on double-stranded DNA. Here we show Rad51 complexes are dissociated by these translocases in mitotic cells. Rad51 overexpression blocked growth of cells deficient in Rdh54 activity. This toxicity was associated with accumulation of Rad51 foci on undamaged chromatin. At normal Rad51 levels, rdh54 deficiency resulted in slight elevation of Rad51 foci. A triple mutant lacking Rdh54, Rad54, and a third Swi2/Snf2 homologue Uls1, accumulated Rad51 foci, grew slowly, and suffered chromosome loss. Thus, Uls1 and Rad54 can partially substitute for Rdh54 in the removal of toxic, non–damage-associated Rad51-DNA complexes. Additional data suggest that the function of Rdh54 and Rad54 in removal of Rad51 foci is significantly specialized; Rad54 predominates for removal of damage-associated foci and Rdh54 predominates for removal of non-damage-associated foci. PMID:20864034

  9. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC–Oxa1–Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  10. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC-Oxa1-Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  11. Targeting and assembly of rat mitochondrial translocase of outer membrane 22 (TOM22) into the TOM complex.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Masao; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2004-05-14

    Tom22 is a preprotein receptor and organizer of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocase complex (TOM complex). Rat Tom22 (rTOM22) is a 142-residue protein, embedded in the outer membrane through the internal transmembrane domain (TMD) with 82 N-terminal residues in the cytosol and 41 C-terminal residues in the intermembrane space. We analyzed the signals that target rTOM22 to the mitochondrial outer membrane and assembly into the TOM complex in cultured mammalian cells. Deletions or mutations were systematically introduced into the molecule, and the intracellular localization of the mutant constructs in HeLa cells was examined by confocal microscopy and cell fractionation. Their assembly into the TOM complex was also examined using blue native gel electrophoresis. These experiments revealed three separate structural elements: a cytoplasmic 10-residue segment with an acidic alpha-helical structure located 30 residues upstream of the TMD (the import sequence), TMD with an appropriate hydrophobicity, and a 20-residue C-terminal segment located 22 residues downstream of the TMD (C-tail signal). The import sequence and TMD were both essential for targeting and integration into the TOM complex, whereas the C-tail signal affected the import efficiency. The import sequence combined with foreign TMD functioned as a mitochondrial targeting and anchor signal but failed to integrate the construct into the TOM complex. Thus, the mitochondrial-targeting and TOM integration signal could be discriminated. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the import sequence interacted with two intramolecular elements, the TMD and C-tail signal, and that it also interacted with the import receptor Tom20. PMID:14985332

  12. Study of the five Rickettsia prowazekii proteins annotated as ATP/ADP translocases (Tlc): Only Tlc1 transports ATP/ADP, while Tlc4 and Tlc5 transport other ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Audia, Jonathon P; Winkler, Herbert H

    2006-09-01

    The obligate intracytoplasmic pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii relies on the transport of many essential compounds from the cytoplasm of the eukaryotic host cell in lieu of de novo synthesis, an evolutionary outcome undoubtedly linked to obligatory growth in this metabolite-replete niche. The paradigm for the study of rickettsial transport systems is the ATP/ADP translocase Tlc1, which exchanges bacterial ADP for host cell ATP as a source of energy, rather than as a source of adenylate. Interestingly, the R. prowazekii genome encodes four open reading frames that are highly homologous to the well-characterized ATP/ADP translocase Tlc1. Therefore, by annotation, the R. prowazekii genome encodes a total of five ATP/ADP translocases: Tlc1, Tlc2, Tlc3, Tlc4, and Tlc5. We have confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR that mRNAs corresponding to all five tlc homologues are expressed in R. prowazekii growing in L-929 cells and have shown their heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli, suggesting that none of the tlc genes are pseudogenes in the process of evolutionary meltdown. However, we demonstrate by heterologous expression in E. coli that only Tlc1 functions as an ATP/ADP transporter. A survey of nucleotides and nucleosides has determined that Tlc4 transports CTP, UTP, and GDP. Intriguingly, although GTP was not transported by Tlc4, it was an inhibitor of CTP and UTP uptake and demonstrated a K(i) similar to that of GDP. In addition, we demonstrate that Tlc5 transports GTP and GDP. We postulate that Tlc4 and Tlc5 serve the primary function of maintaining intracellular pools of nucleotides for rickettsial nucleic acid biosynthesis and do not provide the cell with nucleoside triphosphates as an energy source, as is the case for Tlc1. Although heterologous expression of Tlc2 and Tlc3 was observed in E. coli, we were unable to identify substrates for these proteins. PMID:16923893

  13. Biosynthesis of the tunicamycins: Translocase-I inhibitors that target the synthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tunicamycins are a group of natural products that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycins established as transition state analogs for hexosamine-1-phosphate:prenol phosphate translocases. Hence, ...

  14. YidC, the Escherichia coli homologue of mitochondrial Oxa1p, is a component of the Sec translocase

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Pier A.; Urbanus, Malene L.; Brunner, Josef; de Gier, Jan-Willem L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; van der Does, Chris; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Oudega, Bauke; Luirink, Joen

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, both secretory and inner membrane proteins initially are targeted to the core SecYEG inner membrane translocase. Previous work has also identified the peripherally associated SecA protein as well as the SecD, SecF and YajC inner membrane proteins as components of the translocase. Here, we use a cross-linking approach to show that hydrophilic portions of a co-translationally targeted inner membrane protein (FtsQ) are close to SecA and SecY, suggesting that insertion takes place at the SecA/Y interface. The hydrophobic FtsQ signal anchor sequence contacts both lipids and a novel 60 kDa translocase-associated component that we identify as YidC. YidC is homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxa1p, which has been shown to function in a novel export pathway at the mitochondrial inner membrane. We propose that YidC is involved in the insertion of hydrophobic sequences into the lipid bilayer after initial recognition by the SecAYEG translocase. PMID:10675323

  15. A CD36-related Transmembrane Protein Is Coordinated with an Intracellular Lipid-binding Protein in Selective Carotenoid Transport for Cocoon Coloration*

    PubMed Central

    Sakudoh, Takashi; Iizuka, Tetsuya; Narukawa, Junko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kobayashi, Isao; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Banno, Yutaka; Kitamura, Akitoshi; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Takada, Naoko; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Mita, Kazuei; Tamura, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Tsuchida, Kozo

    2010-01-01

    The transport pathway of specific dietary carotenoids from the midgut lumen to the silk gland in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a model system for selective carotenoid transport because several genetic mutants with defects in parts of this pathway have been identified that manifest altered cocoon pigmentation. In the wild-type silkworm, which has both genes, Yellow blood (Y) and Yellow cocoon (C), lutein is transferred selectively from the hemolymph lipoprotein to the silk gland cells where it is accumulated into the cocoon. The Y gene encodes an intracellular carotenoid-binding protein (CBP) containing a lipid-binding domain known as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer domain. Positional cloning and transgenic rescue experiments revealed that the C gene encodes Cameo2, a transmembrane protein gene belonging to the CD36 family genes, some of which, such as the mammalian SR-BI and the fruit fly ninaD, are reported as lipoprotein receptors or implicated in carotenoid transport for visual system. In C mutant larvae, Cameo2 expression was strongly repressed in the silk gland in a specific manner, resulting in colorless silk glands and white cocoons. The developmental profile of Cameo2 expression, CBP expression, and lutein pigmentation in the silk gland of the yellow cocoon strain were correlated. We hypothesize that selective delivery of lutein to specific tissue requires the combination of two components: 1) CBP as a carotenoid transporter in cytosol and 2) Cameo2 as a transmembrane receptor on the surface of the cells. PMID:20053988

  16. The Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand FSL-1 is internalized via the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway triggered by CD14 and CD36 but not by TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Shamsul, Haque M; Hasebe, Akira; Iyori, Mitsuhiro; Ohtani, Makoto; Kiura, Kazuto; Zhang, Diya; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shibata, Ken- ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Little is known of how Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands are processed after recognition by TLRs. This study was therefore designed to investigate how the TLR2 ligand FSL-1 is processed in macrophages after recognition by TLR2. FSL-1 was internalized into the murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Both chlorpromazine and methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which inhibit clathrin-dependent endocytosis, reduced FSL-1 uptake by RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner but nystatin, which inhibits caveolae- and lipid raft-dependent endocytosis, did not. FSL-1 was co-localized with clathrin but not with TLR2 in the cytosol of RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that internalization of FSL-1 is clathrin dependent. In addition, FSL-1 was internalized by peritoneal macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice. FSL-1 was internalized by human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with CD14 or CD36 but not by the non-transfected cells. Also, knockdown of CD14 or CD36 in the transfectants reduced FSL-1 uptake. In this study, we suggest that (i) FSL-1 is internalized into macrophages via a clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway, (ii) the FSL-1 uptake by macrophages occurs irrespective of the presence of TLR2, and (iii) CD14 and CD36 are responsible for the internalization of FSL-1. PMID:20113368

  17. α1-Antitrypsin Combines with Plasma Fatty Acids and Induces Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Eileen; Wrenger, Sabine; Brügger, Britta; Salipalli, Sandeep; Immenschuh, Stephan; Aggarwal, Nupur; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Mahadeva, Ravi; Marcondes, A Mario Q; Dinarello, Charles A; Welte, Tobias; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2015-10-15

    α1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) purified from human plasma upregulates expression and release of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) in adherent human blood monocytes and in human lung microvascular endothelial cells, providing a mechanism for the broad immune-regulatory properties of A1AT independent of its antiprotease activity. In this study, we demonstrate that A1AT (Prolastin), a potent inducer of Angptl4, contains significant quantities of the fatty acids (FA) linoleic acid (C18:2) and oleic acid (C18:1). However, only trace amounts of FAs were present in preparations that failed to increase Angplt4 expression, for example, A1AT (Zemaira) or M-type A1AT purified by affinity chromatography. FA pull-down assays with Western blot analysis revealed a FA-binding ability of A1AT. In human blood-adherent monocytes, A1AT-FA conjugates upregulated expression of Angptl4 (54.9-fold, p < 0.001), FA-binding protein 4 (FABP4) (11.4-fold, p < 0.001), and, to a lesser degree, FA translocase (CD36) (3.1-fold, p < 0.001) relative to A1AT devoid of FA (A1AT-0). These latter effects of A1AT-FA were blocked by inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ (ST247) and PPARγ (GW9662). When compared with controls, cell pretreatment with ST247 diminished the effect of A1AT-LA on Angptl4 mRNA (11.6- versus 4.1-fold, p < 0.001) and FABP4 mRNA (5.4- versus 2.8-fold, p < 0.001). Similarly, preincubation of cells with GW9662 inhibited inducing effect of A1AT-LA on Angptl4 mRNA (by 2-fold, p < 0.001) and FABP4 mRNA (by 3-fold, p < 0.001). Thus, A1AT binds to FA, and it is this form of A1AT that induces Angptl4 and FABP4 expression via a PPAR-dependent pathway. These findings provide a mechanism for the unexplored area of A1AT biology independent of its antiprotease properties. PMID:26363050

  18. A TatABC-Type Tat Translocase Is Required for Unimpaired Aerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Dan; Schmitz, Sabrina; Freudl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria possess a TatABC-type Tat translocase in which each of the three inner membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC performs a mechanistically distinct function. In contrast, low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, use a TatAC-type minimal Tat translocase in which the TatB function is carried out by a bifunctional TatA. In high-GC Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, tatA, tatB, and tatC genes can be identified, suggesting that these organisms, just like E. coli, might use TatABC-type Tat translocases as well. However, since contrary to this view a previous study has suggested that C. glutamicum might in fact use a TatAC translocase with TatB only playing a minor role, we reexamined the requirement of TatB for Tat-dependent protein translocation in this microorganism. Under aerobic conditions, the misassembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein QcrA was identified as a major reason for the severe growth defect of Tat-defective C. glutamicum mutant strains. Furthermore, our results clearly show that TatB, besides TatA and TatC, is strictly required for unimpaired aerobic growth. In addition, TatB was also found to be essential for the secretion of a heterologous Tat-dependent model protein into the C. glutamicum culture supernatant. Together with our finding that expression of the C. glutamicum TatB in an E. coli ΔtatB mutant strain resulted in the formation of an active Tat translocase, our results clearly indicate that a TatABC translocase is used as the physiologically relevant functional unit for Tat-dependent protein translocation in C. glutamicum and, most likely, also in other TatB-containing Actinobacteria. PMID:25837592

  19. Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA monomer is a single-stranded DNA translocase but not a processive helicase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Chesnik, Marla A; Tomko, Eric J; Lohman, Timothy M

    2007-09-14

    Structural studies of the Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA protein along with biochemical studies of the single-stranded (ss) DNA translocation activity of PcrA monomers have led to the suggestion that a PcrA monomer possesses processive helicase activity in vitro. Yet definitive studies testing whether the PcrA monomer possesses processive helicase activity have not been performed. Here we show, using single turnover kinetic methods, that monomers of PcrA are able to translocate along ssDNA, in the 3' to 5' direction, rapidly and processively, whereas these same monomers display no detectable helicase activity under the same solution conditions in vitro. The PcrA monomer ssDNA translocation activity, although necessary, is not sufficient for processive helicase activity, and thus the translocase and helicase activities of PcrA are separable. These results also suggest that the helicase activity of PcrA needs to be activated either by self-assembly or through interactions with accessory proteins. This same behavior is displayed by both the Escherichia coli Rep and UvrD monomers. Hence, all three of these SF1 enzymes are ssDNA translocases as monomers but do not display processive helicase activity in vitro unless activated. The fact that the translocase and helicase activities are separable suggests that each activity may be used for different functions in vivo. PMID:17631491

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of fatty acid transporters and MCT1 in the sebaceous glands of mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Miao; Lee, Shinhye; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The sebaceous glands secrete sebum to protect the epidermis and hairs by the oily products. The glands express several transporters and binding proteins for the production of fatty acids and uptake of their sources. The present immunohistochemical study examined the expression and localization of CD36, MCT1, FATP4, and E-FABP in the sebaceous glands, including the meibomian and preputial glands of mice. CD36 and MCT1 in sebaceous glands were largely co-localized along the plasma membrane of secretory cells, while they were separately expressed in the glandular portion of meibomian and preputial glands. Immunoreactivities for FATP4 and E-FABP appeared diffusely in the cytoplasm of secretory cells. Genetic deletion of CD36 did not affect the immunolocalization of the three other molecules. The sebaceous glands were judged to be useful for analyzing the functions and relation of fatty acid transporters and binding proteins. PMID:27545003

  1. An adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) gene from Apostichopus japonicus; molecular cloning and expression analysis in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Tu, Jie; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Li, Chao-Feng; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) play a vital role in energy metabolism via ADP/ATP exchange in eukaryotic cells. Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) is an important economic species in China. Here, a cDNA representing an ANT gene of A. japonicus was isolated and characterized from respiratory tree and named AjANT. The full-length AjANT cDNA is 1924 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 38 bp, 3'-UTR of 980 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 906 bp encoding a polypeptide of 301 amino acids. The protein contains three homologous repeat Mito_carr domains (Pfam00153). The deduced AjANT protein sequence has 49-81% in comparison to ANT proteins from other individuals. The predicted tertiary structure of AjANT protein is highly similar to animal ANT proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AjANT is closely related to Holothuroidea ANT genes. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AjANT expression is higher in the respiratory tree than in other examined tissues. After thermal stress or LPS challenge, expression of AjANT was significantly fluctuant compared to the control. These results suggested that changes in the expression of ANT gene might be involved in immune defense and in protecting A. japonicus against thermal stress. PMID:26706223

  2. A new type of signal peptide: central role of a twin-arginine motif in transfer signals for the delta pH-dependent thylakoidal protein translocase.

    PubMed Central

    Chaddock, A M; Mant, A; Karnauchov, I; Brink, S; Herrmann, R G; Klösgen, R B; Robinson, C

    1995-01-01

    The delta pH-driven and Sec-related thylakoidal protein translocases recognise distinct types of thylakoid transfer signal, yet all transfer signals resemble bacterial signal peptides in structural terms. Comparison of known transfer signals reveals a single concrete difference: signals for the delta pH-dependent system contain a common twin-arginine motif immediately before the hydrophobic region. We show that this motif is critical for the delta pH-driven translocation process; substitution of the arg-arg by gln-gln or even arg-lys totally blocks translocation across the thylakoid membrane, and replacement by lys-arg reduces the rate of translocation by > 100-fold. The targeting information in this type of signal thus differs fundamentally from that of bacterial signal peptides, where the required positive charge can be supplied by any basic amino acid. Insertion of a twin-arg motif into a Sec-dependent substrate does not alter the pathway followed but reduces translocation efficiency, suggesting that the motif may also repel the Sec-type system. Other information must help to specify the choice of translocation mechanism, but this information is unlikely to reside in the hydrophobic region because substitution by a hydrophobic section from an integral membrane protein does not affect the translocation pathway. Images PMID:7796800

  3. Escherichia coli ClpB is a non-processive polypeptide translocase.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Weaver, Clarissa L; Lin, Jiabei; Duran, Elizabeth C; Miller, Justin M; Lucius, Aaron L

    2015-08-15

    Escherichia coli caseinolytic protease (Clp)B is a hexameric AAA+ [expanded superfamily of AAA (ATPase associated with various cellular activities)] enzyme that has the unique ability to catalyse protein disaggregation. Such enzymes are essential for proteome maintenance. Based on structural comparisons to homologous enzymes involved in ATP-dependent proteolysis and clever protein engineering strategies, it has been reported that ClpB translocates polypeptide through its axial channel. Using single-turnover fluorescence and anisotropy experiments we show that ClpB is a non-processive polypeptide translocase that catalyses disaggregation by taking one or two translocation steps followed by rapid dissociation. Using single-turnover FRET experiments we show that ClpB containing the IGL loop from ClpA does not translocate substrate through its axial channel and into ClpP for proteolytic degradation. Rather, ClpB containing the IGL loop dysregulates ClpP leading to non-specific proteolysis reminiscent of ADEP (acyldepsipeptide) dysregulation. Our results support a molecular mechanism where ClpB catalyses protein disaggregation by tugging and releasing exposed tails or loops. PMID:26251445

  4. Escherichia coli ClpB is a non-processive polypeptide translocase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Weaver, Clarissa L.; Lin, Jiabei; Duran, Elizabeth C.; Miller, Justin M.; Lucius, Aaron L.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli caseinolytic protease (Clp)B is a hexameric AAA+ [expanded superfamily of AAA (ATPase associated with various cellular activities)] enzyme that has the unique ability to catalyse protein disaggregation. Such enzymes are essential for proteome maintenance. Based on structural comparisons to homologous enzymes involved in ATP-dependent proteolysis and clever protein engineering strategies, it has been reported that ClpB translocates polypeptide through its axial channel. Using single-turnover fluorescence and anisotropy experiments we show that ClpB is a non-processive polypeptide translocase that catalyses disaggregation by taking one or two translocation steps followed by rapid dissociation. Using single-turnover FRET experiments we show that ClpB containing the IGL loop from ClpA does not translocate substrate through its axial channel and into ClpP for proteolytic degradation. Rather, ClpB containing the IGL loop dysregulates ClpP leading to non-specific proteolysis reminiscent of ADEP (acyldepsipeptide) dysregulation. Our results support a molecular mechanism where ClpB catalyses protein disaggregation by tugging and releasing exposed tails or loops. PMID:26251445

  5. Active displacement of RecA filaments by UvrD translocase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Vessela; Chen, Stefanie H; Molzberger, Eileen T; Tomko, Eric; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Jia, Haifeng; Ordabayev, Yerdos; Lohman, Timothy M; Cox, Michael M

    2015-04-30

    The UvrD helicase has been implicated in the disassembly of RecA nucleoprotein filaments in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that UvrD utilizes an active mechanism to remove RecA from the DNA. Efficient RecA removal depends on the availability of DNA binding sites for UvrD and/or the accessibility of the RecA filament ends. The removal of RecA from DNA also requires ATP hydrolysis by the UvrD helicase but not by RecA protein. The RecA-removal activity of UvrD is slowed by RecA variants with enhanced DNA-binding properties. The ATPase rate of UvrD during RecA removal is much slower than the ATPase activity of UvrD when it is functioning either as a translocase or a helicase on DNA in the absence of RecA. Thus, in this context UvrD may operate in a specialized disassembly mode. PMID:25824953

  6. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  7. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis.

    PubMed

    Northall, Sarah J; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming "Displacement loops" (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  8. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  9. Analysis of functional coupling: mitochondrial creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Lemba, Maris; Saks, Valdur A

    2004-07-01

    The mechanism of functional coupling between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MiCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in isolated heart mitochondria is analyzed. Two alternative mechanisms are studied: 1), dynamic compartmentation of ATP and ADP, which assumes the differences in concentrations of the substrates between intermembrane space and surrounding solution due to some diffusion restriction and 2), direct transfer of the substrates between MiCK and ANT. The mathematical models based on these possible mechanisms were composed and simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. The first model, based on a dynamic compartmentation mechanism, was not sufficient to reproduce the measured values of apparent dissociation constants of MiCK reaction coupled to oxidative phosphorylation. The second model, which assumes the direct transfer of substrates between MiCK and ANT, is shown to be in good agreement with experiments--i.e., the second model reproduced the measured constants and the estimated ADP flux, entering mitochondria after the MiCK reaction. This model is thermodynamically consistent, utilizing the free energy profiles of reactions. The analysis revealed the minimal changes in the free energy profile of the MiCK-ANT interaction required to reproduce the experimental data. A possible free energy profile of the coupled MiCK-ANT system is presented. PMID:15240503

  10. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Northall, Sarah J.; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  11. Interaction of divalent metal ions with human translocase of inner membrane of mitochondria Tim23.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yongqiang; Deng, Honghua; Li, Shu Jie

    2016-06-17

    The preprotein translocase of the inner membrane of mitochondria (TIM23 complex) is the main entry gate for proteins of the matrix and the inner membrane. Tim23p, the core component of TIM23 complex, forms the import pore across the inner membrane and exerts a key function in the protein import. However, the interaction of divalent metal ions with Tim23p and the contribution in the interaction of presequence peptide with Tim23p are still unknown. Herein, we investigated the interaction of divalent metal ions with the intermembrane space domain of Tim23p (Tim23IMS) and the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS in presence of Ca(2+) ion by fluorescence spectroscopy in vitro. The static fluorescence quenching indicates the existence of strong binding between divalent metal ions and Tim23IMS. The order of the binding strength is Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), and Co(2+) (from strong to weak). Moreover, the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS is weakened in presence of Ca(2+) ion, which implicates that Ca(2+) ion may play an important role in the protein import by TIM23 complex. PMID:27178215

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase in mitochondrial membrane patch.

