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Sample records for acid transport function

  1. Functional characterization of Caenorhabditis elegans heteromeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Emilija; Stasiuk, Susan; Skelly, Patrick J; Shoemaker, Charles B; Verrey, François

    2004-02-27

    Mammalian heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are composed of a multi-transmembrane spanning catalytic protein covalently associated with a type II glycoprotein (e.g. 4F2hc, rBAT) through a disulfide bond. Caenorhabditis elegans has nine genes encoding close homologues of the HAT catalytic proteins. Three of these genes (designated AAT-1 to AAT-3) have a much higher degree of similarity to the mammalian homologues than the other six, including the presence of a cysteine residue at the position known to form a disulfide bridge to the glycoprotein partner in mammalian HATs. C. elegans also has two genes encoding homologues of the heteromeric amino acid transporter type II glycoprotein subunits (designated ATG-1 and ATG-2). Both ATG, and/or AAT-1, -2, -3 proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested for amino acid transport function. This screen revealed that AAT-1 and AAT-3 facilitate amino acid transport when expressed together with ATG-2 but not with ATG-1 or the mammalian type II glycoproteins 4F2hc and rBAT. AAT-1 and AAT-3 covalently bind to both C. elegans ATG glycoproteins, but only the pairs with ATG-2 traffic to the oocyte surface. Both of these functional, surface-expressed C. elegans HATs transport most neutral amino acids and display the highest transport rate for l-Ala and l-Ser (apparent K(m) 100 microm range). Similar to their mammalian counterparts, the C. elegans HATs function as (near) obligatory amino acid exchangers. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the heteromeric structure and the amino acid exchange function of HATs have been conserved throughout the evolution of nematodes to mammals.

  2. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting β polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) α and β] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of regulatory

  3. Xenobiotic, bile acid, and cholesterol transporters: function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2010-03-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) alpha and beta] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of

  4. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery. PMID:24566561

  5. Functional domains of the fatty acid transport proteins: studies using protein chimeras.

    PubMed

    DiRusso, Concetta C; Darwis, Dina; Obermeyer, Thomas; Black, Paul N

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) function in fatty acid trafficking pathways, several of which have been shown to participate in the transport of exogenous fatty acids into the cell. Members of this protein family also function as acyl CoA synthetases with specificity towards very long chain fatty acids or bile acids. These proteins have two identifying sequence motifs: The ATP/AMP motif, an approximately 100 amino acid segment required for ATP binding and common to members of the adenylate-forming super family of proteins, and the FATP/VLACS motif that consists of approximately 50 amino acid residues and is restricted to members of the FATP family. This latter motif has been implicated in fatty acid transport in the yeast FATP orthologue Fat1p. In the present studies using a yeast strain containing deletions in FAT1 (encoding Fat1p) and FAA1 (encoding the major acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) Faa1p) as an experimental platform, the phenotypic and functional properties of specific murine FATP1-FATP4 and FATP6-FATP4 protein chimeras were evaluated in order to define elements within these proteins that further distinguish the fatty acid transport and activation functions. As expected from previous work FATP1 and FATP4 were functional in the fatty acid transport pathway, while and FATP6 was not. All three isoforms were able to activate the very long chain fatty acids arachidonate (C(20:4)) and lignocerate (C(24:0)), but with distinguishing activities between saturated and highly unsaturated ligands. A 73 amino acid segment common to FATP1 and FATP4 and between the ATP/AMP and FATP/VLACS motifs was identified by studying the chimeras, which is hypothesized to contribute to the transport function.

  6. Identification and functional characterization of uric acid transporter Urat1 (Slc22a12) in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanobu; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Mamada, Hideaki; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2011-06-01

    Uric acid transporter URAT1 contributes significantly to reabsorption of uric acid in humans to maintain a constant serum uric acid (SUA) level. Since alteration of SUA level is associated with various diseases, it is important to clarify the mechanism of change in SUA. However, although expression of mRNA of an ortholog of URAT1 (rUrat1) in rats has been reported, functional analysis and localization have not been done. Therefore, rat rUrat1 was functionally analyzed using gene expression systems and isolated brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from rat kidney, and its localization in kidney was examined immunohistochemically. Uric acid transport by rUrat1 was chloride (Cl-) susceptible with a Km of 1773μM. It was inhibited by benzbromarone and trans-stimulated by lactate and pyrazinecarboxylic acid (PZA). Cl- gradient-susceptible uric acid transport by BBMVs showed similar characteristics to those of uric acid transport by rUrat1. Moreover, rUrat1 was localized at the apical membrane in proximal tubular epithelial cells in rat kidney. Accordingly, rUrat1 is considered to be involved in uric acid reabsorption in rats in the same manner as URAT1 in humans. Therefore, rUrat1 may be a useful model to study issues related to the role of human URAT1.

  7. Expression and purification of a functional uric acid-xanthine transporter (UapA).

    PubMed

    Leung, James; Karachaliou, Mayia; Alves, Claudia; Diallinas, George; Byrne, Bernadette

    2010-07-01

    The Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporters (NATs) family includes carriers with fundamental functions in uptake of key cellular metabolites, such as uric acid or vitamin C. The best studied example of a NAT transporter is the uric acid-xanthine permease (UapA) from the model ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans. Detailed genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed much about the mechanism of action of this protein; however, the difficulties associated with handling eukaryotic membrane proteins have limited efforts to elucidate the precise structure-function relationships of UapA by structural analysis. In this manuscript, we describe the heterologous overexpression of functional UapA as a fusion with GFP in different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The UapA-GFP construct expressed to 2.3 mg/L in a pep4Delta deletion strain lacking a key vacuolar endopeptidase and 3.8 mg/L in an npi1-1 mutant strain with defective Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase activity. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that the UapA-GFP was predominately localized to the plasma membrane in both strains, although a higher intensity of fluorescence was observed for the npi1-1 mutant strain plasma membrane. In agreement with these observations, the npi1-1 mutant strain demonstrated a approximately 5-fold increase in uptake of [(3)H]-xanthine compared to the pep4Delta deletion strain. Despite yielding the best results for functional expression, in-gel fluorescence of the UapA-GFP expressed in the npi1-1 mutant strain revealed that the protein was subject to significant proteolytic degradation. Large scale expression of the protein using the pep4Delta deletion strain followed by purification produced mg quantities of pure, monodispersed protein suitable for further structural and functional studies. In addition, this work has generated a yeast cell based system for performing reverse genetics and other targeted approaches, in order to further understand the mechanism of action of this important model protein.

  8. Nutrient uptake by marine invertebrates: cloning and functional analysis of amino acid transporter genes in developing sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eli; Manahan, Donal T

    2009-08-01

    Transport of amino acids from low concentrations in seawater by marine invertebrates has been extensively studied, but few of the genes involved in this physiological process have been identified. We have characterized three amino acid transporter genes cloned from embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. These genes show phylogenetic proximity to classical amino acid transport systems, including Gly and B0+, and the inebriated gene (INE). Heterologous expression of these genes in frog oocytes induced a 40-fold increase in alanine transport above endogenous levels, demonstrating that these genes mediate alanine transport. Antibodies specific to one of these genes (Sp-AT1) inhibited alanine transport, confirming the physiological activity of this gene in larvae. Whole-mount antibody staining of larvae revealed expression of Sp-AT1 in the ectodermal tissues associated with amino acid transport, as independently demonstrated by autoradiographic localization of radioactive alanine. Maximum rates of alanine transport increased 6-fold during early development, from embryonic to larval stages. Analysis of gene expression during this developmental period revealed that Sp-AT1 transcript abundance remained nearly constant, while that of another transporter gene (Sp-AT2) increased 11-fold. The functional characterization of these genes establishes a molecular biological basis for amino acid transport by developmental stages of marine invertebrates.

  9. Amino acid transporter LAT3 is required for podocyte development and function.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Nishibori, Yukino; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kudo, Akihiko; Ito, Noriko; Fukuhara, Daisuke; Kurayama, Ryota; Higashihara, Eiji; Babu, Ellappan; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Nagata, Michio; Majumdar, Arindam; Tryggvason, Karl; Yan, Kunimasa

    2009-07-01

    LAT3 is a Na+-independent neutral l-amino acid transporter recently isolated from a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Although liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas are known to express LAT3, the tissue distribution and physiologic function of this transporter are not completely understood. Here, we observed that glomeruli express LAT3. Immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that LAT3 localizes to the apical plasma membrane of podocyte foot processes. In mice, starvation upregulated glomerular LAT3, phosphorylated AKT1, reconstituted the actin network, and elongated foot processes. In the fetal kidney, we observed intense LAT3 expression at the capillary loops stage of renal development. Finally, zebrafish morphants lacking lat3 function showed collapsed glomeruli with thickened glomerular basement membranes. Permeability studies of the glomerular filtration barrier in these zebrafish morphants demonstrated a disruption of selective glomerular permeability. Our data suggest that LAT3 may play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of podocyte structure and function by regulating protein synthesis and the actin cytoskeleton.

  10. Isomer-specific effects of conjugated linoleic acid on HDL functionality associated with reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Nicod, Nathalie; Parker, Robert S; Giordano, Elena; Maestro, Virginia; Davalos, Alberto; Visioli, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are atheroprotective because of their role in reverse cholesterol transport. The intestine is involved in this process because it synthesizes HDL, removes cholesterol from plasma and excretes it into the lumen. We investigated the role of selected dietary fatty acids on intestinal cholesterol uptake and HDL functionality. Caco-2 monolayers grown on Transwells were supplemented with either palmitic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, docosahexaenoic, eicosapentaenoic, arachidonic or conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs): c9,t11-CLA; t9,t11-CLA; c10,t12-CLA. Cells synthesized HDL in the basolateral compartment for 24 h in the absence or presence of an antibody to SR-BI (aSR-BI), which inhibits its interaction with HDL. Free cholesterol (FC) accumulated to a greater extent in the presence than in the absence of aSR-BI, indicating net uptake of FC by SR-BI. Uptake's efficiency was significantly decreased when cells were treated with c9,t11-CLA relative to the other fatty acids. These differences were associated with lower HDL functionality, since neither SR-BI protein expression nor expression and alternative splicing of other genes involved lipid metabolism were affected. Only INSIG2 expression was decreased, with no increase of its target genes. Increasing pre-β-HDL synthesis, by inducing ABCA1 and adding APOA1, resulted in reduced uptake of FC by SR-BI after c9,t11-CLA treatment, indicating reduced functionality of pre-β-HDL. Conversely, treatment with c9,t11-CLA resulted in a greater uptake of FC and esterified cholesterol from mature HDL. Therefore, Caco-2 monolayers administered c9,t11-CLA produced a nonfunctional pre-β-HDL but took up cholesterol more efficiently via SR-BI from mature HDL.

  11. Membrane transporters for the special amino acid glutamine: Structure/function relationships and relevance to human health.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    Glutamine together with glucose is essential for body’s homeostasis. It is the most abundant amino acid and is involved in many biosynthetic, regulatory and energy production processes. Several membrane transporters which differ in transport modes, ensure glutamine homeostasis by coordinating its absorption, reabsorption and delivery to tissues. These transporters belong to different protein families, are redundant and ubiquitous. Their classification, originally based on functional properties, has recently been associated with the SLC nomenclature. Function of glutamine transporters is studied in cells over-expressing the transporters or, more recently in proteoliposomes harboring the proteins extracted from animal tissues or over-expressed in microorganisms. The role of the glutamine transporters is linked to their transport modes and coupling with Na+ and H+. Most transporters share specificity for other neutral or cationic amino acids. Na+-dependent co-transporters efficiently accumulate glutamine while antiporters regulate the pools of glutamine and other amino acids. The most acknowledged glutamine transporters belong to the SLC1, 6, 7 and 38 families. The members involved in the homeostasis are the co-transporters B0AT1 and the SNAT members 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7; the antiporters ASCT2, LAT1 and 2. The last two are associated to the ancillary CD98 protein. Some information on regulation of the glutamine transporters exist, which, however, need to be deepened. No information at all is available on structures, besides some homology models obtained using similar bacterial transporters as templates. Some models of rat and human glutamine transporters highlight very similar structures between the orthologues. Moreover the presence of glycosylation and/or phosphorylation sites located at the extracellular or intracellular faces has been predicted. ASCT2 and LAT1 are over-expressed in several cancers, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological intervention.

  12. Membrane transporters for the special amino acid glutamine: structure/function relationships and relevance to human health

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Glutamine together with glucose is essential for body's homeostasis. It is the most abundant amino acid and is involved in many biosynthetic, regulatory and energy production processes. Several membrane transporters which differ in transport modes, ensure glutamine homeostasis by coordinating its absorption, reabsorption and delivery to tissues. These transporters belong to different protein families, are redundant and ubiquitous. Their classification, originally based on functional properties, has recently been associated with the SLC nomenclature. Function of glutamine transporters is studied in cells over-expressing the transporters or, more recently in proteoliposomes harboring the proteins extracted from animal tissues or over-expressed in microorganisms. The role of the glutamine transporters is linked to their transport modes and coupling with Na+ and H+. Most transporters share specificity for other neutral or cationic amino acids. Na+-dependent co-transporters efficiently accumulate glutamine while antiporters regulate the pools of glutamine and other amino acids. The most acknowledged glutamine transporters belong to the SLC1, 6, 7, and 38 families. The members involved in the homeostasis are the co-transporters B0AT1 and the SNAT members 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7; the antiporters ASCT2, LAT1 and 2. The last two are associated to the ancillary CD98 protein. Some information on regulation of the glutamine transporters exist, which, however, need to be deepened. No information at all is available on structures, besides some homology models obtained using similar bacterial transporters as templates. Some models of rat and human glutamine transporters highlight very similar structures between the orthologs. Moreover the presence of glycosylation and/or phosphorylation sites located at the extracellular or intracellular faces has been predicted. ASCT2 and LAT1 are over-expressed in several cancers, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological intervention

  13. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  14. Amino acid composition analysis of secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli with relation to functional classification, ligand specificity and structure.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, Massoud; Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an amino acid composition (AAC) analysis of the complete sequences for 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli, which have functions in the uptake and export of organic and inorganic metabolites, efflux of drugs and in controlling membrane potential. This revealed the trends in content for specific amino acid types and for combinations of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. In certain proteins or groups of proteins, the so-called spikes of high content for a specific amino acid type or combination of amino acids were identified and confirmed statistically, which in some cases could be directly related to function and ligand specificity. This was prevalent in proteins with a function of multidrug or metal ion efflux. Any tool that can help in identifying bacterial multidrug efflux proteins is important for a better understanding of this mechanism of antibiotic resistance. Phylogenetic analysis based on sequence alignments and comparison of sequences at the N- and C-terminal ends confirmed transporter Family classification. Locations of specific amino acid types in some of the proteins that have crystal structures (EmrE, LacY, AcrB) were also considered to help link amino acid content with protein function. Though there are limitations, this work has demonstrated that a basic analysis of AAC is a useful tool to use in combination with other computational and experimental methods for classifying and investigating function and ligand specificity in a large group of transport or other membrane proteins, including those that are molecular targets for development of new drugs.

  15. A functional splice variant of the human Golgi CMP-sialic acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Marín, Roberta; Mollicone, Rosella; Martínez-Duncker, Iván

    2016-12-01

    The human Golgi Cytidine-5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Sia) transporter SLC35A1, a member of the nucleotide sugar transporter family, translocates CMP-Sia from the cytosol into the Golgi lumen where sialyltransferases use it as donor substrate for the synthesis of sialoglycoconjugates. In 2005, we reported a novel Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation (CDG) termed CDG-IIf or SLC35A1-CDG, characterized by macrothrombocytopenia, neutropenia and complete lack of the sialyl-Le(x) antigen (NeuAcα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc-R) on polymorphonuclear cells. This disease was caused by the presence of inactive SLC35A1 alleles. It was also found that the SLC35A1 generates additional isoforms through alternative splicing. In this work, we demonstrate that one of the reported isoforms, the del177 with exon 6 skipping, is able to maintain sialylation in HepG2 cells submitted to wt knockdown and restore sialylation to normal levels in the Chinese Hamester Ovary (CHO) cell line Lec2 mutant deficient in CMP-Sia transport. The characteristics of the alternatively spliced protein are discussed as well as therapeutic implications of this finding in CDGs caused by mutations in nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs).

  16. Functional characterization of the Bombyx mori fatty acid transport protein (BmFATP) within the silkmoth pheromone gland.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kana; Imai, Kiyohiro; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2009-02-20

    Fatty acid transport protein (FATP) is an evolutionarily conserved membrane-bound protein that facilitates the uptake of extracellular long chain fatty acids. In humans and mice, six FATP isoforms have been identified and their tissue-specific distributions suggest that each plays a discrete role in lipid metabolism in association with fatty acid uptake. While the presence of FATP homologs in insects has been demonstrated, their functional role remains to be characterized. Pheromonogenesis is defined as the dynamic period in which all machinery required for sex pheromone biosynthesis is generated and organized within the pheromone gland (PG) cells. By exploiting this unique system in the PG of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, we found that BmFATP is predominantly expressed in the PG and undergoes up-regulation 1 day prior to eclosion. Before eclosion, B. mori PG cells accumulate cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs), which play a role in storing the pheromone (bombykol) precursor fatty acid in the form of triacylglycerol. RNAi-mediated gene silencing of BmFATP in vivo significantly suppressed LD accumulation by preventing the synthesis of triacylglycerols and resulted in a significant reduction in bombykol production. These results, in conjunction with the findings that BmFATP stimulates the uptake of extracellular long-chain fatty acids and BmFATP knockdown reduces cellular long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity, suggest that BmFATP plays an essential role in bombykol biosynthesis by stimulating both LD accumulation and triacylglycerol synthesis via a process called vectorial acylation that couples the uptake of extracellular fatty acids with activation to CoA thioesters during pheromonogenesis.

  17. Excitatory amino acid transporters tonically restrain nTS synaptic and neuronal activity to modulate cardiorespiratory function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) is the initial central termination site for visceral afferents and is important for modulation and integration of multiple reflexes including cardiorespiratory reflexes. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nTS and is removed from the extracellular milieu by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of EAATs in the nTS on basal synaptic and neuronal function and cardiorespiratory regulation. The majority of glutamate clearance in the central nervous system is believed to be mediated by astrocytic EAAT 1 and 2. We confirmed the presence of EAAT 1 and 2 within the nTS and their colocalization with astrocytic markers. EAAT blockade with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) produced a concentration-related depolarization, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency, and enhanced action potential discharge in nTS neurons. Solitary tract-evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced by EAAT blockade. Microinjection of TBOA into the nTS of anesthetized rats induced apneic, sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic responses. These effects mimicked the response to microinjection of exogenous glutamate, and glutamate responses were enhanced by EAAT blockade. Together these data indicate that EAATs tonically restrain nTS excitability to modulate cardiorespiratory function. PMID:26719090

  18. Functional human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) with bile acid synthesis and transport capacities: A novel in vitro cholestatic model

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xuan; Gao, Yimeng; Wu, Zhitao; Ma, Leilei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Le; Lin, Yunfei; Hui, Lijian; Pan, Guoyu

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis is a leading cause of drug withdrawal. However, the use of primary human hepatocytes (PHHs), the gold standard for predicting cholestasis in vitro, is limited by their high cost and batch-to-batch variability. Mature hepatocyte characteristics have been observed in human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) derived from human fibroblast transdifferentiation. Here, we evaluated whether hiHeps could biosynthesize and excrete bile acids (BAs) and their potential as PHH alternatives for cholestasis investigations. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blotting indicated that hiHeps highly expressed BA synthases and functional transporters. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) showed that hiHeps produced normal intercellular unconjugated BAs but fewer conjugated BAs than human hepatocytes. When incubated with representative cholestatic agents, hiHeps exhibited sensitive drug-induced bile salt export pump (BSEP) dysfunction, and their response to cholestatic agent-mediated cytotoxicity correlated well with that of PHHs (r2 = 0.8032). Deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced hepatotoxicity in hiHeps was verified by elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and γ-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT) levels. Mitochondrial damage and cell death suggested DCA-induced toxicity in hiHeps, which were attenuated by hepatoprotective drugs, as in PHHs. For the first time, hiHeps were reported to biosynthesize and excrete BAs, which could facilitate predicting cholestatic hepatotoxicity and screening potential therapeutic drugs against cholestasis. PMID:27934920

  19. Functional characterization of folic acid transport in the intestine of the laying hen using the everted intestinal sac model.

    PubMed

    Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Karmin, O; House, J D

    2011-01-01

    Absorption at the level of the intestine is likely a primary regulatory mechanism for the deposition of dietary supplemented folic acid into the chicken egg. Therefore, factors affecting the intestinal transport of folic acid in the laying hen may influence the level of egg folate concentrations. To this end, a series of experiments using intestinal everted sacs were conducted to characterize intestinal folic acid absorption processes in laying hens. Effects of naturally occurring folate derivatives (5-methyl and 10-formyltetrahydrofolate) as well as heme on folic acid absorption were also investigated. Folic acid absorption was measured based on the rate of uptake of (3)H-labeled folic acid in the everted sac from various segments of the small and large intestines. Folic acid concentration, incubation length, and pH condition were optimized before the performance of uptake experiments. The distribution profile of folic acid transport along the intestine was highest in the upper half of the small intestine. Maximum uptake rate (nmol·100 g tissue(-1)·min(-1)) was observed in the duodenum (20.6 ± 1.9) and jejunum (22.3 ± 2.0) and decreased significantly in the ileum (15.3 ± 1.1) and cecum (9.3 ± 0.9). Transport increased proportionately (P < 0.05) between 0.0001 and 0.1 µM folic acid. Above 0.1 µM, the slope of the regression line was not significantly different from zero (P < 0.137). Folic acid uptake in the jejunum showed a maximum rate of transport at pH 6.0, but was lowest at pH 7.5. The presence of 5-methyl and 10-formyltetrahydrofolate as well as heme impeded folic acid uptake, reducing intestinal folic acid absorption when added at concentrations ranging from 0 to 100 µM. Overall, these data indicated the presence of a folic acid transport system in the entire intestine of the laying hen. Uptake of folic acid in the cecum raises the likelihood of absorption of bacterial-derived folate.

  20. Purification and identification of the functional sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transport glycoprotein from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Radian, R; Bendahan, A; Kanner, B I

    1986-11-25

    Using the reconstitution conditions developed recently (Radian, R., and Kanner, B. I. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 11859-11865) we have now purified the sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter from rat brain to apparent homogeneity. A partially purified transporter preparation was passed over wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose 6MB and non-bound proteins were washed away. The transport activity, as expressed upon reconstitution of the protein into liposomes, was eluted by a solution containing Triton X-100 and N-acetylglucosamine. The specific transport activity was increased almost 400-fold over that of the crude extract. Taking into account an approximately 2.5-fold inactivation during the lectin column chromatography, the actual purification is about 1000-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis of the active fractions revealed one band of 80 kDa and small amounts of a band which ran at an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa. The ratio between the two could be experimentally changed such as, for instance, by lyophilization. Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against the 80-kDa band which also cross-reacted with the 160-kDa band, indicating that the latter apparently represents a dimer form of the first. Using Protein A-Sepharose Cl-4B and the antibody against the 80-kDa band, we were able to quantitatively immunoprecipitate the potential gamma-aminobutyric acid transport activity from a crude transporter preparation. The pure transporter preparation exhibited the same features of the transporter in synaptic plasma membrane vesicles, namely dependence on sodium and chloride, electrogeneity, affinity, and efflux and exchange properties. We conclude that the 80-kDa band represents the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter.

  1. SLC27 fatty acid transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Courtney M; Stahl, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) are critical to many physiological and cellular processes. Aberrant accumulation or depletion of LCFA underlie the pathology of numerous metabolic diseases. Protein-mediated transport of LCFA has been proposed as the major mode of LCFA uptake and activation. Several proteins have been identified to be involved in LCFA uptake. This review focuses on the SLC27 family of fatty acid transport proteins, also known as FATPs, with an emphasis on the gain- and loss-of-function animal models that elucidate the functions of FATPs in vivo and how these transport proteins play a role in physiological and pathological situations.

  2. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar.

  3. Functional Dependence between Septal Protein SepJ from Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 and an Amino Acid ABC-Type Uptake Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Leticia; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the diazotrophic filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, two different cell types, the CO2-fixing vegetative cells and the N2-fixing heterocysts, exchange nutrients, including some amino acids. In the model organism Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the SepJ protein, composed of periplasmic and integral membrane (permease) sections, is located at the intercellular septa joining adjacent cells in the filament. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 bears a gene, Synpcc7942_1024 (here designated dmeA), encoding a permease homologous to the SepJ permease domain. Synechococcus strains lacking dmeA or lacking dmeA and expressing Anabaena sepJ were constructed. The Synechococcus dmeA mutant showed a significant 22 to 32% decrease in the uptake of aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine, a phenotype that could be partially complemented by Anabaena sepJ. Synechococcus mutants of an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC)-type transporter for polar amino acids showed >98% decreased uptake of glutamate irrespective of the presence of dmeA or Anabaena sepJ in the same strain. Thus, Synechococcus DmeA or Anabaena SepJ is needed to observe full (or close to full) activity of the ABC transporter. An Anabaena sepJ deletion mutant was significantly impaired in glutamate and aspartate uptake, which also in this cyanobacterium requires the activity of an ABC-type transporter for polar amino acids. SepJ appears therefore to generally stimulate the activity of cyanobacterial ABC-type transporters for polar amino acids. Conversely, an Anabaena mutant of three ABC-type transporters for amino acids was impaired in the intercellular transfer of 5-carboxyfluorescein, a SepJ-related property. Our results unravel possible functional interactions in transport elements important for diazotrophic growth. IMPORTANCE Membrane transporters are essential for many aspects of cellular life, from uptake and export of substances in unicellular organisms to intercellular

  4. Functional characterization of NAT/NCS2 proteins of Aspergillus brasiliensis reveals a genuine xanthine-uric acid transporter and an intrinsically misfolded polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Krypotou, Emilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Diallinas, George

    2015-02-01

    The Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) family includes members in nearly all domains of life. Functionally characterized NAT transporters from bacteria, fungi, plants and mammals are ion-coupled symporters specific for the uptake of purines, pyrimidines and related analogues. The characterized mammalian NATs are specific for the uptake of L-ascorbic acid. In this work we identify in silico a group of fungal putative transporters, named UapD-like proteins, which represent a novel NAT subfamily. To understand the function and specificity of UapD proteins, we cloned and functionally characterized the two Aspergillus brasiliensis NAT members (named AbUapC and AbUapD) by heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans. AbUapC represents canonical NATs (UapC or UapA), while AbUapD represents the new subfamily. AbUapC is a high-affinity, high-capacity, H(+)/xanthine-uric acid transporter, which can also recognize other purines with very low affinity. No apparent transport function could be detected for AbUapD. GFP-tagging showed that, unlike AbUapC which is localized in the plasma membrane, AbUapD is ER-retained and degraded in the vacuoles, a characteristic of misfolded proteins. Chimeric UapA/AbUapD molecules are also turned-over in the vacuole, suggesting that UapD includes intrinsic peptidic sequences leading to misfolding. The possible evolutionary implication of such conserved, but inactive proteins is discussed.

  5. Functional specialization and differential regulation of short-chain carboxylic acid transporters in the pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Neide; Casal, Margarida; Johansson, Björn; MacCallum, Donna M; Brown, Alistair JP; Paiva, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen Candida albicans has the metabolic flexibility to assimilate a wide range of nutrients in its human host. Previous studies have suggested that C. albicans can encounter glucose-poor microenvironments during infection and that the ability to use alternative non-fermentable carbon sources contributes to its virulence. JEN1 encodes a monocarboxylate transporter in C. albicans and we show that its paralogue, JEN2, encodes a novel dicarboxylate plasma membrane transporter, subjected to glucose repression. A strain deleted in both genes lost the ability to transport lactic, malic and succinic acids by a mediated mechanism and it displayed a growth defect on these substrates. Although no significant morphogenetic or virulence defects were found in the double mutant strain, both JEN1 and JEN2 were strongly induced during infection. Jen1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and Jen2-GFP were upregulated following the phagocytosis of C. albicans cells by neutrophils and macrophages, displaying similar behaviour to an Icl1-GFP fusion. In the murine model of systemic candidiasis approximately 20–25% of C. albicans cells infecting the kidney expressed Jen1-GFP and Jen2-GFP. Our data suggest that Jen1 and Jen2 are expressed in glucose-poor niches within the host, and that these short-chain carboxylic acid transporters may be important in the early stages of infection. PMID:19968788

  6. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transporter: Deglycosylation and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, B.I.; Keynan, S.; Radian, R. )

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled {gamma}-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function is examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, {gamma}-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  7. Selective amino acid substitutions convert the creatine transporter to a gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Joanna R; Christie, David L

    2007-05-25

    The creatine transporter (CRT) is a member of a large family of sodium-dependent neurotransmitter and amino acid transporters. The CRT is closely related to the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, GAT-1, yet GABA is not an effective substrate for the CRT. The high resolution structure of a prokaryotic homologue, LeuT has revealed precise details of the substrate binding site for leucine (Yamashita, A., Singh, S. K., Kawate, T., Jin, Y., and Gouaux, E. (2005) Nature 437, 215-223). We have now designed mutations based on sequence comparisons of the CRT with GABA transporters and the LeuT structural template in an attempt to alter the substrate specificity of the CRT. Combinations of two or three amino acid substitutions at four selected positions resulted in the loss of creatine transport activity and gain of a specific GABA transport function. GABA transport by the "gain of function" mutants was sensitive to nipecotic acid, a competitive inhibitor of GABA transporters. Our results show LeuT to be a good structural model to identify amino acid residues involved in the substrate and inhibitor selectivity of eukaryotic sodium-dependent neurotransmitter and amino acid transporters. However, modification of the binding site alone appears to be insufficient for efficient substrate translocation. Additional residues must mediate the conformational changes required for the diffusion of substrate from the binding site to the cytoplasm.

  8. Proper Fatty Acid Composition Rather than an Ionizable Lipid Amine Is Required for Full Transport Function of Lactose Permease from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Vitrac, Heidi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2013-01-01

    Energy-dependent uphill transport but not energy-independent downhill transport by lactose permease (LacY) is impaired when expressed in Escherichia coli cells or reconstituted in liposomes lacking phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and containing only anionic phospholipids. The absence of PE results in inversion of the N-terminal half and misfolding of periplasmic domain P7, which are required for uphill transport of substrates. Replacement of PE in vitro by lipids with no net charge (phosphatidylcholine (PC), monoglucosyl diacylglycerol (GlcDAG), or diglucosyl diacylglycerol (GlcGlcDAG)) supported wild type transmembrane topology of the N-terminal half of LacY. The restoration of uphill transport in vitro was dependent on LacY native topology and proper folding of P7. Support of uphill transport by net neutral lipids in vitro (PE > PC ≫ GlcDAG ≠ GlcGlcDAG provided that PE or PC contained one saturated fatty acid) paralleled the results observed previously in vivo (PE = PC > GlcDAG ≠ GlcGlcDAG). Therefore, a free amino group is not required for uphill transport as previously concluded based on the lack of in vitro uphill transport when fully unsaturated PC replaced E. coli-derived PE. A close correlation was observed in vivo and in vitro between the ability of LacY to carry out uphill transport, the native conformation of P7, and the lipid headgroup and fatty acid composition. Therefore, the headgroup and the fatty acid composition of lipids are important for defining LacY topological organization and catalytically important structural features, further illustrating the direct role of lipids, independent of other cellular factors, in defining membrane protein structure/function. PMID:23322771

  9. Ascorbic acid participates in a general mechanism for concerted glucose transport inhibition and lactate transport stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maite A; Angulo, Constanza; Brauchi, Sebastián; Nualart, Francisco; Concha, Ilona I

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel function for ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is an important water-soluble antioxidant and cofactor in various enzyme systems. We have previously demonstrated that an increase in neuronal intracellular ascorbic acid is able to inhibit glucose transport in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Because of the presence of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters, ascorbic acid is highly concentrated in brain, testis, lung, and adrenal glands. In this work, we explored how ascorbic acid affects glucose and lactate uptake in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Using immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, the expression of glucose and ascorbic acid transporters in non-neuronal cells was studied. Like neurons, HEK293 cells expressed GLUT1, GLUT3, and SVCT2. With radioisotope-based methods, only intracellular ascorbic acid, but not extracellular, inhibits 2-deoxyglucose transport in HEK293 cells. As monocarboxylates such as pyruvate and lactate, are important metabolic sources, we analyzed the ascorbic acid effect on lactate transport in cultured neurons and HEK293 cells. Intracellular ascorbic acid was able to stimulate lactate transport in both cell types. Extracellular ascorbic acid did not affect this transport. Our data show that ascorbic acid inhibits glucose transport and stimulates lactate transport in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Mammalian cells frequently present functional glucose and monocarboxylate transporters, and we describe here a general effect in which ascorbic acid functions like a glucose/monocarboxylate uptake switch in tissues expressing ascorbic acid transporters.

  10. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter: deglycosylation and limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kanner, B I; Keynan, S; Radian, R

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of 125I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the 125I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function was examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography [Radian, R., Bendahan, A., & Kanner, B.I. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15437-15441]. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, gamma-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  11. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  12. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  13. Functional consequences of sulfhydryl modification of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 at a single solvent-exposed cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Jaison J; Maestas, Matthew J; Rahnama-Vaghef, Ali; Choi, Ye E; Salto, Gerardo; Sanchez, Rachel V; Anderson, Cynthia M; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to optimize the experimental conditions for labeling extracellularly oriented, solvent-exposed cysteine residues of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) with the membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagent [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSET) and to characterize the functional and pharmacological consequences of labeling on transporter steady-state and presteady-state kinetic properties. We expressed human GAT1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and used radiotracer and electrophysiological methods to assay transporter function before and after sulfhydryl modification with MTSET. In the presence of NaCl, transporter exposure to MTSET (1-2.5 mM for 5-20 min) led to partial inhibition of GAT1-mediated transport, and this loss of function was completely reversed by the reducing reagent dithiothreitol. MTSET treatment had no functional effect on the mutant GAT1 C74A, whereas the membrane-permeant reagents N-ethylmaleimide and tetramethylrhodamine-6-maleimide inhibited GABA transport mediated by GAT1 C74A. Ion replacement experiments indicated that MTSET labeling of GAT1 could be driven to completion when valproate replaced chloride in the labeling buffer, suggesting that valproate induces a GAT1 conformation that significantly increases C74 accessibility to the extracellular fluid. Following partial inhibition by MTSET, there was a proportional reduction in both the presteady-state and steady-state macroscopic signals, and the functional and pharmacological properties of the remaining signals were indistinguishable from those of unlabeled GAT1. Therefore, covalent modification of GAT1 at C74 results in completely nonfunctional as well as electrically silent transporters.

  14. Transport of malic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the yeast Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed

    Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1990-04-01

    DL-Malic acid-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula anomala formed a saturable transport system that mediated accumulative transport of L-malic acid with the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Vmax, 0.20 nmol.s-1.mg (dry weight)-1; Km, 0.076 mM L-malate. Uptake of malic acid was accompanied by proton disappearance from the external medium with rates that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics as a function of malic acid concentration. Fumaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, oxaloacetic acid, D-malic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors of succinic acid transport, and all induced proton movements that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting that all of these dicarboxylates used the same transport system. Maleic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid, as well as other Krebs cycle acids such as citric and isocitric acids, were not accepted by the malate transport system. Km measurements as a function of pH suggested that the anionic forms of the acids were transported by an accumulative dicarboxylate proton symporter. The accumulation ratio at pH 5.0 was about 40. The malate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated succinic acid entered the cells slowly by simple diffusion. The permeability of the cells by undissociated acid increased with pH, with the diffusion constant increasing 100-fold between pH 3.0 and 6.0.

  15. Insights into a novel nuclear function for Fascin in the regulation of the amino-acid transporter SLC3A2

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Amine; Bijian, Krikor; Qiu, Dinghong; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Marques, Maud; Chang, Chia-Hao; Nassour, Hassan; Ramotar, Dindial; Damaraju, Sambasivarao; Mackey, John; Bismar, Tarek; Witcher, Michael; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.

    2016-01-01

    Fascin 1 (FSCN1) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein recognized to function primarily in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and formation of plasma membrane protrusions. Here we report a novel nuclear function for Fascin 1. Biochemical studies and genome wide localization using ChIP-seq identified phosphorylated Fascin 1 (pFascin) in complexes associated with transcription and that it co-localizes with histone H3 Lys4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) on chromatin. Gene expression profiling identified genes affected by Fascin 1 including SLC3A2, a gene encoding for a plasma membrane transporter that regulates intracellular amino acid levels. RbBP5, a subunit of the H3K4 histone methyltransferase (HMT) complex was found to interact with Fascin 1 supporting its role in H3K4me3 establishment at target genes. Moreover, we show that changes to SLC3A2 levels affect amino acid-mediated mTORC1 activation. These results reveal that Fascin 1 has a yet undiscovered nuclear function as an epigenetic modulator of genes essential for amino acid metabolism. PMID:27819326

  16. Transporter oligomerization: form and function

    PubMed Central

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alexander D.; Diallinas, George; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Transporters are integral membrane proteins with central roles in the efficient movement of molecules across biological membranes. Many transporters exist as oligomers in the membrane. Depending on the individual transport protein, oligomerization can have roles in membrane trafficking, function, regulation and turnover. For example, our recent studies on UapA, a nucleobase ascorbate transporter, from Aspergillus nidulans, have revealed both that dimerization of this protein is essential for correct trafficking to the membrane and the structural basis of how one UapA protomer can affect the function of the closely associated adjacent protomer. Here, we review the roles of oligomerization in many particularly well-studied transporters and transporter families. PMID:27913684

  17. Transport of Aromatic Amino Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the transport of aromatic amino acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed the existence of two high-affinity transport systems which recognized the three aromatic amino acids. From competition data and studies on the exchange of preformed aromatic amino acid pools, the first transport system was found to be functional with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan (in order of decreasing activity), whereas the second system was active with tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The two systems also transported a number of aromatic amino acid analogues but not other amino acids. Mutants defective in each of the two and in both transport systems were isolated and described. When the amino acids were added at low external concentrations to cells growing logarithmically in glucose minimal medium, the tryptophan pool very quickly became saturated. Under identical conditions, phenylalanine and tyrosine each accumulated in the intracellular pool of P. aeruginosa at a concentration which was 10 times greater than that of tryptophan. PMID:4994029

  18. Abscisic Acid Transport in Human Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Millo, Enrico; Fresia, Chiara; Turco, Emilia; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in the response to environmental stress. Recently, ABA has been shown to be present and active also in mammals, where it stimulates the functional activity of innate immune cells, of mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells, and insulin-releasing pancreatic β-cells. LANCL2, the ABA receptor in mammalian cells, is a peripheral membrane protein that localizes at the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Here we investigated the mechanism enabling ABA transport across the plasmamembrane of human red blood cells (RBC). Both influx and efflux of [3H]ABA occur across intact RBC, as detected by radiometric and chromatographic methods. ABA binds specifically to Band 3 (the RBC anion transporter), as determined by labeling of RBC membranes with biotinylated ABA. Proteoliposomes reconstituted with human purified Band 3 transport [3H]ABA and [35S]sulfate, and ABA transport is sensitive to the specific Band 3 inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid. Once inside RBC, ABA stimulates ATP release through the LANCL2-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase. As ATP released from RBC is known to exert a vasodilator response, these results suggest a role for plasma ABA in the regulation of vascular tone. PMID:25847240

  19. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces IκBα expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 μM), OA (100 μM), or PA (100 μM). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced IκBα expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus.

  20. Ligands targeting the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs).

    PubMed

    Dunlop, John; Butera, John A

    2006-01-01

    This review provides an overview of ligands for the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), a family of high-affinity glutamate transporters localized to the plasma membrane of neurons and astroglial cells. Ligand development from the perspective of identifying novel and more selective tools for elucidating transporter subtype function, and the potential of transporter ligands in a therapeutic setting are discussed. Acute pharmacological modulation of EAAT activity in the form of linear and conformationally restricted glutamate and aspartate analogs is presented, in addition to recent strategies aimed more toward modulating transporter expression levels, the latter of particular significance to the development of transporter based therapeutics.

  1. Cysteine transport through excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3).

    PubMed

    Watts, Spencer D; Torres-Salazar, Delany; Divito, Christopher B; Amara, Susan G

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) limit glutamatergic signaling and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. Of the five known EAAT isoforms (EAATs 1-5), only the neuronal isoform, EAAT3 (EAAC1), can efficiently transport the uncharged amino acid L-cysteine. EAAT3-mediated cysteine transport has been proposed to be a primary mechanism used by neurons to obtain cysteine for the synthesis of glutathione, a key molecule in preventing oxidative stress and neuronal toxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective transport of cysteine by EAAT3 have not been elucidated. Here we propose that the transport of cysteine through EAAT3 requires formation of the thiolate form of cysteine in the binding site. Using Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing EAAT2 and EAAT3, we assessed the transport kinetics of different substrates and measured transporter-associated currents electrophysiologically. Our results show that L-selenocysteine, a cysteine analog that forms a negatively-charged selenolate ion at physiological pH, is efficiently transported by EAATs 1-3 and has a much higher apparent affinity for transport when compared to cysteine. Using a membrane tethered GFP variant to monitor intracellular pH changes associated with transport activity, we observed that transport of either L-glutamate or L-selenocysteine by EAAT3 decreased intracellular pH, whereas transport of cysteine resulted in cytoplasmic alkalinization. No change in pH was observed when cysteine was applied to cells expressing EAAT2, which displays negligible transport of cysteine. Under conditions that favor release of intracellular substrates through EAAT3 we observed release of labeled intracellular glutamate but did not detect cysteine release. Our results support a model whereby cysteine transport through EAAT3 is facilitated through cysteine de-protonation and that once inside, the thiolate is rapidly re-protonated. Moreover, these findings suggest

  2. Transport of malic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the yeast Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed Central

    Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1990-01-01

    DL-Malic acid-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula anomala formed a saturable transport system that mediated accumulative transport of L-malic acid with the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Vmax, 0.20 nmol.s-1.mg (dry weight)-1; Km, 0.076 mM L-malate. Uptake of malic acid was accompanied by proton disappearance from the external medium with rates that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics as a function of malic acid concentration. Fumaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, oxaloacetic acid, D-malic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors of succinic acid transport, and all induced proton movements that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting that all of these dicarboxylates used the same transport system. Maleic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid, as well as other Krebs cycle acids such as citric and isocitric acids, were not accepted by the malate transport system. Km measurements as a function of pH suggested that the anionic forms of the acids were transported by an accumulative dicarboxylate proton symporter. The accumulation ratio at pH 5.0 was about 40. The malate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated succinic acid entered the cells slowly by simple diffusion. The permeability of the cells by undissociated acid increased with pH, with the diffusion constant increasing 100-fold between pH 3.0 and 6.0. PMID:2339872

  3. Amino Acid Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, Kunihiko

    1970-01-01

    The transport of d-alanine, d-glutamic acid, and d-valine in Mycobacterium smegmatis was compared quantitatively with that of their l-isomers. It appeared that the uptake of d-alanine was mediated by an active process displaying saturation kinetics characteristic of enzyme function, whereas the uptake of d-glutamic acid was accomplished by a passive process showing diffusion kinetics. Both processes were involved in the uptake of l-alanine, l-glutamic acid, d-valine, and l-valine. d-Valine competed with l-valine for entry into the cell through a single active process. d-Alanine and l-alanine also utilized the same active process, but the d-isomer could not enter the cell through the passive process. The passive process exhibited characteristics of diffusion, but was sensitive to sulfhydryl-blocking reagents and showed competition among structurally related amino acids. These last findings suggested that the passive process is a facilitated diffusion. PMID:5437732

  4. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  5. Ascorbic acid transport into cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, E.I.; May, V.; Eipper, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    An amidating enzyme designated peptidyl-glycine ..cap alpha..-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) has been studied in a variety of tissues and is dependent on molecular oxygen and stimulated by copper and ascorbic acid. To continue investigating the relationship among cellular ascorbic acid concentrations, amidating ability, and PAM activity, the authors studied ascorbic acid transport in three cell preparations that contain PAM and produce amidated peptides: primary cultures of rat anterior and intermediate pituitary and mouse AtT-20 tumor cells. When incubated in 50 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid all three cell preparations concentrated ascorbic acid 20- to 40-fold, producing intracellular ascorbate concentrations of 1 to 2 mM, based on experimentally determined cell volumes. All three cell preparations displayed saturable ascorbic acid uptake with half-maximal initial rates occurring between 9 and 18 ..mu..M ascorbate. Replacing NaCl in the uptake buffer with choline chloride significantly diminished ascorbate uptake in all three preparations. Ascorbic acid efflux from these cells was slow, displaying half-lives of 7 hours. Unlike systems that transport dehydroascorbic acid, the transport system for ascorbic acid in these cells was not inhibited by glucose. Thus, ascorbate is transported into pituitary cells by a sodium-dependent, active transport system.

  6. Novel properties of the wheat aluminum tolerance organic acid transporter (TaALMT1) revealed by electrophysiological characterization in Xenopus oocytes: Functional and structural implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plant species avoid the phytotoxic effects of aluminum (Al) by exuding organic acid anions which chelate Al3+ and prevent its entry into the root. Several novel genes that encode membrane transporters from the ALMT and MATE families have recently been cloned and implicated in mediating the orga...

  7. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions.

  8. Xenobiotic transporters: ascribing function from gene knockout and mutation studies.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Lu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Transporter-mediated absorption, secretion, and reabsorption of chemicals are increasingly recognized as important determinants in the biological activities of many xenobiotics. In recent years, the rapid progress in generating and characterizing mice with targeted deletion of transporters has greatly increased our knowledge of the functions of transporters in the pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics of xenobiotics. In this introduction, we focus on functions of transporters learned from experiments on knockout mice as well as humans and rodents with natural mutations of these transporters. We limit our discussion to transporters that either directly transport xenobiotics or are important in biliary excretion or cellular defenses, namely multidrug resistance, multidrug resistance-associated proteins, breast cancer resistance protein, organic anion transporting polypeptides, organic anion transporters, organic cation transporters, nucleoside transporters, peptide transporters, bile acid transporters, cholesterol transporters, and phospholipid transporters, as well as metal transporters. Efflux transporters in intestine, liver, kidney, brain, testes, and placenta can efflux xenobiotics out of cells and serve as barriers against the entrance of xenobiotics into cells, whereas many xenobiotics enter the biological system via uptake transporters. The functional importance of a given transporter in each tissue depends on its substrate specificity, expression level, and the presence/absence of other transporters with overlapping substrate preferences. Nevertheless, a transporter may affect a tissue independent of its local expression by altering systemic metabolism. Further studies on the gene regulation and function of transporters, as well as the interrelationship between transporters and phase I/II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, will provide a complete framework for developing novel strategies to protect us from xenobiotic insults.

  9. Amino Acid Transport into Cultured Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, H. Michael; Henke, Randolph R.

    1981-01-01

    Lysine transport into suspension-cultured Wisconsin-38 tobacco cells was observed. Uptake was linear (up to 90 minutes) with respect to time and amount of tissue only after 4 to 6 hours preincubation in calcium-containing medium. The observed cellular accumulation of lysine was against a concentration gradient and not due to exchange diffusion. Transport was stimulated by low pH and characterized by a biphasic uptake isotherm with two Km values for lysine. System I (Km ≃ 5 × 10−6 molar; Vmax ≃ 180 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour) and system II (Km ≃ 10−4 molar; Vmax ≃ 1900 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour) were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and a variety of respiratory inhibitors. This inhibition was not due to increased efflux. In antagonism experiments, system I was inhibited most effectively by basic amino acids, followed by the sulfur amino acids. System I was only slightly inhibited by the neutral and aromatic amino acids and was not inhibited by the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acids. Transport by system II was inhibited by all of the tested amino acids (including aspartic and glutamic acids) and analogs; however, this system was not inhibited by d-arginine. Neither system was strongly inhibited by d-lysine or the lysine analog S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine. Arginine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of both systems with values for Ki similar to the respective Km values. These studies suggest the presence of at least two amino acid permeases in W-38 tobacco cells. PMID:16661678

  10. Amino acid transport by prosthecae of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum: evidence for a broad-range transport system.

    PubMed

    Tam, E; Pate, J L

    1985-10-01

    Prosthecae purified from cells of Asticcaulis biprosthecum possess active transport systems that transport all 20 amino acids tested. Using ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulphate in the presence of oxygen, all 20 amino acids are accumulated against a concentration gradient by isolated prosthecae. Results of experiments testing the inhibition of transport of one amino acid by another, and of experiments testing the exchange of exogenous amino acids with those preloaded in prosthecae, along with characteristics of mutants defective in amino acid transport, suggest the presence in prosthecae of three amino acid transport systems. One, the general or G system, transports at least 18 of the 20 amino acids tested. Another system, referred to as the proline or P system, transports seven amino acids (including proline) that are also transported by the G system. The third system transports only glutamate and aspartate, and is referred to as the acidic amino acid transport system or A system.

  11. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Widdows, Kate L; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P; Please, Colin P; Hanson, Mark A; Sibley, Colin P; Johnstone, Edward D; Sengers, Bram G; Lewis, Rohan M; Glazier, Jocelyn D

    2015-06-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [(14)C]L-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [(14)C]L-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with L-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.

