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Sample records for acid transport genes

  1. Mutation and gene transfer of neutral amino acid transport System L genes in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gewely, M.R.; Collarini, E.J.; Campbell, G.S.; Oxender, D.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors are attempting to clone the genes coding for amino acid transport System L. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants that are temperature sensitive in their leucyl-tRNA synthetase show temperature-dependent regulation of System L. Temperature resistant mutants isolated from these cells have constitutively derepressed System L activity. Somatic cell fusion studies using these mutants have suggested that a trans-acting element controls regulation of System L. Mutants with reduced transport activity were isolated by a TH-suicide selection. The growth of these mutant cells is limited by the transport defect. CHO mutants were transformed with a human cosmid library, followed by selection at high temperatures and low leucine concentrations. Some transformants have increased levels of System L activity, suggesting that human genes coding for leucine transport have been incorporated into the CHO genome. Human sequences were rescued by a lambda in vitro packaging system. These sequences hybridize to vector and total human DNA. Experiments are being done to confirm that these sequences indeed code for transport System L. They are also attempting to label membrane components of amino acid transporters by group-specific modifying reagents.

  2. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  3. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective. PMID:25055961

  4. Aminoaciduria and altered renal expression of luminal amino acid transporters in mice lacking novel gene collectrin.

    PubMed

    Malakauskas, Sandra M; Quan, Hui; Fields, Timothy A; McCall, Shannon J; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Kourany, Wissam M; Frey, Campbell W; Le, Thu H

    2007-02-01

    Defects in renal proximal tubule transport manifest in a number of human diseases. Although variable in clinical presentation, disorders such as Hartnup disease, Dent's disease, and Fanconi syndrome are characterized by wasting of solutes commonly recovered by the proximal tubule. One common feature of these disorders is aminoaciduria. There are distinct classes of amino acid transporters located in the apical and basal membranes of the proximal tubules that reabsorb >95% of filtered amino acids, yet few details are known about their regulation. We present our physiological characterization of a mouse line with targeted deletion of the gene collectrin that is highly expressed in the kidney. Collectrin-deficient mice display a reduced urinary concentrating capacity due to enhanced solute clearance resulting from profound aminoaciduria. The aminoaciduria is generalized, characterized by loss of nearly every amino acid, and results in marked crystalluria. Furthermore, in the kidney, collectrin-deficient mice have decreased plasma membrane populations of amino acid transporter subtypes B(0)AT1, rBAT, and b(0,+)AT, as well as altered cellular distribution of EAAC1. Our data suggest that collectrin is a novel mediator of renal amino acid transport and may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of a number of human disease correlates. PMID:16985211

  5. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  6. Defective canalicular transport and toxicity of dietary ursodeoxycholic acid in the abcb11-/- mouse: transport and gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renxue; Liu, Lin; Sheps, Jonathan A; Forrest, Dana; Hofmann, Alan F; Hagey, Lee R; Ling, Victor

    2013-08-15

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP), encoded by the abcb11 gene, is the major canalicular transporter of bile acids from the hepatocyte. BSEP malfunction in humans causes bile acid retention and progressive liver injury, ultimately leading to end-stage liver failure. The natural, hydrophilic, bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is efficacious in the treatment of cholestatic conditions, such as primary biliary cirrhosis and cholestasis of pregnancy. The beneficial effects of UDCA include promoting bile flow, reducing hepatic inflammation, preventing apoptosis, and maintaining mitochondrial integrity in hepatocytes. However, the role of BSEP in mediating UDCA efficacy is not known. Here, we used abcb11 knockout mice (abcb11-/-) to test the effects of acute and chronic UDCA administration on biliary secretion, bile acid composition, liver histology, and liver gene expression. Acutely infused UDCA, or its taurine conjugate (TUDC), was taken up by the liver but retained, with negligible biliary output, in abcb11-/- mice. Feeding UDCA to abcb11-/- mice led to weight loss, retention of bile acids, elevated liver enzymes, and histological damage to the liver. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed that genes encoding Mdr1a and Mdr1b (canalicular) as well as Mrp4 (basolateral) transporters were upregulated in abcb11-/- mice. We concluded that infusion of UDCA and TUDC failed to induce bile flow in abcb11-/- mice. UDCA fed to abcb11-/- mice caused liver damage and the appearance of biliary tetra- and penta-hydroxy bile acids. Supplementation with UDCA in the absence of Bsep caused adverse effects in abcb11-/- mice. PMID:23764895

  7. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638980

  8. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha and bile acids regulate human concentrative nucleoside transporter-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kerstin; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Wagner, Martin; Trauner, Michael; Eloranta, Jyrki J

    2009-04-01

    The concentrative nucleoside transporter-1 (CNT1) is a member of the solute carrier 28 (SLC28) gene family and is expressed in the liver, intestine, and kidneys. CNT1 mediates the uptake of naturally occurring pyrimidine nucleosides, but also nucleoside analogs used in anticancer and antiviral therapy. Thus expression levels of CNT1 may affect the pharmacokinetics of these drugs and the outcome of drug therapy. Because little is known about the transcriptional regulation of human CNT1 gene expression, we have characterized the CNT1 promoter with respect to DNA response elements and their binding factors. The transcriptional start site of the CNT1 gene was determined by 5'-RACE. In silico analysis revealed the existence of three putative binding sites for the nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF-4alpha) within the CNT1 promoter. A luciferase reporter gene construct containing the CNT1 promoter region was transactivated by HNF-4alpha in human cell lines derived from the liver, intestine, and kidneys. Consistent with this, we showed in electromobility shift assays that HNF-4alpha specifically binds to two conserved direct repeat-1 motifs within the proximal CNT1 promoter. In cotransfection experiments, the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha further increased, whereas the bile acid-inducible corepressor small heterodimer partner reduced, HNF-4alpha-dependent CNT1 promoter activity. Consistent with the latter phenomenon, CNT1 mRNA expression levels were suppressed in primary human hepatocytes upon bile acid treatment. Supporting the physiological relevance and species conservation of this effect, ileal Cnt1 mRNA expression was decreased upon bile acid feeding and increased upon bile duct ligation in mice. PMID:19228884

  9. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops. PMID:27148336

  10. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops. PMID:27148336

  11. The permease homologue Ssy1p controls the expression of amino acid and peptide transporter genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Didion, T; Regenberg, B; Jørgensen, M U; Kielland-Brandt, M C; Andersen, H A

    1998-02-01

    Amino acid transporters of the yeast plasma membrane (permeases) belong to a family of integral membrane proteins with pronounced structural similarity. We present evidence that a member of this family, encoded by the open reading frame (ORF) YDR160w (SSY1), is required for the expression of a set of transporter genes. Thus, deletion of the SSY1 gene causes loss of leucine-inducible transcription of the amino acid permease genes BAP2, TAT1 and BAP3 (ORF YDR046c) and the peptide transporter, PTR2. D-leucine can generate the signal without entering the cell. We propose that Ssy1p is situated in the plasma membrane and is involved in sensing leucine in the medium. PMID:9489675

  12. Characterization of the promoter region of the gene for the rat neutral and basic amino acid transporter and chromosomal localization of the human gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, N; Mosckovitz, R; Gerber, L D; Mathew, S; Murty, V V; Tate, S S; Udenfriend, S

    1994-01-01

    The promoter region of the rat kidney neutral and basic amino acid transporter (NBAT) gene has been isolated and sequenced. The major transcription initiation site was mapped by primer extension. The entire promoter region and a set of 5' deletions within it were expressed at a high level in LLC-PK1 cells using the luciferase indicator gene. Positive and negative regulatory elements in the promoter region were observed. A human genomic clone of the transporter was also obtained and was used to localize the NBAT gene at the p21 region of chromosome 2. Images PMID:8052618

  13. The human gene SLC25A29, of solute carrier family 25, encodes a mitochondrial transporter of basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-05-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation. PMID:24652292

  14. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  15. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  16. Hartnup disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A19.

    PubMed

    Seow, Heng F; Bröer, Stefan; Bröer, Angelika; Bailey, Charles G; Potter, Simon J; Cavanaugh, Juleen A; Rasko, John E J

    2004-09-01

    Hartnup disorder (OMIM 234500) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of renal and gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport noted for its clinical variability. We localized a gene causing Hartnup disorder to chromosome 5p15.33 and cloned a new gene, SLC6A19, in this region. SLC6A19 is a sodium-dependent and chloride-independent neutral amino acid transporter, expressed predominately in kidney and intestine, with properties of system B(0). We identified six mutations in SLC6A19 that cosegregated with disease in the predicted recessive manner, with most affected individuals being compound heterozygotes. The disease-causing mutations that we tested reduced neutral amino acid transport function in vitro. Population frequencies for the most common mutated SLC6A19 alleles are 0.007 for 517G --> A and 0.001 for 718C --> T. Our findings indicate that SLC6A19 is the long-sought gene that is mutated in Hartnup disorder; its identification provides the opportunity to examine the inconsistent multisystemic features of this disorder. PMID:15286788

  17. Identification of the Bile Acid Transporter Slco1a6 as a Candidate Gene That Broadly Affects Gene Expression in Mouse Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianan; Keller, Mark P; Oler, Angie T; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathryn L; Stapleton, Donald S; Broman, Aimee Teo; Zhao, Wen; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Broman, Karl W; Attie, Alan D

    2015-11-01

    We surveyed gene expression in six tissues in an F2 intercross between mouse strains C57BL/6J (abbreviated B6) and BTBR T(+) tf/J (abbreviated BTBR) made genetically obese with the Leptin(ob) mutation. We identified a number of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) affecting the expression of numerous genes distal to the locus, called trans-eQTL hotspots. Some of these trans-eQTL hotspots showed effects in multiple tissues, whereas some were specific to a single tissue. An unusually large number of transcripts (∼8% of genes) mapped in trans to a hotspot on chromosome 6, specifically in pancreatic islets. By considering the first two principal components of the expression of genes mapping to this region, we were able to convert the multivariate phenotype into a simple Mendelian trait. Fine mapping the locus by traditional methods reduced the QTL interval to a 298-kb region containing only three genes, including Slco1a6, one member of a large family of organic anion transporters. Direct genomic sequencing of all Slco1a6 exons identified a nonsynonymous coding SNP that converts a highly conserved proline residue at amino acid position 564 to serine. Molecular modeling suggests that Pro564 faces an aqueous pore within this 12-transmembrane domain-spanning protein. When transiently overexpressed in HEK293 cells, BTBR organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1A6-mediated cellular uptake of the bile acid taurocholic acid (TCA) was enhanced compared to B6 OATP1A6. Our results suggest that genetic variation in Slco1a6 leads to altered transport of TCA (and potentially other bile acids) by pancreatic islets, resulting in broad gene regulation. PMID:26385979

  18. Glycinergic-Fipronil Uptake Is Mediated by an Amino Acid Carrier System and Induces the Expression of Amino Acid Transporter Genes in Ricinus communis Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Zhao, Jun-Long; Wang, Chuan-Wei; Yu, Ai-Xin; Liu, Niu; Chen, Li; Lin, Fei; Xu, Han-Hong

    2016-05-18

    Phloem-mobile insecticides are efficient for piercing and sucking insect control. Introduction of sugar or amino acid groups to the parent compound can improve the phloem mobility of insecticides, so a glycinergic-fipronil conjugate (GlyF), 2-(3-(3-cyano-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-4-((trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-yl)ureido) acetic acid, was designed and synthesized. Although the "Kleier model" predicted that this conjugate is not phloem mobile, GlyF can be continually detected during a 5 h collection of Ricinus communis phloem sap. Furthermore, an R. communis seedling cotyledon disk uptake experiment demonstrates that the uptake of GlyF is sensitive to pH, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), temperature, and p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (pCMBS) and is likely mediated by amino acid carrier system. To explore the roles of amino acid transporters (AATs) in GlyF uptake, a total of 62 AAT genes were identified from the R. communis genome in silico. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AATs in R. communis were organized into the ATF (amino acid transporter) and APC (amino acid, polyaminem and choline transporter) superfamilies, with five subfamilies in ATF and two in APC. Furthermore, the expression profiles of 20 abundantly expressed AATs (cycle threshold (Ct) values <27) were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 h after GlyF treatment by RT-qPCR. The results demonstrated that expression levels of four AAT genes, RcLHT6, RcANT15, RcProT2, and RcCAT2, were induced by the GlyF treatment in R. communis seedlings. On the basis of the observation that the expression profile of the four candidate genes is similar to the time course observation for GlyF foliar disk uptake, it is suggested that those four genes are possible candidates involved in the uptake of GlyF. These results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of GlyF uptake as well as phloem loading from a molecular biology perspective and facilitate functional

  19. [Inherited amino acid transport disorders].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Tada, K

    1992-07-01

    Disorders due to inherited amino acids transport defect are reviewed. The disorders were categorized into three types of transport defects, namely, brush-border membrane of epithelial cells of small intestine and kidney tubules (Hartnup disease, blue diaper syndrome, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria and lysine malabsorption syndrome), basolateral membrane (lysinuric protein intolerance) and membrane of intracellular organelles (cystinosis and hyperornitinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome). Pathogenesis, clinical feature, laboratory findings, diagnosis, genetics and treatment of these disorders are described, briefly. There is not much data for the transport systems themselves, so that further investigation in molecular and gene levels for transport systems is necessary to clarify the characteristics of the transport and heterogeneity of phenotypes in inherited amino acids transport disorders. PMID:1404888

  20. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. PMID:26548558

  1. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. PMID:26548558

  2. Association study of polymorphisms in the excitatory amino acid transporter 2 gene (SLC1A2) with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiangdong; Shibata, Hiroki; Ninomiya, Hideaki; Tashiro, Nobutada; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Background The glutamatergic dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that genes involved in glutametergic transmission are candidates for schizophrenic susceptibility genes. We have been performing systematic association studies of schizophrenia with the glutamate receptor and transporter genes. In this study we report an association study of the excitatory amino acid transporter 2 gene, SLC1A2 with schizophrenia. Methods We genotyped 100 Japanese schizophrenics and 100 controls recruited from the Kyushu area for 11 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers distributed in the SLC1A2 region using the direct sequencing and pyrosequencing methods, and examined allele, genotype and haplotype association with schizophrenia.The positive finding observed in the Kyushu samples was re-examined using 100 Japanese schizophrenics and 100 controls recruited from the Aichi area. Results We found significant differences in genotype and allele frequencies of SNP2 between cases and controls (P = 0.013 and 0.008, respectively). After Bonferroni corrections, the two significant differences disappeared. We tested haplotype associations for all possible combinations of SNP pairs. SNP2 showed significant haplotype associations with the disease (P = 9.4 × 10-5, P = 0.0052 with Bonferroni correction, at the lowest) in 8 combinations. Moreover, the significant haplotype association of SNP2-SNP7 was replicated in the cumulative analysis of our two sample sets. Conclusion We concluded that at least one susceptibility locus for schizophrenia is probably located within or nearby SLC1A2 in the Japanese population. PMID:15296513

  3. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  4. Maternal Factors Are Associated with the Expression of Placental Genes Involved in Amino Acid Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Day, Pricilla E.; Ntani, Georgia; Crozier, Sarah R.; Mahon, Pam A.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Hanson, Mark A.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Cleal, Jane K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maternal environment and lifestyle factors may modify placental function to match the mother’s capacity to support the demands of fetal growth. Much remains to be understood about maternal influences on placental metabolic and amino acid transporter gene expression. We investigated the influences of maternal lifestyle and body composition (e.g. fat and muscle content) on a selection of metabolic and amino acid transporter genes and their associations with fetal growth. Methods RNA was extracted from 102 term Southampton Women’s Survey placental samples. Expression of nine metabolic, seven exchange, eight accumulative and three facilitated transporter genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Increased placental LAT2 (p = 0.01), y+LAT2 (p = 0.03), aspartate aminotransferase 2 (p = 0.02) and decreased aspartate aminotransferase 1 (p = 0.04) mRNA expression associated with pre-pregnancy maternal smoking. Placental mRNA expression of TAT1 (p = 0.01), ASCT1 (p = 0.03), mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (p = 0.02) and glutamine synthetase (p = 0.05) was positively associated with maternal strenuous exercise. Increased glutamine synthetase mRNA expression (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) associated with higher maternal diet quality (prudent dietary pattern) pre-pregnancy. Lower LAT4 (r = -0.25, p = 0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase 2 mRNA expression (r = -0.28, p = 0.01) associated with higher early pregnancy diet quality. Lower placental ASCT1 mRNA expression associated with measures of increased maternal fat mass, including pre-pregnancy BMI (r = -0.26, p = 0.01). Lower placental mRNA expression of alanine aminotransferase 2 associated with greater neonatal adiposity, for example neonatal subscapular skinfold thickness (r = -0.33, p = 0.001). Conclusion A number of maternal influences have been linked with outcomes in childhood, independently of neonatal size; our finding of associations between placental expression of transporter

  5. A high affinity kidney targeting by chitobionic acid-conjugated polysorbitol gene transporter alleviates unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kim, Sanghwa; Firdous, Jannatul; Lee, Ah-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Seo, Min Kyeong; Park, Tae-Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-01

    Aside from kidney transplantation - a procedure which is exceedingly dependent on donor-match and availability leading to excessive costs - there are currently no permanent treatments available which reverse kidney injury and failure. However, kidney-specific targeted gene therapy has outstanding potential to treat kidney-related dysfunction. Herein we report a novel kidney-specific targeted gene delivery system developed through the conjugation of chitobionic acid (CBA) to a polysorbitol gene transporter (PSGT) synthesized from sorbitol diacrylate and low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene to alleviate unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. CBA-PSGT performed exceptionally well for targeted delivery of HGF to kidney tissues compared to its non-targeted counterparts (P < 0.001) after systemic tail-vein injection and significantly reduced the UUO symptoms, returning the UUO rats to a normal health status. The kidney-targeted CBA-PSGT-delivered HGF also strikingly reduced various pathologic and molecular markers in vivo such as the level of collagens (type I and II), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and the expressions of ICAM-1, TIMP-1 and α-SMA which play a critical role in obstructive kidney functions. Therefore, CBA-PSGT should be further investigated because of its potential to alleviate UUO and kidney-related diseases using high affinity kidney targeting. PMID:27318934

  6. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: Structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K.; Dueker, M.; Stoffel, W.

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNA, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several bindings sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1. The ASCT1 gene (SLC1A4) structure reported here will facilitate the characterization of the genes of the other members of the GLAST-related transporter family and might be useful in the elucidation of amino acid transport-related defects. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Role of the DHH1 gene in the regulation of monocarboxylic acids transporters expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mota, Sandra; Vieira, Neide; Barbosa, Sónia; Delaveau, Thierry; Torchet, Claire; Le Saux, Agnès; Garcia, Mathilde; Pereira, Ana; Lemoine, Sophie; Coulpier, Fanny; Darzacq, Xavier; Benard, Lionel; Casal, Margarida; Devaux, Frédéric; Paiva, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments revealed that DHH1, a RNA helicase involved in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation, complemented the phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant affected in the expression of genes coding for monocarboxylic-acids transporters, JEN1 and ADY2 (Paiva S, Althoff S, Casal M, Leao C. FEMS Microbiol Lett, 1999, 170:301-306). In wild type cells, JEN1 expression had been shown to be undetectable in the presence of glucose or formic acid, and induced in the presence of lactate. In this work, we show that JEN1 mRNA accumulates in a dhh1 mutant, when formic acid was used as sole carbon source. Dhh1 interacts with the decapping activator Dcp1 and with the deadenylase complex. This led to the hypothesis that JEN1 expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by Dhh1 in formic acid. Analyses of JEN1 mRNAs decay in wild-type and dhh1 mutant strains confirmed this hypothesis. In these conditions, the stabilized JEN1 mRNA was associated to polysomes but no Jen1 protein could be detected, either by measurable lactate carrier activity, Jen1-GFP fluorescence detection or western blots. These results revealed the complexity of the expression regulation of JEN1 in S. cerevisiae and evidenced the importance of DHH1 in this process. Additionally, microarray analyses of dhh1 mutant indicated that Dhh1 plays a large role in metabolic adaptation, suggesting that carbon source changes triggers a complex interplay between transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects. PMID:25365506

  8. Role of the DHH1 Gene in the Regulation of Monocarboxylic Acids Transporters Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Sónia; Delaveau, Thierry; Torchet, Claire; Le Saux, Agnès; Garcia, Mathilde; Pereira, Ana; Lemoine, Sophie; Coulpier, Fanny; Darzacq, Xavier; Benard, Lionel; Casal, Margarida; Devaux, Frédéric; Paiva, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments revealed that DHH1, a RNA helicase involved in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation, complemented the phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant affected in the expression of genes coding for monocarboxylic-acids transporters, JEN1 and ADY2 (Paiva S, Althoff S, Casal M, Leao C. FEMS Microbiol Lett, 1999, 170∶301–306). In wild type cells, JEN1 expression had been shown to be undetectable in the presence of glucose or formic acid, and induced in the presence of lactate. In this work, we show that JEN1 mRNA accumulates in a dhh1 mutant, when formic acid was used as sole carbon source. Dhh1 interacts with the decapping activator Dcp1 and with the deadenylase complex. This led to the hypothesis that JEN1 expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by Dhh1 in formic acid. Analyses of JEN1 mRNAs decay in wild-type and dhh1 mutant strains confirmed this hypothesis. In these conditions, the stabilized JEN1 mRNA was associated to polysomes but no Jen1 protein could be detected, either by measurable lactate carrier activity, Jen1-GFP fluorescence detection or western blots. These results revealed the complexity of the expression regulation of JEN1 in S. cerevisiae and evidenced the importance of DHH1 in this process. Additionally, microarray analyses of dhh1 mutant indicated that Dhh1 plays a large role in metabolic adaptation, suggesting that carbon source changes triggers a complex interplay between transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects. PMID:25365506

  9. Isolation of the braZ gene encoding the carrier for a novel branched-chain amino acid transport system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, T; Kose-Terai, K; Uratani, Y

    1991-03-01

    The braZ gene for a novel branched-chain amino acid transport system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was isolated and characterized. Determination of the nucleotide sequence showed that the braZ gene comprises 1,311 nucleotides specifying a protein of 437 amino acids. Hydropathy analysis suggested that the product is an integral membrane protein with 12 membrane-spanning segments. The amino acid sequence showed extensive homology to those of the braB and brnQ gene products, branched-chain amino acid carriers of P. aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. By using the T7 RNA polymerase-promoter system, the braZ gene product was identified as a protein of an apparent Mr of 34,000 on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel. Properties of the transport system encoded by braZ were studied by using P. aeruginosa PAO3537, defective in both the high- and low-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems (LIV-I and LIV-II, respectively). The transport system encoded by braZ was found to be another effective branched-chain amino acid transport system in P. aeruginosa PAO and was thus designated as LIV-III. This system is specific for isoleucine and valine, giving the same Km value of 12 microM for these amino acids. The system was found, however, to have a very low affinity for leucine, with a Km value of 150 microM, which contrasts with the substrate specificities of LIV-I and LIV-II. PMID:1900503

  10. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS. PMID:25873685

  11. Transcriptome Analysis and Postprandial Expression of Amino Acid Transporter Genes in the Fast Muscles and Gut of Chinese Perch (Siniperca chuatsi).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Li, Yulong; Cheng, Jia; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Ming; Wu, Yuanan; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jianshe; Chu, Wuying

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of the expression and regulation of growth-related genes in the muscles of Chinese perch is of great interest to aquaculturists because of the commercial value of the species. The transcriptome annotation of the skeletal muscles is a crucial step in muscle growth-related gene analysis. In this study, we generated 52 504 230 reads of mRNA sequence data from the fast muscles of the Chinese perch by using Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq. Twenty-one amino acid transporter genes were annotated by searching protein and gene ontology databases, and postprandial changes in their transcript abundance were assayed after administering a single satiating meal to Chinese perch juveniles (body mass, approximately 100 g), following fasting for 1 week. The gut content of the Chinese perch increased significantly after 1 h and remained high for 6 h following the meal and emptied within 48-96 h. Expression of eight amino acid transporter genes was assayed in the fast muscles through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h. Among the genes, five transporter transcripts were markedly up-regulated within 1 h of refeeding, indicating that they may be potential candidate genes involved in the rapid-response signaling system regulating fish myotomal muscle growth. These genes display coordinated regulation favoring the resumption of myogenesis responding to feeding. PMID:27463683

  12. Transcriptome Analysis and Postprandial Expression of Amino Acid Transporter Genes in the Fast Muscles and Gut of Chinese Perch (Siniperca chuatsi)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zeng, Ming; Wu, Yuanan; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jianshe

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of the expression and regulation of growth-related genes in the muscles of Chinese perch is of great interest to aquaculturists because of the commercial value of the species. The transcriptome annotation of the skeletal muscles is a crucial step in muscle growth-related gene analysis. In this study, we generated 52 504 230 reads of mRNA sequence data from the fast muscles of the Chinese perch by using Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq. Twenty-one amino acid transporter genes were annotated by searching protein and gene ontology databases, and postprandial changes in their transcript abundance were assayed after administering a single satiating meal to Chinese perch juveniles (body mass, approximately 100 g), following fasting for 1 week. The gut content of the Chinese perch increased significantly after 1 h and remained high for 6 h following the meal and emptied within 48–96 h. Expression of eight amino acid transporter genes was assayed in the fast muscles through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h. Among the genes, five transporter transcripts were markedly up-regulated within 1 h of refeeding, indicating that they may be potential candidate genes involved in the rapid-response signaling system regulating fish myotomal muscle growth. These genes display coordinated regulation favoring the resumption of myogenesis responding to feeding. PMID:27463683

  13. Cloning, nucleotide sequences, and identification of products of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO bra genes, which encode the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    A DNA fragment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO containing genes specifying the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) was isolated. The fragment contained the braC gene, encoding the binding protein for branched-chain amino acids, and the 4-kilobase DNA segment adjacent to 3' of braC. The nucleotide sequence of the 4-kilobase DNA fragment was determined and found to contain four open reading frames, designated braD, braE, braF, and braG. The braD and braE genes specify very hydrophobic proteins of 307 and 417 amino acid residues, respectively. The braD gene product showed extensive homology (67% identical) to the livH gene product, a component required for the Escherichia coli high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems. The braF and braG genes encode proteins of 255 and 233 amino acids, respectively, both containing amino acid sequences typical of proteins with ATP-binding sites. By using a T7 RNA polymerase/promoter system together with plasmids having various deletions in the braDEFG region, the braD, braE, braF, and braG gene products were identified as proteins with apparent Mrs of 25,500, 34,000, 30,000, and 27,000, respectively. These proteins were found among cell membrane proteins on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel stained with Coomassie blue. Images PMID:2120183

  14. Nucleotide sequences and characterization of liv genes encoding components of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, K; Ohnishi, K; Kiritani, K

    1992-07-01

    A 7.6-kb fragment of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 containing the liv gene cluster, which specifies the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I), has been isolated. The upstream region contains the livB and livC genes encoding the leucine-isoleucine-valine-threonine and leucine-specific binding proteins, respectively. In this study, the nucleotide sequence of the 4-kb downstream segment was determined and found to contain four reading frames, designated as livA, livE, livF, and livG, that encode putative membrane-associated proteins. The livA and livE genes encode hydrophobic proteins composed of 308 and 425 amino acid residues, respectively. The livF and livG genes encode hydrophilic proteins of 255 and 237 amino acids, respectively; both the proteins contain consensus amino acid sequences found in proteins with ATP-binding sites. These four genes linked together have a potential rho-independent transcriptional terminator adjacent to the 3'-end of livG. No promoter sequence was found in the immediate upstream region of the livAEFG cluster. The livA, livE, livF, and livG gene products were identified as proteins with apparent M(r)s of 25,500, 34,500, 28,000, and 26,000, respectively, by SDS-polyacryl-amide gel electrophoresis. The deduced amino acid sequences of these four proteins showed strong homology to those of the corresponding membrane-associated proteins required for the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems from both Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:1429514

  15. Does Short-Term Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Influence Brain Hippocampus Gene Expression of Zinc Transporter-3?