    PubMed

    Karo, Jaanus; Peterson, Pearu; Vendelin, Marko

    2012-03-01

    Interaction between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) can play an important role in determining energy transfer pathways in the cell. Although the functional coupling between MtCK and ANT has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism of the coupling is not clear. To study the details of the coupling, we turned to molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce a new coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of a patch of the mitochondrial inner membrane containing a transmembrane ANT and an MtCK above the membrane. The membrane model consists of three major types of lipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cardiolipin) in a roughly 2:1:1 molar ratio. A thermodynamics-based coarse-grained force field, termed MARTINI, has been used together with the GROMACS molecular dynamics package for all simulated systems in this work. Several physical properties of the system are reproduced by the model and are in agreement with known data. This includes membrane thickness, dimension of the proteins, and diffusion constants. We have studied the binding of MtCK to the membrane and demonstrated the effect of cardiolipin on the stabilization of the binding. In addition, our simulations predict which part of the MtCK protein sequence interacts with the membrane. Taken together, the model has been verified by dynamical and structural data and can be used as the basis for further studies. PMID:22241474

  13. Roles of Oxa1-related inner membrane translocases in assembly of respiratory chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fiumera, Heather L.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Fox, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions The wide phylogenetic distribution of Oxa1-related proteins appears to reflect both the central role of assembling energy-transducing membrane complexes, and the range of roles in their assembly that Oxa1-related protein scan be adapted to. In different species, Oxa1 and its isoforms appear to assist in the assembly of several different substrate proteins. Recent work on the bacterial protein YidC strongly indicates that it is capable of functioning alone as a translocase for hydrophilic domains and an insertase for TM domains. Thus it is highly likely that the eukaryotic members of this family found in mitochondria and chloroplasts directly catalyze these reactions in a co- and/or posttranslational way. It is presently unclear how Oxa1 recognizes its substrates and whether additional factors assist in this, beyond its direct interaction with mitochondrial ribosomes, demonstrated in S. cerevisiae. Given the apparent co-translational nature of in vivo Oxa1 dependent translocation of the Cox2 N-terminal domain, a detailed mechanistic study of this most criticalOxa1 function will need to await the development of a true in vitro translation system derived from the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane. However, Oxa1is also capable of assisting post-translational insertion and translocation in isolated mitochondria and Cox18 may post-translationally translocate both in vivo and in vitro its only known substrate, the Cox2 C-terminal domain. Thus, biochemical analysis of some of these functions in proteoliposomes may already be possible, taking advantage of the wide variety of mutant forms of S. cerevisiae Oxa1, to examine distinct activities of the protein. It is clear that interpretation of all genetic and biochemical data on Oxa1 and Cox18 will be far more robust when the structure of both proteins in the membrane will be determined. PMID:18522806

  14. Substrate-Dependent Assembly of the Tat Translocase as Observed in Live Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Patrick; Fröbel, Julia; Graumann, Peter L.; Müller, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway guides fully folded proteins across membranes of bacteria, archaea and plant chloroplasts. In Escherichia coli, Tat-specific transport is executed in a still largely unknown manner by three functionally diverse membrane proteins, termed TatA, TatB, and TatC. In order to follow the intracellular distribution of the TatABC proteins in live E. coli cells, we have individually expressed fluorophore-tagged versions of each Tat protein in addition to a set of chromosomally encoded TatABC proteins. In this way, a Tat translocase could form from the native TatABC proteins and be visualized via the association of a fluorescent Tat variant. A functionally active TatA-green fluorescent protein fusion was found to re-locate from a uniform distribution in the membrane into a few clusters preferentially located at the cell poles. Clustering was absolutely dependent on the co-expression of functional Tat substrates, the proton-motive force, and the cognate TatBC subunits. Likewise, polar cluster formation of a functional TatB-mCherry fusion required TatA and TatC and that of a functional TatC-mCherry fusion a functional Tat substrate. Furthermore we directly demonstrate the co-localization of TatA and TatB in the same fluorescent clusters. Our collective results are consistent with distinct Tat translocation sites dynamically forming in vivo in response to newly synthesized Tat substrates. PMID:23936332

  15. Mitochondrial permeability transition as induced by cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Zazueta, C; Reyes-Vivas, H; Zafra, G; Sánchez, C A; Vera, G; Chávez, E

    1998-04-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is caused by the opening of a transmembrane pore whose chemical nature has not been well established yet. The present work was aimed to further contribute to the knowledge of the membrane entity comprised in the formation of the non-specific channel. The increased permeability was established by analyzing the inability of rat kidney mitochondria to take up and accumulate Ca2+, as well as their failure to build up a transmembrane potential, after the cross-linking of membrane proteins by copper plus ortho-phenanthroline. To identify the cross-linked proteins, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. The results are representative of at least three separate experiments. It is indicated that 30 microM Cu2+ induced the release of 4.3 nmol Ca2+ per mg protein. However, in the presence of 100 microM ortho-phenanthroline only 2 microM Cu2+ was required to attain the total release of the accumulated Ca2+; it should be noted that such a reaction is not inhibited by cyclosporin. The increased permeability corresponds to cross-linking of membrane proteins in which approximately 4 nmol thiol groups per mg protein appear to be involved. Such a linking process is inhibited by carboxyatractyloside. By using the fluorescent probe eosin-5-maleimide the label was found in a cross-linking 60 kDa dimer of two 30 kDa monomers. From the data presented it is concluded that copper-o-phenanthroline induces the intermolecular cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase which in turn is converted to non-specific pore. PMID:9675885

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis Transports NAD via the Npt1 ATP/ADP Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Derek J.; Fernández, Reinaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria comprising the order Chlamydiales lack the ability to synthesize nucleotides de novo and must acquire these essential compounds from the cytosol of the host cell. The environmental protozoan endosymbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25 encodes five nucleotide transporters with specificities for different nucleotide substrates, including ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP, and NAD. In contrast, the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis encodes only two nucleotide transporters, the ATP/ADP translocase C. trachomatis Npt1 (Npt1Ct) and the nucleotide uniporter Npt2Ct, which transports GTP, UTP, CTP, and ATP. The notable absence of a NAD transporter, coupled with the lack of alternative nucleotide transporters on the basis of bioinformatic analysis of multiple C. trachomatis genomes, led us to re-evaluate the previously characterized transport properties of Npt1Ct. Using [adenylate-32P]NAD, we demonstrate that Npt1Ct expressed in Escherichia coli enables the transport of NAD with an apparent Km and Vmax of 1.7 μM and 5.8 nM mg−1 h−1, respectively. The Km for NAD transport is comparable to the Km for ATP transport of 2.2 μM, as evaluated in this study. Efflux and substrate competition assays demonstrate that NAD is a preferred substrate of Npt1Ct compared to ATP. These results suggest that during reductive evolution, the pathogenic chlamydiae lost individual nucleotide transporters, in contrast to their environmental endosymbiont relatives, without compromising their ability to obtain nucleotides from the host cytosol through relaxation of transport specificity. The novel properties of Npt1Ct and its conservation in chlamydiae make it a potential target for the development of antimicrobial compounds and a model for studying the evolution of transport specificity. PMID:23708130

  17. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 4 Is Expressed Within Embryonic Ovaries and Dispensable During Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Ho; Brower, Jeffrey V.; Resnick, James L.; Oh, S. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) facilitates the exchange of adenosine triphosphate across the mitochondrial inner membrane and plays a critical role for bioenergetics in eukaryotes. Mice have 3 Ant paralogs, Ant1 (Slc25a4), Ant2 (Slc25a5), and Ant4 (Slc25a31), which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We previously identified that Ant4 was expressed exclusively in testicular germ cells in adult mice and essential for spermatogenesis and subsequently male fertility. Further investigation into the process of spermatogenesis revealed that Ant4 was particularly highly expressed during meiotic prophase I and indispensable for normal progression of leptotene spermatocytes to the stages thereafter. In contrast, the expression and roles of Ant4 in female germ cells have not previously been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the Ant4 gene is expressed during embryonic ovarian development during which meiotic prophase I occurs. We confirmed embryonic ovary-specific Ant4 expression using a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene. In contrast to male, however, Ant4 null female mice were fertile although the litter size was slightly decreased. They showed apparently normal ovarian development which was morphologically indistinguishable from the control animals. These data indicate that Ant4 is a meiosis-specific gene expressed during both male and female gametogenesis however indispensable only during spermatogenesis and not oogenesis. The differential effects of Ant4 depletion within the processes of male and female gametogenesis may be explained by meiosis-specific inactivation of the X-linked Ant2 gene in male, a somatic paralog of the Ant4 gene. PMID:25031318

  18. End-joining inhibition at telomeres requires the translocase and polySUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligase Uls1.

    PubMed

    Lescasse, Rachel; Pobiega, Sabrina; Callebaut, Isabelle; Marcand, Stéphane

    2013-03-20

    In eukaryotes, permanent inhibition of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway at telomeres ensures that chromosome ends do not fuse. In budding yeast, binding of Rap1 to telomere repeats establishes NHEJ inhibition. Here, we show that the Uls1 protein is required for the maintenance of NHEJ inhibition at telomeres. Uls1 protein is a non-essential Swi2/Snf2-related translocase and a Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO)-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligase (STUbL) with unknown targets. Loss of Uls1 results in telomere-telomere fusions. Uls1 requirement is alleviated by the absence of poly-SUMO chains and by rap1 alleles lacking SUMOylation sites. Furthermore, Uls1 limits the accumulation of Rap1 poly-SUMO conjugates. We propose that one of Uls1 functions is to clear non-functional poly-SUMOylated Rap1 molecules from telomeres to ensure the continuous efficiency of NHEJ inhibition. Since Uls1 is the only known STUbL with a translocase activity, it can be the general molecular sweeper for the clearance of poly-SUMOylated proteins on DNA in eukaryotes. PMID:23417015

  19. Double-stranded DNA translocase activity of transcription factor TFIIH and the mechanism of RNA polymerase II open complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Fishburn, James; Tomko, Eric; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Formation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) open complex (OC) requires DNA unwinding mediated by the transcription factor TFIIH helicase-related subunit XPB/Ssl2. Because XPB/Ssl2 binds DNA downstream from the location of DNA unwinding, it cannot function using a conventional helicase mechanism. Here we show that yeast TFIIH contains an Ssl2-dependent double-stranded DNA translocase activity. Ssl2 tracks along one DNA strand in the 5′ → 3′ direction, implying it uses the nontemplate promoter strand to reel downstream DNA into the Pol II cleft, creating torsional strain and leading to DNA unwinding. Analysis of the Ssl2 and DNA-dependent ATPase activity of TFIIH suggests that Ssl2 has a processivity of approximately one DNA turn, consistent with the length of DNA unwound during transcription initiation. Our results can explain why maintaining the OC requires continuous ATP hydrolysis and the function of TFIIH in promoter escape. Our results also suggest that XPB/Ssl2 uses this translocase mechanism during DNA repair rather than physically wedging open damaged DNA. PMID:25775526

  20. End-joining inhibition at telomeres requires the translocase and polySUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligase Uls1

    PubMed Central

    Lescasse, Rachel; Pobiega, Sabrina; Callebaut, Isabelle; Marcand, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, permanent inhibition of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway at telomeres ensures that chromosome ends do not fuse. In budding yeast, binding of Rap1 to telomere repeats establishes NHEJ inhibition. Here, we show that the Uls1 protein is required for the maintenance of NHEJ inhibition at telomeres. Uls1 protein is a non-essential Swi2/Snf2-related translocase and a Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO)-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligase (STUbL) with unknown targets. Loss of Uls1 results in telomere–telomere fusions. Uls1 requirement is alleviated by the absence of poly-SUMO chains and by rap1 alleles lacking SUMOylation sites. Furthermore, Uls1 limits the accumulation of Rap1 poly-SUMO conjugates. We propose that one of Uls1 functions is to clear non-functional poly-SUMOylated Rap1 molecules from telomeres to ensure the continuous efficiency of NHEJ inhibition. Since Uls1 is the only known STUbL with a translocase activity, it can be the general molecular sweeper for the clearance of poly-SUMOylated proteins on DNA in eukaryotes. PMID:23417015

  1. A multisubunit complex of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane protein translocases stabilized in vivo by translocation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Schülke, N; Sepuri, N B; Gordon, D M; Saxena, S; Dancis, A; Pain, D

    1999-08-01

    Translocation of nuclear encoded preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix requires the coordinated action of two translocases: one (Tom) located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the other (Tim) located in the inner membrane. These translocases reversibly cooperate during protein import. We have previously constructed a chimeric precursor (pPGPrA) consisting of an authentic mitochondrial precursor at the N terminus (Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, pPut) linked, through glutathione S-transferase, to protein A. When pPGPrA is expressed in yeast, it becomes irreversibly arrested during translocation across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. Consequently, the two membranes of mitochondria become progressively "zippered" together, forming long stretches in which they are in close contact (Schülke, N., Sepuri, N. B. V., and Pain, D. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 94, 7314-7319). We now demonstrate that trapped PGPrA intermediates hold the import channels stably together and inhibit mitochondrial protein import and cell growth. Using IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography of solubilized zippered membranes, we have isolated a multisubunit complex that contains all Tom and Tim components known to be essential for import of matrix-targeted proteins, namely Tom40, Tom22, Tim17, Tim23, Tim44, and matrix-localized Hsp70. Further characterization of this complex may shed light on structural features of the complete mitochondrial import machinery. PMID:10428870

  2. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2011-11-02

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a 'closed' state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an 'open' state that differs by an {approx} 160{sup o} rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme.

  3. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    E. coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 (SF1) DNA helicase and single stranded (ss) DNA translocase that functions in DNA repair, plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and translocate along ssDNA with 3′ to 5′ directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ss-duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a “closed” state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an “open” state that differs by a ~160° rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, a series of double cysteine UvrD mutants were constructed and labeled with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA as well as ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme. PMID:21704638

  4. Rotations of the 2B sub-domain of E. coli UvrD helicase/translocase coupled to nucleotide and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K; Gauss, George H; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M

    2011-08-19

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a "closed" state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an "open" state that differs by an ∼160° rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme. PMID:21704638

  5. Tim29 is a novel subunit of the human TIM22 translocase and is involved in complex assembly and stability.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael James; Liem, Michael; Louber, Jade; McKenzie, Matthew; Atukorala, Ishara; Ang, Ching-Seng; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Mathivanan, Suresh; Stojanovski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The TIM22 complex mediates the import of hydrophobic carrier proteins into the mitochondrial inner membrane. While the TIM22 machinery has been well characterised in yeast, the human complex remains poorly characterised. Here, we identify Tim29 (C19orf52) as a novel, metazoan-specific subunit of the human TIM22 complex. The protein is integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane with it's C-terminus exposed to the intermembrane space. Tim29 is required for the stability of the TIM22 complex and functions in the assembly of hTim22. Furthermore, Tim29 contacts the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane, TOM complex, enabling a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic carrier substrates across the aqueous intermembrane space. Identification of Tim29 highlights the significance of analysing mitochondrial import systems across phylogenetic boundaries, which can reveal novel components and mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:27554484

  6. Twin-arginine translocase may have a role in the chaperone function of NarJ from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Catherine S.; Howell, Jenika M.; Workentine, Matthew L.; Turner, Raymond J. . E-mail: turnerr@ucalgary.ca

    2006-04-28

    NarJ is a chaperone involved in folding, maturation, and molybdenum cofactor insertion of nitrate reductase A from Escherichia coli. It has also been shown that NarJ exhibits sequence homology to a family of chaperones involved in maturation and cofactor insertion of E. coli redox enzymes that are mediated by twin-arginine translocase (Tat) dependent translocation. In this study, we show that NarJ binds the N-terminal region of NarG through Far Western studies and isothermal titration calorimetry, and the binding event occurs towards a short peptide sequence that contains a homologous twin-arginine motif. Fractionation experiments also show that the interaction of NarJ to the cytoplasmic membrane exhibits Tat-dependence. Upon further investigation through Far Western blots, the interactome of NarJ also exhibits Tat-dependence. Together the data suggest that the Tat system may play a role in the maturation pathway of nitrate reductase A.

  7. Discovery of a capuramycin analog that kills non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its synergistic effects with translocase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siricilla, Shajila; Mitachi, Katsuhiko; Wan, Bajoie; Franzblau, Scott G.; Kurosu, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Capuramycin (1) and its analogs are strong translocase I (MurX/MraY) inhibitors. In our SAR studies of capuramycin analogs against M. tuberculosis (Mtb), we observed for the first time that a capuramycin analog, UT-01320 (3) killed non-replicating (dormant) Mtb at low concentrations under low-oxygen conditions, whereas selective MurX inhibitors killed only replicating Mtb under aerobic conditions. Interestingly, 3 did not exhibit MurX enzyme inhibitory activity even at high concentrations, however, 3 inhibited bacterial RNA polymerases with the IC50 values of 100-150 nM range. A new RNA polymerase inhibitor 3 displayed strong synergistic effects with a MurX inhibitor SQ 641 (2), a promising preclinical TB drug. PMID:25269459

  8. The mitochondrial morphology protein Mdm10 functions in assembly of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, Chris; Rissler, Michael; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Szklarz, Luiza K Sanjuán; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kozjak, Vera; Schönfisch, Birgit; Lohaus, Christiane; Meyer, Helmut E; Yaffe, Michael P; Guiard, Bernard; Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2004-07-01

    The biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins involves the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). The two known subunits of the SAM complex, Mas37 and Sam50, are required for assembly of the abundant outer membrane proteins porin and Tom40. We have identified an unexpected subunit of the SAM complex, Mdm10, which is involved in maintenance of mitochondrial morphology. Mitochondria lacking Mdm10 are selectively impaired in the final steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40, including the association of Tom40 with the receptor Tom22 and small Tom proteins, while the biogenesis of porin is not affected. Yeast mutants of TOM40, MAS37, and SAM50 also show aberrant mitochondrial morphology. We conclude that Mdm10 plays a specific role in the biogenesis of the TOM complex, indicating a connection between the mitochondrial protein assembly apparatus and the machinery for maintenance of mitochondrial morphology. PMID:15239954

  9. Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Produces an Atherofibrotic Histophenotype During Craniofacial Bone Repair Due to Changes of Immunohistochemical Expression of Erk1/2, p38α/β, Adiponectin and Elevated Presence of Cells Exhibiting B-scavenger Receptor (CD36+).

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Caroline Cristine; Scariot, Juliana Souza Vieira Rafaela; Ribeiro, João Cesar Zielak Geraldo Monteiro; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda; Giovanini, Andrea M Marcaccini Allan Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The platelet-extracellular matrix interaction in platelet rich plasma (PRP) through thrombospondin receptor-CD36 induces the secretion of growth factors responsible for cellular proliferation and differentiation during the repair process. Since CD36 also acts as a class B-scavenger-receptor for development of foam-like cells and mitogen-activated kinases, such as Erk1/2 and p38α/β, are important proteins activated by platelet growth factor, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical presence of CD36, Erk1/2, p38α/β during the bone repair treated and non-treated with PRP and to compare these results with the histomorphometry of repair. Simultaneously, the immunopresence of adiponectin was analyzed, which may contribute to osteogenesis at the same time it inhibits fibrosis and impairs adipogenesis and foam cell formation in the medullary area. An artificial bone defect measuring 5×1 mm was produced in the calvaria of 56 Wistar rats. The defects were randomly treated with autograft, autograft+PRP, PRP alone and sham. The animals were euthanized at 2 and 6 weeks post-surgery. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by non-parametric test Student Newman-Keuls (p<0.05) for histomorphometric and immunohistochemical interpretation. The results revealed that in specimens that received PRP the immunopositivity for Erk1/2, p38α/β and CD36 proteins increased significantly while the immunohistochemical expression of adiponectin decreased simultaneously. There was also an accentuated reduction of bone matrix deposition and increase of the medullary area represented by fibrosis and/or presence of foam-like cells, which exhibited immunophenotype CD36+adiponectin. The findings of this study suggest that PRP acted as an inhibitor of osteogenesis during the craniofacial bone repair and induced a pathological condition that mimics an atherofibrotic condition. PMID:27224555

  10. Study of Valproic Acid-Enhanced Hepatocyte Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Renin; Chou, Mei-Chia; Hung, Li-Ying; Wang, Mu-En; Hsu, Meng-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used antiepilepsy drugs. However, several side effects, including weight gain and fatty liver, have been reported in patients following VPA treatment. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatic steatosis using FL83B cell line-based in vitro model. Using fluorescent lipid staining technique, we found that VPA enhanced oleic acid- (OLA-) induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes; this may be due to upregulated lipid uptake, triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. Real-time PCR results showed that, following VPA treatment, the expression levels of genes encoding cluster of differentiation 36 (Cd36), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2), and perilipin 2 (Plin2) were increased, that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I a (Cpt1a) was not affected, and those of acetyl-Co A carboxylase α (Acca) and fatty acid synthase (Fasn) were decreased. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analyses, we found that VPA also induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear translocation and increased levels of cell-surface CD36. Based on these results, we propose that VPA may enhance OLA-induced hepatocyte steatosis through the upregulation of PPARγ- and CD36-dependent lipid uptake, TAG synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. PMID:27034954

  11. Study of Valproic Acid-Enhanced Hepatocyte Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Renin; Chou, Mei-Chia; Hung, Li-Ying; Wang, Mu-En; Hsu, Meng-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used antiepilepsy drugs. However, several side effects, including weight gain and fatty liver, have been reported in patients following VPA treatment. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatic steatosis using FL83B cell line-based in vitro model. Using fluorescent lipid staining technique, we found that VPA enhanced oleic acid- (OLA-) induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes; this may be due to upregulated lipid uptake, triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. Real-time PCR results showed that, following VPA treatment, the expression levels of genes encoding cluster of differentiation 36 (Cd36), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2), and perilipin 2 (Plin2) were increased, that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I a (Cpt1a) was not affected, and those of acetyl-Co A carboxylase α (Acca) and fatty acid synthase (Fasn) were decreased. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analyses, we found that VPA also induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear translocation and increased levels of cell-surface CD36. Based on these results, we propose that VPA may enhance OLA-induced hepatocyte steatosis through the upregulation of PPARγ- and CD36-dependent lipid uptake, TAG synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. PMID:27034954