  12. Modeling Electrical Transport through Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing

    Nucleic acids play a vital role in many biological systems and activities. In recent years, engineers and scientists have been interested in studying their electrical properties. The motivation for these studies stems from the following facts: (1) the bases, which form the building blocks of nucleic acids, have unique ionization potentials. Further, nucleic acids are one of the few nanomaterials that can be reproducibly manufactured with a high degree of accuracy (though admittedly their placement at desired locations remains a challenge). As a result, designed strands with specific sequences may offer unique device properties; (2) electrical methods offer potential for sequencing nucleic acids based on a single molecule; (3) electrical methods for disease detection based on the current flowing through nucleic acids are beginning to be demonstrated. While experiments in the above mentioned areas is promising, a deeper understanding of the electrical current flow through the nucleic acids needs to be developed. The modeling of current flowing in these molecules is complex because: (1) they are based on atomic scale contacts between nucleic acids and metal, which cannot be reproducibly built; (2) the conductivity of nucleic acids is easily influenced by the environment, which is constantly changing; and (3) the nucleic acids by themselves are floppy. This thesis focuses on the modeling of electrical transport through nucleic acids that are connected to two metal electrodes at nanoscale. We first develop a decoherent transport model for the double-stranded helix based on the Landauer-Buttiker framework. This model is rationalized by comparison with an experiment that measured the conductance of four different DNA strands. The developed model is then used to study the: (1) potential to make barriers and wells for quantum transport using specifically engineered sequences; (2) change in the electrical properties of a specific DNA strand with and without methylation; (3

  13. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  14. Renal Transport of Uric Acid: Evolving Concepts and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Bobulescu, Ion Alexandru; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a metabolic waste product, uric acid has been proposed to be an important molecule with multiple functions in human physiology and pathophysiology and may be linked to human diseases beyond nephrolithiasis and gout. Uric acid homeostasis is determined by the balance between production, intestinal secretion, and renal excretion. The kidney is an important regulator of circulating uric acid levels, by reabsorbing around 90% of filtered urate, while being responsible for 60–70% of total body uric acid excretion. Defective renal handling of urate is a frequent pathophysiologic factor underpinning hyperuricemia and gout. In spite of tremendous advances over the past decade, the molecular mechanisms of renal urate transport are still incompletely understood. Many transport proteins are candidate participants in urate handling, with URAT1 and GLUT9 being the best characterized to date. Understanding these transporters is increasingly important for the practicing clinician as new research unveils their physiology, importance in drug action, and genetic association with uric acid levels in human populations. The future may see the introduction of new drugs that specifically act on individual renal urate transporters for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. PMID:23089270

  15. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  16. β-Sulfonamido Functionalized Aspartate Analogues as Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Inhibitors: Distinct Subtype Selectivity Profiles Arising from Subtle Structural Differences.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jacob C; Bjørn-Yoshimoto, Walden E; Bisballe, Niels; Nielsen, Birgitte; Jensen, Anders A; Bunch, Lennart

    2016-10-13

    In this study inspired by previous work on 3-substituted Asp analogues, we designed and synthesized a total of 32 β-sulfonamide Asp analogues and characterized their pharmacological properties at the excitatory amino acid transporter subtypes EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3. In addition to several potent EAAT inhibitors displaying IC50 values ∼1 μM at all three subtypes, this elaborate structure-activity relationship also identified analogues exhibiting distinct preferences or selectivities for specific transporter subtypes. Introduction of two fluorine atoms on the phenyl ring yielded analogue 4y that displayed an IC50 of 0.8 μM at EAAT1 with a 14- and 9-fold preference over EAAT2 and EAAT3, respectively. Conversely, the m-CF3-phenyl analogue 4r was a potent selective EAAT2-inhibitor (IC50 = 2.8 μM) exhibiting 30- and 50-fold selectivity over EAAT1 and EAAT3, respectively. In conclusion, even small structural differences in these β-sulfonamide Asp analogues provide analogues with diverse EAAT subtype selectivity profiles.

  17. Scallop DMT functions as a Ca2+ transporter.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Sayuri; Hosoi, Masatomi; Takagi, Masaya; Hayashi, Isao; Nakao, Kenji; Kaneko, Shuji

    2005-05-09

    We identified a DMT (divalent metal transporter) homologous protein that functions as a Ca(2+) transporter. Scallop DMT cDNA encodes a 539-amino-acid protein with 12 putative membrane-spanning domains and has a consensus transport motif in the fourth extracellular loop. Since its mRNA is significantly expressed in the gill and intestine, it is assumed that scallop DMT transports Ca(2+) from seawater by the gill and from food by the intestine. Scallop DMT lacks the iron-responsive element commonly found in iron-regulatory proteins, suggesting that it is free of the post-transcriptional regulation from intracellular Fe(2+) concentration. Scallop DMT distinctly functions as a Ca(2+) transporter unlike other DMTs, however, it also transports Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) similar to them.

  18. Fatty acids and lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Calder, P C; Yaqoob, P; Thies, F; Wallace, F A; Miles, E A

    2002-01-01

    The immune system acts to protect the host against pathogenic invaders. However, components of the immune system can become dysregulated such that their activities are directed against host tissues, so causing damage. Lymphocytes are involved in both the beneficial and detrimental effects of the immune system. Both the level of fat and the types of fatty acid present in the diet can affect lymphocyte functions. The fatty acid composition of lymphocytes, and other immune cells, is altered according to the fatty acid composition of the diet and this alters the capacity of those cells to produce eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2, which are involved in immunoregulation. A high fat diet can impair lymphocyte function. Cell culture and animal feeding studies indicate that oleic, linoleic, conjugated linoleic, gamma-linolenic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic, arachidonic, alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids can all influence lymphocyte proliferation, the production of cytokines by lymphocytes, and natural killer cell activity. High intakes of some of these fatty acids are necessary to induce these effects. Among these fatty acids the long chain n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid, appear to be the most potent when included in the human diet. Although not all studies agree, it appears that fish oil, which contains eicosapentaenoic acid, down regulates the T-helper 1-type response which is associated with chronic inflammatory disease. There is evidence for beneficial effects of fish oil in such diseases; this evidence is strongest for rheumatoid arthritis. Since n-3 fatty acids also antagonise the production of inflammatory eicosanoid mediators from arachidonic acid, there is potential for benefit in asthma and related diseases. Recent evidence indicates that fish oil may be of benefit in some asthmatics but not others.

  19. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  20. Asymmetric transcriptomic signatures between the cob and florets in the maize ear under optimal- and low-nitrogen conditions at silking, and functional characterization of amino acid transporters ZmAAP4 and ZmVAAT3

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoying; Hasan, Md. Mahmudul; Li, Yanqiang; Liao, Chengsong; Zheng, Hongyan; Liu, Renyi; Li, Xuexian

    2015-01-01

    Coordinated functioning of the cob and florets of the maize ear confers grain yield. The cob is critical for carbon partitioning and assimilated nitrogen (N) supply for grain development. However, molecular recognition of the cob and peripheral florets, characterization of genes mediating translocation of N assimilates, and responses of these two tissues to low N (LN) remain elusive. Transcriptional profiling of the ear of a maize hybrid at silking in the field revealed 1864 differentially expressed genes between the cob and florets, with 1314 genes up-regulated in the cob and 550 genes up-regulated in florets. The cob was characterized by striking enrichment of genes that are involved in carbon/N transport and metabolism, consistent with the physiological role of the cob in carbon/N storage and transfer during ear development. The florets were characterized by enrichment of hormone signalling components and development related genes. We next examined the response of the cob and florets to LN stress. LN caused differential expression of 588 genes in the cob and only 195 genes in the florets, indicating that the cob dominated the response of the ear to LN at the transcriptional level. LN caused comprehensive alterations such as carbon/N metabolism or partitioning, hormone signalling and protein phosphorylation in terms of gene expression in the cob and/or florets. Fourteen genes responsive specifically to LN provided potential molecular markers for N-efficient maize breeding. We further functionally characterized two newly identified broad-spectrum amino acid transporters, ZmAAP4 and ZmVAAT3, that showed distinct expression patterns in the cob and florets and potentially important roles in amino-N mobilization in the ear. While both proteins could transport various amino acids into yeast or Arabidopsis cells, ZmAAP4 appeared to have higher efficiencies than ZmVAAT3 in transporting seven out of 22 examined amino acids. PMID:26136266

  1. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ward

    2009-03-31

    Sucrose is the main photosynthetic product that is transported in the vasculature of plants. The long-distance transport of carbohydrates is required to support the growth and development of net-importing (sink) tissues such as fruit, seeds and roots. This project is focused on understanding the transport mechanism sucrose transporters (SUTs). These are proton-coupled sucrose uptake transporters (membrane proteins) that are required for transport of sucrose in the vasculature and uptake into sink tissues. The accomplishments of this project included: 1) the first analysis of substrate specificity for any SUT. This was accomplished using electrophysiology to analyze AtSUC2, a sucrose transporter from companion cells in Arabidopsis. 2) the first analysis of the transport activity for a monocot SUT. The transport kinetics and substrate specificity of HvSUT1 from barley were studied. 3) the first analysis of a sucrose transporter from sugarcane. and 4) the first analysis of transport activity of a sugar alcohol transporter homolog from plants, AtPLT5. During this period four primary research papers, funded directly by the project, were published in refereed journals. The characterization of several sucrose transporters was essential for the current effort in the analysis of structure/function for this gene family. In particular, the demonstration of strong differences in substrate specificity between type I and II SUTs was important to identify targets for site-directed mutagenesis.

  2. Neutralizing aspartate 83 modifies substrate translocation of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Hotzy, Jasmin; Machtens, Jan-Philipp; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-06-08

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft into neuronal and glial cells. EAATs are not only secondary active glutamate transporters but also function as anion channels. Gating of EAAT anion channels is tightly coupled to transitions within the glutamate uptake cycle, resulting in Na(+)- and glutamate-dependent anion currents. A point mutation neutralizing a conserved aspartic acid within the intracellular loop close to the end of transmembrane domain 2 was recently shown to modify the substrate dependence of EAAT anion currents. To distinguish whether this mutation affects transitions within the uptake cycle or directly modifies the opening/closing of the anion channel, we used voltage clamp fluorometry. Using three different sites for fluorophore attachment, V120C, M205C, and A430C, we observed time-, voltage-, and substrate-dependent alterations of EAAT3 fluorescence intensities. The voltage and substrate dependence of fluorescence intensities can be described by a 15-state model of the transport cycle in which several states are connected to branching anion channel states. D83A-mediated changes of fluorescence intensities, anion currents, and secondary active transport can be explained by exclusive modifications of substrate translocation rates. In contrast, sole modification of anion channel opening and closing is insufficient to account for all experimental data. We conclude that D83A has direct effects on the glutamate transport cycle and that these effects result in changed anion channel function.

  3. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  4. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  5. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  6. Folic acid-Functionalized Nanoparticles for Enhanced Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Emilie; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Kirtane, Ameya; Guru, Bharath Raja; Grill, Alex E.; Whittum-Hudson, Judith; Panyam, Jayanth

    2012-01-01

    The oral absorption of drugs that have poor bioavailability can be enhanced by encapsulation in polymeric nanoparticles. Transcellular transport of nanoparticle-encapsulated drug, possibly through transcytosis, is likely the major mechanism through which nanoparticles improve drug absorption. We hypothesized that the cellular uptake and transport of nanoparticles can be further increased by targeting the folate receptors expressed on the intestinal epithelial cells. The objective of this research was to study the effect of folic acid functionalization on transcellular transport of nanoparticle-encapsulated paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic with poor oral bioavailability. Surface-functionalized poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel were prepared by the interfacial activity assisted surface functionalization technique. Transport of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was investigated using Caco-2 cell monolayers as an in vitro model. Caco-2 cells were found to express folate receptor and the drug efflux protein, p-glycoprotein, to high levels. Encapsulation of paclitaxel in PLGA nanoparticles resulted in a 5-fold increase in apparent permeability (Papp) across Caco-2 cells. Functionalization of nanoparticles with folic acid further increased the transport (8-fold higher transport compared to free paclitaxel). Confocal microscopic studies showed that folic acid-functionalized nanoparticles were internalized by the cells and that nanoparticles did not have any gross effects on tight junction integrity. In conclusion, our studies indicate that folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have the potential to enhance the oral absorption of drugs with poor oral bioavailability. PMID:22670575

  7. Endothelium as a gatekeeper of fatty acid transport

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Devi; Wu, Jingxia; Papangeli, Irinna; Chun, Hyung J.

    2013-01-01

    The endothelium transcends all clinical disciplines and is key to the function of every organ system. A crucial, but poorly understood role of the endothelium is its ability to control the transport of energy supply according to organ needs. Fatty acids (FAs) in particular represent a key energy source that is utilized by a number of tissues, but whose utilization must be tightly regulated to avoid potentially deleterious consequences of excess accumulation, including insulin resistance. Recent studies have identified key endothelial signaling mechanisms involving vascular endothelial growth factor B, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and the peptide ligand apelin, that are critical to endothelial regulation of FA transport. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which these signaling pathways regulate this key endothelial function. PMID:24315207

  8. Structure and Function of Thyroid Hormone Plasma Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model. PMID:25538896

  9. Structure, function, and plasticity of GABA transporters

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    GABA transporters belong to a large family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. They are widely expressed throughout the brain, with different levels of expression in different brain regions. GABA transporters are present in neurons and in astrocytes and their activity is crucial to regulate the extracellular concentration of GABA under basal conditions and during ongoing synaptic events. Numerous efforts have been devoted to determine the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters. There is also evidence that the expression of GABA transporters on the cell membrane and their lateral mobility can be modulated by different intracellular signaling cascades. The strength of individual synaptic contacts and the activity of entire neuronal networks may be finely tuned by altering the density, distribution and diffusion rate of GABA transporters within the cell membrane. These findings are intriguing because they suggest the existence of complex regulatory systems that control the plasticity of GABAergic transmission in the brain. Here we review the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters and highlight the molecular mechanisms that alter the expression and mobility of GABA transporters at central synapses. PMID:24987330

  10. Novel Lactate Transporters from Carboxylic Acid-Producing Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  11. Transport mechanism and regulatory properties of the human amino acid transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5).

    PubMed

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Pochini, Lorena; Panni, Simona; Pingitore, Piero; Hedfalk, Kristina; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-11-01

    The kinetic mechanism of the transport catalyzed by the human glutamine/neutral amino acid transporter hASCT2 over-expressed in P. pastoris was determined in proteoliposomes by pseudo-bi-substrate kinetic analysis of the Na(+)-glutamineex/glutaminein transport reaction. A random simultaneous mechanism resulted from the experimental analysis. Purified functional hASCT2 was chemically cross-linked to a stable dimeric form. The oligomeric structure correlated well with the kinetic mechanism of transport. Half-saturation constants (Km) of the transporter for the other substrates Ala, Ser, Asn and Thr were measured both on the external and internal side. External Km were much lower than the internal ones confirming the asymmetry of the transporter. The electric nature of the transport reaction was determined imposing a negative inside membrane potential generated by K(+) gradients in the presence of valinomycin. The transport reaction resulted to be electrogenic and the electrogenicity originated from external Na(+). Internal Na(+) exerted a stimulatory effect on the transport activity which could be explained by a regulatory, not a counter-transport, effect. Native and deglycosylated hASCT2 extracted from HeLa showed the same transport features demonstrating that the glycosyl moiety has no role in transport function. Both in vitro and in vivo interactions of hASCT2 with the scaffold protein PDZK1 were revealed.

  12. Structural Determinants for Transport Across the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Using C-24 Bile Acid Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) re-absorbs gram quantities of bile acid daily and is a potential prodrug target to increase oral drug absorption. In the absence of a high resolution hASBT crystal structure, 3D-QSAR modeling may prove beneficial in designing prodrug targets to hASBT. The objective was to derive a conformationally sampled pharmacophore 3D–QSAR (CSP-SAR) model for the uptake of bile acid conjugates by hASBT. A series of bile acid conjugates of glutamyl chenodeoxycholate were evaluated in terms of Km and normalized Vmax(normVmax) using hASBT-MDCK cells. All mono-anionic conjugates were potent substrates. Dianions, cations and zwitterions, which bound with a high affinity, were not substrates. CSP-SAR models were derived using structural and physicochemical descriptors, and evaluated via cross-validation. The best CSP-SAR model for Km included two structural and two physiochemical descriptors, where substrate hydrophobicity enhanced affinity. A best CSP-SAR model for Km/normVmax employed one structural and three physicochemical descriptors, also indicating hydrophobicity enhanced efficiency. Overall, the bile acid C-24 region accommodated a range of substituted anilines, provided a single negative charge was present near C-24. In comparing uptake findings to prior inhibition results, increased hydrophobicity enhanced activity, with dianions and zwitterions hindering activity. PMID:20939504

  13. Structure and function of nucleotide sugar transporters: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Barbara; Maggioni, Andrea; Ashikov, Angel; Day, Christopher J.; Haselhorst, Thomas; Tiralongo, Joe

    2014-01-01

    The proteomes of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea are highly diverse due, in part, to the complex post-translational modification of protein glycosylation. The diversity of glycosylation in eukaryotes is reliant on nucleotide sugar transporters to translocate specific nucleotide sugars that are synthesised in the cytosol and nucleus, into the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus where glycosylation reactions occur. Thirty years of research utilising multidisciplinary approaches has contributed to our current understanding of NST function and structure. In this review, the structure and function, with reference to various disease states, of several NSTs including the UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine, GDP-fucose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine/UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose and CMP-sialic acid transporters will be described. Little is known regarding the exact structure of NSTs due to difficulties associated with crystallising membrane proteins. To date, no three-dimensional structure of any NST has been elucidated. What is known is based on computer predictions, mutagenesis experiments, epitope-tagging studies, in-vitro assays and phylogenetic analysis. In this regard the best-characterised NST to date is the CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST). Therefore in this review we will provide the current state-of-play with respect to the structure–function relationship of the (CST). In particular we have summarised work performed by a number groups detailing the affect of various mutations on CST transport activity, efficiency, and substrate specificity. PMID:25210595

  14. Ascorbic acid transport and accumulation in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Washko, P.; Rotrosen, D.; Levine, M. )

    1989-11-15

    The transport, accumulation, and distribution of ascorbic acid were investigated in isolated human neutrophils utilizing a new ascorbic acid assay, which combined the techniques of high performance liquid chromatography and coulometric electrochemical detection. Freshly isolated human neutrophils contained 1.0-1.4 mM ascorbic acid, which was localized greater than or equal to 94% to the cytosol, was not protein bound, and was present only as ascorbic acid and not as dehydroascorbic acid. Upon addition of ascorbic acid to the extracellular medium in physiologic amounts, ascorbic acid was accumulated in neutrophils in millimolar concentrations. Accumulation was mediated by a high affinity and a low affinity transporter; both transporters were responsible for maintenance of concentration gradients as large as 50-fold. The high affinity transporter had an apparent Km of 2-5 microns by Lineweaver-Burk and Eadie-Hofstee analyses, and the low affinity transporter had an apparent Km of 6-7 mM by similar analyses. Each transporter was saturable and temperature dependent. In normal human blood the high affinity transporter should be saturated, whereas the low affinity transporter should be in its linear phase of uptake.

  15. The role of L-type amino acid transporter 1 in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Summary L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is an L-type amino acid transporter and transports large neutral amino acids such as leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, methionine, and histidine. LAT1 was found to be highly expressed especially in human cancer tissues, and up-regulated LAT1 can lead to dysfunction in human tumor cells. These findings suggest that LAT1 plays an important role in human tumors. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of LAT1 expression and its clinical significance and function in tumors. PMID:26668776

  16. Valproic acid induces the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter-3 in human oligodendroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M G; Franchi-Gazzola, R; Reia, L; Allegri, M; Uggeri, J; Chiu, M; Sala, R; Bussolati, O

    2012-12-27

    Glutamate transport in early, undifferentiated oligodendrocytic precursors has not been characterized thus far. Here we show that human oligodendroglioma Hs683 cells are not endowed with EAAT-dependent anionic amino acid transport. However, in these cells, but not in U373 human glioblastoma cells, valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, markedly induces SLC1A1 mRNA, which encodes for the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The effect is detectable after 8h and persists up to 120h of treatment. EAAT3 protein increase becomes detectable after 24h of treatment and reaches its maximum after 72-96h, when it is eightfold more abundant than control. The initial influx of d-aspartate increases in parallel, exhibiting the typical features of an EAAT3-mediated process. SLC1A1 mRNA induction is associated with the increased expression of PDGFRA mRNA (+150%), a marker of early oligodendrocyte precursor cells, while the expression of GFAP, CNP and TUBB3 remains unchanged. Short term experiments have indicated that the VPA effect is shared by trichostatin A, another inhibitor of histone deacetylases. On the contrary, EAAT3 induction is neither prevented by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases nor triggered by a prolonged incubation with lithium, thus excluding a role for the GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Thus, the VPA-dependent induction of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in human oligodendroglioma cells likely occurs through an epigenetic mechanism and may represent an early indicator of commitment to oligodendrocytic differentiation.

  17. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  18. Transport of two naphthoic acids and salicylic acid in soil: experimental study and empirical modeling.

    PubMed

    Hanna, K; Lassabatere, L; Bechet, B

    2012-09-15

    In contrast to the parent compounds, the mechanisms responsible for the transport of natural metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in contaminated soils have been scarcely investigated. In this study, the sorption of three aromatic acids (1-naphthoic acid (NA), 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (HNA) and salicylic acid (SA)) was examined on soil, in a batch equilibrium single-system, with varying pH and acid concentrations. Continuous flow experiments were also carried out under steady-state water flow. The adsorption behavior of naphthoic and benzoic acids was affected by ligand functionality and molecular structure. All modeling options (equilibrium, chemical nonequilibrium, i.e. chemical kinetics, physical nonequilibrium, i.e. surface sites in the immobile water fraction, and both chemical and physical nonequilibrium) were tested in order to describe the breakthrough behavior of organic compounds in homogeneously packed soil columns. Tracer experiments showed a small fractionation of flow into mobile and immobile compartments, and the related hydrodynamic parameters were used for the modeling of reactive transport. In all cases, the isotherm parameters obtained from column tests differed from those derived from the batch experiments. The best accurate modeling was obtained considering nonequilibrium for the three organic compounds. Both chemical and physical nonequilibrium led to appropriate modeling for HNA and NA, while chemical nonequilibrium was the sole option for SA. SA sorption occurs mainly in mobile water and results from the concomitancy of instantaneous and kinetically limited sites. For all organic compounds, retention is contact condition dependent and differs between batch and column experiments. Such results show that preponderant mechanisms are solute dependent and kinetically limited, which has important implications for the fate and transport of carboxylated aromatic compounds in contaminated soils.

  19. Functional genomics of membrane transporters in human populations.

    PubMed

    Urban, Thomas J; Sebro, Ronnie; Hurowitz, Evan H; Leabman, Maya K; Badagnani, Ilaria; Lagpacan, Leah L; Risch, Neil; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2006-02-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward characterizing human DNA sequence variation, there remains a deficiency in information on human phenotypic variation at the single-gene level. We systematically analyzed the function of all protein-altering variants of eleven membrane transporters in heterologous expression systems. Coding-region variants were identified by screening DNA from a large sample (n = 247-276) of ethnically diverse subjects. In total, we functionally analyzed 88 protein-altering variants. Fourteen percent of the polymorphic variants (defined as variants with allele frequencies > or =1% in at least one major ethnic group) had no activity or significantly reduced function. Decreased function variants had significantly lower allele frequencies and were more likely to alter evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues. However, variants at evolutionarily conserved positions with approximately normal activity in cellular assays were also at significantly lower allele frequencies, suggesting that some variants with apparently normal activity in biochemical assays may influence occult functions or quantitative degrees of function that are important in human fitness but not measured in these assays. For example, eight (14%) of the 58 variants for which we had measured the transport of at least two substrates showed substrate-specific defects in transport. These variants and the reduced function variants provide plausible candidates for disease susceptibility or variation in clinical drug response.

  20. Thermodynamics of Ionic Transport through Functionalized Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathee, Vikramjit; Qu, Siyi; Dilenschneider, Theodore; Phillip, William A.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    Through microphase separation of block copolymers, highly porous solid membranes may be assembled. Further functionalization with amine and sulfonic acid groups has demonstrated promise in exquisitely controlling the flux of charged species, and in particular multivalent ions. Using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we explore the essential thermodynamics underlying salt rejection in charge-functionalized membranes, and develop a model capable of linking the performance of these membranes to their molecular character through free energy calculations.

  1. Particulate distribution function evolution for ejecta transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Plohr, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    The time evolution of the ejecta distribution function in a gas is discussed in the context of the recent experiments of W. Buttler and M. Zellner for well characterized Sn surfaces. Evolution equations are derived for the particulate distribution function when the dominant gas-particle interaction in is particulate drag. In the approximation of separability of the distribution function in velocity and size, the solution for the time dependent distribution function is a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind whose kernel is expressible in terms of the vacuum time dependent velocity distribution function measured with piezo probes or Asay foils. The solution of this equation in principle gives the size distribution function. We discuss the solution of this equation and the results of the Buttler - Zellner experiments. These suggest that correlations in velocity and size are necessary for a complete description of the transport dala. The solutions presented also represent an analytic test problem for the calculated distribution function in ejecta transport implementations.

  2. Amino-acid transporters in T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ren, W; Liu, G; Yin, J; Tan, B; Wu, G; Bazer, F W; Peng, Y; Yin, Y

    2017-03-02

    T-cell-mediated immune responses aim to protect mammals against cancers and infections, and are also involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Cellular uptake and the utilization of nutrients is closely related to the T-cell fate decision and function. Research in this area has yielded surprising findings in the importance of amino-acid transporters for T-cell development, homeostasis, activation, differentiation and memory. In this review, we present current information on amino-acid transporters, such as LAT1 (l-leucine transporter), ASCT2 (l-glutamine transporter) and GAT-1 (γ-aminobutyric acid transporter-1), which are critically important for mediating peripheral naive T-cell homeostasis, activation and differentiation, especially for Th1 and Th17 cells, and even memory T cells. Mechanically, the influence of amino-acid transporters on T-cell fate decision may largely depend on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. These discoveries remarkably demonstrate the role of amino-acid transporters in T-cell fate determination, and strongly indicate that manipulation of the amino-acid transporter-mTORC1 axis could ameliorate many inflammatory or autoimmune diseases associated with T-cell-based immune responses.

  3. Identification of a novel sialic acid transporter in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Post, Deborah M B; Mungur, Rachna; Gibson, Bradford W; Munson, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, produces a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) which terminates in N-acetyllactosamine. This glycoform can be further extended by the addition of a single sialic acid residue to the terminal galactose moiety. H. ducreyi does not synthesize sialic acid, which must be acquired from the host during infection or from the culture medium when the bacteria are grown in vitro. However, H. ducreyi does not have genes that are highly homologous to the genes encoding known bacterial sialic acid transporters. In this study, we identified the sialic acid transporter by screening strains in a library of random transposon mutants for those mutants that were unable to add sialic acid to N-acetyllactosamine-containing LOS. Mutants that reacted with the monoclonal antibody 3F11, which recognizes the terminal lactosamine structure, and lacked reactivity with the lectin Maackia amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, were further characterized to demonstrate that they produced a N-acetyllactosamine-containing LOS by silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analyses. The genes interrupted in these mutants were mapped to a four-gene cluster with similarity to genes encoding bacterial ABC transporters. Uptake assays using radiolabeled sialic acid confirmed that the mutants were unable to transport sialic acid. This study is the first report of bacteria using an ABC transporter for sialic acid uptake.

  4. Ammonia Transporters and Their Role in Acid-Base Balance.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2017-04-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is critical to maintenance of normal health. Renal ammonia excretion is the quantitatively predominant component of renal net acid excretion, both under basal conditions and in response to acid-base disturbances. Although titratable acid excretion also contributes to renal net acid excretion, the quantitative contribution of titratable acid excretion is less than that of ammonia under basal conditions and is only a minor component of the adaptive response to acid-base disturbances. In contrast to other urinary solutes, ammonia is produced in the kidney and then is selectively transported either into the urine or the renal vein. The proportion of ammonia that the kidney produces that is excreted in the urine varies dramatically in response to physiological stimuli, and only urinary ammonia excretion contributes to acid-base homeostasis. As a result, selective and regulated renal ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells is central to acid-base homeostasis. Both molecular forms of ammonia, NH3 and NH4(+), are transported by specific proteins, and regulation of these transport processes determines the eventual fate of the ammonia produced. In this review, we discuss these issues, and then discuss in detail the specific proteins involved in renal epithelial cell ammonia transport.

  5. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  6. Unraveling fatty acid transport and activation mechanisms in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Thévenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Fatty acid (FA) transport and activation have been extensively studied in the model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae but have rarely been examined in oleaginous yeasts, such as Yarrowia lipolytica. Because the latter begins to be used in biodiesel production, understanding its FA transport and activation mechanisms is essential. We found that Y. lipolytica has FA transport and activation proteins similar to those of S. cerevisiae (Faa1p, Pxa1p, Pxa2p, Ant1p) but mechanism of FA peroxisomal transport and activation differs greatly with that of S. cerevisiae. While the ScPxa1p/ScPxa2p heterodimer is essential for growth on long-chain FAs, ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 is not impaired for growth on FAs. Meanwhile, ScAnt1p and YlAnt1p are both essential for yeast growth on medium-chain FAs, suggesting they function similarly. Interestingly, we found that the ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 ΔYlant1 mutant was unable to grow on short-, medium-, or long-chain FAs, suggesting that YlPxa1p, YlPxa2p, and YlAnt1p belong to two different FA degradation pathways. We also found that YlFaa1p is involved in FA storage in lipid bodies and that FA remobilization largely depended on YlFat1p, YlPxa1p and YlPxa2p. This study is the first to comprehensively examine FA intracellular transport and activation in oleaginous yeast.

  7. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L−1, whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L−1. Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:25633653

  8. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-30

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L(-1), whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L(-1). Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms.

  9. Transporters for ammonium, amino acids and peptides are expressed in pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, W; Frommer, W B; Ward, J M

    1999-03-01

    Insect capture and digestion contribute substantially to the nitrogen budget of carnivorous plants. In Nepenthes, insect-derived nitrogenous compounds are imported from the pitcher fluid and transported throughout the plant via the vascular tissue to support growth. Import and distribution of nutrients may require transmembrane nitrogen transporters. Representatives of three classes of genes encoding transporters for the nitrogenous compounds ammonium, amino acids and peptides were identified in Nepenthes pitchers. The expression at the cellular level of an ammonium transporter gene, three amino acid transporter genes, and one peptide transporter gene were investigated in the insect trapping organs of Nepenthes. Expression of the ammonium transporter gene NaAMT1 was detected in the head cells of digestive glands in the lower part of the pitcher where NaAMT1 may function in ammonium uptake from the pitcher fluid. One amino acid transporter gene, NaAAP1, was expressed in bundle sheath cells surrounding the vascular tissue. To understand the locations where transmembrane transport could be required within the pitcher, symplasmic and apoplasmic continuity was probed using fluorescent dyes. Symplasmic connections were not found between cortical cells and vascular bundles. Therefore, the amino acid transporter encoded by NaAAP1 may be involved in transport of amino acids into the vascular tissue. In contrast, expression of the peptide transporter gene NaNTR1 was detected in phloem cells of the vascular tissue within pitchers. NaNTR1 may function in the export of nitrogen from the pitcher by loading peptides into the phloem.

  10. Transport of aromatic amino acids by Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Boyaval, P; Moreira, E; Desmazeaud, M J

    1983-09-01

    Whole metabolizing Brevibacterium linens cells were used to study the transport of aromatic amino acids. Kinetic results followed the Michaelis-Menten equation with apparent Km values for phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan of 24, 3.5, and 1.8 microM. Transport of these amino acids was optimum at pH 7.5 and 25 degrees C for phenylalanine and pH 8.0 and 35 degrees C for tyrosine and tryptophan. Crossed inhibitions were all noncompetitive. The only marked stereospecificity was for the L form of phenylalanine. Transport was almost totally inhibited by carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Iodoacetate and N-ethylmaleimide were much more inhibitory for tryptophan transport than for transport of the other two aromatic amino acids.

  11. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  12. Development of intestinal transport function in mammals.

    PubMed

    Pácha, J

    2000-10-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decade in the understanding of mechanisms responsible for the ontogenetic changes of mammalian intestine. This review presents the current knowledge about the development of intestinal transport function in the context of intestinal mucosa ontogeny. The review predominantly focuses on signals that trigger and/or modulate the developmental changes of intestinal transport. After an overview of the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal mucosa, data about the bidirectional traffic (absorption and secretion) across the developing intestinal epithelium are presented. The largest part of the review is devoted to the description of developmental patterns concerning the absorption of nutrients, ions, water, vitamins, trace elements, and milk-borne biologically active substances. Furthermore, the review examines the development of intestinal secretion that has a variety of functions including maintenance of the fluidity of the intestinal content, lubrication of mucosal surface, and mucosal protection. The age-dependent shifts of absorption and secretion are the subject of integrated regulatory mechanisms, and hence, the input of hormonal, nervous, immune, and dietary signals is reviewed. Finally, the utilization of energy for transport processes in the developing intestine is highlighted, and the interactions between various sources of energy are discussed. The review ends with suggestions concerning possible directions of future research.

  13. Bile acid transport in sister of P-glycoprotein (ABCB11) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ping; Wang, Renxue; Ling, Victor

    2005-09-20

    In vertebrates, bile flow is essential for movement of water and solutes across liver canalicular membranes. In recent years, the molecular motor of canalicular bile acid secretion has been identified as a member of the ATP binding cassette transporter (ABC) superfamily, known as sister of P-glycoprotein (Spgp) or bile salt export pump (Bsep, ABCB11). In humans, mutations in the BSEP gene are associated with a very low level of bile acid secretion and severe cholestasis. However, as reported previously, because the spgp(-)(/)(-) knockout mice do not express severe cholestasis and have substantial bile acid secretion, we investigated the "alternative transport system" that allows these mice to be physiologically relatively normal. We examined the expression levels of several ABC transporters in spgp(-)(/)(-) mice and found that the level of multidrug resistance Mdr1 (P-glycoprotein) was strikingly increased while those of Mdr2, Mrp2, and Mrp3 were increased to only a moderate extent. We hypothesize that an elevated level of Mdr1 in the spgp(-)(/)(-) knockout mice functions as an alternative pathway to transport bile acids and protects hepatocytes from bile acid-induced cholestasis. In support of this hypothesis, we showed that plasma membrane vesicles isolated from a drug resistant cell line expressing high levels of P-glycoprotein were capable of transporting bile acids, albeit with a 5-fold lower affinity compared to Spgp. This finding is the first direct evidence that P-glycoprotein (Mdr1) is capable of transporting bile acids.

  14. Structure and mechanism of a Na+-independent amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Paul L; Goehring, April; Shankaranarayanan, Aruna; Gouaux, Eric

    2009-08-21

    Amino acid, polyamine, and organocation (APC) transporters are secondary transporters that play essential roles in nutrient uptake, neurotransmitter recycling, ionic homeostasis, and regulation of cell volume. Here, we present the crystal structure of apo-ApcT, a proton-coupled broad-specificity amino acid transporter, at 2.35 angstrom resolution. The structure contains 12 transmembrane helices, with the first 10 consisting of an inverted structural repeat of 5 transmembrane helices like the leucine transporter LeuT. The ApcT structure reveals an inward-facing, apo state and an amine moiety of lysine-158 located in a position equivalent to the sodium ion site Na2 of LeuT. We propose that lysine-158 is central to proton-coupled transport and that the amine group serves the same functional role as the Na2 ion in LeuT, thus demonstrating common principles among proton- and sodium-coupled transporters.

  15. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Miguel V; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 μm, niflumic acid caused a 19 ± 5 % reduction in l-[3H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of dl-[3H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the l-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, l-glutamate and l-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the l-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the l-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters. PMID:11432999

  16. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, M V; Vandenberg, R J

    2001-07-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. 2. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 microM, niflumic acid caused a 19 +/- 5 % reduction in L-[(3)H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of DL-[(3)H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. 3. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the L-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. 4. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, L-glutamate and L-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the L-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the L-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. 5. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters.

  17. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.; Schachtman, Daniel P.; Clemens, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  18. Modeling acid transport in chemically amplified resist films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-03-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tert butyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a non-linear dependence on acid loading. The degree of anomalous character is reduced by increasing the post-exposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings indicate that the acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. Furthermore, the acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  19. Luminal Heterodimeric Amino Acid Transporter Defective in Cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Rahel; Loffing, Jan; Rossier, Grégoire; Bauch, Christian; Meier, Christian; Eggermann, Thomas; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Kühn, Lukas C.; Verrey, François

    1999-01-01

    Mutations of the glycoprotein rBAT cause cystinuria type I, an autosomal recessive failure of dibasic amino acid transport (b0,+ type) across luminal membranes of intestine and kidney cells. Here we identify the permease-like protein b0,+AT as the catalytic subunit that associates by a disulfide bond with rBAT to form a hetero-oligomeric b0,+ amino acid transporter complex. We demonstrate its b0,+-type amino acid transport kinetics using a heterodimeric fusion construct and show its luminal brush border localization in kidney proximal tubule. These biochemical, transport, and localization characteristics as well as the chromosomal localization on 19q support the notion that the b0,+AT protein is the product of the gene defective in non-type I cystinuria. PMID:10588648

  20. Differential diagnosis of (inherited) amino acid metabolism or transport disorders.

    PubMed

    Blom, W; Huijmans, J G

    1992-02-01

    Disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport are most clearly expressed in urine. Nevertheless the interpretation of abnormalities in urinary amino acid excretion remains difficult. An increase or decrease of almost every amino acid in urine can be due to various etiology. To differentiate between primary and secondary aminoacido-pathies systematic laboratory investigation is necessary. Early diagnosis of disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport is very important, because most of them can be treated, leading to the prevention of (further) clinical abnormalities. In those disorders, which cannot be treated, early diagnosis in an index-patient may prevent the birth of other siblings by means of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.Primary aminoacidopathies can be due to genetically determined transport disorders and enzyme deficiencies in amino acid metabolism or degradation. Secondary aminoacidopathies are the result of abnormal or deficient nutrition, intestinal dysfunction, organ pathology or other metabolic diseases like organic acidurias.A survey of amino acid metabolism and transport abnormalities will be given, illustrated with metabolic pathways and characteristic abnormal amino acid chromatograms.

  1. Functional polymers for anhydrous proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikkannagari, Nagamani

    Anhydrous proton conducting polymers are highly sought after for applications in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). N-heterocycles (eg. imidazole, triazole, and benzimidazole), owing to their amphoteric nature, have been widely studied to develop efficient anhydrous proton transporting polymers. The proton conductivity of N-heterocyclic polymers is influenced by several factors and the design and development of polymers with a delicate balance among various synergistic and competing factors to provide appreciable proton conductivities has been a challenging task. In this thesis, the proton transport (PT) characteristics of polymers functionalized with two diverse classes of functional groups--- N-heterocycles and phenols have been investigated and efforts have been made to develop the molecular design criteria for the design and development of efficient proton transporting functional groups and polymers. The proton conduction pathway in 1H-1,2,3-triazole polymers is probed by employing structurally analogous N-heterocyclic (triazole, imidazole, and pyrazole) and benz-N-heterocyclic (benzotriazole, benzimidazole, and benzopyrazole) polymers. Imidazole-like pathway was found to dominate the proton conductivity of triazole and pyrazole-like pathway makes only a negligible contribution, if any. Polymers containing benz-N-heterocycles exhibited higher proton conductivity than those with the corresponding N-heterocycles. Pyrazole-like functional groups, i.e. the molecules with two nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other, were found not to be good candidates for PT applications. A new class of proton transporting functional groups, phenols, has been introduced for anhydrous PT. One of the highlighting features of phenols over N-heterocycles is that the hydrogen bond donor/acceptor reorientation can happen on a single -OH site, allowing for facile reorientational dynamics in Grotthuss PT and enhanced proton conductivities in phenolic polymers

  2. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm−2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene–graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  3. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ~28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm-2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene-graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime.

  4. LAT1 is the transport competent unit of the LAT1/CD98 heterodimeric amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lara; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena; Albanese, Leticia Maria; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    LAT1 (SLC7A5) and CD98 (SLC3A2) constitute a heterodimeric transmembrane protein complex that catalyzes amino acid transport. Whether one or both subunits are competent for transport is still unclear. The present work aims to solve this question using different experimental strategies. Firstly, LAT1 and CD98 were immuno-detected in protein extracts from SiHa cells. Under oxidizing conditions, i.e., without addition of SH (thiol) reducing agent DTE, both proteins were revealed as a 120kDa major band. Upon DTE treatment separated bands, corresponding to LAT1(35kDa) or CD98(80kDa), were detected. LAT1 function was evaluated in intact cells as BCH sensitive [(3)H]His transport inhibited by hydrophobic amino acids. Antiport of [(3)H]His was measured in proteoliposomes reconstituted with SiHa cell extract in presence of internal His. Transport was increased by DTE. Hydrophobic amino acids were best inhibitors in addition to hydrophilic Tyr, Gln, Asn and Lys. Cys, Tyr and Gln, included in the intraliposomal space, were transported in antiport with external [(3)H]His. Similar experiments were performed in proteoliposomes reconstituted with the recombinant purified hLAT1. Results overlapping those obtained with native protein were achieved. Lower transport of [(3)H]Leu and [(3)H]Gln with respect to [(3)H]His was detected. Kinetic asymmetry was found with external Km for His lower than internal one. No transport was detected in proteoliposomes reconstituted with recombinant hCD98. The experimental data demonstrate that LAT1 is the sole transport competent subunit of the heterodimer. This conclusion has important outcome for following studies on functional characterization and identification of specific inhibitors with potential application in human therapy.

  5. Mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport is mediated by a low-affinity form of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Montesino, Carola; Roa, Francisco J; Peña, Eduardo; González, Mauricio; Sotomayor, Kirsty; Inostroza, Eveling; Muñoz, Carolina A; González, Iván; Maldonado, Mafalda; Soliz, Carlos; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2014-05-01

    sensitive to an intracellular microenvironment low in sodium and high in potassium, and functions as a low-affinity ascorbic acid transporter. We propose that the mitochondrial localization of SVCT2 is a property shared across cells, tissues, and species.

  6. Intestinal transport of sugars and amino acids in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ward A.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.

    1970-01-01

    The specificity and mechanism of altered intestinal transport of diabetic rats was studied with an everted ring technique. Increased intracellular accumulation of amino acids, as well as galactose and 3-O-methylglucose, was demonstrated in diabetes. The greater accumulation by diabetic intestine could not be attributed to a direct effect of the agent used to induce diabetes or to an alteration in food consumption. Although the changes were related to the severity of diabetes and could be reversed with treatment with insulin, they could not be modified by addition of insulin in vitro. The changes could not be induced in control intestine either with hyperglycemia from glucose infusion or preincubation with glucose in vitro. Although the higher concentration gradients of amino acids, galactose, and 3-O-methylglucose could result from increased energy utilization by diabetic intestine, an alteration of cell membrane function, as well, is suggested by the demonstration with kinetic studies of increased influx with an increase in Vmax. PMID:5409812

  7. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs): regulation of expression and function.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Martin; Riha, Juliane; Wlcek, Katrin; Jaeger, Walter; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2011-02-01

    Eleven members of the human organic anion transporter (OATP) family (grouped into six families) facilitate the Na(+)- independent transmembrane transport of various endo- and xenobiotics (bile acids, bilirubin, steroid hormone conjugates, thyroid hormones, prostaglandins, clinically used drugs, and toxins). OATPs are 12-transmembrane glycoproteins (643-722 amino acids) and contain many conserved structural features, for example, eleven cysteines in the large extracellular loop 5. They are important for proper transport, for which translocation of substrates through a central, positively-charged pore in a rocker-switch-type mechanism has been proposed. Although OATPs are expressed in various cells and tissues, some members show a more restricted pattern (well-studied OATP1B1/OATP1B3 in liver, OATP4C1 in kidney, and OATP6A1 in testis). In cancer, the distribution pattern is no longer maintained, and OATPs, like OATP1B3, become upregulated in malignant tissues (colon, breast, prostate). Studies in cell lines and animal models further revealed that the expression of OATPs is regulated in a cell- and tissue-specific way by cytokines and activation of nuclear receptors (LXR, FXR, PXR, CAR, HNF4). Also epigenetic mechanisms and postranslational modifications influence their expression and function. Therefore, changes in the expression of OATPs under pathological conditions will influence transport processes causing an altered accumulation of OATP substrates in cells of excretory organs (intestine, liver, kidney) and on various blood/organ barriers (such as brain, testis, placenta). For drugs, this may result in increased toxicity and adverse drug reactions. Therefore, it is important to improve the knowledge on the regulation and function of individual OATPs, and to apply it for therapeutic considerations.

  8. Transported acid aerosols measured in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Koutrakis, Petros; Allen, George A.; Raizenne, Mark; Stern, Bonnie

    During the period 29 June 1986-9 August 1986, a field health study assessing the acute health effects of air pollutants on children was conducted at a summer girls' camp on the northern shore of Lake Erie in SW Ontario. Continuous air pollution measurements of SO 2, O 3, NO x, particulate sulfates, light scattering, and meteorological measurements including temperature, dew point, and wind speed and direction were made. Twelve-hour integrated samples of size fractioned particles were also obtained using dichotomous samplers and Harvard impactors equipped with an ammonia denuder for subsequent hydrogen ion determination. Particulate samples were analyzed for trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and Neutron Activation, and for organic and elemental carbon by a thermal/optical technique. The measured aerosol was periodically very acidic with observed 12-h averaged H + concentrations in the range < 10-560 nmoles m -3. The aerosol H + appeared to represent the net strong acidity after H 2SO 4 reaction with NH 3(g). Average daytime concentrations were higher than night-time for aerosol H +, sulfate, fine mass and ozone. Prolonged episodes of atmospheric acidity, sulfate, and ozone were associated with air masses arriving at the measurement site from the west and from the southwest over Lake Erie. Sulfate concentrations measured at the lakeshore camp were more than twice those measured at inland sites during extreme pollution episodes. The concentration gradient observed with onshore flow was potentially due to enhanced deposition near the lakeshore caused by discontinuities in the meteorological fields in this region.

  9. Specific lysosomal transport of small neutral amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pisoni, R.L.; Flickinger, K.S.; Thoene, J.G.; Christensen, H.N.

    1986-05-01

    Studies of amino acid exodus from lysosomes have allowed us previously to describe transport systems specific for cystine and another for cationic amino acids in fibroblast lysosomes. They are now able to study amino acid uptake into highly purified fibroblast lysosomes obtained by separating crude granular fraction on gradients formed by centrifugation in 35% isoosmotic Percoll solutions. Analog inhibition and saturation studies indicate that L-(/sup 14/C)proline (50 ..mu..M) uptake by fibroblast lysosomes at 37/sup 0/C in 50 mM citrate/tris pH 7.0 buffer containing 0.25 M sucrose is mediated by two transport systems, one largely specific for L-proline and the other for which transport is shared with small neutral amino acids such as alanine, serine and threonine. At 7 mM, L-proline inhibits L-(/sup 14/C)proline uptake almost completely, whereas ala, ser, val, thr, gly, N-methylalanine and sarcosine inhibit proline uptake by 50-65%. The system shared by alanine, serine and threonine is further characterized by these amino acids strongly inhibiting the uptakes of each other. Lysosomal proline transport is selective for the L-isomer of the amino acid, and is scarcely inhibited by 7 mM arg, glu, asp, leu, phe, his, met, (methylamino) isobutyrate, betaine or N,N-dimethylglycine. Cis or trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline inhibit proline uptake only slightly. In sharp contrast to the fibroblast plasma membrane in which Na/sup +/ is required for most proline and alanine transport, lysosomal uptake of these amino acids occurs independently of Na/sup +/.

  10. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  11. Neutral amino acid transport across brain microvessel endothelial cell monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Audus, K.L.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1986-03-01

    Brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMEC) which form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) possess an amino acid carrier specific for large neutral amino acids (LNAA). The carrier is important for facilitating the delivery of nutrient LNAA's and centrally acting drugs that are LNAA's, to the brain. Bovine BMEC's were isolated and grown up to complete monolayers on regenerated cellulose-membranes in primary culture. To study the transendothelial transport of leucine, the monolayers were placed in a side-by-side diffusion cell, and transport across the monolayers followed with (/sup 3/H)-leucine. The transendothelial transport of leucine in this in vitro model was determined to be bidirectional, and time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent. The transport of leucine was saturable and the apparent K/sub m/ and V/sub max/, 0.18 mM and 6.3 nmol/mg/min, respectively. Other LNAA's, including the centrally acting drugs, ..cap alpha..-methyldopa, L-DOPA, ..cap alpha..-methyl-tyrosine, and baclofen, inhibited leucine transport. The leucine carrier was also found to be stereospecific and not sensitive to inhibitors of active transport. These results are consistent with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Primary cultures of BMEC's appear to be a potentially important tool for investigating at the cellular level, the transport mechanisms of the BBB.

  12. Retinoic acid induces expression of the thyroid hormone transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8).

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takahiko; Liu, Yan-Yun; Richter, Laura L; Mody, Kaizeen; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Brent, Gregory A

    2010-08-27

    Retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone are critical for differentiation and organogenesis in the embryo. Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), expressed predominantly in the brain and placenta, mediates thyroid hormone uptake from the circulation and is required for normal neural development. RA induces differentiation of F9 mouse teratocarcinoma cells toward neurons as well as extraembryonal endoderm. We hypothesized that Mct8 is functionally expressed in F9 cells and induced by RA. All-trans-RA (tRA) and other RA receptor (RAR) agonists dramatically (>300-fold) induced Mct8. tRA treatment significantly increased uptake of triiodothyronine and thyroxine (4.1- and 4.3-fold, respectively), which was abolished by a selective Mct8 inhibitor, bromosulfophthalein. Sequence inspection of the Mct8 promoter region and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR analysis in F9 cells identified 11 transcription start sites and a proximal Sp1 site but no TATA box. tRA significantly enhanced Mct8 promoter activity through a consensus RA-responsive element located 6.6 kilobases upstream of the coding region. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated binding of RAR and retinoid X receptor to the RA response element. The promotion of thyroid hormone uptake through the transcriptional up-regulation of Mct8 by RAR is likely to be important for extraembryonic endoderm development and neural differentiation. This finding demonstrates cross-talk between RA signaling and thyroid hormone signaling in early development at the level of the thyroid hormone transporter.