    PubMed

    Sopian, Nur Farhana Ahmad; Ajat, Mokrish; Shafie, Nurul' Izzati; Noor, Mohd Hezmee Mohd; Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Meng, Goh Yong; Ahmad, Hafandi

    2015-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 fatty acids have been recognized to improve brain cognitive function. Deficiency leads to dysfunctional zinc metabolism associated with learning and memory impairment. The objective of this study is to explore the effect of short-term dietary omega-3 fatty acids on hippocampus gene expression at the molecular level in relation to spatial recognition memory in mice. A total of 24 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups and fed a standard pellet as a control group (CTL, n = 6), standard pellet added with 10% (w/w) fish oil (FO, n = 6), 10% (w/w) soybean oil (SO, n = 6) and 10% (w/w) butter (BT, n = 6). After 3 weeks on the treatment diets, spatial-recognition memory was tested on a Y-maze. The hippocampus gene expression was determined using a real-time PCR. The results showed that 3 weeks of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improved cognitive performance along with the up-regulation of α-synuclein, calmodulin and transthyretin genes expression. In addition, dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency increased the level of ZnT3 gene and subsequently reduced cognitive performance in mice. These results indicate that the increased the ZnT3 levels caused by the deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids produced an abnormal zinc metabolism that in turn impaired the brain cognitive performance in mice. PMID:26184176

  16. Genetic analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system by use of plasmids carrying the bra genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    About 30 mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO defective in the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) were isolated by the selection for resistance to 4-aza-DL-leucine, a toxic leucine analog for LIV-I. All of the mutants were complemented by plasmid pKTH24, harboring the braC gene, which encodes the branched-chain amino acid-binding protein, and the four open reading frames named braD, braE, braF, and braG (T. Hoshino and K. Kose, J. Bacteriol. 172:5531-5539, 1990). We identified five cistrons corresponding to these bra genes by complementation analysis with various derivatives of pKTH24, confirming that the braD, braE, braF, and braG genes are required for the LIV-I transport system. We also found mutations that seem likely to be mutations in a promoter region for the bra genes and those with polarity in the intercistronic region between braC and braD. Analysis with an omega interposon showed that the bra genes are organized as an operon and are cotranscribed in the order braC-braD-braE-braF-braG from a promoter located in the 5'-flanking region of the braC gene. PMID:2120184

  17. The peroxisomal transporter gene ANT1 is regulated by a deviant oleate response element (ORE): characterization of the signal for fatty acid induction.

    PubMed Central

    Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Palmieri, Luigi; Hartig, Andreas; Hamilton, Barbara; Ruis, Helmut; Erdmann, Ralf; Gurvitz, Aner

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae ANT1/YPR128c encodes the peroxisomal adenine nucleotide transporter that provides ATP for intra-peroxisomal activation of medium-chain fatty acids. A lacZ reporter construct comprising the ANT1 promoter was shown to be comparatively more highly expressed in a wild-type strain grown on oleic acid, a long-chain fatty acid, than in pip2Delta(oaf1)Delta mutant cells that are defective in fatty acid induction. The ANT1 promoter was demonstrated to contain a deviant oleate response element (ORE) that could bind the Pip2p-Oaf1p transcription factor and confer activation on a basal CYC1-lacZ reporter gene. Expression of Ant1p as well as other enzymes whose genes are known to be regulated by a canonical ORE was found to be increased in cells grown on lauric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid. We concluded that the signal for induction does not differentiate between long- and medium-chain fatty acids. This signal was independent of beta-oxidation or the biogenesis of the peroxisomal compartment where this process occurs, since a pox1Delta strain blocked in the first and rate-limiting step of beta-oxidation as well as various pex mutant cells devoid of intact peroxisomes produced sufficient amounts of Pip2p-Oaf1p for binding OREs in vitro and for expressing an ORE-driven reporter gene. The signal's durability was shown to be related to the concentration of fatty acids in the medium, since a pex6Delta strain expressed an ORE-driven reporter gene at high levels for a longer period than did isogenic wild-type cells. Generation of the signal was also independent of protein synthesis, as demonstrated by cycloheximide treatment. PMID:12071844

  18. Association study of polymorphisms in the neutral amino acid transporter genes SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and the glycine transporter genes SLC6A5, SLC6A9 with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiangdong; Sagata, Noriaki; Takeuchi, Naoko; Tanaka, Masami; Ninomiya, Hideaki; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Background Based on the glutamatergic dysfunction hypothesis for schizophrenia pathogenesis, we have been performing systematic association studies of schizophrenia with the genes involved in glutametergic transmission. We report here association studies of schizophrenia with SLC1A4, SLC1A5 encoding neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1, ASCT2, and SLC6A5, SLC6A9 encoding glycine transporters GLYT2, GLYT1, respectively. Methods We initially tested the association of 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed in the four gene regions with schizophrenia using 100 Japanese cases-control pairs and examined allele, genotype and haplotype association with schizophrenia. The observed nominal significance were examined in the full-size samples (400 cases and 420 controls). Results We observed nominally significant single-marker associations with schizophrenia in SNP2 (P = 0.021) and SNP3 (P = 0.029) of SLC1A4, SNP1 (P = 0.009) and SNP2 (P = 0.022) of SLC6A5. We also observed nominally significant haplotype associations with schizophrenia in the combinations of SNP2-SNP7 (P = 0.037) of SLC1A4 and SNP1-SNP4 (P = 0.043) of SLC6A5. We examined all of the nominal significance in the Full-size Sample Set, except one haplotype with insufficient LD. The significant association of SNP1 of SLC6A5 with schizophrenia was confirmed in the Full-size Sample Set (P = 0.018). Conclusion We concluded that at least one susceptibility locus for schizophrenia may be located within or nearby SLC6A5, whereas SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and SLC6A9 are unlikely to be major susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population. PMID:18638388

  19. Yeast Cyc8p and Tup1p proteins function as coactivators for transcription of Stp1/2p-dependent amino acid transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Mukai, Yukio

    The yeast Cyc8p-Tup1p complex is known to serve primarily as a transcriptional corepressor in a variety of biological processes. However, less is known about its function as a coactivator. Herein, we found tryptophan transporter genes, TAT1 and TAT2, that, when overexpressed, suppressed the slow growth of Δcyc8. We observed that the addition of tryptophan to Δcyc8 cultures partially restored cell growth, and the deletion of CYC8 and TUP1 reduced transcriptional levels of TAT1 and TAT2. Tup1p bound to the promoter region of TAT1 and TAT2 genes that were dependent on STP1 and STP2 (encoding DNA-binding activator proteins) for expression. Similarly, transcription of the other Stp1/2p-dependent amino acid transporter (AAT) genes also required CYC8 and TUP1 gene functions. These data indicate that Cyc8p-Tup1p plays a role as a transcriptional coactivator for AAT genes via Stp1/2p activators and that lowering intracellular tryptophan by CYC8 deletion causes slow growth. PMID:26546823

  20. Effects of dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio on fatty acid composition, free amino acid profile and gene expression of transporters in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengna; Duan, Yehui; Li, Yinghui; Tang, Yulong; Geng, Meimei; Oladele, Oso Abimbola; Kim, Sung Woo; Yin, Yulong

    2015-03-14

    Revealing the expression patterns of fatty acid and amino acid transporters as affected by dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio would be useful for further clarifying the importance of the balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFA. A total of ninety-six finishing pigs were fed one of four diets with the ratio of 1:1, 2·5:1, 5:1 and 10:1. Pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio of 5:1 had the highest (P< 0·05) daily weight gain, and those fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio of 1:1 had the largest loin muscle area (P< 0·01). The concentration of n-3 PUFA was raised as the ratio declined (P< 0·05) in the longissimus dorsi and subcutaneous adipose tissue. The contents of tryptophan, tasty amino acids and branched-chain amino acids in the longissimus dorsi were enhanced in pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1-5:1. The mRNA expression level of the fatty acid transporter fatty acid transport protein-1 (FATP-1) was declined (P< 0·05) in the longissimus dorsi of pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1-5:1, and increased (P< 0·05) in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 5:1 and 10:1. The expression profile of FATP-4 was similar to those of FATP-1 in the adipose tissue. The mRNA expression level of the amino acid transceptors LAT1 and SNAT2 was up-regulated (P< 0·05) in the longissimus dorsi of pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1 and 2·5:1. In conclusion, maintaining the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1-5:1 would facilitate the absorption and utilisation of fatty acids and free amino acids, and result in improved muscle and adipose composition. PMID:25704496

  1. Na+ dependent acid-base transporters in the choroid plexus; insights from slc4 and slc9 gene deletion studies

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Henriette L.; Nguyen, An T.; Pedersen, Fredrik D.; Damkier, Helle H.

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is located in the ventricular system of the brain, where it secretes the majority of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system and surrounds the central nervous system. The CPE is a highly vascularized single layer of cuboidal cells with an unsurpassed transepithelial water and solute transport rate. Several members of the slc4a family of bicarbonate transporters are expressed in the CPE. In the basolateral membrane the electroneutral Na+ dependent Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, NCBE (slc4a10) is expressed. In the luminal membrane, the electrogenic Na+:HCO3− cotransporter, NBCe2 (slc4a5) is expressed. The electroneutral Na+:HCO3− cotransporter, NBCn1 (slc4a7), has been located in both membranes. In addition to the bicarbonate transporters, the Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE1 (slc9a1), is located in the luminal membrane of the CPE. Genetically modified mice targeting slc4a2, slc4a5, slc4a7, slc4a10, and slc9a1 have been generated. Deletion of slc4a5, 7 or 10, or slc9a1 has numerous impacts on CP function and structure in these mice. Removal of the transporters affects brain ventricle size (slc4a5 and slc4a10) and intracellular pH regulation (slc4a7 and slc4a10). In some instances, removal of the proteins from the CPE (slc4a5, 7, and 10) causes changes in abundance and localization of non-target transporters known to be involved in pH regulation and CSF secretion. The focus of this review is to combine the insights gathered from these knockout mice to highlight the impact of slc4 gene deletion on the CSF production and intracellular pH regulation resulting from the deletion of slc4a5, 7 and 10, and slc9a1. Furthermore, the review contains a comparison of the described human mutations of these genes to the findings in the knockout studies. Finally, the future perspective of utilizing these proteins as potential targets for the treatment of CSF disorders will be discussed. PMID:24155723

  2. Deletion of a gene encoding an amino acid transporter in the midgut membrane causes resistance to a Bombyx parvo-like virus.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Kidokoro, Kurako; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nohata, Junko; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kobayashi, Isao; Uchino, Keiro; Kalyebi, Andrew; Eguchi, Ryokitsu; Hara, Wajiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko

    2008-05-27

    Bombyx mori densovirus type 2 (BmDNV-2), a parvo-like virus, replicates only in midgut columnar cells and causes fatal disease. The resistance expressed in some silkworm strains against the virus is determined by a single gene, nsd-2, which is characterized as nonsusceptibility irrespective of the viral dose. However, the responsible gene has been unknown. We isolated the nsd-2 gene by positional cloning. The virus resistance is caused by a 6-kb deletion in the ORF of a gene encoding a 12-pass transmembrane protein, a member of an amino acid transporter family, and expressed only in midgut. Germ-line transformation with a wild-type transgene expressed in the midgut restores susceptibility, showing that the defective membrane protein is responsible for resistance. Cumulatively, our data show that the membrane protein is a functional receptor for BmDNV-2. This is a previously undescribed report of positional cloning of a mutant gene in Bombyx and isolation of an absolute virus resistance gene in insects. PMID:18495929

  3. Knockdown of a nutrient amino acid transporter gene LdNAT1 reduces free neutral amino acid contents and impairs Leptinotarsa decemlineata pupation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai-Yun; Guo, Wen-Chao; Ahmat, Tursun; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    A Leptinotarsa decemlineata SLC6 NAT gene (LdNAT1) was cloned. LdNAT1 was highly expressed in the larval alimentary canal especially midgut. LdNAT1 mRNA levels were high right after the molt and low just before the molt. JH and a JH analog pyriproxyfen activated LdNAT1 expression. RNAi of an allatostatin gene LdAS-C increased JH and upregulated LdNAT1 transcription. Conversely, silencing of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT decreased JH and reduced LdNAT1 expression. Moreover, 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide repressed LdNAT1 expression, whereas a decrease in 20E by RNAi of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD and disruption of 20E signaling by knockdown of LdE75 and LdFTZ-F1 activated LdNAT1 expression. Thus, LdNAT1 responded to both 20E and JH. Moreover, knockdown of LdNAT1 reduced the contents of cysteine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and serine in the larval bodies and increased the contents of these amino acids in the larval feces. Furthermore, RNAi of LdNAT1 inhibited insulin/target of rapamycin pathway, lowered 20E and JH titers, reduced 20E and JH signaling, retarded larval growth and impaired pupation. These data showed that LdNAT1 was involved in the absorption of several neutral amino acids critical for larval growth and metamorphosis. PMID:26657797

  4. Effects of reducing dietary protein on the expression of nutrition sensing genes (amino acid transporters) in weaned piglets*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; He, Liu-qin; Cui, Zhi-jie; Liu, Gang; Yao, Kang; Wu, Fei; Li, Jun; Li, Tie-jun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of crude protein (CP) levels in the diet on the mRNA expression of amino acid (AA) transporters were studied in a 45-d trial. Eighteen piglets with an initial body weight (BW) of 9.57 kg were assigned to three groups (14%, 17%, and 20% CP in the diet) in a completely randomized design (six replicates per treatment). Diets were supplemented with crystalline AA to achieve equal standardized ileal digestible contents of Lys, Met plus Cys, Thr, and Trp, and were provided ad libitum. After 45 d, all piglets were slaughtered to collect small intestine samples. Compared with the values in the 14% CP group, the expressions of ASCT2, 4F2hc, and ATB0 mRNA in the jejunum were increased by 23.00%, 12.00%, 6.00% and 48.00%, 47.00%, 56.00% in the 17% and 20% CP groups, respectively. These results indicate that a 14% CP diet supplemented with crystalline AA may not transport enough AA into the body and maintain growth performance of piglets. However, a reduction of dietary 17% CP may reduce the excretion of nitrogen into the environment while supporting the development of piglets. Therefore, the 17% CP level is more suitable than 14% CP level. PMID:26055911

  5. The structure of the gene ATRC1 coding for a cationic amino acid transport system in man: Molecular studies in lysinuric protein intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Incerti, B.; Sebastio, G.; Parenti, G.

    1994-09-01

    The human cDNA (ATRC1) homologue of a murine gene encoding for a transporter specific for cationic amino acid (CAA) has been isolated. ATRC1 stimulates the uptake of CAA and shows the kinetic properties of system y+ when expressed in frog oocytes. To characterize the organization of the ATRC1 gene, a {lambda} phages genomic DNA library has been screened using an ATRC1 full length cDNA clone as a probe. Nine positive phages have been subcloned in plasmids and sequenced using cDNA specific primers to identify intron-exon junctions. The ATRC1 gene consists of 13 exons with an alternative first exon. Analysis of the intron/exon boundaries showed canonical sequences at the splice junction sites. ATRC1 expression pattern has been analyzed by RT-PCR. ATRC1 is expressed in adult fibroblasts and enterocytes, in fetal kidney, brain and heart, and in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The knowledge of structure and organization of ATRC1 can help in studying inborn errors of CAA transport. The best characterized among these diseases is Lysinuric Protein Intolerance (LPI) a multisystem disorder with impaired formation of urea and hyperammonemia after protein ingestion. Linkage analysis performed on 10 LPI patients from 9 Italian families using two intragenic RFLPs revealed 3 informative families and no recombinations. Using the CA-repeat microsatellite D12S120 (2 cM far from ATRC-1 locus) we found 7 informative families and 3 recombinational events. The sequence of the entire coding region of an LPI patient failed to show mutations. The data so far obtained do not seem to support the hypothesis that ATRC1 is the LPI gene.

  6. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Effect of egg weight on composition, embryonic growth, and expression of amino acid transporter genes in yolk sac membranes and small intestines of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Chen, M X; Li, X G; Yan, H C; Wang, X Q; Gao, C Q

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of egg weight on the composition of the egg, the growth of the embryo, and the expression of amino acid transporter genes in the yolk sac membranes and small intestines of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia). A total of 240 fertilized eggs were collected and divided into two groups based on the weight of the eggs, light (LE) and heavy (HE). The composition of 20 eggs from each group was measured, and the remaining eggs were weighed and placed in an incubator. On embryonic days (E) 9, 11, 13, and 15 and day of hatch (DOH), 15 embryos/hatchlings from each group were measured for embryonic growth, and samples were collected. The HE had heavier yolk and albumen weights than the LE (P < 0.01). Compared with the LE, the HE had heavier yolk-free embryonic body and yolk sac weights from E13 to DOH (P < 0.05). Additionally, the HE had larger yolk sac membrane weights from E13 to E15 (P < 0.05) and had more residual yolk sac content on DOH than those of the LE (P < 0.01). The yolk absorption was greater for the HE than for the LE from E11 to E13 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the abundance of CAT2 and PepT1 mRNA in the yolk sac membranes was greater in the HE than in the LE on E13 (P < 0.05). Compared with the LE, the gene expression of EAAT2 in the intestine on E13 was greater in the HE, whereas the expression of EAAT3 was lower in the HE (P < 0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that egg weight influenced the composition of the eggs, embryonic development, and expression of amino acid transporter genes in the yolk sac membranes and small intestines of pigeon embryos. PMID:26957627

  8. Gene expression of fatty acid transport and binding proteins in the blood-brain barrier and the cerebral cortex of the rat: differences across development and with different DHA brain status.

    PubMed

    Pélerin, Hélène; Jouin, Mélanie; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen C; Langelier, Bénédicte; Guesnet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Specific mechanisms for maintaining docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration in brain cells but also transporting DHA from the blood across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are not agreed upon. Our main objective was therefore to evaluate the level of gene expression of fatty acid transport and fatty acid binding proteins in the cerebral cortex and at the BBB level during the perinatal period of active brain DHA accretion, at weaning, and until the adult age. We measured by real time RT-PCR the mRNA expression of different isoforms of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) and the fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 in cerebral cortex and isolated microvessels at embryonic day 18 (E18) and postnatal days 14, 21 and 60 (P14, P21 and P60, respectively) in rats receiving different n-3 PUFA dietary supplies (control, totally deficient or DHA-supplemented). In control rats, all the genes were expressed at the BBB level (P14 to P60), the mRNA levels of FABP5 and ACSL3 having the highest values. Age-dependent differences included a systematic decrease in the mRNA expressions between P14-P21 and P60 (2 to 3-fold), with FABP7 mRNA abundance being the most affected (10-fold). In the cerebral cortex, mRNA levels varied differently since FATP4, ACSL3 and ACSL6 and the three FABPs genes were highly expressed. There were no significant differences in the expression of the 10 genes studied in n-3 deficient or DHA-supplemented rats despite significant differences in their brain DHA content, suggesting that brain DHA uptake from the blood does not necessarily require specific transporters within cerebral endothelial cells and could, under these experimental conditions, be a simple passive diffusion process. PMID:25123062

  9. Expression of intestinal transporter genes in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    CHO, SOO-MIN; PARK, SUNG-WON; KIM, NA-HYUN; PARK, JIN-A; YI, HEE; CHO, HEE-JUNG; PARK, KI-HWAN; HWANG, INGYUN; SHIN, HO-CHUL

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to produce a transcriptional database of the intestinal transporters of beagle dogs. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the expression of various mRNAs was measured using GeneChip® oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 124 transporter genes were detected. Genes for fatty acid, peptide, amino acid and glucose and multidrug resistance/multidrug resistance-associated protein (MDR/MRP) transport were expressed at relatively higher levels than the other transporter types. The dogs exhibited abundant mRNA expression of the fatty acid transporters (fatty acid binding proteins, FABPs) FABP1 and FABP2, the ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs) ABCB1A and ABCC2, the amino acid/peptide transporters SLC3A1 and SLC15A1, the glucose transporters SLC5A1, SLC2A2 and SLC2A5, the organic anion transporter SLC22A9 and the phosphate transporters SLC20A1 and SLC37A4. In mice, a similar profile was observed with high expression of the glucose transporters SLC5A1 and SLC2As, the fatty acid transporters FABP1 and FABP2, the MDR/MRP transporters ABCB1A and ABCC2 and the phosphate transporter SLC37A4. However, the overall data reveal diverse transcriptomic profiles of the intestinal transporters of dogs and mice. Therefore, the current database may be useful for comparing the intestinal transport systems of dogs with those of mice to better evaluate xenobiotics. PMID:23251289

  10. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  11. Focal Thalamic Degeneration from Ethanol and Thiamine Deficiency is Associated with Neuroimmune Gene Induction, Microglial Activation, and Lack of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liya; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Background Wernicke's encephalopathy-Korsakoff syndrome (WE-KS) is common in alcoholics, caused by thiamine deficiency (TD; vitamin B1) and associated with lesions to the thalamus (THAL). Although TD alone can cause WE, the high incidence in alcoholism suggests that TD and ethanol (EtOH) interact. Methods Mice in control, TD, or EtOH groups alone or combined were studied after 5 or 10 days of treatment. THAL and entorhinal cortex (ENT) histochemistry and mRNA were assessed. Results Combined EtOH-TD treatment for 5 days (EtOH-TD5) showed activated microglia, proinflammatory gene induction and THAL neurodegeneration that was greater than that found with TD alone (TD5), whereas 10 days resulted in marked THAL degeneration and microglial-neuroimmune activation in both groups. In contrast, 10 days of TD did not cause ENT degeneration. Interestingly, in ENT, TD10 activated microglia and astrocytes more than EtOH-TD10. In THAL, multiple astrocytic markers were lost consistent with glial cell loss. TD blocks glucose metabolism more than acetate. Acetate derived from hepatic EtOH metabolism is transported by monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT) into both neurons and astrocytes that use acetyl-CoA synthetase (AcCoAS) to generate cellular energy from acetate. MCT and AcCoAS expression in THAL is lower than ENT prompting the hypothesis that focal THAL degeneration is related to insufficient MCT and AcCoAS in THAL. To test this hypothesis, we administered glycerin triacetate (GTA) to increase blood acetate and found it protected the THAL from TD-induced degeneration. Conclusions Our findings suggest that EtOH potentiates TD-induced THAL degeneration through neuroimmune gene induction. The findings support the hypothesis that TD deficiency inhibits global glucose metabolism and that a reduced ability to process acetate for cellular energy results in THAL focal degeneration in alcoholics contributing to the high incidence of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in alcoholism. PMID