  12. Macrophage polarisation by fatty acids is PPARgamma-dependent.

    PubMed

    Pararasa, Chatyan; Bailey, Clifford; Griffiths, Helen

    2014-10-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FAs) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of the saturated FA palmitate and unsaturated FA oleate on monocyte phenotype and function. Palmitate increased cell surface expression of integrin CD11b and scavenger receptor CD36 in a concentration-dependent manner with some decrease in mitochondrial reducing capacity at high concentration (300µM). Monocytes incubated with palmitate, but not oleate, showed increased uptake of oxidized LDL and increased adhesion to rat aortic endothelium, particularly at bifurcations. The palmitate-induced increase in CD11b and CD36 expression was associated with increased cellular C16 ceramide and sphingomyelin, loss of reduced glutathione, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased monocyte surface CD11b and CD36 was inhibited by fumonisin B1, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, but not by the superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBap. In contrast, MnTBap prevented the mitochondrial ROS increase and metabolic inhibition due to 300µM palmitate. This study demonstrates that in viable monocytes, palmitate but not oleate increases expression of surface CD11b and CD36. Palmitate increases monocyte adhesion to the aortic wall and promotes uptake of oxidized LDL and this involves de novo ceramide synthesis. We have also explored whether specific dietary fatty acids drive monocyte to macrophage polarisation via metabolic pathways. Here we show that monocytes pre-incubated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate increase production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-6 in response to a phorbol myristate differentiation trigger. This increases mitochondrial superoxide production, reduces dependency on oxidative phosphorylation through ceramide-dependent inhibition of PPARgamma activity and increases TNFa production, again via a mechanism that requires ceramide production. PMID:26461339

  13. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in CETP, SLC46A1, SLC19A1, CD36, BCMO1, APOA5, and ABCA1 are significant predictors of plasma HDL in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a marker-trait association study we estimated the statistical significance of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 23 candidate genes on HDL levels of two independent Caucasian populations. Each population consisted of men and women and their HDL levels were adjusted for gender and body weight. We used a linear regression model. Selected genes corresponded to folate metabolism, vitamins B-12, A, and E, and cholesterol pathways or lipid metabolism. Methods Extracted DNA from both the Sacramento and Beltsville populations was analyzed using an allele discrimination assay with a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform. The adjusted phenotype, y, was HDL levels adjusted for gender and body weight only statistical analyses were performed using the genotype association and regression modules from the SNP Variation Suite v7. Results Statistically significant SNP (where P values were adjusted for false discovery rate) included: CETP (rs7499892 and rs5882); SLC46A1 (rs37514694; rs739439); SLC19A1 (rs3788199); CD36 (rs3211956); BCMO1 (rs6564851), APOA5 (rs662799), and ABCA1 (rs4149267). Many prior association trends of the SNP with HDL were replicated in our cross-validation study. Significantly, the association of SNP in folate transporters (SLC46A1 rs37514694 and rs739439; SLC19A1 rs3788199) with HDL was identified in our study. Conclusions Given recent literature on the role of niacin in the biogenesis of HDL, focus on status and metabolism of B-vitamins and metabolites of eccentric cleavage of β-carotene with lipid metabolism is exciting for future study. PMID:23656756

  15. Downregulation of Carnitine Acyl-Carnitine Translocase by miRNAs 132 and 212 Amplifies Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Mufaddal S.; Rabaglia, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Sushant; Shang, Jin; Ilkayeva, Olga; Mynatt, Randall; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Schadt, Eric E.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Keller, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) 132 and 212 are differentially upregulated in response to obesity in two mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes. Here we show the overexpression of miRNAs 132 and 212 enhances insulin secretion (IS) in response to glucose and other secretagogues including nonfuel stimuli. We determined that carnitine acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT; Slc25a20) is a direct target of these miRNAs. CACT is responsible for transporting long-chain acyl-carnitines into the mitochondria for β-oxidation. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CACT in β-cells led to the accumulation of fatty acyl-carnitines and enhanced IS. The addition of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines promoted IS from rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) as well as primary mouse islets. The effect on INS-1 cells was augmented in response to suppression of CACT. A nonhydrolyzable ether analog of palmitoyl-carnitine stimulated IS, showing that β-oxidation of palmitoyl-carnitine is not required for its stimulation of IS. These studies establish a link between miRNA-dependent regulation of CACT and fatty acyl-carnitine–mediated regulation of IS. PMID:24969106

  16. Tim29 is a novel subunit of the human TIM22 translocase and is involved in complex assembly and stability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael James; Liem, Michael; Louber, Jade; McKenzie, Matthew; Atukorala, Ishara; Ang, Ching-Seng; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Mathivanan, Suresh; Stojanovski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The TIM22 complex mediates the import of hydrophobic carrier proteins into the mitochondrial inner membrane. While the TIM22 machinery has been well characterised in yeast, the human complex remains poorly characterised. Here, we identify Tim29 (C19orf52) as a novel, metazoan-specific subunit of the human TIM22 complex. The protein is integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane with it’s C-terminus exposed to the intermembrane space. Tim29 is required for the stability of the TIM22 complex and functions in the assembly of hTim22. Furthermore, Tim29 contacts the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane, TOM complex, enabling a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic carrier substrates across the aqueous intermembrane space. Identification of Tim29 highlights the significance of analysing mitochondrial import systems across phylogenetic boundaries, which can reveal novel components and mechanisms in higher organisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17463.001 PMID:27554484

  17. Phosphatidylserine stimulation of Drs2p·Cdc50p lipid translocase dephosphorylation is controlled by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Aurore; Montigny, Cédric; Hennrich, Hanka; Barry, Raphaëlle; le Maire, Marc; Jaxel, Christine; Holthuis, Joost; Champeil, Philippe; Lenoir, Guillaume

    2012-04-13

    Here, Drs2p, a yeast lipid translocase that belongs to the family of P(4)-type ATPases, was overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae together with Cdc50p, its glycosylated partner, as a result of the design of a novel co-expression vector. The resulting high yield allowed us, using crude membranes or detergent-solubilized membranes, to measure the formation from [γ-(32)P]ATP of a (32)P-labeled transient phosphoenzyme at the catalytic site of Drs2p. Formation of this phosphoenzyme could be detected only if Cdc50p was co-expressed with Drs2p but was not dependent on full glycosylation of Cdc50p. It was inhibited by orthovanadate and fluoride compounds. In crude membranes, the phosphoenzyme formed at steady state at 4 °C displayed ADP-insensitive but temperature-sensitive decay. Solubilizing concentrations of dodecyl maltoside left this decay rate almost unaltered, whereas several other detergents accelerated it. Unexpectedly, the dephosphorylation rate for the solubilized Drs2p·Cdc50p complex was inhibited by the addition of phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine exerted its anticipated accelerating effect on the dephosphorylation of Drs2p·Cdc50p complex only in the additional presence of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate. These results explain why phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate tightly controls Drs2p-catalyzed lipid transport and establish the functional relevance of the Drs2p·Cdc50p complex overexpressed here. PMID:22351780

  18. The silencing of adenine nucleotide translocase isoform 1 induces oxidative stress and programmed cell death in ADF human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lena, Annalisa; Rechichi, Mariarosa; Salvetti, Alessandra; Vecchio, Donatella; Evangelista, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Gremigni, Vittorio; Rossi, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are multitask proteins involved in several aspects of cell metabolism, as well as in the regulation of cell death/survival processes. We investigated the role played by ANT isoforms 1 and 2 in the growth of a human glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells). The silencing of ANT2 isoform, by small interfering RNA, did not produce significant changes in ADF cell viability. By contrast, the silencing of ANT1 isoform strongly reduced ADF cell viability by inducing a non-apoptotic cell death process resembling paraptosis. We demonstrated that cell death induced by ANT1 depletion cannot be ascribed to the loss of the ATP/ADP exchange function of this protein. By contrast, our findings indicate that ANT1-silenced cells experience oxidative stress, thus allowing us to hypothesize that the effect of ANT1-silencing on ADF is mediated by the loss of the ANT1 uncoupling function. Several studies ascribe a pro-apoptotic role to ANT1 as a result of the observation that ANT1 overexpression sensitizes cells to mitochondrial depolarization or to apoptotic stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its pro-apoptotic function at a high expression level, the reduction of ANT1 density below a physiological baseline impairs fundamental functions of this protein in ADF cells, leading them to undertake a cell death process. PMID:20528917

  19. Protein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane: role of import receptors in the structural organization of the TOM complex.

    PubMed

    Model, Kirstin; Prinz, Thorsten; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael; Krimmer, Thomas; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2002-02-22

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains a multi-subunit machinery responsible for the specific recognition and translocation of precursor proteins. This translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) consists of three receptor proteins, Tom20, Tom22 and Tom70, the channel protein Tom40, and several small Tom proteins. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis of the Neurospora TOM complex has led to different views with two or three stain-filled centers resembling channels. Based on biochemical and electron microscopy studies of the TOM complex isolated from yeast mitochondria, we have discovered the molecular reason for the different number of channel-like structures. The TOM complex from wild-type yeast contains up to three stain-filled centers, while from a mutant yeast selectively lacking Tom20, the TOM complex particles contain only two channel-like structures. From mutant mitochondria lacking Tom22, native electrophoresis separates an approximately 80 kDa subcomplex that consists of Tom40 only and is functional for accumulation of a precursor protein. We conclude that while Tom40 forms the import channels, the two receptors Tom22 and Tom20 are required for the organization of Tom40 dimers into larger TOM structures. PMID:11866524

  20. Insertion and assembly of human tom7 into the preprotein translocase complex of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amelia J; Hoogenraad, Joan; Dougan, David A; Truscott, Kaye N; Yano, Masato; Mori, Masataka; Hoogenraad, Nicholas J; Ryan, Michael T

    2002-11-01

    Tom7 is a component of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) and assembles into a general import pore complex that translocates preproteins into mitochondria. We have identified the human Tom7 homolog and characterized its import and assembly into the mammalian TOM complex. Tom7 is imported into mitochondria in a nucleotide-independent manner and is anchored to the outer membrane with its C terminus facing the intermembrane space. Unlike studies in fungi, we found that human Tom7 assembles into an approximately 120-kDa import intermediate in HeLa cell mitochondria. To detect subunits within this complex, we employed a novel supershift analysis whereby mitochondria containing newly imported Tom7 were incubated with antibodies specific for individual TOM components prior to separation by blue native electrophoresis. We found that the 120-kDa complex contains Tom40 and lacks receptor components. This intermediate can be chased to the stable approximately 380-kDa mammalian TOM complex that additionally contains Tom22. Overexpression of Tom22 in HeLa cells results in the rapid assembly of Tom7 into the 380-kDa complex indicating that Tom22 is rate-limiting for TOM complex formation. These results indicate that the levels of Tom22 within mitochondria dictate the assembly of TOM complexes and hence may regulate its biogenesis. PMID:12198123

  1. sup 31 P NMR saturation-transfer study of the in situ kinetics of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

    SciTech Connect

    Masiakos, P.T.; Williams, G.D.; Berkich, D.A.; Smith, M.B.; LaNoue, K.F. )

    1991-08-27

    The exchange of intramitochondrial ATP (ATP{sub in}) for extramitochondrial ATP (ATP{sub out}) was measured by using {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures in isolated rat liver mitochondria oxidizing glutamate and succinate in the presence of external ATP but no added ADP (state 4). The rate of this exchange is more than an order of magnitude faster than rates reported previously that were determined by using isotopic techniques in the presence of oligomycin, the potent ATPase inhibitor. Differences are ascribed in part to the low levels of matrix ATP present in oligomycin-treated mitochondrial. Intramitochondrial ATP content regulates the rate of the ATP{sub in}/ATP{sub out} exchange. At 18C, the concentration of internal ATP that produces half-maximal transport rate is 6.6{plus minus}0.12 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. The relationship between substrate concentration and flux is sigmoidal and is 90% saturated at 11.3{plus minus}0.18 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. Since the measured rates of exchange of ATP{sub in} for ATP{sub out} are almost 10 times faster than the ATP synthase (ATP/P{sub i}) exchange rates, the translocase cannot limit net ATP/P{sub i} exchange in state 4. It may, nonetheless, limit net synthesis of ATP under other conditions when matrix ATP concentration is lower than in state 4 and when external ADP is present at higher concentrations than in these experiments.

  2. Changes in the expression of the human adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms condition cellular metabolic/proliferative status

    PubMed Central

    Mampel, Teresa; Viñas, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Human cells express four mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (hANT) isoforms that are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. hANT1 is mainly expressed in terminally differentiated muscle cells; hANT2 is growth-regulated and is upregulated in highly glycolytic and proliferative cells; and hANT3 is considered to be ubiquitous and non-specifically regulated. Here, we studied how the expression of hANT isoforms is regulated by proliferation and in response to metabolic stimuli, and examined the metabolic consequences of their silencing and overexpression. In HeLa and HepG2 cells, expression of hANT3 was upregulated by shifting metabolism towards oxidation or by slowed growth associated with contact inhibition or growth-factor deprivation, indicating that hANT3 expression is highly regulated. Under these conditions, changes in hANT2 mRNA expression were not observed in either HeLa or HepG2 cells, whereas in SGBS preadipocytes (which, unlike HeLa and HepG2 cells, are growth-arrest-sensitive cells), hANT2 mRNA levels decreased. Additionally, overexpression of hANT2 promoted cell growth and glycolysis, whereas silencing of hANT3 decreased cellular ATP levels, limited cell growth and induced a stress-like response. Thus, cancer cells require both hANT2 and hANT3, depending on their proliferation status: hANT2 when proliferation rates are high, and hANT3 when proliferation slows. PMID:26842067

  3. Biogenesis of mitochondria: dual role of Tom7 in modulating assembly of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Thornton, Nicolas; Stroud, David; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) involves the assembly of the central β-barrel forming protein Tom40 with six different subunits that are embedded in the membrane via α-helical transmembrane segments. The sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex) of the outer membrane plays a central role in this process. The SAM complex mediates the membrane integration of β-barrel precursor proteins including Tom40. The small Tom proteins Tom5 and Tom6 associate with the precursor of Tom40 at the SAM complex at an early stage of the assembly process and play a stimulatory role in the formation of the mature TOM complex. A fraction of the SAM components interacts with the outer membrane protein mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein 10 (Mdm10) to form the SAM-Mdm10 machinery; however, different views exist on the function of the SAM-Mdm10 complex. We report here that the third small Tom protein, Tom7, plays an inhibitory role at two distinct steps in the biogenesis of the TOM complex. First, Tom7 plays an antagonistic role to Tom5 and Tom6 at the early stage of Tom40 assembly at the SAM complex. Second, Tom7 interacts with Mdm10 that is not bound to the SAM complex, and thus promotes dissociation of the SAM-Mdm10 complex. Since the SAM-Mdm10 complex is required for the biogenesis of Tom22, Tom7 delays the assembly of Tom22 with Tom40 at a late stage of assembly of the TOM complex. Thus, Tom7 modulates the biogenesis of topologically different proteins, the β-barrel forming protein Tom40 and Tom22 that contains a transmembrane α-helix. PMID:21059357

  4. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery. PMID:26138914

  5. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery.

  6. Role of fatty acid transport protein 4 in oleic acid-induced glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from murine intestinal L cells

    PubMed Central

    Poreba, M. A.; Dong, C. X.; Li, S. K.; Stahl, A.; Miner, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The antidiabetic intestinal L cell hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and inhibits gastric emptying. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by luminal oleic acid (OA), which crosses the cell membrane by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that L cell fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are essential for OA-induced GLP-1 release. Therefore, the murine GLUTag L cell model was used for immunoblotting, [3H]OA uptake assay, and GLP-1 secretion assay as determined by radioimmunoassay following treatment with OA ± phloretin, sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, or siRNA against FATP4. FATP4−/− and cluster-of-differentiation 36 (CD36)−/− mice received intraileal OA, and plasma GLP-1 was measured by sandwich immunoassay. GLUTag cells were found to express CD36, FATP1, FATP3, and FATP4. The cells demonstrated specific 3H[OA] uptake that was dose-dependently inhibited by 500 and 1,000 μM unlabeled OA (P < 0.001). Cell viability was not altered by treatment with OA. Phloretin and sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, inhibitors of protein-mediated transport and CD36, respectively, also decreased [3H]OA uptake, as did knockdown of FATP4 by siRNA transfection (P < 0.05–0.001). OA dose-dependently increased GLP-1 secretion at 500 and 1,000 μM (P < 0.001), whereas phloretin, sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, and FATP4 knockdown decreased this response (P < 0.05–0.01). FATP4−/− mice displayed lower plasma GLP-1 at 60 min in response to intraileal OA (P < 0.05), whereas, unexpectedly, CD36−/− mice displayed higher basal GLP-1 levels (P < 0.01) but a normal response to intraileal OA. Together, these findings demonstrate a key role for FATP4 in OA-induced GLP-1 secretion from the murine L cell in vitro and in vivo, whereas the precise role of CD36 remains unclear. PMID:22871340

  7. Short-term overexpression of CD36 in the liver augments hepatic lipid storage and VLDL-triglyceride secretion: Implications for diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. The management of dyslipidemia in T2D is one element in the multifactorial approach to prevent coronary heart disease. Since the levels of plasma fatty acids (FA), triglycerides (TG). and lipoproteins are primarily contr...

  8. Structural Investigation of Park’s Nucleotide on Bacterial Translocase MraY: Discovery of Unexpected MraY Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuo-Ting; Chen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Kun; Huang, Lin-Ya; Hu, Chia-Ming; Chang, Yi-Fan; Hsu, Hua-Ting; Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Wu, Ying-Ta; Cheng, Wei-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Systematic structural modifications of the muramic acid, peptide, and nucleotide moieties of Park’s nucleotide were performed to investigate the substrate specificity of B. subtilis MraY (MraYBS). It was found that the simplest analogue of Park’s nucleotide only bearing the first two amino acids, l-alanine-iso-d-glutamic acid, could function as a MraYBS substrate. Also, the acid group attached to the Cα of iso-d-glutamic acid was found to play an important role for substrate activity. Epimerization of the C4-hydroxyl group of muramic acid and modification at the 5-position of the uracil in Park’s nucleotide were both found to dramatically impair their substrate activity. Unexpectedly, structural modifications on the uracil moiety changed the parent molecule from a substrate to an inhibitor, blocking the MraYBS translocation. One unoptimized inhibitor was found to have a Ki value of 4 ± 1 μM against MraYBS, more potent than tunicamycins. PMID:27531195

  9. Altered chromatographic behaviour of mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase induced by stabilization of the protein by binding of 6'-O-fluorescein-atractyloside.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vernon R; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2003-01-01

    Atractyloside (ATR) is a high-affinity specific inhibitor of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase (AAT). The binding of a fluorescent derivative, 6'- O -fluorescein-ATR (FATR), to mitochondria has been characterized. The binding constants obtained are in agreement with previously published values for ATR, demonstrating that FATR is a suitable probe of the AAT. AAT inhibited by FATR (FATR-AAT) was solubilized in dodecyl maltoside and purified by two separate ion-exchange chromatography steps at different pHs, which allowed FATR-AAT to be purified to homogeneity. The presence of the bound fluorescent probe enabled the inhibited AAT to be distinguished from the unliganded protein during chromatography, as they were markedly different in their chromatographic behaviour. The purified FATR-AAT was dimeric and in a single major conformation containing 1 mole FATR per mole of AAT dimer. In contrast, uninhibited AAT was monomeric and conformationally unstable. Use of the fluorescent ATR derivative in the development of the protocol enabled the stable dimeric AAT to be monitored directly and purified more effectively. The purification protocol was repeated using non-derivatized ATR, and highly pure AAT was obtained that was devoid of other members of the mitochondrial carrier family. PMID:14498831

  10. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds. PMID:26835787

  11. Identification of novel inhibitors of phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase MraY from library screening: Isoquinoline alkaloid michellamine B and xanthene dye phloxine B.

    PubMed

    Mihalyi, Agnes; Jamshidi, Shirin; Slikas, Justinas; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2014-09-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Diversity Set was screened for potential inhibitors of phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase MraY from Escherichia coli using a primary fluorescence enhancement assay, followed by a secondary radiochemical assay. One new MraY inhibitor was identified from this screen, a naphthylisoquinoline alkaloid michellamine B, which inhibited E. coli MraY (IC50 456μM) and Bacillus subtilis MraY (IC50 386μM), and which showed antimicrobial activity against B. subtilis (MIC 16μg/mL). Following an earlier report of halogenated fluoresceins identified from a combined MraY/MurG screen, three halogenated fluoresceins were tested as inhibitors of E. coli MraY and E. coli MurG, and phloxine B was identified as an inhibitor of E. coli MraY (IC50 32μM). Molecular docking of inhibitor structures against the structure of Aquifex aeolicus MraY indicates that phloxine B appears to bind to the Mg(2+) cofactor in the enzyme active site, while michellamine B binds to a hydrophobic groove formed between transmembrane helices 5 and 9. PMID:25127465

  12. Mapping precursor-binding site on TatC subunit of twin arginine-specific protein translocase by site-specific photo cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Zoufaly, Stefan; Fröbel, Julia; Rose, Patrick; Flecken, Tobias; Maurer, Carlo; Moser, Michael; Müller, Matthias

    2012-04-13

    A number of secreted precursor proteins of bacteria, archaea, and plant chloroplasts stand out by a conserved twin arginine-containing sequence motif in their signal peptides. Many of these precursor proteins are secreted in a completely folded conformation by specific twin arginine translocation (Tat) machineries. Tat machineries are high molecular mass complexes consisting of two types of membrane proteins, a hexahelical TatC protein, and usually one or two single-spanning membrane proteins, called TatA and TatB. TatC has previously been shown to be involved in the recognition of twin arginine signal peptides. We have performed an extensive site-specific cross-linking analysis of the Escherichia coli TatC protein under resting and translocating conditions. This strategy allowed us to map the recognition site for twin arginine signal peptides to the cytosolic N-terminal region and first cytosolic loop of TatC. In addition, discrete contact sites between TatC, TatB, and TatA were revealed. We discuss a tentative model of how a twin arginine signal sequence might be accommodated in the Tat translocase. PMID:22362773

  13. The RECG1 DNA Translocase Is a Key Factor in Recombination Surveillance, Repair, and Segregation of the Mitochondrial DNA in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Le Ret, Monique; Bergdoll, Marc; Bichara, Marc; Dietrich, André

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondria of flowering plants have considerably larger and more complex genomes than the mitochondria of animals or fungi, mostly due to recombination activities that modulate their genomic structures. These activities most probably participate in the repair of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lesions by recombination-dependent processes. Rare ectopic recombination across short repeats generates new genomic configurations that contribute to mtDNA heteroplasmy, which drives rapid evolution of the sequence organization of plant mtDNAs. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana RECG1, an ortholog of the bacterial RecG translocase, is an organellar protein with multiple roles in mtDNA maintenance. RECG1 targets to mitochondria and plastids and can complement a bacterial recG mutant that shows defects in repair and replication control. Characterization of Arabidopsis recG1 mutants showed that RECG1 is required for recombination-dependent repair and for suppression of ectopic recombination in mitochondria, most likely because of its role in recovery of stalled replication forks. The analysis of alternative mitotypes present in a recG1 line and of their segregation following backcross allowed us to build a model to explain how a new stable mtDNA configuration, compatible with normal plant development, can be generated by stoichiometric shift. PMID:26462909

  14. A gene on chromosome 11q23 coding for a putative glucose- 6-phosphate translocase is mutated in glycogen-storage disease types Ib and Ic.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-da-Cunha, M; Gerin, I; Chen, Y T; de Barsy, T; de Lonlay, P; Dionisi-Vici, C; Fenske, C D; Lee, P J; Leonard, J V; Maire, I; McConkie-Rosell, A; Schweitzer, S; Vikkula, M; Van Schaftingen, E

    1998-01-01

    Glycogen-storage diseases type I (GSD type I) are due to a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase, an enzymatic system present in the endoplasmic reticulum that plays a crucial role in blood glucose homeostasis. Unlike GSD type Ia, types Ib and Ic are not due to mutations in the phosphohydrolase gene and are clinically characterized by the presence of associated neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. Biochemical evidence indicates the presence of a defect in glucose-6-phosphate (GSD type Ib) or inorganic phosphate (Pi) (GSD type Ic) transport in the microsomes. We have recently cloned a cDNA encoding a putative glucose-6-phosphate translocase. We have now localized the corresponding gene on chromosome 11q23, the region where GSD types Ib and Ic have been mapped. Using SSCP analysis and sequencing, we have screened this gene, for mutations in genomic DNA, from patients from 22 different families who have GSD types Ib and Ic. Of 20 mutations found, 11 result in truncated proteins that are probably nonfunctional. Most other mutations result in substitutions of conserved or semiconserved residues. The two most common mutations (Gly339Cys and 1211-1212 delCT) together constitute approximately 40% of the disease alleles. The fact that the same mutations are found in GSD types Ib and Ic could indicate either that Pi and glucose-6-phosphate are transported in microsomes by the same transporter or that the biochemical assays used to differentiate Pi and glucose-6-phosphate transport defects are not reliable. PMID:9758626

  15. A Dynamic cpSRP43-Albino3 Interaction Mediates Translocase Regulation of Chloroplast Signal Recognition Particle (cpSRP)-targeting Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nathaniel E.; Marty, Naomi J.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Kight, Alicia D.; Daily, Anna; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh; Henry, Ralph L.; Goforth, Robyn L.