  13. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  14. Effect of common polymorphisms of the farnesoid X receptor and bile acid transporters on the pharmacokinetics of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao; Fok, Benny S P; Wo, Siu-Kwan; Lee, Vincent H L; Zuo, Zhong; Tomlinson, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a natural, dihydroxy bile acid, promotes gallstone dissolution and has been attributed with several other beneficial effects. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) may influence the pharmacokinetics of UDCA by modulating the expression of bile acid transporters. This exploratory study examined whether common functional polymorphisms in FXR and in bile acid transporter genes affect the pharmacokinetics of exogenous UDCA. Polymorphisms in genes for transporters involved in bile acid transport, solute carrier organic anion 1B1 (SLCO1B1) 388A>G and 521T>C, solute carrier 10A1 (SLC10A1) 800 C>T and ATP-binding cassette B11 (ABCB11) 1331T>C, and the FXR -1G>T polymorphism were genotyped in 26 male Chinese subjects who ingested single oral 500-mg doses of UDCA. Plasma concentrations of UDCA and its major conjugate metabolite glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) were determined. The mean systemic exposure of UDCA was higher in the five subjects with one copy of the FXR -1G>T variant allele than in those homozygous for the wild-type allele (n = 21) (AUC0-24 h : 38.5 ± 28.2 vs. 20.9 ± 8.0 μg h/mL, P = 0.021), but this difference appeared mainly due to one outlier with the -1GT genotype and elevated baseline and post-treatment UDCA concentrations. After excluding the outlier, body weight was the only factor associated with plasma concentrations of UDCA and there were no significant associations with the other polymorphisms examined. None of the polymorphisms affected the pharmacokinetics of GUDCA. This study showed that the common polymorphisms in bile acid transporters had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of exogenous UDCA but an effect of the FXR polymorphism cannot be excluded.

  15. Carrier-mediated placental transport of cimetidine and valproic acid across differentiating JEG-3 cell layers.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Ueda, C; Yamada, K; Nakamura, A; Hatsuda, Y; Kawanishi, S; Nishii, S; Ogawa, M

    2015-07-01

    Human choriocarcinoma has been used as a model to study trophoblast transcellular drug transport in the placenta. Previous models had limitations regarding low molecular weight drug transport through the intracellular gap junction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate placental carrier-mediated transport across a differentiating JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell (DJEGs) layer model in which the intracellular gap junction was restricted. Cimetidine is the substrate of an efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). BCRP highly expressed in the placenta, and its function in the DJEGs model was investigated. In addition, the placental drug transport of another efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and an influx transporter, monocarboxylate transporter (MCT), were examined with various substrates. Cimetidine permeated from the fetal side to the maternal side at significantly high levels and saturated in a dose-dependent manner. The permeability coefficient of a MRP substrate, fluorescein, across the DJEGs model was significantly increased by inhibiting MRP function with probenecid. On the other hand, permeation in the influx direction to the fetal side with a substrate of MCT, valproic acid, had a gentle dose-dependent saturation. These findings suggest that the DJEGs model could be used to evaluate transcellular placental drug transport mediated by major placental transporters.

  16. Functional analysis of rat acidic calponin.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Yabe, Sachiko; Nakamura, Kouta; Koizumi, Youichi

    2002-05-01

    Recombinant acidic calponin, a member of the calponin family, interacted with F-actin, but not with microtubules, desmin filaments, tropomyosin, calmodulin, S100 and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles with significant affinity. The bindings of acidic calponin to F-actin occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and were saturated at a molar ratio of about 1 acidic calponin to 1-2 actin molecules. The apparent Kd value of acidic calponin to F-actin was calculated to be 1.6 x 10(5) M(-1). Chemical cross-linking experiments indicated that a 1:1 molar covalent complex of acidic calponin and actin monomer was produced as in the case of basic calponinactin binding. No significant morphologic change of F-actin was observed by the addition of acidic calponin. Acidic calponin had little effect on actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity unlike basic calponin. Basic calponin partially competed with acidic calponin for binding to F-actin. Domain mapping with V8 protease revealed that acidic calponin binding site resided within the C-terminal 16 kDa fragment of actin, where the binding of basic calponin also occurs. However, both calponins showed reversal effects on fluorescence intensity of pyrene-labeled F-actin. Fragments of acidic calponin with 30 and 22 kDa, lacking the C-terminal acidic tail, were bound to F-actin. Interestingly, both the fragments became bound to PS vesicles, but not to other components. Circular dichroism studies showed that limited digestion of acidic calponin resulted in about 30% decrease of alpha-helix and beta contents. The present results suggest that acidic calponin is functionally distinct from basic calponin and expresses a novel characteristic after removal of the acidic tail region.

  17. Acid-base transport in pancreas—new challenges

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Ivana; Haanes, Kristian A.; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Along the gastrointestinal tract a number of epithelia contribute with acid or basic secretions in order to aid digestive processes. The stomach and pancreas are the most extreme examples of acid (H+) and base (HCO−3) transporters, respectively. Nevertheless, they share the same challenges of transporting acid and bases across epithelia and effectively regulating their intracellular pH. In this review, we will make use of comparative physiology to enlighten the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic HCO−3 and fluid secretion, which is still challenging physiologists. Some of the novel transporters to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H+-K+-ATPases), as well as the calcium-activated K+ and Cl− channels, such as KCa3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signaling, fine-tune, and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport contributes to pancreatic diseases including cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, and cancer. PMID:24391597

  18. Fatty acid binding protein facilitates sarcolemmal fatty acid transport but not mitochondrial oxidation in rat and human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham P; Lally, Jamie; Nickerson, James G; Alkhateeb, Hakam; Snook, Laelie A; Heigenhauser, George J F; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2007-01-01

    The transport of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) across mitochondrial membranes is regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) activity. However, it appears that additional fatty acid transport proteins, such as fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36, influence not only LCFA transport across the plasma membrane, but also LCFA transport into mitochondria. Plasma membrane-associated fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) is also known to be involved in sacrolemmal LCFA transport, and it is also present on the mitochondria. At this location, it has been identified as mitochondrial aspartate amino transferase (mAspAT), despite being structurally identical to FABPpm. Whether this protein is also involved in mitochondrial LCFA transport and oxidation remains unknown. Therefore, we have examined the ability of FABPpm/mAspAT to alter mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction increased (P < 0.05) the mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content in rat (+22%) and human skeletal muscle (+33%). By contrast, muscle contraction did not alter the content of mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein in either rat or human muscles. Electrotransfecting rat soleus muscles, in vivo, with FABPpm cDNA increased FABPpm protein in whole muscle (+150%; P < 0.05), at the plasma membrane (+117%; P < 0.05) and in mitochondria (+80%; P < 0.05). In these FABPpm-transfected muscles, palmitate transport into giant vesicles was increased by +73% (P < 0.05), and fatty acid oxidation in intact muscle was increased by +18% (P < 0.05). By contrast, despite the marked increase in mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content (+80%), the rate of mitochondrial palmitate oxidation was not altered (P > 0.05). However, electrotransfection increased mAspAT activity by +70% (P < 0.05), and the mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content was significantly correlated with mAspAT activity (r= 0.75). It is concluded that FABPpm has two distinct functions depending on its subcellular location: (a) it contributes to

  19. Functions and transport of silicon in plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, J F; Yamaji, N

    2008-10-01

    Silicon exerts beneficial effects on plant growth and production by alleviating both biotic and abiotic stresses including diseases, pests, lodging, drought, and nutrient imbalance. Recently, two genes (Lsi1 and Lsi2) encoding Si transporters have been identified from rice. Lsi1 (low silicon 1) belongs to a Nod26-like major intrinsic protein subfamily in aquaporin, while Lsi2 encodes a putative anion transporter. Lsi1 is localized on the distal side of both exodermis and endodermis in rice roots, while Lsi2 is localized on the proximal side of the same cells. Lsi1 shows influx transport activity for Si, while Lsi2 shows efflux transport activity. Therefore, Lsi1 is responsible for transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells, whereas Lsi2 is an efflux transporter responsible for the transport of Si from the root cells to the apoplast. Coupling of Lsi1 with Lsi2 is required for efficient uptake of Si in rice.

  20. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-07

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  1. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  2. Transport of Amino Acids to the Maize Root 1

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Ann

    1966-01-01

    When 5-mm maize root tips were excised and placed in an inorganic salts solution for 6 hours, there was a loss of alcohol-insoluble nitrogen. The levels of threonine, proline, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and lysine in the alcohol soluble fraction were severely reduced, whereas those of glutamate, aspartate, ornithine, and alanine were scarcely affected. There was a 4-fold increase in the level of γ-aminobutyrate. Those amino acids whose synthesis appeared to be deficient in excised root tips also showed poor incorporation of acetate carbon. In addition, the results show that asparagine and the amino acids of the neutral and basic fraction were preferentially transported to the root tip region. The results therefore suggest that the synthesis of certain amino acids in the root tip region is restricted, and that this requirement for amino acids in the growing region could regulate the flow of amino acids to the root tip. PMID:16656225

  3. KCl stimulation increases norepinephrine transporter function in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Mandela, Prashant; Ordway, Gregory A

    2006-09-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) plays a pivotal role in terminating noradrenergic signaling and conserving norepinephrine (NE) through the process of re-uptake. Recent evidence suggests a close association between NE release and regulation of NET function. The present study evaluated the relationship between release and uptake, and the cellular mechanisms that govern these processes. KCl stimulation of PC12 cells robustly increased [3H]NE uptake via the NET and simultaneously increased [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in uptake and release were dependent on Ca2+. Treatment of cells with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or okadaic acid decreased [3H]NE uptake but did not block KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake. In contrast, PMA increased [3H]NE release and augmented KCl-stimulated release, while okadaic acid had no effects on release. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated signaling cascades with KN93 (a Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor), or ML7 and ML9 (myosin light chain kinase inhibitors), reduced [3H]NE uptake and blocked KCl-stimulated increases in uptake. In contrast, KN93, ML7 and ML9 had no effect on KCl-stimulated [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake were independent of transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane. While increases in both NE release and uptake mediated by KCl stimulation require Ca2+, different intracellular mechanisms mediate these two events.

  4. Amino acid composition analysis of human secondary transport proteins and implications for reliable membrane topology prediction.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2016-07-08

    Secondary transporters in humans are a large group of proteins that transport a wide range of ions, metals, organic and inorganic solutes involved in energy transduction, control of membrane potential and osmotic balance, metabolic processes and in the absorption or efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. They are also emerging as important targets for development of new drugs and as target sites for drug delivery to specific organs or tissues. We have performed amino acid composition (AAC) and phylogenetic analyses and membrane topology predictions for 336 human secondary transport proteins and used the results to confirm protein classification and to look for trends and correlations with structural domains and specific substrates and/or function. Some proteins showed statistically high contents of individual amino acids or of groups of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. One recurring trend was a correlation between high contents of charged and/or polar residues with misleading results in predictions of membrane topology, which was especially prevalent in Mitochondrial Carrier family proteins. We demonstrate how charged or polar residues located in the middle of transmembrane helices can interfere with their identification by membrane topology tools resulting in missed helices in the prediction. Comparison of AAC in the human proteins with that in 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli revealed similar overall trends along with differences in average contents for some individual amino acids and groups of similar amino acids that are presumed to result from a greater number of functions and complexity in the higher organism.

  5. An Active Learning Exercise to Facilitate Understanding of Nephron Function: Anatomy and Physiology of Renal Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal transport is a central mechanism underlying electrolyte homeostasis, acid base balance and other essential functions of the kidneys in human physiology. Thus, knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the nephron is essential for the understanding of kidney function in health and disease. However, students find this content difficult to…

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Orlaith B; Mroz, Magdalena S; Ward, Joseph B J; Colliva, Carolina; Scharl, Michael; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gilmer, John F; Fallon, Padraic G; Hofmann, Alan F; Roda, Aldo; Murray, Frank E; Keely, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroxy bile acids, such as chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), are well known to promote colonic fluid and electrolyte secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea associated with bile acid malabsorption. However, CDCA is rapidly metabolised by colonic bacteria to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), the effects of which on epithelial transport are poorly characterised. Here, we investigated the role of UDCA in the regulation of colonic epithelial secretion. Cl− secretion was measured across voltage-clamped monolayers of T84 cells and muscle-stripped sections of mouse or human colon. Cell surface biotinylation was used to assess abundance/surface expression of transport proteins. Acute (15 min) treatment of T84 cells with bilateral UDCA attenuated Cl− secretory responses to the Ca2+ and cAMP-dependent secretagogues carbachol (CCh) and forskolin (FSK) to 14.0 ± 3.8 and 40.2 ± 7.4% of controls, respectively (n= 18, P < 0.001). Investigation of the molecular targets involved revealed that UDCA acts by inhibiting Na+/K+-ATPase activity and basolateral K+ channel currents, without altering their cell surface expression. In contrast, intraperitoneal administration of UDCA (25 mg kg−1) to mice enhanced agonist-induced colonic secretory responses, an effect we hypothesised to be due to bacterial metabolism of UDCA to lithocholic acid (LCA). Accordingly, LCA (50–200 μm) enhanced agonist-induced secretory responses in vitro and a metabolically stable UDCA analogue, 6α-methyl-UDCA, exerted anti-secretory actions in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, UDCA exerts direct anti-secretory actions on colonic epithelial cells and metabolically stable derivatives of the bile acid may offer a new approach for treating intestinal diseases associated with diarrhoea. PMID:23507881

  7. The involvement of L-type amino acid transporters in theanine transport.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Kimura, Toru; Tachiki, Takashi; Anzai, Naohiko; Sakurai, Takuya; Ushimaru, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    L-Theanine has favorable physiological effects in terms of human health, but the mechanisms that transport it to its target organs or cells are not completely defined. To identify the major transport mechanisms of L-theanine, we screened for candidate transporters of L-3H-theanine in several mammal cell lines that intrinsically express multiple transporters with various specificities. All of the cells tested, T24, HepG2, COS1, 293A, Neuro2a, and HuH7, absorbed L-3H-theanine. Uptake was significantly inhibited by the addition of L-leucine and by a specific inhibitor of the system L transport system, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). L-3H-Theanine uptake occurred mostly independently of Na+. These results indicate that L-theanine was taken up via a system L like transport system in all of the cells tested. Additionally, in experiments using cells stably expressing two system L isoforms, LAT1 and LAT2, we found that the two isoforms mediated L-theanine transport to similar extents. Taken together, our results indicate that L-theanine is transported mostly via the system L transport pathway and its isoforms.

  8. Mode of action of pyrazinamide: disruption of Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane transport and energetics by pyrazinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wade, Mary Margaret; Scorpio, Angelo; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Zhonghe

    2003-11-01

    Pyrazinamide is an important sterilizing drug that shortens tuberculosis (TB) therapy. However, the mechanism of action of pyrazinamide is poorly understood because of its unusual properties. Here we show that pyrazinoic acid, the active moiety of pyrazinamide, disrupted membrane energetics and inhibited membrane transport function in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The preferential activity of pyrazinamide against old non-replicating bacilli correlated with their low membrane potential and the disruption of membrane potential by pyrazinoic acid and acid pH. Inhibitors of membrane energetics increased the antituberculous activity of pyrazinamide. These findings shed new light on the mode of action of pyrazinamide and may help in the design of new drugs that shorten therapy.

  9. Molecular physiology of the insect K-activated amino acid transporter 1 (KAAT1) and cation-anion activated amino acid transporter/channel 1 (CAATCH1) in the light of the structure of the homologous protein LeuT.

    PubMed

    Castagna, M; Bossi, E; Sacchi, V F

    2009-06-01

    K-activated amino acid transporter 1 (KAAT1) and cation-anion-activated amino acid transporter/channel 1 (CAATCH1) are amino acid cotransporters, belonging to the Na/Cl-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family (also called SLC6/NSS), that have been cloned from Manduca sexta midgut. They have been thoroughly studied by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and structure/function analyses have made it possible to identify the structural determinants of their cation and amino acid selectivity. About 40 mutants of these proteins have been studied by measuring amino acid uptake and current/voltage relationships. The results obtained since the cloning of KAAT1 and CAATCH1 are here discussed in the light of the 3D model of the first crystallized member of the family, the leucine transporter LeuT.

  10. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  11. Aromatic amino acid transporter AAT-9 of Caenorhabditis elegans localizes to neurons and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Emilija; Bacconi, Andrea; Stetak, Attila; Hajnal, Alex; Stasiuk, Susan; Skelly, Patrick J; Forster, Ian; Shoemaker, Charles B; Verrey, Francois

    2004-11-19

    The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes nine homologues of mammalian glycoprotein-associated amino acid transporters. Two of these C. elegans proteins (AAT-1 and AAT-3) have been shown to function as catalytic subunits (light chains) of heteromeric amino acid transporters. These proteins need to associate with a glycoprotein heavy chain subunit (ATG-2) to reach the cell surface in a manner similar to that of their mammalian homologues. AAT-1 and AAT-3 contain a cysteine residue in the second putative extracellular loop through which a disulfide bridge can form with a heavy chain. In contrast, six C. elegans members of this family (AAT-4 to AAT-9) lack such a cysteine residue. We show here that one of these transporter proteins, AAT-9, reaches the cell surface in Xenopus oocytes without an exogenous heavy chain and that it functions as an exchanger of aromatic amino acids. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments demonstrate that AAT-9 displays a substrate-activated conductance. Immunofluorescence shows that it is expressed close to the pharyngeal bulbs within C. elegans neurons. The selective expression of an aat-9 promoter-green fluorescent protein construct in several neurons of this region and in wall muscle cells around the mouth supports and extends these localization data. Taken together, the results show that AAT-9 is expressed in excitable cells of the nematode head and pharynx in which it may provide a pathway for aromatic amino acid transport.

  12. Fatty acid transport protein expression in human brain and potential role in fatty acid transport across human brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ryan W; On, Ngoc H; Del Bigio, Marc R; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2011-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by the brain capillary endothelial cells, provides a protective barrier between the systemic blood and the extracellular environment of the CNS. Passage of fatty acids from the blood to the brain may occur either by diffusion or by proteins that facilitate their transport. Currently several protein families have been implicated in fatty acid transport. The focus of the present study was to identify the fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) expressed in the brain microvessel endothelial cells and characterize their involvement in fatty acid transport across an in vitro BBB model. The major fatty acid transport proteins expressed in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC), mouse capillaries and human grey matter were FATP-1, -4 and fatty acid binding protein 5 and fatty acid translocase/CD36. The passage of various radiolabeled fatty acids across confluent HBMEC monolayers was examined over a 30-min period in the presence of fatty acid free albumin in a 1 : 1 molar ratio. The apical to basolateral permeability of radiolabeled fatty acids was dependent upon both saturation and chain length of the fatty acid. Knockdown of various fatty acid transport proteins using siRNA significantly decreased radiolabeled fatty acid transport across the HBMEC monolayer. Our findings indicate that FATP-1 and FATP-4 are the predominant fatty acid transport proteins expressed in the BBB based on human and mouse expression studies. While transport studies in HBMEC monolayers support their involvement in fatty acid permeability, fatty acid translocase/CD36 also appears to play a prominent role in transport of fatty acids across HBMEC.

  13. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action.

  14. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  15. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  16. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  17. Branched-chain amino acids and brain function.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, John D

    2005-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) influence brain function by modifying large, neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport at the blood-brain barrier. Transport is shared by several LNAAs, notably the BCAAs and the aromatic amino acids (ArAAs), and is competitive. Consequently, when plasma BCAA concentrations rise, which can occur in response to food ingestion or BCAA administration, or with the onset of certain metabolic diseases (e.g., uncontrolled diabetes), brain BCAA concentrations rise, and ArAA concentrations decline. Such effects occur acutely and chronically. Such reductions in brain ArAA concentrations have functional consequences: biochemically, they reduce the synthesis and the release of neurotransmitters derived from ArAAs, notably serotonin (from tryptophan) and catecholamines (from tyrosine and phenylalanine). The functional effects of such neurochemical changes include altered hormonal function, blood pressure, and affective state. Although the BCAAs thus have biochemical and functional effects in the brain, few attempts have been made to characterize time-course or dose-response relations for such effects. And, no studies have attempted to identify levels of BCAA intake that might produce adverse effects on the brain. The only "model" of very high BCAA exposure is a very rare genetic disorder, maple syrup urine disease, a feature of which is substantial brain dysfunction but that probably cannot serve as a useful model for excessive BCAA intake by normal individuals. Given the known biochemical and functional effects of the BCAAs, it should be a straightforward exercise to design studies to assess dose-response relations for biochemical and functional effects and, in this context, to explore for adverse effect thresholds.

  18. Controlling transport and chemical functionality of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Latham, Andrew H; Williams, Mary Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of metal, magnetic, semiconductor, and polymer nanoparticles with tunable sizes and properties can be synthesized by wet-chemical techniques. Magnetic nanoparticles are particularly attractive because their inherent superparamagnetic properties make them desirable for medical imaging, magnetic field assisted transport, and separations and analyses. With such applications on the horizon, synthetic routes for quickly and reliably rendering magnetic nanoparticle surfaces chemically functional have become an increasingly important focus. This Account describes common synthetic routes for making and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles and discusses initial applications in magnetic field induced separations. The most widely studied magnetic nanoparticles are iron oxide (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4), cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O4), iron platinum (FePt), and manganese ferrite (MnFe 2O4), although others have been investigated. Magnetic nanoparticles are typically prepared under either high-temperature organic phase or aqueous conditions, producing particles with surfaces that are stabilized by attached surfactants or associated ions. Although it requires more specialized glassware, high-temperature routes are generally preferred when a high degree of stability and low particle size dispersity is desired. Particles can be further modified with a secondary metal or polymer to create core-shell structures. The outer shells function as protective layers for the inner metal cores and alter the surface chemistry to enable postsynthetic modification of the surfactant chemistry. Efforts by our group as well as others have centered on pathways to yield nanoparticles with surfaces that are both easily functionalized and tunable in terms of the number and variety of attached species. Ligand place-exchange reactions have been shown quite successful for exchanging silanes, acids, thiols, and dopamine ligands onto the surfaces of some magnetic particles. Poly(ethylene oxide

  19. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  20. Inorganic nanoparticles as nucleic acid transporters into eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanov, R. N.; Zarytova, V. F.; Zenkova, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The review is concerned with inorganic nanoparticles (gold, titanium dioxide, silica, iron oxides, calcium phosphate) used as nucleic acid transporters into mammalian cells. Methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and approaches to surface modification through covalent or noncovalent attachment of low- or high-molecular-weight compounds are considered. The data available from the literature on biological action of nucleic acids delivered into the cells by nanoparticles and on the effect of nanoparticles and their conjugates and complexes on the cell survival are summarized. Pathways of cellular internalization of nanoparticles and the mechanism of their excretion, as well as the ways of release of nucleic acids from their complexes with nanoparticles after the cellular uptake are described. The bibliography includes 161 references.

  1. Control of machine functions or transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, M.D.; Lee, M.J.; Jaeger, J.; King, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer code, COMFORT, has been developed at SLAC for on-line calculation of the strengths of magnetic elements in an electron storage ring or transport beam line, subject to first order fitting constraints on the ring or beam line parameters. This code can also be used off-line as an interactive lattice or beam line design tool.

  2. Novel male-biased expression in paralogs of the aphid slimfast nutrient amino acid transporter expansion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A major goal of molecular evolutionary biology is to understand the fate and consequences of duplicated genes. In this context, aphids are intriguing because the newly sequenced pea aphid genome harbors an extraordinary number of lineage-specific gene duplications relative to other insect genomes. Though many of their duplicated genes may be involved in their complex life cycle, duplications in nutrient amino acid transporters appear to be associated rather with their essential amino acid poor diet and the intracellular symbiosis aphids rely on to compensate for dietary deficits. Past work has shown that some duplicated amino acid transporters are highly expressed in the specialized cells housing the symbionts, including a paralog of an aphid-specific expansion homologous to the Drosophila gene slimfast. Previous data provide evidence that these bacteriocyte-expressed transporters mediate amino acid exchange between aphids and their symbionts. Results We report that some nutrient amino acid transporters show male-biased expression. Male-biased expression characterizes three paralogs in the aphid-specific slimfast expansion, and the male-biased expression is conserved across two aphid species for at least two paralogs. One of the male-biased paralogs has additionally experienced an accelerated rate of non-synonymous substitutions. Conclusions This is the first study to document male-biased slimfast expression. Our data suggest that the male-biased aphid slimfast paralogs diverged from their ancestral function to fill a functional role in males. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that members of the slimfast expansion are maintained in the aphid genome not only for the previously hypothesized role in mediating amino acid exchange between the symbiotic partners, but also for sex-specific roles. PMID:21917168

  3. Transporters in human platelets: physiologic function and impact for pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Greinacher, Andreas; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2012-04-12

    Platelets store signaling molecules (eg, serotonin and ADP) within their granules. Transporters mediate accumulation of these molecules in platelet granules and, on platelet activation, their translocation across the plasma membrane. The balance between transporter-mediated uptake and elimination of signaling molecules and drugs in platelets determines their intracellular concentrations and effects. Several members of the 2 major transporter families, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and solute carriers (SLCs), have been identified in platelets. An example of an ABC transporter is MRP4 (ABCC4), which facilitates ADP accumulation in dense granules. MRP4 is a versatile transporter, and various additional functions have been proposed, notably lipid mediator release and a role in aspirin resistance. Several other ABC proteins have been detected in platelets with functions in glutathione and lipid homeostasis. The serotonin transporter (SERT, SLC6A4) in the platelet plasma membrane represents a well-characterized example of the SLC family. Moreover, recent experiments indicate expression of OATP2B1 (SLCO2B1), a high affinity transporter for certain statins, in platelets. Changes in transporter localization and expression can affect platelet function and drug sensitivity. This review summarizes available data on the physiologic and pharmacologic role of transporters in platelets.

  4. SLC6 Transporters: Structure, Function, Regulation, Disease Association and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Pramod Akula; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na+-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes. PMID:23506866

  5. SLC6 transporters: structure, function, regulation, disease association and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Akula Bala; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L Keith

    2013-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na(+)-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes.

  6. Glucocorticoid regulation of amino acid transport in anucleate rat hepatoma (HTC) cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The transport of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) by rat hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids. To investigate the role of the nucleus in the regulation of transport and to determine whether steroid hormones or steroid-receptor complexes may have direct effects on cytoplasmic or membrane functions, we have examined the regulation of transport by dexamethasone in anucleate HTC cells. Cytoplasts prepared from suspension cultures of HTC cells fully retain active transport of AIB with the same kinetic properties as intact cells. However, the uptake of AIB is not inhibited by dexamethasone or other corticosteroids. Neither is the inhibited rate of transport, manifested by cytoplasts prepared from dexamethasone-treated cells, restored to normal upon removal of the hormone. Anucleate cells exhibit specific, saturable binding of [3H]dexamethasone; however, the binding is reduced compared with that of intact cells. The nucleus is thus required for the glucocorticoid regulation of amino acid transport in HTC cells. PMID:7217203

  7. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  8. Transport of Arginine and Aspartic Acid into Isolated Barley Mesophyll Vacuoles 1

    PubMed Central

    Martinoia, Enrico; Thume, Monika; Vogt, Esther; Rentsch, Doris; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    1991-01-01

    The transport of arginine into isolated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mesophyll vacuoles was investigated. In the absence of ATP, arginine uptake was saturable with a Km of 0.3 to 0.4 millimolar. Positively charged amino acids inhibited arginine uptake, lysine being most potent with a Ki of 1.2 millimolar. In the presence of free ATP, but not of its Mg-complex, uptake of arginine was drastically enhanced and a linear function of its concentration up to 16 millimolar. The nonhydrolyzable adenylyl imidodiphosphate, but no other nucleotide tested, could substitute for ATP. Therefore, it is suggested that this process does not require energy and does not involve the tonoplast ATPase. The ATP-dependent arginine uptake was strongly inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids were inhibitory (I50 phenylalanine 1 millimolar). Similar characteristics were observed for the uptake of aspartic acid. However, rates of ATP-stimulated aspartic acid transport were 10-fold lower as compared to arginine transport. Uptake of aspartate in the absence of ATP was negligible. PMID:16668447

  9. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  10. [Hepatocellular transport of bile acids and organic anions in infection and SIRS--evidence for different mechanisms for regulating membrane transport proteins].

    PubMed

    Bolder, U; Thasler, W E; Hofmann, A F; Jauch, K W

    1998-01-01

    The alteration of proinflammatory mediators during sepsis and SIRS results in a large variety of adaptive changes of metabolic and physiologic variables. This study investigated the alterations of hepatocellular transport in a rat sepsis model (LPS i.p.) as well as in a model inducing SIRS by sterile abscess formation (turpentine i.m.). Two bile acids (Cholyltaurine and Chemodeoxycholyltaurine) and one organic anion (Sulfolithocholyltaurine) were used as marker substrates to investigate the time course of hepatocellular transport function. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused rat livers and plasma membrane vesicles. During sepsis, both, the transport of bile acids and that of the organic anion was markedly reduced. In contrast no alteration of transport was detected during SIRS. However, biliary secretion of glutathione (+90%) and bile acid independent bile flow (%) were increased. mRNA levels of bile acid and organic anion transport proteins were reduced. The lowest values were noted 12 h after injection of LPS or turpentine. Almost unchanged kinetic parameters during SIRS pointed to a normal population of transporters with regard to quantity and substrate affinity. Therefore it seems that transcriptional regulation plays an important role for the expression of transport proteins during sepsis, whereas posttranscriptional regulation may be of importance during SIRS. The clinical phenomenon of septic cholestasis including jaundice implies endotoxemia and differenciates against SIRS.

  11. Perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCA) atmospheric formation and transport to the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike-thackray, C.; Selin, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) are highly persistent and toxic environmental contaminants that have been found in remote locations such as the Arctic, far from emission sources. These persistent organic pollutants are emitted directly to the atmosphere as well as being produced by the degradation of precursor compounds in the atmosphere, but recent trends towards increasing precursor emissions and decreasing direct emissions raise the importance of production in the atmosphere. Our work aims to improve understanding of the atmospheric degradation of fluorotelomer precursor compounds to form the long-chain PFCAs PFOA (C8) and PFNA (C9).Using the atmospheric chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, which uses assimilated meteorology to simulate the atmospheric transport of trace gas species, we investigate the interaction of the atmospheric formation of PFCAs and the atmospheric transport of their precursor species. Our simulations are a first application of the GEOS-Chem framework to PFCA chemistry. We highlight the importance of the spatial and temporal variability of background atmospheric chemical conditions experienced during transport. We find that yields and formation times of PFOA and PFNA respond differently and strongly to the photochemical conditions of the atmosphere, such as the abundance of NO, HO2, and other photochemical species.

  12. Size does matter: 18 amino acids at the N-terminal tip of an amino acid transporter in Leishmania determine substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schlisselberg, Doreen; Mazarib, Eldar; Inbar, Ehud; Rentsch, Doris; Myler, Peter J.; Zilberstein, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Long N-terminal tails of amino acid transporters are known to act as sensors of the internal pool of amino acids and as positive regulators of substrate flux rate. In this study we establish that N-termini of amino acid transporters can also determine substrate specificity. We show that due to alternative trans splicing, the human pathogen Leishmania naturally expresses two variants of the proline/alanine transporter, one 18 amino acid shorter than the other. We demonstrate that the longer variant (LdAAP24) translocates both proline and alanine, whereas the shorter variant (∆18LdAAP24) translocates just proline. Remarkably, co-expressing the hydrophilic N-terminal peptide of the long variant with ∆18LdAAP24 was found to recover alanine transport. This restoration of alanine transport could be mediated by a truncated N-terminal tail, though truncations exceeding half of the tail length were no longer functional. Taken together, the data indicate that the first 18 amino acids of the negatively charged N-terminal LdAAP24 tail are required for alanine transport and may facilitate the electrostatic interactions of the entire negatively charged N-terminal tail with the positively charged internal loops in the transmembrane domain, as this mechanism has been shown to underlie regulation of substrate flux rate for other transporters. PMID:26549185

  13. N-Glycosylation is required for Na{sup +}-dependent vitamin C transporter functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Veedamali S. Marchant, Jonathan S.; Reidling, Jack C.; Said, Hamid M.

    2008-09-12

    The human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) mediate cellular uptake of ascorbic acid. Both these transporters contain potential sites for N-glycosylation in their extracellular domains (Asn-138, Asn-144 [hSVCT1]; Asn-188, Asn-196 [hSVCT2]), however the role of N-glycosylation in transporter function is unexplored. On the basis of the result that tunicamycin decreased {sup 14}C-ascorbic acid uptake in HepG2 cells, we systematically ablated all consensus N-glycosylation sites in hSVCT1 and hSVCT2 to resolve any effects on ascorbic acid uptake, transporter expression and targeting. We show that removal of individual N-glycosylation sites significantly impairs protein expression and consequently ascorbic acid uptake for hSVCT1 mutants (N138Q is retained intracellularly) and for hSVCT2 mutants (all of which reach the cell surface). N-Glycosylation is therefore essential for vitamin C transporter functionality.

  14. Novel therapeutic approaches targeting L-type amino acid transporters for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Keitaro; Anzai, Naohiko

    2017-01-01

    L-type amino acid transporters (LATs) mainly assist the uptake of neutral amino acids into cells. Four LATs (LAT1, LAT2, LAT3 and LAT4) have so far been identified. LAT1 (SLC7A5) has been attracting much attention in the field of cancer research since it is commonly up-regulated in various cancers. Basic research has made it increasingly clear that LAT1 plays a predominant role in malignancy. The functional significance of LAT1 in cancer and the potential therapeutic application of the features of LAT1 to cancer management are described in this review. PMID:28144396

  15. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  16. Functional characterization of a Na+-dependent dicarboxylate transporter from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Christopher; Fitzgerald, Gabriel A.; Wang, Da-Neng

    2014-01-01

    The SLC13 transporter family, whose members play key physiological roles in the regulation of fatty acid synthesis, adiposity, insulin resistance, and other processes, catalyzes the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates and sulfate across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. SLC13 transporters are part of the divalent anion:Na+ symporter (DASS) family that includes several well-characterized bacterial members. Despite sharing significant sequence similarity, the functional characteristics of DASS family members differ with regard to their substrate and coupling ion dependence. The publication of a high resolution structure of dimer VcINDY, a bacterial DASS family member, provides crucial structural insight into this transporter family. However, marrying this structural insight to the current functional understanding of this family also demands a comprehensive analysis of the transporter’s functional properties. To this end, we purified VcINDY, reconstituted it into liposomes, and determined its basic functional characteristics. Our data demonstrate that VcINDY is a high affinity, Na+-dependent transporter with a preference for C4- and C5-dicarboxylates. Transport of the model substrate, succinate, is highly pH dependent, consistent with VcINDY strongly preferring the substrate’s dianionic form. VcINDY transport is electrogenic with succinate coupled to the transport of three or more Na+ ions. In contrast to succinate, citrate, bound in the VcINDY crystal structure (in an inward-facing conformation), seems to interact only weakly with the transporter in vitro. These transport properties together provide a functional framework for future experimental and computational examinations of the VcINDY transport mechanism. PMID:24821967

  17. Identification of transport pathways for citric acid cycle intermediates in the human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Pajor, Ana M

    2008-04-01

    Citric acid cycle intermediates are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract through carrier-mediated mechanisms, although the transport pathways have not been clearly identified. This study examines the transport of citric acid cycle intermediates in the Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cell line, often used as a model of small intestine. Inulin was used as an extracellular volume marker instead of mannitol since the apparent volume measured with mannitol changed with time. The results show that Caco-2 cells contain at least three distinct transporters, including the Na+-dependent di- and tricarboxylate transporters, NaDC1 and NaCT, and one or more sodium-independent pathways, possibly involving organic anion transporters. Succinate transport is mediated mostly by Na+-dependent pathways, predominantly by NaDC1, but with some contribution by NaCT. RT-PCR and functional characteristics verified the expression of these transporters in Caco-2 cells. In contrast, citrate transport in Caco-2 cells occurs by a combination of Na+-independent pathways, possibly mediated by an organic anion transporter, and Na+-dependent mechanisms. The non-metabolizable dicarboxylate, methylsuccinate, is also transported by a combination of Na+-dependent and -independent pathways. In conclusion, we find that multiple pathways are involved in the transport of di- and tricarboxylates by Caco-2 cells. Since many of these pathways are not found in human intestine, this model may be best suited for studying Na+-dependent transport of succinate by NaDC1.

  18. Plant Intracellular Transport: Tracing Functions of the Retrograde Kinesin.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2015-09-21

    Adding to its varied repertoire of functions in cell morphogenesis and cell division, a molecular motor protein of the kinesin-14 class has recently been implicated in rapid retrograde transport along cellular tracks in moss.

  19. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of long-term research of the morpho-functional characteristics of the cells of the stomach, small intestine and gallbladder the mechanism and function of membrane vesicles in the implementation of the main functions of these organs sets out in this article: the secretion of hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and the fluid at a concentration of bile epitheliocytes of gallbladder. Proofs of the intracellular formation of hydrochloric acid in tubulovesicles of the parietal cells and turnover of its secretory membranes in the process of secretory cycle, that has ensured the re-use and explained the extraordinary life of these unique cells are presented. The credible mechanism of HCl output oppression by H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity blockers has set out on this basis. The article provides detailed endocytosis mechanism of the ions and nutrients absorption by enterocytes. The mechanism of participation of the apical contractile complex of brush border of epithelial cells in the initiation of endocytosis and cytoplasmic microtubules in transport of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm was analyzed. Based on our research and numerous of the world scientific proceedings the conclusion was done about the existence of two energy dependent types of transport in the absorptive epithelium of the digestive--transmembrane (ionic and nutritive) homeostatic type which is realized by the ATP-system of the basal plasmalemma, and vesicular (endocytosis) type which is impltmented by apical contractile complex of brush border and cytoplasmic microtubules. Both types of transport are interrelated and are under constant cellular control. This observation is relevant to the majority of cells, including those involved in the secretion of various substances: hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, enzymes by main cells of the gastric glands and exocrinocytes of the pancreas, hormone by endocrine cells of the APUD system and, finally

  20. Experimental Study and Reactive Transport Modeling of Boric Acid Leaching of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Chiang, K.-T. K.

    2013-07-01

    Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs) at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure, compromise the integrity of the structure, or cause unmonitored releases of contaminated water to the environment. Experimental data indicate that pH is a critical parameter that determines the corrosion susceptibility of rebar in borated water and the degree of concrete degradation by boric acid leaching. In this study, reactive transport modeling of concrete leaching by borated water was performed to provide information on the solution pH in the concrete crack or matrix and the degree of concrete degradation at different locations of an SFP concrete structure exposed to borated water. Simulations up to 100 years were performed using different boric acid concentrations, crack apertures, and solution flow rates. Concrete cylinders were immersed in boric acid solutions for several months and the mineralogical changes and boric acid penetration in the concrete cylinder were evaluated as a function of time. The depths of concrete leaching by boric acid solution derived from the reactive transport simulations were compared with the measured boric acid penetration depth.

  1. Antibacterial drug treatment increases intestinal bile acid absorption via elevated levels of ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter but not organic solute transporter α protein.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drug treatment increases the bile acid pool size and hepatic bile acid concentration through the elevation of hepatic bile acid synthesis. However, the involvement of intestinal bile acid absorption in the increased bile acid pool size remains unclear. To determine whether intestinal bile acid absorption contributes to the increased bile acid pool in mice treated with antibacterial drugs, we evaluated the levels of bile acid transporter proteins and the capacity of intestinal bile acid absorption. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in ampicillin (ABPC)-treated mice, whereas organic solute transporter α (OSTα) mRNA levels, but not protein levels, significantly decreased in mice. Similar alterations in the expression levels of bile acid transporters were observed in mice treated with bacitracin/neomycin/streptomycin. The capacity for intestinal bile acid absorption was evaluated by an in situ loop method. Increased ileal absorption of taurochenodeoxycholic acid was observed in mice treated with ABPC. These results suggest that intestinal bile acid absorption is elevated in an ASBT-dependent manner in mice treated with antibacterial drugs.

  2. Role of glutathione transport processes in kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The kidneys are highly dependent on an adequate supply of glutathione (GSH) to maintain normal function. This is due, in part, to high rates of aerobic metabolism, particularly in the proximal tubules. Additionally, the kidneys are potentially exposed to high concentrations of oxidants and reactive electrophiles. Renal cellular concentrations of GSH are maintained by both intracellular synthesis and transport from outside the cell. Although function of specific carriers has not been definitively demonstrated, it is likely that multiple carriers are responsible for plasma membrane transport of GSH. Data suggest that the organic anion transporters OAT1 and OAT3 and the sodium-dicarboxylate 2 exchanger (SDCT2 or NaDC3) mediate uptake across the basolateral plasma membrane (BLM) and that the organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP1 and at least one of the multidrug resistance proteins mediate efflux across the brush-border plasma membrane (BBM). BLM transport may be used pharmacologically to provide renal proximal tubular cells with exogenous GSH to protect against oxidative stress whereas BBM transport functions physiologically in turnover of cellular GSH. The mitochondrial GSH pool is derived from cytoplasmic GSH by transport into the mitochondrial matrix and is mediated by the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate exchangers. Maintenance of the mitochondrial GSH pool is critical for cellular and mitochondrial redox homeostasis and is important in determining susceptibility to chemically induced apoptosis. Hence, membrane transport processes are critical to regulation of renal cellular and subcellular GSH pools and are determinants of susceptibility to cytotoxicity induced by oxidants and electrophiles.

  3. Intracellular dehydroascorbic acid inhibits SVCT2-dependent transport of ascorbic acid in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Guidarelli, Andrea; Cerioni, Liana; Scotti, Maddalena; Cantoni, Orazio

    2015-09-01

    Exposure of U937 cells to low concentrations of L-ascorbic acid (AA) is associated with a prompt cellular uptake and a further mitochondrial accumulation of the vitamin. Under the same conditions, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) uptake was followed by rapid reduction and accumulation of identical intracellular levels of AA, however, in the absence of significant mitochondrial uptake. This event was instead observed after exposure to remarkably greater concentrations of DHA. Furthermore, experiments performed in isolated mitochondria revealed that DHA transport through hexose transporters and Na(+) -dependent transport of AA were very similar. These results suggest that the different subcellular compartmentalization of the vitamin is mediated by events promoting inhibition of mitochondrial AA transport, possibly triggered by low levels of DHA. We obtained results in line with this notion in intact cells, and more direct evidence in isolated mitochondria. This inhibitory effect was promptly reversible after DHA removal and comparable with that mediated by established inhibitors, as quercetin. The results presented collectively indicate that low intracellular concentrations of DHA, because of its rapid reduction back to AA, are a poor substrate for direct mitochondrial uptake. DHA concentrations, however, appear sufficiently high to mediate inhibition of mitochondrial transport of AA/DHA-derived AA.

  4. Functional Characterization of Pneumocystis carinii Inositol Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Margaret S.; Sesterhenn, Thomas; Porollo, Aleksey; Vadukoot, Anish Kizhakkekkara; Merino, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungi in the genus Pneumocystis live in the lungs of mammals, where they can cause a fatal pneumonia (PCP [Pneumocystis pneumonia]) in hosts with compromised immune systems. The absence of a continuous in vitro culture system for any species of Pneumocystis has led to limited understanding of these fungi, especially for the discovery of new therapies. We recently reported that Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis murina, and most significantly, Pneumocystis jirovecii lack both enzymes necessary for myo-inositol biosynthesis but contain genes with homologies to fungal myo-inositol transporters. Since myo-inositol is essential for eukaryotic viability, the primary transporter, ITR1, was functionally and structurally characterized in P. carinii. The predicted structure of P. carinii ITR1 (PcITR1) contained 12 transmembrane alpha-helices with intracellular C and N termini, consistent with other inositol transporters. The apparent Km was 0.94 ± 0.08 (mean ± standard deviation), suggesting that myo-inositol transport in P. carinii is likely through a low-affinity, highly selective transport system, as no other sugars or inositol stereoisomers were significant competitive inhibitors. Glucose transport was shown to use a different transport system. The myo-inositol transport was distinct from mammalian transporters, as it was not sodium dependent and was cytochalasin B resistant. Inositol transport in these fungi offers an attractive new drug target because of the reliance of the fungi on its transport, clear differences between the mammalian and fungal transporters, and the ability of the host to both synthesize and transport this critical nutrient, predicting low toxicity of potential inhibitors to the fungal transporter. PMID:27965450

  5. Molecular alterations of canalicular transport systems in experimental models of cholestasis: possible functional correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Trauner, M.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of unidirectional, ATP-dependent canalicular transport systems (also termed "export pumps") for bile salts, amphiphilic anionic conjugates, lipophilic cations, and phospholipids has opened new opportunities for understanding biliary physiology and the pathophysiology of cholestasis. In addition, ATP-independent canalicular transport systems for glutathione and bicarbonate contribute to (bile acid-independent) bile formation. Canalicular excretion of bile salts and several non-bile acid organic anions is impaired in various experimental models of cholestasis. Recent cloning of several canalicular transport systems now facilitates studies on their molecular regulation in cholestasis. Although the picture is far from complete, experimental evidence now exists that decreased or even absent expression of canalicular transport proteins may explain impaired transport function resulting in hyperbilirubinemia and cholestasis. With the increasing availability of molecular probes for these transport systems in humans, new information on the molecular regulation of canalicular transport proteins in human cholestatic liver diseases is beginning to emerge and should bring new insights into their pathophysiology and treatment. This article gives an overview on molecular alterations of canalicular transport systems in experimental models of cholestasis and discusses the potential implications of these changes for the pathophysiology of cholestasis. PMID:9626757

  6. Structural basis for amino acid export by DMT superfamily transporter YddG.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hirotoshi; Doki, Shintaro; Takemoto, Mizuki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Fukui, Keita; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Tabuchi, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Koichi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-06-16

    The drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily is a large group of membrane transporters ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and includes exporters for a remarkably wide range of substrates, such as toxic compounds and metabolites. YddG is a bacterial DMT protein that expels aromatic amino acids and exogenous toxic compounds, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Here we present structural and functional analyses of YddG. Using liposome-based analyses, we show that Escherichia coli and Starkeya novella YddG export various amino acids. The crystal structure of S. novella YddG at 2.4 Å resolution reveals a new membrane transporter topology, with ten transmembrane segments in an outward-facing state. The overall structure is basket-shaped, with a large substrate-binding cavity at the centre of the molecule, and is composed of inverted structural repeats related by two-fold pseudo-symmetry. On the basis of this intramolecular symmetry, we propose a structural model for the inward-facing state and a mechanism of the conformational change for substrate transport, which we confirmed by biochemical analyses. These findings provide a structural basis for the mechanism of transport of DMT superfamily proteins.

  7. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  8. Transport of heptafluorostearate across model membranes. Membrane transport of long-chain fatty acid anions I.

    PubMed

    Schmider, W; Fahr, A; Blum, H E; Kurz, G

    2000-05-01

    Heptafluorostearic acid, an isogeometric derivative of stearic acid, has a pK(a) value of about 0.5. To evaluate the suitability of heptafluorostearate as model compound for anions of long-chain fatty acids in membrane transport, monolayer and liposome studies were performed with lipid mixtures containing phospholipids;-cholesterol-heptafluorostearate or stearate (100:40:20 molar ratios). Transfer of heptafluorostearate and stearate from liposomes to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was followed by measuring the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The percentage of heptafluorostearate, equivalent to the amount placed in their outer monolayer, transferred from liposomes (120;-130 nm diameter) to BSA was 55.7 +/- 3.7% within 10 min at 25 degrees C and 55 +/- 2% within 5 min at 37 degrees C. Slow transfer of 22.7 +/- 2.5% of heptafluorostearate at 25 degrees C followed with a half-life of 2.3 +/- 0.4 h and of 20 +/- 4% at 37 degrees C with a half-life of 0.9 +/- 0.1 h until the final equilibrium distributions between BSA and liposomes were reached, 79 +/- 6% to 21 +/- 5% at 25 degrees C and 75 +/- 5% to 25 +/- 4% at 37 degrees C. The pseudounimolecular rate constants for flip-flop of heptafluorostearate equal k(FF,25) = 0.24 +/- 0.05 h(-) and k(FF,37) = 0.6 +/- 0.1 h(-), respectively. By comparison, transfer of stearate required only 3 min to reach equilibrium distribution. The difference between heptafluorostearate and stearate may be explained by a rapid flip-flop movement of the un-ionized fatty acids which exist in different concentrations in accordance with their pK(a) values. Half-life of flip-flop of heptafluorostearate makes it suitable to study mediated membrane transport of long-chain fatty acid anions.

  9. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  10. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Light-Activated Amino Acid Transport Systems in Halobacterium halobium Envelope Vesicles: Role of Chemical and Electrical Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Russell E.; Greene, Richard V.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    The accumulation of 20 commonly occurring L-amino acids by cell envelope vesicles of Halobacterium halobium, in response to light-induced membrane potential and an artificially created sodium gradient, has been studied. Nineteen of these amino acids are actively accumulated under either or both of these conditions. Glutamate is unique in that its uptake is driven only by a chemical gradient for sodium. Amino acid concentrations at half-maximal uptake rates (Km) and maximal transport rates (V(sub max) have been determined for the uptake of all 19 amino acids. The transport systems have been partially characterized with respect to groups of amino acids transported by common carriers, cation effects, and relative response to the electrical and chemical components of the sodium gradient, the driving forces for uptake. The data presented clearly show that the carrier systems, which are responsible for uptake of individual amino acids, are as variable in their properties as those found in other organisms, i. e., some are highly specific for individual amino acids, some transport several amino acids competitively, some are activated by a chemical gradient of sodium only, and some function also in the complete absence of such a gradient. For all amino acids, Na(+) and K(+) are both required for maximal rate of uptake. The carriers for L-leucine and L-histidine are symmetrical in that these amino acids are transported in both directions across the vesicle membrane. It is suggested that coupling of substrate transport to metabolic energy via transient ionic gradients may be a general phenomenon in procaryotes.