  12. Amino Acid Transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1969-01-01

    Properties of the transport systems for amino acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated. Exogenous 14C-labeled amino acids were shown to equilibrate with the internal native amino acid pool prior to incorporation into protein. When added at low external concentrations, the majority of the amino acids examined entered the protein of the cell unaltered. The rates of amino acid transport, established at low concentrations with 18 commonly occurring amino acids, varied as much as 40-fold. The transport process became saturated at high external amino acid concentrations, was temperature-sensitive, and was inhibited by sodium azide and iodoacetamide. Intracellular to extracellular amino acid ratios of 100- to 300-fold were maintained during exponential growth of the population in a glucose minimal medium. When the medium became depleted of glucose, neither extracellular nor intracellular amino acids could be detected. PMID:4974392

  13. Cloning and nucleotide sequences of livB and livC, the structural genes encoding binding proteins of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, K; Nakazima, A; Matsubara, K; Kiritani, K

    1990-02-01

    The liv gene cluster responsible for encoding the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport proteins in Salmonella typhimurium was mapped in the 7.6-kilobase HindIII-SacI segment of plasmid pMN12 by utilizing the gene dosage effect. By subcloning and biochemical analysis, the livB and livC structural genes encoding the leucine-, isoleucine-, valine-, threonine-binding protein (LIVT-BP) and the leucine-specific binding protein (L-BP), respectively, were localized within the 3,617-base HindIII-BstEII segment. Upon determining the nucleotide sequence of the 3,617 bases, we found that the coding sequence of the livB gene (1,095 base pairs) starts at the position 355 and specifies the precursor LIVT-BP of 365 amino acid residues, and the livC gene (1,107 base pairs) starts at the position 2,452 and encodes the precursor L-BP of 369 amino acid residues. The two genes, separated by a 1-kilobase intergenic region, each possess potential promoters and rho-independent transcriptional terminators. The mature LIVT-BP and L-BP are produced by removing the putative 21 and 23 signal peptides from the respective precursors. In comparison with the analogous two binding proteins from Escherichia coli K-12, strong homologies are observed. PMID:2193932

  14. Carnitine transport and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Nicola; Frigeni, Marta; Pasquali, Marzia

    2016-10-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent β-oxidation. It can be synthesized by the body or assumed with the diet from meat and dairy products. Defects in carnitine biosynthesis do not routinely result in low plasma carnitine levels. Carnitine is accumulated by the cells and retained by kidneys using OCTN2, a high affinity organic cation transporter specific for carnitine. Defects in the OCTN2 carnitine transporter results in autosomal recessive primary carnitine deficiency characterized by decreased intracellular carnitine accumulation, increased losses of carnitine in the urine, and low serum carnitine levels. Patients can present early in life with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic encephalopathy, or later in life with skeletal and cardiac myopathy or sudden death from cardiac arrhythmia, usually triggered by fasting or catabolic state. This disease responds to oral carnitine that, in pharmacological doses, enters cells using the amino acid transporter B(0,+). Primary carnitine deficiency can be suspected from the clinical presentation or identified by low levels of free carnitine (C0) in the newborn screening. Some adult patients have been diagnosed following the birth of an unaffected child with very low carnitine levels in the newborn screening. The diagnosis is confirmed by measuring low carnitine uptake in the patients' fibroblasts or by DNA sequencing of the SLC22A5 gene encoding the OCTN2 carnitine transporter. Some mutations are specific for certain ethnic backgrounds, but the majority are private and identified only in individual families. Although the genotype usually does not correlate with metabolic or cardiac involvement in primary carnitine deficiency, patients presenting as adults tend to have at least one missense mutation retaining residual activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler

  15. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L(-1), whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L(-1). Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:25633653

  16. Identification and application of keto acids transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Peiran; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Production of organic acids by microorganisms is of great importance for obtaining building-block chemicals from sustainable biomass. Extracellular accumulation of organic acids involved a series of transporters, which play important roles in the accumulation of specific organic acid while lack of systematic demonstration in eukaryotic microorganisms. To circumvent accumulation of by-product, efforts have being orchestrated to carboxylate transport mechanism for potential clue in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06. Six endogenous putative transporter genes, YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D24607g, YALI0D20108g and YALI0E32901g, were identified. Transport characteristics and substrate specificities were further investigated using a carboxylate-transport-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. These transporters were expressed in Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 to assess their roles in regulating extracellular keto acids accumulation. In a Y. lipolytica T1 line over expressing YALI0B19470g, α-ketoglutarate accumulated to 46.7 g·L−1, whereas the concentration of pyruvate decreased to 12.3 g·L−1. Systematic identification of these keto acids transporters would provide clues to further improve the accumulation of specific organic acids with higher efficiency in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:25633653

  17. Deletion of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 2 (GAT2 and SLC6A13) gene in mice leads to changes in liver and brain taurine contents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Holmseth, Silvia; Guo, Caiying; Hassel, Bjørnar; Höfner, Georg; Huitfeldt, Henrik S; Wanner, Klaus T; Danbolt, Niels C

    2012-10-12

    The GABA transporters (GAT1, GAT2, GAT3, and BGT1) have mostly been discussed in relation to their potential roles in controlling the action of transmitter GABA in the nervous system. We have generated the first mice lacking the GAT2 (slc6a13) gene. Deletion of GAT2 (both mRNA and protein) neither affected growth, fertility, nor life span under nonchallenging rearing conditions. Immunocytochemistry showed that the GAT2 protein was predominantly expressed in the plasma membranes of periportal hepatocytes and in the basolateral membranes of proximal tubules in the renal cortex. This was validated by processing tissue from wild-type and knockout mice in parallel. Deletion of GAT2 reduced liver taurine levels by 50%, without affecting the expression of the taurine transporter TAUT. These results suggest an important role for GAT2 in taurine uptake from portal blood into liver. In support of this notion, GAT2-transfected HEK293 cells transported [(3)H]taurine. Furthermore, most of the uptake of [(3)H]GABA by cultured rat hepatocytes was due to GAT2, and this uptake was inhibited by taurine. GAT2 was not detected in brain parenchyma proper, excluding a role in GABA inactivation. It was, however, expressed in the leptomeninges and in a subpopulation of brain blood vessels. Deletion of GAT2 increased brain taurine levels by 20%, suggesting a taurine-exporting role for GAT2 in the brain. PMID:22896705

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease alters intestinal bile acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Jahnel, Jörg; Fickert, Peter; Hauer, Almuthe C; Högenauer, Christoph; Avian, Alexander; Trauner, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids (BAs) critically depends on absorption of BA in the terminal ileum and colon, which can be affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diarrhea in IBD is believed to result in part from BA malabsorption (BAM). We explored whether IBD alters mRNA expression of key intestinal BA transporters, BA detoxifying systems, and nuclear receptors that regulate BA transport and detoxification. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, mucosal biopsy specimens from the terminal ileum in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and from the descending colon in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were assessed for mRNA expression. Levels were compared with healthy controls. The main ileal BA uptake transporter, the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, was downregulated in active CD and UC and in CD in remission. Other significant changes such as repression of breast cancer-related protein and sulphotransferase 2A1 were seen only during active disease. In UC, pancolitis (but not exclusively left-sided colitis) was associated with altered expression of major BA transporters [multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3), MRP4, multidrug resistance gene 1, organic solute transporter α/β] and nuclear receptors (pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor) in the descending colon. UC pancolitis leads to broad changes and CD ileitis to selective changes in intestinal BA transporter expression. Early medical manipulation of intestinal BA transporters may help prevent BAM. PMID:24965812

  19. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  20. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  1. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae peptide transport gene.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, J R; Basrai, M A; Steiner, H Y; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae peptide transport gene (PTR2) isolated from a genomic DNA library by directly selecting for functional complementation of a peptide transport-deficient mutant. Deletion and frameshift mutageneses were used to localize the complementing activity to a 3.1-kbp region on the transforming plasmid. DNA sequencing of the complementing region identified an open reading frame spanning 1,803 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts a hydrophobic peptide consisting of 601 amino acids, having a molecular mass of 68.1 kDa, composed in part of 12 hydrophobic segments, and sharing significant similarities with a nitrate transport protein encoded by the CHL1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Northern (RNA) hybridization experiments demonstrated a single transcript that was 1.8 kb in length and that was transiently induced by the addition of L-leucine to the growth medium. The PTR2 gene was localized to the right arm of chromosome XI by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel chromosome blotting and by hybridization to known chromosome XI lambda phage clones of S. cerevisiae DNA. PTR2 was tightly linked to the UBI2 gene, with the coding sequences being separated by a 466-bp region and oriented so that the genes were transcribed convergently. A chromosomal disruption of the PTR2 gene in a haploid strain was not lethal under standard growth conditions. The cloning of PTR2 represents the first example of the molecular genetic characterization of a eucaryotic peptide transport gene. Images PMID:8264579

  2. Modeling Electrical Transport through Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing

    Nucleic acids play a vital role in many biological systems and activities. In recent years, engineers and scientists have been interested in studying their electrical properties. The motivation for these studies stems from the following facts: (1) the bases, which form the building blocks of nucleic acids, have unique ionization potentials. Further, nucleic acids are one of the few nanomaterials that can be reproducibly manufactured with a high degree of accuracy (though admittedly their placement at desired locations remains a challenge). As a result, designed strands with specific sequences may offer unique device properties; (2) electrical methods offer potential for sequencing nucleic acids based on a single molecule; (3) electrical methods for disease detection based on the current flowing through nucleic acids are beginning to be demonstrated. While experiments in the above mentioned areas is promising, a deeper understanding of the electrical current flow through the nucleic acids needs to be developed. The modeling of current flowing in these molecules is complex because: (1) they are based on atomic scale contacts between nucleic acids and metal, which cannot be reproducibly built; (2) the conductivity of nucleic acids is easily influenced by the environment, which is constantly changing; and (3) the nucleic acids by themselves are floppy. This thesis focuses on the modeling of electrical transport through nucleic acids that are connected to two metal electrodes at nanoscale. We first develop a decoherent transport model for the double-stranded helix based on the Landauer-Buttiker framework. This model is rationalized by comparison with an experiment that measured the conductance of four different DNA strands. The developed model is then used to study the: (1) potential to make barriers and wells for quantum transport using specifically engineered sequences; (2) change in the electrical properties of a specific DNA strand with and without methylation; (3

  3. Transport genes of Chromobacterium violaceum: an overview.

    PubMed

    Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Jorge, Daniel Macedo de Melo; Bezerra, Walderly Melgaço; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Simpson, Andrew John George

    2004-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the free-living bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum has been determined by a consortium of laboratories in Brazil. Almost 500 open reading frames (ORFs) coding for transport-related membrane proteins were identified in C. violaceum, which represents 11% of all genes found. The main class of transporter proteins is the primary active transporters (212 ORFs), followed by electrochemical potential-driven transporters (154 ORFs) and channels/pores (62 ORFs). Other classes (61 ORFs) include group translocators, transport electron carriers, accessory factors, and incompletely characterized systems. Therefore, all major categories of transport-related membrane proteins currently recognized in the Transport Protein Database (http://tcdb.ucsd.edu/tcdb) are present in C. violaceum. The complex apparatus of transporters of C. violaceum is certainly an important factor that makes this bacterium a dominant microorganism in a variety of ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions. From a biotechnological point of view, the most important finding is the transporters of heavy metals, which could lead to the exploitation of C. violaceum for bioremediation. PMID:15100993

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review. This review focuses on the effect(s) of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on gene transcription as determined from data generated using cDNA microarrays. Introduced within the past decade, this methodology allows detection of the expression of thousands of genes simultaneo...

  5. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  6. Abscisic Acid Transport in Human Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Millo, Enrico; Fresia, Chiara; Turco, Emilia; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in the response to environmental stress. Recently, ABA has been shown to be present and active also in mammals, where it stimulates the functional activity of innate immune cells, of mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells, and insulin-releasing pancreatic β-cells. LANCL2, the ABA receptor in mammalian cells, is a peripheral membrane protein that localizes at the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Here we investigated the mechanism enabling ABA transport across the plasmamembrane of human red blood cells (RBC). Both influx and efflux of [3H]ABA occur across intact RBC, as detected by radiometric and chromatographic methods. ABA binds specifically to Band 3 (the RBC anion transporter), as determined by labeling of RBC membranes with biotinylated ABA. Proteoliposomes reconstituted with human purified Band 3 transport [3H]ABA and [35S]sulfate, and ABA transport is sensitive to the specific Band 3 inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid. Once inside RBC, ABA stimulates ATP release through the LANCL2-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase. As ATP released from RBC is known to exert a vasodilator response, these results suggest a role for plasma ABA in the regulation of vascular tone. PMID:25847240

  7. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  8. FUBT, a putative MFS transporter, promotes secretion of fusaric acid in the cotton pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusaric acid (FA) is a key component in virulence and symptom development in cotton during infection by Fusarium oxysporum. A putative MFS transporter gene was identified upstream of the polyketide synthase gene responsible for the biosynthesis of FA. Disruption of the transporter gene, designated...

  9. The ABC transporter gene family of Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Armin; Cunningham, Phil; Dean, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background The large gene superfamily of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters encodes membrane proteins involved in trafficking processes across biological membranes and further essential cell biological functions. ABC transporters are evolutionary ancient and involved in the biochemical defence against toxicants. We report here a genome-wide survey of ABC proteins of Daphnia pulex, providing for the first time information on ABC proteins in crustacea, a primarily aquatic arthropod subphylum of high ecological and economical importance. Results We identified 64 ABC proteins in the Daphnia genome, which possesses members of all current ABC subfamilies A to H. To unravel phylogenetic relationships, ABC proteins of Daphnia were compared to those from yeast, worm, fruit fly and human. A high conservation of Daphnia of ABC transporters was observed for proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes, including the mitochondrial half transporters of the ABCB subfamily, which function in iron metabolism and transport of Fe/S protein precursors, and the members of subfamilies ABCD, ABCE and ABCF, which have roles in very long chain fatty acid transport, initiation of gene transcription and protein translation, respectively. A number of Daphnia proteins showed one-to-one orthologous relationships to Drosophila ABC proteins including the sulfonyl urea receptor (SUR), the ecdysone transporter ET23, and the eye pigment precursor transporter scarlet. As the fruit fly, Daphnia lacked homologues to the TAP protein, which plays a role in antigene processing, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which functions as a chloride channel. Daphnia showed two proteins homologous to MDR (multidrug resistance) P-glycoproteins (ABCB subfamily) and six proteins homologous to MRPs (multidrug resistance-associated proteins) (ABCC subfamily). However, lineage specific gene duplications in the ABCB and ABCC subfamilies complicated the inference of function. A

  10. Oncogenicity of L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) revealed by targeted gene disruption in chicken DT40 cells: LAT1 is a promising molecular target for human cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, Mayumi; Ohno, Yoshiya; Masuko, Kazue; Takeuchi, Akiko; Suda, Kentaro; Kubo, Akihiro; Kawahara, Rieko; Okazaki, Shogo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi; Yagi, Hideki; Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki; Masuko, Takashi

    2011-03-25

    Highlights: {yields} We established LAT1 amino-acid transporter-disrupted DT40 cells. {yields} LAT1-disrupted cells showed slow growth and lost the oncogenicity. {yields} siRNA and mAb inhibited human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LAT1 is a promising target molecule for cancer therapy. -- Abstract: L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is the first identified light chain of CD98 molecule, disulfide-linked to a heavy chain of CD98. Following cDNA cloning of chicken full-length LAT1, we have constructed targeting vectors for the disruption of chicken LAT1 gene from genomic DNA of chicken LAT1 consisting of 5.4 kb. We established five homozygous LAT1-disrupted (LAT1{sup -/-}) cell clones, derived from a heterozygous LAT1{sup +/-} clone of DT40 chicken B cell line. Reactivity of anti-chicken CD98hc monoclonal antibody (mAb) with LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 cells was markedly decreased compared with that of wild-type DT40 cells. All LAT1{sup -/-} cells were deficient in L-type amino-acid transporting activity, although alternative-splice variant but not full-length mRNA of LAT1 was detected in these cells. LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones showed outstandingly slow growth in liquid culture and decreased colony-formation capacity in soft agar compared with wild-type DT40 cells. Cell-cycle analyses indicated that LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones have prolonged cell-cycle phases compared with wild-type or LAT1{sup +/-} DT40 cells. Knockdown of human LAT1 by small interfering RNAs resulted in marked in vitro cell-growth inhibition of human cancer cells, and in vivo tumor growth of HeLa cells in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by anti-human LAT1 mAb. All these results indicate essential roles of LAT1 in the cell proliferation and occurrence of malignant phenotypes and that LAT1 is a promising candidate as a molecular target of human cancer therapy.

  11. Performance, serum biochemical responses, and gene expression of intestinal folate transporters of young and older laying hens in response to dietary folic acid supplementation and challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jing, M; Munyaka, P M; Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; O, K; House, J D

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary folic acid (FA) supplementation on performance, serum biochemical indices, and mRNA abundance of intestinal folate transporters in young and older laying hens after acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Two experiments were conducted separately involving 48 Shaver White young laying hens (24 wk of age) in experiment 1 and 48 Shaver White older laying hens (58 wk of age) in experiment 2. Birds were fed 2 diets in a complete randomized design. The diets were wheat-soybean meal based, with or without supplemental 4 mg of FA/kg of diet. Birds were fed for 8 wk, during which time feed consumption and egg production were monitored. At the end of each feeding experiment, 6 hens from each dietary treatment were injected intravenously with 8 mg/kg of BW of either Escherichia coli LPS or sterile saline. Four hours after injection, blood and intestinal samples were collected for further analysis. Compared with the control, dietary FA supplementation increased egg weight and egg mass and decreased serum glucose levels in the young laying hens, and reduced serum uric acid in the older laying hens (P < 0.05). Relative to saline injection, plasma homocysteine, serum calcium, and phosphorus levels were found to be lower in both young and older laying hens after LPS challenge (P < 0.05). Other serum biochemical variables and the mRNA expression of 2 folate transport genes in the small and large intestine were differentially affected by LPS challenge, and some of those responses varied with the age of the birds. Additionally, interactions between diet and LPS challenge were specifically found in the older laying hens. In summary, in addition to improving production performance, there were effects of dietary FA supplementation and its interaction with LPS challenge on biochemical constituents, and age played a role in the development of responses to diet and bacterial LPS infections. PMID:24570431

  12. Boramino acid as a marker for amino acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Haojun; Chen, Kai; Shao, Yihan; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are a series of integral channels for uphill cellular uptake of nutrients and neurotransmitters. Abnormal expression of AATs is often associated with cancer, addiction, and multiple mental diseases. Although methods to evaluate in vivo expression of AATs would be highly useful, efforts to develop them have been hampered by a lack of appropriate tracers. We describe a new class of AA mimics—boramino acids (BAAs)—that can serve as general imaging probes for AATs. The structure of a BAA is identical to that of the corresponding natural AA, except for an exotic replacement of the carboxylate with -BF3−. Cellular studies demonstrate strong AAT-mediated cell uptake, and animal studies show high tumor-specific accumulation, suggesting that BAAs hold great promise for the development of new imaging probes and smart AAT-targeting drugs. PMID:26601275

  13. Vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene therapy prevents development of motor complications in parkinsonian rats after chronic intermittent L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine administration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Yong; Lee, Eun Ah; Jeon, Mi Young; Kang, Ho Young; Park, Yong Gu

    2006-01-01

    Motor complications after chronic L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) therapy occur partly because of the sensitization to dopaminergic agents resulting from pulsatile dopaminergic stimulation. The loss of presynaptic storage contributes to short duration of action by dopamine. Vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) controls intraneuronal dopamine storage by packaging dopamine into synaptic vesicles, thereby allowing exocytotic release of dopamine. Using primary fibroblast doubly transduced with VMAT-2 and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) genes, we previously demonstrated the beneficial effects of such double gene transduction in the production, storage, and gradual release of dopamine in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we further evaluate the effect of achieving sustained level of dopamine within the striata by VMAT-2 gene on behavioral response of parkinsonian rats after chronic intermittent L-DOPA administration. Primary fibroblast (PF) cells were genetically modified with AADC and VMAT-2 genes. We grafted primary fibroblast cells, PF with AADC (PFAADC), or doubly transduced PF with AADC and VMAT-2 (PFVMAA) (n = 6 for each group) into parkinsonian rat striata and administered L-DOPA (25 mg/kg/day) intermittently for 4 weeks. For behavioral study, we employed a model of akinesia using forepaw adjusting steps (FAS) that have been well characterized to reflect the effect of the lesion and the antiparkinsonian effect of dopaminergic drugs and transplants. The duration of FAS response to L-DOPA was sustained for a longer duration in rats grafted with PFVMAA cells than in those grafted with either control cells or cells with AADC alone. In PFVMAA-grafted animals, prolonged duration of FAS responses to L-DOPA was sustained even 6 weeks after discontinuation of 4-week intermittent L-DOPA treatment. These findings suggest that the restoration of dopamine storage capacity could enhance the efficacy of L-DOPA therapy and attenuate the motor fluctuations

  14. Identification of a 12-gene fusaric acid biosynthetic gene cluster in Fusarium species through comparative and functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a ...