    2010-01-01

    The chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) and its receptor, chloroplast FtsY (cpFtsY), form an essential complex with the translocase Albino3 (Alb3) during post-translational targeting of light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding proteins (LHCPs). Here, we describe a combination of studies that explore the binding interface and functional role of a previously identified cpSRP43-Alb3 interaction. Using recombinant proteins corresponding to the C terminus of Alb3 (Alb3-Cterm) and various domains of cpSRP43, we identify the ankyrin repeat region of cpSRP43 as the domain primarily responsible for the interaction with Alb3-Cterm. Furthermore, we show Alb3-Cterm dissociates a cpSRP·LHCP targeting complex in vitro and stimulates GTP hydrolysis by cpSRP54 and cpFtsY in a strictly cpSRP43-dependent manner. These results support a model in which interactions between the ankyrin region of cpSRP43 and the C terminus of Alb3 promote distinct membrane-localized events, including LHCP release from cpSRP and release of targeting components from Alb3. PMID:20729200

  16. Biogenesis of the preprotein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane: protein kinase A phosphorylates the precursor of Tom40 and impairs its import.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sanjana; Schmidt, Oliver; Harbauer, Angelika B; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2012-05-01

    The preprotein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) functions as the main entry gate for the import of nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria. The major subunits of the TOM complex are the three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 and the central channel-forming protein Tom40. Cytosolic kinases have been shown to regulate the biogenesis and activity of the Tom receptors. Casein kinase 2 stimulates the biogenesis of Tom22 and Tom20, whereas protein kinase A (PKA) impairs the receptor function of Tom70. Here we report that PKA exerts an inhibitory effect on the biogenesis of the β-barrel protein Tom40. Tom40 is synthesized as precursor on cytosolic ribosomes and subsequently imported into mitochondria. We show that PKA phosphorylates the precursor of Tom40. The phosphorylated Tom40 precursor is impaired in import into mitochondria, whereas the nonphosphorylated precursor is efficiently imported. We conclude that PKA plays a dual role in the regulation of the TOM complex. Phosphorylation by PKA not only impairs the receptor activity of Tom70, but it also inhibits the biogenesis of the channel protein Tom40. PMID:22419819

  17. SecDF as Part of the Sec-Translocase Facilitates Efficient Secretion of Bacillus cereus Toxins and Cell Wall-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Slamti, Leyla; McKay, Matthew J.; Hegna, Ida K.; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Hassan, Karl A.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Lereclus, Didier; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Molloy, Mark P.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of SecDF in protein secretion in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 by in-depth characterization of a markerless secDF knock out mutant. Deletion of secDF resulted in pleiotropic effects characterized by a moderately slower growth rate, aberrant cell morphology, enhanced susceptibility to xenobiotics, reduced virulence and motility. Most toxins, including food poisoning-associated enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl, and cytotoxin K, as well as phospholipase C were less abundant in the secretome of the ΔsecDF mutant as determined by label-free mass spectrometry. Global transcriptome studies revealed profound transcriptional changes upon deletion of secDF indicating cell envelope stress. Interestingly, the addition of glucose enhanced the described phenotypes. This study shows that SecDF is an important part of the Sec-translocase mediating efficient secretion of virulence factors in the Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen B. cereus, and further supports the notion that B. cereus enterotoxins are secreted by the Sec-system. PMID:25083861

  18. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R.; Oliva, María E.; Lombardo, Yolanda B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  19. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats.

    PubMed

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R; Oliva, María E; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  20. Genetic influences on oral fat perception and preference: Presented at the symposium "The Taste for Fat: New Discoveries on the Role of Fat in Sensory Perception, Metabolism, Sensory Pleasure and Beyond" held at the Institute of Food Technologists 2011 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, June 12, 2011.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kathleen L

    2012-03-01

    Research suggests that dietary fat is perceived not only by texture, but also by taste. However, the receptors for chemosensory response to fat have not been identified. We report on 2 genes,TAS2R38 and CD36, that may play a role in fat perception and preference in humans. TAS2R38 is a taste receptor for bitter thiourea compounds, including 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). Nontasters of these compounds tend to be poor at discriminating fat in foods, even though they prefer higher fat versions of these foods. CD36, a fatty acid translocase expressed on multiple cell types including taste cells, plays a critical role in fat preferences in animals. In studies conducted in our laboratory with African-American adults, we identified a variant in the CD36 gene, rs1761667, that predicts oral responses to fat. Individuals who have the A/A genotype at this site tend to find Italian salad dressings creamier than those who have other genotypes at this site. In addition, A/A individuals report higher preferences for added fats, oils, and spreads (for example margarine). Assuming these data are confirmed in other populations, screening for CD36 genotype may provide helpful information to food companies for developing fat-modified products. PMID:22384968

  1. Genetic Variation of Fatty Acid Oxidation and Obesity, A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Freitag Luglio, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of fat metabolism is an important component of the etiology of obesity as well as individual response to weight loss program. The influence of lipolysis process had receives many attentions in recent decades. Compared to that, fatty acid oxidation which occurred after lipolysis seems to be less exposed. There are limited publications on how fatty acid oxidation influences predisposition to obesity, especially the importance of genetic variations of fatty acid oxidation proteins on development of obesity. The aim of this review is to provide recent knowledge on how polymorphism of genes related fatty acid oxidation is obtained. Studies in human as well as animal model showed that disturbance of genes related fatty acid oxidation process gave impact on body weight and risks to obesity. Several polymorphisms on CD36, CPT, ACS and FABP had been shown to be related to obesity either by regulating enzymatic activity or directly influence fatty acid oxidation process. PMID:27127449

  2. Structural Features Reminiscent of ATP-Driven Protein Translocases Are Essential for the Function of a Type III Secretion-Associated ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Junya; Lefebre, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacterial pathogens and symbionts utilize type III secretion systems to interact with their hosts. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells to modulate a variety of cellular functions. One of the most conserved components of these systems is an ATPase, which plays an essential role in the recognition and unfolding of proteins destined for secretion by the type III pathway. Here we show that structural features reminiscent of other ATP-driven protein translocases are essential for the function of InvC, the ATPase associated with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III secretion system. Mutational and functional analyses showed that a two-helix-finger motif and a conserved loop located at the entrance of and within the predicted pore formed by the hexameric ATPase are essential for InvC function. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the function of this highly conserved component of type III secretion machines. IMPORTANCE Type III secretion machines are essential for the virulence or symbiotic relationships of many bacteria. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into host cells to modulate cellular functions, thus facilitating bacterial colonization and replication. An essential component of these machines is a highly conserved ATPase, which is necessary for the recognition and secretion of proteins destined to be delivered by the type III secretion pathway. Using modeling and structure and function analyses, we have identified structural features of one of these ATPases from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that help to explain important aspects of its function. PMID:26170413

  3. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Is Acetylated in Vivo in Human Muscle: Modeling Predicts a Decreased ADP Affinity and Altered Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics techniques have revealed that lysine acetylation is abundant in mitochondrial proteins. This study was undertaken (1) to determine the relationship between mitochondrial protein acetylation and insulin sensitivity in human skeletal muscle, identifying key acetylated proteins, and (2) to use molecular modeling techniques to understand the functional consequences of acetylation of adenine nucleotide translocase 1 (ANT1), which we found to be abundantly acetylated. Eight lean and eight obese nondiabetic subjects had euglycemic clamps and muscle biopsies for isolation of mitochondrial proteins and proteomics analysis. A number of acetylated mitochondrial proteins were identified in muscle biopsies. Overall, acetylation of mitochondrial proteins was correlated with insulin action (r = 0.60; P < 0.05). Of the acetylated proteins, ANT1, which catalyzes ADP–ATP exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane, was acetylated at lysines 10, 23, and 92. The extent of acetylation of lysine 23 decreased following exercise, depending on insulin sensitivity. Molecular dynamics modeling and ensemble docking simulations predicted the ADP binding site of ANT1 to be a pocket of positively charged residues, including lysine 23. Calculated ADP–ANT1 binding affinities were physiologically relevant and predicted substantial reductions in affinity upon acetylation of lysine 23. Insertion of these derived binding affinities as parameters into a complete mathematical description of ANT1 kinetics predicted marked reductions in adenine nucleotide flux resulting from acetylation of lysine 23. Therefore, acetylation of ANT1 could have dramatic physiological effects on ADP–ATP exchange. Dysregulation of acetylation of mitochondrial proteins such as ANT1 therefore could be related to changes in mitochondrial function that are associated with insulin resistance. PMID:24884163

  4. Three ways in, one way out: water dynamics in the trans-membrane domains of the inner membrane translocase AcrB.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Powered by proton-motive force, the inner membrane translocase AcrB is the engine of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in Escherichia coli. As proton conduction in proteins occurs along hydrogen-bonded networks of polar residues and water molecules, knowledge of the protein-internal water distribution and water-interacting residues allows drawing conclusions to possible pathways of proton conduction. Here, we report a series of 6× 50 ns independent molecular dynamics simulations of asymmetric AcrB embedded in a phospholipid/water environment. Simulating each monomer in its proposed protonation state, we calculated for each trans-membrane domain the average water distribution, identified residues interacting with these waters and quantified each residue's frequency of water hydrogen bond contact. Combining this information we find three possible routes of proton transfer connecting a continuously hydrated region of known key residues in the TMD interior to bulk water by one cytoplasmic and up to three periplasm water channels in monomer B and A. We find that water access of the trans-membrane domains is regulated by four groups of residues in a combination of side chain re-orientations and shifts of trans-membrane helices. Our findings support a proton release event via Arg971 during the C intermediate or in the transition to A, and proton uptake occurring in the A or B state or during a so far unknown intermediate in between B and C where cytoplasmic water access is still possible. Our simulations suggest experimentally testable hypotheses, which have not been investigated so far. PMID:21905112

  5. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim interacts with components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM).

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel O; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated. PMID:25875815

  6. Unfolding-resistant translocase targeting: a novel mechanism for outer mitochondrial membrane localization exemplified by the Bbeta2 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Dagda, Ruben K; Barwacz, Chris A; Cribbs, J Thomas; Strack, Stefan

    2005-07-22

    Heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) consists of scaffolding (A), catalytic (C), and variable (B, B', and B'') subunits. Variable subunits dictate subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme. The Bbeta regulatory subunit gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12, and one of its splice variants, Bbeta2, targets PP2A to mitochondria to promote apoptosis in PC12 cells (Dagda, R. K., Zaucha, J. A., Wadzinski, B. E., and Strack, S. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 24976-24985). Here, we report that Bbeta2 is localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane by a novel mechanism, combining a cryptic mitochondrial import signal with a structural arrest domain. Scanning mutagenesis demonstrates that basic and hydrophobic residues mediate mitochondrial association and the proapoptotic activity of Bbeta2. When fused to green fluorescent protein, the N terminus of Bbeta2 acts as a cleavable mitochondrial import signal. Surprisingly, full-length Bbeta2 is not detectably cleaved and is retained at the outer mitochondrial membrane, even though it interacts with the TOM22 import receptor, as shown by luciferase complementation in intact cells. Mutations that open the C-terminal beta-propeller of Bbeta2 facilitate mitochondrial import, indicating that this rigid fold acts as a stop-transfer domain by resisting the partial unfolding step prerequisite for matrix translocation. Because hybrids of prototypical import and beta-propeller domains recapitulate this behavior, we predict the existence of other similarly localized proteins and a selection against highly stable protein folds in the mitochondrial matrix. This unfolding-resistant targeting to the mitochondrial translocase is necessary but not sufficient for the proapoptotic activity of Bbeta2, which also requires association with the rest of the PP2A holoenzyme. PMID:15923182

  7. The Pro-Apoptotic BH3-Only Protein Bim Interacts with Components of the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane (TOM)

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel O.; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated. PMID:25875815

  8. Characterization of duodenal expression and localization of fatty acid-sensing receptors in humans: relationships with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Little, Tanya J; Isaacs, Nicole J; Young, Richard L; Ott, Raffael; Nguyen, Nam Q; Rayner, Christopher K; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2014-11-15

    Fatty acids (FAs) stimulate the secretion of gastrointestinal hormones, including cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which suppress energy intake. In obesity, gastrointestinal responses to FAs are attenuated. Recent studies have identified a key role for the FA-sensing receptors cluster of differentiation (CD)36, G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)40, GPR120, and GPR119 in mediating gastrointestinal hormone secretion. This study aimed to determine the expression and localization of these receptors in the duodenum of humans and to examine relationships with obesity. Duodenal mucosal biopsies were collected from nine lean [body mass index (BMI): 22 ± 1 kg/m2], six overweight (BMI: 28 ± 1 kg/m2), and seven obese (BMI: 49 ± 5 kg/m2) participants. Absolute levels of receptor transcripts were quantified using RT-PCR, while immunohistochemistry was used for localization. Transcripts were expressed in the duodenum of lean, overweight, and obese individuals with abundance of CD36>GPR40>GPR120>GPR119. Expression levels of GPR120 (r = 0.46, P = 0.03) and CD36 (r = 0.69, P = 0.0004) were directly correlated with BMI. There was an inverse correlation between expression of GPR119 with BMI (r2 = 0.26, P = 0.016). Immunolabeling studies localized CD36 to the brush border membrane of the duodenal mucosa and GPR40, GPR120, and GPR119 to enteroendocrine cells. The number of cells immunolabeled with CCK (r = -0.54, P = 0.03) and GLP-1 (r = -0.49, P = 0.045) was inversely correlated with BMI, such that duodenal CCK and GLP-1 cell density decreased with increasing BMI. In conclusion, CD36, GPR40, GPR120, and GPR119 are expressed in the human duodenum. Transcript levels of duodenal FA receptors and enteroendocrine cell density are altered with increasing BMI, suggesting that these changes may underlie decreased gastrointestinal hormone responses to fat and impaired energy intake regulation in obesity. PMID:25258406

  9. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  10. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590355

  11. ATPase active-site electrostatic interactions control the global conformation of the 100 kDa SecA translocase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dorothy M.; Zheng, Haiyan; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    SecA is an intensively studied mechanoenzyme that uses ATP hydrolysis to drive processive extrusion of secreted proteins through a protein-conducting channel in the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria. The ATPase motor of SecA is strongly homologous to that in DEAD-box RNA helicases. It remains unclear how local chemical events in its ATPase active site control the overall conformation of an ~100 kDa multidomain enzyme and drive protein transport. In this paper, we use biophysical methods to establish that a single electrostatic charge in the ATPase active site controls the global conformation of SecA. The enzyme undergoes an ATP-modulated endothermic conformational transition (ECT) believed to involve similar structural mechanics to the protein transport reaction. We have characterized the effects of an isosteric glutamate-to-glutamine mutation in the catalytic base, which mimics the immediate electrostatic consequences of ATP hydrolysis in the active site. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that this mutation facilitates the ECT in E. coli SecA and triggers it completely in B. subtilis SecA. Consistent with the substantial increase in entropy observed in the course of the ECT, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrates that it increases protein backbone dynamics in domain-domain interfaces at remote locations from the ATPase active site. The catalytic glutamate is one of ~250 charged amino acids in SecA, and yet neutralization of its sidechain charge is sufficient to trigger a global order-disorder transition in this 100 kDa enzyme. The intricate network of structural interactions mediating this effect couples local electrostatic changes during ATP hydrolysis to global conformational and dynamic changes in SecA. This network forms the foundation of the allosteric mechanochemistry that efficiently harnesses the chemical energy stored in ATP to drive complex mechanical processes. PMID:23167435

  12. Ensemble Methods for Monitoring Enzyme Translocation along Single Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Eric J.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    We review transient kinetic methods developed to study the mechanism of translocation of nucleic acid motor proteins. One useful stopped-flow fluorescence method monitors arrival of the translocase at the end of a fluorescently labeled nucleic acid. When conducted under single-round conditions the time courses can be analyzed quantitatively using n-step sequential models to determine the kinetic parameters for translocation (rate, kinetic step size and processivity). The assay and analysis discussed here can be used to study enzyme translocation along a linear lattice such as ssDNA or ssRNA. We outline the methods for experimental design and two approaches, along with their limitations, that can be used to analyze the time courses. Analysis of the full time courses using n-step sequential models always yields an accurate estimate of the translocation rate. An alternative semi-quantitative “time to peak” analysis yields accurate estimates of translocation rates only if the enzyme initiates translocation from a unique site on the nucleic acid. However, if initiation occurs at random sites along the nucleic acid, then the “time to peak” analysis can yield inaccurate estimates of even the rates of translocation depending on the values of other kinetic parameters, especially the rate of dissociation of the translocase. Thus, in those cases analysis of the full time course is needed to obtain accurate estimates of translocation rates. PMID:20371288

  13. CD36 expression contributes to age induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiac remodeling and impaired cardiac performance in the elderly significantly increase the risk of developing heart disease. Although vascular abnormalities associated with aging contribute to the age-related decline in cardiac function, myocardium-specific events may also be involved. We show th...

  14. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  15. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  16. It takes two to tango: two TatA paralogues and two redox enzyme-specific chaperones are involved in the localization of twin-arginine translocase substrates in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Wei; Hitchcock, Andrew; Salmon, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The food-borne zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni has complex electron transport chains required for growth in the host, many of which contain cofactored periplasmic enzymes localized by the twin-arginine translocase (TAT). We report here the identification of two paralogues of the TatA translocase component in C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168, encoded by cj1176c (tatA1) and cj0786 (tatA2). Deletion mutants constructed in either or both of the tatA1 and tatA2 genes displayed distinct growth and enzyme activity phenotypes. For sulphite oxidase (SorAB), the multi-copper oxidase (CueO) and alkaline phosphatase (PhoX), complete dependency on TatA1 for correct periplasmic activity was observed. However, the activities of nitrate reductase (NapA), formate dehydrogenase (FdhA) and trimethylamine N-oxide reductase (TorA) were significantly reduced in the tatA2 mutant. In contrast, the specific rate of fumarate reduction catalysed by the flavoprotein subunit of the methyl menaquinone fumarate reductase (MfrA) was similar in periplasmic fractions of both the tatA1 and the tatA2 mutants and only the deletion of both genes abolished activity. Nevertheless, unprocessed MfrA accumulated in the periplasm of the tatA1 (but not tatA2) mutant, indicating aberrant signal peptide cleavage. Surprisingly, TatA2 lacks two conserved residues (Gln8 and Phe39) known to be essential in Escherichia coli TatA and we suggest it is unable to function correctly in the absence of TatA1. Finally, only two TAT chaperones (FdhM and NapD) are encoded in strain NCTC 11168, which mutant studies confirmed are highly specific for formate dehydrogenase and nitrate reductase assembly, respectively. Thus, other TAT substrates must use general chaperones in their biogenesis. PMID:24961951

  17. Reduced capacity for fatty acid oxidation in rats with inherited susceptibility to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Friedman, Mark I

    2007-08-01

    High-fat, energy-dense diets promote weight gain and obesity in humans and other animals, but the mechanisms underlying such diet-induced obesity remain elusive. To determine whether a reduced capacity to oxidize fat is involved in the etiology of diet-induced obesity, we examined different measures of fatty acid oxidation in rats selectively bred for susceptibility (DIO) or resistance (DR) to dietary obesity before and after they were fed a high-fat diet and became obese. DIO rats eating a low-fat diet oxidized less dietary fatty acid in vivo and had lower levels of plasma ketone bodies during fasting compared with DR rats. Lean DIO rats fed a low-fat diet showed reduced liver messenger RNA expression of CD36, which transports fatty acids across cell membranes, and long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADL), which catalyzes the first step in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The deficit in CD36 and ACADL messenger RNA expression was also seen in obese DIO rats that had been eating a high-fat diet and, in addition, was accompanied by reduced expression of liver carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, the enzyme that mediates transport of long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria. No differences were found in the expression of liver enzymes involved in fat synthesis; however, in muscle, DIO rats fed the low-fat, but not high-fat, diet showed greater expression of diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 and lipoprotein lipase than did DR rats. Expression of muscle enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation was similar in the 2 groups. These findings provide a metabolic mechanism for the development of diet-induced obesity and thus suggest potential targets for intervention strategies to treat or prevent it. PMID:17618960

  18. Stress Signaling from Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Contributes to Phenotypes of Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared to epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g. activin A, CD36) to prevent breast cancer. PMID:25172842

  19. Lactobacillus plantarum LG42 Isolated from Gajami Sik-Hae Inhibits Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocyte

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Oh, Suk-Heung; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether lactic acid bacteria isolated from gajami sik-hae (GLAB) are capable of reducing the intracellular lipid accumulation by downregulating the expression of adipogenesis-related genes in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The GLAB, Lactobacillus plantarum LG42, significantly decreased the intracellular triglyceride storage and the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of transcription factors like peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) α involved in adipogenesis was markedly decreased by the GLAB treatment. Moreover, the GLAB also decreased the expression level of adipogenic markers like adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), leptin, GPDH, and fatty acid translocase (CD36) significantly. These results suggest that the GLAB inhibits lipid accumulation in the differentiated adipocyte through downregulating the expression of adipogenic transcription factors and other specific genes involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:23555088

  20. Assembly, translocation, and activation of XerCD-dif recombination by FtsK translocase analyzed in real-time by FRET and two-color tethered fluorophore motion

    PubMed Central

    May, Peter F. J.; Zawadzki, Pawel; Sherratt, David J.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Arciszewska, Lidia K.