  12. Substrate Selectivity of YgfU, a Uric Acid Transporter from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Papakostas, Konstantinos; Frillingos, Stathis

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT/NCS2) family includes more than 2,000 members, but only 15 have been characterized experimentally. Escherichia coli has 10 members, of which the uracil permease UraA and the xanthine permeases XanQ and XanP are functionally known. Of the remaining members, YgfU is closely related in sequence and genomic locus with XanQ. We analyzed YgfU and showed that it is a proton-gradient dependent, low-affinity (Km 0.5 mm), and high-capacity transporter for uric acid. It also shows a low capacity for transport of xanthine at 37 °C but not at 25 °C. Based on the set of positions delineated as important from our previous Cys-scanning analysis of permease XanQ, we subjected YgfU to rationally designed site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the conserved His-37 (TM1), Glu-270 (TM8), Asp-298 (TM9), and Gln-318 and Asn-319 (TM10) are functionally irreplaceable, and Thr-100 (TM3) is essential for the uric acid selectivity because its replacement with Ala allows efficient uptake of xanthine. The key role of these residues is corroborated by the conservation pattern and homology modeling on the recently described x-ray structure of permease UraA. In addition, site-specific replacements at TM8 (S271A, M274D, V282S) impair expression in the membrane, and V320N (TM10) inactivates the permease, whereas R327G (TM10) or S426N (TM14) reduces the affinity for uric acid (4-fold increased Km). Our study shows that comprehensive analysis of structure-function relationships in a newly characterized transporter can be accomplished with relatively few site-directed replacements, based on the knowledge available from Cys-scanning mutagenesis of a prototypic homolog. PMID:22437829

  13. EfeUOB (YcdNOB) is a tripartite, acid-induced and CpxAR-regulated, low-pH Fe2+ transporter that is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12 but functional in E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jieni; Woodhall, Mark R; Alvarez, Javier; Cartron, Michaël L; Andrews, Simon C

    2007-08-01

    Escherichia coli possesses iron transporters specific for either Fe2+ or Fe3+. Although Fe2+ is far more soluble than Fe3+, it rapidly oxidizes aerobically at pH > or = 7. Thus, FeoAB, the major Fe2+ transporter of E. coli, operates anaerobically. However, Fe2+ remains stable aerobically under acidic conditions, although a low-pH Fe2+ importer has not been previously identified. Here we show that ycdNOB (efeUOB) specifies the first such transporter. efeUOB is repressed at high pH by CpxAR, and is Fe2+-Fur repressed. EfeU is homologous to the high-affinity iron permease, Ftr1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other fungi. EfeO is periplasmic with a cupredoxin N-terminal domain; EfeB is also periplasmic and is haem peroxidase-like. All three Efe proteins are required for Efe function. The efeU gene of E. coli K-12 is cryptic due to a frameshift mutation - repair of the single-base-pair deletion generates a functional EfeUOB system. In contrast, the efeUOB operon of the enterohaemorrhagic strain, O157:H7, lacks any frameshift and is functional. A 'wild-type' K-12 strain bearing a functional EfeUOB displays a major growth advantage under aerobic, low-pH, low-iron conditions when a competing metal is provided. 55Fe transport assays confirm the ferrous iron specificity of EfeUOB.

  14. Effects of benthos on sediment transport: difficulties with functional grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, P. A.; Nowell, A. R. M.

    No consistent functional grouping of organisms as stabilizers vs destabilizers, respectively decreasing or enhancing erodibility, is possible. Benthic organisms can affect erodibility in particular—and sediment transport in general—via alternation (1) of fluid momentum impinging on the bed, (2) of particle exposure to the flow, (3) of adhesion between particles, and (4) of particle momentum. The net effects of a species or individual on erosion and deposition thresholds or on transport rates are not in general predictable from extant data. Furthermore, they depend upon the context of flow conditions, bed configuration, and community composition into which the organism is set. Separation of organism effects into these four categories does, however, allow their explicit incorporation into DuBoys-type and stochastic sediment dynamic models already in use and thus permits the specification of parameters whose measurement will enhance predictability of sediment transport modes and rates in natural, organism-influenced, marine settings. If the variable of prime concern is the total amount of sediment transported, rather than the frequency of transport events or the spatial pattern of erosion and eposition, and if most transport occurs in rare but intense bouts (e.g., winter storms on boreal continental shelves), then it may be possible to ignore organism effects without major sacrifices in accuracy or precision. Under high transport rates, suspended load effects override organism-produced bottom roughness, abrasion removes adhesives from transporting grains, and transport rates (normalized per unit width of the channel or bed) exceed feeding and pelletization rates. Moreover, at high rates most material transports as suspended load, effectively out of reach of the benthos. The transport rates at which organism effects are overridden, however, remain to be determined. For lower transport rates, foraging theory promises to provide insights into organism effects.

  15. Amino Acid Residues in the Putative Transmembrane Domain 11 of Human Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Dictate Transporter Substrate Binding, Stability, and Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weifang; Wu, Zhixuan; Fang, Zihui; Huang, Jiujiu; Huang, Hong; Hong, Mei

    2015-12-07

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs, gene symbol SLCO) are membrane proteins that mediate the sodium-independent transport of a wide range of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Due to their broad substrate specificity, wide tissue distribution, and involvement in drug-drug interactions, OATPs have been considered as key players in drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. Transmembrane domains (TMs) are crucial structural features involved in proper functions of many transporters. According to computer-based modeling and previous studies of our laboratory and others, TM11 of OATP1B1 may face the substrate interaction pocket and thus play an important role in the transport function of the protein. Alanine-scanning of the transmembrane domain identified seven critical amino acid residues within the region. Further analysis revealed that alanine substitution of these residues resulted in reduced protein stability, which led to significantly decreased protein expression on the plasma membrane. In addition, all mutants exhibited an altered Km for ES uptake (either high affinity or low affinity component, or both), though Km for taurocholate transport only changed in R580A, G584A, and F591A. These results suggested that critical residues in TM11 not only affect protein stability of the transporter, but its interaction with substrates as well. The identification of seven essential residues out of 21 TM amino acids highlighted the importance of this transmembrane domain in the proper function of OATP1B1.

  16. Functional and physiological evidence for a rhesus-type ammonia transporter in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Kerstin; Neuhäuser, Benjamin; Gilch, Stefan; Ludewig, Uwe; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2007-08-01

    Ammonium transporters form a conserved family of transport proteins and are widely distributed among all domains of life. The genome of Nitrosomonas europaea codes for a single gene (rh1) that belongs to the family of the AMT/Rh ammonium transporters. For the first time, this study provides functional and physiological evidence for a rhesus-type ammonia transporter in bacteria (N. europaea). The methylammonium (MA) transport activity of N. europaea correlated with the Rh1 expression. The K(m) value for the MA uptake of N. europaea was 1.8+/-0.2 mM (pH 7.25), and the uptake was competitively inhibited by ammonium [K(i)(NH(4) (+)) 0.3+/-0.1 mM at pH 7.25]. The MA uptake rate was pH dependent, indicating that the uncharged form of MA is transported by Rh1. An effect of the glutamine synthetase on the MA uptake was not observed. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the function of Rh1 from N. europaea as an ammonia/MA transporter was confirmed. The results suggest that Rh1 equilibrates the uncharged substrate species. A low pH value in the periplasmic space during ammonia oxidation seems to be responsible for the ammonium accumulation functioning as an acid NH(4) (+) trap.

  17. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  18. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  19. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-04-23

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion.

  20. Functional Characterization of 5-Oxoproline Transport via SLC16A1/MCT1*

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shotaro; Futagi, Yuya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Ogura, Jiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone is a tripeptide that consists of 5-oxoproline, histidine, and proline. The peptide is rapidly metabolized by various enzymes. 5-Oxoproline is produced by enzymatic hydrolysis in a variety of peptides. Previous studies showed that 5-oxoproline could become a possible biomarker for autism spectrum disorders. Here we demonstrate the involvement of SLC16A1 in the transport of 5-oxoproline. An SLC16A1 polymorphism (rs1049434) was recently identified. However, there is no information about the effect of the polymorphism on SLC16A1 function. In this study, the polymorphism caused an observable change in 5-oxoproline and lactate transport via SLC16A1. The Michaelis constant (Km) was increased in an SLC16A1 mutant compared with that in the wild type. In addition, the proton concentration required to produce half-maximal activation of transport activity (K0.5, H+) was increased in the SLC16A1 mutant compared with that in the wild type. Furthermore, we examined the transport of 5-oxoproline in T98G cells as an astrocyte cell model. Despite the fact that 5-oxoproline is an amino acid derivative, Na+-dependent and amino acid transport systems scarcely contributed to 5-oxoproline transport. Based on our findings, we conclude that H+-coupled 5-oxoproline transport is mediated solely by SLC16A1 in the cells. PMID:25371203

  1. Functional droplets that recognize, collect, and transport debris on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ying; Chang, Chia-Chih; Choudhary, Umesh; Bolukbasi, Irem; Crosby, Alfred J.; Emrick, Todd

    2016-01-01

    We describe polymer-stabilized droplets capable of recognizing and picking up nanoparticles from substrates in experiments designed for transporting hydroxyapatite nanoparticles that represent the principal elemental composition of bone. Our experiments, which are inspired by cells that carry out materials transport in vivo, used oil-in-water droplets that traverse a nanoparticle-coated substrate driven by an imposed fluid flow. Nanoparticle capture is realized by interaction of the particles with chemical functionality embedded within the polymeric stabilizing layer on the droplets. Nanoparticle uptake efficiency is controlled by solution conditions and the extent of functionality available for contact with the nanoparticles. Moreover, in an elementary demonstration of nanoparticle transportation, particles retrieved initially from the substrate were later deposited “downstream,” illustrating a pickup and drop-off technique that represents a first step toward mimicking point-to-point transportation events conducted in living systems. PMID:27819054

  2. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. ); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. ); Dixon, L.D. , Martinez, GA ); Jones, R.H. , Los Gatos, CA ); Klimas, M.J. ); Peterson, R.W

    1992-03-01

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  3. OsABCB14 functions in auxin transport and iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxia; Zhang, Saina; Guo, Haipeng; Wang, Suikang; Xu, Ligen; Li, Chuanyou; Qian, Qian; Chen, Fan; Geisler, Markus; Qi, Yanhua; Jiang, De An

    2014-07-01

    Members of the ATP Binding Cassette B/Multidrug-Resistance/P-glyco-protein (ABCB/MDR/PGP) subfamily were shown to function primarily in Oryza sativa (rice) auxin transport; however, none of the rice ABCB transporters have been functionally characterized. Here, we describe that a knock-down of OsABCB14 confers decreased auxin concentrations and polar auxin transport rates, conferring insensitivity to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). OsABCB14 displays enhanced specific auxin influx activity in yeast and protoplasts prepared from rice knock-down alleles. OsABCB14 is localized at the plasma membrane, pointing to an important directionality under physiological conditions. osabcb14 mutants were surprisingly found to be insensitive to iron deficiency treatment (-Fe). Their Fe concentration is higher and upregulation of Fe deficiency-responsive genes is lower in osabcb14 mutants than in wild-type rice (Nipponbare, NIP). Taken together, our results strongly support the role of OsABCB14 as an auxin influx transporter involved in Fe homeostasis. The functional characterization of OsABCB14 provides insights in monocot auxin transport and its relationship to Fe nutrition.

  4. Structure and Function of SLC4 Family HCO3- Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Yang, Jichun; Chen, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier SLC4 family consists of 10 members, nine of which are HCO3- transporters, including three Na+-independent Cl−/HCO3- exchangers AE1, AE2, and AE3, five Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCe2, NBCn1, NBCn2, and NDCBE, as well as “AE4” whose Na+-dependence remains controversial. The SLC4 HCO3- transporters play critical roles in pH regulation and transepithelial movement of electrolytes with a broad range of demonstrated physiological relevances. Dysfunctions of these transporters are associated with a series of human diseases. During the past decades, tremendous amount of effort has been undertaken to investigate the topological organization of the SLC4 transporters in the plasma membrane. Based upon the proposed topology models, mutational and functional studies have identified important structural elements likely involved in the ion translocation by the SLC4 transporters. In the present article, we review the advances during the past decades in understanding the structure and function of the SLC4 transporters. PMID:26648873

  5. Impact of Microbial Growth on Subsurface Perfluoroalkyl Acid Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, T. S.; Higgins, C. P.; Sharp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and transport of poly and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the presence of active microbial communities has not been widely investigated. These emerging contaminants are commonly utilized in aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF) and have often been detected in groundwater. This study explores the transport of a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), in microbially active settings. Single point organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients derived by exposing inactive cellular material to PFASs result in more than an order of magnitude increase in sorption compared to soil organic carbon sorption coefficients found in literature. For example, the sorption coefficients for PFOS are 4.05±0.07 L/kg and 2.80±0.08 L/kg for cellular organic carbon and soil organic carbon respectively. This increase in sorption, coupled with enhanced extracellular polymeric substance production observed during growth of a common hydrocarbon degrading soil microbe exposed to source-level concentrations of PFASs (10 mg/L of 11 analytes, 110 mg/L total) may result in PFAS retardation in situ. To address the upscaling of this phenomenon, flow-through columns packed with low-organic carbon sediment and biostimulated with 10 mg/L glucose were exposed to PFAS concentrations from 15 μg/L to 10 mg/L of each 11 analytes. Breakthrough and tailing of each analyte was measured and modeled with Hydrus-1D to explore sorption coefficients over time for microbially active columns.

  6. The importance of the excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3).

    PubMed

    Bjørn-Yoshimoto, Walden E; Underhill, Suzanne M

    2016-09-01

    The neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) is fairly ubiquitously expressed in the brain, though it does not necessarily maintain the same function everywhere. It is important in maintaining low local concentrations of glutamate, where its predominant post-synaptic localization can buffer nearby glutamate receptors and modulate excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. It is also the main neuronal cysteine uptake system acting as the rate-limiting factor for the synthesis of glutathione, a potent antioxidant, in EAAT3 expressing neurons, while on GABAergic neurons, it is important in supplying glutamate as a precursor for GABA synthesis. Several diseases implicate EAAT3, and modulation of this transporter could prove a useful therapeutic approach. Regulation of EAAT3 could be targeted at several points for functional modulation, including the level of transcription, trafficking and direct pharmacological modulation, and indeed, compounds and experimental treatments have been identified that regulate EAAT3 function at different stages, which together with observations of EAAT3 regulation in patients is giving us insight into the endogenous function of this transporter, as well as the consequences of altered function. This review summarizes work done on elucidating the role and regulation of EAAT3.

  7. Peptide modules for overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport to cells.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna A; Kiselev, Anton V

    2016-01-01

    Absence of safe and efficient methods of nucleic acids delivery is one of the major issues which limits the development of human gene therapy. Highly efficient viral vectors raise questions due to safety reasons. Among non-viral vectors peptide-based carriers can be considered as good candidates for the development of "artificial viruses"--multifunctional polyplexes that mimic viruses. Suggested strategy to obtain multifunctionality is to combine several peptide modules into one modular carrier. Different kinds of peptide modules are needed for successful overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport into the cells. Design of such modules and establishment of structure-function relationships are issues of importance to researchers working in the field of nucleic acids delivery.

  8. Few Amino Acid Exchanges Expand the Substrate Spectrum of Monocarboxylate Transporter 10.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Jörg; Braun, Doreen; Kinne, Anita; Rathmann, Daniel; Köhrle, Josef; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) belong to the SLC16 family within the major facilitator superfamily of transmembrane transporters. MCT8 is a thyroid hormone transporter mutated in the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, a severe psychomotor retardation syndrome. MCT10 is closely related to MCT8 and is known as T-type amino acid transporter. Both transporters mediate T3 transport, but although MCT8 also transports rT3 and T4, these compounds are not efficiently transported by MCT10, which, in contrast, transports aromatic amino acids. Based on the 58% amino acid identity within the transmembrane regions among MCT8 and MCT10, we reasoned that substrate specificity may be primarily determined by a small number of amino acid differences between MCT8 and MCT10 along the substrate translocation channel. Inspecting the homology model of MCT8 and a structure-guided alignment between both proteins, we selected 8 amino acid positions and prepared chimeric MCT10 proteins with selected amino acids changed to the corresponding amino acids in MCT8. The MCT10 mutant harboring 8 amino acid substitutions was stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney 1 cells and found to exhibit T4 transport activity. We then successively reduced the number of amino acid substitutions and eventually identified a minimal set of 2-3 amino acid exchanges which were sufficient to allow T4 transport. The resulting MCT10 chimeras exhibited KM values for T4 similar to MCT8 but transported T4 at a slower rate. The acquisition of T4 transport by MCT10 was associated with complete loss of the capacity to transport Phe, when Tyr184 was mutated to Phe.

  9. Acid-base transport by the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Lara A.; Boron, Walter F.; Zhou, Yuehan

    2015-01-01

    Each day, the kidneys filter 180 L of blood plasma, equating to some 4,300 mmol of the major blood buffer, bicarbonate (HCO3−). The glomerular filtrate enters the lumen of the proximal tubule (PT), and the majority of filtered HCO3− is reclaimed along the early (S1) and convoluted (S2) portions of the PT in a manner coupled to the secretion of H+ into the lumen. The PT also uses the secreted H+ to titrate non-HCO3− buffers in the lumen, in the process creating “new HCO3−” for transport into the blood. Thus, the PT – along with more distal renal segments – is largely responsible for regulating plasma [HCO3−]. In this review we first focus on the milestone discoveries over the past 50+ years that define the mechanism and regulation of acid-base transport by the proximal tubule. Further on in the review, we will summarize research still in progress from our laboratory, work that addresses the problem of how the PT is able to finely adapt to acid–base disturbances by rapidly sensing changes in basolateral levels of HCO3− and CO2 (but not pH), and thereby to exert tight control over the acid–base composition of the blood plasma. PMID:21170887

  10. Thyroid hormone transporters--functions and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana; Morte, Beatriz

    2015-07-01

    The cellular influx and efflux of thyroid hormones are facilitated by transmembrane protein transporters. Of these transporters, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is the only one specific for the transport of thyroid hormones and some of their derivatives. Mutations in SLC16A2, the gene that encodes MCT8, lead to an X-linked syndrome with severe neurological impairment and altered concentrations of thyroid hormones. Histopathological analysis of brain tissue from patients who have impaired MCT8 function indicates that brain lesions start prenatally, and are most probably the result of cerebral hypothyroidism. A Slc16a2 knockout mouse model has revealed that Mct8 is an important mediator of thyroid hormone transport, especially T3, through the blood-brain barrier. However, unlike humans with an MCT8 deficiency, these mice do not have neurological impairment. One explanation for this discrepancy could be differences in expression of the T4 transporter OATP1C1 in the blood-brain barrier; OATP1C1 is more abundant in rodents than in primates and permits the passage of T4 in the absence of T3 transport, thus preventing full cerebral hypothyroidism. In this Review, we discuss the relevance of thyroid hormone transporters in health and disease, with a particular focus on the pathophysiology of MCT8 mutations.

  11. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  12. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Acutely Decreases Monoaminergic Transporter Function

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Stout, Kristen A.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Allen, Scott C.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that non-contingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of non-contingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence. PMID:22120988

  13. Methamphetamine self-administration acutely decreases monoaminergic transporter function.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Stout, Kristen A; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Allen, Scott C; Nielsen, Shannon M; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-03-01

    Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that noncontingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of noncontingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence.

  14. The transport of uric acid across mouse small intestine in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bronk, J R; Shaw, M I

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro recirculation technique was used to study the uptake and transport of uric acid by the jejunum of mouse small intestine. Three components of the serosal secretions appeared to be endogenously derived nucleic acid derivatives; two of these were identified as uric acid and uracil. There was no detectable metabolism of uric acid by the intestine. Uric acid transported from the lumen appeared in the serosal fluid at a concentration higher than that in the lumen. The final serosal/luminal concentration ratio of about 1.18 for exogenous uric acid was found to be constant over the concentration range studied (0.01-0.1 mM). The presence of exogenous uric acid in the lumen did not affect the production of endogenous uric acid by the intestine and its release into the serosal secretions. Mucosal concentration of exogenous uric acid was below, but the total mucosal concentration (exogenous+endogenous) was above, that in the lumen. There was no evidence for the secretion of endogenous uric acid into the lumen. Oxypurinol significantly decreased the rate of serosal appearance of exogenous uric acid. Allopurinol did not affect the transport of exogenous uric acid from the lumen and there was negligible metabolism of allopurinol to oxypurinol by the tissue. Uracil did not affect the transport of exogenous uric acid from the lumen, or the serosal appearance of endogenous uric acid. Likewise uracil transport was unaffected by luminal uric acid. PMID:3795104

  15. Butyric acid increases transepithelial transport of ferulic acid through upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4).

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Kerstin; Kerimi, Asimina; Poquet, Laure; Williamson, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Ferulic acid is released by microbial hydrolysis in the colon, where butyric acid, a major by-product of fermentation, constitutes the main energy source for colonic enterocytes. We investigated how varying concentrations of this short chain fatty acid may influence the absorption of the phenolic acid. Chronic treatment of Caco-2 cells with butyric acid resulted in increased mRNA and protein abundance of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4), previously proposed to facilitate ferulic acid absorption in addition to passive diffusion. Short term incubation with butyric acid only led to upregulation of MCT4 while both conditions increased transepithelial transport of ferulic acid in the apical to basolateral, but not basolateral to apical, direction. Chronic treatment also elevated intracellular concentrations of ferulic acid, which in turn gave rise to increased concentrations of ferulic acid metabolites. Immunofluorescence staining of cells revealed uniform distribution of MCT1 protein in the cell membrane, whereas MCT4 was only detected in the lateral plasma membrane sections of Caco-2 cells. We therefore propose that MCT1 may be acting as an uptake transporter and MCT4 as an efflux system across the basolateral membrane for ferulic acid, and that this process is stimulated by butyric acid.

  16. Low- and high-affinity transport systems for citric acid in the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Cássio, F; Leáo, C

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid-grown cells of the yeast Candida utilis induced two transport systems for citric acid, presumably a proton symport and a facilitated diffusion system for the charged and the undissociated forms of the acid, respectively. Both systems could be observed simultaneously when the transport was measured at 25 degrees C with labelled citric acid at pH 3.5 with the following kinetic parameters: for the low-affinity system, Vmax, 1.14 nmol of undissociated citric acid s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.59 mM undissociated acid; for the high-affinity system, Vmax, 0.38 nmol of citrate s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.056 mM citrate. At high pH values (above 5.0), the low-affinity system was absent or not measurable. The two transport systems exhibited different substrate specificities. Isocitric acid was a competitive inhibitor of citric acid for the high-affinity system, suggesting that these tricarboxylic acids used the same transport system, while aconitic, tricarballylic, trimesic, and hemimellitic acids were not competitive inhibitors. With respect to the low-affinity system, isocitric acid, L-lactic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors, suggesting that all of these mono-, di-, and tricarboxylic acids used the same low-affinity transport system. The two transport systems were repressed by glucose, and as a consequence diauxic growth was observed. Both systems were inducible, and not only citric acid but also lactic acid and malic acid may induce those transport systems. The induction of both systems was not dependent on the relative concentration of the anionic form(s) and of undissociated citric acid in the culture medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1664712

  17. Differential expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporters (PAT[1] and PAT[2]) in tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The PATs have been identified as growth-regulatory nutrient sensors in Drosophila and as activators of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mammalian cell cultures. These studies suggest that, beyond their classical function as transporters of simple amino acids (AA), the PATs act as tranceptors,...

  18. Protein kinase C restricts transport of carnitine by amino acid transporter ATB(0,+) apically localized in the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Michalec, Katarzyna; Mysiorek, Caroline; Kuntz, Mélanie; Bérézowski, Vincent; Szczepankiewicz, Andrzej A; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M; Cecchelli, Roméo; Nałęcz, Katarzyna A

    2014-07-15

    Carnitine (3-hydroxy-4-trimethylammoniobutyrate) is necessary for transfer of fatty acids through the inner mitochondrial membrane. Carnitine, not synthesized in the brain, is delivered there through the strongly polarized blood-brain barrier (BBB). Expression and presence of two carnitine transporters - organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and amino acid transporter B(0,+) (ATB(0,+)) have been demonstrated previously in an in vitro model of the BBB. Due to potential protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites within ATB(0,+) sequence, the present study verified effects of this kinase on transporter function and localization in the BBB. ATB(0,+) can be regulated by estrogen receptor α and up-regulated in vitro, therefore its presence in vivo was verified with the transmission electron microscopy. The analyses of brain slices demonstrated ATB(0,+) luminal localization in brain capillaries, confirmed by biotinylation experiments in an in vitro model of the BBB. Brain capillary endothelial cells were shown to control carnitine gradient. ATB(0,+) was phosphorylated by PKC, what correlated with inhibition of carnitine transport. PKC activation did not change the amount of ATB(0,+) present in the apical membrane of brain endothelial cells, but resulted in transporter exclusion from raft microdomains. ATB(0,+) inactivation by a lateral movement in plasma membrane after transporter phosphorylation has been postulated.

  19. Cationic amino acid transporters play key roles in the survival and transmission of apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Esther; Hapuarachchi, Sanduni V.; Miller, Catherine M.; Fairweather, Stephen J.; Cai, Yeping; Smith, Nicholas C.; Cockburn, Ian A.; Bröer, Stefan; Kirk, Kiaran; van Dooren, Giel G.

    2017-01-01

    Apicomplexans are obligate intracellular parasites that scavenge essential nutrients from their hosts via transporter proteins on their plasma membrane. The identities of the transporters that mediate amino acid uptake into apicomplexans are unknown. Here we demonstrate that members of an apicomplexan-specific protein family—the Novel Putative Transporters (NPTs)—play key roles in the uptake of cationic amino acids. We show that an NPT from Toxoplasma gondii (TgNPT1) is a selective arginine transporter that is essential for parasite survival and virulence. We also demonstrate that a homologue of TgNPT1 from the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei (PbNPT1), shown previously to be essential for the sexual gametocyte stage of the parasite, is a cationic amino acid transporter. This reveals a role for cationic amino acid scavenging in gametocyte biology. Our study demonstrates a critical role for amino acid transporters in the survival, virulence and life cycle progression of these parasites. PMID:28205520

  20. Intestinal transport of zinc and folic acid: a mutual inhibitory effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ghishan, F.K.; Said, H.M.; Wilson, P.C.; Murrell, J.E.; Greene, H.L.

    1986-02-01

    Recent observations suggest an inverse relationship between folic acid intake and zinc nutriture and indicate an interaction between folic acid and zinc at the intestinal level. To define that interaction, we designed in vivo and in vitro transport studies in which folic acid transport in the presence of zinc, as well as zinc transport in the presence of folic acid was examined. These studies show that zinc transport is significantly decreased when folate is present in the intestinal lumen. Similarly folic acid transport is significantly decreased with the presence of zinc. To determine whether this intestinal inhibition is secondary to zinc and folate-forming complexes, charcoal-binding studies were performed. These studies indicate that zinc and folate from complexes at pH 2.0, but that at pH 6.0, these complexes dissolve. Therefore, our studies suggest that under normal physiological conditions a mutual inhibition between folate and zinc exists at the site of intestinal transport.

  1. Cationic amino acid transporters play key roles in the survival and transmission of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Esther; Hapuarachchi, Sanduni V; Miller, Catherine M; Fairweather, Stephen J; Cai, Yeping; Smith, Nicholas C; Cockburn, Ian A; Bröer, Stefan; Kirk, Kiaran; van Dooren, Giel G

    2017-02-16

    Apicomplexans are obligate intracellular parasites that scavenge essential nutrients from their hosts via transporter proteins on their plasma membrane. The identities of the transporters that mediate amino acid uptake into apicomplexans are unknown. Here we demonstrate that members of an apicomplexan-specific protein family-the Novel Putative Transporters (NPTs)-play key roles in the uptake of cationic amino acids. We show that an NPT from Toxoplasma gondii (TgNPT1) is a selective arginine transporter that is essential for parasite survival and virulence. We also demonstrate that a homologue of TgNPT1 from the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei (PbNPT1), shown previously to be essential for the sexual gametocyte stage of the parasite, is a cationic amino acid transporter. This reveals a role for cationic amino acid scavenging in gametocyte biology. Our study demonstrates a critical role for amino acid transporters in the survival, virulence and life cycle progression of these parasites.

  2. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  3. Hypomorphic variants of cationic amino acid transporter 3 in males with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nava, Caroline; Rupp, Johanna; Boissel, Jean-Paul; Mignot, Cyril; Rastetter, Agnès; Amiet, Claire; Jacquette, Aurélia; Dupuits, Céline; Bouteiller, Delphine; Keren, Boris; Ruberg, Merle; Faudet, Anne; Doummar, Diane; Philippe, Anne; Périsse, Didier; Laurent, Claudine; Lebrun, Nicolas; Guillemot, Vincent; Chelly, Jamel; Cohen, David; Héron, Delphine; Brice, Alexis; Closs, Ellen I; Depienne, Christel

    2015-12-01

    Cationic amino acid transporters (CATs) mediate the entry of L-type cationic amino acids (arginine, ornithine and lysine) into the cells including neurons. CAT-3, encoded by the SLC7A3 gene on chromosome X, is one of the three CATs present in the human genome, with selective expression in brain. SLC7A3 is highly intolerant to variation in humans, as attested by the low frequency of deleterious variants in available databases, but the impact on variants in this gene in humans remains undefined. In this study, we identified a missense variant in SLC7A3, encoding the CAT-3 cationic amino acid transporter, on chromosome X by exome sequencing in two brothers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We then sequenced the SLC7A3 coding sequence in 148 male patients with ASD and identified three additional rare missense variants in unrelated patients. Functional analyses of the mutant transporters showed that two of the four identified variants cause severe or moderate loss of CAT-3 function due to altered protein stability or abnormal trafficking to the plasma membrane. The patient with the most deleterious SLC7A3 variant had high-functioning autism and epilepsy, and also carries a de novo 16p11.2 duplication possibly contributing to his phenotype. This study shows that rare hypomorphic variants of SLC7A3 exist in male individuals and suggest that SLC7A3 variants possibly contribute to the etiology of ASD in male subjects in association with other genetic factors.

  4. Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues Lining the Extracellular Loop I of Sodium-coupled Bile Acid Transporter ASBT Interact with Na+ and 7α-OH Moieties on the Ligand Cholestane Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Functional contributions of residues Val-99—Ser-126 lining extracellular loop (EL) 1 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter were determined via cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol modification, and in silico interpretation. Despite membrane expression for all but three constructs (S112C, Y117C, S126C), most EL1 mutants (64%) were inactivated by cysteine mutation, suggesting a functional role during sodium/bile acid co-transport. A negative charge at conserved residues Asp-120 and Asp-122 is required for transport function, whereas neutralization of charge at Asp-124 yields a functionally active transporter. D124A exerts low affinity for common bile acids except deoxycholic acid, which uniquely lacks a 7α-hydroxyl (OH) group. Overall, we conclude that (i) Asp-122 functions as a Na+ sensor, binding one of two co-transported Na+ ions, (ii) Asp-124 interacts with 7α-OH groups of bile acids, and (iii) apolar EL1 residues map to hydrophobic ligand pharmacophore features. Based on these data, we propose a comprehensive mechanistic model involving dynamic salt bridge pairs and hydrogen bonding involving multiple residues to describe sodium-dependent bile acid transporter-mediated bile acid and cation translocation. PMID:18508772

  5. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine).

  6. Stimulation of the amino acid transporter SLC6A19 by JAK2

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, Shefalee K.; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Merches, Katja; Gu, Shuchen; Broeer, Stefan; Lang, Florian

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amino acid transporter SLC6A19 is upregulated by Janus kinase-2 JAK2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {sup V617F}JAK2 mutant, causing myeloproliferative disease, is more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JAK2 inhibitor AG490 reverses stimulation of SLC6A19 by {sup V617F}JAK2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JAK2 enhances SLC6A19 protein insertion into the cell membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLC6A19 may contribute to amino acid uptake into {sup V617F}JAK2 expressing tumor cells. -- Abstract: JAK2 (Janus kinase-2) is expressed in a wide variety of cells including tumor cells and contributes to the proliferation and survival of those cells. The gain of function mutation {sup V617F}JAK2 mutant is found in the majority of myeloproliferative diseases. Cell proliferation depends on the availability of amino acids. Concentrative cellular amino acid uptake is in part accomplished by Na{sup +} coupled amino acid transport through SLC6A19 (B(0)AT). The present study thus explored whether JAK2 activates SLC6A19. To this end, SLC6A19 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without wild type JAK2, {sup V617F}JAK2 or inactive {sup K882E}JAK2 and electrogenic amino acid transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. In SLC6A19-expressing oocytes but not in oocytes injected with water or JAK2 alone, the addition of leucine (2 mM) to the bath generated a current (I{sub le}), which was significantly increased following coexpression of JAK2 or {sup V617F}JAK2, but not by coexpression of {sup K882E}JAK2. Coexpression of JAK2 enhanced the maximal transport rate without significantly modifying the affinity of the carrier. Exposure of the oocytes to the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (40 {mu}M) resulted in a gradual decline of I{sub le}. According to chemiluminescence JAK2 enhanced the carrier protein abundance in the cell membrane. The decline of I{sub le} following inhibition of carrier insertion by brefeldin A (5 {mu}M) was similar

  7. SNAT2 amino acid transporter is regulated by amino acids of the SLC6 gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter subfamily in neocortical neurons and may play no role in delivering glutamine for glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Sukhjeevan; Defamie, Norah; Zhang, Xiong; De Gois, Stéphanie; Shawki, Ali; Mackenzie, Bryan; Chen, Chu; Varoqui, Hélène; Erickson, Jeffrey D

    2009-04-24

    System A transporters SNAT1 and SNAT2 mediate uptake of neutral alpha-amino acids (e.g. glutamine, alanine, and proline) and are expressed in central neurons. We tested the hypothesis that SNAT2 is required to support neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis by examining spontaneous excitatory activity after inducing or repressing SNAT2 expression for prolonged periods. We stimulated de novo synthesis of SNAT2 mRNA and increased SNAT2 mRNA stability and total SNAT2 protein and functional activity, whereas SNAT1 expression was unaffected. Increased endogenous SNAT2 expression did not affect spontaneous excitatory action-potential frequency over control. Long term glutamine exposure strongly repressed SNAT2 expression but increased excitatory action-potential frequency. Quantal size was not altered following SNAT2 induction or repression. These results suggest that spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in pyramidal neurons does not rely on SNAT2. To our surprise, repression of SNAT2 activity was not limited to System A substrates. Taurine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and beta-alanine (substrates of the SLC6 gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter family) repressed SNAT2 expression more potently (10x) than did System A substrates; however, the responses to System A substrates were more rapid. Since ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein are known to bind to an amino acid response element within the SNAT2 promoter and mediate induction of SNAT2 in peripheral cell lines, we tested whether either factor was similarly induced by amino acid deprivation in neurons. We found that glutamine and taurine repressed the induction of both transcription factors. Our data revealed that SNAT2 expression is constitutively low in neurons under physiological conditions but potently induced, together with the taurine transporter TauT, in response to depletion of neutral amino acids.

  8. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes.

    PubMed

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P; Jaeger, Heinrich M; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-17

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane's electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  9. Discovery of CLC transport proteins: cloning, structure, function and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jentsch, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract After providing a personal description of the convoluted path leading 25 years ago to the molecular identification of the Torpedo Cl− channel ClC-0 and the discovery of the CLC gene family, I succinctly describe the general structural and functional features of these ion transporters before giving a short overview of mammalian CLCs. These can be categorized into plasma membrane Cl− channels and vesicular Cl−/H+-exchangers. They are involved in the regulation of membrane excitability, transepithelial transport, extracellular ion homeostasis, endocytosis and lysosomal function. Diseases caused by CLC dysfunction include myotonia, neurodegeneration, deafness, blindness, leukodystrophy, male infertility, renal salt loss, kidney stones and osteopetrosis, revealing a surprisingly broad spectrum of biological roles for chloride transport that was unsuspected when I set out to clone the first voltage-gated chloride channel. PMID:25590607

  10. L-aspartic acid transport by cat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Preston, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Cat and dog red cells are unusual in that they have no Na/K ATPase and contain low K and high Na intracellularly. They also show significant Na dependent L-aspartate (L-asp) transport. The authors have characterized this system in cat RBCs. The influx of /sup 3/H-L-asp (typically 2..mu..M) was measured in washed RBCs incubated for 60 s at 37/sup 0/C in medium containing 140 mM NaCl, 5 mM Kcl, 2 mM CaCl/sub 2/, 15 mM MOPS pH 7.4, 5 mM glucose, and /sup 14/C-PEG as a space marker. The cells were washed 3 times in the medium immediately before incubation which was terminated by centrifuging the RBCs through a layer of dibutylphthalate. Over an L-asp concentration range of 0.5-1000..mu..M, influx obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a small added linear diffusion component. The Kt and Jmax of the saturable component were 5.40 +/- 0.34 ..mu..M and 148.8 +/- 7.2 ..mu..mol 1. cell/sup -1/h/sup -1/ respectively. Replacement of Na with Li, K, Rb, Cs or choline reduce influx to diffusion. With the addition of asp analogues (4/sup +/M L-asp, 40/sup +/M inhibitor), the following sequence of inhibition was observed (range 80% to 40% inhib.): L-glutamate > L-cysteine sulfonate > D-asp > L-cysteic acid > D-glutamate. Other amino acids such as L-alanine, L-proline, L-lysine, L-cysteine, and taurine showed no inhibition (<5%). These data suggest that cat red cells contain a high-affinity Na dependent transport system for L-asp, glutamate, and closely related analogues which resembles that found in the RBCs of other carnivores and in neural tissues.

  11. Beyond genotype: serotonin transporter epigenetic modification predicts human brain function.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Yuliya S; Koenen, Karestan C; Galea, Sandro; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Seney, Marianne L; Sibille, Etienne; Williamson, Douglas E; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2014-09-01

    We examined epigenetic regulation in regards to behaviorally and clinically relevant human brain function. Specifically, we found that increased promoter methylation of the serotonin transporter gene predicted increased threat-related amygdala reactivity and decreased mRNA expression in postmortem amygdala tissue. These patterns were independent of functional genetic variation in the same region. Furthermore, the association with amygdala reactivity was replicated in a second cohort and was robust to both sampling methods and age.

  12. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  13. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in Small Intestine IDENTIFICATION, ISOLATION, AND EVIDENCE FOR ITS ROLE IN CELLULAR FATTY ACID TRANSPORT

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Manning, Joan A.

    1974-01-01

    A soluble fatty acid-binding protein (FABP), mol wt ∼ 12,000 is present in intestinal mucosa and other tissues that utilize fatty acids, including liver, myocardium, adipose, and kidney. This protein binds long chain fatty acids both in vivo and in vitro. FABP was isolated from rat intestine by gel filtration and isoelectric focusing. It showed a reaction of complete immunochemical identity with proteins in the 12,000 mol wt fatty acid-binding fractions of liver, myocardium, and adipose tissue supernates. (The presence of immunochemically nonidentical 12,000 mol wt FABP in these tissues is not excluded.) By quantitative radial immunodiffusion, supernatant FABP concentration in mucosa from proximal and middle thirds of jejuno-ileum significantly exceeded that in distal third, duodenum, and liver, expressed as micrograms per milligram soluble protein, micrograms per gram DNA, and micrograms per gram tissue. FABP concentration in villi was approximately three times greater than in crypts. Small quantities of FABP were present in washed nuclei-cell membrane, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. However, the amount of FABP solubilized per milligram membrane protein was similar for all particulate fractions, and total membrane-associated FABP was only about 16% of supernatant FABP. Intestinal FABP concentration was significantly greater in animals maintained on high fat diets than on low fat; saturated and unsaturated fat diets did not differ greatly in this regard. The preponderance of FABP in villi from proximal and middle intestine, its ability to bind fatty acids in vivo as well as in vitro, and its response to changes in dietary fat intake support the concept that this protein participates in cellular fatty acid transport during fat absorption. Identical or closely related 12,000 mol wt proteins may serve similar functions in other tissues. Images PMID:4211161

  14. Involvement of the L-Type Amino Acid Transporter Lat2 in the Transport of 3,3′-Diiodothyronine across the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kinne, Anita; Wittner, Melanie; Wirth, Eva K.; Hinz, Katrin M.; Schülein, Ralf; Köhrle, Josef; Krause, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are transported across cell membranes by transmembrane transporter proteins, for example by members of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) and the L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) families. LATs consist of a light chain (e.g. LAT2) and a heavy chain (CD98), which is essential for their cell surface expression and functionality. The specificity of Lat2 for thyroid hormones and their metabolites and its role in their transport was not fully clear. This fact motivated us to establish a cell system to elucidate the uptake of thyroid hormones and their metabolites by mouse Lat2. The coinjection of cRNA coding for Lat2 and CD98 into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in a markedly increased level of 3,3′-diiodo-L-thyronine (3,3′-T2) and to some extent also enhanced T3 transport. To gain insight into properties of thyroid hormones and their metabolites transported by Lat2, we inhibited 3,3′-T2 uptake by various iodothyronine derivatives. T1 and T2 derivatives as well as 2-aminobicyclo-[2, 2,1]-heptane-2-carboxylic acid strongly competed with 3,3′-T2 uptake. In addition, we performed T2 uptake measurements with the thyroid hormone-specific transporter MCT8. For both Lat2 and MCT8, Km values in a low micromolar range were calculated. We demonstrated that oocytes are a suitable system for thyroid hormone transport studies mediated by Lat2. Our data indicates that Lat2 compared to other thyroid hormone transporters prefers 3,3′-T2 as the substrate. Thus, Lat2 might contribute to the availability of thyroid hormone by importing and/or exporting 3,3′-T2, which is generated either by T3 inactivation or by rapid deiodinase 1-mediated rT3 degradation. PMID:26601072

  15. The evolution of Jen3 proteins and their role in dicarboxylic acid transport in Yarrowia

    PubMed Central

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Michely, Stéphanie; Thevenieau, France; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Jen proteins in yeast are involved in the uptake of mono/dicarboxylic acids. The Jen1 subfamily transports lactate and pyruvate, while the Jen2 subfamily transports fumarate, malate, and succinate. Yarrowia lipolytica has six JEN genes: YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D20108g, YALI0D24607g, and YALI0E32901g. Through phylogenetic analyses, we found that these genes represent a new subfamily, Jen3 and that these three Jen subfamilies derivate from three putative ancestral genes. Reverse transcription-PCR. revealed that only four YLJEN genes are expressed and they are upregulated in the presence of lactate, pyruvate, fumarate, malate, and/or succinate, suggesting that they are able to transport these substrates. Analysis of deletion mutant strains revealed that Jen3 subfamily proteins transport fumarate, malate, and succinate. We found evidence that YALI0C15488 encodes the main transporter because its deletion was sufficient to strongly reduce or suppress growth in media containing fumarate, malate, or succinate. It appears that the other YLJEN genes play a minor role, with the exception of YALI0E32901g, which is important for malate uptake. However, the overexpression of each YLJEN gene in the sextuple-deletion mutant strain ΔYLjen1-6 revealed that all six genes are functional and have evolved to transport different substrates with varying degrees of efficacy. In addition, we found that YALI0E32901p transported succinate more efficiently in the presence of lactate or fumarate. PMID:25515252

  16. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  17. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  18. Capacitance-Voltage Measurement of Transporting Function at Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Toshiya; Miyahara, Yuji

    In this paper, we report the detection of transporting function at cell membrane using capacitance-voltage (CV) measurement. The detection principle of our devices is based on the field-effect of electrostatic interaction between charged species at cell membrane in solution and surface electrons in silicon crystal through the gate insulator of Si3N4/SiO2 thin double-layer. We designed an oocyte-based field-effect capacitor, on which a Xenopus laevis oocyte was fixed. The transporter of human organic anion transporting peptide C (hOATP-C) was expressed at oocyte membrane by induction of cRNA. The electrical phenomena such as ion or molecular charge flux at the interface between cell membrane and gate surface could be detected as the change of flat band voltage in CV characteristics. The flat band voltage shift decreased with incubation time after introduction of substrate into the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor. The electrical signal is due to the change of charge flux from the oocyte at the gate surface inspired by transporter-substrate binding. The platform based on the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor is suitable for a simple and non-invasive detection system in order to analyze function of transporters related to drug efficacy.

  19. Report membrane transport of lactic acid in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  20. Stable isotope tracer reveals that viviparous snakes transport amino acids to offspring during gestation.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, James U; Beaupre, Steven J

    2012-03-01

    Viviparity and placentation have evolved from oviparity over 100 times in squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes). The independent origins of placentation have resulted in a variety of placental morphologies in different taxa, ranging from simple apposition of fetal and maternal tissues to endotheliochorial implantation that is homoplasious with mammalian placentation. Because the eggs of oviparous squamates transport gases and water from the environment and calcium from the eggshell, the placentae of viviparous squamates are thought to have initially evolved to accomplish these functions from within the maternal oviduct. Species with complex placentae have also been shown to rely substantially, or even primarily, on placental transport of organic nutrients for embryonic nutrition. However, it is unclear whether species with only simple placentae are also capable of transporting organic nutrients to offspring. Among viviparous squamates, all of the snakes that have been studied thus far have been shown to have simple placentae. However, most studies of snake placentation are limited to a single lineage, the North American Natricinae. We tested the abilities of four species of viviparous snakes - Agkistrodon contortrix (Viperidae), Boa constrictor (Boidae), Nerodia sipedon (Colubridae: Natricinae) and Thamnophis sirtalis (Colubridae: Natricinae) - to transport diet-derived amino acids to offspring during gestation. We fed [(15)N]leucine to pregnant snakes, and compared offspring (15)N content with that of unlabeled controls. Labeled females allocated significantly more (15)N to offspring than did controls, but (15)N allocation did not differ among species. Our results indicate that viviparous snakes are capable of transporting diet-derived amino acids to their offspring during gestation, possibly via placentation.

  1. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cloning and functional characterization of the pig (Sus scrofa) organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yejin; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zheren; Xiao, Yunpeng; Hong, Mei

    2013-08-01

    1. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are a family of transporter proteins that have been extensively recognized as key determinants of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of various drugs. Human OATP1A2 has been demonstrated to transport wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Study on OATP1A2 orthologues of other species, however, is still limited. 2. Here, we described the cloning and functional characterization of a member of the OATP/Oatp family member obtained from pig (Sus scrofa) liver. Sequence analysis suggested that it has a high homology with human OATP1A2 and bovine Oatp1a2. Prototypic substrates estrone-3-sulfate (E-3-S) and taurocholic acid were transported by the protein. The transport of these two substrates is pH-dependent, with lower pH showing higher uptake function. Kinetic study showed the transport of these two substrates have a Km of 42.5 ± 12.1 and 33.1 ± 8.7 µM, respectively. Pig Slco1a2 has the highest expression level in the liver, and to a less extend in the brain and small intestine. 3. In conclusion, an OATP member was cloned from pig liver. Sequence analysis and phylogenic study revealed it as an orthologue of human OATP1A2. Its kinetic characteristic for prototypic substrates and organ distribution are similar with that of OATP1A2.

  3. Design Function and Structure of a Monomeric CLC Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    L Robertson; L Kolmakova-Partensky; C Miller

    2011-12-31

    Channels and transporters of the ClC family cause the transmembrane movement of inorganic anions in service of a variety of biological tasks, from the unusual - the generation of the kilowatt pulses with which electric fish stun their prey - to the quotidian - the acidification of endosomes, vacuoles and lysosomes. The homodimeric architecture of ClC proteins, initially inferred from single-molecule studies of an elasmobranch Cl{sup -} channel and later confirmed by crystal structures of bacterial Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} antiporters, is apparently universal. Moreover, the basic machinery that enables ion movement through these proteins - the aqueous pores for anion diffusion in the channels and the ion-coupling chambers that coordinate Cl{sup -} and H{sup +} antiport in the transporters - are contained wholly within each subunit of the homodimer. The near-normal function of a bacterial ClC transporter straitjacketed by covalent crosslinks across the dimer interface and the behaviour of a concatemeric human homologue argue that the transport cycle resides within each subunit and does not require rigid-body rearrangements between subunits. However, this evidence is only inferential, and because examples are known in which quaternary rearrangements of extramembrane ClC domains that contribute to dimerization modulate transport activity, we cannot declare as definitive a 'parallel-pathways picture in which the homodimer consists of two single-subunit transporters operating independently. A strong prediction of such a view is that it should in principle be possible to obtain a monomeric ClC. Here we exploit the known structure of a ClC Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} exchanger, ClC-ec1 from Escherichia coli, to design mutants that destabilize the dimer interface while preserving both the structure and the transport function of individual subunits. The results demonstrate that the ClC subunit alone is the basic functional unit for transport and that cross-subunit interaction is not

  4. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  5. Universal probability distribution function for bursty transport in plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, I; Benkadda, S; Garbet, X; Ropokis, G; Hizanidis, K; del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2009-10-16

    Bursty transport phenomena associated with convective motion present universal statistical characteristics among different physical systems. In this Letter, a stochastic univariate model and the associated probability distribution function for the description of bursty transport in plasma turbulence is presented. The proposed stochastic process recovers the universal distribution of density fluctuations observed in plasma edge of several magnetic confinement devices and the remarkable scaling between their skewness S and kurtosis K. Similar statistical characteristics of variabilities have been also observed in other physical systems that are characterized by convection such as the x-ray fluctuations emitted by the Cygnus X-1 accretion disc plasmas and the sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  6. Properties of an Inducible C4-Dicarboxylic Acid Transport System in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ghei, Om. K.; Kay, William W.