  15. Apical transporters for neutral amino acids: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bröer, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    Absorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine involves a variety of transporters for different groups of amino acids. This is illustrated by inherited disorders of amino acid absorption, such as Hartnup disorder, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria, dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, and lysinuric protein intolerance, affecting separate groups of amino acids. Recent advances in the molecular identification of apical neutral amino acid transporters has shed a light on the molecular basis of Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria. PMID:18400692

  16. Electrogenicity of Na(+)-coupled bile acid transporters.

    PubMed Central

    Weinman, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Na(+)-bile acid cotransporters NTCP and ASBT are largely responsible for the Na(+)-dependent bile acid uptake in hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. This review discusses the experimental methods available for demonstrating electrogenicity and examines the accumulating evidence that coupled transport by each of these bile acid transporters is electrogenic. The evidence includes measurements of transport-associated currents by patch clamp electrophysiological techniques, as well as direct measurement of fluorescent bile acid transport rates in whole cell patch clamped, voltage clamped cells. The results support a Na+:bile acid coupling stoichiometry of 2:1. PMID:9626753

  17. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590355

  18. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Dobritzsch, Melanie; Lübken, Tilo; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Blum, Elke; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Dräger, Birgit; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  19. Amino acid absorption and homeostasis in mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Nässl, Anna-Maria; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Fenselau, Henning; Marth, Mena Katharina; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore

    2011-07-01

    The intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 mediates the uptake of di- and tripeptides derived from dietary protein breakdown into epithelial cells. Whereas the transporter appears to be essential to compensate for the reduced amino acid delivery in patients with mutations in amino acid transporter genes, such as in cystinuria or Hartnup disease, its physiological role in overall amino acid absorption is still not known. To assess the quantitative importance of PEPT1 in overall amino acid absorption and metabolism, PEPT1-deficient mice were studied by using brush border membrane vesicles, everted gut sacs, and Ussing chambers, as well as by transcriptome and proteome analysis of intestinal tissue samples. Neither gene expression nor proteome profiling nor functional analysis revealed evidence for any compensatory changes in the levels and/or function of transporters for free amino acids in the intestine. However, most plasma amino acid levels were increased in Pept1(-/-) compared with Pept1(+/+) animals, suggesting that amino acid handling is altered. Plasma appearance rates of (15)N-labeled amino acids determined after intragastric administration of a low dose of protein remained unchanged, whereas administration of a large protein load via gavage revealed marked differences in plasma appearance of selected amino acids. PEPT1 seems, therefore, important for overall amino acid absorption only after high dietary protein intake when amino acid transport processes are saturated and PEPT1 can provide additional absorption capacity. Since renal amino acid excretion remained unchanged, elevated basal concentrations of plasma amino acids in PEPT1-deficient animals seem to arise mainly from alterations in hepatic amino acid metabolism. PMID:21350187

  20. A cryptic melibiose transporter gene possessing a frameshift from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, T; Shimamoto, T; Xu, X J; Okazaki, N; Kawakami, H; Tsuchiya, T

    2001-04-01

    Wild-type Citrobacter freundii cannot grow on melibiose as a sole source of carbon. The melibiose transporter gene melB was cloned from a C. freundii mutant M4 that could utilize melibiose as a sole carbon source. Although the cloned melB gene is closely similar to the melB genes of other bacteria, it is cryptic because of a frameshift mutation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to construct a functional melB gene by deleting one nucleotide, resulting in the production of an active melibiose transporter. The active MelB transporter could utilize Na(+) and H(+) as coupling cations to melibiose transport. The amino acid sequence of the C. freundii MelB was found to be most similar to those of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli MelB. These facts are consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of bacteria and the cation coupling properties of the melibiose transporters. PMID:11275561

  1. Taxol induced apoptosis regulates amino acid transport in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyuan; Shen, Dejun; Chen, Zujian; Clayton, Sheila; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2007-03-01

    A major outcome from Taxol treatment is induction of tumor cell apoptosis. However, metabolic responses to Taxol-induced apoptosis are poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesize that alterations in specific amino acid transporters may affect the Taxol-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In this case, the activity of the given transporter may serve as a biomarker that could provide a biological assessment of response to drug treatment. We have examined the mechanisms responsible for Taxol-induced neutral amino acid uptake by breast cancer cells, such as MCF-7, BT474, MDAMB231 and T47D. The biochemical and molecular studies include: (1) growth-inhibition (MTT); (2) transport kinetics: (3) substrate-specific inhibition; (4) effect of thiol-modifying agents NEM and NPM; (5) gene expression of amino acid transporters; and (6) apoptotic assays. Our data show that Taxol treatment of MCF-7 cells induced a transient increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of the neutral amino acid transporter B0 at both gene and protein level. This increase was attenuated by blocking the transporter in the presence of high concentrations of the substrate amino acid. Other neutral amino acid transporters such as ATA2 (System A) and ASC were not altered. Amino acid starvation resulted in the expected up-regulation of System A (ATA2) gene, but not for B0 and ASC. B0 was significantly down regulated. Taxol treatment had no significant effect on the uptake of arginine and glutamate as measured by System y(+) and X(-) (GC) respectively. Tunel assays and FACS cell cycle analysis demonstrated that both Taxol- and doxorubicin-induced upregulation of B0 transporter gene with accompanying increase in cell apoptosis, could be reversed partially by blocking the B0 transporter with high concentration of alanine, and/or by inhibiting the caspase pathway. Both Taxol and doxorubicin treatment caused a significant decrease in S-phase of the cell cycle. However, Taxol-induced an increase primarily

  2. Identification and characterization of an amino acid transporter expressed differentially in liver

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sumin; Roderick, Hywel Llewelyn; Camacho, Patricia; Jiang, Jean X.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular metabolic needs are fulfilled by transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane by means of specialized transporter proteins. Although many of the classical amino acid transporters have been characterized functionally, less than half of these proteins have been cloned. In this report, we identify and characterize a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane amino acid transporter. The deduced amino acid sequence is 505 residues and is highly hydrophobic with the likely predicted structure of 9 transmembrane domains, which putatively place the amino terminus in the cytoplasm and the carboxy terminus on the cell surface. Expression of the cRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed strong transport activities specific for histidine and glutamine. This protein is a Na+- and pH-dependent transporter and tolerates substitution of Na+ by Li+. Furthermore, this transporter is not an obligatory exchanger because efflux occurs in the absence of influx. This transporter is expressed predominantly in the liver, although it is also present in the kidney, brain, and heart. In the liver, it is located in the plasma membrane of hepatocytes, and the strongest expression was detected in those adjacent to the central vein, gradually decreasing towards the portal tract. Because this protein displays functional similarities to the N-system amino acid transport, we have termed it mNAT, for murine N-system amino acid transporter. This is the first transporter gene identified within the N-system, one of the major amino acid transport systems in the body. The expression pattern displayed by mNAT suggests a potential role in hepatocyte physiology. PMID:10716701

  3. Novel Lactate Transporters from Carboxylic Acid-Producing Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  4. Structural Determinants for Transport Across the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Using C-24 Bile Acid Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) re-absorbs gram quantities of bile acid daily and is a potential prodrug target to increase oral drug absorption. In the absence of a high resolution hASBT crystal structure, 3D-QSAR modeling may prove beneficial in designing prodrug targets to hASBT. The objective was to derive a conformationally sampled pharmacophore 3D–QSAR (CSP-SAR) model for the uptake of bile acid conjugates by hASBT. A series of bile acid conjugates of glutamyl chenodeoxycholate were evaluated in terms of Km and normalized Vmax(normVmax) using hASBT-MDCK cells. All mono-anionic conjugates were potent substrates. Dianions, cations and zwitterions, which bound with a high affinity, were not substrates. CSP-SAR models were derived using structural and physicochemical descriptors, and evaluated via cross-validation. The best CSP-SAR model for Km included two structural and two physiochemical descriptors, where substrate hydrophobicity enhanced affinity. A best CSP-SAR model for Km/normVmax employed one structural and three physicochemical descriptors, also indicating hydrophobicity enhanced efficiency. Overall, the bile acid C-24 region accommodated a range of substituted anilines, provided a single negative charge was present near C-24. In comparing uptake findings to prior inhibition results, increased hydrophobicity enhanced activity, with dianions and zwitterions hindering activity. PMID:20939504

  5. ABC transporter AtABCG25 is involved in abscisic acid transport and responses

    PubMed Central

    Kuromori, Takashi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Shimizu, Hidetada; Sugimoto, Eriko; Kamiya, Asako; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is one of the most important phytohormones involved in abiotic stress responses, seed maturation, germination, and senescence. ABA is predominantly produced in vascular tissues and exerts hormonal responses in various cells, including guard cells. Although ABA responses require extrusion of ABA from ABA-producing cells in an intercellular ABA signaling pathway, the transport mechanisms of ABA through the plasma membrane remain unknown. Here we isolated an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, AtABCG25, from Arabidopsis by genetically screening for ABA sensitivity. AtABCG25 was expressed mainly in vascular tissues. The fluorescent protein-fused AtABCG25 was localized at the plasma membrane in plant cells. In membrane vesicles derived from AtABCG25-expressing insect cells, AtABCG25 exhibited ATP-dependent ABA transport. The AtABCG25-overexpressing plants showed higher leaf temperatures, implying an influence on stomatal regulation. These results strongly suggest that AtABCG25 is an exporter of ABA and is involved in the intercellular ABA signaling pathway. The presence of the ABA transport mechanism sheds light on the active control of multicellular ABA responses to environmental stresses among plant cells. PMID:20133881

  6. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on the expression of peroxisomal ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sabrina; Skrzypski, Jérémy; Courvoisier, Anne; Gondcaille, Catherine; Bonnetain, Franck; André, Agnès; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Bellenger, Sandrine; Bellenger, Jérôme; Narce, Michel; Savary, Stéphane

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomal ABC transporters encoded by the ABCD genes are thought to participate in the import of specific fatty acids in the peroxisomal matrix. ABCD1 deficiency is associated with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), the most frequent peroxisomal disorder which is characterized by the accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). ABCD2 (the closest homolog of ABCD1) and ABCD3 have been shown to have partial functional redundancy with ABCD1; only when overexpressed, they can compensate for VLCFA accumulation. Other lipids, for instance polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), should be possible candidate substrates for the ABCD2 and ABCD3 gene products, ALDRP and PMP70 respectively. Moreover, PUFA, which are known regulators of gene expression, could therefore represent potent inducers of the ABCD genes. To test this hypothesis, littermates of n-3-deficient rats were subjected to an n-3-deficient diet or equilibrated diets containing ALA (alpha-linolenic acid, 18:3n-3) as unique source of n-3 fatty acids or ALA plus DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3) at two different doses. We analyzed the expression of peroxisomal ABC transporters and of the peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase gene 1 (Acox1) in adrenals, brain and liver. Whatever the diet, we did not observe any difference in gene expression in adrenals and brain. However, the hepatic expression level of Abcd2 and Abcd3 genes was found to be significantly higher in the n-3-deficient rats than in the rats fed the ALA diet or the DHA supplemented diets. This was accompanied by important changes in hepatic fatty acid composition. In summary, the hepatic expression of Abcd2 and Abcd3 but not of Abcd1 and Abcd4 appears to be highly sensitive towards dietary PUFA. This difference could be linked to the substrate specificity of the peroxisomal ABC transporters and a specific involvement of Abcd2 and Abcd3 in PUFA metabolism. PMID:18585430

  7. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transporter for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Pu-Chun

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown great promises in integrating nanomaterials in biomedicine. To explore the feasibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as transporters for gene delivery, we have investigated the binding of SWNTs and RNA polymer poly(rU), and the diffusion and the translocation of the SWNT-poly(rU) complexes. Through single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we have found that the pi- stacking dominates the hydrophobic interactions between the carbon rings on tubes and the nitrogenous bases of RNA. Our diffusion study has further demonstrated the feasibility of tracking the motion of water soluble SWNT-poly(rU) complexes. The uptake of SWNT-poly(rU) by breast cancer cells MCF7 was observed using confocal scanning fluorescence microscopy. It was evident that the complexes could penetrate through cell membrane into cytoplasm and cell nucleus. Our cell culture, MTS assay, and radioisotope labeling showed the negligible cytotoxicity of surface modified SWNTs with RNA polymer and amino acids in cell growth medium. These studies have paved the way for gene transfection using SWNTs as transporters.

  8. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis. PMID:25883600

  9. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis. PMID:25883600

  10. Disruption of Transporters Affiliated with Enantio-Pyochelin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 Has Pleiotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.; Loper, Joyce E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. In this study, we investigated whether several transporters that are encoded by genes within or adjacent to the enantio-pyochelin biosynthetic cluster, serve as efflux systems for enantio-pyochelin and/or its intermediates. In addition, we determined whether these transporters have broad substrates range specificity using a Phenotype Microarray system. Intriguingly, knockouts of the pchH and fetF transporter genes resulted in mutant strains that secrete higher levels of enantio-pyochelin as well as its intermediates salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. Analyses of these mutants did not indicate significant change in transcription of biosynthetic genes involved in enantio-pyochelin production. In contrast, the deletion mutant of PFL_3504 resulted in reduced transcription of the biosynthetic genes as well as decreased dihydroaeruginoic acid concentrations in the culture supernatant, which could either point to regulation of gene expression by the transporter or its role in dihydroaeruginoic acid transport. Disruption of each of the transporters resulted in altered stress and/or chemical resistance profile of Pf-5, which may reflect that these transporters could have specificity for rather a broad range of substrates. PMID:27442435

  11. Disruption of Transporters Affiliated with Enantio-Pyochelin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 Has Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A; Loper, Joyce E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. In this study, we investigated whether several transporters that are encoded by genes within or adjacent to the enantio-pyochelin biosynthetic cluster, serve as efflux systems for enantio-pyochelin and/or its intermediates. In addition, we determined whether these transporters have broad substrates range specificity using a Phenotype Microarray system. Intriguingly, knockouts of the pchH and fetF transporter genes resulted in mutant strains that secrete higher levels of enantio-pyochelin as well as its intermediates salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. Analyses of these mutants did not indicate significant change in transcription of biosynthetic genes involved in enantio-pyochelin production. In contrast, the deletion mutant of PFL_3504 resulted in reduced transcription of the biosynthetic genes as well as decreased dihydroaeruginoic acid concentrations in the culture supernatant, which could either point to regulation of gene expression by the transporter or its role in dihydroaeruginoic acid transport. Disruption of each of the transporters resulted in altered stress and/or chemical resistance profile of Pf-5, which may reflect that these transporters could have specificity for rather a broad range of substrates. PMID:27442435

  12. LHT1, a lysine- and histidine-specific amino acid transporter in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Bush, D R

    1997-01-01

    We have identified a new amino acid transporter from the Arabidopsis thaliana expressed sequence tag cDNA collection by functional complementation of a yeast amino acid transport mutant. Transport analysis of the expressed protein in yeast shows that it is a high-affinity transporter for both lysine (Lys) and histidine with Michaelis constant values of 175 and 400 microM, respectively. This transporter (LHT1, lysine histidine transporter) has little affinity for arginine when measured directly in uptake experiments or indirectly with substrate competition. The cDNA is 1.7 kb with an open reading frame that codes for a protein with 446 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 50.5 kD. Hydropathy analysis shows that LHT1 is an integral membrane protein with 9 to 10 putative membrane-spanning domains. Southern-blot analysis suggests that LHT1 is a single-copy gene in the Arabidopsis genome. RNA gel-blot analysis shows that this transporter is present in all tissues, with the strongest expression in young leaves, flowers, and siliques. Wholemount, in situ hybridization revealed that expression is further localized on the surface of roots in young seedlings and in pollen. Overall, LHT1 belongs to a new class of amino acid transporter that is specific for Lys and histidine, and, given its substrate specificity, it has significant promise as a tool for improving the Lys content of Lys-deficient grains. PMID:9390441

  13. Genetic evidence of a high-affinity cyanuric acid transport system in Pseudomonas sp. ADP.

    PubMed

    Platero, Ana I; Santero, Eduardo; Govantes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. ADP plasmid pADP-1 encodes the activities involved in the hydrolytic degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. Here, we explore the presence of a specific transport system for the central intermediate of the atrazine utilization pathway, cyanuric acid, in Pseudomonas sp. ADP. Growth in fed-batch cultures containing limiting cyanuric acid concentrations is consistent with high-affinity transport of this substrate. Acquisition of the ability to grow at low cyanuric acid concentrations upon conjugal transfer of pADP1 to the nondegrading host Pseudomonas putida KT2442 suggests that all activities required for this phenotype are encoded in this plasmid. Co-expression of the pADP1-borne atzDEF and atzTUVW genes, encoding the cyanuric acid utilization pathway and the subunits of an ABC-type solute transport system, in P. putida KT2442 was sufficient to promote growth at cyanuric acid concentrations as low as 50 μM in batch culture. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the atzTUVW gene products are involved in high-affinity transport of cyanuric acid. PMID:24484197

  14. Molecular cloning of mouse amino acid transport system B0, a neutral amino acid transporter related to Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Bröer, Angelika; Klingel, Karin; Kowalczuk, Sonja; Rasko, John E J; Cavanaugh, Juleen; Bröer, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    Resorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine is mediated by transporters, which prefer groups of amino acids with similar physico-chemical properties. It is generally assumed that most neutral amino acids are transported across the apical membrane of epithelial cells by system B(0). Here we have characterized a novel member of the Na(+)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family (B(0)AT1) isolated from mouse kidney, which shows all properties of system B(0). Flux experiments showed that the transporter is Na(+)-dependent, electrogenic, and actively transports most neutral amino acids but not anionic or cationic amino acids. Superfusion of mB(0)AT1-expressing oocytes with neutral amino acids generated inward currents, which were proportional to the fluxes observed with labeled amino acids. In situ hybridization showed strong expression in intestinal microvilli and in the proximal tubule of the kidney. Expression of mouse B(0)AT1 was restricted to kidney, intestine, and skin. It is generally assumed that mutations of the system B(0) transporter underlie autosomal recessive Hartnup disorder. In support of this notion mB(0)AT1 is located on mouse chromosome 13 in a region syntenic to human chromosome 5p15, the locus of Hartnup disorder. Thus, the human homologue of this transporter is an excellent functional and positional candidate for Hartnup disorder. PMID:15044460

  15. Transport, metabolism, and effect of chronic feeding of lagodeoxycholic acid. A new, natural bile acid.

    PubMed

    Schmassmann, A; Angellotti, M A; Clerici, C; Hofmann, A F; Ton-Nu, H T; Schteingart, C D; Marcus, S N; Hagey, L R; Rossi, S S; Aigner, A

    1990-10-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid, the 7 beta-hydroxy epimer of chenodeoxycholic acid, is more hydrophilic and less hepatotoxic than chenodeoxycholic acid. Because "lagodeoxycholic acid," the 12 beta-hydroxy epimer of deoxycholic acid, is also more hydrophilic than deoxycholic acid, it was hypothesized that it should also be less hepatotoxic than deoxycholic acid. To test this, lagodeoxycholic acid was synthesized, and its transport and metabolism were examined in the rat, rabbit, and hamster. The taurine conjugate of lagodeoxycholic acid was moderately well transported by the perfused rat ileum (Tmax = 2 mumol/min.kg). In rats and hamsters with biliary fistulas, the taurine conjugate of lagodeoxycholic acid was well transported by the liver with a Tmax greater than 20 mumol/min.kg; for the taurine conjugate of deoxycholic acid, doses infused at a rate greater than 2.5 mumol/min.kg are known to cause cholestasis and death. Hepatic biotransformation of lagodeoxycholic acid in the rabbit was limited to conjugation with glycine; in the hamster, lagodeoxycholic acid was conjugated with glycine or taurine; in addition, 7-hydroxylation occurred to a slight extent (approximately 10%). When lagodeoxycholic acid was instilled in the rabbit colon, it was absorbed as such although within hours it was progressively epimerized by bacteria to deoxycholic acid. When injected intravenously and allowed to circulate enterohepatically, lagodeoxycholic acid was largely epimerized to deoxycholic acid in 24 hours. Surgical creation of a distal ileostomy abolished epimerization in the rabbit, indicating that exposure to colonic bacterial enzymes was required for the epimerization. Lagodeoxycholic acid was administered for 3 weeks at a dose of 180 mumol/day (0.1% by weight of a chow diet; 2-4 times the endogenous bile acid synthesis rate); other groups received identical doses of deoxycholic acid (hamster) or cholyltaurine, a known precursor of deoxycholic acid (rabbit). After 3 weeks of

  16. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions. PMID:26721276

  17. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  18. Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis and Transport of Acinetobactin in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Tarik; Choi, Chul Hee

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria survive in iron-limited host environments by using several iron acquisition mechanisms. Acinetobacter baumannii, causing serious infections in compromised patients, produces an iron-chelating molecule, called acinetobactin, which is composed of equimolar quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), L-threonine, and N-hydroxyhistamine, to compete with host cells for iron. Genes that are involved in the production and transport of acinetobactin are clustered within the genome of A. baumannii. A recent study showed that entA, located outside of the acinetobactin gene cluster, plays important roles in the biosynthesis of the acinetobactin precursor DHBA and in bacterial pathogenesis. Therefore, understanding the genes that are associated with the biosynthesis and transport of acinetobactin in the bacterial genome is required. This review is intended to provide a general overview of the genes in the genome of A. baumannii that are required for acinetobactin biosynthesis and transport. PMID:25873846

  19. Sialic acid acquisition in bacteria-one substrate, many transporters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gavin H

    2016-06-15

    The sialic acids are a family of 9-carbon sugar acids found predominantly on the cell-surface glycans of humans and other animals within the Deuterostomes and are also used in the biology of a wide range of bacteria that often live in association with these animals. For many bacteria sialic acids are simply a convenient source of food, whereas for some pathogens they are also used in immune evasion strategies. Many bacteria that use sialic acids derive them from the environment and so are dependent on sialic acid uptake. In this mini-review I will describe the discovery and characterization of bacterial sialic acids transporters, revealing that they have evolved multiple times across multiple diverse families of transporters, including the ATP-binding cassette (ABC), tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP), major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and sodium solute symporter (SSS) transporter families. In addition there is evidence for protein-mediated transport of sialic acids across the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria, which can be coupled to periplasmic processing of different sialic acids to the most common form, β-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) that is most frequently taken up into the cell. PMID:27284039

  20. Sialic Acid Transport Contributes to Pneumococcal Colonization ▿

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Carolyn; Burnaugh, Amanda M.; Woodiga, Shireen A.; King, Samantha J.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia and meningitis. Airway colonization is a necessary precursor to disease, but little is known about how the bacteria establish and maintain colonization. Carbohydrates are required as a carbon source for pneumococcal growth and, therefore, for colonization. Free carbohydrates are not readily available in the naso-oropharynx; however, N- and O-linked glycans are common in the airway. Sialic acid is the most common terminal modification on N- and O-linked glycans and is likely encountered frequently by S. pneumoniae in the airway. Here we demonstrate that sialic acid supports pneumococcal growth when provided as a sole carbon source. Growth on sialic acid requires import into the bacterium. Three genetic regions have been proposed to encode pneumococcal sialic acid transporters: one sodium solute symporter and two ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Data demonstrate that one of these, satABC, is required for transport of sialic acid. A satABC mutant displayed significantly reduced growth on both sialic acid and the human glycoprotein alpha-1. The importance of satABC for growth on human glycoprotein suggests that sialic acid transport may be important in vivo. Indeed, the satABC mutant was significantly reduced in colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that S. pneumoniae is able to use sialic acid as a sole carbon source and that utilization of sialic acid is likely important during pneumococcal colonization. PMID:21189320

  1. Regulation of renal amino acid transporters during metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moret, Caroline; Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Jiang, Jean X; Verrey, Francois; Wagner, Carsten A

    2007-02-01

    The kidney plays a major role in acid-base homeostasis by adapting the excretion of acid equivalents to dietary intake and metabolism. Urinary acid excretion is mediated by the secretion of protons and titratable acids, particularly ammonia. NH(3) is synthesized in proximal tubule cells from glutamine taken up via specific amino acid transporters. We tested whether kidney amino acid transporters are regulated in mice in which metabolic acidosis was induced with NH(4)Cl. Blood gas and urine analysis confirmed metabolic acidosis. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to quantify the mRNAs of 16 amino acid transporters. The mRNA of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was quantified as positive control for the regulation and that of GAPDH, as internal standard. In acidosis, the mRNA of kidney system N amino acid transporter SNAT3 (SLC38A3/SN1) showed a strong induction similar to that of PEPCK, whereas all other tested mRNAs encoding glutamine or glutamate transporters were unchanged or reduced in abundance. At the protein level, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increased abundance of SNAT3 and reduced expression of the basolateral cationic amino acid/neutral amino acid exchanger subunit y(+)-LAT1 (SLC7A7). SNAT3 was localized to the basolateral membrane of the late proximal tubule S3 segment in control animals, whereas its expression was extended to the earlier S2 segment of the proximal tubule during acidosis. Our results suggest that the selective regulation of SNAT3 and y(+)LAT1 expression may serve a major role in the renal adaptation to acid secretion and thus for systemic acid-base balance. PMID:17003226

  2. Fatty acid transport protein 1 can compensate for fatty acid transport protein 4 in the developing mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2015-02-01

    Fatty acid transport protein (FATP) 4 is one of a family of six FATPs that facilitate long- and very-long-chain fatty acid uptake. Mice lacking FATP4 are born with tight, thick skin and a defective barrier; they die neonatally because of dehydration and restricted movements. Mutations in SLC27A4, the gene encoding FATP4, cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), characterized by premature birth, respiratory distress, and edematous skin with severe ichthyotic scaling. Symptoms of surviving patients become mild, although atopic manifestations are common. We previously showed that suprabasal keratinocyte expression of a Fatp4 transgene in Fatp4 mutant skin rescues the lethality and ameliorates the skin phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that FATP1, the closest FATP4 homolog, can compensate for the lack of FATP4 in our mouse model of IPS, as it might do postnatally in IPS patients. Transgenic expression of FATP1 in suprabasal keratinocytes rescued the phenotype of Fatp4 mutants, and FATP1 sorted to the same intracellular organelles as endogenous FATP4. Thus, FATP1 and FATP4 likely have overlapping substrate specificities, enzymatic activities, and biological functions. These results suggest that increasing expression of FATP1 in suprabasal keratinocytes could normalize the skin of IPS patients and perhaps prevent the atopic manifestations. PMID:25184958

  3. Genetic mapping of hph2, a mutation affecting amino acid transport in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    We describe the genetic mapping of hyperphenylal-aninemia 2 (hph2), a recessive mutation in the mouse that causes deficient amino acid transport similar to Hartnup disorder, a human genetic amino acid transport disorder. The hph2 locus was mapped in three separate crosses to identify candidate genes for hph2 and a region of homology in the human genome where we propose the Hartnup Disorder gene might lie. The mutation maps to mouse Chromosome (Chr) 7 distal of the simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) marker D7Mit140 and does not recombine with D7Nds4, an SSLP marker in the fibroblast growth factor 3 (Fgf3) gene. Unexpectedly, the mutant chromosome affects recombination frequency in the D7Mit12 to D7Nds4 interval. PMID:9060407

  4. Mutations in the white gene of Drosophila melanogaster affecting ABC transporters that determine eye colouration.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, S M; Brooker, M R; Gill, T R; Cox, G B; Howells, A J; Ewart, G D

    1999-07-15

    The white, brown and scarlet genes of Drosophila melanogaster encode proteins which transport guanine or tryptophan (precursors of the red and brown eye colour pigments) and belong to the ABC transporter superfamily. Current models envisage that the white and brown gene products interact to form a guanine specific transporter, while white and scarlet gene products interact to form a tryptophan transporter. In this study, we report the nucleotide sequence of the coding regions of five white alleles isolated from flies with partially pigmented eyes. In all cases, single amino acid changes were identified, highlighting residues with roles in structure and/or function of the transporters. Mutations in w(cf) (G589E) and w(sat) (F590G) occur at the extracellular end of predicted transmembrane helix 5 and correlate with a major decrease in red pigments in the eyes, while brown pigments are near wild-type levels. Therefore, those residues have a more significant role in the guanine transporter than the tryptophan transporter. Mutations identified in w(crr) (H298N) and w(101) (G243S) affect amino acids which are highly conserved among the ABC transporter superfamily within the nucleotide binding domain. Both cause substantial and similar decreases of red and brown pigments indicating that both tryptophan and guanine transport are impaired. The mutation identified in w(Et87) alters an amino acid within an intracellular loop between transmembrane helices 2 and 3 of the predicted structure. Red and brown pigments are reduced to very low levels by this mutation indicating this loop region is important for the function of both guanine and tryptophan transporters. PMID:10407069

  5. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D. . Inst. of Environmental Medicine); Waldman, J. )

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the pollution data collected during a 1986 field study in order to assess the nature and sources of acidic aerosols in the Toronto metropolitan area during this period. Through the examination of the continuous and filter aerosol data, isobaric back-trajectories of air masses, weather maps, and available trace element data, assessment are made of the character and possible sources of acid aerosols in this Southern Ontario city.