    2015-01-01

    The FtsK dsDNA translocase functions in bacterial chromosome unlinking by activating XerCD-dif recombination in the replication terminus region. To analyze FtsK assembly and translocation, and the subsequent activation of XerCD-dif recombination, we extended the tethered fluorophore motion technique, using two spectrally distinct fluorophores to monitor two effective lengths along the same tethered DNA molecule. We observed that FtsK assembled stepwise on DNA into a single hexamer, and began translocation rapidly (∼0.25 s). Without extruding DNA loops, single FtsK hexamers approached XerCD-dif and resided there for ∼0.5 s irrespective of whether XerCD-dif was synapsed or unsynapsed. FtsK then dissociated, rather than reversing. Infrequently, FtsK activated XerCD-dif recombination when it encountered a preformed synaptic complex, and dissociated before the completion of recombination, consistent with each FtsK–XerCD-dif encounter activating only one round of recombination. PMID:26324908

  1. Separation of structural and dynamic functions of the mitochondrial translocase: Tim44 is crucial for the inner membrane import sites in translocation of tightly folded domains, but not of loosely folded preproteins.

    PubMed

    Bömer, U; Maarse, A C; Martin, F; Geissler, A; Merlin, A; Schönfisch, B; Meijer, M; Pfanner, N; Rassow, J

    1998-08-01

    The essential gene TIM44 encodes a subunit of the inner mitochondrial membrane preprotein translocase that forms a complex with the matrix heat-shock protein Hsp70. The specific role of Tim44 in protein import has not yet been defined because of the lack of means to block its function. Here we report on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant allele of TIM44 that allows selective and efficient inactivation of Tim44 in organello. Surprisingly, the mutant mitochondria are still able to import preproteins. The import rate is only reduced by approximately 30% compared with wild-type as long as the preproteins do not carry stably folded domains. Moreover, the number of import sites is not reduced. However, the mutant mitochondria are strongly impaired in pulling folded domains of preproteins close to the outer membrane and in promoting their unfolding. Our results demonstrate that Tim44 is not an essential structural component of the import channel, but is crucial for import of folded domains. We suggest that the concerted action of Tim44 and mtHsp70 drives unfolding of preproteins and accelerates translocation of loosely folded preproteins. While mtHsp70 is essential for import of both tightly and loosly folded preproteins, Tim44 plays a more specialized role in translocation of tightly folded domains. PMID:9687491

  2. Sal1p, a calcium-dependent carrier protein that suppresses an essential cellular function associated With the Aac2 isoform of ADP/ATP translocase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin Jie

    2004-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) catalyzes ADP/ATP exchange between the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix. It is also proposed to form or regulate the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, a megachannel of high conductancy on the mitochondrial membranes. Eukaryotic genomes generally contain multiple isoforms of Ant. In this study, it is shown that the Ant isoforms are functionally differentiated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the three yeast Ant proteins can equally support respiration (the R function), Aac2p and Aac3p, but not Aac1p, have an additional physiological function essential for cell viability (the V function). The loss of V function in aac2 mutants leads to a lethal phenotype under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lethality is suppressed by a strain-polymorphic locus, named SAL1 (for Suppressor of aac2 lethality). SAL1 was identified to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein of the mitochondrial carrier family. Notably, the Sal1 protein was shown to bind calcium through two EF-hand motifs located on its amino terminus. Calcium binding is essential for the suppressor activity. Finally, Sal1p is not required for oxidative phosphorylation and its overexpression does not complement the R(-) phenotype of aac2 mutants. On the basis of these observations, it is proposed that Aac2p and Sal1p may define two parallel pathways that transport a nucleotide substrate in an operational mode distinct from ADP/ATP exchange. PMID:15238515

  3. Derivatives of the cationic plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine amplify protonophorous activity of fatty acids in model membranes and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pustovidko, Antonina V; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I; Severina, Inna I; Simonyan, Ruben A; Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Antonenko, Yuri N; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2013-09-01

    Previously it has been shown by our group that berberine and palmatine, penetrating cations of plant origin, when conjugated with plastoquinone (SkQBerb and SkQPalm), can accumulate in isolated mitochondria or in mitochondria of living cells and effectively protect them from oxidative damage. In the present work, we demonstrate that SkQBerb, SkQPalm, and their analogs lacking the plastoquinone moiety (C10Berb and C10Palm) operate as mitochondria-targeted compounds facilitating protonophorous effect of free fatty acids. These compounds induce proton transport mediated by small concentrations of added fatty acids both in planar and liposomal model lipid membranes. In mitochondria, such an effect can be carried out by endogenous fatty acids and the adenine nucleotide translocase. PMID:23026390

  4. Effect of fatty acids on energy coupling processes in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, L; Schönfeld, P

    1993-11-01

    Long-chain fatty acids are natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. The protonophoric mechanism of this action is due to transbilayer movement of undissociated fatty acid in one direction and the passage of its anion in the opposite direction. The transfer of the dissociated form of fatty acid can be, at least in some kinds of mitochondrion, facilitated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Apart from dissipating the electrochemical proton gradient, long-chain fatty acids decrease the activity of the respiratory chain by mechanism(s) not fully understood. In intact cells and tissues fatty acids operate mostly as excellent respiratory substrates, providing electrons to the respiratory chain. This function masks their potential uncoupling effect which becomes apparent only under special physiological or pathological conditions characterized by unusual fatty acid accumulation. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids do not have protonophoric properties. Nevertheless, they contribute to energy dissipation because of slow intramitochondrial hydrolysis of their activation products, acyl-AMP and acyl-CoA. Long-chain fatty acids increase permeability of mitochondrial membranes to alkali metal cations. This is due to their ionophoric mechanism of action. Regulatory function of fatty acids with respect to specific cation channels has been postulated for the plasma membrane of muscle cells, but not demonstrated in mitochondria. Under cold stress, cold acclimation and arousal from hibernation the uncoupling effect of fatty acids may contribute to increased thermogenesis, especially in the muscle tissue. In brown adipose tissue, the special thermogenic organ of mammals, long-chain fatty acids promote operation of the unique natural uncoupling protein, thermogenin. As anionic amphiphiles, long-chain fatty acids increase the negative surface charge of biomembranes, thus interfering in their enzymic and transporting functions. PMID:8399375

  5. Possible Involvement of Palmitate in Pathogenesis of Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Shikama, Yosuke; Kudo, Yasusei; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Funaki, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity and higher concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma. Among FFAs, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), such as palmitate, have been suggested to promote inflammatory responses. Although many epidemiological studies have shown a link between periodontitis and T2D, little is known about the clinical significance of SFAs in periodontitis. In this study, we showed that gingival fibroblasts have cell-surface expression of CD36, which is also known as FAT/fatty acid translocase. Moreover, CD36 expression was increased in gingival fibroblasts of high-fat diet-induced T2D model mice, compared with gingival fibroblasts of mice fed a normal diet. DNA microarray analysis revealed that palmitate increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Consistent with these results, we confirmed that palmitate-induced interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and CXCL1 secretion in HGF, using a cytokine array and ELISA. SFAs, but not an unsaturated fatty acid, oleate, induced IL-8 production. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, significantly suppressed palmitate-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production. Treatment of HGF with a CD36 inhibitor also inhibited palmitate-induced pro-inflammatory responses. Finally, we demonstrated that Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) lipopolysaccharide and heat-killed P.g. augmented palmitate-induced chemokine secretion in HGF. These results suggest a potential link between SFAs in plasma and the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:25921577

  6. Fatty acid metabolism in pulmonary arterial hypertension: role in right ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, multifactorial disease in which an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance leads to increased afterload on the right ventricle (RV), causing right heart failure and death. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of RV dysfunction in PAH is limited but is constantly improving. Increasing evidence suggests that in PAH RV dysfunction is associated with various components of metabolic syndrome, such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. The relationship between RV dysfunction and fatty acid/glucose metabolites is multifaceted, and in PAH it is characterized by a shift in utilization of energy sources toward increased glucose utilization and reduced fatty acid consumption. RV dysfunction may be caused by maladaptive fatty acid metabolism resulting from an increase in fatty acid uptake by fatty acid transporter molecule CD36 and an imbalance between glucose and fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria. This leads to lipid accumulation in the form of triglycerides, diacylglycerol, and ceramides in the cytoplasm, hallmarks of lipotoxicity. Current interventions in animal models focus on improving RV dysfunction through altering fatty acid oxidation rates and limiting lipid accumulation, but more specific and effective therapies may be available in the coming years based on current research. In conclusion, a deeper understanding of the complex mechanisms of the metabolic remodeling of the RV will aid in the development of targeted treatments for RV failure in PAH. PMID:26064451

  7. Fatty acid-induced astrocyte ketone production and the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Levin, Barry E

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are major worldwide public health issues today. A relationship between total fat intake and obesity has been found. In addition, the mechanisms of long-term and excessive high-fat diet (HFD) intake in the development of obesity still need to be elucidated. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is a major site involved in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis where "metabolic sensing neurons" integrate metabolic signals from the periphery. Among these signals, fatty acids (FA) modulate the activity of VMH neurons using the FA translocator/CD36, which plays a critical role in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. During low-fat diet (LFD) intake, FA are oxidized by VMH astrocytes to fuel their ongoing metabolic needs. However, HFD intake causes VMH astrocytes to use FA to generate ketone bodies. We postulate that these astrocyte-derived ketone bodies are exported to neurons where they produce excess ATP and reactive oxygen species, which override CD36-mediated FA sensing and act as a signal to decrease short-term food intake. On a HFD, VMH astrocyte-produced ketones reduce elevated caloric intake to LFD levels after 3 days in rats genetically predisposed to resist (DR) diet-induced obesity (DIO), but not leptin-resistant DIO rats. This suggests that, while VMH ketone production on a HFD can contribute to protection from obesity, the inherent leptin resistance overrides this inhibitory action of ketone bodies on food intake. Thus, astrocytes and neurons form a tight metabolic unit that is able to monitor circulating nutrients to alter food intake and energy homeostasis. PMID:27122369

  8. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  9. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  10. Real-time quantification of fatty acid uptake using a novel fluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinfang; Sportsman, Richard; Harris, Jeff; Stahl, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    Uptake of nonesterified long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into many cell types and organs such as liver, heart, intestine, and skeletal muscle occurs primarily through a saturable, protein-mediated mechanism. Membrane proteins that increase the uptake of LCFAs, such as FAT/CD36 and fatty acid transport proteins, represent significant therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes. However, currently available methods for the quantification of LCFA uptake neither allow for real-time measurements of uptake kinetics nor are ideally suited for the development of LCFA uptake inhibitors in high-throughput screens. To address both problems, we developed a LCFA uptake assay using a fluorescently labeled fatty acid and a nontoxic cell-impermeable quenching agent that allows fatty acid transport to be measured in real time using fluorescence plate readers or standard fluorescence microscopy. With this assay, we faithfully reproduced known differentiation- and hormone-induced changes in LCFA uptake by 3T3-L1 cells and determined LCFA uptake kinetics with previously unobtainable temporal resolution. Applications of this novel assay should facilitate new insights into the biology of fatty acid uptake and provide new means for obesity-related drug discovery. PMID:15547301

  11. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation. PMID:27118706

  12. A high fat diet induces sex-specific differences in hepatic lipid metabolism and nitrite/nitrate in rats.

    PubMed

    Stanimirovic, Julijana; Obradovic, Milan; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Sudar-Milovanovic, Emina; Zafirovic, Sonja; Pitt, Samantha J; Stewart, Alan J; Isenovic, Esma R

    2016-04-01

    Men and women differ substantially with regard to the severity of insulin resistance (IR) but the underlying mechanism(s) of how this occurs is poorly characterized. We investigated whether a high fat (HF) diet resulted in sex-specific differences in nitrite/nitrate production and lipid metabolism and whether these variances may contribute to altered obesity-induced IR. Male and female Wistar rats were fed a standard laboratory diet or a HF diet for 10 weeks. The level of plasma nitrite/nitrate, as well as free fatty acid (FFA), in both plasma and liver lysates were assessed. The levels of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), p65 subunit of NFκB, total and phosphorylated forms of Akt, mTOR and PDK-1 in lysates, and the levels of glucose transporter 2 (Glut-2) and fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36) in plasma membrane fractions of liver were assessed. HF-fed male rats exhibited a significant increase in plasma nitrite/nitrate, and hepatic FFA and FAT/CD36 levels compared with controls. They also displayed a relative decrease in iNOS and Glut-2 levels in the liver. Phosphorylation of Akt (at Ser(473) and Thr(308)), mTOR and PDK-1 was also reduced. HF-fed female rats exhibited increased levels of NFκB-p65 in liver compared with controls, while levels of Glut-2, FAT/CD36 and Akt phosphorylation at Thr(308) and PDK-1 were decreased. Our results reveal that altered lipid and glucose metabolism in obesity, lead to altered iNOS expression and nitrite/nitrate production. It is likely that this mechanism contributes to sex-specific differences in the development of IR. PMID:26924725

  13. A Functional, Genome-wide Evaluation of Liposensitive Yeast Identifies the “ARE2 Required for Viability” (ARV1) Gene Product as a Major Component of Eukaryotic Fatty Acid Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Ruggles, Kelly V.; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S.; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A.; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Repa, Joyce J.; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the “ARE2 required for viability” (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease. PMID:24273168

  14. Genetics Home Reference: ornithine translocase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... to move a molecule called ornithine within the mitochondria (the energy-producing centers in cells). Specifically, this protein transports ornithine across the inner membrane of mitochondria to the region called the mitochondrial matrix , where ...

  15. Ruminant and industrial trans-fatty acid uptake in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Riya; LaVallee, Renee; Maddaford, Thane G; Devaney, Brittany; Bassett, Chantal M C; Edel, Andrea L; Pierce, Grant N

    2016-05-01

    Dietary trans-fats are strongly associated with heart disease. However, the capacity for the tissues of the body, and specifically the heart, to take up trans-fats is unknown. It is also unknown if different trans-fats have different uptake capacities in the heart and other tissues of the body. Diets of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were supplemented for 14weeks with foods that contained 1.5% of the trans-fat elaidic acid or vaccenic acid. Tissues were extracted and frozen in liquid nitrogen, and then lipids were analyzed by gas chromatography for fatty acid content. Isolated cardiomyocytes were also exposed to elaidic or vaccenic acid in cell culture media for 24h. Dietary supplementation with vaccenic or elaidic acid resulted in a 20-fold higher accumulation of these TFAs in fat deposits in the body in comparison to liver. Liver tissue accumulated about twice as much per gram tissue as heart. Similar quantities of both elaidic acid and vaccenic acid were taken up by the tissues. Isolated cardiomyocytes exhibited an unusually large uptake of trans-fat, and this was dependent upon both the concentration and duration of exposure to the trans-fats but not upon the type of trans-fat. Expression levels of CD36 and FATP4 were not significantly changed during dietary interventions or exposure of cells to trans-fats. We conclude that fat, liver and heart (including cardiomyocytes) are all capable of accumulating trans-fat in response to dietary supplementation without changes in fatty acid transport protein expression. PMID:27133424

  16. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  17. Seasonal upregulation of catabolic enzymes and fatty acid transporters in the flight muscle of migrating hoary bats, Lasiurus cinereus.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Liam P; Fenton, M Brock; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2013-06-01

    The high energy density of fat, and limited capacity for carbohydrate storage suggest that migrating bats should fuel endurance flights with fat, as observed in migrating birds. Yet, cursorial mammals are unable to support high intensity exercise with fat stores. We hypothesized that migratory bats and birds have converged on similar physiological mechanisms to fuel endurance flight with fat. We predicted bats would seasonally upregulate fatty acid transport and oxidation pathways when migration demands were high. We studied seasonal variation in mitochondrial oxidative enzyme activities and fatty acid transport protein expression in the flight muscle of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus). Carnitine palmitoyl transferase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and citrate synthase activity increased during migration. There were no changes in expression of fatty acid translocase or plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein expression increased 5-fold in migrating females, but did not vary seasonally in males. An aerial insectivore lifestyle, and the coincidence of migration and pregnancy may explain differences in transporter expression compared to previously studied birds. Overall, our results are consistent with seasonal upregulation of lipid metabolism and aerobic capacity, and confirm that migration poses distinct physiological challenges for bats. PMID:23545469

  18. Linoleic acid permeabilizes gastric epithelial cells by increasing connexin 43 levels in the cell membrane via a GPR40- and Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Salas, Daniela P; Delgado-López, Fernando; Lampe, Paul D; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is known to activate G-protein coupled receptors and connexin hemichannels (Cx HCs) but possible interlinks between these two responses remain unexplored. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of action of LA on the membrane permeability mediated by Cx HCs in MKN28 cells. These cells were found to express connexins, GPR40, GPR120, and CD36 receptors. The Cx HC activity of these cells increased after 5 min of treatment with LA or GW9508, an agonist of GPR40/GPR120; or exposure to extracellular divalent cation-free solution (DCFS), known to increase the open probability of Cx HCs, yields an immediate increase in Cx HC activity of similar intensity and additive with LA-induced change. Treatment with a CD36 blocker or transfection with siRNA-GPR120 maintains the LA-induced Cx HC activity. However, cells transfected with siRNA-GPR40 did not show LA-induced Cx HC activity but activity was increased upon exposure to DCFS, confirming the presence of activatable Cx HCs in the cell membrane. Treatment with AKTi (Akt inhibitor) abrogated the LA-induced Cx HC activity. In HeLa cells transfected with Cx43 (HeLa-Cx43), LA induced phosphorylation of surface Cx43 at serine 373 (S373), site for Akt phosphorylation. HeLa-Cx43 but not HeLa-Cx43 cells with a S373A mutation showed a LA-induced Cx HC activity directly related to an increase in cell surface Cx43 levels. Thus, the increase in membrane permeability induced by LA is mediated by an intracellular signaling pathway activated by GPR40 that leads to an increase in membrane levels of Cx43 phosphorylated at serine 373 via Akt. PMID:26869446

  19. Structural frameworks for considering microbial protein and nucleic-acid dependent motor ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Nathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Many fundamental cellular processes depend on enzymes that utilize chemical energy to catalyze unfavourable reactions. Certain classes of ATPases provide a particularly vivid example of the process of energy conversion, employing cycles of nucleotide turnover to move and/or rearrange biological polymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. Four well characterized classes of ATP-dependent protein/nucleic acid translocases and remodelling factors are found in all three domains of life (bacteria, archaea, and eukarya): ASCE P-loop NTPases, GHL proteins, actin-fold enzymes, and chaperonins. These unrelated protein superfamilies have each evolved the ability to couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the generation of motion and force along or within their substrates. The past several years have witnessed the emergence of a wealth of structural data that help explain how such molecular engines couple nucleotide turnover to conformational change. In this review, we highlight several recent advances to illustrate some of the mechanisms by which each family of ATP-dependent motors facilitates the rearrangement and movement of proteins, protein complexes and nucleic acids. PMID:18647240

  20. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638980

  1. Retinoblastoma Protein Knockdown Favors Oxidative Metabolism and Glucose and Fatty Acid Disposal in Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Petar D; Ribot, Joan; López-Mejía, Isabel C; Fajas, Lluís; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Deficiency in the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) favors leanness and a healthy metabolic profile in mice largely attributed to activation of oxidative metabolism in white and brown adipose tissues. Less is known about Rb modulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. This was studied here by transiently knocking down Rb expression in differentiated C2C12 myotubes using small interfering RNAs. Compared with control cells transfected with non-targeting RNAs, myotubes silenced for Rb (by 80-90%) had increased expression of genes related to fatty acid uptake and oxidation such as Cd36 and Cpt1b (by 61% and 42%, respectively), increased Mitofusin 2 protein content (∼2.5-fold increase), increased mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio (by 48%), increased oxygen consumption (by 65%) and decreased intracellular lipid accumulation. Rb silenced myotubes also displayed up-regulated levels of glucose transporter type 4 expression (∼5-fold increase), increased basal glucose uptake, and enhanced insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, exercise in mice led to increased Rb phosphorylation (inactivation) in skeletal muscle as evidenced by immunohistochemistry analysis. In conclusion, the silencing of Rb enhances mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and fatty acid and glucose disposal in skeletal myotubes, and changes in Rb status may contribute to muscle physiological adaptation to exercise. PMID:26241807

  2. Detection of atherosclerotic lesions and intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current approaches to the diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis cannot target to lesion-determinant cells in the artery wall. Intimal macrophage infiltration promotes atherosclerotic lesion development by facilitating the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and increasing in...