    1973-01-01

    The transport of the tricarboxylic acid cycle C4-dicarboxylic acids was studied in both the wild-type strain and tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants of Bacillus subtilis. Active transport of malate, fumarate, and succinate was found to be inducible by these dicarboxylic acids or by precursors to them, whereas glucose or closely related metabolites catabolite-repressed their uptake. l-Malate was found to be the best dicarboxylic acid transport inducer in succinic dehydrogenase, fumarase, and malic dehydrogenase mutants. Succinate and fumarate are accumulated over 100-fold in succinic dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, respectively, whereas mutants lacking malate dehydrogenase were unable to accumulate significant quantities of the C4-dicarboxylic acids. The stereospecificity of this transport system was studied from a comparison of the rates of competitive inhibition of both succinate uptake and efflux in a succinate dehydrogenase mutant by utilizing thirty dicarboxylic acid analogues. The system was specific for the C4-dicarboxylic acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, neither citrate nor α-ketoglutarate were effective competitive inhibitors. Of a wide variety of metabolic inhibitors tested, inhibiors of oxidative phosphorylation and of the formation of proton gradients were the most potent inhibitors of transport. From the kinetics of dicarboxylic acid transport (Km approximately 10−4 M for succinate or fumarate in succinic acid dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants) and from the competitive inhibition studies, it was concluded that an inducible dicarboxylic acid transport system mediates the entry of malate, fumarate, or succinate into B. subtilis. Mutants devoid of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were shown to accumulate both α-ketoglutarate and glutamate, and these metabolites subsequently inhibited the transport of all the C4-dicarboxylic acids, suggesting a regulatory role. Images PMID:4633350

  7. Adsorption and transport of polymaleic acid on Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone: batch and transport experiments.

    PubMed

    Durce, Delphine; Landesman, Catherine; Grambow, Bernd; Ribet, Solange; Giffaut, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) can affect the mobility of radionuclides in pore water of clay-rich geological formations, such as those intended to be used for nuclear waste disposal. The present work studies the adsorption and transport properties of a polycarboxylic acid, polymaleic acid (PMA, Mw=1.9kDa), on Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples (COx). Even though this molecule is rather different from the natural organic matter found in clay rock, the study of its retention properties on both dispersed and intact samples allows assessing to which extent organic acids may undergo sorption under natural conditions (pH7) and what could be the impact on their mobility. PMA sorption and desorption were investigated in dispersed systems. The degree of sorption was measured after 1, 8 and 21days and for a range of PMA initial concentrations from 4.5×10(-7) to 1.4×10(-3)mol.L(-1). The reversibility of the sorption process was estimated by desorption experiments performed after the sorption experiments. At the sorption steady state, the sorption was described by a two-site Langmuir model. A total sorption capacity of COx for PMA was found to be 1.01×10(-2) mol.kg(-1) distributed on two sorption sites, one weak and one strong. The desorption of PMA was incomplete, independently of the duration of the sorption phase. The amount of desorbable PMA even appeared to decrease for sorption phases from 1 to 21days. To describe the apparent desorption hysteresis, two conceptual models were applied. The two-box diffusion model accounted for intraparticle diffusion and more generally for nonequilibrium processes. The two-box first-order non-reversible model accounted for a first-order non-reversible sorption and more generally for kinetically-controlled irreversible sorption processes. The use of the two models revealed that desorption hysteresis was not the result of nonequilibrium processes but was due to irreversible sorption. Irreversible sorption on the strong site was

  8. Adsorption and transport of polymaleic acid on Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone: Batch and transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durce, Delphine; Landesman, Catherine; Grambow, Bernd; Ribet, Solange; Giffaut, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) can affect the mobility of radionuclides in pore water of clay-rich geological formations, such as those intended to be used for nuclear waste disposal. The present work studies the adsorption and transport properties of a polycarboxylic acid, polymaleic acid (PMA, Mw = 1.9 kDa), on Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples (COx). Even though this molecule is rather different from the natural organic matter found in clay rock, the study of its retention properties on both dispersed and intact samples allows assessing to which extent organic acids may undergo sorption under natural conditions (pH 7) and what could be the impact on their mobility. PMA sorption and desorption were investigated in dispersed systems. The degree of sorption was measured after 1, 8 and 21 days and for a range of PMA initial concentrations from 4.5 × 10- 7 to 1.4 × 10- 3 mol.L- 1. The reversibility of the sorption process was estimated by desorption experiments performed after the sorption experiments. At the sorption steady state, the sorption was described by a two-site Langmuir model. A total sorption capacity of COx for PMA was found to be 1.01×10- 2 mol.kg- 1 distributed on two sorption sites, one weak and one strong. The desorption of PMA was incomplete, independently of the duration of the sorption phase. The amount of desorbable PMA even appeared to decrease for sorption phases from 1 to 21 days. To describe the apparent desorption hysteresis, two conceptual models were applied. The two-box diffusion model accounted for intraparticle diffusion and more generally for nonequilibrium processes. The two-box first-order non-reversible model accounted for a first-order non-reversible sorption and more generally for kinetically-controlled irreversible sorption processes. The use of the two models revealed that desorption hysteresis was not the result of nonequilibrium processes but was due to irreversible sorption. Irreversible sorption on the strong site was

  9. Sialic acid transporter NanT participates in Tannerella forsythia biofilm formation and survival on epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Ruscitto, Angela; Frey, Andrew M; Stafford, Graham P; Sharma, Ashu

    2016-05-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a periodontal pathogen implicated in periodontitis. This gram-negative pathogen depends on exogenous peptidoglycan amino sugar N-acetylmuramic acid (NAM) for growth. In the biofilm state the bacterium can utilize sialic acid (Neu5Ac) instead of NAM to sustain its growth. Thus, the sialic acid utilization system of the bacterium plays a critical role in the growth and survival of the organism in the absence of NAM. We sought the function of a T. forsythia gene annotated as nanT coding for an inner-membrane sugar transporter located on a sialic acid utilization genetic cluster. To determine the function of this putative sialic acid transporter, an isogenic nanT-deletion mutant generated by allelic replacement strategy was evaluated for biofilm formation on NAM or Neu5Ac, and survival on KB epithelial cells. Moreover, since T. forsythia forms synergistic biofilms with Fusobacterium nucleatum, co-biofilm formation activity in mixed culture and sialic acid uptake in culture were also assessed. The data showed that the nanT-inactivated mutant of T. forsythia was attenuated in its ability to uptake sialic acid. The mutant formed weaker biofilms compared to the wild-type strain in the presence of sialic acid and as co-biofilms with F. nucleatum. Moreover, compared to the wild-type T. forsythia nanT-inactivated mutant showed reduced survival when incubated on KB epithelial cells. Taken together, the data presented here demonstrate that NanT-mediated sialic transportation is essential for sialic acid utilization during biofilm growth and survival of the organism on epithelial cells and implies sialic acid might be key for its survival both in subgingival biofilms and during infection of human epithelial cells in vivo.

  10. Structural and functional heterogeneity in phloem loading and transport

    PubMed Central

    Slewinski, Thomas L.; Zhang, Cankui; Turgeon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is often regarded as a relatively straightforward transport system composed of loading (collection), long-distance (transport), and unloading (release) zones. While this simple view is necessary and useful in many contexts, it belies the reality, which is that the phloem is inherently complex. At least three types of sieve element–companion cell complexes are found in minor veins of leaves. Individual species may have more than one type, indicating that they employ multiple loading strategies, even in the same vein. Gene expression data in particular point to heterogeneity in sieve element–companion cell complexes of minor veins, perhaps in all flowering plants. Phloem heterogeneity in the transport phloem is also evident in many species based on anatomical, biochemical and gene expression data. In this regard, members of the Cucurbitaceae are especially complex and interesting. We conclude that a hidden world of specialized phloem function awaits discovery. PMID:23847646

  11. Functional characterization of Citrus macrophylla BOR1 as a boron transporter.

    PubMed

    Cañon, Paola; Aquea, Felipe; Rodríguez-Hoces de la Guardia, Amparo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2013-11-01

    Plants have evolved to develop an efficient system of boron uptake and transport using a range of efflux carriers named BOR proteins. In this work we isolated and characterized a boron transporter of citrus (Citrus macrophylla), which was named CmBOR1 for its high homology to AtBOR1. CmBOR1 has 4403 bp and 12 exons. Its coding region has 2145 bp and encodes for a protein of 714 amino acids. CmBOR1 possesses the molecular features of BORs such as an anion exchanger domain and the presence of 10 transmembrane domains. Functional analysis in yeast indicated that CmBOR1 has an efflux boron transporter activity, and transformants have increased tolerance to excess boron. CmBOR1 is expressed in leaves, stem and flowers and shows the greatest accumulation in roots. The transcript accumulation was significantly increased under boron deficiency conditions in shoots. In contrast, the accumulation of the transcript did not change in boron toxicity conditions. Finally, we observed that constitutive expression of CmBOR1 was able to increase tolerance to boron deficiency conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that CmBOR1 is a xylem loading boron transporter. Based on these results, it was determined that CmBOR1 encodes a boric acid/borate transporter involved in tolerance to boron deficiency in plants.

  12. Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP trial)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0080 TITLE: Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP trial) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP trial) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...IRB approval regarding changes to the protocol language. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prehospital; Tranexamic acid 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  13. Monocarboxylate transporter 10 functions as a thyroid hormone transporter in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sanae; Namba, Noriyuki; Abe, Makoto; Fujiwara, Makoto; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ozono, Keiichi

    2012-08-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for normal proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes. Thus, untreated congenital hypothyroidism is marked by severe short stature. The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a highly specific transporter for thyroid hormone. The hallmarks of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, caused by MCT8 mutations, are severe psychomotor retardation and elevated T(3) levels. However, growth is mostly normal. We therefore hypothesized that growth plate chondrocytes use transporters other than MCT8 for thyroid hormone uptake. Extensive analysis of thyroid hormone transporter mRNA expression in mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells revealed that monocarboxylate transporter 10 (Mct10) was most abundantly expressed among the transporters known to be highly specific for thyroid hormone, namely Mct8, Mct10, and organic anion transporter 1c1. Expression levels of Mct10 mRNA diminished with chondrocyte differentiation in these cells. Accordingly, Mct10 mRNA was expressed most abundantly in the growth plate resting zone chondrocytes in vivo. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Mct10 mRNA in ATDC5 cells decreased [(125)I]T(3) uptake up to 44% compared with negative control (P < 0.05). Moreover, silencing Mct10 mRNA expression abolished the known effects of T(3), i.e. suppression of proliferation and enhancement of differentiation, in ATDC5 cells. These results suggest that Mct10 functions as a thyroid hormone transporter in chondrocytes and can explain at least in part why Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome patients do not exhibit significant growth impairment.

  14. AtMRP2, an Arabidopsis ATP binding cassette transporter able to transport glutathione S-conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites: functional comparisons with Atmrp1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y P; Li, Z S; Drozdowicz, Y M; Hortensteiner, S; Martinoia, E; Rea, P A

    1998-01-01

    Three ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter-like activities directed toward large amphipathic organic anions have recently been identified on the vacuolar membrane of plant cells. These are the Mg-ATP-energized, vanadate-inhibitable vacuolar accumulation of glutathione S-conjugates (GS conjugates), chlorophyll catabolites, and bile acids, respectively. Although each of these activities previously had been assigned to distinct pumps in native plant membranes, we describe here the molecular cloning, physical mapping, and heterologous expression of a gene, AtMRP2, from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a multispecific ABC transporter competent in the transport of both GS conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites. Unlike its isoform, AtMRP1, which transports the model Brassica napus chlorophyll catabolite transporter substrate Bn-NCC-1 at low efficiency, heterologously expressed AtMRP2 has the facility for simultaneous high-efficiency parallel transport of GS conjugates and Bn-NCC-1. The properties of AtMRP2 therefore establish a basis for the manipulation of two previously identified plant ABC transporter activities and provide an explanation for how the comparable transporter in native plant membranes would be systematically mistaken for two distinct transporters. These findings are discussed with respect to the functional organization of AtMRP2, the inability of AtMRP2 and AtMRP1 to transport the model bile acid transporter substrate taurocholate (despite the pronounced sensitivity of both to direct inhibition by this agent), the differential patterns of expression of their genes in the intact plant, and the high capacity of AtMRP2 for the transport of glutathionated herbicides and anthocyanins. PMID:9490749

  15. Mechanism of L-lactic acid transport in L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Itagaki, Shirou; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2004-10-01

    L-lactic acid transport plays an important role in the regulation of L-lactic acid circulation into and out of muscle. To clarify the transport mechanism of L-lactic acid in skeletal muscle, L-lactic acid uptake was investigated using a L6 cell line. mRNAs of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1, 2 and 4 were found to be expressed in L6 cells. The [(14)C] L-lactic acid uptake by L6 cells increased up to pH of 6.0. The [(14)C] L-lactic acid uptake at pH 6.0 was concentration-dependent with a K(m) of 3.7 mM. This process was reduced by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate, a typical MCT1, 2 and 4 inhibitor. These results suggest that an MCT participates in the uptake of L-lactic acid by L6 cells. [(14)C] L-lactic acid uptake was markedly inhibited by monocarboxylic acids and monocarboxylate drugs but not by dicarboxylic acids and amino acids. Moreover, benzoic acid, a substrate for MCT1, competitively inhibited this process with K(i) of 1.7 mM. [(14)C] L-lactic acid efflux in L6 cells was inhibited by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate but not by benzoic acid. These results suggest that [(14)C] L-lactic acid efflux in L6 cells is mediated by MCT other than MCT1.

  16. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    "rocker switch" may apply to certain MFS transporters, intermediate "tilted" states may exist under certain circumstances or as transitional structures. Although wet lab experimental confirmation is required, our results suggest that transport mechanisms in this transporter family should probably not be assumed to be conserved simply based on standard structural homology considerations. Furthermore, steered molecular dynamics elucidating energetic interactions of ligands with amino acid residues in an appropriately modeled transporter may have predictive value in understanding the impact of mutations and/or polymorphisms on transporter function.

  17. Functional characterization of a xylose transporter in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks will only become economically feasible when the majority of cellulosic and hemicellulosic biopolymers can be efficiently converted into bioethanol. The main component of cellulose is glucose, whereas hemicelluloses mainly consist of pentose sugars such as D-xylose and L-arabinose. The genomes of filamentous fungi such as A. nidulans encode a multiplicity of sugar transporters with broad affinities for hexose and pentose sugars. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has a long history of use in industrial fermentation processes, is not able to efficiently transport or metabolize pentose sugars (e.g. xylose). Subsequently, the aim of this study was to identify xylose-transporters from A. nidulans, as potential candidates for introduction into S. cerevisiae in order to improve xylose utilization. Results In this study, we identified the A. nidulans xtrD (xylose transporter) gene, which encodes a Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporter, and which was specifically induced at the transcriptional level by xylose in a XlnR-dependent manner, while being partially repressed by glucose in a CreA-dependent manner. We evaluated the ability of xtrD to functionally complement the S. cerevisiae EBY.VW4000 strain which is unable to grow on glucose, fructose, mannose or galactose as single carbon source. In S. cerevisiae, XtrD was targeted to the plasma membrane and its expression was able to restore growth on xylose, glucose, galactose, and mannose as single carbon sources, indicating that this transporter accepts multiple sugars as a substrate. XtrD has a high affinity for xylose, and may be a high affinity xylose transporter. We were able to select a S. cerevisiae mutant strain that had increased xylose transport when expressing the xtrD gene. Conclusions This study characterized the regulation and substrate specificity of an A. nidulans transporter that represents a good candidate for further directed

  18. Transceptors as a functional link of transporters and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Diallinas, George

    2017-01-01

    Cells need to communicate with their environment in order to obtain nutrients, grow, divide and respond to signals related to adaptation in changing physiological conditions or stress. A very basic question in biology is how cells, especially of those organisms living in rapidly changing habitats, sense their environment. Apparently, this question is of particular importance to all free-living microorganisms. The critical role of receptors, transporters and channels, transmembrane proteins located in the plasma membrane of all types of cells, in signaling environmental changes is well established. A relative newcomer in environment sensing are the so called transceptors, membrane proteins that possess both solute transport and receptor-like signaling activities. Now, the transceptor concept is further enlarged to include micronutrient sensing via the iron and zinc high-affinity transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, what seems to underline the transport and/or sensing function of receptors, transporters and transceptors is ligand-induced conformational alterations recognized by downstream intracellular effectors. PMID:28357392

  19. Charge transport through dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes bound to graphene-gold nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Longlong; Zhang, Qian; Tao, Shuhui; Zhao, Cezhou; Almutib, Eman; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven W. D.; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J.; Du, Jun; Yang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Graphene-based electrodes are attractive for single-molecule electronics due to their high stability and conductivity and reduced screening compared with metals. In this paper, we use the STM-based matrix isolation I(s) method to measure the performance of graphene in single-molecule junctions with one graphene electrode and one gold electrode. By measuring the length dependence of the electrical conductance of dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes, we find that the transport is consistent with phase-coherent tunneling, but with an attenuation factor of βN = 0.69 per methyl unit, which is lower than the value measured for Au-molecule-Au junctions. Comparison with density-functional-theory calculations of electron transport through graphene-molecule-Au junctions and Au-molecule-Au junctions reveals that this difference is due to the difference in Fermi energies of the two types of junction, relative to the frontier orbitals of the molecules. For most molecules, their electrical conductance in graphene-molecule-Au junctions is higher than that in Au-molecule-Au junctions, which suggests that graphene offers superior electrode performance, when utilizing carboxylic acid anchor groups.Graphene-based electrodes are attractive for single-molecule electronics due to their high stability and conductivity and reduced screening compared with metals. In this paper, we use the STM-based matrix isolation I(s) method to measure the performance of graphene in single-molecule junctions with one graphene electrode and one gold electrode. By measuring the length dependence of the electrical conductance of dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes, we find that the transport is consistent with phase-coherent tunneling, but with an attenuation factor of βN = 0.69 per methyl unit, which is lower than the value measured for Au-molecule-Au junctions. Comparison with density-functional-theory calculations of electron transport through graphene-molecule-Au junctions and Au

  20. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  1. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L.; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca2+ pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca2+ pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca2+ pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca2+ pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a 32P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca2+, thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca2+-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus. PMID:20573858

  2. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses.

    PubMed

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca(2+) pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca(2+) pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca(2+) pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a (32)P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca(2+), thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca(2+)-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus.

  3. The Human Gene SLC25A29, of Solute Carrier Family 25, Encodes a Mitochondrial Transporter of Basic Amino Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation. PMID:24652292

  4. The human gene SLC25A29, of solute carrier family 25, encodes a mitochondrial transporter of basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-05-09

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation.

  5. The expression and function of organic anion transporting polypeptides in normal tissues and in cancer.

    PubMed

    Obaidat, Amanda; Roth, Megan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are members of the SLCO gene superfamily of proteins. The 11 human OATPs are classified into 6 families and subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. OATPs are expressed in several epithelial tissues throughout the body and transport mainly amphipathic molecules with molecular weights of more than 300 kDa. Members of the OATP1 and OATP2 families are functionally the best-characterized OATPs. Among these are the multispecific OATP1A2, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1. They transport various endo- and xenobiotics, including hormones and their conjugates as well as numerous drugs such as several anticancer agents. Recent reports demonstrate that some OATPs are up- or downregulated in several cancers and that OATP expression might affect cancer development. On the basis of the findings summarized in this review, we propose that OATPs could be valuable targets for anticancer therapy.

  6. Approximate Green's function methods for HZE transport in multilayered materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Shinn, Judy L.; Costen, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport in multilayered materials. The code is established to operate on the Langley nuclear fragmentation model used in engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurements. The code was found to be highly efficient and compared well with the perturbation approximation.

  7. [Human peritoneum in vitro: changes in urate transport after administration of pyrazinoic acid].

    PubMed

    Czyzewska, K; Grzegorzewska, A; Stawny, B; Knapowski, J

    1989-01-01

    The article is an analysis of the dynamics of two-direction transportation of uric acid (UA) through the human peritoneum in vitro, and also changes of the dynamics under the influence of pyrazinoic++ acid. The peritoneum was taken from the anterior abdominal wall of patients undergoing planned abdominal surgery. It was found that the transportation of UA both from the vascular to the mesothelial side of the peritoneal membrane and in the opposite direction remained on a stable level for 120 minutes. The introduction of pyrazinoic++ acid decreased the transportation of UA from the vascular to the mesothelial side of the peritoneum on the average by 50 per cent. The transportation in the opposite direction did not change. The results obtained are consistent with results of clinical examinations. One may suppose that pyrazinoic++ acid induces changes in transportation qualities of the peritoneum.

  8. Functional characterization of a novel disaccharide transporter in lobster hepatopancreas.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Olivia; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2017-02-08

    In animals, the accepted model of carbohydrate digestion and absorption involves reduction of disaccharides into the monosaccharides glucose, fructose, and galactose followed by their individual transmembrane transport into cells. In 2011, a gene for a distinct disaccharide sucrose transporter (SCRT) was found in Drosophila melanogaster and characterized in a yeast expression system. The purpose of the present investigation was to functionally identify and characterize a putative disaccharide transporter analog in the hepatopancreas of the American lobster, Homarus americanus. Purified hepatopancreatic brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used in transport experiments using (14)C-sucrose and a Millipore filter isolation technique. In the absence of sodium, an external pH of 4 significantly stimulated the uptake of (14)C-sucrose compared to that occurring at pH 5, 6, or 7. At pH 7, increasing external concentrations of sodium increased (14)C-sucrose uptake by BBMV in a hyperbolic fashion and this stimulation was significantly reduced when the pH was changed to 4, suggesting that both protons and sodium ions were each capable of driving the uptake of the sugar. In experiments with a variety of monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides, used as potential inhibitors of (14)C-sucrose uptake, only maltose and trehalose inhibited carrier-mediated (14)C-sucrose transport. An additional experiment showed that 20 mM maltose was a competitive inhibitor of (14)C-sucrose uptake. The use of a putative lobster SCRT by both maltose and trehalose is nutritionally appropriate for lobsters as they commonly digest glycogen and chitin, polymers of maltose and trehalose, respectively. These findings suggest there is a brush-border proton- or sodium-dependent, hepatopancreatic carrier process, shared by sucrose, maltose, and trehalose, that may function to absorb disaccharides that are produced from digestion of naturally occurring dietary constituents.

  9. Amino acid transport in schistosomes: Characterization of the permeaseheavy chain SPRM1hc.

    PubMed

    Krautz-Peterson, Greice; Camargo, Simone; Huggel, Katja; Verrey, François; Shoemaker, Charles B; Skelly, Patrick J

    2007-07-27

    Schistosomes are human parasitic flatworms that constitute an important public health problem globally. Adult parasites live in the bloodstream where they import nutrients such as amino acids across their body surface (the tegument). One amino acid transporter, Schistosome Permease 1 light chain, SPRM1lc, a member of the glycoprotein-associated family of transporters (gpaAT), has been characterized in schistosomes. Only a single member of the SLC3 family of glycoproteins that associate with gpaATs is found following extensive searching of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum. In this report, we characterize this schistosome permease heavy chain (SPRM1hc) gene and protein. The 72-kDa gene product is predicted to possess a single transmembrane domain, a (betaalpha)(8) (TIM barrel) conformation and a catalytic triad. Xenopus oocytes functionally expressing SPRM1hc with SPRM1lc import phenylalanine, arginine, lysine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, tryptophan, and leucine. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that in Xenopus extracts and in schistosome extracts SPRM1hc is associated into a high molecular weight complex with SPRM1lc that is disrupted by reducing agents. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis demonstrate that SPRM1hc is expressed in each schistosome life stage examined (eggs, cercariae, schistosomula, adult males and females). SPRM1hc is widely distributed throughout adult male and female worms as determined by immunolocalization. Consistent with the hypothesis that SPRM1hc functions to facilitate nutrient uptake from host blood, immunogold electron microscopy confirms that the protein is distributed on the host-interactive tegumental membranes. We propose that surface-exposed, host-interactive, nutrient-transporting proteins like the SPRM1 heterodimer are promising vaccine candidates.

  10. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05). Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine. PMID:26107628

  11. Evidence for the transport function of uricase, an oxidative enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Pordy, W.T.; Lipkowitz, M.S.; Abramson, R.G. )

    1987-10-01

    (2-{sup 14}C)urate uptake was examined in proteoliposomes prepared with phosphatidylcholine and either pig liver uricase or albumin, and in protein-free liposomes. Urate uptake was only evident in proteoliposomes that contained active uricase. Uptakes were indistinguishable in the presence and absence of inwardly directed gradients of sodium, potassium, or choline chloride or outwardly directed hydroxyl gradients. Both urate and allantoin accumulated within proteoliposomes during urate uptake; however, (2-{sup 14}C)allantoin was not taken up by proteoliposomes. Urate uptake was accelerated in the presence of unlabeled urate in the trans position, saturable, and competitively inhibited by oxonate, findings consistent with carrier-mediated transport. Finally, the kinetics of urate uptake and oxidation were virtually identical, implying that the transporter is uricase. Thus, these studies provide evidence that uricase can function as a transport protein for urate when inserted in a lipid bilayer: transport via uricase is neither cation dependent (not a cotransporter) nor dependent on an exchangeable anion (not a urate/anion exchanger). Additionally, these studies demonstrate that neither urate nor allantoin cross lipid bilayers by simple or nonionic diffusion.

  12. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  13. Modeling transport in the kidney: investigating function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of water and solute transport in the kidney have significantly expanded our understanding of renal function in both health and disease. This review describes recent theoretical developments and emphasizes the relevance of model findings to major unresolved questions and controversies. These include the fundamental processes by which urine is concentrated in the inner medulla, the ultrastructural basis of proteinuria, irregular flow oscillation patterns in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and the mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effects of thiazides. Macroscopic models of water, NaCl, and urea transport in populations of nephrons have served to test, confirm, or refute a number of hypotheses related to the urine concentrating mechanism. Other macroscopic models focus on the mechanisms, role, and irregularities of renal hemodynamic control and on the regulation of renal oxygenation. At the mesoscale, models of glomerular filtration have yielded significant insight into the ultrastructural basis underlying a number of disorders. At the cellular scale, models of epithelial solute transport and pericyte Ca2+ signaling are being used to elucidate transport pathways and the effects of hormones and drugs. Areas where further theoretical progress is conditional on experimental advances are also identified. PMID:19889951

  14. Functional role of polar amino acid residues in Na+/H+ exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, C A; Dibattista, E R; Fliegel, L

    2001-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are a family of ubiquitous membrane proteins. In higher eukaryotes they regulate cytosolic pH by removing an intracellular H(+) in exchange for an extracellular Na(+). In yeast and Escherichia coli, Na(+)/H(+) exchangers function in the opposite direction to remove intracellular Na(+) in exchange for extracellular H(+). Na(+)/H(+) exchangers display an internal pH-sensitivity that varies with the different antiporter types. Only recently have investigations examined the amino acids involved in pH-sensitivity and in cation binding and transport. Histidine residues are good candidates for H(+)-sensing amino acids, since they can ionize within the physiological pH range. Histidine residues have been shown to be important in the function of the E. coli Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NhaA and in the yeast Na(+)/H(+) exchanger sod2. In E. coli, His(225) of NhaA may function to interact with, or regulate, the pH-sensory region of NhaA. In sod2, His(367) is also critical to transport and may be a functional analogue of His(225) of NhaA. Histidine residues are not critical for the function of the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, although an unusual histidine-rich sequence of the C-terminal tail has some influence on activity. Other amino acids involved in cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are only beginning to be studied. Amino acids with polar side chains such as aspartate and glutamate have been implicated in transport activity of NhaA and sod2, but have not been studied in the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in pH-sensitivity and cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. PMID:11415429

  15. Structure-Function Analysis of Peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Using Chimeric Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  16. The action of flufenamic acid and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories on sulfate transport in the isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C H; Bracht, A; Yamamoto, N S; Ishii-Iwamoto, E L; Sampaio, E; Kelmer-Bracht, A M

    1999-06-01

    inhibition (more than 95%), which does not allow a uniform tracer distribution over the whole cellular space during a single passage through the liver. The degree of inhibition of sulfate transport by 100 microM flufenamic acid was a function of the concentration of nontracer sulfate. With sulfate in the range between 1.2 and 25 mM, the inhibition degree increased linearly with the concentration. In the presence of flufenamic acid, the saturation curve of equilibrium exchange showed a substrate inhibition-like phenomenon, which was absent in the control curve. As inhibitors of sulfate transport in hepatocytes, flufenamic and niflumic acids are less active than in erythrocytes by a factor of 10(2). This observation is most probably indicative of structural differences between the hepatic sulfate carrier and the anion carrier of erythrocytes. It is unlikely that the action of flufenamic acid and its analogs on sulfate transport is a consequence of energy metabolism inhibition. Nimesulide is as active as flufenamic or niflumic acid in inhibiting energy metabolism but considerably less efficient as an inhibitor of sulfate transport. Our results as well as literature data reveal that the interactions of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories with the liver membranes and intracellular structures are ample and complex. Even at high concentrations, however, these interactions are not so intense as to change the vascular and cellular spaces.

  17. Discontinuous membrane helices in transport proteins and their correlation with function.

    PubMed

    Screpanti, Emanuela; Hunte, Carola

    2007-08-01

    Alpha-helical bundles and beta-barrel proteins represent the two basic types of architecture known for integral membrane proteins. Irregular structural motifs have been revealed with the growing number of structures determined. "Discontinuous" helices are present in membrane proteins that actively transport ions. In the Ca(2+)-ATPase, a primary active transporter, and in the secondary transporters NhaA, LeuT(Aa), ClC H(+)/Cl(-) exchanger and Glt(Ph), the helical structure of two membrane segments is interrupted and the interjacent polypeptide chain forms an extended peptide. The discontinuous helices are integrated in the membrane either as transmembrane-spanning or hairpin-type segments. In addition, the secondary transporters have inverted internal duplication domains, which are only weakly correlated with their amino acid sequence. The symmetry comprises either parts of or the complete molecule, but always includes the discontinuous helices. The helix-peptide-helix motif is correlated with the ion translocation function. The extended peptides with their backbone atoms, the helix termini and the polar/charged amino acid residues in close vicinity provide the basis for ion recognition, binding and translocation.

  18. Oleic acid stimulates system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Gaccioli, Francesca; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Jones, Helen N; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-03-01

    Obese women have an increased risk to deliver large babies. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth in these pregnancies are not well understood. Obese pregnant women typically have elevated circulating lipid levels. We tested the hypothesis that fatty acids stimulate placental amino acid transport, mediated via toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Circulating NEFA levels and placental TLR4 expression were assessed in women with varying prepregnancy body mass index (BMI). The effects of oleic acid on system A and system L amino acid transport, and on the activation of the mTOR (4EBP1, S6K1, rpS6), TLR4 (IĸB, JNK, p38 MAPK), and STAT3 signaling pathways were determined in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. Maternal circulating NEFAs (n = 33), but not placental TLR4 mRNA expression (n = 16), correlated positively with BMI (P < 0.05). Oleic acid increased trophoblast JNK and STAT3 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), whereas mTOR activity was unaffected. Furthermore, oleic acid doubled trophoblast system A activity (P < 0.05), without affecting system L activity. siRNA-mediated silencing of TLR4 expression prevented the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on system A activity. Our data suggest that maternal fatty acids can increase placental nutrient transport via TLR4, thereby potentially affecting fetal growth.

  19. Active transport of amino acids by a guanidiniocarbonyl-pyrrole receptor.

    PubMed

    Urban, Christian; Schmuck, Carsten

    2010-08-16

    Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of a transporter 9 for N-acetylated amino acids. Transporter 9 is a conjugate of a guanidiniocarbonyl pyrrole cation, one of the most efficient carboxylate binding motifs reported so far, and a hydrophobic tris(dodecylbenzyl) group, which ensures solubility in organic solvents. In its protonated form, 9 binds N-acetylated amino acid carboxylates in wet organic solvents with association constants in the range of 10(4) M(-1) as estimated by extraction experiments. Aromatic amino acids are preferred due to additional cation-pi-interactions of the amino acid side chain with the guanidiniocarbonyl pyrrole moiety. U-tube experiments established efficient transport across a bulk liquid chloroform phase with fluxes approaching 10(-6) mol m(-2) s(-1). In experiments with single substrates, the release rate of the amino acid from the receptor-substrate complex at the interface with the receiving phase is rate determining. In contrast to this, in competition experiments with several substrates, the thermodynamic affinity to 9 becomes decisive. As 9 can only transport anions in its protonated form and has a pK(a) value of approximately 7, pH-driven active transport of amino acids is also possible. Transport occurs as a symport of the amino acid carboxylate and a proton.

  20. Mfsd2a Is a Transporter for the Essential ω-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in Eye and Is Important for Photoreceptor Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bernice H; Chan, Jia Pei; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Poh, Rebecca W; Foo, Juat Chin; Galam, Dwight L A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nguyen, Long N; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Yeo, Sia W; Luu, Chi D; Wenk, Markus R; Silver, David L

    2016-05-13

    Eye photoreceptor membrane discs in outer rod segments are highly enriched in the visual pigment rhodopsin and the ω-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The eye acquires DHA from blood, but transporters for DHA uptake across the blood-retinal barrier or retinal pigment epithelium have not been identified. Mfsd2a is a newly described sodium-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) symporter expressed at the blood-brain barrier that transports LPCs containing DHA and other long-chain fatty acids. LPC transport via Mfsd2a has been shown to be necessary for human brain growth. Here we demonstrate that Mfsd2a is highly expressed in retinal pigment epithelium in embryonic eye, before the development of photoreceptors, and is the primary site of Mfsd2a expression in the eye. Eyes from whole body Mfsd2a-deficient (KO) mice, but not endothelium-specific Mfsd2a-deficient mice, were DHA-deficient and had significantly reduced LPC/DHA transport in vivo Fluorescein angiography indicated normal blood-retinal barrier function. Histological and electron microscopic analysis indicated that Mfsd2a KO mice exhibited a specific reduction in outer rod segment length, disorganized outer rod segment discs, and mislocalization of and reduction in rhodopsin early in postnatal development without loss of photoreceptors. Minor photoreceptor cell loss occurred in adult Mfsd2a KO mice, but electroretinography indicated visual function was normal. The developing eyes of Mfsd2a KO mice had activated microglia and up-regulation of lipogenic and cholesterogenic genes, likely adaptations to loss of LPC transport. These findings identify LPC transport via Mfsd2a as an important pathway for DHA uptake in eye and for development of photoreceptor membrane discs.

  1. Human organic anion transporter 2 is distinct from organic anion transporters 1 and 3 with respect to transport function.

    PubMed

    Henjakovic, Maja; Hagos, Yohannes; Krick, Wolfgang; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2015-11-15

    Phylogentically, organic anion transporter (OAT)1 and OAT3 are closely related, whereas OAT2 is more distant. Experiments with human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably transfected with human OAT1, OAT2, or OAT3 were performed to compare selected transport properties. Common to OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3 is their ability to transport cGMP. OAT2 interacted with prostaglandins, and cGMP uptake was inhibited by PGE2 and PGF2α with IC50 values of 40.8 and 12.7 μM, respectively. OAT1 (IC50: 23.7 μM), OAT2 (IC50: 9.5 μM), and OAT3 (IC50: 1.6 μM) were potently inhibited by MK571, an established multidrug resistance protein inhibitor. OAT2-mediated cGMP uptake was not inhibited by short-chain monocarboxylates and, as opposed to OAT1 and OAT3, not by dicarboxylates. Consequently, OAT2 showed no cGMP/glutarate exchange. OAT1 and OAT3 exhibited a pH and a Cl- dependence with higher substrate uptake at acidic pH and lower substrate uptake in the absence of Cl-, respectively. Such pH and Cl- dependencies were not observed with OAT2. Depolarization of membrane potential by high K+ concentrations in the presence of the K+ ionophore valinomycin left cGMP uptake unaffected. In addition to cGMP, OAT2 transported urate and glutamate, but cGMP/glutamate exchange could not be demonstrated. These experiments suggest that OAT2-mediated cGMP uptake does not occur via exchange with monocarboxylates, dicarboxylates, and hydroxyl ions. The counter anion for electroneutral cGMP uptake remains to be identified.

  2. Fetal hydantoin syndrome: inhibition of placental folic acid transport as a potential mechanism for fetal growth retardation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Will, M.; Barnard, J.A.; Said, H.M.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1985-04-01

    Maternal hydantoin ingestion during pregnancy results in a well defined clinical entity termed ''fetal hydantoin syndrome''. The clinical characteristics of this syndrome includes growth retardation, and congenital anomalies. Because folic acid is essential for protein synthesis and growth, and since hydantoin interferes with intestinal transport of folic acid, the authors postulated that part of the fetal hydantoin syndrome may be due to inhibition of placental folic acid by maternal hydantoin. Therefore, they studied in vivo placental folate transport in a well-established model for fetal hydantoin syndrome in the rat. Our results indicate that maternal hydantoin ingestion, significantly decreased fetal weight and placental and fetal uptake of folate compared to controls. To determine whether maternal hydantoin ingestion has a generalized or specific effect on placental function, they examined placental and fetal zinc transport in the same model. Our results indicate that zinc transport is not altered by hydantoin ingestion. They conclude that maternal hydantoin ingestion results in fetal growth retardation which may be due in part to inhibition of placental folate transport.

  3. Amino acid transport system - A substrate predicts the therapeutic effects of particle radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mariko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Arano, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    L-[methyl-11C]Methionine (11C-Met) is useful for estimating the therapeutic efficacy of particle radiotherapy at early stages of the treatment. Given the short half-life of 11C, the development of longer-lived 18F- and 123I-labeled probes that afford diagnostic information similar to 11C-Met, are being sought. Tumor uptake of 11C-Met is involved in many cellular functions such as amino acid transport System-L, protein synthesis, and transmethylation. Among these processes, since the energy-dependent intracellular functions involved with 11C-Met are more reflective of the radiotherapeutic effects, we evaluated the activity of the amino acid transport System-A as an another energy-dependent cellular function in order to estimate radiotherapeutic effects. In this study, using a carbon-ion beam as the radiation source, the activity of System-A was evaluated by a specific System-A substrate, alpha-[1-14C]-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid (14C-MeAIB). Cellular growth and the accumulation of 14C-MeAIB or 14C-Met were evaluated over time in vitro in cultured human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells (3-Gy) or in vivo in murine xenografts of HSG tumors (6- or 25-Gy) before and after irradiation with the carbon-ion beam. Post 3-Gy irradiation, in vitro accumulation of 14C-Met and 14C-MeAIB decreased over a 5-day period. In xenografts of HSG tumors in mice, tumor re-growth was observed in vivo on day-10 after a 6-Gy irradiation dose, but no re-growth was detected after the 25-Gy irradiation dose. Consistent with the growth results, the in vivo tumor accumulation of 14C-MeAIB did not decrease after the 6-Gy irradiation dose, whereas a significant decrease was observed after the 25-Gy irradiation dose. These results indicate that the activity of energy dependent System-A transporter may reflect the therapeutic efficacy of carbon-ion radiotherapy and suggests that longer half-life radionuclide-labeled probes for System-A may also provide widely available probes to evaluate the effects

  4. Functional characterization of dipeptide transport system in human jejunum.

    PubMed

    Adibi, S A; Soleimanpour, M R

    1974-05-01

    The present studies were performed to determine whether dipeptide absorption in human jejunum exhibits the characteristics of carrier-mediated transport. 15-cm jejunal segments from human volunteers were perfused with test solutions containing varying amounts of either glycylglycine, glycylleucine, glycine, leucine, glycylglycine with leucine or glycine, glycylglycine with glycylleucine, or glycylleucine with an equimolar mixture of free glycine and leucine. Jejunal absorption rates of both glycylglycine and glycylleucine followed the kinetics of a saturable process. The K(m) value in millimoles/liter of glycylglycine was significantly greater than the K(m) value of glycylleucine (43.3+/-2.6 vs. 26.8+/-5.9, P < 0.05); and the K(m) value of glycine was also significantly greater than the K(m) value of leucine (42.7+/-7.5 vs. 20.4+/-5.4, P < 0.05). While overlapping occurred among the K(m) values of free amino acids and dipeptides, the transport kinetics of dipeptides were characterized by higher V(max) values (in micromoles per minute per 15 centimeters) than those of free amino acids. For example, the V(max) values for glycylglycine and glycine were 837+/-62 and 590+/-56, respectively (P < 0.02). While jejunal absorption rates of glycylglycine were not significantly affected by free leucine or free glycine, they were competitively inhibited by glycylleucine. The jejunal absorption rate of glycylleucine was not significantly altered by an equimolar mixture of free glycine and leucine. The selective absorption of dipeptides was investigated by infusing three equimolar mixtures, each containing two different dipeptides. Among the three dipeptides examined, glycylglycine was the least absorbed. There was no significant difference between the absorption of glycylleucine and leucylglycine. The above studies suggest that absorption of both glycylglycine and glycylleucine is mediated by a carrier which is not shared with free neutral amino acids; and that both COOH- and NH

  5. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  6. Diverse functional roles of monosaccharide transporters and their homologs in vascular plants: a physiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Slewinski, Thomas L

    2011-07-01

    Vascular plants contain two gene families that encode monosaccharide transporter proteins. The classical monosaccharide transporter(-like) gene superfamily is large and functionally diverse, while the recently identified SWEET transporter family is smaller and, thus far, only found to transport glucose. These transporters play essential roles at many levels, ranging from organelles to the whole plant. Many family members are essential for cellular homeostasis and reproductive success. Although most transporters do not directly participate in long-distance transport, their indirect roles greatly impact carbon allocation and transport flux to the heterotrophic tissues of the plant. Functional characterization of some members from both gene families has revealed their diverse roles in carbohydrate partitioning, phloem function, resource allocation, plant defense, and sugar signaling. This review highlights the broad impacts and implications of monosaccharide transport by describing some of the functional roles of the monosaccharide transporter(-like) superfamily and the SWEET transporter family.

  7. Transport and metabolic effects of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, K W; Roon, R J

    1982-11-24

    alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid is actively transported into yeast cells by the general amino acid transport system. The system exhibits a Km for alpha-aminoisobutyric acid of 270 microM, a Vmax of 24 nmol/min per mg cells (dry weight), and a pH optimum of 4.1-4.3. alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid is also transported by a minor system(s) with a Vmax of 1.7 nmol/min per mg cells. Transport occurs against a concentration gradient with the concentration ratio reaching over 1000:1 (in/out). The alpha-aminoisobutyric acid is not significantly metabolized or incorporated into protein after an 18 h incubation. alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid inhibits cell growth when a poor nitrogen source such as proline is provided but not with good nitrogen sources such as NH+4. During nitrogen starvation alpha-aminoisobutyric acid strongly inhibits the synthesis of the nitrogen catabolite repression sensitive enzyme, asparaginase II. Studies with a mutant yeast strain (GDH-CR) suggest that alpha-aminoisobutyric acid inhibition of asparaginase II synthesis occurs because alpha-aminoisobutyric acid is an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis in nitrogen starved cells.

  8. Characteristics of the transport of ascorbic acid into leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Raghoebar, M.; Huisman, J.A.M.; van den Berg, W.B.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-02-02

    The degree and the mode of association of (/sup 14/C)-ascorbic acid with leucocytes are examined. The degree of association of ascorbic acid with polymorphonuclear leucocytes (1-3 %) is dependent on cell type, extracellular concentration of ascorbic acid, incubation temperature, intactness of the cells and the extracellular pH. All experiments are performed according to strict protocols as these compounds are labile in aqueous solutions. Further it is noticed that in all experiments an outward gradient of leucocyte endogenic ascorbic acid exists. The results suggest that the association process comprises at least one saturable pathway. The activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes by phorbol myristate acetate increases the accumulation of ascorbic acid threefold. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Relationship between acid precipitation and three-dimensional transport associated with synoptic-scale cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Haagenson, P.L.; Lazrus, A.L.; Kuo, Y.H.; Caldwell, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    Field data collected during APEX (Acid Precipitation Experiment) are used in combination with an isentropic trajectory model to analyze the relationship between acid precipitation and three-dimensional transport associated with cyclonic storms. Data are presented which indicate that high acidity in precipitation is often associated with slow transport speed and elevated SO2 concentrations in the dry air feeding into the precipitating regions. Conversely, low acidity is usually related to rapid transit, descending motion, and transport above the atmospheric boundary layer. The results also show that precipitation in the cold sector of a cyclone (in advance of the surface warm front) is often more acidic than that in other sectors of the storm. Four case studies are included to detail some of these meteorological effects. 19 references.

  10. The ABC transporter ABC40 encodes a phenylacetic acid export system in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan S; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is used for the industrial production of β-lactam antibiotics. The pathway for β-lactam biosynthesis has been resolved and involves the enzyme phenylacetic acid CoA ligase that is responsible for the CoA activation of the side chain precursor phenylacetic acid (PAA) that is used for the biosynthesis of penicillin G. To identify ABC transporters related to β-lactam biosynthesis, we analyzed the expression of all 48 ABC transporters present in the genome of P. chryso-genum when grown in the presence and absence of PAA. ABC40 is significantly upregulated when cells are grown or exposed to high levels of PAA. Although deletion of this transporter did not affect β-lactam biosynthesis, it resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity to PAA and other weak acids. It is concluded that ABC40 is involved in weak acid detoxification in P. chrysogenum including resistance to phenylacetic acid.

  11. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  12. Proton transport in triflic acid pentahydrate studied via ab initio path integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2011-06-16

    Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid hydrates provide a well-defined system to study proton dissociation and transport in perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, typically used as the electrolyte in hydrogen fuel cells, in the limit of minimal water. The triflic acid pentahydrate crystal (CF(3)SO(3)H·5H(2)O) is sufficiently aqueous that it contains an extended three-dimensional water network. Despite it being extended, however, long-range proton transport along the network is structurally unfavorable and would require considerable rearrangement. Nevertheless, the triflic acid pentahydrate crystal system can provide a clear picture of the preferred locations of local protonic defects in the water network, which provides insights about related structures in the disordered, low-hydration environment of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the proton defect is most likely to transfer to the closest water that has the expected presolvation and only contains water in its first solvation shell. Unlike the tetrahydrate of triflic acid (CF(3)SO(3)H·4H(2)O), there is no evidence of the proton preferentially transferring to a water molecule bridging two of the sulfonate groups. However, this could be an artifact of the crystal structure since the only such water molecule is separated from the proton by long O-O distances. Hydrogen bonding criteria, using the two-dimensional potential of mean force, are extracted. Radial distribution functions, free energy profiles, radii of gyration, and the root-mean-square displacement computed from ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations reveal that quantum effects do significantly extend the size of the protonic defect and increase the frequency of proton transfer events by nearly 15%. The calculated IR spectra confirm that the dominant protonic defect mostly exists as an Eigen cation but contains some Zundel ion characteristics. Chain lengths and ring sizes determined from the

  13. EAAT3 promotes amino acid transport and proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin-Ling; Gao, Chun-Qi; Li, Xiang-Guang; Jin, Cheng-Long; Wang, Dan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Wen-Ce; Kong, Xiang-Feng; Yao, Kang; Yan, Hui-Chao; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2016-06-21

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3, encoded by SLC1A1) is an epithelial type high-affinity anionic amino acid transporter, and glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for intestinal epithelial cells. This study investigated the effects of EAAT3 on amino acid transport and cell proliferation through activation of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Anionic amino acid and cystine (Cys) transport were increased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 knockdown rather than other amino acids. MTT and cell counting assays suggested that IPEC-J2 cell proliferation increased (P<0.05) with EAAT3 overexpression. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1, Thr389) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, Thr70) was increased by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased by EAAT3 knockdown (P<0.05), as were levels of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate for the first time that EAAT3 facilitates anionic amino acid transport and activates the mTOR pathway, promoting Cys transport and IPEC-J2 cell proliferation.

  14. EAAT3 promotes amino acid transport and proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cheng-long; Wang, Dan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Wen-ce; Kong, Xiang-feng; Yao, Kang; Yan, Hui-chao; Wang, Xiu-qi

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3, encoded by SLC1A1) is an epithelial type high-affinity anionic amino acid transporter, and glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for intestinal epithelial cells. This study investigated the effects of EAAT3 on amino acid transport and cell proliferation through activation of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Anionic amino acid and cystine (Cys) transport were increased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 knockdown rather than other amino acids. MTT and cell counting assays suggested that IPEC-J2 cell proliferation increased (P<0.05) with EAAT3 overexpression. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1, Thr389) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, Thr70) was increased by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased by EAAT3 knockdown (P<0.05), as were levels of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate for the first time that EAAT3 facilitates anionic amino acid transport and activates the mTOR pathway, promoting Cys transport and IPEC-J2 cell proliferation. PMID:27231847

  15. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  16. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  17. Transportation management center functions. A synthesis of highway practice

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, W.H.