  6. Physiological Adaptation to the Loss of Amino Acid Transport Ability

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, Ruth M.; Ogilvie-Villa, Susan

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Neurospora crassa devoid of constitutive amino acid transport ability can utilize arginine as the sole nitrogen source. Nitrogen starvation, presence of arginine, and mutational inactivation of the general permease are key factors in signaling production of an extracellular enzyme which removes the alpha-amino group from the amino acid. PMID:6214547

  7. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.; Schachtman, Daniel P.; Clemens, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  8. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  9. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine-histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  10. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine–histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  11. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D.; Waldman, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    Authors used recently developed equipment to continuously monitor levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentrations in the ambient air outside Toronto, Ontario. These data were combined with 48-hour isobaric air mass back-trajectories ending in Toronto on each of the four days with highest acid (and sulfate) aerosol levels. The air masses with highest acid levels were found to have first passed over the SO/sub 2/ source region of the U.S. and then across the Great Lakes to Toronto. The role of ammonia as a modulator of aerosol acidity for eastern U.S. cities but not for Toronto (where the Great Lakes serve as ammonia sinks) is also discussed.

  12. Correlation of nucleoside and nucleobase transporter gene expression with antimetabolite drug cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Gong, Shimei; Monks, Anne; Zaharevitz, Daniel; Moscow, Jeffrey A

    2002-01-01

    Antimetabolite drugs that inhibit nucleic acid metabolism are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Nucleoside and nucleobase transporters are important for the cellular uptake of nucleic acids and their corresponding anticancer analogue drugs. Thus, these transporters may play a role both in antimetabolite drug sensitivity, by mediating the uptake of nucleoside analogues, and in antimetabolite drug resistance, by mediating the uptake of endogenous nucleosides that may rescue cells from toxicity. Therefore, we examined the relation of the expression of nucleoside and nucleobase transporters to antimetabolite cytotoxicity. We measured the RNA levels of all eight known nucleoside and nucleobase transporters in 50 cell lines included in the National Cancer Institute's Anticancer Drug Screen panel. RNA levels of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs), equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) and nucleobase transporters (NCBTs) were determined by quantitative RT-PCR using real-time fluorescence acquisition. This method was validated by measuring the expression of the MDR1 gene, and correlating our results with independently determined measurements of MDR1 RNA levels and protein function in these cell lines. We then correlated the pattern of RNA levels to the pattern of cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in the NCI drug screen database using the COMPARE analysis. Several hypothesized relations between transporter gene expression and cytotoxicity, based upon known interactions between certain nucleoside analogues and transporter proteins, were not observed, suggesting that expression of individual transporters may not be a significant determinant of the cytotoxicity of these drugs. The most closely correlated drug cytotoxicity patterns to transporter gene expression patterns (where increased expression corresponds to increase sensitivity) included those between CNT1 and O6-methylguanine and between ENT2 and hydroxyurea. We also observed that p53 status influenced

  13. The evolution of Jen3 proteins and their role in dicarboxylic acid transport in Yarrowia

    PubMed Central

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Michely, Stéphanie; Thevenieau, France; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Jen proteins in yeast are involved in the uptake of mono/dicarboxylic acids. The Jen1 subfamily transports lactate and pyruvate, while the Jen2 subfamily transports fumarate, malate, and succinate. Yarrowia lipolytica has six JEN genes: YALI0B19470g, YALI0C15488g, YALI0C21406g, YALI0D20108g, YALI0D24607g, and YALI0E32901g. Through phylogenetic analyses, we found that these genes represent a new subfamily, Jen3 and that these three Jen subfamilies derivate from three putative ancestral genes. Reverse transcription-PCR. revealed that only four YLJEN genes are expressed and they are upregulated in the presence of lactate, pyruvate, fumarate, malate, and/or succinate, suggesting that they are able to transport these substrates. Analysis of deletion mutant strains revealed that Jen3 subfamily proteins transport fumarate, malate, and succinate. We found evidence that YALI0C15488 encodes the main transporter because its deletion was sufficient to strongly reduce or suppress growth in media containing fumarate, malate, or succinate. It appears that the other YLJEN genes play a minor role, with the exception of YALI0E32901g, which is important for malate uptake. However, the overexpression of each YLJEN gene in the sextuple-deletion mutant strain ΔYLjen1-6 revealed that all six genes are functional and have evolved to transport different substrates with varying degrees of efficacy. In addition, we found that YALI0E32901p transported succinate more efficiently in the presence of lactate or fumarate. PMID:25515252

  14. Transport of D-serine via the amino acid transporter ATB(0,+) expressed in the colon.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takahiro; Huang, Wei; Nakanishi, Takeo; Bridges, Christy C; Smith, Sylvia B; Prasad, Puttur D; Ganapathy, Malliga E; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2002-02-22

    D-Serine, synthesized endogenously in the brain, is an important modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Since colonic bacteria produce D-serine, we asked the question whether there are transport mechanisms in the colon that might make this exogenously produced D-serine available to the host. Here we identify for the first time an amino acid transporter in the intestine for high-affinity active transport of D-serine. This transporter, called ATB(0,+), is a Na(+)- and Cl(-)-coupled transporter for L-enantiomers of neutral and cationic amino acids. Here we demonstrate that ATB(0,+) is also capable of mediating the Na(+)- and Cl(-)-coupled transport of D-serine. The affinity of ATB(0,+) for L-serine and D-serine is similar, the K(t) value for the two enantiomers being approximately 150 microM. In addition to D-serine, ATB(0,+) transports D-alanine, D-methionine, D-leucine, and D-tryptophan. However, several other neutral and cationic amino acids that are transportable substrates for ATB(0,+) as L-enantiomers are not transported when presented as D-enantiomers. ATB(0,+) is expressed in the intestinal tract, interestingly not in the proximal intestine but in the distal intestine. Expression is most predominant in the colon where the transporter is localized to the luminal membrane of colonocytes, making this transporter uniquely suitable for absorption of bacteria-derived D-serine. PMID:11846403

  15. Alternate mechanism for amino acid entry into Neurospora crassa: extracellular deamination and subsequent keto acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, R M; Brown, D T; DeBusk, A G; Penderghast, R D

    1981-01-01

    The growth of the pm nbg mutant strain of Neurospora crassa was inhibited by the amino acid analog para-fluorophenylalanine despite the fact that none of the three constitutive amino acid permeases is functional in this strain. This observation led to the detection of both a deaminase which was released into the growth medium in response to para-fluorophenylalanine and a keto acid transport system which allowed entry of the resulting keto acid into the cell. The transported keto acid was recovered in cellular protein, suggesting its regeneration as the amino acid. The cooperative activity of these two systems represents an additional mechanism for the intracellular accumulation of amino acids, which is distinct from the known amino acid permeases. Images PMID:6452443

  16. Human Transporter Database: Comprehensive Knowledge and Discovery Tools in the Human Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Adam Y.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Li, Chuan-Yun; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Transporters are essential in homeostatic exchange of endogenous and exogenous substances at the systematic, organic, cellular, and subcellular levels. Gene mutations of transporters are often related to pharmacogenetics traits. Recent developments in high throughput technologies on genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics allow in depth studies of transporter genes in normal cellular processes and diverse disease conditions. The flood of high throughput data have resulted in urgent need for an updated knowledgebase with curated, organized, and annotated human transporters in an easily accessible way. Using a pipeline with the combination of automated keywords query, sequence similarity search and manual curation on transporters, we collected 1,555 human non-redundant transporter genes to develop the Human Transporter Database (HTD) (http://htd.cbi.pku.edu.cn). Based on the extensive annotations, global properties of the transporter genes were illustrated, such as expression patterns and polymorphisms in relationships with their ligands. We noted that the human transporters were enriched in many fundamental biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation and cardiac muscle contraction, and significantly associated with Mendelian and complex diseases such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. Overall, HTD provides a well-organized interface to facilitate research communities to search detailed molecular and genetic information of transporters for development of personalized medicine. PMID:24558441

  17. Neutral amino acid transport in epithelial cells and its malfunction in Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Bröer, S; Cavanaugh, J A; Rasko, J E J

    2005-02-01

    Hartnup disorder is an autosomal recessive abnormality of renal and gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport. A corresponding transport activity has been characterized in kidney and intestinal cells and named system B(0). The failure to resorb amino acids in this disorder is thought to be compensated by a protein-rich diet. However, in combination with a poor diet and other factors, more severe symptoms can develop in Hartnup patients, including a photosensitive pellagra-like skin rash, cerebellar ataxia and other neurological symptoms. Homozygosity mapping in a Japanese family and linkage analysis on six Australian pedigrees placed the Hartnup disorder gene at a locus on chromosome 5p15. This fine mapping facilitated a candidate gene approach within the interval, which resulted in the cloning and characterization of a novel member of the sodium-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family (B(0)AT1, SLC6A19) from mouse and human kidney, which shows all properties of system B(0). Flux experiments and electrophysiological recording showed that the transporter is Na(+) dependent and Cl(-) independent, electrogenic and actively transports most neutral amino acids. In situ hybridization showed strong expression in intestinal villi and in the proximal tubule of the kidney. Expression of B(0)AT1 was restricted to kidney, intestine and skin. A total of ten mutations have been identified in SLC6A19 that co-segregate with disease in the predicted recessive manner, with the majority of affected individuals being compound heterozygotes. These mutations lead to altered neutral amino acid transport function compared to the wild-type allele in vitro. One of the mutations occurs in members of the original Hartnup family described in 1956, thereby defining SLC6A19 as the 'Hartnup'-gene. PMID:15667315

  18. Regulation of branched-chain amino acid transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Oxender, D L

    1976-01-01

    The repression and derepression of leucine, isoleucine, and valine transport in Escherichia coli K-12 was examined by using strains auxotrophic for leucine, isoleucine, valine, and methionine. In experiments designed to limit each of these amino acids separately, we demonstrate that leucine limitation alone derepressed the leucine-binding protein, the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I), and the membrane-bound, low-affinity system (LIV-II). This regulation did not seem to involve inactivation of transport components, but represented an increase in the differential rate of synthesis of transport components relative to total cellular proteins. The apparent regulation of transport by isoleucine, valine, and methionine reported elsewhere was shown to require an intact leucine, biosynthetic operon and to result from changes in the level of leucine biosynthetic enzymes. A functional leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase was also required for repression of transport. Transport regulation was shown to be essentially independent of ilvA or its gene product, threonine deaminase. The central role of leucine or its derivatives in cellular metabolism in general is discussed. PMID:783137

  19. Effect of genotype on duodenal expression of nutrient transporter genes in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown clear differences between dairy breeds in their feed intake and production efficiencies. The duodenum is critical in the coordination of digestion and absorption of nutrients. This study examined gene transcript abundance of important classes of nutrient transporters in the duodenum of non lactating dairy cows of different feed efficiency potential, namely Holstein-Friesian (HF), Jersey (JE) and their F1 hybrid. Duodenal epithelial tissue was collected at slaughter and stored at -80°C. Total RNA was extracted from tissue and reverse transcribed to generate cDNA. Gene expression of the following transporters, namely nucleoside; amino acid; sugar; mineral; and lipid transporters was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Data were statistically analysed using mixed models ANOVA in SAS. Orthogonal contrasts were used to test for potential heterotic effects and spearman correlation coefficients calculated to determine potential associations amongst gene expression values and production efficiency variables. Results While there were no direct effects of genotype on expression values for any of the genes examined, there was evidence for a heterotic effect (P < 0.05) on ABCG8, in the form of increased expression in the F1 genotype compared to either of the two parent breeds. Additionally, a tendency for increased expression of the amino acid transporters, SLC3A1 (P = 0.072), SLC3A2 (P = 0.081) and SLC6A14 (P = 0.072) was also evident in the F1 genotype. A negative (P < 0.05) association was identified between the expression of the glucose transporter gene SLC5A1 and total lactational milk solids yield, corrected for body weight. Positive correlations (P < 0.05) were also observed between the expression values of genes involved in common transporter roles. Conclusion This study suggests that differences in the expression of sterol and amino acid transporters in the duodenum could contribute towards the

  20. Transport Function of Rice Amino Acid Permeases (AAPs).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Margaret R; Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    The transport function of four rice (Oryza sativa) amino acid permeases (AAPs), OsAAP1 (Os07g04180), OsAAP3 (Os06g36180), OsAAP7 (Os05g34980) and OsAAP16 (Os12g08090), was analyzed by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and electrophysiology. OsAAP1, OsAAP7 and OsAAP16 functioned, similarly to Arabidopsis AAPs, as general amino acid permeases. OsAAP3 had a distinct substrate specificity compared with other rice or Arabidopsis AAPs. OsAAP3 transported the basic amino acids lysine and arginine well but selected against aromatic amino acids. The transport of basic amino acids was further analyzed for OsAAP1 and OsAAP3, and the results support the transport of both neutral and positively charged forms of basic amino acids by the rice AAPs. Cellular localization using the tandem enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter pHusion showed that OsAAP1 and OsAAP3 localized to the plasma membrane after transient expression in onion epidermal cells or stable expression in Arabidopsis. PMID:25907566

  1. Inhibition of 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid transport by amphipathic drugs.

    PubMed

    Branda, R F; Nelson, N L

    1981-01-01

    Numerous chemically unrelated drugs after the membrane transport of folate compounds. To investigate drug structure-activity relationships, we measured the effect of amphipathic drugs (that is, compounds with polar-apolar character) on 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid permeability of human erythrocytes. All drugs tested were inhibitory, but only compounds that exist at least partially in the anionic form were highly active. Ethacrynic acid, sulfinpyrazone, phenylbutazone, sulfasalazine, and furosemide were effective transport inhibitors in micromolar concentrations. In contrast, compounds that are capable of forming cations at physiologic pH, such as chlorpromazine, procaine, tetracaine, and papaverine, were inhibitory only in millimolar concentrations or caused hemolysis before major inhibition was seen. Inhibitory activity correlated with drug dissociation constant (r = 0.87). A double-reciprocal plot analysis of drug effect on 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid transport showed changes in both Km and Vmax (indicating a mixture of competitive and noncompetitive inhibition) by ethacrynic acid, sulfasalazine, and phlorizin. Inhibitory activity of a series of eight phenoxyacetic derivatives, including ethacrynic acid, correlated highly with measurements of liposolubility (r = 0.87) but only weakly with the Hammet substituent constant (r = 0.56). These results suggest that the effect of amphipathic drugs on 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid transport is influenced by drug pKa and by the presence of hydrophobic substituents, but is relatively independent of electron-attracting groups. PMID:6926815

  2. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting β polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) α and β] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of regulatory

  3. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. )

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The yeast SNF3 gene encodes a glucose transporter homologous to the mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Celenza, J L; Marshall-Carlson, L; Carlson, M

    1988-01-01

    The SNF3 gene is required for high-affinity glucose transport in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has also been implicated in control of gene expression by glucose repression. We report here the nucleotide sequence of the cloned SNF3 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that SNF3 encodes a 97-kilodalton protein that is homologous to mammalian glucose transporters and has 12 putative membrane-spanning regions. We also show that a functional SNF3-lacZ gene-fusion product cofractionates with membrane proteins and is localized to the cell surface, as judged by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Expression of the fusion protein is regulated by glucose repression. Images PMID:3281163

  5. ABC-B transporter genes in Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Che, Hua; Mani, Thangadurai; Keller, Kathy; Prichard, Roger K

    2016-08-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is a filarial nematode causing infection and heartworm disease in dogs and other canids, cats, and occasionally in humans. Prevention with macrocyclic lactones (ML) is recommended during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been reported. ABC-B transporter genes are thought to be involved in the mechanism of ML resistance in other nematodes. This study aimed to identify all the ABC-B transporter genes in D. immitis using as a reference the nDi.2.2 D. immitis whole genome, which is not completely annotated. Using bioinformatic tools and PCR amplification on pooled D. immitis genomic DNA and on pooled cDNA, nine ABC transporter genes including one pseudogene were characterized. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses allowed identification of three P-glycoproteins (Pgps) (Dim-pgp-3 Dim-pgp-10, Dim-pgp-11), of two ABC-B half transporter genes (one ortholog of Cel-haf-4 and Cel-haf-9; and one ortholog of Cel-haf-1 and Cel-haf-3), of one ABC half transporter gene (ortholog of Cel-haf-5) that contained an ABC-C motif, and of one additional half transporter that would require functional study for characterization. The number of ABC-B transporter genes identified was lower than in Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus. Further studies are needed to understand their possible role in ML resistance in D. immitis. These ABC transporters constitute a base for ML resistance investigation in D. immitis and advance our understanding of the molecular biology of this parasite. PMID:27164440

  6. Transported acid aerosols measured in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Koutrakis, Petros; Allen, George A.; Raizenne, Mark; Stern, Bonnie

    During the period 29 June 1986-9 August 1986, a field health study assessing the acute health effects of air pollutants on children was conducted at a summer girls' camp on the northern shore of Lake Erie in SW Ontario. Continuous air pollution measurements of SO 2, O 3, NO x, particulate sulfates, light scattering, and meteorological measurements including temperature, dew point, and wind speed and direction were made. Twelve-hour integrated samples of size fractioned particles were also obtained using dichotomous samplers and Harvard impactors equipped with an ammonia denuder for subsequent hydrogen ion determination. Particulate samples were analyzed for trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and Neutron Activation, and for organic and elemental carbon by a thermal/optical technique. The measured aerosol was periodically very acidic with observed 12-h averaged H + concentrations in the range < 10-560 nmoles m -3. The aerosol H + appeared to represent the net strong acidity after H 2SO 4 reaction with NH 3(g). Average daytime concentrations were higher than night-time for aerosol H +, sulfate, fine mass and ozone. Prolonged episodes of atmospheric acidity, sulfate, and ozone were associated with air masses arriving at the measurement site from the west and from the southwest over Lake Erie. Sulfate concentrations measured at the lakeshore camp were more than twice those measured at inland sites during extreme pollution episodes. The concentration gradient observed with onshore flow was potentially due to enhanced deposition near the lakeshore caused by discontinuities in the meteorological fields in this region.

  7. The HXT2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for high-affinity glucose transport.

    PubMed Central

    Kruckeberg, A L; Bisson, L F

    1990-01-01

    The HXT2 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified on the basis of its ability to complement the defect in glucose transport of a snf3 mutant when present on the multicopy plasmid pSC2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of HXT2 revealed an open reading frame of 541 codons, capable of encoding a protein of Mr 59,840. The predicted protein displayed high sequence and structural homology to a large family of procaryotic and eucaryotic sugar transporters. These proteins have 12 highly hydrophobic regions that could form transmembrane domains; the spacing of these putative transmembrane domains is also highly conserved. Several amino acid motifs characteristic of this sugar transporter family are also present in the HXT2 protein. An hxt2 null mutant strain lacked a significant component of high-affinity glucose transport when under derepressing (low-glucose) conditions. However, the hxt2 null mutation did not incur a major growth defect on glucose-containing media. Genetic and biochemical analyses suggest that wild-type levels of high-affinity glucose transport require the products of both the HXT2 and SNF3 genes; these genes are not linked. Low-stringency Southern blot analysis revealed a number of other sequences that cross-hybridize with HXT2, suggesting that S. cerevisiae possesses a large family of sugar transporter genes. Images PMID:2233722

  8. Placental amino acid transport may be regulated by maternal vitamin D and vitamin D-binding protein: results from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    PubMed

    Cleal, J K; Day, P E; Simner, C L; Barton, S J; Mahon, P A; Inskip, H M; Godfrey, K M; Hanson, M A; Cooper, C; Lewis, R M; Harvey, N C

    2015-06-28

    Both maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations during pregnancy and placental amino acid transporter gene expression have been associated with development of the offspring in terms of body composition and bone structure. Several amino acid transporter genes have vitamin D response elements in their promoters suggesting the possible linkage of these two mechanisms. We aimed to establish whether maternal 25(OH)D and vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) levels relate to expression of placental amino acid transporters. RNA was extracted from 102 placental samples collected in the Southampton Women's Survey, and gene expression was analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. Gene expression data were normalised to the geometric mean of three housekeeping genes, and related to maternal factors and childhood body composition. Maternal serum 25(OH)D and VDBP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Maternal 25(OH)D and VDBP levels were positively associated with placental expression of specific genes involved in amino acid transport. Maternal 25(OH)D and VDBP concentrations were correlated with the expression of specific placental amino acid transporters, and thus may be involved in the regulation of amino acid transfer to the fetus. The positive correlation of VDBP levels and placental transporter expression suggests that delivery of vitamin D to the placenta may be important. This exploratory study identifies placental amino acid transporters which may be altered in response to modifiable maternal factors and provides a basis for further studies. PMID:25940599

  9. Na+ Interactions with the Neutral Amino Acid Transporter ASCT1*

    PubMed Central

    Scopelliti, Amanda J.; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar; Ryan, Renae M.; Vandenberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The alanine, serine, cysteine transporters (ASCTs) belong to the solute carrier family 1A (SLC1A), which also includes the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the prokaryotic aspartate transporter GltPh. Acidic amino acid transport by the EAATs is coupled to the co-transport of three Na+ ions and one proton, and the counter-transport of one K+ ion. In contrast, neutral amino acid exchange by the ASCTs does not require protons or the counter-transport of K+ ions and the number of Na+ ions required is not well established. One property common to SLC1A family members is a substrate-activated anion conductance. We have investigated the number and location of Na+ ions required by ASCT1 by mutating residues in ASCT1 that correspond to residues in the EAATs and GltPh that are involved in Na+ binding. Mutations to all three proposed Na+ sites influence the binding of substrate and/or Na+, or the rate of substrate exchange. A G422S mutation near the Na2 site reduced Na+ affinity, without affecting the rate of exchange. D467T and D467A mutations in the Na1 site reduce Na+ and substrate affinity and also the rate of substrate exchange. T124A and D380A mutations in the Na3 site selectively reduce the affinity for Na+ and the rate of substrate exchange without affecting substrate affinity. In many of the mutants that reduce the rate of substrate transport the amplitudes of the substrate-activated anion conductances are not substantially affected indicating altered ion dependence for channel activation compared with substrate exchange. PMID:24808181

  10. Primordial transport of sugars and amino acids via Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, William; Rau, Aruna

    1981-09-01

    Experimental support is given for a model concerning the origin of a primordial transport system. The model is based on the facilitated diffusion of amino acids stimulated by aliphatic aldehyde carriers and sugars stimulated by aliphatic amine carriers. The lipid-soluble diffusing species is the Schiff base. The possible role of this simple transport system in the origin of an early protocell is discussed.