  3. Increased Oral Detection, but Decreased Intestinal Signaling for Fats in Mice Lacking Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Duca, Frank A.; Swartz, Timothy D.; Sakar, Yassine; Covasa, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    Germ-free (GF) mice lacking intestinal microbiota are significantly leaner than normal (NORM) control mice despite consuming more calories. The contribution of microbiota on the recognition and intake of fats is not known. Thus, we investigated the preference for, and acceptance of, fat emulsions in GF and NORM mice, and associated changes in lingual and intestinal fatty acid receptors, intestinal peptide content, and plasma levels of gut peptides. GF and NORM C57Bl/6J mice were given 48-h two-bottle access to water and increasing concentrations of intralipid emulsions. Gene expression of the lingual fatty acid translocase CD36 and protein expression of intestinal satiety peptides and fatty-acid receptors from isolated intestinal epithelial cells were determined. Differences in intestinal enteroendocrine cells along the length of the GI tract were quantified. Circulating plasma satiety peptides reflecting adiposity and biochemical parameters of fat metabolism were also examined. GF mice had an increased preference and intake of intralipid relative to NORM mice. This was associated with increased lingual CD36 (P<0.05) and decreased intestinal expression of fatty acid receptors GPR40 (P<0.0001), GPR41 (P<0.0001), GPR43 (P<0.05), and GPR120 (P<0.0001) and satiety peptides CCK (P<0.0001), PYY (P<0.001), and GLP-1 (P<0.001). GF mice had fewer enteroendocrine cells in the ileum (P<0.05), and more in the colon (P<0.05), relative to NORM controls. Finally, GF mice had lower levels of circulating leptin and ghrelin (P<0.001), and altered plasma lipid metabolic markers indicative of energy deficits. Increased preference and caloric intake from fats in GF mice are associated with increased oral receptors for fats coupled with broad and marked decreases in expression of intestinal satiety peptides and fatty-acid receptors. PMID:22768116

  4. Resistance of Young Rat Hepatic Mitochondria to Bile Acid-Induced Permeability Transition: Potential Role of Alpha Tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Gumpricht, Eric; Devereaux, Michael W.; Dahl, Rolf; Soden, Jason S.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Leonard, Scott W.; Traber, Maret G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    Retention of bile acids within the liver is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of cholestatic liver disorders, which are more common in human infants. The objective of this study was to evaluate developmental changes in mitochondrial factors involved in bile acid-induced hepatocyte injury. Hepatic mitochondria from adult rats (aged 9 weeks) underwent a mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and release of cytochrome c upon exposure to glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). In contrast, mitochondria from young rats (age 6–36 days) were resistant to MPT induction and cytochrome c release. Neither mitochondrial levels of MPT-associated proteins (voltage-dependent anion channel, cyclophilin D, or adenine nucleotide translocase), Bcl-2 family proteins, nor antioxidant enzymes explained this resistance. Mitochondria from young rats contained 2–3-fold higher α-tocopherol (α-TH). In vivo α-TH enrichment of adult hepatic mitochondria increased their MPT resistance. Tetra-linoleoyl cardiolipin (TL-CL), the primary molecular species of cardiolipin (CL), was reduced in mitochondria of the young rat; however, enrichment with CL and TL-CL only modestly increased their MPT susceptibility. In conclusion, we observed an unexpected resistance in young rats to bile acid induction of mitochondrial cell death pathways, which may be related to developmental differences in membrane composition. PMID:18596569

  5. Plasma membrane phospholipase A2 controls hepatocellular fatty acid uptake and is responsive to pharmacological modulation: implications for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Wannhoff, Andreas; Pathil, Anita; Chamulitrat, Walee

    2014-07-01

    Excess hepatic fat accumulation leads to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a serious threat to health for which no effective treatment is available. However, the mechanism responsible for fatty acid uptake by hepatocytes remains unclear. Using the human hepatocyte-derived tumor cell line HepG2, we found that fatty acid influx is mediated by a heterotetrameric plasma membrane protein complex consisting of plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein, caveolin-1, CD36, and calcium-independent membrane phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β). Blocking iPLA2β with the bile acid-phospholipid conjugate ursodeoxycholate-lysophosphatidylethanolamide (UDCA-LPE) caused the dissociation of the complex, thereby inhibiting fatty acid influx (IC50 47 μM), and suppressed the synthesis of all subunits through a reduction in lysophosphatidylcholine from 8.0 to 3.5 μmol/mg of protein and corresponding depletion of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These findings were substantiated by an observed 56.5% decrease in fatty acid influx in isolated hepatocytes derived from iPLA2β-knockout mice. Moreover, steatosis and inflammation were abrogated by UDCA-LPE treatment in a cellular model of NASH. Thus, iPLA2β acts as an upstream checkpoint for mechanisms that regulate fatty acid uptake, and its inhibition by UDCA-LPE qualifies this nontoxic compound as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of NASH.-Stremmel, W., Staffer, S., Wannhoff, A., Pathil, A., Chamulitrat, W. Plasma membrane phospholipase A2 controls hepatocellular fatty acid uptake and is responsive to pharmacological modulation: implications for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:24719358

  6. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  7. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  8. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  9. Apolipoprotein D Transgenic Mice Develop Hepatic Steatosis through Activation of PPARγ and Fatty Acid Uptake.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Marilyne; Lalonde, Simon; Najyb, Ouafa; Thiery, Maxime; Daneault, Caroline; Des Rosiers, Chrisitne; Rassart, Eric; Mounier, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice (Tg) overexpressing human apolipoprotein D (H-apoD) in the brain are resistant to neurodegeneration. Despite the use of a neuron-specific promoter to generate the Tg mice, they expressed significant levels of H-apoD in both plasma and liver and they slowly develop hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. We show here that hepatic PPARγ expression in Tg mice is increased by 2-fold compared to wild type (WT) mice. Consequently, PPARγ target genes Plin2 and Cide A/C are overexpressed, leading to increased lipid droplets formation. Expression of the fatty acid transporter CD36, another PPARgamma target, is also increased in Tg mice associated with elevated fatty acid uptake as measured in primary hepatocytes. Elevated expression of AMPK in the liver of Tg leads to phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, indicating a decreased activity of the enzyme. Fatty acid synthase expression is also induced but the hepatic lipogenesis measured in vivo is not significantly different between WT and Tg mice. In addition, expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme of beta-oxidation, is slightly upregulated. Finally, we show that overexpressing H-apoD in HepG2 cells in presence of arachidonic acid (AA), the main apoD ligand, increases the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. Supporting the role of apoD in AA transport, we observed enrichment in hepatic AA and a decrease in plasmatic AA concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the hepatic steatosis observed in apoD Tg mice is a consequence of increased PPARγ transcriptional activity by AA leading to increased fatty acid uptake by the liver. PMID:26083030

  10. Arrhythmia causes lipid accumulation and reduced glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Lenski, Matthias; Schleider, Gregor; Kohlhaas, Michael; Adrian, Lucas; Adam, Oliver; Tian, Qinghai; Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter; Lehrke, Michael; Maack, Christoph; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is characterized by irregular contractions of atrial cardiomyocytes and increased energy demand. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of arrhythmia on glucose and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in cardiomyocytes, mice and human left atrial myocardium. Compared to regular pacing, irregular (pseudo-random variation at the same number of contractions/min) pacing of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes induced shorter action potential durations and effective refractory periods and increased diastolic [Ca(2+)]c. This was associated with the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Membrane expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and (14)C-palmitic acid uptake were augmented while membrane expression of glucose transporter subtype 4 (GLUT-4) as well as (3)H-glucose uptake were reduced. Inhibition of AMPK and CaMKII prevented these arrhythmia-induced metabolic changes. Similar alterations of FA metabolism were observed in a transgenic mouse model (RacET) for spontaneous AF. Consistent with these findings samples of left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to matched samples of patients with sinus rhythm showed up-regulation of CaMKII and AMPK and increased membrane expression of FAT/CD36, resulting in lipid accumulation. These changes of FA metabolism were accompanied by decreased membrane expression of GLUT-4, increased glycogen content and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein bax. Irregular pacing of cardiomyocytes increases diastolic [Ca(2+)]c and activation of CaMKII and AMPK resulting in lipid accumulation, reduced glucose uptake and increased glycogen synthesis. These metabolic changes are accompanied by an activation of pro-apoptotic signalling pathways. PMID:26018791

  11. Emodin ameliorates high-fat-diet induced insulin resistance in rats by reducing lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanni; Chang, Shufang; Dong, Jie; Zhu, Shenyin; Zheng, Xiaoying; Li, Juan; Long, Rui; Zhou, Yuanda; Cui, Jianyu; Zhang, Ye

    2016-06-01

    Emodin, an anthraquinone derivative isolated from root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum, has been reported to have promising anti-diabetic activity. The present study was to explore the possible mechanism of emodin to ameliorate insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was induced by feeding a high fat diet to Sprague-Dawley rats. The blood glucose and lipid profiles in serum were measured by an enzymatic method, and a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp was used to evaluate insulin resistance. L6 cells were cultured and treated with palmitic acid and emodin. The lipid content was assayed in the soleus muscle and L6 cells by Oil Red O staining. Western blot, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining were used to detect the following in the rat soleus muscle and L6 cells: protein levels, mRNA levels of FATP1, FATP4, transporter fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), and plasma membrane-associated fatty acid protein (FABPpm). We found that blood glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly decreased in the emodin group. Oil Red O staining and the level of TG in skeletal muscle and L6 cells confirmed that lipid deposition decreased after treatment with emodin. Furthermore, the protein levels and mRNA levels of FATP1 in skeletal muscle and in L6 cells of rats were significantly decreased, yet the protein levels and mRNA levels of FATP4, FAT/CD36 and FABPpm did not drop off significantly. The study suggest that emodin ameliorates insulin resistance by reducing FATP1-mediated skeletal muscle lipid accumulation in rats fed a high fat diet. PMID:27020550

  12. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  13. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  14. Thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP) promotes the synthesis of medium-chain fatty acids in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, D W; Luo, J; He, Q Y; Wu, M; Shi, H B; Wang, H; Wang, M; Xu, H F; Loor, J J

    2016-04-01

    In nonruminants, thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP) is a crucial protein for cellular de novo lipogenesis. However, the role of THRSP in regulating the synthesis of milk fatty acid composition in goat mammary gland remains unknown. In the present study, we compared gene expression of THRSP among different goat tissues. Results revealed that THRSP had the highest expression in subcutaneous fat, and expression was higher during lactation compared with the dry period. Overexpression of THRSP upregulated the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2), and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM) in goat mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, overexpression of THRSP led to downregulation of thrombospondin receptor (CD36) and had no effect on the expression of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α (ACACA) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor1 (SREBF1). In addition, overexpressing THRSP in vitro resulted in a significant increase in triacylglycerol (TAG) concentration and the concentrations of C12:0 and C14:0. Taken together, these results highlight an important role of THRSP in regulating lipogenesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26851858

  15. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  16. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  17. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  18. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  19. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  20. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  1. Medium-chain fatty acid reduces lipid accumulation by regulating expression of lipid-sensing genes in human liver cells with steatosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baogui; Fu, Jing; Li, Lumin; Gong, Deming; Wen, Xuefang; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Zheling

    2016-05-01

    Accumulation of lipids in the liver can lead to cell dysfunction and steatosis, an important factor in pathogenesis causing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The mechanisms related to lipid deposition in the liver, however, remain poorly understood. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) on the lipolysis and expression of lipid-sensing genes in human liver cells with steatosis. A cellular steatosis model, which is suitable to experimentally investigate the impact of fat accumulation in the liver, was established in human normal liver cells (LO2 cells) with a mixture of free fatty acids (oleate/palmitate, 2:1) at 200 μm for 24 h incubation. MCFA was found to down-regulate expression of liver X receptor-α, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, CD 36 and lipoprotein lipase in this cellular model, and have positive effects on adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. These results suggest that MCFA may reduce lipid accumulation by regulating key lipid-sensing genes in human liver cells with steatosis. PMID:26932533

  2. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD) Extension Study for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Triheptanoin Studies.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-26

    Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase (CPT I or CPT II) Deficiency; Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Long-chain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency; Carnitine-acylcarnitine Translocase (CACT) Deficiency

  3. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  4. Long-chain fatty acids act as protonophoric uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, P; Schild, L; Kunz, W

    1989-12-01

    The effect of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) on respiration and transmembrane potential (delta psi) in the resting state, and the rate of delta psi dissipation [d delta psi/dt)i) was investigated with oligomycin-inhibited rat liver mitochondria using succinate (plus rotenone) as substrate. The results obtained were compared with those of classical protonophores such as 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-2-trifluoromethylbenzimidazole (TTFB). The effects of oleate or palmitate and that of DNP or TTFB on respiration and delta psi can be described by a common force-flow relationship. These facts all in all are not compatible with a decoupler-type uncoupling mechanism of LCFA; still, they indicate that the latter are protonophores. Moreover, the oleate-induced increase in the rate of delta psi dissipation closely correlates with that in respiration, suggesting that the uncoupling activity and the protonophoric activity of LCFA are interrelated. Carboxyatractyloside (CAT) exerted only a small inhibitory effect on oleate-induced respiration and delta psi dissipation, indicating that the adenine nucleotide translocase contributes to the uncoupling effect of LCFA to a minor extent only. Proton transport through the lipid region of the membrane as mediated by permeation of the protonated and deprotonated forms of LCFA is interpreted as the main process of the uncoupling of LCFA. PMID:2556180

  5. Apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of all-trans retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, Monica; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Alana, Lide; Vinas, Octavi; Mampel, Teresa . E-mail: tmampel@ub.edu

    2006-06-10

    We examined the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) in HeLa cells. Our results demonstrated that HeLa cells were more sensitive to the anti-proliferative effects of atRA than to its apoptotic effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that caspase inhibition attenuates cell death but does not alter the atRA-dependent reduction in cell proliferation, which suggests that atRA-induced apoptosis is independent of the arrest in cell proliferation. To check whether ANT proteins mediated these atRA effects, we transiently transfected cells with expression vectors encoding for individual ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase 1-3). Our results revealed that ANT1 and ANT3 over-expressing HeLa cells increased their atRA sensitivity. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the different functional activities of ANT isoforms, but also contribute to a better understanding of the properties of atRA as an anti-tumoral agent used in cancer therapy.

  6. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  7. Magnolia Bioactive Constituent 4-O-Methylhonokiol Prevents the Impairment of Cardiac Insulin Signaling and the Cardiac Pathogenesis in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J.; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  8. Magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol prevents the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling and the cardiac pathogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  9. A Motif Unique to the Human Dead-Box Protein DDX3 Is Important for Nucleic Acid Binding, ATP Hydrolysis, RNA/DNA Unwinding and HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication. PMID:21589879

  10. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  11. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  13. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  14. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  15. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  16. From fatty-acid sensing to chylomicron synthesis: role of intestinal lipid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Buttet, Marjorie; Traynard, Véronique; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Besnard, Philippe; Poirier, Hélène; Niot, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Today, it is well established that the development of obesity and associated diseases results, in part, from excessive lipid intake associated with a qualitative imbalance. Among the organs involved in lipid homeostasis, the small intestine is the least studied even though it determines lipid bioavailability and largely contributes to the regulation of postprandial hyperlipemia (triacylglycerols (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA)). Several Lipid-Binding Proteins (LBP) are expressed in the small intestine. Their supposed intestinal functions were initially based on what was reported in other tissues, and took no account of the physiological specificity of the small intestine. Progressively, the identification of regulating factors of intestinal LBP and the description of the phenotype of their deletion have provided new insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in fat absorption. This review will discuss the physiological contribution of each LBP in the main steps of intestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA): uptake, trafficking and reassembly into chylomicrons (CM). Moreover, current data indicate that the small intestine is able to adapt its lipid absorption capacity to the fat content of the diet, especially through the coordinated induction of LBP. This adaptation requires the existence of a mechanism of intestinal lipid sensing. Emerging data suggest that the membrane LBP CD36 may operate as a lipid receptor that triggers an intracellular signal leading to the modulation of the expression of LBP involved in CM formation. This event could be the starting point for the optimized synthesis of large CM, which are efficiently degraded in blood. Better understanding of this intestinal lipid sensing might provide new approaches to decrease the prevalence of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:23958439

  17. Testosterone Replacement Modulates Cardiac Metabolic Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction by Upregulating PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of testosterone as a metabolic hormone, its effects on myocardial metabolism in the ischemic heart remain unclear. Myocardial ischemia leads to metabolic remodeling, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and cardiac dysfunction. In the present study, the effects of testosterone replacement on the ischemic heart were assessed in a castrated rat myocardial infarction model established by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery 2 weeks after castration. The results of real-time PCR and Western blot analyses showed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) decreased in the ischemic myocardium of castrated rats, compared with the sham-castration group, and the mRNA expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism (the fatty acid translocase CD36, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and glucose transporter-4 also decreased. A decline in ATP levels in the castrated rats was accompanied by increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrosis and impaired cardiac function, compared with the sham-castration group, and these detrimental effects were reversed by testosterone replacement. Taken together, our findings suggest that testosterone can modulate myocardial metabolic remodeling by upregulating PPARα after myocardial infarction, exerting a protective effect on cardiac function. PMID:27413362

  18. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  19. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood vessel to keep it open. Bipolar disorder. Taking folic acid does not appear to improve the antidepressant effects of lithium in people with bipolar disorder. However, taking folate with the medication valproate improves ...

  20. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  1. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  2. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  3. Carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. PMID:25639596

  4. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Amicar® Oral Solution ... Aminocaproic acid comes as a tablet and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  5. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  6. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  7. Differences in growth, fillet quality, and fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression between juvenile male and female rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Manor, Meghan L; Cleveland, Beth M; Kenney, P Brett; Yao, Jianbo; Leeds, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Sexual maturation occurs at the expense of stored energy and nutrients, including lipids; however, little is known regarding sex effects on nutrient regulatory mechanisms in rainbow trout prior to maturity. Thirty-two, 14-month-old, male and female rainbow trout were sampled for growth, carcass yield, fillet composition, and gene expression of liver, white muscle, and visceral adipose tissue. Growth parameters, including gonadosomatic index, were not affected by sex. Females had higher percent separable muscle yield, but there were no sex effects on fillet proximate composition. Fillet shear force indicated females produce firmer fillets than males. Male livers had greater expression of three cofactors within the mTOR signaling pathway that act to inhibit TORC1 assembly; mo25, rictor, and pras40. Male liver also exhibited increased expression of β-oxidation genes cpt1b and ehhadh. These findings are indicative of increased mitochondrial β-oxidation in male liver. Females exhibited increased expression of the mTOR cofactor raptor in white muscle and had higher expression levels of several genes within the fatty acid synthesis pathway, including gpat, srebp1, scd1, and cd36. Female muscle also had increased expression of β-oxidation genes cpt1d and cpt2. Increased expression of both fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation genes suggests female muscle may have greater fatty acid turnover. Differences between sexes were primarily associated with variation of gene expression within the mTOR signaling pathway. Overall, data suggest there is differential regulation of gene expression in male and female rainbow trout tissues prior to the onset of sexual maturity that may lead to nutrient repartitioning during maturation. PMID:25673423

  8. Abolition of mitochondrial substrate-level phosphorylation by itaconic acid produced by LPS-induced Irg1 expression in cells of murine macrophage lineage.

    PubMed

    Németh, Beáta; Doczi, Judit; Csete, Dániel; Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Adams, Daniel; Kiss, Gergely; Nagy, Adam M; Horvath, Gergo; Tretter, Laszlo; Mócsai, Attila; Csépányi-Kömi, Roland; Iordanov, Iordan; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Itaconate is a nonamino organic acid exhibiting antimicrobial effects. It has been recently identified in cells of macrophage lineage as a product of an enzyme encoded by immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1), acting on the citric acid cycle intermediate cis-aconitate. In mitochondria, itaconate can be converted by succinate-coenzyme A (CoA) ligase to itaconyl-CoA at the expense of ATP (or GTP), and is also a weak competitive inhibitor of complex II. Here, we investigated specific bioenergetic effects of increased itaconate production mediated by LPS-induced stimulation of Irg1 in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and RAW-264.7 cells. In rotenone-treated macrophage cells, stimulation by LPS led to impairment in substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) of in situ mitochondria, deduced by a reversal in the directionality of the adenine nucleotide translocase operation. In RAW-264.7 cells, the LPS-induced impairment in SLP was reversed by short-interfering RNA(siRNA)-but not scrambled siRNA-treatment directed against Irg1. LPS dose-dependently inhibited oxygen consumption rates (61-91%) and elevated glycolysis rates (>21%) in BMDM but not RAW-264.7 cells, studied under various metabolic conditions. In isolated mouse liver mitochondria treated with rotenone, itaconate dose-dependently (0.5-2 mM) reversed the operation of adenine nucleotide translocase, implying impairment in SLP, an effect that was partially mimicked by malonate. However, malonate yielded greater ADP-induced depolarizations (3-19%) than itaconate. We postulate that itaconate abolishes SLP due to 1) a "CoA trap" in the form of itaconyl-CoA that negatively affects the upstream supply of succinyl-CoA from the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; 2) depletion of ATP (or GTP), which are required for the thioesterification by succinate-CoA ligase; and 3) inhibition of complex II leading to a buildup of succinate which shifts succinate-CoA ligase equilibrium toward ATP (or GTP) utilization. Our results

  9. Glycyrrhetinic acid as inhibitor or amplifier of permeability transition in rat heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Valentina; Brunati, Anna Maria; Fiore, Cristina; Rossi, Carlo Alberto; Salvi, Mauro; Tibaldi, Elena; Palermo, Mario; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GE), a hydrolysis product of glycyrrhizic acid, one of the main constituents of licorice root, is able, depending on its concentration, to prevent or to induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) (a phenomenon related to oxidative stress) in rat heart mitochondria (RHM). In RHM, below a threshold concentration of 7.5 microM, GE prevents oxidative stress and MPT induced by supraphysiological Ca2+ concentrations. Above this concentration, GE induces oxidative stress by interacting with a Fe-S centre of Complex I, thus producing ROS, and amplifies the opening of the transition pore, once again induced by Ca2+. GE also inhibits Ca2+ transport in RHM, thereby preventing the oxidative stress induced by the cation. However, the reduced amount of Ca2+ transported in the matrix is sufficient to predispose adenine nucleotide translocase for pore opening. Comparisons between observed results and the effects of GE in rat liver mitochondria (RLM), in which the drug induces only MPT without exhibiting any protective effect, confirm that it interacts in a different way with RHM, suggesting tissue specificity for its action. The concentration dependence of the opposite effects of GE, in RHM but not RLM, is most probably due to the existence of a different, more complex, pathway by means of which GE reaches its target. It follows that high GE concentrations are necessary to stimulate the oxidative stress capable of inducing MPT, because of the above effect, which prevents the interaction of low concentrations of GE with the Fe-S centre. The reported results also explain the mechanism of apoptosis induction by GE in cardiomyocytes. PMID:17980701

  10. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  11. Extract of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) stimulates 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jeong In; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yun, Jong Won

    2010-11-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has long been used as a folk medicine due to its numerous biological functions such as antibacterial, antiallergic, antiinflammatory and antioxidative activities. In the present study, it was found that the I. obliquus hot water extract (IOWE) activated adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Even in the absence of adipogenic stimuli by insulin, the IOWE strongly induced adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The major constituent of IOWE was glucose-rich polysaccharides with a molecular mass of 149  kDa. IOWE enhanced the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, increasing TG (triacylglycerol) accumulation that is critical for acquisition of the adipocyte phenotype, in a dose-dependent manner. IOWE stimulated gene expression of C/EBPα (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α) and PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ) during adipocyte differentiation, and induced the expression of PPARγ target genes such as aP2 (adipocyte protein 2), LPL (lipoprotein lipase) and CD36 (fatty acid translocase). Immunoblot analysis revealed that IOWE increased the expression of adipogenic makers such as PPARγ and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4). The luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that IOWE did not exhibit PPARγ ligand activity. Although these results require further investigation, the ability of natural mushroom product to increase PPARγ transcriptional activities may be expected to be therapeutic targets for dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21031614