    1998-12-31

    Transportation management centers (TMCs), or traffic management centers, have become a vital part of the transportation fabric in many urban areas. This synthesis presents information on the current operational and technical practices used by highway, transit, and multimodal TMCs in several urbanized areas. It also provides information to developers and suppliers of hardware and software for traffic control technology and communications systems. This report of the Transportation Research Board describes the various types of TMCs, their functions, and details of design, operations, and staffing. It describes the practice of agencies in the United States and Canada, based on survey responses from 147 TMCs. These agencies are responsible for highways, surface streets, bridges and tunnels, transit, including bus and rail, and several integrated TMCs that include more than one mode. Design criteria describe in detail the physical facility design of TMCs, as well as the software configurations and the interrelationships among TMCs of various types. The required staffing and the personnel roles are highlighted. To the extent that data are available, ranges of costs and benefits for TMCs are included in this report.

  18. Functional expression of sodium-glucose transporters in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scafoglio, Claudio; Hirayama, Bruce A.; Kepe, Vladimir; Liu, Jie; Ghezzi, Chiara; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Moatamed, Neda A.; Huang, Jiaoti; Koepsell, Hermann; Barrio, Jorge R.; Wright, Ernest M.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a major metabolic substrate required for cancer cell survival and growth. It is mainly imported into cells by facilitated glucose transporters (GLUTs). Here we demonstrate the importance of another glucose import system, the sodium-dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs), in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and investigate their role in cancer cell survival. Three experimental approaches were used: (i) immunohistochemical mapping of SGLT1 and SGLT2 distribution in tumors; (ii) measurement of glucose uptake in fresh isolated tumors using an SGLT-specific radioactive glucose analog, α-methyl-4-deoxy-4-[18F]fluoro-d-glucopyranoside (Me4FDG), which is not transported by GLUTs; and (iii) measurement of in vivo SGLT activity in mouse models of pancreatic and prostate cancer using Me4FDG-PET imaging. We found that SGLT2 is functionally expressed in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and provide evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors block glucose uptake and reduce tumor growth and survival in a xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that Me4FDG-PET imaging may be used to diagnose and stage pancreatic and prostate cancers, and that SGLT2 inhibitors, currently in use for treating diabetes, may be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:26170283

  19. Recent Advance in the Relationship between Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlong; Tan, Feng; Xu, Pingyi; Qu, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder disease in the elderly and is characterized by degeneration of dopamine neurons and formation of Lewy bodies. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). If glutamate is not removed promptly in the synaptic cleft, it will excessively stimulate the glutamate receptors and induce excitotoxic effects on the CNS. With lack of extracellular enzyme to decompose glutamate, glutamate uptake in the synaptic cleft is mainly achieved by the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, also known as high-affinity glutamate transporters). Current studies have confirmed that decreased expression and function of EAATs appear in PD animal models. Moreover, single unilateral administration of EAATs inhibitor in the substantia nigra mimics several PD features and this is a solid evidence supporting that decreased EAATs contribute to the process of PD. Drugs or treatments promoting the expression and function of EAATs are shown to attenuate dopamine neurons death in the substantia nigra and striatum, ameliorate the behavior disorder, and improve cognitive abilities in PD animal models. EAATs are potential effective drug targets in treatment of PD and thus study of relationship between EAATs and PD has predominant medical significance currently. PMID:26981287

  20. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of new 2,4-syn-functionalized (S)-glutamate analogues and structure-activity relationship studies at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Zeinab; Larsen, Anja P; Venskutonytė, Raminta; Han, Liwei; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Birgitte; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Jensen, Anders A; Pickering, Darryl S; Frydenvang, Karla; Gefflaut, Thierry; Bunch, Lennart

    2013-02-28

    In the mammalian central nervous system, (S)-glutamate (Glu) is released from the presynaptic neuron where it activates a plethora of pre- and postsynaptic Glu receptors. The fast acting ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) are ligand gated ion channels and are believed to be involved in a vast number of neurological functions such as memory and learning, synaptic plasticity, and motor function. The synthesis of 14 enantiopure 2,4-syn-Glu analogues 2b-p is accessed by a short and efficient chemoenzymatic approach starting from readily available cyclohexanone 3. Pharmacological characterization at the iGluRs and EAAT1-3 subtypes revealed analogue 2i as a selective GluK1 ligand with low nanomolar affinity. Two X-ray crystal structures of the key analogue 2i in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of GluA2 and GluK3 were determined. Partial domain closure was seen in the GluA2-LBD complex with 2i comparable to that induced by kainate. In contrast, full domain closure was observed in the GluK3-LBD complex with 2i, similar to that of GluK3-LBD with glutamate bound.

  1. Role of organic acids in promoting colloidal transport of mercury from mine tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slowey, A.J.; Johnson, S.B.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2005-01-01

    A number of factors affect the transport of dissolved and paniculate mercury (Hg) from inoperative Hg mines, including the presence of organic acids in the rooting zone of vegetated mine waste. We examined the role of the two most common organic acids in soils (oxalic and citric acid) on Hg transport from such waste by pumping a mixed organic acid solution (pH 5.7) at 1 mL/min through Hg mine tailings columns. For the two total organic acid concentrations investigated (20 ??M and 1 mM), particle-associated Hg was mobilized, with the onset of paniculate Hg transport occurring later for the lower organic acid concentration. Chemical analyses of column effluent indicate that 98 wt % of Hg mobilized from the column was paniculate. Hg speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, showing that HgS minerals are dominant in the mobilized particles. Hg adsorbed to colloids is another likely mode of transport due to the abundance of Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides, Fe-sulfides, alunite, and jarosite in the tailings to which Hg(II) adsorbs. Organic acids produced by plants are likely to enhance the transport of colloid-associated Hg from vegetated Hg mine tailings by dissolving cements to enable colloid release. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  2. Fluid transport by the cornea endothelium is dependent on buffering lactic acid efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Shimin; Kim, Edward; Bonanno, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of corneal hydration is dependent on the active transport properties of the corneal endothelium. We tested the hypothesis that lactic acid efflux, facilitated by buffering, is a component of the endothelial fluid pump. Rabbit corneas were perfused with bicarbonate-rich (BR) or bicarbonate-free (BF) Ringer of varying buffering power, while corneal thickness was measured. Perfusate was collected and analyzed for lactate efflux. In BF with no added HEPES, the maximal corneal swelling rate was 30.0 ± 4.1 μm/h compared with 5.2 ± 0.9 μm/h in BR. Corneal swelling decreased directly with [HEPES], such that with 60 mM HEPES corneas swelled at 7.5 ± 1.6 μm/h. Perfusate [lactate] increased directly with [HEPES]. Similarly, reducing the [HCO3 (-)] increased corneal swelling and decreased lactate efflux. Corneal swelling was inversely related to Ringer buffering power (β), whereas lactate efflux was directly related to β. Ouabain (100 μM) produced maximal swelling and reduction in lactate efflux, whereas carbonic anhydrase inhibition and an monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 inhibitor produced intermediate swelling and decreases in lactate efflux. Conversely, 10 μM adenosine reduced the swelling rate to 4.2 ± 0.8 μm/h and increased lactate efflux by 25%. We found a strong inverse relation between corneal swelling and lactate efflux (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Introducing lactate in the Ringer transiently increased corneal thickness, reaching a steady state (0 ± 0.6 μm/h) within 90 min. We conclude that corneal endothelial function does not have an absolute requirement for bicarbonate; rather it requires a perfusing solution with high buffering power. This facilitates lactic acid efflux, which is directly linked to water efflux, indicating that lactate flux is a component of the corneal endothelial pump.

  3. A structure-function analysis of ion transport in crustacean gills and excretory organs.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carolina A; Onken, Horst; McNamara, John C

    2008-11-01

    Osmotic and ionic regulation in the Crustacea is mostly accomplished by the multifunctional gills, together with the excretory organs. In addition to their role in gas exchange, the gills constitute organs of active, transepithelial, ion transport, an activity of major importance that underlies many essential physiological functions like osmoregulation, calcium homeostasis, ammonium excretion and extracellular pH regulation. This review focuses on structure-function relationships in crustacean gills and excretory effectors, from the organ to molecular levels of organization. We address the diversity of structural architectures encountered in different crustacean gill types, and in constituent cell types, before examining the physiological mechanisms of Na(+), Cl(-), Ca(2+) and NH(4)(+) transport, and of acid-base equivalents, based on findings obtained over the last two decades employing advanced techniques. The antennal and maxillary glands constitute the principal crustacean excretory organs, which have received less attention in functional studies. We examine the diversity present in antennal and maxillary gland architecture, highlighting the structural similarities between both organ types, and we analyze the functions ascribed to each glandular segment. Emphasis is given to volume and osmoregulatory functions, capacity to produce dilute urine in freshwater crustaceans, and the effect of acclimation salinity on urine volume and composition. The microanatomy and diversity of function ascribed to gills and excretory organs are appraised from an evolutionary perspective, and suggestions made as to future avenues of investigation that may elucidate evolutionary and adaptive trends underpinning the invasion and exploitation of novel habitats.

  4. A glial amino-acid transporter controls synapse strength and courtship in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Yael; Grillet, Micheline; Augustin, Hrvoje; Ferveur, Jean-François; Featherstone, David E

    2008-01-01

    Mate choice is an evolutionarily critical decision that requires the detection of multiple sex-specific signals followed by central integration of these signals to direct appropriate behavior. The mechanisms controlling mate choice remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the glial amino-acid transporter genderblind controls whether Drosophila melanogaster males will attempt to mate with other males. Genderblind (gb) mutant males showed no alteration in heterosexual courtship or copulation, but were attracted to normally unappealing male species-specific chemosensory cues. As a result, genderblind mutant males courted and attempted to copulate with other Drosophila males. This homosexual behavior could be induced within hours using inducible RNAi, suggesting that genderblind controls nervous system function rather than its development. Consistent with this, and indicating that glial genderblind regulates ambient extracellular glutamate to suppress glutamatergic synapse strength in vivo, homosexual behavior could be turned on and off by altering glutamatergic transmission pharmacologically and/or genetically.

  5. Estradiol augments while progesterone inhibits arginine transport in human endothelial cells through modulation of cationic amino acid transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Bentur, Ohad S; Schwartz, Doron; Chernichovski, Tamara; Ingbir, Merav; Weinstein, Talia; Chernin, Gil; Schwartz, Idit F

    2015-08-15

    Decreased generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) characterizes endothelial dysfunction (ECD). Delivery of arginine to eNOS by cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1) was shown to modulate eNOS activity. We found in female rats, but not in males, that CAT-1 activity is preserved with age and in chronic renal failure, two experimental models of ECD. In contrast, during pregnancy CAT-1 is inhibited. We hypothesize that female sex hormones regulate arginine transport. Arginine uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was determined following incubation with either 17β-estradiol (E2) or progesterone. Exposure to E2 (50 and 100 nM) for 30 min resulted in a significant increase in arginine transport and reduction in phosphorylated CAT-1 (the inactive form) protein content. This was coupled with a decrease in phosphorylated MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Progesterone (1 and 100 pM for 30 min) attenuated arginine uptake and increased phosphorylated CAT-1, phosphorylated protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein content. GO-6976 (PKCα inhibitor) prevented the progesterone-induced decrease in arginine transport. Coincubation with both progesterone and estrogen for 30 min resulted in attenuated arginine transport. While estradiol increases arginine transport and CAT-1 activity through modulation of constitutive signaling transduction pathways involving ERK, progesterone inhibits arginine transport and CAT-1 via both PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect that predominates over estradiol.

  6. Engineering rTCA pathway and C4-dicarboxylate transporter for L-malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Wang, Yuancai; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Guipeng; Liu, Liming

    2017-02-22

    L-Malic acid is an important component of a vast array of food additives, antioxidants, disincrustants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Here, we presented a pathway optimization strategy and a transporter modification approach to reconstruct the L-malic acid biosynthesis pathway and transport system, respectively. First, pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) and malate dehydrogenase (mdh) from Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus oryzae were combinatorially overexpressed to construct the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) pathway for L-malic acid biosynthesis. Second, the L-malic acid transporter (Spmae) from Schizosaccharomyces pombe was engineered by removing the ubiquitination motification to enhance the L-malic acid efflux system. Finally, the L-malic acid pathway was optimized by controlling gene expression levels, and the final L-malic acid concentration, yield, and productivity were up to 30.25 g L(-1), 0.30 g g(-1), and 0.32 g L(-1) h(-1) in the resulting strain W4209 with CaCO3 as a neutralizing agent, respectively. In addition, these corresponding parameters of pyruvic acid remained at 30.75 g L(-1), 0.31 g g(-1), and 0.32 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively. The metabolic engineering strategy used here will be useful for efficient production of L-malic acid and other chemicals.

  7. Amyloid-beta peptide decreases expression and function of glutamate transporters in nervous system cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huichun; Zhang, Xiuping; Meng, Xingjun; Xu, Pingyi; Zou, Xiaoming; Qu, Shaogang

    2017-02-08

    Glutamate is an essential excitatory neurotransmitter that regulates brain functions, and its activity is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters. Excess glutamate in the synaptic cleft and dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporters have been shown to be involved in development of Alzheimer's disease, but the precise regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. Using a D-[(3)H]-aspartic acid uptake assay, we found that Aβ1-42 oligomers impaired glutamate uptake in astrocytes and neurons. In astrocytes, this process was accompanied by reduced expression of GLT-1 and GLAST as detected by Western blot and immunocytofluorescence. However, mRNA levels of EAATs detected by qPCR in astrocytes and neurons were not altered, which suggests that this process is post-translational. Co-localization analysis using immunocytofluorescence showed that ubiquitylation of GLT-1 significantly increased. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced endocytosis of astrocytic GLT-1 may be involved in ubiquitylation. In addition, Aβ1-42 oligomers enhanced secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 into culture supernatant, which may be correlated with an inflammatory response and altered EAATs expression or function in Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the idea that dysregulation of the glutamatergic system may play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, enhancing expression or function of EAATs in astrocytes and neurons might be a new therapeutic approach in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Third system for neutral amino acid transport in a marine pseudomonad.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, S M; Hildebrandt, V A; Lee, T

    1977-01-01

    Uptake of leucine by the marine pseudomonad B-16 is an energy-dependent, concentrative process. Respiratory inhibitors, uncouplers, and sulfhydryl reagents block transport. The uptake of leucine is Na+ dependent, although the relationship between the rate of leucine uptake and Na+ concentration depends, to some extent, on the ionic strength of the suspending assay medium and the manner in which cells are washed prior to assay. Leucine transport can be separated into at least two systems: a low-affinity system with an apparent Km of 1.3 X 10(-5) M, and a high-affinity system with an apparent Km of 1.9 X 10(-7) M. The high-affinity system shows a specificity unusual for bacterial systems in that both aromatic and aliphatic amino acids inhibit leucine transport, provided that they have hydrophobic side chains of a length greater than that of two carbon atoms. The system exhibits strict stereospecificity for the L form. Phenylalanine inhibition was investigated in more detail. The Ki for inhibition of leucine transport by phenylalanine is about 1.4 X 10(-7) M. Phenylalanine itself is transported by an energy-dependent process whose specificity is the same as the high-affinity leucine transport system, as is expected if both amino acids share the same transport system. Studies with protoplasts indicate that a periplasmic binding protein is not an essential part of this transport system. Fein and MacLeod (J. Bacteriol. 124:1177-1190, 1975) reported two neutral amino acid transport systems in strain B-16: the DAG system, serving glycine, D-alanine, D-serine, and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid; and the LIV system, serving L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-valine, and L-alanine. The high-affinity system reported here is a third neutral amino acid transport system in this marine pseudomonad. We propose the name "LIV-II" system. PMID:856786

  9. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  10. Acid-base transport in pancreatic cancer: molecular mechanisms and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Kong, Su Chii; Giannuzzo, Andrea; Gianuzzo, Andrea; Novak, Ivana; Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2014-12-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by a microenvironment that is highly acidic, while intracellular pH (pHi) is normal or even elevated. This is the result of elevated metabolic rates in the highly proliferative cancer cells, in conjunction with often greatly increased rates of net cellular acid extrusion. Studies in various cancers have suggested that while the acid extrusion mechanisms employed are generally the same as those in healthy cells, the specific transporters upregulated vary with the cancer type. The main such transporters include Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, various HCO3(-) transporters, H(+) pumps, and lactate-H(+) cotransporters. The mechanisms leading to their dysregulation in cancer are incompletely understood but include changes in transporter expression levels, trafficking and membrane localization, and posttranslational modifications. In turn, accumulating evidence has revealed that in addition to supporting their elevated metabolic rate, their increased acid efflux capacity endows the cancer cells with increased capacity for invasiveness, proliferation, and chemotherapy resistance. The pancreatic duct exhibits an enormous capacity for acid-base transport, rendering pHi dysregulation a potentially very important topic in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). PDAC - accounting for about 90% of all pancreatic cancers - has one of the highest cancer mortality rates known, and new diagnostic and treatment options are highly needed. However, very little is known about whether pH regulation is altered in PDAC and, if so, the possible role of this in cancer development. Here, we review current models for pancreatic acid-base transport and pH homeostasis and summarize current views on acid-base dysregulation in cancer, focusing where possible on the few studies to date in PDAC. Finally, we present new data-mining analyses of acid-base transporter expression changes in PDAC and discuss essential directions for future work.

  11. In-stream sorption of fulvic acid in an acidic stream: A stream-scale transport experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Hornberger, G.M.; Bencala, K.E.; Boyer, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    The variation of concentration and composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in stream waters cannot be explained solely on the basis of soil processes in contributing subcatchments. To investigate in-stream processes that control DOC, we injected DOC-enriched water into a reach of the Snake River (Summit County, Colorado) that has abundant iron oxyhydroxides coating the streambed. The injected water was obtained from the Suwannee River (Georgia), which is highly enriched in fulvic acid. The fulvic acid from this water is the standard reference for aquatic fulvic acid for the International Humic Substances Society and has been well characterized. During the experimental injection, significant removal of sorbable fulvic acid occurred within the first 141 m of stream reach. We coinjected a conservative tracer (lithium chloride) and analyzed the results with the one-dimensional transport with inflow and storage (OTIS) stream solute transport model to quantify the physical transport mechanisms. The downstream transport of fulvic acid as indicated by absorbance was then simulated using OTIS with a first-order kinetic sorption rate constant applied to the sorbable fulvic acid. The "sorbable" fraction of injected fulvic acid was irreversibly sorbed by streambed sediments at rates (kinetic rate constants) of the order of 10-4-10-3 S-1. In the injected Suwannee River water, sorbable and nonsorbable fulvic acid had distinct chemical characteristics identified in 13C-NMR spectra. The 13C-NMR spectra indicate that during the experiment, the sorbable "signal" of greater aromaticity and carboxyl content decreased downstream; that is, these components were preferentially removed. This study illustrates that interactions between the water and the reactive surfaces will modify significantly the concentration and composition of DOC observed in streams with abundant chemically reactive surfaces on the streambed and in the hyporheic zone.

  12. Myosin 1b Regulates Amino Acid Transport by Associating Transporters with the Apical Plasma Membrane of Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Shigeru; Coluccio, Lynne M

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATers) in the brush border of the apical plasma membrane (APM) of renal proximal tubule (PT) cells mediate amino acid transport (AAT). We found that the membrane-associated class I myosin myosin 1b (Myo1b) localized at the apical brush border membrane of PTs. In opossum kidney (OK) 3B/2 epithelial cells, which are derived from PTs, expressed rat Myo1b-GFP colocalized in patched microvilli with expressed mouse V5-tagged SIT1 (SIT1-V5), which mediates neutral amino acid transport in OK cells. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of opossum Myo1b-specific shRNA resulted in knockdown (kd) of Myo1b expression, less SIT1-V5 at the APM as determined by localization studies, and a decrease in neutral AAT as determined by radioactive uptake assays. Myo1b kd had no effect on Pi transport or noticeable change in microvilli structure as determined by rhodamine phalloidin staining. The studies are the first to define a physiological role for Myo1b, that of regulating renal AAT by modulating the association of AATers with the APM.

  13. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  14. Characteristics and Possible Functions of Mitochondrial Ca2+ Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria produce around 92% of the ATP used in the typical animal cell by oxidative phosphorylation using energy from their electrochemical proton gradient. Intramitochondrial free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) has been found to be an important component of control of the rate of this ATP production. In addition, [Ca2+]m also controls the opening of a large pore in the inner mitochondrial membrane, the permeability transition pore (PTP), which plays a role in mitochondrial control of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Therefore, [Ca2+]m can control whether the cell has sufficient ATP to fulfill its functions and survive or is condemned to death. Ca2+ is also one of the most important second messengers within the cytosol, signaling changes in cellular response through Ca2+ pulses or transients. Mitochondria can also sequester Ca2+ from these transients so as to modify the shape of Ca2+ signaling transients or control their location within the cell. All of this is controlled by the action of four or five mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms and the PTP. The characteristics of these mechanisms of Ca2+ transport and a discussion of how they might function are described in this paper. PMID:19161975

  15. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  16. Transport of Corilagin, Gallic Acid, and Ellagic Acid from Fructus Phyllanthi Tannin Fraction in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-juan; Liang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Wen-Jing; Han, Shu-Xian; Qi, Qi; Cui, Ya-Ping; Li, Shi; Yang, Guang-Hui; Shao, Yan-Yan; Zhu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the absorption property of the representative hydrolyzable tannin, namely corilagin, and its hydrolysates gallic acid (GA) and ellagic acid (EA) from the Fructus Phyllanthi tannin fraction (PTF) in vitro. Methods. Caco-2 cells monolayer model was established. Influences of PTF on Caco-2 cells viability were detected with MTT assay. The transport across monolayers was examined for different time points, concentrations, and secretory directions. The inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) and sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), and tight junction modulators were used to study the transport mechanism. LC-MS method was employed to quantify the absorption concentration. Results. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) values of the three compounds were below 1.0 × 10−6 cm/s. The absorption of corilagin and GA were much lower than their efflux, and the uptake of both compounds was increased in the presence of inhibitors of P-gp and MRPs. The absorption of EA was decreased in the company of OATP and SGLT1 inhibitors. Moreover, the transport of corilagin, GA, and EA was enhanced by tight junction modulators. Conclusion. These observations indicated that the three compounds in PTF were transported via passive diffusion combined with protein mediated transport. P-gp and MRPs might get involved in the transport of corilagin and GA. The absorption of EA could be attributed to OATP and SGLT1 protein. PMID:27738446

  17. Functional characterization of a ClC transporter by solid-supported membrane electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Celma, Juan; Szydelko, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    EcClC, a prokaryotic member of the ClC family of chloride channels and transporters, works as coupled H+/Cl− exchanger. With a known structure and the possibility of investigating its behavior with different biochemical and biophysical techniques, the protein has become an important model system for the family. Although many aspects of its function have been previously characterized, it was difficult to measure transport on the same sample under different environmental conditions. To overcome this experimental limitation, we have studied EcClC by solid-supported membrane electrophysiology. The large transport-related transient currents and a simple way of relating transport rates to the measured signal have allowed a thorough investigation of ion selectivity, inhibition, and the dependence of transport on changes in ion concentration and pH. Our results confirm that the protein transports larger anions with about similar rates, whereas the smaller fluoride is not a substrate. We also show that 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2’-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS), a known inhibitor of other anion transport protein, irreversibly inhibits EcClC from the intracellular side. The chloride dependence shows an apparent saturation at millimolar concentrations that resembles a similar behavior in eukaryotic ClC channels. Our experiments have also allowed us to quantify the pH dependence of transport. EcClC shows a strong activation at low pH with an apparent pKa of 4.6. The pronounced pH dependence is lost by the mutation of a conserved glutamate facing the extracellular solution that was previously shown to be an acceptor for transported protons, whereas it is largely retained by the mutation of an equivalent residue at the intracellular side. Our results have provided a quantitative basis for the transport behavior of EcClC, and they will serve as a reference for future investigations of novel electrogenic transporters with still-uncharacterized properties. PMID:23478993

  18. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  19. Maternal micronutrients and omega 3 fatty acids affect placental fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Nisha S; Dangat, Kamini D; Joshi, Asmita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2013-03-01

    Adequate supply of LCPUFA from maternal plasma is crucial for fetal normal growth and development. The present study examines the effect of maternal micronutrients (folic acid and vitamin B12) and omega 3 fatty acids on placental mRNA levels of fatty acid desaturases (Δ5 and Δ6) and transport proteins. Pregnant female rats were divided into 6 groups at 2 levels of folic acid both in the presence and absence of vitamin B12. Both the vitamin B12 deficient groups were supplemented with omega 3 fatty acid. Maternal vitamin B12 deficiency reduced placental mRNA and protein levels of Δ5 desaturase, mRNA levels of FATP1 and FATP4 (p<0.05 for all) as compared to control while omega 3 fatty acid supplementation normalized the levels. Our data for the first time indicates that altered maternal micronutrients and omega 3 fatty acids play a key role in regulating fatty acid desaturase and transport protein expression in placenta.

  20. Unsaturated fatty acids and phytosterols regulate cholesterol transporter genes in Caco-2 and HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngki; Carr, Timothy P

    2013-02-01

    Dietary consumption of phytosterols and certain fatty acids has been shown to reduce cholesterol absorption and plasma cholesterol concentrations. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether phytosterols or fatty acids can alter the expression of cholesterol transporters by functioning as signaling molecules. This study tested the hypothesis that various fatty acids and phytosterols commonly found in the food supply can modulate the expression of transporters including Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and scavenger receptor class B type I and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the intestine and liver. Caco-2 cells were used as models of enterocytes, and HepG2 cells were used as a model of hepatocytes. The cells were treated for 18 hours with 100 μmol/L of a fatty acid, or for 24 hours with 10 μmol/L of 25α-hydroxycholesterol, or 100 μmol/L of cholesterol, sitosterol, and stigmasterol to measure expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in Caco-2 cells and sterols in HepG2 cells significantly reduced the messenger RNA expression levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, scavenger receptor class B type I, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Importantly, sitosterol and stigmasterol reduced the messenger RNA levels of genes to a similar extent as cholesterol. The data support the hypothesis that unsaturated fatty acid and phytosterols can act as signaling molecules and alter the expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport and metabolism.

  1. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter.

  2. Filtered density function approach for reactive transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Nicolae; Schüler, Lennart; Attinger, Sabine; Knabner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering may be used in coarse-grained simulations (CGS) of reactive transport in groundwater, similar to the large eddy simulations (LES) in turbulence. The filtered density function (FDF), stochastically equivalent to a probability density function (PDF), provides a statistical description of the sub-grid, unresolved, variability of the concentration field. Besides closing the chemical source terms in the transport equation for the mean concentration, like in LES-FDF methods, the CGS-FDF approach aims at quantifying the uncertainty over the whole hierarchy of heterogeneity scales exhibited by natural porous media. Practically, that means estimating concentration PDFs on coarse grids, at affordable computational costs. To cope with the high dimensionality of the problem in case of multi-component reactive transport and to reduce the numerical diffusion, FDF equations are solved by particle methods. But, while trajectories of computational particles are modeled as stochastic processes indexed by time, the concentration's heterogeneity is modeled as a random field, with multi-dimensional, spatio-temporal sets of indices. To overcome this conceptual inconsistency, we consider FDFs/PDFs of random species concentrations weighted by conserved scalars and we show that their evolution equations can be formulated as Fokker-Planck equations describing stochastically equivalent processes in concentration-position spaces. Numerical solutions can then be approximated by the density in the concentration-position space of an ensemble of computational particles governed by the associated Itô equations. Instead of sequential particle methods we use a global random walk (GRW) algorithm, which is stable, free of numerical diffusion, and practically insensitive to the increase of the number of particles. We illustrate the general FDF approach and the GRW numerical solution for a reduced complexity problem consisting of the transport of a single scalar in groundwater

  3. Substrate specificity and transport mechanism of amino-acid transceptor Slimfast from Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Rodriguez, Stacy D.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Price, David P.; Drake, Lisa L.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2015-01-01

    Anautogenous mosquitoes depend on vertebrate blood as nutrient source for their eggs. A highly efficient set of membrane transporters mediates the massive movement of nutrient amino acids between mosquito tissues after a blood meal. Here we report the characterization of the amino-acid transporter Slimfast (Slif) from the yellow-fever mosquito Aedes aegypti using codon-optimized heterologous expression. Slif is a well-known component of the target-of-rapamycin signalling pathway and fat body nutrient sensor, but its substrate specificity and transport mechanism were unknown. We found that Slif transports essential cationic and neutral amino acids with preference for arginine. It has an unusual dual-affinity mechanism with only the high affinity being Na+ dependent. Tissue-specific expression and blood meal-dependent regulation of Slif are consistent with conveyance of essential amino acids from gut to fat body. Slif represents a novel transport system and type of transceptor for sensing and transporting essential amino acids during mosquito reproduction. PMID:26449545

  4. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation.

    PubMed

    Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-06-28

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation.

  5. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Dorado, Boris; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-06-26

    In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models

  6. Inactivating Mutations in MFSD2A, Required for Omega-3 Fatty Acid Transport in Brain, Cause a Lethal Microcephaly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Nguyen, Long N.; Yang, Hongbo; Zaki, Maha S.; Kara, Majdi; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Akizu, Naiara; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Schroth, Jana; Copeland, Brett; Vaux, Keith K.; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Quek, Debra Q.Y.; Wong, Bernice H.; Tan, Bryan C.; Wenk, Markus R.; Gunel, Murat; Gabriel, Stacey; Chi, Neil C.; Silver, David L.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant omega-3 fatty acid in brain, and although considered essential, deficiency has not been linked to disease1,2. Despite the large mass of DHA in phospholipids, the brain does not synthesize it. DHA is imported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) through the Major Facilitator Superfamily Domain 2a (Mfsd2a)3. Mfsd2a transports DHA as well as other fatty acids in the form of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). We identify two families displaying MFSD2A mutations in conserved residues. Patients exhibited a lethal microcephaly syndrome linked to inadequate uptake of LPC lipids. The MFSD2A mutations impaired transport activity in a cell-based assay. Moreover, when expressed in mfsd2aa zebrafish morphants, mutants failed to rescue microcephaly, BBB breakdown and lethality. Our results establish a link between transport of DHA and LPCs by MFSD2A and human brain growth and function, presenting the first evidence of monogenic disease related to transport of DHA in humans. PMID:26005868

  7. Pathways of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Utilization: Implications for Brain Function in Neuropsychiatric Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joanne J.; Green, Pnina; Mann, J. John; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25498862

  8. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  9. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor

    PubMed Central

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. l-lysine, l-histidine and l-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike l-histidine, l-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and d-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, l-Asp-γ-l-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of l-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1Y395C by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1K9R,K16R. Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes. PMID:24852066

  10. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  11. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  12. The solute carrier family 10 (SLC10): beyond bile acid transport

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Polli, James E.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier (SLC) family 10 (SLC10) comprises influx transporters of bile acids, steroidal hormones, various drugs, and several other substrates. Because the seminal transporters of this family, namely, sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2), were primarily bile acid transporters, the term “sodium bile salt cotransporting family” was used for the SLC10 family. However, this notion became obsolete with the finding of other SLC10 members that do not transport bile acids. For example, the sodium-dependent organic anion transporter (SOAT; SLC10A6) transports primarily sulfated steroids. Moreover, NTCP was shown to also transport steroids and xenobiotics, including HMG-CoA inhibitors (statins). The SLC10 family contains four additional members, namely, P3 (SLC10A3; SLC10A3), P4 (SLC10A4; SLC10A4), P5 (SLC10A5; SLC10A5) and SLC10A7 (SLC10A7), several of which were unknown or considered hypothetical until approximately a decade ago. While their substrate specificity remains undetermined, great progress has been made towards their characterization in recent years. SLC10A4 may participate in vesicular storage or exocytosis of neurotransmitters or mastocyte mediators, whereas SLC10A5 and SLC10A7 may be involved in solute transport and SLC10A3 may have a role as a housekeeping protein. Finally, the newly found role of bile acids in glucose and energy homeostasis, via the TGR5 receptor, sheds new light on the clinical relevance of ASBT and NTCP. The present mini-review provides a brief summary of recent progress on members of the SLC10 family. PMID:23506869

  13. Aminoaciduria, but normal thyroid hormone levels and signalling, in mice lacking the amino acid and thyroid hormone transporter Slc7a8.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doreen; Wirth, Eva K; Wohlgemuth, Franziska; Reix, Nathalie; Klein, Marc O; Grüters, Annette; Köhrle, Josef; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2011-10-15

    LAT2 (system L amino acid transporter 2) is composed of the subunits Slc7a8/Lat2 and Slc3a2/4F2hc. This transporter is highly expressed along the basolateral membranes of absorptive epithelia in kidney and small intestine, but is also abundant in the brain. Lat2 is an energy-independent exchanger of neutral amino acids, and was shown to transport thyroid hormones. We report in the present paper that targeted inactivation of Slc7a8 leads to increased urinary loss of small neutral amino acids. Development and growth of Slc7a8(-/-) mice appears normal, suggesting functional compensation of neutral amino acid transport by alternative transporters in kidney, intestine and placenta. Movement co-ordination is slightly impaired in mutant mice, although cerebellar development and structure remained inconspicuous. Circulating thyroid hormones, thyrotropin and thyroid hormone-responsive genes remained unchanged in Slc7a8(-/-) mice, possibly because of functional compensation by the thyroid hormone transporter Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), which is co-expressed in many cell types. The reason for the mild neurological phenotype remains unresolved.

  14. Transport of acetic acid in Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects of ethanol and their implications on the resistance of the yeast to acidic environments.

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, M J; Miranda, L; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 grown in a medium with acetic acid, ethanol, or glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source transported acetic acid by a saturable transport system. This system accepted propionic and formic acids but not lactic, sorbic, and benzoic acids. When the carbon source was glucose or fructose, the cells displayed activity of a mediated transport system specific for acetic acid, apparently not being able to recognize other monocarboxylic acids. In both types of cells, ethanol inhibited the transport of labelled acetic acid. The inhibition was noncompetitive, and the dependence of the maximum transport rate on the ethanol concentration was found to be exponential. These results reinforced the belief that, under the referenced growth conditions, the acid entered the cells mainly through a transporter protein. The simple diffusion of the undissociated acid appeared to contribute, with a relatively low weight, to the overall acid uptake. It was concluded that in Z. bailii, ethanol plays a protective role against the possible negative effects of acetic acid by inhibiting its transport and accumulation. Thus, the intracellular concentration of the acid could be maintained at levels lower than those expected if the acid entered the cells only by simple diffusion. PMID:8795203

  15. Amino Acid Transport Associated to Cluster of Differentiation 98 Heavy Chain (CD98hc) Is at the Cross-road of Oxidative Stress and Amino Acid Availability.

    PubMed

    de la Ballina, Laura R; Cano-Crespo, Sara; González-Muñoz, Elena; Bial, Susanna; Estrach, Soline; Cailleteau, Laurence; Tissot, Floriane; Daniel, Hannelore; Zorzano, Antonio; Ginsberg, Mark H; Palacín, Manuel; Féral, Chloé C

    2016-04-29

    CD98hc functions as an amino acid (AA) transporter (together with another subunit) and integrin signaling enhancer. It is overexpressed in highly proliferative cells in both physiological and pathological conditions. CD98hc deletion induces strong impairment of cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro Here, we investigate CD98hc-associated AA transport in cell survival and proliferation. By using chimeric versions of CD98hc, the two functions of the protein can be uncoupled. Although recovering the CD98hc AA transport capacity restores the in vivo and in vitro proliferation of CD98hc-null cells, reconstitution of the integrin signaling function of CD98hc is unable to restore in vitro proliferation of those cells. CD98hc-associated transporters (i.e. xCT, LAT1, and y(+)LAT2 in wild-type cells) are crucial to control reactive oxygen species and intracellular AA levels, thus sustaining cell survival and proliferation. Moreover, in CD98hc-null cells the deficiency of CD98hc/xCT cannot be compensated, leading to cell death by ferroptosis. Supplementation of culture media with β-mercaptoethanol rescues CD98hc-deficient cell survival. Under such conditions null cells show oxidative stress and intracellular AA imbalance and, consequently, limited proliferation. CD98hc-null cells also present reduced intracellular levels of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAAs and ARO AAs, respectively) and induced expression of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Interestingly, external supply of dipeptides containing BCAAs and ARO AAs rescues cell proliferation and compensates for impaired uptake of CD98hc/LAT1 and CD98hc/y(+)LAT2. Our data establish CD98hc as a master protective gene at the cross-road of redox control and AA availability, making it a relevant therapeutic target in cancer.

  16. Soy-dairy protein blend and whey protein ingestion after resistance exercise increases amino acid transport and transporter expression in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Reidy, P T; Walker, D K; Dickinson, J M; Gundermann, D M; Drummond, M J; Timmerman, K L; Cope, M B; Mukherjea, R; Jennings, K; Volpi, E; Rasmussen, B B

    2014-06-01

    Increasing amino acid availability (via infusion or ingestion) at rest or postexercise enhances amino acid transport into human skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether alterations in amino acid availability, from ingesting different dietary proteins, can enhance amino acid transport rates and amino acid transporter (AAT) mRNA expression. We hypothesized that the prolonged hyperaminoacidemia from ingesting a blend of proteins with different digestion rates postexercise would enhance amino acid transport into muscle and AAT expression compared with the ingestion of a rapidly digested protein. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, we studied 16 young adults at rest and after acute resistance exercise coupled with postexercise (1 h) ingestion of either a (soy-dairy) protein blend or whey protein. Phenylalanine net balance and transport rate into skeletal muscle were measured using stable isotopic methods in combination with femoral arteriovenous blood sampling and muscle biopsies obtained at rest and 3 and 5 h postexercise. Phenylalanine transport into muscle and mRNA expression of select AATs [system L amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, system A amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1] increased to a similar extent in both groups (P < 0.05). However, the ingestion of the protein blend resulted in a prolonged and positive net phenylalanine balance during postexercise recovery compared with whey protein (P < 0.05). Postexercise myofibrillar protein synthesis increased similarly between groups. We conclude that, while both protein sources enhanced postexercise AAT expression, transport into muscle, and myofibrillar protein synthesis, postexercise ingestion of a protein blend results in a slightly prolonged net amino acid balance across the leg compared with whey protein.

  17. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field.

  18. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed.

  19. Nucleic acid functionalized graphene for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2012-02-06

    There is immense demand for complex nanoarchitectures based on graphene nanostructures in the fields of biosensing or nanoelectronics. DNA molecules represent the most versatile and programmable recognition element and can provide a unique massive parallel assembly strategy with graphene nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate a facile strategy for covalent linking of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) to graphene using carbodiimide chemistry and apply it to genosensing. Since graphenes can be prepared by different methods and can contain various oxygen containing groups, we thoroughly investigated the utility of four different chemically modified graphenes for functionalization by ssDNA. The materials were characterized in detail and the different DNA functionalized graphene platforms were then employed for the detection of DNA hybridization and DNA polymorphism by using impedimetric methods. We believe that our findings are very important for the development of novel devices that can be used as alternatives to classical techniques for sensitive and fast DNA analysis. In addition, covalent functionalization of graphene with ssDNA is expected to have broad implications, from biosensing to nanoelectronics and directed, DNA programmable, self-assembly.

  20. Stanniocalcin-1 Controls Ion Regulation Functions of Ion-transporting Epithelium Other than Calcium Balance

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ming-Yi; Lin, Chia-Hao; Chao, Pei-Lin; Hung, Jo-Chi; Cruz, Shelly A.; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) was first identified to involve in Ca2+ homeostasis in teleosts, and was thought to act as a hypocalcemic hormone in vertebrate. Recent studies suggested that STC-1 exhibits broad effects on ion balance, not confines to Ca2+, but the mechanism of this regulation process remains largely unknown. Here, we used zebrafish embryos as an alternative in vivo model to investigate how STC-1 regulates transepithelial ion transport function in ion-transporting epithelium. Expression of stc-1 mRNA in zebrafish embryos was increased in high-Ca2+ environments but decreased by acidic and ion-deficient treatments while overexpression of stc-1 impaired the hypotonic acclimation by decreasing whole body Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- contents and H+ secretion ability. Injection of STC-1 mRNA also down-regulated mRNA expressions of epithelial Ca2+ channel, H+-ATPase, and Na+-Cl- cotransporter, suggesting the roles of STC-1 in regulation of ions other than Ca2+. Knockdown of STC-1 caused an increase in ionocyte progenitors (foxi3a as the marker) and mature ionocytes (ion transporters as the markers), but did not affect epithelium stem cells (p63 as the marker) in the embryonic skin. Overexpression of STC-1 had the corresponding opposite effect on ionocyte progenitors, mature ionocytes in the embryonic skin. Taken together, STC-1 negatively regulates the number of ionocytes to reduce ionocyte functions. This process is important for body fluid ionic homeostasis, which is achieved by the regulation of ion transport functions in ionocytes. The present findings provide new insights into the broader functions of STC-1, a hypocalcemic hormone. PMID:25561895

  1. Fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation in mammals: roles played by different isoforms of rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Black, Paul N; Coleman, Rosalind A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2006-03-01

    Mammals express multiple isoforms of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL1 and ACSL3-6) in various tissues. These enzymes are essential for fatty acid metabolism providing activated intermediates for complex lipid synthesis, protein modification, and beta-oxidation. Yeast in contrast express four major ACSLs, which have well-defined functions. Two, Faa1p and Faa4p, are specifically required for fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation. Four ACSLs from the rat were expressed in a yeast faa1delta faa4delta strain and their roles in fatty acid transport and trafficking characterized. All four restored ACS activity yet varied in substrate preference. ACSL1, 4, and 6 were able to rescue fatty acid transport activity and triglyceride synthesis. ACSL5, however, was unable to facilitate fatty acid transport despite conferring robust oleoyl-CoA synthetase activity. This is the first study evaluating the role of the mammalian ACSLs in fatty acid transport and supports a role for ACSL1, 4, and 6 in transport by vectorial acylation.

  2. Functional Characterization of Candida albicans ABC Transporter Cdr1p

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Saini, Preeti; Smriti; Jha, Sudhakar; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2003-01-01

    In view of the importance of Candida drug resistance protein (Cdr1p) in azole resistance, we have characterized it by overexpressing it as a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged fusion protein (Cdr1p-GFP). The overexpressed Cdr1p-GFP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is shown to be specifically labeled with the photoaffinity analogs iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) and azidopine, which have been used to characterize the drug-binding sites on mammalian drug-transporting P-glycoproteins. While nystatin could compete for the binding of IAAP, miconazole specifically competed for azidopine binding, suggesting that IAAP and azidopine bind to separate sites on Cdr1p. Cdr1p was subjected to site-directed mutational analysis. Among many mutant variants of Cdr1p, the phenotypes of F774A and ΔF774 were particularly interesting. The analysis of GFP-tagged mutant variants of Cdr1p revealed that a conserved F774, in predicted transmembrane segment 6, when changed to alanine showed increased binding of both photoaffinity analogues, while its deletion (ΔF774), as revealed by confocal microscopic analyses, led to mislocalization of the protein. The mislocalized ΔF774 mutant Cdr1p could be rescued to the plasma membrane as a functional transporter by growth in the presence of a Cdr1p substrate, cycloheximide. Our data for the first time show that the drug substrate-binding sites of Cdr1p exhibit striking similarities with those of mammalian drug-transporting P-glycoproteins and despite differences in topological organization, the transmembrane segment 6 in Cdr1p is also a major contributor to drug substrate-binding site(s). PMID:14665469

  3. Proton transport in triflic acid hydrates studied via path integral car-parrinello molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2009-12-31

    The mono-, di-, and tetrahydrates of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, which contain characteristic H(3)O(+), H(5)O(2)(+), and H(9)O(4)(+) structures, provide model systems for understanding proton transport in materials with high perfluorosulfonic acid density such as perfluorosulfonic acid membranes commonly employed in hydrogen fuel cells. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that protons in these solids are predisposed to transfer to the water most strongly bound to sulfonate groups via a Grotthuss-type mechanism, but quickly return to the most solvated defect structure either due to the lack of a nearby species to stabilize the new defect or a preference for the proton to be maximally hydrated. Path integral molecular dynamics of the mono- and dihydrate reveal significant quantum effects that facilitate proton transfer to the "presolvated" water or SO(3)(-) in the first solvation shell and increase the Zundel character of all the defects. These trends are quantified in free energy profiles for each bonding environment. Hydrogen bonding criteria for HOH-OH(2) and HOH-O(3)S are extracted from the two-dimensional potential of mean force. The quantum radial distribution function, radius of gyration, and root-mean-square displacement position correlation function show that the protonic charge is distributed over two or more water molecules. Metastable structural defects with one excess proton shared between two sulfonate groups and another Zundel or Eigen type cation defect are found for the mono- and dihydrate but not for the tetrahydrate crystal. Results for the tetrahydrate native crystal exhibit minor differences at 210 and 250 K. IR spectra are calculated for all native and stable defect structures. Graph theory techniques are used to characterize the chain lengths and ring sizes in the hydrogen bond network. Low conductivities when limited water is present may be attributable to trapping of protons between SO(3)(-) groups and the increased

  4. Multicellularity and the Functional Interdependence of Motility and Molecular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, C.; Ganguly, S.; Kessler, J. O.; Michod, R.; Goldstein, R. E.

    2006-03-01

    Benefits, costs and requirements accompany the transition from motile totipotent unicellular organisms to multicellular organisms having cells specialized into reproductive (germ) and vegetative (sterile soma) functions such as motility. In flagellated colonial organisms such as the volvocalean green algae, organized beating by the somatic cells' flagella yields propulsion important in phototaxis and chemotaxis. It has not been generally appreciated that for the larger colonies, flagellar stirring of boundary layers and remote transport are fundamental for maintaining a sufficient rate of metabolite turnover, one not attainable by diffusive transport alone. We describe experiments that quantify the role of advective dynamics in enhancing productivity in germ-soma differentiated colonies. First, experiments with suspended deflagellated colonies of Volvox carteri show that forced advection improves productivity. Second, Particle Imaging Velocimetry of fluid motion around colonies reveals flow fields with very large characteristic velocities U extending to length scales comparable to the colony radius R. For a typical metabolite diffusion constant D, the Peclet number Pe=2UR/D 1, indicative of the dominance of advection over diffusion, with striking augmentation at the cell division stage.

  5. An Improved Green's Function for Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for the high charge and energy (HZE) by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions.

  6. Functional Characterization of a Eukaryotic Melibiose Transporter1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Lingner, Ulrike; Münch, Steffen; Sode, Björn; Deising, Holger B.; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi drastically affect plant health and cause significant losses in crop yield and quality. In spite of their impact, little is known about the carbon sources used by these fungi in planta and about the fungal transporters importing sugars from the plant-fungus interface. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of MELIBIOSE TRANSPORTER1 (MBT1) from the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola (teleomorph Glomerella graminicola), the causal agent of leaf anthracnose and stalk rot disease in maize (Zea mays). Functional characterization of the MBT1 protein in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the MBT1 cDNA revealed that α-d-galactopyranosyl compounds such as melibiose, galactinol, and raffinose are substrates of MBT1, with melibiose most likely being the preferred substrate. α-d-Glucopyranosyl disaccharides like trehalose, isomaltose, or maltose are also accepted by MBT1, although with lower affinities. The MBT1 gene shows low and comparable expression levels in axenically grown C. graminicola and upon infection of maize leaves both during the initial biotrophic development of the fungus and during the subsequent necrotrophic phase. Despite these low levels of MBT1 expression, the MBT1 protein allows efficient growth of C. graminicola on melibiose as sole carbon source in axenic cultures. Although Δmbt1 mutants are unable to grow on melibiose, they do not show virulence defects on maize. PMID:21593216

  7. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin C Function in the Brain: Vital Role of the Ascorbate Transporter (SVCT2)

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona E.; May, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain. However, it also has a number of other important functions, participating as a co-factor in several enzyme reactions including catecholamine synthesis, collagen production and regulation of HIF-1α. Ascorbate is transported into the brain and neurons via the Sodium-dependent Vitamin C Transporter-2 (SVCT2), which causes accumulation of ascorbate within cells against a concentration gradient. Dehydroascorbic acid, the oxidized form of ascorbate, is transported via glucose transporters of the GLUT family. Once in cells, it is rapidly reduced to ascorbate. The highest concentrations of ascorbate in the body are found in the brain and neuroendocrine tissues such as adrenal, although the brain is the most difficult organ to deplete of ascorbate. Combined with regional asymmetry in ascorbate distribution within different brain areas, these facts suggest an important role for ascorbate in the brain. Ascorbate is proposed as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic and GABAergic transmission and related behaviors. Neurodegenerative diseases typically involve high levels of oxidative stress and thus ascorbate has been posited to have potential therapeutic roles against ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntingdon's disease. PMID:19162177

  9. Vitamin C function in the brain: vital role of the ascorbate transporter SVCT2.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Fiona E; May, James M

    2009-03-15

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain. However, it also has a number of other important functions, participating as a cofactor in several enzyme reactions, including catecholamine synthesis, collagen production, and regulation of HIF-1 alpha. Ascorbate is transported into the brain and neurons via the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2), which causes accumulation of ascorbate within cells against a concentration gradient. Dehydroascorbic acid, the oxidized form of ascorbate, is transported via glucose transporters of the GLUT family. Once in cells, it is rapidly reduced to ascorbate. The highest concentrations of ascorbate in the body are found in the brain and in neuroendocrine tissues such as adrenal, although the brain is the most difficult organ to deplete of ascorbate. Combined with regional asymmetry in ascorbate distribution within different brain areas, these facts suggest an important role for ascorbate in the brain. Ascorbate is proposed as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic transmission and related behaviors. Neurodegenerative diseases typically involve high levels of oxidative stress and thus ascorbate has been posited to have potential therapeutic roles against ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease.