  11. Renal Transport of Uric Acid: Evolving Concepts and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Bobulescu, Ion Alexandru; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a metabolic waste product, uric acid has been proposed to be an important molecule with multiple functions in human physiology and pathophysiology and may be linked to human diseases beyond nephrolithiasis and gout. Uric acid homeostasis is determined by the balance between production, intestinal secretion, and renal excretion. The kidney is an important regulator of circulating uric acid levels, by reabsorbing around 90% of filtered urate, while being responsible for 60–70% of total body uric acid excretion. Defective renal handling of urate is a frequent pathophysiologic factor underpinning hyperuricemia and gout. In spite of tremendous advances over the past decade, the molecular mechanisms of renal urate transport are still incompletely understood. Many transport proteins are candidate participants in urate handling, with URAT1 and GLUT9 being the best characterized to date. Understanding these transporters is increasingly important for the practicing clinician as new research unveils their physiology, importance in drug action, and genetic association with uric acid levels in human populations. The future may see the introduction of new drugs that specifically act on individual renal urate transporters for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. PMID:23089270

  12. Horizontal gene transfer of stress resistance genes through plasmid transport.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, Erum; Badar, Uzma; Akhter, Jameela; Shams, Hina; Sultana, Maria; Ansari, Maqsood A

    2012-03-01

    The horizontal gene transfer of plasmid-determined stress tolerance was achieved under lab conditions. Bacterial isolates, Enterobacter cloacae (DGE50) and Escherichia coli (DGE57) were used throughout the study. Samples were collected from contaminated marine water and soil to isolate bacterial strains having tolerance against heavy metals and antimicrobial agents. We have demonstrated plasmid transfer, from Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(-) strain (DGE50) to Amp(-)Cu(-)Zn(+) strain (DGE57), producing Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(+) transconjugants (DGE(TC50→57)) and Amp(+)Cu(-)Zn(+) transformants (DGE(TF50→57)). DGE57 did not carry any plasmid, therefore, it can be speculated that zinc tolerance gene in DGE57 is located on chromosome. DGE50 was found to carry three plasmids, out of which two were transferred through conjugation into DGE57, and only one was transferred through transformation. Plasmid transferred through transformation was one out of the two transferred through conjugation. Through the results of transformation it was revealed that the genes of copper and ampicillin tolerance in DGE50 were located on separate plasmids, since only ampicillin tolerance genes were transferred through transformation as a result of one plasmid transfer. By showing transfer of plasmids under lab conditions and monitoring retention of respective phenotype via conjugation and transformation, it is very well demonstrated how multiple stress tolerant strains are generated in nature. PMID:22805823

  13. Functional characterization of nucleoside transporter gene replacements in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Boitz, Jan M; Galazka, Jon; Arendt, Cassandra S; Carter, Nicola S; Ullman, Buddy

    2006-12-01

    Leishmania donovani express two nucleoside transporters of non-overlapping ligand selectivity. To evaluate the physiological role of nucleoside transporters in L. donovani, homozygous null mutants of the genes encoding the LdNT1 adenosine-pyrimidine nucleoside transporter and the LdNT2 inosine-guanosine transporter were created singly and in combination by single targeted gene replacement followed by selection for loss-of-heterozygosity. The mutant alleles were verified by Southern blotting, and the effects of gene replacement on transport phenotype were evaluated by rapid sampling transport measurements and by drug resistance profiles. The Deltaldnt1, Deltaldnt2, and Deltaldnt1/Deltaldnt2 mutants were all capable of proliferation in defined culture medium supplemented with any of a spectrum of purine nucleobases or nucleosides, except that a Deltaldnt2 lesion conferred an inability to efficiently salvage exogenous xanthosine, a newly discovered ligand of LdNT2. Each of the three knockout strains was viable as promastigotes and axenic amastigotes and capable of maintaining an infection in J774 and bone marrow-derived murine macrophages. These genetic studies demonstrate: (1) that L. donovani promastigotes, axenic amastigotes, and tissue amastigotes are viable in the absence of nucleoside transport; (2) that nucleoside transporters are not essential for sustaining an infection in mammalian host cells; (3) that the phagolysosome of macrophages is likely to contain purines that are not LdNT1 or LdNT2 ligands, i.e., nucleobases. Furthermore, the Deltaldnt1, Deltaldnt2, and Deltaldnt1/Deltaldnt2 knockouts offer a unique genetically defined null background for the biochemical and genetic characterization of nucleoside transporter genes and cDNAs from phylogenetically diverse species and of genetically manipulated LdNT1 and LdNT2 constructs. PMID:17050001

  14. MmpL Genes Are Associated with Mycolic Acid Metabolism in Mycobacteria and Corynebacteria

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Cristian; Rittmann, Doris; Singh, Albel; Krumbach, Karin; Bhatt, Kiranmai; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Bhatt, Apoorva

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycolic acids are vital components of the cell wall of the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are required for viability and virulence. While mycolic acid biosynthesis is studied extensively, components involved in mycolate transport remain unidentified. We investigated the role of large membrane proteins encoded by mmpL genes in mycolic acid transport in mycobacteria and the related corynebacteria. MmpL3 was found to be essential in mycobacteria and conditional depletion of MmpL3 in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in loss of cell wall mycolylation, and of the cell wall-associated glycolipid, trehalose dimycolate. In parallel, an accumulation of trehalose monomycolate (TMM) was observed, suggesting that mycolic acids were transported as TMM. In contrast to mycobacteria, we found redundancy in the role of two mmpL genes, in Corynebacterium glutamicum; a complete loss of trehalose-associated and cell wall bound corynomycolates was observed in an NCgl0228-NCgl2769 double mutant, but not in individual single mutants. Our studies highlight the role of mmpL genes in mycolic acid metabolism and identify potential new targets for anti-TB drug development. PMID:22520756

  15. Neutral amino acid transport in bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Barker, G A; Wilkins, R J; Golding, S; Ellory, J C

    1999-02-01

    1. The sodium-dependent amino acid transport systems responsible for proline, glycine and glutamine transport, together with the sodium-independent systems for leucine and tryptophan, have been investigated in isolated bovine chondrocytes by inhibition studies and ion replacement. Each system was characterized kinetically. 2. Transport via system A was identified using the system-specific analogue alpha-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) as an inhibitor of proline, glycine and glutamine transport. 3. Uptake of proline, glycine and glutamine via system ASC was identified by inhibition with alanine or serine. 4. System Gly was identified by the inhibition of glycine transport with excess sarcosine (a substrate for system Gly) whilst systems A and ASC were inhibited. This system, having a very limited substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was also shown to be Na+ and Cl- dependent. Evidence for expression of the system Gly component GLYT-1 was obtained using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). 5. System N, also of narrow substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was shown to be present in chondrocytes. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was inhibited by high concentrations of histidine (a substrate of system N) in the presence of excess MeAIB and serine. 6. System L was identified using the system specific analogue 2-aminobicyclo(2,2, 1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) and D-leucine as inhibitors of leucine and tryptophan transport. 7. The presence of system T was tested by using leucine, tryptophan and tyrosine inhibition. It was concluded that this system was absent in the chondrocyte. 8. Kinetic analysis showed the Na+-independent chondrocyte L system to have apparent affinities for leucine and tryptophan of 125 +/- 27 and 36 +/- 11 microM, respectively. 9. Transport of the essential amino acids leucine and tryptophan into bovine chondrocytes occurs only by the Na+-independent system L, but with a higher affinity than the

  16. Amino acid depletion activates TonEBP and sodium-coupled inositol transport.

    PubMed

    Franchi-Gazzola, R; Visigalli, R; Dall'Asta, V; Sala, R; Woo, S K; Kwon, H M; Gazzola, G C; Bussolati, O

    2001-06-01

    The expression of the osmosensitive sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT) is regulated by multiple tonicity-responsive enhancers (TonEs) in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. In response to hypertonicity, the nuclear abundance of the transcription factor TonE-binding protein (TonEBP) is increased, and the transcription of the SMIT gene is induced. Transport system A for neutral amino acids, another osmosensitive mechanism, is progressively stimulated if amino acid substrates are not present in the extracellular compartment. Under this condition, as in hypertonicity, cells shrink and mitogen-activated protein kinases are activated. We demonstrate here that a clear-cut nuclear redistribution of TonEBP, followed by SMIT expression increase and inositol transport activation, is observed after incubation of cultured human fibroblasts in Earle's balanced salts (EBSS), an isotonic, amino acid-free saline. EBSS-induced SMIT stimulation is prevented by substrates of system A, although these compounds do not compete with inositol for transport through SMIT. We conclude that the incubation in isotonic, amino acid-free saline triggers an osmotic stimulus and elicits TonEBP-dependent responses like hypertonic treatment. PMID:11350742

  17. Campylobacter jejuni influences the expression of nutrient transporter genes in the intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Ghareeb, Khaled; Khayal, Basel; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against pathogens. However, the interaction of Campylobacter with intestinal epithelial cells and its effects on the intestinal function of chickens are poorly studied. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to characterize the effects of C. jejuni oral infection on the mRNA expression of nutrient transporters in the intestine. Newly hatched specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens were orally infected with C. jejuni (NCTC 12744; 1 × 10(8)CFU/bird) at 14 days of age. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses at 14 days-post infection (dpi) revealed that the relative gene expression of the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT-1) and the peptide transporter (PepT-1) was down-regulated (P<0.05) in all investigated segments (duodenum, jejunum and cecum) of Campylobacter-infected birds, while the facilitated glucose transporter (GLUT-2) was down-regulated (P<0.05) in jejunal and cecal tissues only. Furthermore, down-regulation (P<0.05) of the cationic amino acid transporter (CAT-2) and the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-3) was seen in the jejunum, and down-regulation (P<0.05) of the l-type amino acid transporter (y(+)LAT-2) was noticed in the duodenum of infected birds. The decreased expression of intestinal nutrient transporters coincided with a decrease (P<0.05) in body weight and body weight gain during a 2-week post infection period. For the first time, it can be concluded that nutrient transporter expression is compromised in the small and large intestine of Campylobacter-infected birds with negative consequences on growth performance. Furthermore, the down-regulation of mRNA expression of glucose and amino acid transporters may result in accumulation of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, which may favor C. jejuni replication and colonization. PMID:24834798

  18. Acid-base transport in pancreas—new challenges

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Ivana; Haanes, Kristian A.; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Along the gastrointestinal tract a number of epithelia contribute with acid or basic secretions in order to aid digestive processes. The stomach and pancreas are the most extreme examples of acid (H+) and base (HCO−3) transporters, respectively. Nevertheless, they share the same challenges of transporting acid and bases across epithelia and effectively regulating their intracellular pH. In this review, we will make use of comparative physiology to enlighten the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic HCO−3 and fluid secretion, which is still challenging physiologists. Some of the novel transporters to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H+-K+-ATPases), as well as the calcium-activated K+ and Cl− channels, such as KCa3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signaling, fine-tune, and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport contributes to pancreatic diseases including cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, and cancer. PMID:24391597

  19. Energetics of low affinity amino acid transport into brain slices.

    PubMed

    Banay-Schwartz, M; Teller, D N; Lajtha, A

    1976-01-01

    It appears possible to dissect and study some of the potential energy sources for amino acid transport in brain slices despite the apparent complexity of the tissue in comparison to that of isolated bacterial vesicles23. The uptake capability of the tissue may be inadvertently damaged in some experimental protocols so that very special controls must be used to ensure that the treatment did not somehow inactivate the very mechanism that thereafter will be tested. We have presented some evidence that brain slice amino acid transport may not be obligatorily linked to glycolysis, ATP levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity, K+ levels or direction of flux, or to Na+ flux. However, the energy source linkage for different amino acids appears to be rather specific, so that further generalizations are difficult to sustain. For instance, the incubation media and conditions we describe here were experimentally adjusted to maximize uptake of D-glu or alpha-AIB in the absence of glucose, or in lowered K+ or Na+. Therefore, these procedures, the results of which directly challenge some common assumptions regarding the energy basis for active transport in brain slices, probably will not be universally extensible to all other actively transported amino acids. PMID:782193

  20. Transport of amino acids and nucleic acid precursors in malarial parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that exogenously supplied amino acids are transferred into the malaria-infected cell, where they are incorporated into proteins. Most amino acids appear to enter the cell by facilitated or simple diffusion; however, the high distribution ratios seen in Plasmodium knowlesi-infected cells are difficult to explain on this basis. The changes (leakiness) observed in amino acid transport in P. lophurae infected cells are probably the result of ATP depletion in the host cell as well as the elaboration of plasmodial substances. Depletion of isoleucine, methionine, and cysteine from the medium strikingly depresses the in vitro growth of P. knowlesi. The degree of amino acid incorporation into the malaria-infected cell is not correlated with the amount of a particular amino acid in the host cell haemoglobin, the decline of that amino acid in the plasma of infected animals, or the ratio of free amino acids of the erythrocyte to those of the plasma. In erythrocyte-“free” P. lophurae, carrier-mediated transport is apparently limited to a small number of amino acids; all others seem to enter by simple diffusion. Malaria-infected erythrocytes transport exogenously supplied purines at substantially higher rates than uninfected red cells. The preferred purines are adenosine, hypoxanthine, and inosine. The only pyrimidine incorporated is orotic acid. Thymidine, cytidine, and uridine do not readily enter the red cell, and incorporation does not take place because the parasites lack the appropriate enzyme for conversion to nucleotides. Erythrocyte-“free” P. berghei and P. lophurae take up purines and orotic acid. It has been suggested that in vivo the preferred purines are hypoxanthine and inosine, and that the transport locus for erythrocytes is specific for 6-oxopurines. Similar results of purine incorporation are reported for the insect stages of P. cynomolgi and P. berghei, although transport studies have not been carried out. PMID:338180

  1. Sodium-coupled sugar and amino acid transport in an acidic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, G A; Clay, L P

    1988-01-01

    1. Nutrient transport mechanisms of lobster hepatopancreatic epithelial brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) are strongly influenced by the acidic nature of the tubular lumen. 2. Sodium-dependent glucose uptake by BBMV was electrogenic and was stimulated at low pH by reducing sugar transport Ki, without affecting JM. 3. Glutamate was largely transported in zwitterionic form at pH 4.0 by an electrically silent cotransport mechanism with both Na and Cl. 4. Increased H+ concentration tripled the apparent membrane permeability to glutamate as well as the amino acid transport JM. 5. At pH 4.0 leucine was transported as a cation by two dissimilar carrier systems: a Na-independent process shared by polar amino acids, and an electroneutral Na-2Cl-dependent mechanism shared with non-polar amino acids. 6. A model is proposed for hepatopancreatic BBMV at acidic pH which employs ionic chemical gradients and membrane potential as nutrient transport driving forces. PMID:2902970

  2. Analysis of Porphyra Membrane Transporters Demonstrates Gene Transfer among Photosynthetic Eukaryotes and Numerous Sodium-Coupled Transport Systems1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Blouin, Nicolas A.; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L.; Klein, Anita S.; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H.; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-01-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters. PMID:22337920

  3. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  4. Identification of a 12-gene Fusaric Acid Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium Species Through Comparative and Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daren W; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Lee-Han; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Lee, Soohyung; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho; Busman, Mark; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Proctor, Robert H; Lee, Theresa

    2015-03-01

    In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a polyketide-derived SM produced by multiple species of the fungal genus Fusarium. This SM is of concern because it is toxic to animals and, therefore, is considered a mycotoxin and may contribute to plant pathogenesis. Preliminary descriptions of the fusaric acid (FA) biosynthetic gene (FUB) cluster have been reported in two Fusarium species, the maize pathogen F. verticillioides and the rice pathogen F. fujikuroi. The cluster consisted of five genes and did not include a transcription factor or transporter gene. Here, analysis of the FUB region in F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi, and F. oxysporum, a plant pathogen with multiple hosts, indicates the FUB cluster consists of at least 12 genes (FUB1 to FUB12). Deletion analysis confirmed that nine FUB genes, including two Zn(II)2Cys6 transcription factor genes, are required for production of wild-type levels of FA. Comparisons of FUB cluster homologs across multiple Fusarium isolates and species revealed insertion of non-FUB genes at one or two locations in some homologs. Although the ability to produce FA contributed to the phytotoxicity of F. oxysporum culture extracts, lack of production did not affect virulence of F. oxysporum on cactus or F. verticillioides on maize seedlings. These findings provide new insights into the genetic and biochemical processes required for FA production. PMID:25372119

  5. Norepinephrine transport-mediated gene expression in noradrenergic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yao Fei; Caron, Marc G; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Background We have identified a differential gene expression profile in neural crest stem cells that is due to deletion of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene. NET is the target of psychotropic substances, such as tricyclic antidepressants and the drug of abuse, cocaine. NET mutations have been implicated in depression, anxiety, orthostatic intolerance and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). NET function in adult noradrenergic neurons of the peripheral and central nervous systems is to internalize norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. By contrast, during embryogenesis norepinephrine (NE) transport promotes differentiation of neural crest stem cells and locus ceruleus progenitors into noradrenergic neurons, whereas NET inhibitors block noradrenergic differentiation. While the structure of NET und the regulation of NET function are well described, little is known about downstream target genes of norepinephrine (NE) transport. Results We have prepared gene expression profiles of in vitro differentiating wild type and norepinephrine transporter-deficient (NETKO) mouse neural crest cells using long serial analysis of gene expression (LongSAGE). Comparison analyses have identified a number of important differentially expressed genes, including genes relevant to neural crest formation, noradrenergic neuron differentiation and the phenotype of NETKO mice. Examples of differentially expressed genes that affect noradrenergic cell differentiation include genes in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, the Phox2b binding partner Tlx2, the ubiquitin ligase Praja2, and the inhibitor of Notch signaling, Numbl. Differentially expressed genes that are likely to contribute to the NETKO phenotype include dopamine-β-hydroxylase (Dbh), tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), the peptide transmitter 'cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript' (Cart), and the serotonin receptor subunit Htr3a. Real-time PCR confirmed differential expression of key genes not

  6. Rare Mutations in Renal Sodium and Potassium Transporter Genes Exhibit Impaired Transport Function

    PubMed Central

    Welling, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent efforts to explore the genetic underpinnings of hypertension revealed rare mutations in kidney salt transport genes contribute to blood pressure variation and hypertension susceptibility in the general population. The current review focuses on these latest findings, highlighting a discussion about the rare mutations and how they affect transport function. Recent findings Rare mutations that confer a low blood pressure trait and resistance to hypertension have recently been extensively studied. Physiological and biochemical analyses of the effected renal salt transport molecules (NKCC2 (SLC12A1), ROMK (KCNJ1), and NCC (SLC12A3)) revealed that most of the mutations do, in fact, cause a loss of transport function. The mutations disrupt transport by many different mechanisms, including altering biosynthetic processing, trafficking, ion transport, and regulation. Summary New insights into the genetic basis of hypertension have recently emerged, supporting a major role of rare, rather than common, gene variants. Many different rare mutations have been found to affect the functions of different salt transporter genes by different mechanisms, yet all confer the same blood pressure phenotype. These studies reinforce the critical roles of the kidney, and renal salt transport in blood pressure regulation and hypertension. PMID:24253496

  7. Mutations in the SLC3A1 transporter gene in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Raben, N.; Aksentijevich, I.

    1995-06-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the development of kidney stones. Guided by the identification of the SLC3A1 amino acid-transport gene on chromosome 2, we recently established genetic linkage of cystinuria to chromosome 2p in 17 families, without evidence for locus heterogeneity. Other authors have independently identified missense mutations in SLC3A1 in cystinuria patients. In this report we describe four additional cystinuria-associated mutations in this gene: a frameshift, a deletion, a transversion inducing a critical amino acid change, and a nonsense mutation. The latter stop codon was found in all of eight Ashkenazi Jewish carrier chromosomes examined. This report brings the number of disease-associated mutations in this gene to 10. We also assess the frequency of these mutations in our 17 cystinuria families. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  9. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  10. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  11. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  12. Fatty Acid and Lipid Transport in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Xu, Changcheng; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and lipids are essential - not only as membrane constituents but also for growth and development. In plants and algae, FAs are synthesized in plastids and to a large extent transported to the endoplasmic reticulum for modification and lipid assembly. Subsequently, lipophilic compounds are distributed within the cell, and thus are transported across most membrane systems. Membrane-intrinsic transporters and proteins for cellular FA/lipid transfer therefore represent key components for delivery and dissemination. In addition to highlighting their role in lipid homeostasis and plant performance, different transport mechanisms for land plants and green algae - in the model systems Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - are compared, thereby providing a current perspective on protein-mediated FA and lipid trafficking in photosynthetic cells. PMID:26616197

  13. Cation-halide transport through peptide pores containing aminopicolinic acid.

    PubMed

    Basak, Debajyoti; Sridhar, Sucheta; Bera, Amal K; Madhavan, Nandita

    2016-05-18

    Synthetic pores that selectively transport ions of biological significance through membranes could be potentially used in medical diagnostics or therapeutics. Herein, we report cation-selective octapeptide pores derived from alanine and aminopicolinic acid. The ion transport mechanism through the pores has been established to be a cation-chloride symport. The cation-chloride co-transport is biologically essential for the efficient functioning of the central nervous system and has been implicated in diseases such as epilepsy. The pores formed in synthetic lipid bilayers do not exhibit any closing events. The ease of synthesis as well as infinite lifetimes of these pores provides scope for modifying their transport behaviour to develop sensors. PMID:27137995

  14. Genomic organization of SLC3A1, a transporter gene mutated in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Sood, R.; Raben, N.

    1996-08-15

    The SLC3A1 gene encodes a transport protein for cystine and the dibasic amino acids. Recently mutations in this gene have been shown to cause cystinuria. We report the genomic structure and organization of SLC3A1, which is composed of 10 exons and spans nearly 45 kb. Until now screening for mutations in SLC3A1 has been based on RT-PCR amplification of illegitimate mRNA transcripts from white blood cells. In this report we provide primers for amplification of exons from genomic DNA, thus simplifying the process of screening for SLC3A1 mutations in cystinuria. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The effect of transport stress on turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) liver acute phase proteins gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andreia Tomás; Lecchi, Cristina; Grilli, Guido; Giudice, Chiara; Nodari, Sara Rota; Vinco, Leonardo J; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transport-related stress on the liver gene expression of four acute phase proteins (APP), namely α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Serum Amyloid A (SAA) and PIT54, in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). A group of seven BUT BIG 6 commercial hens was subjected to a two-hour long road transportation and the quantitative gene expression of APP in the liver was compared to that of a non transported control group. The expression of AGP and CRP mRNA was found to be increased in animals slaughtered after road transport. The presence of AGP protein was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The results of this study showed that road-transport may induce the mRNA expression of immune related proteins. The finding that AGP and CRP can be upregulated during transport could suggest their use as for the assessment of turkey welfare during transport. PMID:26850544

  16. Vitamin E transport gene variants and prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the February 15, 2009 issue of Cancer Research, Wright et al. investigated whether polymorphisms in two vitamin E transport genes are associated with elevated prostate cancer risk resulting from altered plasma vitamin E concentrations. However, the circulating vitamin E level is influenced by man...

  17. Association of Norepinephrine Transporter Gene with Methylphenidate Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Li; Wang, Yu-Feng; Li, Jun; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the association between alleles of the norepinephrine transporter gene and the methylphenidate response. Method: Chinese Han youths with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder recruited in the Outpatient Department of the Institute of Mental Health from 2001 to 2004 were treated with methylphenidate in…

  18. A natural mutation led truncation in Ma1, one of the two aluminum-activated malate transporter like genes at the Ma locus, is associated with low fruit acidity in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidity levels greatly affect fruit taste and flavor, thereby the consumer’s acceptance and market value. In mature apple fruit, malic acid is the nearly exclusive organic acid. Several studies have confirmed that the major quantitative trait locus Ma largely controls the variation of fruit acidity ...

  19. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  20. [Enhancers on the transmembrane transport of chlorogenic acid].

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Deng, Sheng-Qi; Jiang, Xue-Hua; Wang, Ling-Ling; Xiao, Yu

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the influence of the difference enhancers on the transport mechanism of chlorogenic acid (CGA) across Caco-2 cells model, a RP-HPLC method was adopted to detect the concentrations of CGA. At the concentrations of 20 to 80 microg x mL(-1), the difference of absorption rate constants (K(a)) was not statistically significant. At the concentrations of 40 and 20 microg x mL(-1), the ratios of apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) of the apical to basolateral and the basolateral to apical were 1.14 and 1.18, respectively. With the effect of enhancers K(a) and P(app) increased, the absorption half-life (T1/2) decreased. CGA passed through the Caco-2 cell membrane mainly by passive transport. It showed that monocarboxylic acid transporter (MCT) could be involved in the across membrane transport process of CGA. Borneol had no effect on the cell membrane transport processes. The order of increasing absorption of CGA caused by the enhancers was sodium lauryl sulphate > sodium taurocholate > carbomer. PMID:24761618

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of the Soybean (Glycine max) GmLAX Auxin Transporter Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chenglin; Wang, Yongqin; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in regulation of plant growth and development as well as plant responses to abiotic stresses. This is mainly achieved through its uneven distribution in plant via a polar auxin transport process. Auxin transporters are major players in polar auxin transport. The AUXIN RESISTENT 1/LIKE AUX1 (AUX/LAX) auxin influx carriers belong to the amino acid permease family of proton-driven transporters and function in the uptake of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In this study, genome-wide comprehensive analysis of the soybean AUX/LAX (GmLAX) gene family, including phylogenic relationships, chromosome localization, and gene structure, was carried out. A total of 15 GmLAX genes, including seven duplicated gene pairs, were identified in the soybean genome. They were distributed on 10 chromosomes. Despite their higher percentage identities at the protein level, GmLAXs exhibited versatile tissue-specific expression patterns, indicating coordinated functioning during plant growth and development. Most GmLAXs were responsive to drought and dehydration stresses and auxin and abscisic acid (ABA) stimuli, in a tissue- and/or time point- sensitive mode. Several GmLAX members were involved in responding to salt stress. Sequence analysis revealed that promoters of GmLAXs contained different combinations of stress-related cis-regulatory elements. These studies suggest that the soybean GmLAXs were under control of a very complex regulatory network, responding to various internal and external signals. This study helps to identity candidate GmLAXs for further analysis of their roles in soybean development and adaption to adverse environments. PMID:27014306

  2. Comprehensive Analysis of the Soybean (Glycine max) GmLAX Auxin Transporter Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chenglin; Wang, Yongqin; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in regulation of plant growth and development as well as plant responses to abiotic stresses. This is mainly achieved through its uneven distribution in plant via a polar auxin transport process. Auxin transporters are major players in polar auxin transport. The AUXIN RESISTENT 1/LIKE AUX1 (AUX/LAX) auxin influx carriers belong to the amino acid permease family of proton-driven transporters and function in the uptake of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In this study, genome-wide comprehensive analysis of the soybean AUX/LAX (GmLAX) gene family, including phylogenic relationships, chromosome localization, and gene structure, was carried out. A total of 15 GmLAX genes, including seven duplicated gene pairs, were identified in the soybean genome. They were distributed on 10 chromosomes. Despite their higher percentage identities at the protein level, GmLAXs exhibited versatile tissue-specific expression patterns, indicating coordinated functioning during plant growth and development. Most GmLAXs were responsive to drought and dehydration stresses and auxin and abscisic acid (ABA) stimuli, in a tissue- and/or time point- sensitive mode. Several GmLAX members were involved in responding to salt stress. Sequence analysis revealed that promoters of GmLAXs contained different combinations of stress-related cis-regulatory elements. These studies suggest that the soybean GmLAXs were under control of a very complex regulatory network, responding to various internal and external signals. This study helps to identity candidate GmLAXs for further analysis of their roles in soybean development and adaption to adverse environments. PMID:27014306

  3. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  4. Novel acid resistance genes from the metagenome of the Tinto River, an extremely acidic environment.