  12. Dietary sunflower oil modulates milk fatty acid composition without major changes in adipose and mammary tissue fatty acid profile or related gene mRNA abundance in sheep.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carrera, T; Frutos, P; Leroux, C; Chilliard, Y; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bernard, L; Toral, P G

    2015-04-01

    There are very few studies in ruminants characterizing mammary and adipose tissue (AT) expression of genes and gene networks for diets causing variations in milk fatty acid (FA) composition without altering milk fat secretion, and even less complementing this information with data on tissue FA profiles. This work was conducted in sheep in order to investigate the response of the mammary gland and the subcutaneous and perirenal AT, in terms of FA profile and mRNA abundance of genes involved in lipid metabolism, to a diet known to modify milk FA composition. Ten lactating Assaf ewes were randomly assigned to two treatments consisting of a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (60 : 40) supplemented with 0 (control diet) or 25 (SO diet) g of sunflower oil/kg of diet dry matter for 7 weeks. Milk composition, including FA profile, was analysed after 48 days on treatments. On day 49, the animals were euthanized and tissue samples were collected to analyse FA and mRNA abundance of 16 candidate genes. Feeding SO did not affect animal performance but modified milk FA composition. Major changes included decreases in the concentration of FA derived from de novo synthesis (e.g. 12:0, 14:0 and 16:0) and increases in that of long-chain FA (e.g. 18:0, c9-18:1, trans-18:1 isomers and c9,t11-CLA); however, they were not accompanied by significant variations in the mRNA abundance of the studied lipogenic genes (i.e. ACACA, FASN, LPL, CD36, FABP3, SCD1 and SCD5) and transcription factors (SREBF1 and PPARG), or in the constituent FA of mammary tissue. Regarding the FA composition of AT, the little influence of SO did not appear to be linked to changes in gene mRNA abundance (decreases of GPAM and SREBF1 in both tissues, and of PPARG in the subcutaneous depot). Similarly, the great variation between AT (higher contents of saturated FA and trans-18:1 isomers in the perirenal, and of cis-18:1, c9,t11-CLA and n-3 PUFA in the subcutaneous AT) could not be related to

  13. Altered Fatty Acid Metabolism-Related Gene Expression in Liver from Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Porras, José Antonio; Aragonès, Gemma; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis and the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to evaluate gene expression of different fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes in morbidly obese (MO) women with NAFLD. Liver expression of key genes related to de novo FA synthesis (LXRα, SREBP1c, ACC1, FAS), FA uptake and transport (PPARγ, CD36, FABP4), FA oxidation (PPARα), and inflammation (IL6, TNFα, CRP, PPARδ) were assessed by RT-qPCR in 127 MO women with normal liver histology (NL, n = 13), simple steatosis (SS, n = 47) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 67). Liver FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MO NAFLD women with both SS and NASH compared to those with NL (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, respectively). Hepatic IL6 and TNFα mRNA expression was higher in NASH than in SS subjects (p = 0.033, p = 0.050, respectively). Interestingly, LXRα, ACC1 and FAS expression had an inverse relation with the grade of steatosis. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. In conclusion, our results indicate that lipogenesis seems to be downregulated in advanced stages of SS, suggesting that, in this type of extreme obesity, the deregulation of the lipogenic pathway might be associated with the severity of steatosis. PMID:25474087

  14. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side ... to blood clots (ischemic stroke). Inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome.Taking folic acid by mouth does not improve ...

  15. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  16. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  17. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  18. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  19. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  20. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  1. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  3. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  5. Gene expression of fatty acid transport and binding proteins in the blood-brain barrier and the cerebral cortex of the rat: differences across development and with different DHA brain status.

    PubMed

    Pélerin, Hélène; Jouin, Mélanie; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen C; Langelier, Bénédicte; Guesnet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Specific mechanisms for maintaining docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration in brain cells but also transporting DHA from the blood across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are not agreed upon. Our main objective was therefore to evaluate the level of gene expression of fatty acid transport and fatty acid binding proteins in the cerebral cortex and at the BBB level during the perinatal period of active brain DHA accretion, at weaning, and until the adult age. We measured by real time RT-PCR the mRNA expression of different isoforms of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) and the fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 in cerebral cortex and isolated microvessels at embryonic day 18 (E18) and postnatal days 14, 21 and 60 (P14, P21 and P60, respectively) in rats receiving different n-3 PUFA dietary supplies (control, totally deficient or DHA-supplemented). In control rats, all the genes were expressed at the BBB level (P14 to P60), the mRNA levels of FABP5 and ACSL3 having the highest values. Age-dependent differences included a systematic decrease in the mRNA expressions between P14-P21 and P60 (2 to 3-fold), with FABP7 mRNA abundance being the most affected (10-fold). In the cerebral cortex, mRNA levels varied differently since FATP4, ACSL3 and ACSL6 and the three FABPs genes were highly expressed. There were no significant differences in the expression of the 10 genes studied in n-3 deficient or DHA-supplemented rats despite significant differences in their brain DHA content, suggesting that brain DHA uptake from the blood does not necessarily require specific transporters within cerebral endothelial cells and could, under these experimental conditions, be a simple passive diffusion process. PMID:25123062

  6. JNK deficiency enhances fatty acid utilization and diverts glucose from oxidation to glycogen storage in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Vijayvargia, Ravi; Mann, Kara; Weiss, Harvey R; Pownall, Henry J; Ruan, Hong

    2010-09-01

    Although germ-line deletion of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) improves overall insulin sensitivity in mice, those studies could not reveal the underlying molecular mechanism and the tissue site(s) in which reduced JNK activity elicits the observed phenotype. Given its importance in nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and glucose utilization, we hypothesized that the insulin-sensitive phenotype associated with Jnk deletion originates from loss of JNK function in skeletal muscle. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene silencing was used to identify the functions of JNK subtypes in regulating energy metabolism and metabolic responses to elevated concentrations of NEFA in C2C12 myotubes, a cellular model of skeletal muscle. We show for the first time that cellular JNK2- and JNK1/JNK2-deficiency divert glucose from oxidation to glycogenesis due to increased glycogen synthase (GS) activity and induction of Pdk4. We further show that JNK2- and JNK1/JNK2-deficiency profoundly increase cellular NEFA oxidation, and their conversion to phospholipids and triglyceride. The increased NEFA utilization was coupled to increased expressions of selective NEFA handling genes including Cd36, Acsl4, and Chka, and enhanced palmitic acid (PA)-dependent suppression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc). In JNK-intact cells, PA inhibited insulin signaling and glycogenesis. Although silencing Jnk1 and/or Jnk2 prevented PA-induced inhibition of insulin signaling, it did not completely block decreased insulin-mediated glycogenesis, thus indicating JNK-independent pathways in the suppression of glycogenesis by PA. Muscle-specific inhibition of JNK2 (or total JNK) improves the capacity of NEFA utilization and glycogenesis, and is a potential therapeutic target for improving systemic insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:20094041

  7. The Structure of LepA, the Ribosomal Back Translocase

    SciTech Connect

    Evans,R.; Blaha, G.; Bailey, S.; Steitz, T.

    2008-01-01

    LepA is a highly conserved elongation factor that promotes the back translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome during the elongation cycle. We have determined the crystal structure of LepA from Escherichia coli at 2.8- Angstroms resolution. The high degree of sequence identity between LepA and EF-G is reflected in the structural similarity between the individual homologous domains of LepA and EF-G. However, the orientation of domains III and V in LepA differs from their orientations in EF-G. LepA also contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) not found in EF-G that has a previously unobserved protein fold. The high structural similarity between LepA and EF-G enabled us to derive a homology model for LepA bound to the ribosome using a 7.3- Angstroms cryo-EM structure of a complex between EF-G and the 70S ribosome. In this model, the very electrostatically positive CTD of LepA is placed in the direct vicinity of the A site of the large ribosomal subunit, suggesting a possible interaction between the CTD and the back translocated tRNA or 23S rRNA.

  8. Initial assembly steps of a translocase for folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blümmel, Anne-Sophie; Haag, Laura A.; Eimer, Ekaterina; Müller, Matthias; Fröbel, Julia

    2015-01-01

    The so-called Tat (twin-arginine translocation) system transports completely folded proteins across cellular membranes of archaea, prokaryotes and plant chloroplasts. Tat-directed proteins are distinguished by a conserved twin-arginine (RR-) motif in their signal sequences. Many Tat systems are based on the membrane proteins TatA, TatB and TatC, of which TatB and TatC are known to cooperate in binding RR-signal peptides and to form higher-order oligomeric structures. We have now elucidated the fine architecture of TatBC oligomers assembled to form closed intramembrane substrate-binding cavities. The identification of distinct homonymous and heteronymous contacts between TatB and TatC suggest that TatB monomers coalesce into dome-like TatB structures that are surrounded by outer rings of TatC monomers. We also show that these TatBC complexes are approached by TatA protomers through their N-termini, which thereby establish contacts with TatB and membrane-inserted RR-precursors. PMID:26068441

  9. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Frauke; Sokolova, Lucie; Lintzel, Julia; Brutschy, Bernhard; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  10. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, substrate transporter translocation, and metabolism in the contracting hyperthyroid rat heart.

    PubMed

    Heather, Lisa C; Cole, Mark A; Atherton, Helen J; Coumans, Will A; Evans, Rhys D; Tyler, Damian J; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Clarke, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones can modify cardiac metabolism via multiple molecular mechanisms, yet their integrated effect on overall substrate metabolism is poorly understood. Here we determined the effect of hyperthyroidism on substrate metabolism in the isolated, perfused, contracting rat heart. Male Wistar rats were injected for 7 d with T(3) (0.2 mg/kg x d ip). Plasma free fatty acids increased by 97%, heart weights increased by 33%, and cardiac rate pressure product, an indicator of contractile function, increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic rates and lactate efflux rates were increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rat hearts, mediated by an increased insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. This was accompanied by a 70% increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and a 100% increase in phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, confirming downstream signaling from AMPK. Fatty acid oxidation rates increased in direct proportion to the increased heart weight and rate pressure product in the hyperthyroid heart, mediated by synchronized changes in mitochondrial enzymes and respiration. Protein levels of the fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), were reduced by 24% but were accompanied by a 19% increase in the sarcolemmal content of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). Thus, the relationship between fatty acid metabolism, cardiac mass, and contractile function was maintained in the hyperthyroid heart, associated with a sarcolemmal reorganization of fatty acid transporters. The combined effects of T(3)-induced AMPK activation and insulin stimulation were associated with increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 localization and glycolytic flux in the hyperthyroid heart. PMID:19940039

  11. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA during IVM affected oocyte developmental competence in cattle.

    PubMed

    Oseikria, Mouhamad; Elis, Sébastien; Maillard, Virginie; Corbin, Emilie; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2016-06-01

    The positive effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) on fertility in ruminants seems to be partly mediated through direct effects on the oocyte developmental potential. We aimed to investigate whether supplementation with physiological levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) during IVM has an effect on oocyte maturation and in vitro embryo development in cattle. We reported that DHA (0, 1, 10, or 100 μM) had no effect on oocyte viability or maturation rate after 22-hour IVM. Incubation of oocyte-cumulus complexes with 1-μM DHA during IVM significantly increased (P < 0.05) oocyte cleavage rate as compared with control (86.1% vs. 78.8%, respectively) and the greater than 4-cell embryo rate at Day 2 after parthenogenetic activation (39.1% vs. 29.7%, respectively). Supplementation with 1 μM DHA during IVM also induced a significant increase in the blastocyst rate at Day 7 after IVF as compared with control (30.6% vs. 17.6%, respectively) and tended to increase the number of cells in the blastocysts (97.1 ± 4.9 vs. 81.2 ± 5.3, respectively; P = 0.08). On the contrary, 10-μM DHA had no effects, whereas 100-μM DHA significantly decreased the cleavage rate compared with control (69.5% vs.78.8%, respectively) and the greater than 4-cell embryo rate at Day 2 after parthenogenetic activation (19.5% vs. 29.7%). As was shown by real-time polymerase chain reaction, negative effects of 100-μM DHA were associated with significant increase of progesterone synthesis by oocyte-cumulus complexes, a three-fold increase in expression level of FA transporter CD36 and a two-fold decrease of FA synthase FASN genes in cumulus cells (CCs) of corresponding oocytes. Docosahexaenoic acid at 1 and 10 μM had no effect on expression of those and other key lipid metabolism-related genes in CC. In conclusion, administration of a low physiological dose of DHA (1 μM) during IVM may have beneficial effects on oocyte developmental

  12. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  13. Heat stress enhances adipogenic differentiation of subcutaneous fat depot-derived porcine stromovascular cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, H; Donkin, S S; Ajuwon, K M

    2015-08-01

    Heat stress (HS) results from excessive heat load on animals such that all adaptive mechanisms used to dissipate the heat do not return the body to normal body temperature. In pigs, HS results in increased fat deposition compared with pair-fed animals in a thermoneutral environment. Although there is evidence that HS increases activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in adipose tissue of heat stressed pigs, the fundamental causes of the increased adiposity are still unknown. It remains unclear whether HS directly alters metabolism in adipocytes. Therefore, to understand the mechanism of HS effects on porcine adipocytes, we used an in vitro adipocyte differentiation model to characterize cellular responses that occur during differentiation of pig adipocytes. Preadipocytes (stromovascular cells) were differentiated for 9 d at a normal (37°C) or HS (41.5°C) temperature under 5% CO. Expressions of HS genes such as heat shock proteins (HSP; HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90), adipogenic markers peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins α (C/EBPα), fatty acid synthase (FAS), adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), fatty acid translocase 36 (CD36), fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4), fatty acid transport protein 6 (FATP6), LPL, glucose transporter protein type 4 (GLUT4), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1 or PEPCK-C), and glycerol kinase (GK) and adipokines (adiponectin and leptin) were determined by real-time-PCR and immunoblotting or ELISA. Cellular triglyceride (TAG) and ATP concentrations were also determined. As expected, HS increased ( < 0.05) the expressions of HSP genes. There was no HS treatment effect on the level of PPARγ, although C/EBPα was induced ( < 0.05) in HS. So it remains unclear whether HS affects adipocyte differentiation. However, HS leads to increased expressions of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and TAG synthesis (FAS, aP2, CD36, FATP4, FATP6, LPL, GLUT4, PCK1, and GK). This is supported by increased

  14. Summer-to-Winter Phenotypic Flexibility of Fatty Acid Transport and Catabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Heart of Small Birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Swanson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged shivering in birds is mainly fueled by lipids. Consequently, lipid transport and catabolism are vital for thermogenic performance and could be upregulated along with thermogenic capacity as part of the winter phenotype. We investigated summer-to-winter variation in lipid transport and catabolism by measuring mRNA expression, protein levels, and enzyme activities for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolic pathways in pectoralis muscle and heart in two small temperate-zone resident birds, American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Cytosolic fatty acid binding protein (FABPc; a key component of intramyocyte lipid transport) mRNA and/or protein levels were generally higher in winter for pectoralis muscle and heart for both species. However, seasonal variation in plasma membrane lipid transporters, fatty acyl translocase, and plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein in pectoralis and heart differed between the two species, with winter increases for chickadees and seasonal stability or summer increases for goldfinches. Catabolic enzyme activities generally showed limited seasonal differences for both tissues and both species. These data suggest that FABPc is an important target of upregulation for the winter phenotype in pectoralis and heart of both species. Plasma membrane lipid transporters and lipid catabolic capacity were also elevated in winter for chickadees but not for goldfinches. Because the two species show differential regulation of distinct aspects of lipid transport and catabolism, these data are consistent with other recent studies documenting that different bird species or populations employ a variety of strategies to promote elevated winter thermogenic capacity. PMID:26658250

  15. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  16. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  17. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  18. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the blood. ... Methylmalonic acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ...

  19. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  20. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  1. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  2. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  3. Sex and depot differences in ex vivo adipose tissue fatty acid storage and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Chen, Liang; Oberschneider, Elisabeth; Harteneck, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue fatty acid storage varies according to sex, adipose tissue depot, and degree of fat gain. However, the mechanism(s) for these variations is not completely understood. We examined whether differences in adipose tissue glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) might play a role in these variations. We optimized an enzyme activity assay for total GPAT and GPAT1 activity in human adipose tissue and measured GPAT activity. Omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue was collected from obese and nonobese adults for measures of GPAT and GPAT1 activities, ex vivo palmitate storage, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) and diacylglycerol-acyltransferase (DGAT) activities, and CD36 protein. Total GPAT and GPAT1 activities decreased as a function of adipocyte size in both omental (r = −0.71, P = 0.003) and subcutaneous (r = −0.58, P = 0.04) fat. The relative contribution of GPAT1 to total GPAT activity increased as a function of adipocyte size, accounting for up to 60% of GPAT activity in those with the largest adipocytes. We found strong, positive correlations between ACS, GPAT, and DGAT activities for both sexes and depots (r values 0.58–0.91) and between these storage factors and palmitate storage rates into TAG (r values 0.55–0.90). We conclude that: 1) total GPAT activity decreases as a function of adipocyte size; 2) GPAT1 can account for over half of adipose GPAT activity in hypertrophic obesity; and 3) ACS, GPAT, and DGAT are coordinately regulated. PMID:25738782

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ravacci, Graziela Rosa; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Tortelli, Tharcisio Citrângulo; Torrinhas, Raquel Suzana M. M.; Santos, Jéssica Reis; Logullo, Angela Flávia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic genes involved in uptake (CD36), transport (FABP4), and storage (DGAT) of exogenous fatty acids (FA), as well as increased activation of “de novo” FA synthesis (FASN). We further investigate whether this lipogenesis reprogramming might be regulated by mTOR/PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway markers, p70S6 K1, SREBP1, and LIPIN1, as well as an increase in DEPTOR expression (the main inhibitor of the mTOR) was detected in HB4aC5.2. Based on these results, a PPARγ selective antagonist, GW9662, was used to treat both cells lines, and the lipogenic genes remained overexpressed in the HB4aC5.2 but not HB4a cells. DHA treatment inhibited all lipogenic genes (except for FABP4) in both cell lines yet only induced death in the HB4aC5.2 cells, mainly when associated with trastuzumab. Neither trastuzumab nor GW9662 alone was able to induce cell death. In conclusion, oncogenic transformation of breast cells by HER2 overexpression may require a reprogramming of lipogenic genetic that is independent of mTORC1 pathway and PPARγ activity. This reprogramming was inhibited by DHA. PMID:26640797

  5. GPR40 and GPR120 fatty acid sensors are critical for postoral but not oral mediation of fat preferences in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2013-12-15

    In addition to orosensory signals, postoral actions of fat stimulate appetite and condition flavor preferences, but the gut sensors mediating these responses are unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the fatty acid sensors GPR40 and GPR120 in postoral and oral preferences for a soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid). Mice were trained to drink a flavored solution (CS+) paired with intragastric (IG) oil infusions and another flavored solution (CS-) paired with water infusions. Knockout (KO) mice missing GPR40 or GPR120 sensors increased their CS+ intake in one-bottle tests (1 h/day) but less so than wild-type (WT) mice. The KO mice also preferred the CS+ to CS- in a two-bottle test, but the preference was attenuated in GPR40 KO mice. Double-knockout (DoKO) mice missing both GPR40 and GPR120 displayed attenuated stimulation of CS+ intake and only a marginal CS+ preference. The DoKO mice developed a more substantial CS+ preference when tested 24 h/day, although weaker than that of WT mice. The DoKO mice also consumed less of the CS+ paired with IG Intralipid, as well as less Intralipid in oral tests. However, DoKO mice, like GPR40 KO and GPR120 KO mice did not differ from WT mice in their preference for Intralipid over water at 0.001%-20% concentrations. In contrast to prior results obtained with mice missing the CD36 fatty acid sensor, these findings indicate that, together, GPR40 and GPR120 play a critical role in the postoral stimulation of appetite by fat but are not essential for oral fat preferences. PMID:24154510

  6. Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Microbial enzymes convert fatty acids to mono-, di-, and trihydroxy fatty acid products. Among them, Bacillus megaterium ALA2 converted n-6 and n-3 PUFAs to many new oxygenated fatty acids. Linoleic acid was ...