  10. Transport of cationic amino acids by the mouse ecotropic retrovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Closs, E I; Albritton, L M; Cunningham, J M

    1991-08-22

    Susceptibility of rodent cells to infection by ecotropic murine leukaemia viruses (MuLV) is determined by binding of the virus envelope to a membrane receptor that has multiple membrane-spanning domains. Cells infected by ecotropic MuLV synthesize envelope protein, gp70, which binds to this receptor, thereby preventing additional infections. The consequences of envelope-MuLV receptor binding for the infected host cell have not been directly determined, partly because the cellular function of the MuLV receptor protein is unknown. Here we report a coincidence in the positions of the first eight putative membrane-spanning domains found in the virus receptor and in two related proteins, the arginine and histidine permeases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fig. 1), but not in any other proteins identified by computer-based sequence comparison of the GenBank data base. Xenopus oocytes injected with receptor-encoding messenger RNA show increased uptake of L-arginine, L-lysine and L-ornithine. The transport properties and the expression pattern of the virus receptor behave in ways previously attributed to y+, the principal transporter of cationic L-amino acids in mammalian cells.

  11. Barley has two peroxisomal ABC transporters with multiple functions in β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Medhurst, Anne; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Zhang, Xuebin; Devonshire, Jean; Scholefield, Duncan; Fernández, José; Axcell, Barry; Ramsay, Luke; Waterham, Hans R.; Waugh, Robbie; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In oilseed plants, peroxisomal β-oxidation functions not only in lipid catabolism but also in jasmonate biosynthesis and metabolism of pro-auxins. Subfamily D ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate import of β-oxidation substrates into the peroxisome, and the Arabidopsis ABCD protein, COMATOSE (CTS), is essential for this function. Here, the roles of peroxisomal ABCD transporters were investigated in barley, where the main storage compound is starch. Barley has two CTS homologues, designated HvABCD1 and HvABCD2, which are widely expressed and present in embryo and aleurone tissues during germination. Suppression of both genes in barley RNA interference (RNAi) lines indicated roles in metabolism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA), jasmonate biosynthesis, and determination of grain size. Transformation of the Arabidopsis cts-1 null mutant with HvABCD1 and HvABCD2 confirmed these findings. HvABCD2 partially or completely complemented all tested phenotypes of cts-1. In contrast, HvABCD1 failed to complement the germination and establishment phenotypes of cts-1 but increased the sensitivity of hypocotyls to 100 μM IBA and partially complemented the seed size phenotype. HvABCD1 also partially complemented the yeast pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant for fatty acid β-oxidation. It is concluded that the core biochemical functions of peroxisomal ABC transporters are largely conserved between oilseeds and cereals but that their physiological roles and importance may differ. PMID:24913629

  12. Hydrodynamic transport functions from quantum kinetic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E. A.; Hu, B. L.; Ramsey, S. A.

    2000-06-01

    Starting from the quantum kinetic field theory [E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu, Phys. Rev. D 37, 2878 (1988)] constructed from the closed-time-path (CTP), two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action we show how to compute from first principles the shear and bulk viscosity functions in the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic regime. For a real scalar field with λΦ4 self-interaction we need to include four-loop graphs in the equation of motion. This work provides a microscopic field-theoretical basis to the ``effective kinetic theory'' proposed by Jeon and Yaffe [S. Jeon and L. G. Yaffe, Phys. Rev. D 53, 5799 (1996)], while our result for the bulk viscosity reproduces their expression derived from linear-response theory and the imaginary-time formalism of thermal field theory. Though unavoidably involved in calculations of this sort, we feel that the approach using fundamental quantum kinetic field theory is conceptually clearer and methodically simpler than the effective kinetic theory approach, as the success of the latter requires a clever rendition of diagrammatic resummations which is neither straightforward nor fail-safe. Moreover, the method based on the CTP-2PI effective action illustrated here for a scalar field can be formulated entirely in terms of functional integral quantization, which makes it an appealing method for a first-principles calculation of transport functions of a thermal non-Abelian gauge theory, e.g., QCD quark-gluon plasma produced from heavy ion collisions.

  13. Artificial muscles to restore transport function of diseased atria.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Hayoz, Daniel; Thévenaz, Pierrick; Roulet, Jean-Yves; Salchli, Francois; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2008-01-01

    Surgical treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation often fails to restore the transport function of the atrium. This study first introduces the concept of an atrial assist device to restore the pump function of the atrium. A micro motorless pump based on artificial muscle technology, is positioned on the external surface of the atrium to compress it and restore its muscular activity. A bench model reproduces the function of fibrillating atrium to assess the circulatory support that this pump can provide. The Atripump is a dome shape silicone coated nitinol actuator mounted on a plastic ring. A pacemaker-like control unit drives the actuator, which compresses the atrium, providing the mechanical support to the blood circulation. The bench model consists of an open circuit made of latex bladder 60 mm in diameter filled with water. The Atripump is placed on the outer surface of the bladder. Pressure, volume, and temperature changes were recorded. The contraction rate was 1 Hz with power supply of 12 V, 400 mA for 200 milliseconds. Preload ranged from 15 to 21 cm H20. The pump produced a maximal work of 16 x 10(-3) J. Maximal volume pumped was 492 ml/min. This artificial muscle pump is compact, and reproduces the hemodynamic performances of normal atrium.

  14. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-09-21

    Based on our earlier works [X. Zheng et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); J. S. Jin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a rigorous and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  15. Transport of Palmitic Acid Across the Tegument of the Entomophilic Nematode Romanomermis culicivorax

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Roger; Burford, Ian R.

    1984-01-01

    Romanomermis culicivorax juveniles, dissected out of Aedes aegypti larvae 7 days after infection, were incubated under controlled conditions in isotonic saline containing ¹⁴C-U-palmitic acid to investigate the nature of the transport mechanism(s) used by the nematode for transcuticular uptake of palmitic acid. Net uptake of the isotope by the nematode was of a logarithmic nature with respect to time. Uptake of palmitic acid was accomplished by a combination of diffusion and a mediated process which was substrate saturable and competitively inhibited by myristic and stearic acids. Both 2,4-dinitrophenol and ouabain inhibited uptake of palmitic acid and thus supported the hypothesis that the carrier system is of the active transport variety and is coupled to a Na⁺K⁺ ATPase pump. PMID:19295867

  16. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  17. 1/f fluctuations of amino acids regulate water transportation in aquaporin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), which transport water molecules across cell membranes, are involved in many physiological processes. Recently, it is reported that the water-water interactions within the channel are broken at the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter (ar/R region), which prevents proton transportation [U. K. Eriksson et al., Science 340, 1346 (2013), 10.1126/science.1234306]. However, the effects of the conformational fluctuations of amino acids on water transportation remain unclear. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze water transportation and fluctuations of amino acids within AQP1. The amino acids exhibit 1/f fluctuations, indicating possession of long-term memory. Moreover, we find that water molecules crossing the ar/R region obey a non-Poisson process. To investigate the effect of 1/f fluctuations on water transportation, we perform restrained molecular dynamics simulations of AQP1 and simple Langevin stochastic simulations. As a result, we confirm that 1/f fluctuations of amino acids contribute to water transportation in AQP1. These findings appreciably enhance our understanding of AQPs and suggest possibilities for developing biomimetic nanopores.

  18. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  19. ATP-dependent transport of bile acid intermediates across rat liver peroxisomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Une, Mizuho; Iguchi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Tomoko; Tomita, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2003-08-01

    The bile acid intermediate 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) is converted to cholic acid exclusively in peroxisomes by the oxidative cleavage of the side chain. To investigate the mechanism by which the biosynthetic intermediates of bile acids are transported into peroxisomes, we incubated THCA or its CoA ester (THC-CoA) with isolated intact rat liver peroxisomes and analyzed their oxidation products, cholic acid and 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoic acid. The oxidation of both THCA and THC-CoA was dependent on incubation time and peroxisomal proteins, and was stimulated by ATP. THC-CoA was efficiently oxidized to cholic acid and 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoic acid as compared with THCA, suggesting that THC-CoA is the preferred substrate for transport into peroxisomes. The oxidation of THC-CoA was significantly inhibited by sodium azide, verapamile, and N-ethylmaleimide. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of ATP on the oxidation was not replaced by GTP or AMP. In addition, the ATP-dependent oxidation of THC-CoA was markedly inhibited by pretreatment of peroxisomes with proteinase K when peroxisomal matrix proteins were not degraded. These results suggest that an ATP-dependent transport system for THC-CoA exists on peroxisomal membranes.

  20. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  1. Density functional theory study of the oligomerization of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Devis; Watson, Ken L

    2014-11-20

    We present a density functional theory [M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p)] study of the structures and free energies of formation of oligomers of four carboxylic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, tetrolic acid, and benzoic acid) in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride. Solvation effects were treated using the SMD continuum solvation model. The low-lying energy structures of molecular complexes were located by adopting an efficient search procedure to probe the potential energy surfaces of the oligomers of carboxylic acids (CA)n (n = 2-6). The free energies of the isomers of (CA)n in solution were determined as the sum of the electronic energy, vibrational-rotational-translational gas-phase contribution, and solvation free energy. The assessment of the computational protocol adopted in this study with respect to the dimerization of acetic acid, (AA)2, and formic acid, (FA)2, located new isomers of (AA)2 and (FA)2 and gave dimerization constants in good agreement with the experimental values. The calculation of the self-association of acetic acid, tetrolic acid, and benzoic acid shows the following: (i) Classic carboxylic dimers are the most stable isomer of (CA)2 in both the gas phase and solution. (ii) Trimers of carboxylic acid are stable in apolar aprotic solvents. (iii) Molecular clusters consisting of two interacting classic carboxylic dimers (CA)4,(D+D) are the most stable type of tetramers, but their formation from the self-association of classic carboxylic dimers is highly unfavorable. (iv) For acetic acid and tetrolic acid the reactions (CA)2 + 2CA → (CA)4,(D+D) and (CA)3 + CA → (CA)4,(D+D) are exoergonic, but these aggregation pathways go through unstable clusters that could hinder the formation of tetrameric species. (v) For tetrolic acid the prenucleation species that are more likely to form in solution are dimeric and trimeric structures that have encoded structural motifs resembling the α and β solid forms of tetrolic acid. (vi) Stable tetramers of

  2. Pep7p provides a novel protein that functions in vesicle-mediated transport between the yeast Golgi and endosome.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, G C; Zhang, J; Garlow, S J; Wesp, A; Riezman, H; Jones, E W

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae pep7 mutants are defective in transport of soluble vacuolar hydrolases to the lysosome-like vacuole. PEP7 is a nonessential gene that encodes a hydrophilic protein of 515 amino acids. A cysteine-rich tripartite motif in the N-terminal half of the polypeptide shows striking similarity to sequences found in many other eukaryotic proteins. Several of these proteins are thought to function in the vacuolar/lysosomal pathway. Mutations that change highly conserved cysteine residues in this motif lead to a loss of Pep7p function. Kinetic studies demonstrate that Pep7p function is required for the transport of the Golgi-precursors of the soluble hydrolases carboxypeptidase Y, proteinase A, and proteinase B to the endosome. Integral membrane hydrolase alkaline phosphatase is transported to the vacuole by a parallel intracellular pathway that does not require Pep7p function. pep7 mutants accumulate a 40-60-nm vesicle population, suggesting that Pep7p functions in a vesicle consumption step in vesicle-mediated transport of soluble hydrolases to the endosome. Whereas pep7 mutants demonstrate no defects in endocytic uptake at the plasma membrane, the mutants demonstrate defects in transport of receptor-mediated macromolecules through the endocytic pathway. Localization studies indicate that Pep7p is found both as a soluble cytoplasmic protein and associated with particulate fractions. We conclude that Pep7p functions as a novel regulator of vesicle docking and/or fusion at the endosome. Images PMID:9168472

  3. Bibliography for acid-rock drainage and selected acid-mine drainage issues related to acid-rock drainage from transportation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-rock drainage occurs through the interaction of rainfall on pyrite-bearing formations. When pyrite (FeS2) is exposed to oxygen and water in mine workings or roadcuts, the mineral decomposes and sulfur may react to form sulfuric acid, which often results in environmental problems and potential damage to the transportation infrastructure. The accelerated oxidation of pyrite and other sulfidic minerals generates low pH water with potentially high concentrations of trace metals. Much attention has been given to contamination arising from acid mine drainage, but studies related to acid-rock drainage from road construction are relatively limited. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling acid-rock drainage and contaminant transport from roadcuts in Tennessee. The basic components of acid-rock drainage resulting from transportation activities are described and a bibliography, organized by relevant categories (remediation, geochemical, microbial, biological impact, and secondary mineralization) is presented.

  4. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  5. Functional genomics analysis of free fatty acid production under continuous phosphate limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Korosh, Travis C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-10-13

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are an attractive platform chemical that serves as a functional intermediate in metabolic pathways for producing oleochemicals. Many groups have established strains of Escherichia coli capable of producing various chain-length mixtures of FFA by heterologous expression of acyl-ACP thioesterases. For example, high levels of dodecanoic acid are produced by an E. coli strain expressing the Umbellularia californica FatB2 thioesterase, BTE. Prior studies achieved high dodecanoic acid yields and productivities under phosphate-limiting media conditions. In an effort to understand the metabolic and physiological changes that led to increased FFA production, the transcriptome of this strain was assessed as a function of nutrient limitation and growth rate. FFA generation under phosphate limitation led to consistent changes in transporter expression, osmoregulation, and central metabolism. Guided by these results, targeted knockouts led to a further ~11 % in yield in FFA.

  6. Expression, Purification, and Structural Insights for the Human Uric Acid Transporter, GLUT9, Using the Xenopus laevis Oocytes System

    PubMed Central

    Clémençon, Benjamin; Lüscher, Benjamin P.; Fine, Michael; Baumann, Marc U.; Surbek, Daniel V.; Bonny, Olivier; Hediger, Matthias A.

    2014-01-01

    The urate transporter, GLUT9, is responsible for the basolateral transport of urate in the proximal tubule of human kidneys and in the placenta, playing a central role in uric acid homeostasis. GLUT9 shares the least homology with other members of the glucose transporter family, especially with the glucose transporting members GLUT1-4 and is the only member of the GLUT family to transport urate. The recently published high-resolution structure of XylE, a bacterial D-xylose transporting homologue, yields new insights into the structural foundation of this GLUT family of proteins. While this represents a huge milestone, it is unclear if human GLUT9 can benefit from this advancement through subsequent structural based targeting and mutagenesis. Little progress has been made toward understanding the mechanism of GLUT9 since its discovery in 2000. Before work can begin on resolving the mechanisms of urate transport we must determine methods to express, purify and analyze hGLUT9 using a model system adept in expressing human membrane proteins. Here, we describe the surface expression, purification and isolation of monomeric protein, and functional analysis of recombinant hGLUT9 using the Xenopus laevis oocyte system. In addition, we generated a new homology-based high-resolution model of hGLUT9 from the XylE crystal structure and utilized our purified protein to generate a low-resolution single particle reconstruction. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the functional protein extracted from the Xenopus system fits well with the homology-based model allowing us to generate the predicted urate-binding pocket and pave a path for subsequent mutagenesis and structure-function studies. PMID:25286413

  7. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25582294

  8. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Pasqualini, Renata; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  9. Overexpression of the Aspergillus niger GatA transporter leads to preferential use of D-galacturonic acid over D-xylose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pectin is a structural heteropolysaccharide of the primary cell walls of plants and as such is a significant fraction of agricultural waste residues that is currently insufficiently used. Its main component, D-galacturonic acid, is an attractive substrate for bioconversion. The complete metabolic pathway is present in the genome of Aspergillus niger, that is used in this study. The objective was to identify the D-galacturonic acid transporter in A. niger and to use this transporter to study D-galacturonic acid metabolism. We have functionally characterized the gene An14g04280 that encodes the D-galacturonic acid transporter in A. niger. In a mixed sugar fermentation it was found that the An14g04280 overexpression strain, in contrast to the parent control strain, has a preference for D-galacturonic acid over D-xylose as substrate. Overexpression of this transporter in A. niger resulted in a strong increase of D-galacturonic acid uptake and induction of the D-galacturonic acid reductase activity, suggesting a metabolite controlled regulation of the endogenous D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway. PMID:25177540

  10. Regulation of beta-galactoside transport and accumulation in heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H; Brino, G; Peterkofsky, A; Reizer, J

    1987-01-01

    Galactose-grown cells of the heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus buchneri transported methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (TMG) by an active transport mechanism and accumulated intracellular free TMG when provided with an exogenous source of energy, such as arginine. The intracellular concentration of TMG resultant under these conditions was approximately 20-fold higher than that in the medium. In contrast, the provision of energy by metabolism of glucose, gluconate, or glucosamine promoted a rapid but transient uptake of TMG followed by efflux that established a low cellular concentration of the galactoside, i.e., only two- to fourfold higher than that in the medium. Furthermore, the addition of glucose to cells preloaded with TMG in the presence of arginine elicited a rapid efflux of the intracellular galactoside. The extent of cellular TMG displacement and the duration of the transient effect of glucose on TMG transport were related to the initial concentration of glucose in the medium. Exhaustion of glucose from the medium restored uptake and accumulation of TMG, providing arginine was available for ATP generation. The nonmetabolizable sugar 2-deoxyglucose elicited efflux of TMG from preloaded cells of L. buchneri but not from those of L. brevis. Phosphorylation of this glucose analog was catalyzed by cell extracts of L. buchneri but not by those of L. brevis. Iodoacetate, at a concentration that inhibits growth and ATP production from glucose, did not prevent efflux of cellular TMG elicited by glucose. The results suggested that a phosphorylated metabolite(s) at or above the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate was required to evoke displacement of intracellular TMG from the cells. Counterflow experiments suggested that glucose converted the active uptake of TMG in L. brevis to a facilitated diffusion mechanism that allowed equilibrium of TMG between the extra- and intracellular milieux. The means by which glucose

  11. Cholesterol reduces the effects of dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids on water and solute transport in the human jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Broor, S L; Slota, T; Ammon, H V

    1980-01-01

    Jejunal perfusion studies were performed in 16 healthy volunteers to test the hypothesis that intraluminal cholesterol can mitigate the fluid secretion induced by dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids. Fluid secretion in the presence of 5 mM taurodeoxycholate was somewhat reduced by 4 mM mono-olein which was used for the solubilization of cholesterol. Addition of 0.8 mM cholesterol reduced fluid secretion further (P less than 0.05). Fluid secretion induced by 4 mM oleic acid was changed to net absorption in a linear fashion with increasing cholesterol concentration in the perfusion solutions. 1 mM cholesterol reduced fluid secretion induced by 6 mM oleic acid (P less than 0.005), but had no effect on fluid secretion induced by 6 mM linolenic acid. Glucose absorption was generally affected in a similar manner as water transport. In vitro, 1 mM cholesterol reduced monomer activity of 6 mM oleic acid to 72.3 +/- 0.9% of control and that of linolenic acid to 81.1 +/- 1.7% of control. Although statistically significant (P less than 0.001), the difference in the effects of cholesterol on monomer activities of the two fatty acids was rather small and it is unlikely that changes in monomer concentration of fatty acids and bile acids account for the protective effect of cholesterol. The in vivo observations point to a new physiological role for biliary cholesterol: the modification of the response of the small intestine to the effects of dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids. PMID:7358850

  12. Expression of the SNAT2 amino acid transporter during the development of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Angelina; Angelina, Rodríguez; Berumen, Laura C; Francisco, Zafra; Giménez, Cecilio; Cecilio, Giménez; García-Alcocer, María Guadalupe; Guadalupe, García-Alcocer María

    2011-11-01

    The sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) is a protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian tissues and that displays Na(+), voltage and pH dependent activity. This transporter mediates the passage of small zwitterionic amino acids across the cell membrane and regulates the cell homeostasis and its volume. We have examined the expression of SNAT2 mRNA and protein during the development of the rat cerebral cortex, from gestation through the postnatal stages to adulthood. Our data reveal that SNAT2 mRNA and protein expression is higher during embryogenesis, while it subsequently diminishes during postnatal development. Moreover, during embryonic period SNAT2 colocalizes with the radial glial cells marker GLAST, while in postnatal period it is mainly detected in neuronal dendrites. These findings suggest a relevant role for amino acid transport through SNAT2 in the developing embryonic brain.

  13. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-01-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  14. Influence of stearic acid on postprandial lipemia and hemostatic function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas A B; Berry, Sarah E E

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested that fats rich in stearic acid may result in exaggerated postprandial lipemia and have adverse effects on hemostatic function. The effects of test meals containing different saturated and monounsaturated FA were compared in healthy subjects in a series of studies to investigate this hypothesis. Stearic acid, when present as cocoa butter, resulted in similar postprandial lipemia and factor VII activation compared with a meal containing high-oleic sunflower oil. Stearic acid when presented as shea butter or as randomized stearate-rich TAG resulted in decreased postprandial lipemia and decreased postprandial activation of factor VII. Stearic acid-rich test meals did not result in impaired fibrinolytic activity compared with either a low-fat meal or a meal high in oleate. The difference in responses between the different stearic acid-rich fats appears to be due to varying solid fat contents of the fats at 37 degrees C.

  15. Further evaluation of the interrelationship between the hepatocellular transport of bile acids and endocytosed proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, M. C.; el-Mir, M. Y.; Monte, M. J.; Perez-Barriocanal, F.; Marin, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on the relationship between the hepatocellular transport of endogenous or exogenously loaded bile acids (sodium taurocholate, TC, 0.5 mumol/min/100 g body wt) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or immunoglobulin A (IgA) (0.5 mg/100 g body wt) were carried out on anaesthetized Wistar rats. The time course of HRP excretion into bile (acceleration in the secretory peak), but not the total amount of HRP output, was affected by TC infusion. Administration of HRP was found to have no stimulatory effect on either spontaneous or TC-induced bile flow, bile acid, lecithin or cholesterol output. Spontaneous bile acid output was increased (25 and 67%, respectively) in rats that were treated for 12-h fasting or by oral administration of TC (45 mg/100 g body wt, every 12 h, for 2 days). These manoeuvres did not change the inability of HRP and IgA to increase bile acid output. Exogenous TC load had no stimulatory effect on the hepatocellular transport of endogenous bile acid pool, that was labelled by a combination of fasting and oral administration of 14C-glycocholic acid 12 h before the experiments. Therefore, exogenous bile acid load-induced stimulation of transcytosis had no effect on endogenous bile acid output. Moreover, bile secretion of both endogenous and exogenously loaded bile acids is unaffected by the administration of proteins, irrespective of whether they are endocytosed by a receptor or nonreceptor mediated process. PMID:1571280

  16. Glucose-Sensitive Hydrogel Optical Fibers Functionalized with Phenylboronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Jiang, Nan; Fallahi, Afsoon; Montelongo, Yunuen; Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U; Tamayol, Ali; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Mahmood, Iram; Yang, Su-A; Kim, Ki Su; Butt, Haider; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-02-13

    Hydrogel optical fibers are utilized for continuous glucose sensing in real time. The hydrogel fibers consist of poly(acrylamide-co-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate) cores functionalized with phenylboronic acid. The complexation of the phenylboronic acid and cis-diol groups of glucose enables reversible changes of the hydrogel fiber diameter. The analyses of light propagation loss allow for quantitative glucose measurements within the physiological range.

  17. Auxin Activity of Substituted Benzoic Acids and Their Effect on Polar Auxin Transport 1

    PubMed Central

    Keitt, George W.; Baker, Robert A.

    1966-01-01

    Six dichloro-, 3 trichloro-, 2 triiodo-, and 3 heterosubstituted benzoic acids (amiben, dinoben, dicamba), and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid have been tested for effects on growth and on polar auxin transport. Growth activity with and without kinetin was measured by effects on fresh and dry weights of 30-day cultures of fresh tobacco pith. Transport inhibition was measured by following uptake and output of IAA-2-14C through 10 mm bean epicotyl sections. The distribution of callus growth on vascularized tobacco stem segments was also observed. Avena first internode extension assays established the relative activities: dicamba > amiben > dinoben suggested by pith growth results. Growth effects of active compounds were similar with and without kinetin, except that amiben was less active with kinetin, while 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid was more active with kinetin than alone. The weak auxin activity of NPA was confirmed. Transport experiments showed that NPA was the most inhibitory compound tested, followed by TIBA. Other compounds tested were at least 300 times less inhibitory to IAA transport. The best growth promoters were the least inhibitory to transport, and the most effective transport inhibitors were at best poor auxins. It is suggested that the weak auxin and auxin synergistic activity of TIBA (and perhaps 2,3-dichlorobenzoic acid) in extension growth tests arises from its inhibition of transport of endogenous or added auxin out of the sections, rather than from its intrinsic auxin activity. Chemically induced apolar callus growth on vascularized tobacco stem explants can arise from inhibition of native auxin transport, apolar growth stimulation by auxinic action of the test compound, or both. PMID:16656441

  18. Proximal renal tubular acidosis mediated by mutations in NBCe1-A: unraveling the transporter's structure-functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Ira; Zhu, Quansheng

    2013-01-01

    NBCe1 belongs to the SLC4 family of base transporting membrane proteins that plays a significant role in renal, extrarenal, and systemic acid-base homeostasis. Recent progress has been made in characterizing the structure-function properties of NBCe1 (encoded by the SLC4A4 gene), and those factors that regulate its function. In the kidney, the NBCe1-A variant that is expressed on the basolateral membrane of proximal tubule is the key transporter responsible for overall transepithelial bicarbonate absorption in this nephron segment. NBCe1 mutations impair transepithelial bicarbonate absorption causing the syndrome of proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA). Studies of naturally occurring NBCe1 mutant proteins in heterologous expression systems have been very helpful in elucidation the structure-functional properties of the transporter. NBCe1 mutations are now known to cause pRTA by various mechanisms including the alteration of the transporter function (substrate ion interaction, electrogenicity), abnormal processing to the plasma membrane, and a perturbation in its structural properties. The elucidation of how NBCe1 mutations cause pRTA in addition to the recent studies which have provided further insight into the topology of the transporter have played an important role in uncovering its critically important structural-function properties. PMID:24391589

  19. Salicylic Acid Is an Uncoupler and Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Electron Transport1

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Christel; Howell, Katharine A.; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James M.; Day, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of salicylic acid (SA) on respiration and mitochondrial function was examined in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension cell cultures in the range of 0.01 to 5 mm. Cells rapidly accumulated SA up to 10-fold of the externally applied concentrations. At the lower concentrations, SA accumulation was transitory. When applied at 0.1 mm or less, SA stimulated respiration of whole cells and isolated mitochondria in the absence of added ADP, indicating uncoupling of respiration. However, at higher concentrations, respiration was severely inhibited. Measurements of ubiquinone redox poise in isolated mitochondria suggested that SA blocked electron flow from the substrate dehydrogenases to the ubiquinone pool. This inhibition could be at least partially reversed by re-isolating the mitochondria. Two active analogs of SA, benzoic acid and acetyl-SA, had the same effect as SA on isolated tobacco mitochondria, whereas the inactive p-hydroxybenzoic acid was without effect at the same concentration. SA induced an increase in Aox protein levels in cell suspensions, and this was correlated with an increase in Aox1 transcript abundance. However, when applied at 0.1 mm, this induction was transient and disappeared as SA levels in the cells declined. SA at 0.1 mm also increased the expression of other SA-responsive genes, and this induction was dependent on active mitochondria. The results indicate that SA is both an uncoupler and an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport and suggest that this underlies the induction of some genes by SA. The possible implications of this for the interpretation of SA action in plants are discussed. PMID:14684840

  20. Esterification of fatty acid catalyzed by hydrothermally stable propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Mar, Win Win; Somsook, Ekasith

    2013-01-01

    Propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been synthesized via one-step strategy at 130°C based on the co-condensation of TEOS and MPTMS in the presence of Pluronic 123 polymer and H₂O₂ in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized solid exhibited hydrothermal stability in boiling water without significant change in textural properties. The catalytic performance of the synthesized solid was studied in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol. The experimental results revealed that the large mesopore structures of SBA-15-PrSO₃H solid synthesized at 130°C could favor a facile access of oleic acid to the acid sites, making the comparable activity to that of phenyl ethyl sulfonic acid functionalized silica and higher than that of dry amberlyst-15.

  1. New Functions and Potential Applications of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Uneyama, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Tonouchi, Naoto

    2016-11-22

    Currently, several types of amino acids are being produced and used worldwide. Nevertheless, several new functions of amino acids have been recently discovered that could result in other applications. For example, oral stimulation by glutamate triggers the cephalic phase response to prepare for food digestion. Further, the stomach and intestines have specific glutamate-recognizing systems in their epithelial mucosa. Regarding clinical applications, addition of monosodium glutamate to the medicinal diet has been shown to markedly enhance gastric secretion in a vagus-dependent manner. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are the major components of muscles, and ingestion of BCAAs has been found to be effective for decreasing muscle pain. BCAAs are expected to be a solution for the serious issue of aging. Further, ingestion of specific amino acids could be beneficial. Glycine can be ingested for good night's sleep: glycine ingestion before bedtime significantly improved subjective sleep quality. Ingestion of alanine and glutamine effectively accelerates alcohol metabolism, and ingestion of cystine and theanine effectively prevents colds. Finally, amino acids could be used in a novel clinical diagnostic method: the balance of amino acids in the blood could be an indicator of the risk of diseases such as cancer. These newly discovered functions of amino acids are expected to contribute to the resolution of various issues.

  2. Biological functions of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Thelin, Martin A; Bartolini, Barbara; Axelsson, Jakob; Gustafsson, Renata; Tykesson, Emil; Pera, Edgar; Oldberg, Åke; Maccarana, Marco; Malmstrom, Anders

    2013-05-01

    The presence of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate changes the properties of the polysaccharides because it generates a more flexible chain with increased binding potentials. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate influences multiple cellular properties, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and the regulation of cytokine/growth factor activities. Under pathological conditions such as wound healing, inflammation and cancer, iduronic acid has diverse regulatory functions. Iduronic acid is formed by two epimerases (i.e. dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 and 2) that have different tissue distribution and properties. The role of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate is highlighted by the vast changes in connective tissue features in patients with a new type of Ehler-Danlos syndrome: adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome. Future research aims to understand the roles of the two epimerases and their interplay with the sulfotransferases involved in chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Furthermore, a better definition of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate functions using different knockout models is needed. In this review, we focus on the two enzymes responsible for iduronic acid formation, as well as the role of iduronic acid in health and disease.

  3. Tuning transport selectivity of ionic species by phosphoric acid gradient in positively charged nanochannel membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Fan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xizhen; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin

    2015-02-03

    The transport of ionic species through a nanochannel plays important roles in fundamental research and practical applications of the nanofluidic device. Here, we demonstrated that ionic transport selectivity of a positively charged nanochannel membrane can be tuned under a phosphoric acid gradient. When phosphoric acid solution and analyte solution were connected by the positively charged nanochannel membrane, the faster-moving analyte through the positively charged nanochannel membrane was the positively charged dye (methylviologen, MV(2+)) instead of the negatively charged dye (1,5-naphthalene disulfonate, NDS(2-)). In other words, a reversed ion selectivity of the nanochannel membranes can be found. It can be explained as a result of the combination of diffusion, induced electroosmosis, and induced electrophoresis. In addition, the influencing factors of transport selectivity, including concentration of phosphoric acid, penetration time, and volume of feed solution, were also investigated. The results showed that the transport selectivity can further be tuned by adjusting these factors. As a method of tuning ionic transport selectivity by establishing phosphoric acid gradient, it will be conducive to improving the separation of ionic species.

  4. Reactive iron transport in an acidic mountain stream in Summit County, Colorado: A hydrologic perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    A pH perturbation experiment was conducted in an acidic, metal-enriched, mountain stream to identify relative rates of chemical and hydrologic processes as they influence iron transport. During the experiment the pH was lowered from 4.2 to 3.2 for three hours by injection of sulfuric acid. Amorphous iron oxides are abundant on the streambed, and dissolution and photoreduction reactions resulted in a rapid increase in the dissolved iron concentration. The increase occurred simultaneously with the decrease in pH. Ferrous iron was the major aqueous iron species. The changes in the iron concentration during the experiment indicate that variation exists in the solubility properties of the hydrous iron oxides on the streambed with dissolution of at least two compartments of hydrous iron oxides contributing to the iron pulse. Spatial variations of the hydrologic properties along the stream were quantified by simulating the transport of a coinjected tracer, lithium. A simulation of iron transport, as a conservative solute, indicated that hydrologie transport had a significant role in determining downstream changes in the iron pulse. The rapidity of the changes in iron concentration indicates that a model based on dynamic equilibrium may be adequate for simulating iron transport in acid streams. A major challenge for predictive solute transport models of geochemical processes may be due to substantial spatial and seasonal variations in chemical properties of the reactive hydrous oxides in such streams, and in the physical and hydrologic properties of the stream. ?? 1989.

  5. Salicylic acid transport in Ricinus communis involves a pH-dependent carrier system in addition to diffusion.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Françoise; Chollet, Jean-François; Legros, Sandrine; Jousse, Cyril; Lemoine, Rémi; Faucher, Mireille; Bush, Daniel R; Bonnemain, Jean-Louis

    2009-08-01

    Despite its important functions in plant physiology and defense, the membrane transport mechanism of salicylic acid (SA) is poorly documented due to the general assumption that SA is taken up by plant cells via the ion trap mechanism. Using Ricinus communis seedlings and modeling tools (ACD LogD and Vega ZZ softwares), we show that phloem accumulation of SA and hydroxylated analogs is completely uncorrelated with the physicochemical parameters suitable for diffusion (number of hydrogen bond donors, polar surface area, and, especially, LogD values at apoplastic pHs and Delta LogD between apoplast and phloem sap pH values). These and other data (such as accumulation in phloem sap of the poorly permeant dissociated form of monohalogen derivatives from apoplast and inhibition of SA transport by the thiol reagent p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid [pCMBS]) lead to the following conclusions. As in intestinal cells, SA transport in Ricinus involves a pH-dependent carrier system sensitive to pCMBS; this carrier can translocate monohalogen analogs in the anionic form; the efficiency of phloem transport of hydroxylated benzoic acid derivatives is tightly dependent on the position of the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring (SA corresponds to the optimal position) but moderately affected by halogen addition in position 5, which is known to increase plant defense. Furthermore, combining time-course experiments and pCMBS used as a tool, we give information about the localization of the SA carrier. SA uptake by epidermal cells (i.e. the step preceding the symplastic transport to veins) insensitive to pCMBS occurs via the ion-trap mechanism, whereas apoplastic vein loading involves a carrier-mediated mechanism (which is targeted by pCMBS) in addition to diffusion.

  6. Anacardic Acid, Salicylic Acid, and Oleic Acid Differentially Alter Cellular Bioenergetic Function in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Price, Stephanie M; Schultz, David J; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-11-01

    Anacardic acid is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical that inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Since mitochondrial-targeted anticancer therapy (mitocans) may be useful in breast cancer, we examined the effect of anacardic acid on cellular bioenergetics and OXPHOS pathway proteins in breast cancer cells modeling progression to endocrine-independence: MCF-7 estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ endocrine-sensitive; LCC9 and LY2 ERα+, endocrine-resistant, and MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. At concentrations similar to cell proliferation IC50 s, anacardic acid reduced ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate (OCR), mitochondrial reserve capacity, and coupling efficiency while increasing proton leak, reflecting mitochondrial toxicity which was greater in MCF-7 compared to endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells. These results suggest tolerance in endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells to mitochondrial stress induced by anacardic acid. Since anacardic acid is an alkylated 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, the effects of salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety) and oleic acid (OA, monounsaturated alkyl moiety) were tested. SA inhibited whereas OA stimulated cell viability. In contrast to stimulation of basal OCR by anacardic acid (uncoupling effect), neither SA nor OA altered basal OCR- except OA inhibited basal and ATP-linked OCR, and increased ECAR, in MDA-MB-231 cells. Changes in OXPHOS proteins correlated with changes in OCR. Overall, neither the 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety nor the monounsaturated alky moiety of anacardic acid is solely responsible for the observed mitochondria-targeted anticancer activity in breast cancer cells and hence both moieties are required in the same molecule for the observed effects. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2521-2532, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  8. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the amino acid transporter superfamily in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Haoli; Cao, Xiaoli; Shi, Shandang; Li, Silu; Gao, Junpeng; Ma, Yuling; Zhao, Qin; Chen, Qin

    2016-10-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are integral membrane proteins responsible for the transmembrane transport of amino acids and play important roles in various physiological processes of plants. However, there has not yet been a genome-wide overview of the StAAT gene family to date and only StAAP1 has been previously studied in potato. In this paper, a total of 72 StAATs were identified using a series of bioinformatics searches and classified into 12 subfamilies based on their phylogenetic relationship with known Arabidopsis and rice AATs. Chromosomal localization revealed their distribution on all 12 chromosomes. Nearly one-third of StAAT genes (23 of 72) were derived from gene duplication, among which tandem duplication made the greatest contribution to the expansion of the StAAT family. Motif analysis showed that the same subfamily had similar conserved motifs in both numbers and varieties. Moreover, high-throughput sequencing data was used to analyze the expression patterns of StAAT genes and was verified by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The expression of StAAT genes exhibited both abundant and tissue-specific expression patterns, which might be connected to their functional roles in long- and short-distance transport. This study provided a comprehensive survey of the StAAT gene family, and could serve as a theoretical foundation for the further functional identification and utilization of family members.

  9. Alpha-aminoisobutyric acid transport into human glia and glioma cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Ronquist, G; Agren, G; Ponten, J; Westermark, B

    1976-11-01

    The AIB transport into human glia and glioma cells in culture has been studied. Because of the high affinity of AIB to the plastic culture dishes, a special washing technique had to be developed. With this technique, it was possible to perform transport experiments in a single plate containing about one million cells. The cells were viable, intact and adhered to the supporting medium throughout the experiment. The AIB transport into both types of cells was Na+-dependent and showed saturation kinetics when the small component of the transport due to diffusion had been subtracted. The AIB transport capacity of neoplastic glioma cells was 3.6 times higher than that of glia cells. This difference was related to the Vmax-values for the two types of cells. The apparent Km-values were the same. Inhibition experiments with other amino acids support the view that AIB is transported via System A in both glia and glioma cells. Sulfhydryl reagents (ethacrynic acid and NEM) and cytochalasin B clearly inhibited the AIB transport into glia cells whereas the effect on glioma cells was minimal.

  10. Acid-sensing ion channels in gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  11. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH < pK). Steady states were achieved with different extracellular levels of fumaric acid, obtained by adding different amounts of fumaric acid to the feed medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed.

  12. Regulation of amino acid transport in isolated rat hepatocytes during development

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Spagnuolo, S.; Dini, L.; Devirgiliis, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of amino acid depletion or supplementation and the effect of glucagon and insulin on the amino acid transport mediated by system A were investigated by determining the uptake of either 2-amino (1-/sup 14/C)isobutyric acid (AIB) or N-methyl 2-amino (1-/sup 14/C)isobutyric acid (MeAIB) in rat hepatocytes, freshly isolated at different stages of pre- and postnatal development. The data obtained show that the Na/sup +/ -dependent uptake was higher at the earliest developmental stages, and steadily decreased until the adult level. The hormones increased AIB and MeAIB uptake enhancing the V/sub max/, while the K/sub m/ was unchanged. This effect was evident in cells from adult and 18-20-day-old fetuses, while no response was present before the 18th day of fetal life and in the prenatal period. Actinomycin D or cycloheximide abolished this hormone-dependent increase. A decrease in AIB and MeAIB transport after incubation in an amino acid-rich medium was demonstrated at all ages tested, but was particularly evident in the prenatal life. The increase in the activity of the system following amino acid starvation was shown to be mostly dependent from de novo protein synthesis in the fetal life; on the contrary in the adult the increase appeared to be more linked to the release from transinhibition of the transport.

  13. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Melton, Elaina M; Cerny, Ronald L; DiRusso, Concetta C; Black, Paul N

    2013-11-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  14. Overexpression of Human Fatty Acid Transport Protein 2/Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) Reveals Distinct Patterns of Trafficking of Exogenous Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4hr. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  15. Organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1a4 (Oatp1a4) is important for secondary bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L.; Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATPs; rodent: Oatps) were thought to have important functions in bile acid (BA) transport. Oatp1a1, 1a4, and 1b2 are the three major Oatp1 family members in rodent liver. Our previous studies have characterized the BA homeostasis in Oatp1a1-null and Oatp1b2-null mice. The present study investigated the physiological role of Oatp1a4 in BA homeostasis by using Oatp1a4-null mice. Oatp1a4 expression is female-predominant in livers of mice, and thereby it was expected that female Oatp1a4-null mice will have more prominent changes than males. Interestingly, the present study demonstrated that female Oatp1a4-null mice had no significant alterations in BA concentrations in serum or liver, though they had increased mRNA of hepatic BA efflux transporters (Mrp4 and Ostα/β) and ileal BA transporters (Asbt and Ostα/β). In contrast, male Oatp1a4-null mice showed significantly altered BA homeostasis, including increased concentrations of deoxycholic acid (DCA) in serum, liver and intestinal contents. After feeding a DCA-supplemented diet, male but not female Oatp1a4-null mice had higher concentrations of DCA in serum and livers than their WT controls. This suggested that Oatp1a4 is important for intestinal absorption of secondary BAs in male mice. Furthermore, loss of Oatp1a4 function did not decrease BA accumulation in serum or livers of bile-ductligated mice, suggesting that Oatp1a4 is not likely a BA uptake transporter. In summary, the present study for the first time demonstrates that Oatp1a4 does not appear to mediate the hepatic uptake of BAs, but plays an important male-predominant role in secondary BA metabolism in mice. PMID:23747753

  16. Identification of a Disulfide Bridge in Sodium-Coupled Neutral Amino Acid Transporter 2(SNAT2) by Chemical Modification

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ruiping; Yuan, Yanmeng; Guo, Zhanyun; Grewer, Christof; Zhang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) belongs to solute carrier 38 (SLC38) family of transporters, which is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and mediates transport of small, neutral amino acids, exemplified by alanine(Ala, A). Yet structural data on SNAT2, including the relevance of intrinsic cysteine residues on structure and function, is scarce, in spite of its essential roles in many tissues. To better define the potential of intrinsic cysteines to form disulfide bonds in SNAT2, mutagenesis experiments and thiol-specific chemical modifications by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and methoxy-polyethylene glycol maleimide (mPEG-Mal, MW 5000) were performed, with or without the reducing regent dithiothreitol (DTT) treatment. Seven single mutant transporters with various cysteine (Cys, C) to alanine (Ala, A) substitutions, and a C245,279A double mutant were introduced to SNAT2 with a hemagglutinin (HA) tag at the C-terminus. The results showed that the cells expressing C245A or C279A were labeled by one equivalent of mPEG-Mal in the presence of DTT, while wild-type or all the other single Cys to Ala mutants were modified by two equivalents of mPEG-Mal. Furthermore, the molecular weight of C245,279A was not changed in the presence or absence of DTT treatment. The results suggest a disulfide bond between Cys245 and Cys279 in SNAT2 which has no effect on cell surface trafficking, as well as transporter function. The proposed disulfide bond may be important to delineate proximity in the extracellular domain of SNAT2 and related proteins. PMID:27355203

  17. Functional amino acids in fish nutrition, health and welfare.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Waagbø, Rune; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Protein is the most expensive part of fish diets and supplies amino acids (AA) for energy, growth, protein synthesis and as substrates for key metabolic pathways. Functional AA is a term used to describe AA that are involved in cellular processes apart from protein synthesis. A deficiency, or imbalance, in functional AA may impair body metabolism and homeostasis. Recent years have seen an increased interest in AA to increase disease resistance, immune response, reproduction, behavior and more. This has led to a boost of commercially available functional fish feeds that aim to optimize fish performance and quality of the product. This review aim to collect recent findings of functional AA and of how they may improve fish health and welfare. It will focus on functional properties of some of the most studied AA, namely arginine, glutamine, glutamate, tryptophan, sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine and taurine), histidine and branched chain amino acids. Where information is not available in fish, we will point towards functions known in animals and humans, with possible translational functions to fish.

  18. An SLC6 transporter of the novel B0,− system aids in absorption and detection of nutrient amino acids in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Ryan; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Fox, Jeffrey; Kim, Hongkyun; Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Nutrient amino acid transporters (NATs) of solute carrier family 6 (SLC6) mediate uptake of essential amino acids in mammals and insects. Phylogenomic analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) SLC6 family identifies five genes paralogous to an insect-specific NAT subfamily. Here we cloned and characterized the first representative of the identified nematode-specific transporters, SNF-5. SNF-5 mediates broad spectrum cation-coupled transport of neutral amino acids with submillimolar affinities and stoichiometry of 1 AA:1 Na+, except for 1 l-Pro:2 Na+. Unexpectedly, it transports acidic l-Glu− and l-Asp− (1 AA−:3 Na+), revealing it to be the first member of a new B0,− system among characterized SLC6 transporters. This activity correlates with a unique positively charged His+ 377 in the substrate-binding pocket. snf-5 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescent protein labels intestinal cells INT1-9 and three pairs of amphid sensory neurons: ASI, ADF and ASK. These cells are intimately involved in control of dauer diapause, development, metabolism and longevity. The snf-5 deletion mutants do not show apparent morphological disorders, but increase dauer formation while reducing dauer maintenance upon starvation. Overall, the present study characterized the first nematode-specific NAT and revealed important structural and functional aspects of this transporter. In addition to the predictable role in alimentary amino acid absorption, our results indicate possible neuronal roles of SNF-5 as an amino acid provider to specific neuronal functions, including sensing of amino acid availability. PMID:23580723

  19. Hepatic alterations are accompanied by changes to bile acid transporter-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinov, Damir; DeMorrow, Sharon; McMillin, Matthew; Kain, Jessica; Mukherjee, Sanjib; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Frampton, Gabriel; Bricker, Paul Clint S.; Hurst, Jacob; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    Annually, there are over 2 million incidents of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and treatment options are non-existent. While many TBI studies have focused on the brain, peripheral contributions involving the digestive and immune systems are emerging as factors involved in the various symptomology associated with TBI. We hypothesized that TBI would alter hepatic function, including bile acid system machinery in the liver and brain. The results show activation of the hepatic acute phase response by 2 hours after TBI, hepatic inflammation by 6 hours after TBI and a decrease in hepatic transcription factors, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3 at 2 and 24 hrs after TBI. Bile acid receptors and transporters were decreased as early as 2 hrs after TBI until at least 24 hrs after TBI. Quantification of bile acid transporter, ASBT-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus, revealed a significant decrease following TBI. These results are the first to show such changes following a TBI, and are compatible with previous studies of the bile acid system in stroke models. The data support the emerging idea of a systemic influence to neurological disorders and point to the need for future studies to better define specific mechanisms of action. PMID:28106051

  20. Synthesis and characterization of carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, Ted V.

    Silicon nanoparticles are of great interest in a great number of fields. Silicon nanoparticles show great promise particularly in the field of bioimaging. Carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles have the ability to covalently bond to biomolecules through the conjugation of the carboxylic acid to an amine functionalized biomolecule. This thesis explores the synthesis of silicon nanoparticles functionalized by both carboxylic acids and alkenes and their carboxylic acid functionality. Also discussed is the characterization of the silicon nanoparticles by the use of x-ray spectroscopy. Finally, the nature of the Si-H bond that is observed on the surface of the silicon nanoparticles will be investigated using photoassisted exciton mediated hydrosilation reactions. The silicon nanoparticles are synthesized from both carboxylic acids and alkenes. However, the lack of solubility of diacids is a significant barrier to carboxylic acid functionalization by a mixture of monoacids and diacids. A synthesis route to overcome this obstacle is to synthesize silicon nanoparticles with terminal vinyl group. This terminal vinyl group is distal to the surface of the silicon nanoparticle. The conversion of the vinyl group to a carboxylic acid is accomplished by oxidative cleavage using ozonolysis. The carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles were then successfully conjugated to amine functionalized DNA strand through an n-hydroxy succinimide ester activation step, which promotes the formation of the amide bond. Conjugation was characterized by TEM and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The PAGE results show that the silicon nanoparticle conjugates move slower through the polyacrylamide gel, resulting in a significant separation from the nonconjugated DNA. The silicon nanoparticles were then characterized by the use of x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (Xanes) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the bonding and chemical

  1. Methylene blue inhibits function of the 5-HT transporter

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Murat; Isaev, Dmytro; Lorke, Dietrich E; Hasan, Muhammed; Petroianu, Georg; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methylene blue (MB) is commonly employed as a treatment for methaemoglobinaemia, malaria and vasoplegic shock. An increasing number of studies indicate that MB can cause 5-HT toxicity when administered with a 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. MB is a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidases, but other targets that may contribute to MB toxicity have not been identified. Given the role of the 5-HT transporter (SERT) in the regulation of extracellular 5-HT concentrations, the present study aimed to characterize the effect of MB on SERT. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Live cell imaging, in conjunction with the fluorescent SERT substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+), [3H]5-HT uptake and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to examine the effects of MB on SERT function. KEY RESULTS In EM4 cells expressing GFP-tagged human SERT (hSERT), MB concentration-dependently inhibited ASP+ accumulation (IC50: 1.4 ± 0.3 µM). A similar effect was observed in N2A cells. Uptake of [3H]5-HT was decreased by MB pretreatment. Furthermore, patch-clamp studies in hSERT expressing cells indicated that MB significantly inhibited 5-HT-evoked ion currents. Pretreatment with 8-Br-cGMP did not alter the inhibitory effect of MB on hSERT activity, and intracellular Ca2+ levels remained unchanged during MB application. Further experiments revealed that ASP+ binding to cell surface hSERT was reduced after MB treatment. In whole-cell radioligand experiments, exposure to MB (10 µM; 10 min) did not alter surface binding of the SERT ligand [125I]RTI-55. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MB modulated SERT function and suggested that SERT may be an additional target upon which MB acts to produce 5-HT toxicity. PMID:21542830

  2. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  3. Fatty acids as an energy source for the operation of axoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Toshifumi; Hiruma, Hiromi; Hori, Hideaki; Hashimoto, Yoko; Ichikawa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2003-05-16

    Fatty acids are utilized as a cellular energy source. In the present study, we investigated whether fatty acids could affect axoplasmic transport. Cultured mouse superior cervical ganglion neurons were placed in the glucose-containing medium (145 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 1 mM CaCl(2), 1 mM MgCl(2), 5 mM D-glucose, 10 mM Hepes, pH 7.3, 37 degrees C), and axoplasmic transport of particles in neurites was observed under video-enhanced contrast microscopy. A variety of fatty acids (acetate (C2), caproate (C6), caprylate (C8), caprate (C10), 2-decenoate (C10:1), arachidonate (C20:4); 0.1-1 mM) caused a transient increase in the amount of particles transported in both anterograde and retrograde directions. The increasing effects of fatty acids were dose-dependent. A half-maximum effective dose (ED(50)) for acetate was 0.8 mM, which is similar to the reported K(m) value of acetyl-CoA synthetase for acetate. The ED(50) for caprylate was 28 microM, which is near the K(m) value of acyl-CoA synthetase for medium- and long-chain fatty acids. Application of 5 mM malonate, an inhibitor of the citrate cycle, induced a steady-state decrease in axoplasmic transport, indicating that energy derived from the citrate cycle is required for the maintenance of axoplasmic transport. The increasing effect of acetate (1 mM) on axoplasmic transport was completely abolished by pretreatment with malonate (5 mM), suggesting that acetate produces ATP for axoplasmic transport via the citrate cycle. Alternatively, the effect of caprate (1 mM) was retained after treatment with malonate. Thus, fatty acids except acetate produce ATP probably through both the beta-oxidation pathway and the citrate cycle, increasing axoplasmic transport. Since the effect of fatty acids was transient, certain negative feedback mechanisms might be involved. The removal of glucose from the medium resulted in a low steady-state level of axoplasmic transport. Under such condition, the acetate (1 mM)-induced transient increase in

  4. Functional Determinants of Metal Ion Transport and Selectivity in Paralogous Cation Diffusion Facilitator Transporters CzcD and MntE in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) are a large family of divalent metal transporters that collectively possess broad metal specificity and contribute to intracellular metal homeostasis and virulence in bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses two homologous CDF efflux transporters, MntE and CzcD. Cells lacking mntE or czcD are sensitive to manganese (Mn) or zinc (Zn) toxicity, respectively, and specifically accumulate Mn or Zn, respectively, thus suggesting that MntE selectively transports Mn, while CzcD transports Zn. Here, we probe the origin of this metal specificity using a phenotypic growth analysis of pneumococcal variants. Structural homology to Escherichia coli YiiP predicts that both MntE and CzcD are dimeric and each protomer harbors four pairs of conserved metal-binding sites, termed the A site, the B site, and the C1/C2 binuclear site. We find that single amino acid mutations within both the transmembrane domain A site and the B site in both CDFs result in a cellular metal sensitivity similar to that of the corresponding null mutants. However, multiple mutations in the predicted cytoplasmic C1/C2 cluster of MntE have no impact on cellular Mn resistance, in contrast to the analogous substitutions in CzcD, which do have on impact on cellular Zn resistance. Deletion of the MntE-specific C-terminal tail, present only in Mn-specific bacterial CDFs, resulted in only a modest growth phenotype. Further analysis of MntE-CzcD functional chimeric transporters showed that Asn and Asp in the ND-DD A-site motif of MntE and the most N-terminal His in the HD-HD site A of CzcD (the specified amino acids are underlined) play key roles in transporter metal selectivity. IMPORTANCE Cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins are divalent metal ion transporters that are conserved in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans and that play important roles in cellular physiology, from metal homeostasis and resistance to type I diabetes in vertebrates

  5. Possible expression of a particular gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter isoform responsive to upregulation by hyperosmolarity in rat calvarial osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Sayumi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Takarada, Takeshi; Iemata, Mika; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-11-21

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, but widely distributed in different peripheral organs. We have previously shown the functional expression of GABA(B) receptors required for GABAergic signal input by cultured rat calvarial osteoblasts. This study focused on the possible functional expression of the machinery required for GABAergic signal termination such as GABA transporters. In rat calvarial osteoblasts cultured for 7 days, [(3)H]GABA accumulation was observed in a temperature-, sodium- and chloride-dependent manner, consisting of a single component with a K(m) value of 789.6+/-9.0 microM and a V(max) value of 4.4+/-0.1 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Both nipecotic and L-2,4-diaminobutyric acids significantly inhibited [(3)H]GABA accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Constitutive expression was seen with mRNA for the betaine/GABA transporter-1 (BGT-1) and taurine transporter (TauT), while hyperosmotic cultivation led to significant increases in both [(3)H]GABA accumulation and BGT-1 mRNA expression without affecting TauT mRNA expression. Highly immunoreactive cells were detected for the BGT-1 isoform at the surface of trabecular bone of neonatal rat tibias. Sustained exposure to GABA significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, but not cellular viability, at concentrations above 0.1 mM in osteoblasts cultured for 3 to 28 days. Nipecotic acid not only decreased ALP activity alone, but also further decreased ALP activity in osteoblasts cultured in the presence of GABA. These results suggest that the BGT-1 isoform may be functionally expressed by rat calvarial osteoblasts to play a hitherto unidentified role in mechanisms underlying hyperosmotic regulation of osteoblastogenesis.