    PubMed

    Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Morgante, Verónica; Mirete, Salvador; González-Pastor, José E

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms that thrive in acidic environments are endowed with specialized molecular mechanisms to survive under this extremely harsh condition. In this work, we performed functional screening of six metagenomic libraries from planktonic and rhizosphere microbial communities of the Tinto River, an extremely acidic environment, to identify genes involved in acid resistance. This approach has revealed 15 different genes conferring acid resistance to Escherichia coli, most of which encoding putative proteins of unknown function or previously described proteins not known to be related to acid resistance. Moreover, we were able to assign function to one unknown and three hypothetical proteins. Among the recovered genes were the ClpXP protease, the transcriptional repressor LexA and nucleic acid-binding proteins such as an RNA-binding protein, HU and Dps. Furthermore, nine of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis and, remarkably, most of them were able to expand the capability of these bacteria to survive under severe acid stress. From this set of genes, four presented a broad-host range as they enhance the acid resistance of the three different organisms tested. These results expand our knowledge about the different strategies used by microorganisms to survive under extremely acid conditions. PMID:23145860

  5. Uptake of aristolochic acid I into Caco-2 cells by monocarboxylic acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Osamu; Haraguchi, Koichi; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yoshihisa; Endo, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The uptake mechanism of aristolochic acid I (AAI) was investigated using Caco-2 cells cultured on dishes and permeable membranes. The uptake of AAI from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells cultured on a dish was rapid, and a decrease in the pH of the incubation medium significantly increased uptake. Incubation at low temperature (4°C) and treatment with sodium azide (a metabolic inhibitor) or carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (a protonophore) significantly inhibited the AAI uptake. Coincubation with L-lactic acid or benzoic acid, typical substrates for the proton-linked monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCTs), significantly decreased the AAI uptake, as did coincubation with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (an inhibitor of MCTs). Dixon plotting revealed the competitive inhibition of benzoic acid on the AAI uptake. To confirm the AAI uptake via MCTs, the apical-to-basolateral transport of AAI was investigated using the Caco-2 cells cultured on the permeable membranes. The transport of AAI at pH 6.0 was markedly higher than that at pH 7.4, and was significantly decreased by coincubation with benzoic acid. These results suggest that the uptake of AAI from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells is mediated mainly by MCTs along with benzoic acid. PMID:25177030

  6. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25616451

  7. The involvement of L-type amino acid transporters in theanine transport.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Kimura, Toru; Tachiki, Takashi; Anzai, Naohiko; Sakurai, Takuya; Ushimaru, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    L-Theanine has favorable physiological effects in terms of human health, but the mechanisms that transport it to its target organs or cells are not completely defined. To identify the major transport mechanisms of L-theanine, we screened for candidate transporters of L-3H-theanine in several mammal cell lines that intrinsically express multiple transporters with various specificities. All of the cells tested, T24, HepG2, COS1, 293A, Neuro2a, and HuH7, absorbed L-3H-theanine. Uptake was significantly inhibited by the addition of L-leucine and by a specific inhibitor of the system L transport system, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). L-3H-Theanine uptake occurred mostly independently of Na+. These results indicate that L-theanine was taken up via a system L like transport system in all of the cells tested. Additionally, in experiments using cells stably expressing two system L isoforms, LAT1 and LAT2, we found that the two isoforms mediated L-theanine transport to similar extents. Taken together, our results indicate that L-theanine is transported mostly via the system L transport pathway and its isoforms. PMID:23221699

  8. Structural insights into thyroid hormone transport mechanisms of the L-type amino acid transporter 2.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Katrin M; Meyer, Katja; Kinne, Anita; Schülein, Ralf; Köhrle, Josef; Krause, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are transported across cell membranes by different transmembrane transporter proteins. In previous studies, we showed marked 3,3'-diiodothyronine (3,3'-T2) but moderate T3 uptake by the L-type amino acid transporter 2 (Lat2). We have now studied the structure-function relationships of this transporter and TH-like molecules. Our Lat2 homology model is based on 2 crystal structures of the homologous 12-transmembrane helix transporters arginine/agmatine antiporter and amino acid/polyamine/organocation transporter. Model-driven mutagenesis of residues lining an extracellular recognition site and a TH-traversing channel identified 9 sensitive residues. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as expression system, we found that side chain shortening (N51S, N133S, N248S, and Y130A) expanded the channel and increased 3,3'-T2 transport. Side chain enlargements (T140F, Y130R, and I137M) decreased 3,3'-T2 uptake, indicating channel obstructions. The opposite results with mutations maintaining (F242W) or impairing (F242V) uptake suggest that F242 may have a gating function. Competitive inhibition studies of 14 TH-like compounds revealed that recognition by Lat2 requires amino and carboxylic acid groups. The size of the adjacent hydrophobic group is restricted. Bulky substituents in positions 3 and 5 of the tyrosine ring are allowed. The phenolic ring may be enlarged, provided that the whole molecule is flexible enough to fit into the distinctly shaped TH-traversing channel of Lat2. Taken together, the next Lat2 features were identified 1) TH recognition site; 2) TH-traversing channel in the center of Lat2; and 3) switch site that potentially facilitates intracellular substrate release. Together with identified substrate features, these data help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and role of Lat2 in T2 transport. PMID:25945809

  9. Mitochondrial transporters for ornithine and related amino acids: a review.

    PubMed

    Monné, Magnus; Miniero, Daniela Valeria; Daddabbo, Lucia; Palmieri, Luigi; Porcelli, Vito; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2015-09-01

    Among the members of the mitochondrial carrier family, there are transporters that catalyze the translocation of ornithine and related substrates, such as arginine, homoarginine, lysine, histidine, and citrulline, across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mitochondrial carriers ORC1, ORC2, and SLC25A29 from Homo sapiens, BAC1 and BAC2 from Arabidopsis thaliana, and Ort1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been biochemically characterized by transport assays in liposomes. All of them transport ornithine and amino acids with side chains terminating at least with one amine. There are, however, marked differences in their substrate specificities including their affinity for ornithine (KM values in the mM to μM range). These differences are most likely reflected by minor differences in the substrate binding sites of these carriers. The physiological role of the above-mentioned mitochondrial carriers is to link several metabolic pathways that take place partly in the cytosol and partly in the mitochondrial matrix and to provide basic amino acids for mitochondrial translation. In the liver, human ORC1 catalyzes the citrulline/ornithine exchange across the mitochondrial inner membrane, which is required for the urea cycle. Human ORC1, ORC2, and SLC25A29 are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis and transport of arginine, which can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of NO, agmatine, polyamines, creatine, glutamine, glutamate, and proline, as well as in the degradation of basic amino acids. BAC1 and BAC2 are implicated in some processes similar to those of their human counterparts and in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism linked to stress conditions and the development of plants. Ort1p is involved in the biosynthesis of arginine and polyamines in yeast. PMID:26002808

  10. Arabidopsis IRT2 gene encodes a root-periphery iron transporter.

    PubMed

    Vert, G; Briat, J F; Curie, C

    2001-04-01

    Iron uptake from the soil is a tightly controlled process in plant roots, involving specialized transporters. One such transporter, IRT1, was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and shown to function as a broad-range metal ion transporter in yeast. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the IRT2 cDNA, a member of the ZIP family of metal transporters, highly similar to IRT1 at the amino-acid level. IRT2 expression in yeast suppresses the growth defect of iron and zinc transport yeast mutants and enhances iron uptake and accumulation. However, unlike IRT1, IRT2 does not transport manganese or cadmium in yeast. IRT2 expression is detected only in roots of A. thaliana plants, and is upregulated by iron deficiency. By fusing the IRT2 promoter to the uidA reporter gene, we show that the IRT2 promoter is mainly active in the external cell layers of the root subapical zone, and therefore provide the first tissue localization of a plant metal transporter. Altogether, these data support a role for the IRT2 transporter in iron and zinc uptake from the soil in response to iron-limited conditions. PMID:11389759

  11. Abscisic acid transporters cooperate to control seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohyun; Yim, Sojeong; Choi, Hyunju; Kim, Areum; Lee, Keun Pyo; Lopez-Molina, Luis; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Seed germination is a key developmental process that has to be tightly controlled to avoid germination under unfavourable conditions. Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential repressor of seed germination. In Arabidopsis, it has been shown that the endosperm, a single cell layer surrounding the embryo, synthesizes and continuously releases ABA towards the embryo. The mechanism of ABA transport from the endosperm to the embryo was hitherto unknown. Here we show that four AtABCG transporters act in concert to deliver ABA from the endosperm to the embryo: AtABCG25 and AtABCG31 export ABA from the endosperm, whereas AtABCG30 and AtABCG40 import ABA into the embryo. Thus, this work establishes that radicle extension and subsequent embryonic growth are suppressed by the coordinated activity of multiple ABA transporters expressed in different tissues. PMID:26334616

  12. Hartnup disorder: polymorphisms identified in the neutral amino acid transporter SLC1A5.

    PubMed

    Potter, S J; Lu, A; Wilcken, B; Green, K; Rasko, J E J

    2002-10-01

    Hartnup disorder is an inborn error of renal and gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport. The cloning and functional characterization of the 'system B0' neutral amino acid transporter SLC1A5 led to it being proposed as a candidate gene for Hartnup disorder. Linkage analysis performed at 19q13.3, the chromosomal position of SLC1A5, was suggestive of an association with the Hartnup phenotype in some families. However, SLC1A5 was not linked to the Hartnup phenotype in other families. Linkage analysis also excluded an alternative candidate region at 11q13 implicated by a putative mouse model for Hartnup disorder. Sequencing of the coding region of SLC1A5 in Hartnup patients revealed two coding region polymorphisms. These mutations did not alter the predicted amino acid sequence of SLC1A5 and were considered unlikely to play a role in Hartnup disorder. There were no mutations in splice sites flanking each exon. Quantitative RT-PCR of SLC1A5 messenger RNA in affected and unaffected subjects did not support systemic differences in expression as an explanation for Hartnup disorder. In the six unrelated Hartnup pedigrees studied, examination of linkage at 19q13.3, polymorphisms in the coding sequence and quantitation of expression of SLC1A5 did not suffice to explain the defect in neutral amino acid transport. PMID:12555937

  13. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R.; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The LS genotype was the most common genotype found in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene. PMID:27274339

  14. Gene expression analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum subjected to long-term lactic acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Kinga; Satorhelyi, Peter; Lange, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Silakowski, Barbara; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacteria form an important part of the red smear cheese microbial surface consortium. To gain a better understanding of molecular adaptation due to low pH induced by lactose fermentation, the global gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum adapted to pH 5.7 with lactic acid under continuous growth in a chemostat was characterized by DNA microarray analysis. Expression of a total of 116 genes was increased and that of 90 genes was decreased compared to pH 7.5 without lactic acid, representing 7% of the genes in the genome. The up-regulated genes encode mainly transcriptional regulators, proteins responsible for export, import, and metabolism, and several proteins of unknown function. As much as 45% of the up-regulated open reading frames code for hypothetical proteins. These results were validated using real-time reverse transcription-PCR. To characterize the functions of 38 up-regulated genes, 36 single-crossover disruption mutants were generated and analyzed for their lactic acid sensitivities. However, only a sigB knockout mutant showed a highly significant negative effect on growth at low pH, suggesting a function in organic-acid adaptation. A sigE mutant already displayed growth retardation at neutral pH but grew better at acidic pH than the sigB mutant. The lack of acid-sensitive phenotypes in 34 out of 36 disrupted genes suggests either a considerable redundancy in acid adaptation response or coincidental effects. Other up-regulated genes included genes for ion transporters and metabolic pathways, including carbohydrate and respiratory metabolism. The enhanced expression of the nrd (ribonucleotide reductase) operon and a DNA ATPase repair protein implies a cellular response to combat acid-induced DNA damage. Surprisingly, multiple iron uptake systems (totaling 15% of the genes induced >or=2-fold) were induced at low pH. This induction was shown to be coincidental and could be attributed to iron-sequestering effects in complex media at low p

  15. Gene Expression Analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum Subjected to Long-Term Lactic Acid Adaptation▿ ¶

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Kinga; Satorhelyi, Peter; Lange, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F.; Silakowski, Barbara; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Corynebacteria form an important part of the red smear cheese microbial surface consortium. To gain a better understanding of molecular adaptation due to low pH induced by lactose fermentation, the global gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum adapted to pH 5.7 with lactic acid under continuous growth in a chemostat was characterized by DNA microarray analysis. Expression of a total of 116 genes was increased and that of 90 genes was decreased compared to pH 7.5 without lactic acid, representing 7% of the genes in the genome. The up-regulated genes encode mainly transcriptional regulators, proteins responsible for export, import, and metabolism, and several proteins of unknown function. As much as 45% of the up-regulated open reading frames code for hypothetical proteins. These results were validated using real-time reverse transcription-PCR. To characterize the functions of 38 up-regulated genes, 36 single-crossover disruption mutants were generated and analyzed for their lactic acid sensitivities. However, only a sigB knockout mutant showed a highly significant negative effect on growth at low pH, suggesting a function in organic-acid adaptation. A sigE mutant already displayed growth retardation at neutral pH but grew better at acidic pH than the sigB mutant. The lack of acid-sensitive phenotypes in 34 out of 36 disrupted genes suggests either a considerable redundancy in acid adaptation response or coincidental effects. Other up-regulated genes included genes for ion transporters and metabolic pathways, including carbohydrate and respiratory metabolism. The enhanced expression of the nrd (ribonucleotide reductase) operon and a DNA ATPase repair protein implies a cellular response to combat acid-induced DNA damage. Surprisingly, multiple iron uptake systems (totaling 15% of the genes induced ≥2-fold) were induced at low pH. This induction was shown to be coincidental and could be attributed to iron-sequestering effects in complex media at low p

  16. Production of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid by Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 containing cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuewei; He, Qingfang; Peng, Zhenying; Yu, Jinhui; Bian, Fei; Li, Youzhi; Bi, Yuping

    2015-11-01

    Genetic modification is useful for improving the nutritional qualities of cyanobacteria. To increase the total unsaturated fatty acid content, along with the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 fatty acids, genetic engineering can be used to modify fatty acid metabolism. Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, a fast-growing cyanobacterium, does not contain a Δ6 desaturase gene and is therefore unable to synthesize γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are important in human health. In this work, we constructed recombinant vectors Syd6D, Syd15D and Syd6Dd15D to express the Δ15 desaturase and Δ6 desaturase genes from Synechocystis PCC6803 in Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, with the aim of expressing polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overexpression of the Δ15 desaturase gene in Synechococcus resulted in 5.4 times greater accumulation of α-linolenic acid compared with the wild-type while Δ6 desaturase gene expression produced both GLA and SDA. Co-expression of the two genes resulted in low-level accumulation of GLA but much larger amounts of SDA, accounting for as much to 11.64% of the total fatty acid content.

  17. Production of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid by Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 containing cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuewei; He, Qingfang; Peng, Zhenying; Yu, Jinhui; Bian, Fei; Li, Youzhi; Bi, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Genetic modification is useful for improving the nutritional qualities of cyanobacteria. To increase the total unsaturated fatty acid content, along with the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 fatty acids, genetic engineering can be used to modify fatty acid metabolism. Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, a fast-growing cyanobacterium, does not contain a Δ6 desaturase gene and is therefore unable to synthesize γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are important in human health. In this work, we constructed recombinant vectors Syd6D, Syd15D and Syd6Dd15D to express the Δ15 desaturase and Δ6 desaturase genes from Synechocystis PCC6803 in Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, with the aim of expressing polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overexpression of the Δ15 desaturase gene in Synechococcus resulted in 5.4 times greater accumulation of α-linolenic acid compared with the wild-type while Δ6 desaturase gene expression produced both GLA and SDA. Co-expression of the two genes resulted in low-level accumulation of GLA but much larger amounts of SDA, accounting for as much to 11.64% of the total fatty acid content.

  18. Genome expansion and differential expression of amino acid transporters at the aphid/Buchnera symbiotic interface.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Duncan, Rebecca P; Shigenobu, Shuji; Wilson, Alex C C

    2011-11-01

    In insects, some of the most ecologically important symbioses are nutritional symbioses that provide hosts with novel traits and thereby facilitate exploitation of otherwise inaccessible niches. One such symbiosis is the ancient obligate intracellular symbiosis of aphids with the γ-proteobacteria, Buchnera aphidicola. Although the nutritional basis of the aphid/Buchnera symbiosis is well understood, the processes and structures that mediate the intimate interactions of symbiotic partners remain uncharacterized. Here, using a de novo approach, we characterize the complement of 40 amino acid polyamine organocation (APC) superfamily member amino acid transporters (AATs) encoded in the genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We find that the A. pisum APC superfamily is characterized by extensive gene duplications such that A. pisum has more APC superfamily transporters than other fully sequenced insects, including a ten paralog aphid-specific expansion of the APC transporter slimfast. Detailed expression analysis of 17 transporters selected on the basis of their phylogenetic relationship to five AATs identified in an earlier bacteriocyte expressed sequence tag study distinguished a subset of eight transporters that have been recruited for amino acid transport in bacteriocyte cells at the symbiotic interface. These eight transporters include transporters that are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in bacteriocytes and intriguingly, the four AATs that show bacteriocyte-enriched expression are all members of gene family expansions, whereas three of the four that are highly expressed but not enriched in bacteriocytes retain one-to-one orthology with transporters in other genomes. Finally, analysis of evolutionary rates within the large A. pisum slimfast expansion demonstrated increased rates of molecular evolution coinciding with two major shifts in expression: 1) a loss of gut expression and possibly a gain of bacteriocyte expression and 2) loss of expression

  19. Assignment of the human GABA transporter gene (GABATHG) locus to chromosome 3p24-p25

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Guo, Li-He

    1995-09-01

    An essential regulatory process of synaptic transmission is the inactivation of released neurotransmitters by the transmitter-specific uptake mechanism, {gamma}-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory transmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system; its activity is terminated by a high-affinity Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} -dependent specific GABA transporter (GAT), which carries the neurotransmitter to the presynaptic neuron and/or glial elements surrounding the synaptic cleft. Deficiency of the transporter may cause epilepsy and some other nervous diseases. The human GAT gene (GABATHG), approximately 25 kb in length, has been cloned and sequenced by our colleagues (7). Here the results of the in situ hybridization mapping with the gene are presented. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Molecular basis of essential amino acid transport from studies of insect nutrient amino acid transporters of the SLC6 family (NAT-SLC6)

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Two protein families that represent major components of essential amino acid transport in insects have been identified. They are annotated as the SLC6 and SLC7 families of transporters according to phylogenetic proximity to characterized amino acid transporters (HUGO nomenclature). Members of these families have been identified as important apical and basolateral parts of transepithelial essential amino acid absorption in the metazoan alimentary canal. Synergistically, they play critical physiological roles as essential substrate providers to diverse metabolic processes, including generic protein synthesis. This review briefly clarifies the requirements for amino acid transport and a variety of amino acid transport mechanisms, including the aforementioned families. Further it focuses on the large group of Nutrient Amino acid Transporters (NATs), which comprise a recently identified subfamily of the Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter family (NSS or SLC6). The first insect NAT, cloned from the caterpillar gut, has a broad substrate spectrum similar to mammalian B0 transporters. Several new NAT-SLC6 members have been characterized in an effort to explore mechanisms for the essential amino acid absorption in model dipteran insects. The identification and functional characterization of new B0-like and narrow specificity transporters of essential amino acids in fruit fly and mosquitoes leads to a fundamentally important insight: that NATs evolved and act together as the integrated active core of a transport network that mediates active alimentary absorption and systemic distribution of essential amino acids. This role of NATs is projected from the most primitive prokaryotes to the most complex metazoan organisms, and represents an interesting platform for unraveling the molecular evolution of amino acid transport and modeling amino acid transport disorders. The comparative study of NATs elucidates important adaptive differences between essential amino acid transportomes

  1. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids. PMID:26945769

  2. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  3. Cloning of three ZIP/Nramp transporter genes from a Ni hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi japonicum and their Ni2+-transport abilities.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takafumi; Usui, Koji; Horie, Kenji; Nosaka, Shiro; Mizuno, Naoharu; Obata, Hitoshi

    2005-08-01

    Ni homeostasis is essential for plant cell activity, but the mechanisms of Ni-transport and delivery are unknown. To elucidate the role of ZIP and NRAMP metal-transporters for Ni2+-transport and homeostasis, we cloned their homologous genes from the Ni hyperaccumulator Thlaspi japonicum, and investigated their Ni-transporting abilities by expression in yeast. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two Zip transporter genes (TjZnt1, TjZnt2) and one Nramp transporter gene cloned had high homologies with TcZNT1 and TcZNT2 of Thlaspi caerulescens and AtNRAMP4 of Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively, and were predicted as integral membrane proteins with 6 or 12 transmembrane domains. TjZNT1 and TjZNT2 had two long histidine-rich domains in the putative cytoplasmic domain between transmembrane domains III and IV. TjNRAMP4 conserved a consensus transporter motif between transmembrane domains VIII and IX. The yeast transformed with TjZNT1 or TjZNT2 showed a marked increase in Ni2+ tolerance with the gene expression. In contrast, the expression of TjNramp4 caused elevation of Ni2+ sensitivity and Ni2+ concentration. These data suggest that ZIP/NRAMP transporters participate in Ni2+ homeostasis of Ni hyperaccumulator plants. TjZNT1 had Zn2+-, Cd2+- and Mn2+-transporting abilities and TjZNT2 also had Zn2+- and Mn2+-transporting abilities, but TjNRAMP4 could transport Ni2+ but not Zn2+, Cd2+ or Mn2+. PMID:16198592

  4. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  5. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  6. Mfsd2a is a transporter for the essential omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long N; Ma, Dongliang; Shui, Guanghou; Wong, Peiyan; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wenk, Markus R; Goh, Eyleen L K; Silver, David L

    2014-05-22

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is essential for normal brain growth and cognitive function. Consistent with its importance in the brain, DHA is highly enriched in brain phospholipids. Despite being an abundant fatty acid in brain phospholipids, DHA cannot be de novo synthesized in brain and must be imported across the blood-brain barrier, but mechanisms for DHA uptake in brain have remained enigmatic. Here we identify a member of the major facilitator superfamily--Mfsd2a (previously an orphan transporter)--as the major transporter for DHA uptake into brain. Mfsd2a is found to be expressed exclusively in endothelium of the blood-brain barrier of micro-vessels. Lipidomic analysis indicates that Mfsd2a-deficient (Mfsd2a-knockout) mice show markedly reduced levels of DHA in brain accompanied by neuronal cell loss in hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as cognitive deficits and severe anxiety, and microcephaly. Unexpectedly, cell-based studies indicate that Mfsd2a transports DHA in the form of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not unesterified fatty acid, in a sodium-dependent manner. Notably, Mfsd2a transports common plasma LPCs carrying long-chain fatty acids such LPC oleate and LPC palmitate, but not LPCs with less than a 14-carbon acyl chain. Moreover, we determine that the phosphor-zwitterionic headgroup of LPC is critical for transport. Importantly, Mfsd2a-knockout mice have markedly reduced uptake of labelled LPC DHA, and other LPCs, from plasma into brain, demonstrating that Mfsd2a is required for brain uptake of DHA. Our findings reveal an unexpected essential physiological role of plasma-derived LPCs in brain growth and function. PMID:24828044

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel copper transporter gene family TaCT1 in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoxun; Fan, Renchun; Li, Libin; Wei, Bo; Li, Guoliang; Gu, Liqing; Wang, Xianping; Zhang, Xiangqi