  7. Effect of the ratios of unsaturated fatty acids on the expressions of genes related to fat and protein in the bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, R; Yan, S M; Qi, L Z; Zhao, Y L

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the different ratios of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) (oleic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid) on the cell viability and triacylglycerol (TAG) content, as well as the mRNA expression of the genes related to lipid and protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). Primary cells were isolated from the mammary glands of Holstein dairy cows and were passaged twice. Afterward, the cells were randomly allocated to six treatments, five UFA-treated groups, and one control group. For all of the treatments, the the fetal bovine serum in the culture solution was replaced with fatty acid-free BSA (1 g/L), and the cells were treated with different ratios of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids (0.75:4:1, 1.5:10:1, 2:13.3:1, 3:20:1, and 4:26.7:1) for 48 h, which were group 1 to group 5. The control culture solution contained only fatty acid-free BSA without UFAs (0 μM). The results indicated that the cell viability was not affected by adding different ratios of UFAs, but the accumulation of TAG was significantly influenced by supplementing with different ratios of UFAs. Adding different ratios of UFAs suppressed the expression of ACACA and FASN but had the opposite effect on the abundances of FABP3 and CD36 mRNA. The expression levels of PPARG, SPEBF1, CSN1S1, and CSN3 mRNA in the BMECs were affected significantly after adding different ratios of UFAs. Our results suggested that groups 1, 2, and 3 (0.75:4:1, 1.5:10:1, and 2:13.3:1) had stronger auxo-action on fat synthesis in the BMECs, where group 3 (2:13.3:1) was the best, followed by group 4 (3:20:1). However, group 5 (4:26.7:1) was the worst. Genes related to protein synthesis in the BMECs were better promoted in groups 2 and 3, and group 3 had the strongest auxo-action, whereas the present study only partly examined the regulation of protein synthesis at the transcriptional level; more studies on translation level are needed in the future

  8. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  9. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  10. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  11. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  12. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  13. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  14. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  15. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  16. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  17. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  18. Dietary fatty acid composition changes mitochondrial phospholipids and oxidative capacities in rainbow trout red muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Kraffe, E; Bureau, W; Bureau, D P

    2008-03-01

    Dietary conditioning of juvenile trout changed the acyl chain composition of mitochondrial phospholipids and the oxidative capacities of muscle mitochondria. Trout were fed three diets differing only in fatty acid (FA) composition. The highly unsaturated 22:6 n-3 (DHA) accounted for 0.4, 14, and 30% of fatty acids in Diets 1, 2 and 3. After 10 weeks of growth, the dietary groups differed markedly in FA composition of mitochondrial phospholipids, with significant dietary effects for virtually all FA. Mean mitochondrial DHA levels were 19, 40 and 33% in trout fed Diets 1, 2 and 3. Mitochondrial oxidative capacities changed with diet, while mitochondrial concentrations of cytochromes and of the adenylate nucleotide translocase (nmol mg(1) protein) did not. Mitochondria from fish fed Diet 1 had higher non-phosphorylating (state 4) rates at 5 degrees C than those fed other diets. When phosphorylating (state 3) rates differed between dietary groups, rates at 5 and 15 degrees C were higher for fish fed the more unsaturated diets. Stepwise multiple regressions indicated that FA composition could explain much (42-70%) of the variability of state 4 rates, particularly at 5 degrees C. At 15 degrees C, FA composition explained 16-42% of the variability of states 3 and 4 rates. Similar conclusions were obtained for the complete data set (trout fed diets 1, 2 and 3) and for the data from trout achieving similar growth rates (e.g. those fed Diets 1 and 2). Neither general characteristics of membrane FA, such as % saturates, unsaturation index, n-3, n-6 or n-3/n-6 nor levels of abundant unsaturated FA such as DHA or 18:1(n-9 + n-7), were systematically correlated with mitochondrial capacities even though they differed considerably between trout fed the different diets. Relatively minor FA (20:5n-3, 20:0, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 18:0 and 15:0) showed better correlations with mitochondrial oxidative capacities. This supports the concept that acyl chain composition modulates mitochondrial

  19. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  20. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  1. Differential regulation of the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes with skeletal muscle type in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kimura, Sayaka; Kitashiro, Ayana; Tsuchii, Nami; Tsuchihashi, Tatsuya; Inui, Mariko; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The regulatory mechanisms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are known to differ among skeletal muscle types in mammals. For example, glycolytic muscles prefer glucose as an energy source, whereas oxidative muscles prefer fatty acids (FA). We herein demonstrated differences in the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the pectoralis major (a glycolytic twitch muscle), adductor superficialis (an oxidative twitch muscle), and adductor profound (a tonic muscle) of 14-day-old chicks. Under ad libitum feeding conditions, the mRNA levels of muscle type phosphofructokinase-1 were markedly lower in the adductor superficialis muscle, suggesting that basal glycolytic activity is very low in this type of muscle. In contrast, high mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36) in the adductor superficialis muscle suggest that FA uptake is high in this type of muscle. The mRNA levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) were significantly higher in the adductor profound muscle than in other muscles, suggesting that basal lipolytic activity is high in this type of muscle. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ and CPT1b were significantly increased in the adductor superficialis muscle, but not in other muscles, after 24h of fasting. Therefore, the availability of FA in the oxidative twitch muscles in growing chickens appears to be upregulated by fasting. Our results suggest that lipid metabolism-related genes are upregulated under both basal and fasting conditions in the adductor superficialis in growing chickens. PMID:26188321

  2. Hepatic PPARγ Is Not Essential for the Rapid Development of Steatosis After Loss of Hepatic GH Signaling, in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Kineman, Rhonda D; Majumdar, Neena; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose

    2016-05-01

    Our group has previously reported de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and hepatic triglyceride content increases in chow-fed male mice within 7 days of hepatocyte-specific GH receptor knockdown (aLivGHRkd). Here, we report that these changes are associated with an increase in hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), consistent with previous reports showing steatosis is associated with an increase in PPARγ expression in mice with congenital loss of hepatic GH signaling. PPARγ is thought to be an important driver of steatosis by enhancing DNL, as well as increasing the uptake and esterification of extrahepatic fatty acids (FAs). In order to determine whether hepatic PPARγ is critical for the rapid development of steatosis in the aLivGHRkd mouse model, we have generated aLivGHRkd mice, with or without PPARγ (ie, adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific double knockout of GHR and PPARγ). Hepatic PPARγ was not required for the rapid increase in liver triglyceride content or FA indexes of DNL (16:0/18:2 and 16:1/16:0). However, loss of hepatic PPARγ blunted the rise in fatty acid translocase/CD36 and monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 expression induced by aLivGHRkd, and this was associated with a reduction in the hepatic content of 18:2. These results suggest that the major role of PPARγ is to enhance pathways critical in uptake and reesterification of extrahepatic FA. Because FAs have been reported to directly increase PPARγ expression, we speculate that in the aLivGHRkd mouse, the FA produced by DNL enhances the expression of PPARγ, which in turn increases extrahepatic FA uptake, thereby further enhancing PPARγ activity and exacerbating steatosis overtime. PMID:26950202

  3. Enhanced expression of Nrf2 in mice attenuates the fatty liver produced by a methionine- and choline-deficient diet☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as an important promoter of the progression of fatty liver diseases. The current study investigates the potential functions of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway, an important hepatic oxidative stress sensor, in a rodent fatty liver model. Mice with no (Nrf2-null), normal (wild type, WT), and enhanced (Keap1 knockdown, K1-kd) expression of Nrf2 were fed a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet or a control diet for 5 days. Compared to WT mice, the MCD diet-caused hepatosteatosis was more severe in the Nrf2-null mice and less in the K1-kd mice. The Nrf2-null mice had lower hepatic glutathione and exhibited more lipid peroxidation, whereas the K1-kd mice had the highest amount of glutathione in the liver and developed the least lipid peroxidation among the three genotypes fed the MCD diet. The Nrf2 signaling pathway was activated by the MCD diet, and the Nrf2-targeted cytoprotective genes Nqo1 and Gstα1/2 were induced in WT and even more in K1-kd mice. In addition, Nrf2-null mice on both control and MCD diets exhibited altered expression profiles of fatty acid metabolism genes, indicating Nrf2 may influence lipid metabolism in liver. For example, mRNA levels of long chain fatty acid translocase CD36 and the endocrine hormone Fgf21 were higher in livers of Nrf2-null mice and lower in the K1-kd mice than WT mice fed the MCD diet. Taken together, these observations indicate that Nrf2 could decelerate the onset of fatty livers caused by the MCD diet by increasing hepatic antioxidant and detoxification capabilities. PMID:20350562

  4. Gut fat signaling and appetite control with special emphasis on the effect of thylakoids from spinach on eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Rebello, C J; O'Neil, C E; Greenway, F L

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic controls of eating are embedded in a neural system that permits an interaction with the environment. The result is an integrated adaptive response that coordinates the internal milieu with the prevailing environment. Securing adequate amounts of fat and optimizing its storage and use has an evolutionary basis. By generating neuronal and endocrine feedback signals, behavior and metabolism could then adapt to fluctuations in food availability. However, in modern society, foods that appeal to the palate are neither in shortage nor are they difficult to procure. These foods can activate brain reward circuitry beyond their evolved 'survival advantage' limits. Many foods high in fat invoke an undeniably pleasurable sensation and could excessively stimulate the brain's reward pathways leading to overeating. However, the high appeal and potential for being eaten in excess notwithstanding, fat has the added distinction of inducing powerful signals in the gut that are transduced to the brain and result in the regulation of appetite. Fatty acids are sensed by G-protein-coupled receptors on enteroendocrine cells which trigger the release of peptides involved in appetite regulation. Lipid sensing may also occur through the fatty acid translocase, CD-36, on enterocytes. Additionally, fat can activate dopaminergic systems affecting reward, to promote an inhibition over eating. Prolonging the presence of fats in the gastrointestinal lumen permits the activation of signaling mechanisms. Thylakoids, found within the chloroplasts of plants, are flattened disc-like membranous vesicles in which the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis occur. By interacting with lipids and delaying fat digestion, thylakoid membranes promote the release of peptides involved in appetite regulation and may influence the reward system. This review explores gut lipid sensing and signaling in the context of appetite regulation. The effects of thylakoid membranes on eating behavior are

  5. Enhanced expression of Nrf2 in mice attenuates the fatty liver produced by a methionine- and choline-deficient diet

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-06-15

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as an important promoter of the progression of fatty liver diseases. The current study investigates the potential functions of the Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathway, an important hepatic oxidative stress sensor, in a rodent fatty liver model. Mice with no (Nrf2-null), normal (wild type, WT), and enhanced (Keap1 knockdown, K1-kd) expression of Nrf2 were fed a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet or a control diet for 5 days. Compared to WT mice, the MCD diet-caused hepatosteatosis was more severe in the Nrf2-null mice and less in the K1-kd mice. The Nrf2-null mice had lower hepatic glutathione and exhibited more lipid peroxidation, whereas the K1-kd mice had the highest amount of glutathione in the liver and developed the least lipid peroxidation among the three genotypes fed the MCD diet. The Nrf2 signaling pathway was activated by the MCD diet, and the Nrf2-targeted cytoprotective genes Nqo1 and Gst{alpha}1/2 were induced in WT and even more in K1-kd mice. In addition, Nrf2-null mice on both control and MCD diets exhibited altered expression profiles of fatty acid metabolism genes, indicating Nrf2 may influence lipid metabolism in liver. For example, mRNA levels of long chain fatty acid translocase CD36 and the endocrine hormone Fgf21 were higher in livers of Nrf2-null mice and lower in the K1-kd mice than WT mice fed the MCD diet. Taken together, these observations indicate that Nrf2 could decelerate the onset of fatty livers caused by the MCD diet by increasing hepatic antioxidant and detoxification capabilities.

  6. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  7. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  8. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  9. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications ...

  11. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  12. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  13. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  14. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  15. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some ... dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. ...

  16. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  17. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  18. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  19. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  20. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  1. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  2. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  3. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  4. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... boric acid poisoning usually occurs when someone swallows powdered roach-killing products that contain the chemical. Chronic ... vein (IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Note: Activated charcoal does not effectively treat (absorb) boric acid. For ...

  5. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  6. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  7. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  8. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  9. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  10. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  11. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  12. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  13. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  14. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  15. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  16. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  17. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  18. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  1. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  2. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The well-known fatty acids with a Δ5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32) and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19). Finally, the Δ5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs). This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between Δ5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs. PMID:21116406

  3. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  4. Clostridium ramosum Promotes High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Gnotobiotic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Woting, Anni; Pfeiffer, Nora; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestines of obese humans and mice are enriched with Erysipelotrichi, a class within the Firmicutes. Clostridium ramosum, a member of the Erysipelotrichi, is associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome in humans. To clarify the possible obesogenic potential of this bacterial species and to unravel the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of C. ramosum in obesity development in gnotobiotic mice. Mice were associated with a simplified human intestinal (SIHUMI) microbiota of eight bacterial species, including C. ramosum, with the SIHUMI microbiota except C. ramosum (SIHUMIw/oCra), or with C. ramosum only (Cra) and fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a low-fat diet (LFD). Parameters related to the development of obesity and metabolic diseases were compared. After 4 weeks of HFD feeding, the mouse groups did not differ in energy intake, diet digestibility, gut permeability, and parameters of low-grade inflammation. However, SIHUMI and Cra mice fed the HFD gained significantly more body weight and body fat and displayed higher food efficiency than SIHUMIw/oCra mice fed the HFD. Gene expression of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) in jejunal mucosa and of fatty acid translocase (CD36) in ileal mucosa was significantly increased in the obese SIHUMI and Cra mice compared with the less obese SIHUMIw/oCra mice. The data demonstrate that the presence of C. ramosum in SIHUMI and Cra mice enhanced diet-induced obesity. Upregulation of small intestinal glucose and fat transporters in these animals may contribute to their increased body fat deposition. PMID:25271283

  5. Substrate uptake and metabolism are preserved in hypertrophic caveolin-3 knockout hearts

    PubMed Central

    Augustus, Ayanna S.; Buchanan, Jonathan; Addya, Sankar; Rengo, Giuseppe; Pestell, Richard G.; Fortina, Paolo; Koch, Walter J.; Bensadoun, Andre; Abel, E. Dale; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Caveolin-3 (Cav3), the primary protein component of caveolae in muscle cells, regulates numerous signaling pathways including insulin receptor signaling and facilitates free fatty acid (FA) uptake by interacting with several FA transport proteins. We previously reported that Cav3 knockout mice (Cav3KO) develop cardiac hypertrophy with diminished contractile function; however, the effects of Cav3 gene ablation on cardiac substrate utilization are unknown. The present study revealed that the uptake and oxidation of FAs and glucose were normal in hypertrophic Cav3KO hearts. Real-time PCR analysis revealed normal expression of lipid metabolism genes including FA translocase (CD36) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 in Cav3KO hearts. Interestingly, myocardial cAMP content was significantly increased by 42%; however, this had no effect on PKA activity in Cav3KO hearts. Microarray expression analysis revealed a marked increase in the expression of genes involved in receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane, including Rab4a and the expression of WD repeat/FYVE domain containing proteins. We observed a fourfold increase in the expression of cellular retinol binding protein-III and a 3.5-fold increase in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 11, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family involved in the biosynthesis and inactivation of steroid hormones. In summary, a loss of Cav3 in the heart leads to cardiac hypertrophy with normal substrate utilization. Moreover, a loss of Cav3 mRNA altered the expression of several genes not previously linked to cardiac growth and function. Thus we have identified a number of new target genes associated with the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:18552160

  6. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  7. Acid-Base Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3− and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3− is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys. PMID:26597304

  8. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  9. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  10. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  11. Recovery of organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  12. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  13. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perfluoroalkyl acids(PFAAs) area a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perflurinated carbon backbone (4-12in length) and a acidic functional moiety (Carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and have numerous industr...

  14. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  15. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  16. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  17. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reviews of available data indicate that precipitation in a large region of North America is highly acidic when its pH is compared with the expected pH value of 5.65 for pure rain water in equilibrium with CO2. A growing body of evidence suggests that acid rain is responsib...

  18. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  19. Fats and fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The absolute fat requirement of the human species is the amount of essential fatty acids needed to maintain optimal fatty acid composition of all tissues and normal eicosanoid synthesis. At most, this requirement is no more than about 5% of an adequate energy intake. However, fat accounts for appro...

  20. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  1. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  2. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  4. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...

  5. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  6. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  7. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  8. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  9. Lowbush blueberries inhibit scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A expression and attenuate foam cell formation in ApoE-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries have recently been reported to reduce atherosclerotic lesion progression in apoE deficient (apoE-/-) mice. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine whether blueberries altered scavenger receptors expression and foam cell fo...

  10. Dietary Lipid Levels Influence Lipid Deposition in the Liver of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea) by Regulating Lipoprotein Receptors, Fatty Acid Uptake and Triacylglycerol Synthesis and Catabolism at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Liao, Kai; Wang, Tianjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation has been observed in fish fed a high-lipid diet. However, no information is available on the mechanism by which dietary lipid levels comprehensively regulate lipid transport, uptake, synthesis and catabolism in fish. Therefore, the present study aimed to gain further insight into how dietary lipids affect lipid deposition in the liver of large yellow croaker(Larimichthys crocea). Fish (150.00±4.95 g) were fed a diet with a low (6%), moderate (12%, the control diet) or high (18%) crude lipid content for 10 weeks. Growth performance, plasma biochemical indexes, lipid contents and gene expression related to lipid deposition, including lipoprotein assembly and clearance, fatty acid uptake and triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism, were assessed. Growth performance was not significantly affected. However, the hepato-somatic and viscera-somatic indexes as well as plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly increased in fish fed the high-lipid diet. In the livers of fish fed the high-lipid diet, the expression of genes related to lipoprotein clearance (LDLR) and fatty acid uptake (FABP11) was significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein assembly (apoB100), triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism (DGAT2, CPT I) was significantly down-regulated compared with fish fed the control diet, and hepatic lipid deposition increased. In fish fed the low-lipid diet, the expression of genes associated with lipoprotein assembly and clearance (apoB100, LDLR, LRP-1), fatty acid uptake (CD36, FATP1, FABP3) and triacylglycerol synthesis (FAS) was significantly increased, whereas the expression of triacylglycerol catabolism related genes (ATGL, CPT I) was reduced compared with fish fed the control diet. However, hepatic lipid content in fish fed the low-lipid diet decreased mainly due to low dietary lipid intake. In summary, findings of this study provide molecular

  11. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  12. WASTE ACID DETOXIFICATION AND RECLAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) project demonstrated the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation (WADR) systems ability to recover waste electropolish acid solutions generated during the manufacturing of gun-tubes, and reuse the clean acid. ...

  13. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  14. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  15. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty or scaly ... photosensitizing agents. When aminolevulinic acid is activated by light, it damages the cells of actinic keratosis lesions.

  16. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  17. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to filter fluids and waste normally (chronic glomerulonephritis ) Lead poisoning Long-term (chronic) alcohol use Risks There are ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 28. Read More Gout Lead poisoning Liver disease Polycythemia vera Uric acid - blood Update ...

  18. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria, including infections of the ears, lungs, sinus, skin, ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Clavulanic acid is in a class of medications ...

  19. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Chemical Emergencies: Case Definition: Hydrofluoric Acid . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services; 2005. Goldfrank LR, ed. Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies . 8th ed. New ...

  20. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  1. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  2. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Pantothenic acid and biotin are types of B vitamins. They are water-soluble, which means that the ... found in foods that are good sources of B vitamins, including the following: Animal proteins Avocado Broccoli, kale, ...

  3. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  4. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  5. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a ... as a liquid to be injected subcutaneously (just under the skin) by a doctor. Your doctor will ...

  6. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  7. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the treatment of epilepsy, and to treat bipolar disorder and migraines. I have been taking valproic acid ... that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual problems and difficulty getting pregnant. ...

  8. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  9. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test ... Alcoholism Chemotherapy-related side effects Diabetes Excessive exercise Gout Hypoparathyroidism Lead poisoning Leukemia Medullary cystic kidney disease ...

  10. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The ... level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. ...

  11. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... more easily than natural food folate. Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Folic acid reduces the risk for spina ... g., orange juice and green vegetables). Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Spina bifida and anencephaly are neural tube ...

  12. Folic acid in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... green leafy vegetables Dried beans and peas (legumes) Citrus fruits and juices Fortified means that vitamins have ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Folic Acid Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  13. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amoxicillin is in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth ... allergic to amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), clavulanic acid, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medications.tell your doctor ...

  14. Boric Acid Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L. C.; Heimbach, M. D.; Truscott, D. R.; Duncan, B. D.

    1964-01-01

    Boric acid poisoning in 11 infants, occurring in the newborn nursery as a result of the accidental and inadvertent use of 2.5% boric acid in the preparation of the formulae, is reported. Five of the infants died. All except two exhibited the classical symptomatology of acute boric acid poisoning, namely, diarrhea, vomiting, erythema, exfoliation, desquamation of the skin, and marked central nervous system irritation. Early manifestations of poisoning were nonspecific, and one patient died before skin manifestations were noted. Peritoneal dialysis, instituted in nine cases, was found to be the most effective method of treatment. It is recommended that boric acid, which is of doubtful therapeutic value, should be completely removed from hospitals, dispensaries and pharmacopoeias. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14166459

  15. Polymers for acid thickening

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.W.

    1980-09-30

    Acids, thickened with branched emulsion or suspension polymers of diallyldimethylammonium chloride are useful as oil well drilling and fracturing fluids for stimulating well production and in other applications, such as thickeners for cosmetics, paints, adhesives, textiles and printing inks.

  16. Acid-base chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, C.W.; Blewit, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The book is not a research compendium and there are no references to the literature. It is a teaching text covering the entire range of undergraduate subject matter dealing with acid-base chemistry (some of it remotely) as taught in inorganic, analytical, and organic chemistry courses. The excellent chapters VII through IX deal in detail with the quantitative aspects of aqueous acid-base equilibria (salt hydrolysis and buffer, titrations, polyprotic and amphoteric substances).

  17. Utilization of acid tars

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A.F.; Denisova, T.L.; Aminov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly produced acid tar (FPAT), obtained as refinery waste in treating petroleum oils with sulfuric acid and oleum, contains 80% or more sulfuric acid. Of such tars, pond acid tars, which contain up to 80% neutral petroleum products and sulfonated resins, are more stable, and have found applications in the production of binders for paving materials. In this article the authors are presenting results obtained in a study of the composition and reactivity of FPAT and its stability in storage in blends with asphalts obtained in deasphalting operations, and the possibility of using the FPAT in road construction has been examined. In this work, wastes were used which were obtained in treating the oils T-750, KhF-12, I-8A, and MS-14. Data on the change in group chemical composition of FPAT are shown, and the acidity, viscosity, needle penetration, and softening point of acid tars obtained from different grades of oils are plotted as functions of the storage time. It is also shown that the fresh and hardened FPATs differ in their solubilities in various solvents.

  18. Mammalian Fatty Acid Elongases

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Very long chain fatty acids confer functional diversity on cells by variations in their chain length and degree of unsaturation. Microsomal fatty acid elongation represents the major pathway for determining the chain length of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular lipids. The overall reaction for fatty acid elongation involves four enzymes and utilizes malonyl CoA, NADPH, and fatty acyl CoA as substrates. While the fundamental pathway and its requirements have been known for many years, recent advances have revealed a family of enzymes involved in the first step of the reaction, i.e., the condensation reaction. Seven fatty acid elongase subtypes (Elovl #1–7) have been identified in the mouse, rat, and human genomes. These enzymes determine the rate of overall fatty acid elongation. Moreover, these enzymes also display differential substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and regulation, making them important regulators of cellular lipid composition as well as specific cellular functions. Herein, methods are described to measure elongase activity, analyze elongation products, and alter cellular elongase expression. PMID:19763486

  19. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  20. Autophagy on acid.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumors tends to be more acidic (6.5-7.0) than surrounding normal (7.2-7.4) tissue. Chaotic vasculature, oxygen limitation and major metabolic changes all contribute to the acidic microenvironment. We have previously proposed that low extracellular pH (pHe) plays a critical role in the development and progression of solid tumors. While extracellular acidosis is toxic to most normal cells, cancer cells can adapt and survive under this harsh condition. In this study, we focused on identifying survival strategies employed by cancer cells when challenged with an acidic pHe (6.6-6.7) either acutely or for many generations. While acutely acidic cells did not grow, those acclimated over many generations grew at the same rate as control cells. We observed that these cells induce autophagy in response to acidosis both acutely and chronically, and that this adaptation appears to be necessary for survival. Inhibition of autophagy in low pH cultured cells results in cell death. Histological analysis of tumor xenografts reveals a strong correlation of LC3 protein expression in regions projected to be acidic. Furthermore, in vivo buffering experiments using sodium bicarbonate, previously shown to raise extracellular tumor pH, decreases LC3 protein expression in tumor xenografts. These data imply that autophagy can be induced by extracellular acidosis and appears to be chronically employed as a survival adaptation to acidic microenvironments. PMID:22874557