  6. The role of membrane fatty-acid transporters in regulating skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise.

    PubMed

    Pelsers, Maurice M A L; Stellingwerff, Trent; van Loon, Luc J C

    2008-01-01

    While endogenous carbohydrates form the main substrate source during high-intensity exercise, long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) represent the main substrate source during more prolonged low- to moderate-intensity exercise. Adipose tissue lipolysis is responsible for the supply of LCFA to the contracting muscle. Once taken up by skeletal muscle tissue, LCFA can either serve as a substrate for oxidative phosphorylation or can be directed towards esterification into triacylglycerol. Myocellular uptake of LCFA comprises a complex and incompletely understood process. Although LCFA can enter the cell via passive diffusion, more recent reports indicate that LCFA uptake is tightly regulated by plasma membrane-located transport proteins (fatty acid translocase [FAT/CD36], plasmalemmal-located fatty acid binding protein [FABPpm] and fatty acid transport protein [FATP]). Depending on cardiac and skeletal muscle energy demands, some of these LCFA transporters can translocate rapidly from intracellular pools to the plasma membrane to allow greater LCFA uptake. This translocation process can be induced by insulin and/or muscle contraction. However, the precise signalling pathways responsible for activating the translocation machinery remain to be elucidated. This article will provide an overview on the effects of diet, acute exercise and exercise training on the expression and/or translocation of the various LCFA transporters in skeletal muscle tissue (FAT/CD36, FABPpm, FATP).

  7. Functional analysis and molecular model of the human urate transporter/channel, hUAT.

    PubMed

    Leal-Pinto, Edgar; Cohen, B Eleazar; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Abramson, Ruth G

    2002-07-01

    Recombinant protein, designated hUAT, the human homologue of the rat urate transporter/channel (UAT), functions as a highly selective urate channel in lipid bilayers. Functional analysis indicates that hUAT activity, like UAT, is selectively blocked by oxonate from its cytosolic side, whereas pyrazinoate and adenosine selectively block from the channel's extracellular face. Importantly, hUAT is a galectin, a protein with two beta-galactoside binding domains that bind lactose. Lactose significantly increased hUAT open probability but only when added to the channel's extracellular side. This effect on open probability was mimicked by glucose, but not ribose, suggesting a role for extracellular glucose in regulating hUAT channel activity. These functional observations support a four-transmembrane-domain structural model of hUAT, as previously predicted from the primary structure of UAT. hUAT and UAT, however, are not functionally identical: hUAT has a significantly lower single-channel conductance and open probability is voltage independent. These differences suggest that evolutionary changes in specific amino acids in these highly homologous proteins are functionally relevant in defining these biophysical properties.

  8. Human, rat and chicken small intestinal Na+-Cl−-creatine transporter: functional, molecular characterization and localization

    PubMed Central

    Peral, M J; García-Delgado, M; Calonge, M L; Durán, J M; De La Horra, M C; Wallimann, T; Speer, O; Ilundáin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In spite of all the fascinating properties of oral creatine supplementation, the mechanism(s) mediating its intestinal absorption has(have) not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize intestinal creatine transport. [14C]Creatine uptake was measured in chicken enterocytes and rat ileum, and expression of the creatine transporter CRT was examined in human, rat and chicken small intestine by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results show that enterocytes accumulate creatine against its concentration gradient. This accumulation was electrogenic, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, with a probable stoichiometry of 2 Na+: 1 Cl−: 1 creatine, and inhibited by ouabain and iodoacetic acid. The kinetic study revealed a Km for creatine of 29 μm. [14C]Creatine uptake was efficiently antagonized by non-labelled creatine, guanidinopropionic acid and cyclocreatine. More distant structural analogues of creatine, such as GABA, choline, glycine, β-alanine, taurine and betaine, had no effect on intestinal creatine uptake, indicating a high substrate specificity of the creatine transporter. Consistent with these functional data, messenger RNA for CRT was detected only in the cells lining the intestinal villus. The sequences of partial clones, and of the full-length cDNA clone, isolated from human and rat small intestine were identical to previously cloned CRT cDNAs. Immunological analysis revealed that CRT protein was mainly associated with the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This study reports for the first time that mammalian and avian enterocytes express CRT along the villus, where it mediates high-affinity, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, apical creatine uptake. PMID:12433955

  9. The transport of indole-3-acetic Acid in boron- and calcium-deficient sunflower hypocotyl segments.

    PubMed

    Tang, P M; Dela Fuente, R K

    1986-06-01

    Transfer of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Russian Mammoth) seedlings from complete nutrient solution to solutions deficient in either boron or calcium resulted in a steady decline in the rate of auxin transport, compared to seedlings that remained in the complete solution. In seedlings transferred to solutions deficient in both B and Ca, the decline in auxin transport was greater than seedlings deficient in only one element. The transfer of B- or Ca-deficient seedlings back to the complete solution prevented further decline in auxin transport, but auxin transport did not increase to the same level as seedlings maintained in complete solution. The significant reduction in auxin transport during the early stages of B or Ca deficiency was not related to (a) reduced growth rate of the hypocotyl, (b) increased acropetal movement of auxin, or (c) lack of respiratory substrates in the hypocotyl. In addition, no difference was found in the water-extractable total and ionic Ca in B-deficient and control nondeficient hypocotyls, indicating a direct effect of B on auxin transport, rather than indirectly by affecting Ca absorption. The rate of auxin transport in hypocotyls deficient in either B or Ca, was inversely correlated with K(+) leakage and rate of respiration. The data presented strongly support the view that there are separate sites for B and Ca in the basipetal transport of the plant hormone indoleacetic acid.

  10. Urinary solute transport by ileal segments. I. Effects of nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Piñeiro, L; Mateos, F; Montero, A; Madero, R; Martínez-Piñeiro, J A

    1993-12-01

    This study was conducted to quantify urinary solute transport by the ileum, using an in vivo human model, and to determine the effect of nicotinic acid on this process. Patients were studied under both basal conditions and niacin therapy. The rates of solute transport were established by analysis of excretion indexes for each solute. Potassium and ammonium were absorbed by the ileum, while phosphorus, sodium and bicarbonate were secreted. The percentage excretion index of sodium and bicarbonate increased by approximately 100 and 600% respectively, causing a significant rise in urinary pH. Although not statistically significant, there was a tendency for chloride to be absorbed and for water to pass into the bowel lumen. Nicotinic acid 3 g/day had no significant effect on urinary solute transport.

  11. Charge transport and structural dynamics in carboxylic-acid-based deep eutectic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Philip J; Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam P; Benson, Roberto S; Sangoro, Joshua R

    2014-08-07

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in the 1:2 mol ratio mixture of lidocaine and decanoic acid (LID-DA), a model deep eutectic mixture (DEM), have been characterized over a wide temperature range using broad-band dielectric spectroscopy and depolarized dynamic light scattering. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to assess the degree of proton transfer between the neutral parent molecules. From our detailed analysis of the dielectric spectra, we have determined that this carboxylic-acid-based DEM is approximately 25% ionic at room temperature. Furthermore, we have found that the characteristic diffusion rate of mobile charge carriers is practically identical to the rate of structural relaxation at all measured temperatures, indicating that fast proton transport does not occur in LID-DA. Our results demonstrate that while LID-DA exhibits the thermal characteristics of a DEM, its charge transport properties resemble those of a protic ionic liquid.

  12. Mutation of aspartic acid-351, lysine-352, and lysine-515 alters the Ca2+ transport activity of the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, K; MacLennan, D H

    1988-01-01

    Full-length cDNAs encoding neonatal and adult isoforms of the Ca2+-ATPase of rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells. The microsomal fraction isolated from transfected COS-1 cells contained immunoreactive Ca2+-ATPase and catalyzed Ca2+ transport at rates at least 15-fold above controls. No differences were observed in either the rates or Ca2+ dependency of Ca2+ transport catalyzed by the two isoforms. Aspartic acid-351, the site of formation of the catalytic acyl phosphate in the enzyme, was mutated to asparagine, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, histidine, or alanine. In every case, Ca2+ transport activity and Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation were eliminated. Ca2+ transport was also eliminated by mutation of lysine-352 to arginine, glutamine, or glutamic acid or by mutation of Asp351-Lys352 to Lys351-Asp352. Mutation of lysine-515, the site of fluorescein isothiocyanate modification in the enzyme, resulted in diminished Ca2+ transport activity as follows: arginine, 60%; glutamine, 25%; glutamic acid, 5%. These results demonstrate the absolute requirement of acylphosphate formation for the Ca2+ transport function and define a residue important for ATP binding. They also demonstrate the feasibility of a thorough analysis of active sites in the Ca2+-ATPase by expression and site-specific mutagenesis. Images PMID:2966962

  13. Transport of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid under Two Soil Management Practices in an Italian Vineyard.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marco; Marta, Anna Dalla; Zanchi, Camillo A; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-09-01

    Worldwide, glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in controlling the growth of annual and perennial weeds. An increasing number of studies have highlighted the environmental risk resulting from the use of this molecule in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of the study was to determine the transport of glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), through runoff and transported sediment from a vineyard under two different soil management systems: harrowed inter-row (HR) and permanent grass covered inter-row (GR). The study was performed over a period of 4 yr. Glyphosate and AMPA concentrations were found to be higher in runoff and in transported sediment from HR compared with GR, regardless of the amount of runoff and transported sediment. The mean annual percentages of glyphosate loss, via runoff and transported sediment, were about 1.37 and 0.73% for HR and GR, respectively. Aminomethylphosphonic acid represented approximately 30.9 and 40.0% of the total glyphosate losses in GR and HR, respectively. Moreover, results suggested that rains occurring within 4 wk after treatment could cause the transport of glyphosate and AMPA in high concentrations. Soil analyses indicated that glyphosate content was below detection within 1 yr, whereas AMPA remained in the soil profiles along the vine row and in the inter-row. Results indicated that GR can reduce soil and herbicide loss by runoff in vineyard cropping system.

  14. Modulating Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Transport-Induced Immunosuppression in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Minka, Ndazo Salka; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2011-01-01

    The effect of 12 h road transportation on some basic blood cells and the modulating role of ascorbic acid were investigated in 40 adult Red Sokoto goats during the hot dry season. The animals were divided into two groups, GI (experimental; n = 20) and GII (control; n = 20). Group 1 was administered with ascorbic acid (AA) per os at a dosage rate of 100 mg/kg body weight, while GII was given 10 mL of sterile water per goat. Forty minutes after the administration and loading, the goats were transported for 12 h. The result obtained in GII goats showed that loading, transportation, high ambient temperature (AT), and relative humidity (RH) encountered during transportation induced lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and eosinopenia, which can cause immunosuppression. In GI goats, the administration of AA prior to loading and transportation ameliorated the adverse effects of loading and transportation stress on neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and eosinopenia of the goats. PMID:23738106

  15. Glycinergic-Fipronil Uptake Is Mediated by an Amino Acid Carrier System and Induces the Expression of Amino Acid Transporter Genes in Ricinus communis Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Zhao, Jun-Long; Wang, Chuan-Wei; Yu, Ai-Xin; Liu, Niu; Chen, Li; Lin, Fei; Xu, Han-Hong

    2016-05-18

    Phloem-mobile insecticides are efficient for piercing and sucking insect control. Introduction of sugar or amino acid groups to the parent compound can improve the phloem mobility of insecticides, so a glycinergic-fipronil conjugate (GlyF), 2-(3-(3-cyano-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-4-((trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-yl)ureido) acetic acid, was designed and synthesized. Although the "Kleier model" predicted that this conjugate is not phloem mobile, GlyF can be continually detected during a 5 h collection of Ricinus communis phloem sap. Furthermore, an R. communis seedling cotyledon disk uptake experiment demonstrates that the uptake of GlyF is sensitive to pH, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), temperature, and p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (pCMBS) and is likely mediated by amino acid carrier system. To explore the roles of amino acid transporters (AATs) in GlyF uptake, a total of 62 AAT genes were identified from the R. communis genome in silico. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AATs in R. communis were organized into the ATF (amino acid transporter) and APC (amino acid, polyaminem and choline transporter) superfamilies, with five subfamilies in ATF and two in APC. Furthermore, the expression profiles of 20 abundantly expressed AATs (cycle threshold (Ct) values <27) were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 h after GlyF treatment by RT-qPCR. The results demonstrated that expression levels of four AAT genes, RcLHT6, RcANT15, RcProT2, and RcCAT2, were induced by the GlyF treatment in R. communis seedlings. On the basis of the observation that the expression profile of the four candidate genes is similar to the time course observation for GlyF foliar disk uptake, it is suggested that those four genes are possible candidates involved in the uptake of GlyF. These results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of GlyF uptake as well as phloem loading from a molecular biology perspective and facilitate functional

  16. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Tonoplast Dicarboxylate Transporter in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Zhang, Zhanquan; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Acidity plays an important role in flavor and overall organoleptic quality of fruit and is mainly due to the presence of organic acids. Understanding the molecular basis of organic acid metabolism is thus of primary importance for fruit quality improvement. Here, we cloned a putative tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter gene (SlTDT) from tomato, and submitted it to the NCBI database (GenBank accession number: KC733165). SlTDT protein contained 13 putative transmembrane domains in silico analysis. Confocal microscopic study using green fluorescent fusion proteins revealed that SlTDT was localized on tonoplast. The expression patterns of SlTDT in tomato were analyzed by RT-qPCR. The results indicated that SlTDT expressed in leaves, roots, flowers and fruits at different ripening stages, suggesting SlTDT may be associated with the development of different tissues. To further explore the function of SlTDT, we constructed both overexpression and RNAi vectors and obtained transgenic tomato plants by agrobacterium-mediated method. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis showed that overexpression of SlTDT significantly increased malate content, and reduced citrate content in tomato fruit. By contrast, repression of SlTDT in tomato reduced malate content of and increased citrate content. These results indicated that SlTDT played an important role in remobilization of malate and citrate in fruit vacuoles. PMID:28261242

  17. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Tonoplast Dicarboxylate Transporter in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiling; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Zhang, Zhanquan; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Acidity plays an important role in flavor and overall organoleptic quality of fruit and is mainly due to the presence of organic acids. Understanding the molecular basis of organic acid metabolism is thus of primary importance for fruit quality improvement. Here, we cloned a putative tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter gene (SlTDT) from tomato, and submitted it to the NCBI database (GenBank accession number: KC733165). SlTDT protein contained 13 putative transmembrane domains in silico analysis. Confocal microscopic study using green fluorescent fusion proteins revealed that SlTDT was localized on tonoplast. The expression patterns of SlTDT in tomato were analyzed by RT-qPCR. The results indicated that SlTDT expressed in leaves, roots, flowers and fruits at different ripening stages, suggesting SlTDT may be associated with the development of different tissues. To further explore the function of SlTDT, we constructed both overexpression and RNAi vectors and obtained transgenic tomato plants by agrobacterium-mediated method. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis showed that overexpression of SlTDT significantly increased malate content, and reduced citrate content in tomato fruit. By contrast, repression of SlTDT in tomato reduced malate content of and increased citrate content. These results indicated that SlTDT played an important role in remobilization of malate and citrate in fruit vacuoles.

  18. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  19. Functional Analysis of Leishmania Cyclopropane Fatty Acid Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Oyola, Samuel O.; Evans, Krystal J.; Smith, Terry K.; Smith, Barbara A.; Hilley, James D.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Kaye, Paul M.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    The single gene encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthetase (CFAS) is present in Leishmania infantum, L. mexicana and L. braziliensis but absent from L. major, a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In L. infantum, usually causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, the CFAS gene is transcribed in both insect (extracellular) and host (intracellular) stages of the parasite life cycle. Tagged CFAS protein is stably detected in intracellular L. infantum but only during the early log phase of extracellular growth, when it shows partial localisation to the endoplasmic reticulum. Lipid analyses of L. infantum wild type, CFAS null and complemented parasites detect a low abundance CFAS-dependent C19Δ fatty acid, characteristic of a cyclopropanated species, in wild type and add-back cells. Sub-cellular fractionation studies locate the C19Δ fatty acid to both ER and plasma membrane-enriched fractions. This fatty acid is not detectable in wild type L. major, although expression of the L. infantum CFAS gene in L. major generates cyclopropanated fatty acids, indicating that the substrate for this modification is present in L. major, despite the absence of the modifying enzyme. Loss of the L. infantum CFAS gene does not affect extracellular parasite growth, phagocytosis or early survival in macrophages. However, while endocytosis is also unaffected in the extracellular CFAS nulls, membrane transporter activity is defective and the null parasites are more resistant to oxidative stress. Following infection in vivo, L. infantum CFAS nulls exhibit lower parasite burdens in both the liver and spleen of susceptible hosts but it has not been possible to complement this phenotype, suggesting that loss of C19Δ fatty acid may lead to irreversible changes in cell physiology that cannot be rescued by re-expression. Aberrant cyclopropanation in L. major decreases parasite virulence but does not influence parasite tissue tropism. PMID:23251490

  20. Transport of fluorescent bile acids by the isolated perfused rat liver: kinetics, sequestration, and mobilization.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, F; Schteingart, C D; Ton-Nu, H T; Cerrè, C; Steinbach, J H; Yeh, H Z; Hofmann, A F

    1998-08-01

    Hepatocyte transport of six fluorescent bile acids containing nitrobenzoxadiazolyl (NBD) or a fluorescein derivative on the side chain was compared with that of natural bile acids using the single-pass perfused rat liver. Compounds were infused at 40 nmol/g liver min for 15 minutes; hepatic uptake and biliary recovery were measured; fractional extraction, intrinsic basolateral clearance, and sequestration (nonrecovery after 45 minutes of additional perfusion) were calculated. Fluorescent bile acids were efficiently extracted during the first 3 minutes (70%-97%), but net extraction decreased with time mostly because of regurgitation into the perfusate. For cholylglycine and ursodeoxycholylglycine (UDC-glycine), extraction was 94% to 99%, and regurgitation did not occur. Intrinsic hepatic clearance of fluorescent bile acids (2-7 mL/g liver x min) was lower than that of cholylglycine (9.0 +/- 0.6; mean +/- SD) and UDC-glycine (21.4 +/- 0.4). Sequestration at 60 minutes was 8% to 26% for fluorescent bile acids with a cholyl moiety (cholylglycylaminofluorescein [CGamF], cholyllysylfluorescein [C-L-F], cholyl-[N epsilon-NBD]-lysine [C-L-NBD], and cholylaminofluorescein [CamF]), 32% for ursodeoxycholylaminofluorescein (UDCamF), and 88% for ursodeoxycholyl-(N epsilon-NBD)lysine (UDC-L-NBD). Cholylglycine and UDC-glycine had <3% retention. Biliary secretion of sequestered UDCamF, but not of UDC-L-NBD, was induced by adding dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (DBcAMP) to the perfusate, possibly by translocation to the canaliculus of pericanalicular vesicles containing fluorescent bile acids. Biliary secretion of UDC-L-NBD, but not of UDCamF, was induced by adding cholyltaurine or UDC-taurine, possibly by inhibition of binding to intracellular constituents or of transport into organelles. It is concluded that fluorescent bile acids are efficiently transported across the basolateral membrane, but in contrast to natural conjugated bile acids, are sequestered in the

  1. Role of sodium ion in transport of folic acid in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of sodium on folate transport across the intestinal luminal membrane was analyzed using two techniques: the influx chamber and isoalted brush-border membrane vesicles. Preincubation of tissue in Na -free medium did not have a consistent effect on folic acid influx provided that Na was present in the test solution. Replacement of Na in the test solution by choline resulted in a significant reduction of folic acid influx. However, when intestinal sheets that had been equilibrated in Na -free solution were exposed to test solutions containing either Na , Li , K , Rb , Cs , Tris , or guanidinium as main cations, folic acid influx was not significantly decreased. Concentration-dependence studies showed that replacement of Na by Rb did not affect the saturable mechanism of folate transport. Rather, a decrease in nonsaturable folic acid uptake accounted for the slightly reduced influx observed in the presence of Rb . Experiments with brush-border membrane vesicles revealed that methotrexate uptake was significantly higher in the presence of external Na than in the presence of K , but was not different from uptake in the presence of K plus valinomycin. These data suggest that 1) the saturable component of folate transport is not Na dependent, and 2) nonsaturable transport of folic acid across the luminal membrane occurs in part through a conductive pathway that involves a negatively charged species of folate and a cation whose membrane permeability affects the rate of folate transport. The importance of Na in this process in vivo derives from the fact that Na is the most permeant cation available at the absorptive site in the small intestine.

  2. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health. PMID:25186768

  3. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health.

    PubMed

    Douillard, François P; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-29

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health.

  4. An assay for functional xylose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengqiang; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Suo, Fan; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-11-15

    It has been considered that more efficient uptake of xylose could promote increased xylose metabolic capacity of several microorganisms. In this study, an assay to screen xylose transporters was established in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, which expresses the xylosidase gene of Bacillus pumilus intracellularly. The absorbed xylose analog p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (pNPX) rapidly hydrolyzed to p-nitrophenol (pNP), which displayed a yellow tint when exposed to xylosidase in vivo. The xylose transporter activities of the strain were computed using the pNP production rate, which was detected extracellularly. This method could be used for both high-throughput screening and smaller scale investigations. AraEp, which is a pentose transporter of Corynebacterium glutamicum, was expressed in S. cerevisiae and exhibited better transport capacity than the endogenous transporters Hxt7p and Gal2p. Moreover, a mutant of AraEp with 103% greater transport capacity was screened out, and the computer simulation suggested that transmembrane domain 5 was an important factor for the transport capacity of AraEp in S. cerevisiae.

  5. Separate responses of karyopherins to glucose and amino acid availability regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K.

    2014-01-01

    The importin-β family members (karyopherins) mediate the majority of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Msn5 and Los1, members of the importin-β family, function in tRNA nuclear export. tRNAs move bidirectionally between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Nuclear tRNA accumulation occurs upon amino acid (aa) or glucose deprivation. To understand the mechanisms regulating tRNA subcellular trafficking, we investigated whether Msn5 and Los1 are regulated in response to nutrient availability. We provide evidence that tRNA subcellular trafficking is regulated by distinct aa-sensitive and glucose-sensitive mechanisms. Subcellular distributions of Msn5 and Los1 are altered upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Redistribution of tRNA exportins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm likely provides one mechanism for tRNA nuclear distribution upon glucose deprivation. We extended our studies to other members of the importin-β family and found that all tested karyopherins invert their subcellular distributions upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Glucose availability regulates the subcellular distributions of karyopherins likely due to alteration of the RanGTP gradient since glucose deprivation causes redistribution of Ran. Thus nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution of macromolecules is likely generally altered upon glucose deprivation due to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and redistribution of karyopherins between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:25057022

  6. Uncoupling of Energy-Linked Functions of Corn Mitochondria by Linoleic Acid and Monomethyldecenylsuccinic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Baddeley, M. Susan; Hanson, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Linoleic acid and monomethyldecenylsuccinic acid were tested as uncoupling agents for energy linked functions of corn mitochondria. 2,4-dinitrophenol was used as a standard for comparison. Both compounds uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation, released oligomycin-blocked respiration, and accelerated adenosine triphosphatase. Linoleic acid uncoupled calcium-activated phosphate accumulation and the increase in light scattering that accompanies the accumulation. Unlike dinitrophenol, linoleic acid at 0.1 mm had a destructive effect on membrane semipermeability. Kinetic studies indicated that dinitrophenol and linoleic acid compete with phosphate for active sites in oxidative phosphorylation. Some linoleic acid is taken up by respiring mitochondria and a major share of the uptake is incorporated into phospholipids. Calcium ion and oligomycin promote the uptake, but coenzyme A does not. It is deduced that fatty acid probably attacks the non-phosphorylated intermediate, I∼X, producing X∼acyl. Uncoupling results from breakdown of X∼acyl, but sufficient X∼acyl is maintained to serve as a source of activated fatty acid. PMID:16656708

  7. SGLT2 inhibitor lowers serum uric acid through alteration of uric acid transport activity in renal tubule by increased glycosuria.

    PubMed

    Chino, Yukihiro; Samukawa, Yoshishige; Sakai, Soichi; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2014-10-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been reported to lower the serum uric acid (SUA) level. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reduction, SUA and the urinary excretion rate of uric acid (UE(UA)) were analysed after the oral administration of luseogliflozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor, to healthy subjects. After dosing, SUA decreased, and a negative correlation was observed between the SUA level and the UE(UA), suggesting that SUA decreased as a result of the increase in the UE(UA). The increase in UE(UA) was correlated with an increase in urinary D-glucose excretion, but not with the plasma luseogliflozin concentration. Additionally, in vitro transport experiments showed that luseogliflozin had no direct effect on the transporters involved in renal UA reabsorption. To explain that the increase in UE(UA) is likely due to glycosuria, the study focused on the facilitative glucose transporter 9 isoform 2 (GLUT9ΔN, SLC2A9b), which is expressed at the apical membrane of the kidney tubular cells and transports both UA and D-glucose. It was observed that the efflux of [(14) C]UA in Xenopus oocytes expressing the GLUT9 isoform 2 was trans-stimulated by 10 mm D-glucose, a high concentration of glucose that existed under SGLT2 inhibition. On the other hand, the uptake of [(14) C]UA by oocytes was cis-inhibited by 100 mm D-glucose, a concentration assumed to exist in collecting ducts. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the UE(UA) could potentially be increased by luseogliflozin-induced glycosuria, with alterations of UA transport activity because of urinary glucose.

  8. Transport of some strong incompletely dissociated acids through anion-exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Palatý, Zdenek; Záková, Alena

    2003-12-01

    Nitric and sulfuric acids belong among strong incompletely dissociated acids, so that in the description of their transport through an ion-exchange membrane, ionic equilibria have to be taken into account. The paper presents the determination of ionic mobilities and diffusivity of nondissociated form of these acids. For that purpose, data on the dialysis experiments with nitric and sulfuric acids in a batch mixed cell with an anion-exchange membrane NEOSEPTA-AFN, which have been completed by those on the membrane conductivity, have been used. The dependencies of the ionic mobilities and the diffusivity of nondissociated form of nitric acid upon the acid concentration in the membrane have been approximated by second degree polynomials. Their coefficients have been determined by numerical integration of the partial differential equation describing the concentration fields of the acids in the membrane and liquid films on both sides of the membrane, followed by an optimizing procedure. The model used is based on the Nernst-Planck electrodiffusion equation. Using all the experimental data obtained at various acid concentrations and rotational speeds of the stirrers, it has been found that ionic mobility is strongly affected by the acid concentration in the membrane and decreases in the series H(3)O(+), SO(2-)(4), NO(-)(3), HSO(-)(4).

  9. Transport of the aromatic amino acids into isolated rat liver cells. Properties of uptake by two distinct systems.

    PubMed Central

    Salter, M; Knowles, R G; Pogson, C I

    1986-01-01

    The transport of the aromatic amino acids into isolated rat liver cells was studied. There was a rapid and substantial binding of the aromatic amino acids, L-alanine and L-leucine to the plasma membrane. This has important consequences for the determination of rates of transport and intracellular concentrations of the amino acids. Inhibition studies with a variety of substrates of various transport systems gave results consistent with aromatic amino acid transport being catalysed by two systems: a 2-aminobicyclo(2,2,1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH)-insensitive aromatic D- and L-amino acid-specific system, and the L-type system (BCH-sensitive). The BCH-insensitive component of transport was Na+-independent and facilitated non-concentrative transport of the aromatic amino acids; it was unaffected by culture of liver cells for 24 h, by 48 h starvation, dexamethasone phosphate or glucagon. Kinetic properties of the BCH-inhibitable component were similar to those previously reported for the L2-system in liver cells. The BCH-insensitive component was a comparatively low-Km low-Vmax. transport system that we suggest is similar to the T-transport system previously seen only in human red blood cells. The results are discussed with reference to the importance of the T- and L-systems in the control of aromatic L-amino acid degradation in the liver. PMID:3954748

  10. The altered glucose metabolism in tumor and a tumor acidic microenvironment associated with extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Xiaozhou; Dai, Dong; Song, Xiuyu; Xu, Wengui

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, also knowns as cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) or basigin, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein that is involved in numerous physiological and pathological functions, especially in tumor invasion and metastasis. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) catalyze the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates such as L-lactate across the plasma membrane to preserve the intracellular pH and maintain cell homeostasis. As a chaperone to some MCT isoforms, CD147 overexpression significantly contributes to the metabolic transformation of tumor. This overexpression is characterized by accelerated aerobic glycolysis and lactate efflux, and it eventually provides the tumor cells with a metabolic advantage and an invasive phenotype in the acidic tumor microenvironment. This review highlights the roles of CD147 and MCTs in tumor cell metabolism and the associated molecular mechanisms. The regulation of CD147 and MCTs may prove to be with a therapeutic potential for tumors through the metabolic modification of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27009812

  11. Transport of indoleacetic acid in intact corn coleoptiles. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, K.E.; Briggs, W.R. )

    1990-10-01

    We have characterized the transport of ({sup 3}H)indoleacetic acid (IAA) in intact corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles. We have used a wide range of concentrations of added IAA (28 femtomoles to 100 picomoles taken up over 60 minutes). The shape of the transport curve varies with the concentration of added IAA, although the rate of movement of the observed front of tracer is invariant with concentration. At the lowest concentration of tracer used, the labeled IAA in the transport stream is not detectably metabolized or immobilized, curvature does not develop as a result of tracer application, and normal phototropic and gravitropic responsiveness are not affected. Therefore we believe we are observing the transport of true tracer quantities of labeled auxin at this lowest concentration.

  12. Expression profiles of the genes associated with metabolism and transport of amino acids and their derivatives in rat liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, C S; Chang, C F

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids (AA) are components of protein and precursors of many important biological molecules. To address effects of the genes associated with metabolism and transport of AA and their derivatives during rat liver regeneration (LR), we firstly obtained the above genes by collecting databases data and retrieving related thesis, and then analyzed their expression profiles during LR using Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. The LR-associated genes were identified by comparing the gene expression difference between partial hepatectomy (PH) and sham-operation (SO) rat livers. It was approved that 134 genes associated with metabolism of AA and their derivatives and 26 genes involved in transport of them were LR-associated. The initially and totally expressing number of these genes occurring in initial phase of LR (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction of liver tissue (72-168 h after PH) were respectively 76, 17, 79, 5 and 162, 89, 564, 195, illustrating that these LR-associated genes were initially expressed mainly in initial stage, and functioned in different phases. Frequencies of up-regulation and down-regulation of them being separately 564 and 357 demonstrated that genes up-regulated outnumbered those down-regulated. Categorization of their expression patterns into 22 types implied the diversity of cell physiological and biochemical activities. According to expression changes and patterns of the above-mentioned genes in LR, it was presumed that histidine biosynthesis in the metaphase and anaphase, valine metabolism in the anaphase, and metabolism of glutamate, glutamine, asparate, asparagine, methionine, alanine, leucine and aromatic amino acid almost were enhanced in the whole LR; as for amino acid derivatives, transport of neutral amino acids, urea, gamma-aminobutyric acid, betaine and taurine, metabolism of dopamine, heme, S-adenosylmethionine, thyroxine, and

  13. The Aspergillus nidulans Proline Permease as a Model for Understanding the Factors Determining Substrate Binding and Specificity of Fungal Amino Acid Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Gournas, Christos; Evangelidis, Thomas; Athanasopoulos, Alexandros; Mikros, Emmanuel; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in fungi is mediated by general and specialized members of the yeast amino acid transporter (YAT) family, a branch of the amino acid polyamine organocation (APC) transporter superfamily. PrnB, a highly specific l-proline transporter, only weakly recognizes other Put4p substrates, its Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologue. Taking advantage of the high sequence similarity between the two transporters, we combined molecular modeling, induced fit docking, genetic, and biochemical approaches to investigate the molecular basis of this difference and identify residues governing substrate binding and specificity. We demonstrate that l-proline is recognized by PrnB via interactions with residues within TMS1 (Gly56, Thr57), TMS3 (Glu138), and TMS6 (Phe248), which are evolutionary conserved in YATs, whereas specificity is achieved by subtle amino acid substitutions in variable residues. Put4p-mimicking substitutions in TMS3 (S130C), TMS6 (F252L, S253G), TMS8 (W351F), and TMS10 (T414S) broadened the specificity of PrnB, enabling it to recognize more efficiently l-alanine, l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, and glycine without significantly affecting the apparent Km for l-proline. S253G and W351F could transport l-alanine, whereas T414S, despite displaying reduced proline uptake, could transport l-alanine and glycine, a phenotype suppressed by the S130C mutation. A combination of all five Put4p-ressembling substitutions resulted in a functional allele that could also transport l-alanine and glycine, displaying a specificity profile impressively similar to that of Put4p. Our results support a model where residues in these positions determine specificity by interacting with the substrates, acting as gating elements, altering the flexibility of the substrate binding core, or affecting conformational changes of the transport cycle. PMID:25572393

  14. A versatile proline/alanine transporter in the unicellular pathogen Leishmania donovani regulates amino acid homoeostasis and osmotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Ehud; Schlisselberg, Doreen; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; Rentsch, Doris; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-01-15

    Unlike all other organisms, parasitic protozoa of the family Trypanosomatidae maintain a large cellular pool of proline that, together with the alanine pool, serve as alternative carbon sources as well as reservoirs of organic osmolytes. These reflect adaptation to their insect vectors whose haemolymphs are exceptionally rich in the two amino acids. In the present study we identify and characterize a new neutral amino acid transporter, LdAAP24, that translocates proline and alanine across the Leishmania donovani plasma membrane. This transporter fulfils multiple functions: it is the sole supplier for the intracellular pool of proline and contributes to the alanine pool; it is essential for cell volume regulation after osmotic stress; and it regulates the transport and homoeostasis of glutamate and arginine, none of which are its substrates. Notably, we provide evidence that proline and alanine exhibit different roles in the parasitic response to hypotonic shock; alanine affects swelling, whereas proline influences the rate of volume recovery. On the basis of our data we suggest that LdAAP24 plays a key role in parasite adaptation to its varying environments in host and vector, a phenomenon essential for successful parasitism.

  15. Enhanced serotonin transporter function during depression in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Willeit, Matthäus; Sitte, Harald H; Thierry, Nikolaus; Michalek, Klaus; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Zill, Peter; Winkler, Dietmar; Brannath, Werner; Fischer, Michael B; Bondy, Brigitta; Kasper, Siegfried; Singer, Ernst A

    2008-06-01

    Decreased synaptic serotonin during depressive episodes is a central element of the monoamine hypothesis of depression. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT, SERT) is a key molecule for the control of synaptic serotonin levels. Here we aimed to detect state-related alterations in the efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward and outward transport in platelets of drug-free depressed patients suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 5-HTT turnover rate, a measure for the number of inward transport events per minute, and tyramine-induced, 5-HTT-mediated outward transport were assessed at baseline, after 4 weeks of bright light therapy, and in summer using a case-control design in a consecutive sample of 73 drug-free depressed patients with SAD and 70 nonseasonal healthy controls. Patients were drug-naive or medication-free for at least 6 months prior to study inclusion, females patients were studied in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. All participants were genotyped for a 5-HTT-promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) to assess the influence of this polymorphism on 5-HTT parameters. Efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward (p=0.014) and outward (p=0.003) transport was enhanced in depressed patients. Both measures normalized toward control levels after therapy and in natural summer remission. Changes in outward transport showed a clear correlation with treatment response (rho=0.421, p=0.001). Changes in inward transport were mediated by changes in 5-HTT transport efficiency rather than affinity or density. 5-HTTLPR was not associated with any of the 5-HTT parameters. In sum, we conclude that the 5-HTT is in a hyperfunctional state during depression in SAD and normalizes after light therapy and in natural summer remission.

  16. Na-coupled bicarbonate transporters of the Slc4 family in the nervous system: function, localization, and relevance to neurologic function

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Debeshi; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    Many cellular processes including neuronal activity are sensitive to changes in intracellular and/or extracellular pH— both of which are regulated by acid-base transporter activity. HCO3−-dependent transporters are particularly potent regulators of intracellular pH in neurons and astrocytes, and also contribute to the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The molecular physiology of HCO3− transporters has advanced considerably over the past ~14 years as investigators have cloned and characterized the function and localization of many Na-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters of the Slc4 family (NCBTs). In this review, we provide an updated overview of the function and localization of NCBTs in the nervous system. Multiple NCBTs are expressed in neurons and astrocytes in various brain regions, as well as in epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Characteristics of human patients with SLC4 gene mutations/deletions and results from recent studies on mice with Slc4 gene disruptions highlight the functional importance of NCBTs in neuronal activity, somatosensory function, and CSF production. Furthermore, energy-deficient states (e.g., hypoxia and ischemia) lead to altered expression and activity of NCBTs. Thus, recent studies expand our understanding of the role of NCBTs in regulating the pH and ionic composition of the nervous system that can modulate neuronal activity. PMID:20884330

  17. Large amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) prodrugs of valproic acid: new prodrug design ideas for central nervous system delivery.

    PubMed

    Peura, Lauri; Malmioja, Kalle; Laine, Krista; Leppänen, Jukka; Gynther, Mikko; Isotalo, Antti; Rautio, Jarkko

    2011-10-03

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery is a major challenge in drug development because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently restricts the entry of drug molecules into the CNS at sufficient amounts. The brain uptake of poorly penetrating drugs could be improved by utilizing the transporters at the BBB with a prodrug approach. In this study, we designed four phenylalanine derivatives of valproic acid and studied their ability to utilize a large amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) in CNS delivery with an aim to show that the meta-substituted phenylalanine prodrugs bind to LAT1 with a higher affinity compared with the affinity of the para-substituted derivatives. All of the prodrugs crossed the BBB carrier mediatedly via LAT1 in in situ rat brain perfusion. For the first time, we introduced a novel meta-substituted phenylalanine analogue promoiety which improved the LAT1 affinity 10-fold and more importantly the rat brain uptake of the prodrug 2-fold compared with those of the para-substituted derivatives. Therefore, we have characterized a new prodrug design idea for CNS drug delivery utilizing a transporter-mediated prodrug approach.

  18. The plasma transport and metabolism of retinoic acid in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John Edgar; Milch, Peter O.; Muto, Yasutoshi; Goodman, DeWitt S.

    1973-01-01

    The transport of retinoic acid in plasma was examined in vitamin A-deficient rats maintained on small doses of radioactively labelled retinoic acid. After ultracentrifugation of serum adjusted to density 1.21, most of the radioactivity (83%) was associated with the proteins of density greater than 1.21, and not with the serum lipoproteins. Gel filtration of the labelled serum on Sephadex G-200 showed that the radioactive label was associated with protein in the molecular-weight range of serum albumin. On polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis almost all of the recovered radioactivity migrated with serum albumin. Similar esults were obtained with serum from a normal control rat given a single oral dose of [14C]retinoic acid. These findings indicate that retinoic acid is transported in rat serum bound to serum albumin, and not by retinol-binding protein (the specific transport protein for plasma retinol). Several tissues and the entire remaining carcase of each rat were extracted with ethanol–acetone to determine the tissue distribution of retinoic acid and some of its metabolites. The total recover of radioactive compounds in in the entire body of the rat was about 7–9μg, representing less than 5% or 10% respectively of the total administered label in the two dosage groups studied. The results confirm that retinoic acid is not stored in any tissue. Most of the radioactive material was found in the carcase, rather than in the specific tissues analysed. Two-thirds of the radioactivity in the carcase appeared to represent unchanged retinoic acid. Of the tissues examined, the liver, kidneys and intestine had relatively high concentrations of radioactive compounds, whereas the testes and fat-pads had the lowest concentrations. PMID:4721615

  19. Transport of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and its conjugates in nodal stem segments of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    Tamas, I.A.; Lim, R.

    1987-04-01

    Donor agar blocks containing either (2-acetyl-/sup 14/C) IAA; (2-acetyl-/sup 14/C) indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartate; (2-aceyl-/sup 14/) indole-3-acetyl-L-glycine; or (2-acetyl-/sup 14/C) indole-3-acetyl-L-alanine were placed on either the apical or the basal cut surface of stem segments each bearing an axillary bud in the middle. A receiver block was placed on the end opposite to the donor. After transport, the segments were divided into five equal sections plus the bud, and the radioactivity of donors, receivers and each part of the stem segments was counted. For all substances, the amount of /sup 14/C transported to the bud from the base was the same or greater than that from the apical end. After basipetal transport, the distribution of /sup 14/C in the segment declined sharply from apex to base. The opposite was true for acropetal transport. Transport for the three IAA conjugates did not different substantially from each other. The IAA transport inhibitor, naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), inhibited basipetal /sup 14/C-IAA transport to the base of the stem segment but did not alter substantially the amount of /sup 14/C-IAA recovered from the bud. The results will be discussed in relation to axillary bud growth regulation.

  20. Sodium-coupled and electrogenic transport of B-complex vitamin nicotinic acid by slc5a8, a member of the Na/glucose co-transporter gene family

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Elangovan; Fei, You-Jun; Miyauchi, Seiji; Zhuang, Lina; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2005-01-01

    SMCT (sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter; slc5a8) is a Na+-coupled transporter for lactate, pyruvate and short-chain fatty acids. Similar to these already known substrates of SMCT, the water-soluble B-complex vitamin nicotinic acid also exists as a monocarboxylate anion (nicotinate) under physiological conditions. Therefore we evaluated the ability of SMCT to mediate the uptake of nicotinate. In mammalian cells, the cloned mouse SMCT (slc5a8) induced the uptake of nicotinate. The SMCT-induced uptake was Na+-dependent. The Michaelis constant for the uptake process was 296±88 μM. The Na+-activation kinetics indicated that at least two Na+ ions are involved in the process. Among the various structural analogues tested, nicotinate was the most effective substrate. Nicotinamide and methylnicotinate were not recognized by the transporter. 2-Pyrazine carboxylate and isonicotinate interacted with the transporter to a moderate extent. SMCT-mediated uptake of nicotinate was inhibited by lactate and pyruvate. In the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system, SMCT-mediated nicotinate transport was electrogenic, as evident from the nicotinate-induced inward currents under voltage-clamp conditions. Substrate-induced currents in this expression system corroborated the substrate specificity determined in the mammalian cell expression system. The kinetic parameters with regard to the affinity of the transporter for nicotinate and the Hill coefficient for Na+ activation, determined by using the oocyte expression system, were also similar to those obtained from the mammalian cell expression system. We conclude that SMCT functions not only as a Na+-coupled transporter for short-chain fatty acids and lactate but also as a Na+-coupled transporter for the water-soluble vitamin nicotinic acid. PMID:15651982

  1. Effect of maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and omega 3 fatty acids on liver fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Nisha S; Manglekar, Rupali R; Dangat, Kamini D; Kulkarni, Asmita V; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2012-01-01

    A disturbed fatty acid metabolism increases the risk of adult non-communicable diseases. This study examines the effect of maternal micronutrients on the fatty acid composition, desaturase activity, mRNA levels of fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in the liver. Pregnant female rats were divided into 6 groups at 2 levels of folic acid both in the presence and absence of vitamin B(12). The vitamin B(12) deficient groups were supplemented with omega 3 fatty acid. An imbalance of maternal micronutrients reduces liver docosahexaenoic acid, increases Δ5 desaturase activity but decreases mRNA levels, decreases Δ6 desaturase activity but not mRNA levels as compared to control. mRNA level of Δ5 desaturase reverts back to the levels of the control group as a result of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation. Our data for the first time indicates that maternal micronutrients differentially alter the activity and expression of fatty acid desaturases in the liver.

  2. Molecular Switch Controlling the Binding of Anionic Bile Acid Conjugates to Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; Tririya, Gasirat; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) may serve as a prodrug target for oral drug absorption. Synthetic, biological, NMR and computational approaches identified the structure-activity relationships of mono- and dianionic bile acid conjugates for hASBT binding. Experimental data combined with a conformationally-sampled pharmacophore/QSAR modeling approach (CSP-SAR) predicted that dianionic substituents with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between hydroxyls on the cholane skeleton and the acid group on the conjugate's aromatic ring increased conjugate hydrophobicity and improved binding affinity. Notably, the model predicted the presence of a conformational molecular switch, where shifting the carboxylate substituent on an aromatic ring by a single position controlled binding affinity. Model validation was performed by effectively shifting the spatial location of the carboxylate by inserting a methylene adjacent to the aromatic ring, resulting in the predicted alteration in binding affinity. This work illustrates conformation as a determinant of ligand binding affinity to a biological transporter. PMID:20504026

  3. Poly(amino acid) functionalized maghemite and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, Davide; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Domínguez-Vera, José Manuel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2013-02-01

    Bimodal MRI/OI imaging probes are of great