    2014-07-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and copper transporter plays a pivotal role for keeping copper homeostasis. However, little is known about copper transporters in wheat. Here, we report a novel copper transporter gene family, TaCT1, in common wheat. Three TaCT1 homoeologous genes were isolated and assigned to group 5 chromosomes. Each of the TaCT1 genes (TaCT1-5A, -5B or -5D) possesses 12 transmembrane domains. TaCT1 genes exhibited higher transcript levels in leaf than in root, culm and spikelet. Excess copper down-regulated the transcript levels of TaCT1 and copper deficiency-induced TaCT1 expression. Subcellular experiments localized the TaCT1 to the Golgi apparatus. Yeast expression experiments and virus-induced gene silencing analysis indicated that the TaCT1 functioned in copper transport. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that three amino acid residues, Met(35), Met(38) and Cys(365), are required for TaCT1 function. Phylogenetic and functional analyses suggested that homologous genes shared high similarity with TaCT1 may exist exclusively in monocot plants. Our work reveals a novel wheat gene family encoding major facilitator superfamily (MFS)-type copper transporters, and provides evidence for their functional involvement in promoting copper uptake and keeping copper homeostasis in common wheat. PMID:24372025

  8. Expression profile of PIN, AUX/LAX and PGP auxin transporter gene families in Sorghum bicolor under phytohormone and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Shen, ChenJia; Bai, YouHuang; Wang, SuiKang; Zhang, SaiNa; Wu, YunRong; Chen, Ming; Jiang, DeAn; Qi, YanHua

    2010-07-01

    Auxin is transported by the influx carriers auxin resistant 1/like aux1 (AUX/LAX), and the efflux carriers pin-formed (PIN) and P-glycoprotein (PGP), which play a major role in polar auxin transport. Several auxin transporter genes have been characterized in dicotyledonous Arabidopsis, but most are unknown in monocotyledons, especially in sorghum. Here, we analyze the chromosome distribution, gene duplication and intron/exon of SbPIN, SbLAX and SbPGP gene families, and examine their phylogenic relationships in Arabidopsis, rice and sorghum. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that most of these genes were differently expressed in the organs of sorghum. SbPIN3 and SbPIN9 were highly expressed in flowers, SbLAX2 and SbPGP17 were mainly expressed in stems, and SbPGP7 was strongly expressed in roots. This suggests that individual genes might participate in specific organ development. The expression profiles of these gene families were analyzed after treatment with: (a) the phytohormones indole-3-acetic acid and brassinosteroid; (b) the polar auxin transport inhibitors 1-naphthoxyacetic acids, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid; and (c) abscissic acid and the abiotic stresses of high salinity and drought. Most of the auxin transporter genes were strongly induced by indole-3-acetic acid and brassinosteroid, providing new evidence for the synergism of these phytohormones. Interestingly, most genes showed similar trends in expression under polar auxin transport inhibitors and each also responded to abscissic acid, salt and drought. This study provides new insights into the auxin transporters of sorghum. PMID:20528920

  9. Cloning and Expression of a Hexose Transporter Gene Expressed during the Ripening of Grape Berry1

    PubMed Central

    Fillion, Laurent; Ageorges, Agnès; Picaud, Sarah; Coutos-Thévenot, Pierre; Lemoine, Rémi; Romieu, Charles; Delrot, Serge

    1999-01-01

    The ripening of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) is characterized by massive sugar import into the berries. The events triggering this process and the pathways of assimilate transport are still poorly known. A genomic clone Vvht1 (Vitis vinifera hexose transporter1) and the corresponding cDNA encoding a hexose transporter whose expression is induced during berry ripening have been isolated. Vvht1 is expressed mainly in the berries, with a first peak of expression at anthesis, and a second peak about 5 weeks after véraison (a viniculture term for the inception of ripening). Vvht is strictly conserved between two grape cultivars (Pinot Noir and Ugni-Blanc). The organization of the Vvht1 genomic sequence is homologous to that of the Arabidopsis hexose transporter, but differs strongly from that of the Chlorella kessleri hexose transporter genes. The Vvht1 promoter sequence contains several potential regulating cis elements, including ethylene-, abscisic acid-, and sugar-responsive boxes. Comparison of the Vvht1 promoter with the promoter of grape alcohol dehydrogenase, which is expressed at the same time during ripening, also allowed the identification of a 15-bp consensus sequence, which suggests a possible co-regulation of the expression of these genes. The expression of Vvht1 during ripening indicates that sucrose is at least partially cleaved before uptake into the flesh cells. PMID:10444092

  10. Serotonin transporter gene: will epigenetics prove less depressing than genetics?

    PubMed

    de Geus, Eco J C; Middeldorp, Christel M

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin transporter gene has been hypothesized to influence, possibly in interaction with environmental factors, the vulnerability for depression. So far, genetic studies have tested the association of the repeat polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) with depression and whether it is moderated by exposure to stressful events. This has not yielded unequivocal results, even across meta-analyses. However, environmental factors may induce epigenetic changes in the structure of DNA that can influence gene expression. These epigenetic effects may be independent of the genetic polymorphisms in the gene region. This editorial reviews an article in this issue that compared the intrapair differences in depressive symptoms in monozygotic twin pairs with the intrapair differences of methylation at cytosine-guanine dinucleotide sites in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene. Differences in depressive symptoms were correlated with differences in methylation status, such that higher methylation, which, in this sample of identical twins, must be environmental in origin, is associated with more depressive symptoms. Noteworthy is the fact that the epigenetic effects were independent of the 5-HTTLPR. These results should encourage genome-wide testing of the contribution of epigenetic effects to depression. PMID:23788696

  11. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2007-12-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) increased Bsep mRNA expression. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  12. Mutations in the SLC3A1 Transporter Gene in Cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Pras, Elon; Raben, Nina; Golomb, Eliahu; Arber, Nadir; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Harel, Daniela; Katz, Giora; Liberman, Uri; Pras, Mordechai; Kastner, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the development of kidney stones. Guided by the identification of the SLC3A1 amino acid–transport gene on chromosome 2, we recently established genetic linkage of cystinuria to chromosome 2p in 17 families, without evidence for locus heterogeneity. Other authors have independently identified missense mutations in SLC3A1 in cystinuria patients. In this report we describe four additional cystinuria-associated mutations in this gene: a frameshift, a deletion, a transversion inducing a critical amino acid change, and a nonsense mutation. The latter stop codon was found in all of eight Ashkenazi Jewish carrier chromosomes examined. This report brings the number of disease-associated mutations in this gene to 10. We also assess the frequency of these mutations in our 17 cystinuria families. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:7539209

  13. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Giudetti, Anna M; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  14. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Giudetti, Anna M.; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V.; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  15. Isolation and functional characterization of the PfNT1 nucleoside transporter gene from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Carter, N S; Ben Mamoun, C; Liu, W; Silva, E O; Landfear, S M; Goldberg, D E; Ullman, B

    2000-04-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of human malaria, is incapable of de novo purine synthesis, and thus, purine acquisition from the host is an indispensable nutritional requirement. This purine salvage process is initiated by the transport of preformed purines into the parasite. We have identified a gene encoding a nucleoside transporter from P. falciparum, PfNT1, and analyzed its function and expression during intraerythrocytic parasite development. PfNT1 predicts a polypeptide of 422 amino acids with 11 transmembrane domains that is homologous to other members of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter family. Southern analysis and BLAST searching of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) malaria data base indicate that PfNT1 is a single copy gene located on chromosome 14. Northern analysis of RNA from intraerythrocytic stages of the parasite demonstrates that PfNT1 is expressed throughout the asexual life cycle but is significantly elevated during the early trophozoite stage. Functional expression of PfNT1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increases their ability to take up naturally occurring D-adenosine (K(m) = 13.2 microM) and D-inosine (K(m) = 253 microM). Significantly, PfNT1, unlike the mammalian nucleoside transporters, also has the capacity to transport the stereoisomer L-adenosine (K(m) > 500 microM). Inhibition studies with a battery of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and bases as well as their analogs indicate that PfNT1 exhibits a broad substrate specificity for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides. These data provide compelling evidence that PfNT1 encodes a functional purine/pyrimidine nucleoside transporter whose expression is strongly developmentally regulated in the asexual stages of the P. falciparum life cycle. Moreover, the unusual ability to transport L-adenosine and the vital contribution of purine transport to parasite survival makes PfNT1 an attractive target for therapeutic evaluation. PMID

  16. Identification of Nitrogen-Fixing Genes and Gene Clusters from Metagenomic Library of Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community. PMID:24498417

  17. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  18. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  19. Gene expression profiles of murine fatty liver induced by the administration of valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho; Hong, Il; Kim, Mingoo; Lee, Byung Hoon; Kim, Ju-Han; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-Il; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu; Lee, Mi-Ock . E-mail: molee@snu.ac.kr

    2007-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been used as anticonvulsants, however, it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis and necrosis in the liver. To explore the mechanisms of VPA-induced steatosis, we profiled the gene expression patterns of the mouse liver that were altered by treatment with VPA using microarray analysis. VPA was orally administered as a single dose of 100 mg/kg (low-dose) or 1000 mg/kg (high-dose) to ICR mice and the animals were killed at 6, 24, or 72 h after treatment. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were not significantly altered in the experimental animals. However, symptoms of steatosis were observed at 72 h with low-dose and at 24 h and 72 h with high-dose. After microarray data analysis, 1910 genes were selected by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) as VPA-responsive genes. Hierarchical clustering revealed that gene expression changes depended on the time rather than the dose of VPA treatment. Gene profiling data showed striking changes in the expression of genes associated with lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, oncogenesis, signal transduction, and development. Functional categorization of 1156 characteristically up- and down-regulated genes (cutoff > 1.5-fold) revealed that 60 genes were involved in lipid metabolism that was interconnected with biological pathways for biosynthesis of triglyceride and cholesterol, catabolism of fatty acid, and lipid transport. This gene expression profile may be associated with the known steatogenic hepatotoxicity of VPA and it may provide useful information for prediction of hepatotoxicity of unknown chemicals or new drug candidates through pattern recognition.

  20. Transport and metabolism of glycolic acid by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the excretion of glycolate from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the conditions affecting glycolate synthesis and metabolism were investigated. Although glycolate is synthesized only in the light, the metabolism occurs in the light and dark with greater metabolism in the light due to refixation of photorespiratory CO/sub 2/. The amount of internal glycolate will affect the metabolism of externally added glycolate. When glycolate synthesis exceeds the metabolic capacity, glycolate is excreted from the cell. The transport of glycolate into the cells occurs very rapidly. Equilibrium is achieved at 4/sup 0/C within the time cells are pelleted by the silicone oil centrifugation technique through a layer of (/sup 14/C) glycolate. Glycolate uptake does not show the same time, temperature and pH dependencies as diffusion of benzoate. Uptake can be inhibited by treatment of cells with N-ethylmaleimide and stimulated in the presence of valino-mycin/KCl. Acetate and lactate are taken up as quickly as glycolate. The hypothesis was made that glycolate is transported by a protein carrier that transports monocarboxylic acids. The equilibrium concentration of glycolate is dependent on the cell density, implying that there may be a large number of transporter sites and that uptake is limited by substrate availability.

  1. Perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCA) atmospheric formation and transport to the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike-thackray, C.; Selin, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) are highly persistent and toxic environmental contaminants that have been found in remote locations such as the Arctic, far from emission sources. These persistent organic pollutants are emitted directly to the atmosphere as well as being produced by the degradation of precursor compounds in the atmosphere, but recent trends towards increasing precursor emissions and decreasing direct emissions raise the importance of production in the atmosphere. Our work aims to improve understanding of the atmospheric degradation of fluorotelomer precursor compounds to form the long-chain PFCAs PFOA (C8) and PFNA (C9).Using the atmospheric chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, which uses assimilated meteorology to simulate the atmospheric transport of trace gas species, we investigate the interaction of the atmospheric formation of PFCAs and the atmospheric transport of their precursor species. Our simulations are a first application of the GEOS-Chem framework to PFCA chemistry. We highlight the importance of the spatial and temporal variability of background atmospheric chemical conditions experienced during transport. We find that yields and formation times of PFOA and PFNA respond differently and strongly to the photochemical conditions of the atmosphere, such as the abundance of NO, HO2, and other photochemical species.

  2. Exploring the diversity of arsenic resistance genes from acid mine drainage microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Verónica; Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; Postigo Cacho, Marina; González-Pastor, José E

    2015-06-01

    The microbial communities from the Tinto River, a natural acid mine drainage environment, were explored to search for novel genes involved in arsenic resistance using a functional metagenomic approach. Seven pentavalent arsenate resistance clones were selected and analysed to find the genes responsible for this phenotype. Insights about their possible mechanisms of resistance were obtained from sequence similarities and cellular arsenic concentration. A total of 19 individual open reading frames were analysed, and each one was individually cloned and assayed for its ability to confer arsenic resistance in Escherichia coli cells. A total of 13 functionally active genes involved in arsenic resistance were identified, and they could be classified into different global processes: transport, stress response, DNA damage repair, phospholipids biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis and RNA-modifying enzymes. Most genes (11) encode proteins not previously related to heavy metal resistance or hypothetical or unknown proteins. On the other hand, two genes were previously related to heavy metal resistance in microorganisms. In addition, the ClpB chaperone and the RNA-modifying enzymes retrieved in this work were shown to increase the cell survival under different stress conditions (heat shock, acid pH and UV radiation). Thus, these results reveal novel insights about unidentified mechanisms of arsenic resistance. PMID:24801164

  3. Cadmium induces retinoic acid signaling by regulating retinoic acid metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2009-09-11

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1-6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1-6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 microm cadmium in Hepa 1-6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  4. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  5. Isolation and characterization of a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter gene in Dunaliella viridis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyun; Gao, Xiaoshu; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Qingqi; Song, Rentao; Xu, Zhengkai

    2006-02-01

    A sodium-dependent phosphate transporter gene, DvSPT1, was isolated from a cDNA library using a probe derived from a subtracted cDNA library of Dunaliella viridis. Sequencing analyses revealed a cDNA sequence of 2649 bp long and encoded an open-reading frame consisting of 672 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of DvSPT1 exhibited 31.2% identity to that of TcPHO from Tetraselmis chui. Hydrophobicity and secondary structure prediction revealed 11 conserved transmembrane domains similar to those found in PHO89 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and PHO4 from Neurospora crassa. Northern blot analysis indicated that the DvSPT1 expression was induced upon NaCl hyperosmotic stress or phosphate depletion. Functional characterization in yeast Na+ export pump mutant G19 suggested that DvSPT1 encoded a Na+ transporter protein. The gene sequence of GDvSPT1 (7922 bp) was isolated from a genomic library of D. viridis. Southern blot analysis indicated that there exist at least two homologous genes in D. viridis. PMID:16359638

  6. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the amino acid transporter superfamily in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Haoli; Cao, Xiaoli; Shi, Shandang; Li, Silu; Gao, Junpeng; Ma, Yuling; Zhao, Qin; Chen, Qin

    2016-10-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are integral membrane proteins responsible for the transmembrane transport of amino acids and play important roles in various physiological processes of plants. However, there has not yet been a genome-wide overview of the StAAT gene family to date and only StAAP1 has been previously studied in potato. In this paper, a total of 72 StAATs were identified using a series of bioinformatics searches and classified into 12 subfamilies based on their phylogenetic relationship with known Arabidopsis and rice AATs. Chromosomal localization revealed their distribution on all 12 chromosomes. Nearly one-third of StAAT genes (23 of 72) were derived from gene duplication, among which tandem duplication made the greatest contribution to the expansion of the StAAT family. Motif analysis showed that the same subfamily had similar conserved motifs in both numbers and varieties. Moreover, high-throughput sequencing data was used to analyze the expression patterns of StAAT genes and was verified by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The expression of StAAT genes exhibited both abundant and tissue-specific expression patterns, which might be connected to their functional roles in long- and short-distance transport. This study provided a comprehensive survey of the StAAT gene family, and could serve as a theoretical foundation for the further functional identification and utilization of family members. PMID:27289266

  7. The Maize PIN Gene Family of Auxin Transporters.

    PubMed

    Forestan, Cristian; Farinati, Silvia; Varotto, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of plant development and its differential distribution in plant tissues, established by a polar cell to cell transport, can trigger a wide range of developmental processes. A few members of the two families of auxin efflux transport proteins, PIN-formed (PIN) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB/PGP), have so far been characterized in maize. Nine new Zea mays auxin efflux carriers PIN family members and two maize PIN-like genes have now been identified. Four members of PIN1 (named ZmPIN1a-d) cluster, one gene homologous to AtPIN2 (ZmPIN2), three orthologs of PIN5 (ZmPIN5a-c), one gene paired with AtPIN8 (ZmPIN8), and three monocot-specific PINs (ZmPIN9, ZmPIN10a, and ZmPIN10b) were cloned and the phylogenetic relationships between early-land plants, monocots, and eudicots PIN proteins investigated, including the new maize PIN proteins. Tissue-specific expression patterns of the 12 maize PIN genes, 2 PIN-like genes and ZmABCB1, an ABCB auxin efflux carrier, were analyzed together with protein localization and auxin accumulation patterns in normal conditions and in response to drug applications. ZmPIN gene transcripts have overlapping expression domains in the root apex, during male and female inflorescence differentiation and kernel development. However, some PIN family members have specific tissue localization: ZmPIN1d transcript marks the L1 layer of the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem during the flowering transition and the monocot-specific ZmPIN9 is expressed in the root endodermis and pericycle. The phylogenetic and gene structure analyses together with the expression pattern of the ZmPIN gene family indicate that subfunctionalization of some maize PINs can be associated to the differentiation and development of monocot-specific organs and tissues and might have occurred after the divergence between dicots and monocots. PMID:22639639

  8. Tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli downregulates intestinal transport.

    PubMed

    Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Rotte, Anand; Gu, Shuchen; Michael, Diana; Pasham, Venkanna; Wang, Kan; Kempe, Daniela S; Ackermann, Teresa F; Brücher, Björn; Fend, Falko; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2011-05-01

    Loss of function mutations of the tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) underly the familial adenomatous polyposis. Mice carrying an inactivating mutation in the apc gene (apc (Min/+)) similarly develop intestinal polyposis. APC is effective at least in part by degrading β-catenin and lack of APC leads to markedly enhanced cellular β-catenin levels. β-Catenin has most recently been shown to upregulate the Na+/K+ ATPase. The present study, thus, explored the possibility that APC could influence intestinal transport. The abundance and localization of β-catenin were determined utilizing Western blotting and confocal microscopy, the activity of the electrogenic glucose carrier (SGLT1) was estimated from the glucose-induced current in jejunal segments utilizing Ussing chamber experiments and the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3) activity from Na+ -dependent re-alkalinization of cytosolic pH (ΔpH(i)) following an ammonium pulse employing BCECF fluorescence. As a result, β-catenin abundance in intestinal tissue was significantly higher in apc (Min/+) mice than in wild-type mice (apc (+/+)). The β-catenin protein was localized in the basolateral membrane. Both, the glucose-induced current and ΔpH(i) were significantly higher in apc (Min/+) mice than in apc (+/+) mice. In conclusion, intestinal electrogenic transport of glucose and intestinal Na+/H+ exchanger activity are both significantly enhanced in apc (Min/+) mice, pointing to a role of APC in the regulation of epithelial transport. PMID:21476133

  9. Boric acid increases the expression levels of human anion exchanger genes SLC4A2 and SLC4A3.

    PubMed

    Akbas, F; Aydin, Z

    2012-01-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient in plants and animals. The role of boron in living systems includes coordinated regulation of gene expression, growth and proliferation of higher plants and animals. There are several well-defined genes associated with boron transportation and tolerance in plants and these genes show close homology with human anion exchanger genes. Mutation of these genes also characterizes some genetic disorders. We investigated the toxic effects of boric acid on HEK293 cells and mRNA expression of anion exchanger (SLC4A1, SLC4A2 and SLC4A3) genes. Cytotoxicity of boric acid at different concentrations was tested by using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Gene expression profiles were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. In the HEK293 cells, the nontoxic upper concentration of boric acid was 250 μM; more than 500 μM caused cytotoxicity. The 250 μM boric acid concentration increased gene expression level of SLC4A2 up to 8.6-fold and SLC4A3 up to 2.6-fold, after 36-h incubation. There was no significant effect of boric acid on SLC4A1 mRNA expression levels. PMID:22576912

  10. Unraveling fatty acid transport and activation mechanisms in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Thévenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Fatty acid (FA) transport and activation have been extensively studied in the model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae but have rarely been examined in oleaginous yeasts, such as Yarrowia lipolytica. Because the latter begins to be used in biodiesel production, understanding its FA transport and activation mechanisms is essential. We found that Y. lipolytica has FA transport and activation proteins similar to those of S. cerevisiae (Faa1p, Pxa1p, Pxa2p, Ant1p) but mechanism of FA peroxisomal transport and activation differs greatly with that of S. cerevisiae. While the ScPxa1p/ScPxa2p heterodimer is essential for growth on long-chain FAs, ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 is not impaired for growth on FAs. Meanwhile, ScAnt1p and YlAnt1p are both essential for yeast growth on medium-chain FAs, suggesting they function similarly. Interestingly, we found that the ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 ΔYlant1 mutant was unable to grow on short-, medium-, or long-chain FAs, suggesting that YlPxa1p, YlPxa2p, and YlAnt1p belong to two different FA degradation pathways. We also found that YlFaa1p is involved in FA storage in lipid bodies and that FA remobilization largely depended on YlFat1p, YlPxa1p and YlPxa2p. This study is the first to comprehensively examine FA intracellular transport and activation in oleaginous yeast. PMID:25887939

  11. The Nitrate Transporter (NRT) Gene Family in Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Euring, Dejuan; Volmer, Katharina; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient required for plant growth. It also acts as a signal regulating plant development. Nitrate is actively taken up and transported by nitrate transporters (NRT), which form a large family with many members and distinct functions. In contrast to Arabidopsis and rice there is little information about the NRT family in woody plants such as Populus. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus NRT family was performed. Sixty-eight PtNRT1/PTR, 6 PtNRT2, and 5 PtNRT3 genes were identified in the P. trichocarpa genome. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the genes of the NRT family are divided into three clades: NRT1/PTR with four subclades, NRT2, and NRT3. Topological analysis indicated that all members of PtNRT1/PTR and PtNRT2 have 8 to 12 trans-membrane domains, whereas the PtNRT3 proteins have no or up to two trans-membrane domains. Four PtNRT3 members were predicted as secreted proteins. Microarray analyses revealed tissue-specific expression patterns of PtNRT genes with distinct clusters of NRTs for roots, for the elongation zone of the apical stem segment and the developing xylem and a further cluster for leaves, bark and wood. A comparison of different poplar species (P. trichocarpa, P. tremula, P. euphratica, P. fremontii x P. angustifolia, and P. x canescens) showed that the tissue-specific patterns of the NRT genes varied to some extent with species. Bioinformatic analysis of putative cis-regulatory elements in the promoter regions of PtNRT family retrieved motifs suggesting the regulation of the NRT genes by N metabolism, by energy and carbon metabolism, and by phytohormones and stress. Multivariate analysis suggested that the combination and abundance of motifs in distinct promoters may lead to tissue-specificity. Our genome wide analysis of the PtNRT genes provides a valuable basis for functional analysis towards understanding the role of nitrate transporters for tree growth. PMID:23977227

  12. Molecular evolution of the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) gene family.

    PubMed

    Körbes, Ana Paula; Kulcheski, Franceli Rodrigues; Margis, Rogério; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina

    2016-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases (LPAATs) perform an essential cellular function by controlling the production of phosphatidic acid (PA), a key intermediate in the synthesis of membrane, signaling and storage lipids. Although LPAATs have been extensively explored by functional and biotechnological studies, little is known about their molecular evolution and diversification. We performed a genome-wide analysis using data from several plants and animals, as well as other eukaryotic and prokaryotic species, to identify LPAAT genes and analyze their evolutionary history. We used phylogenetic and molecular evolution analysis to test the hypothesis of distinct origins for these genes. The reconstructed phylogeny supported the ancient origin of some isoforms (plant LPAAT1 and LPAATB; animal AGPAAT1/2), while others emerged more recently (plant LPAAT2/3/4/5; AGPAAT3/4/5/8). Additionally, the hypothesis of endosymbiotic origin of the plastidic isoform LPAAT1 was confirmed. LPAAT genes from plants and animals mainly experienced strong purifying selection pressures with limited functional divergence after the species-specific duplications. Gene expression analyses of LPAAT isoforms in model plants demonstrated distinct LPAAT expression patterns in these organisms. The results showed that distinct origins followed by diversification of the LPAAT genes shaped the evolution of TAG biosynthesis. The expression pattern of individual genes may be responsible for adaptation into multiple ecological niches. PMID:26721558

  13. Metatranscriptomic analysis of lactic acid bacterial gene expression during kimchi fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Jin, Hyun Mi; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2013-05-15

    Barcode-based 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed that the kimchi microbiome was dominated by six lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Leuconostoc (Lc.) mesenteroides, Lactobacillus (Lb.) sakei, Weissella (W.) koreensis, Lc. gelidum, Lc. carnosum, and Lc. gasicomitatum. Therefore, we used completed genome sequences of representatives of these bacteria to investigate metatranscriptomic gene-expression profiles during kimchi fermentation. Total mRNA was extracted from kimchi samples taken at five time points during a 29 day-fermentation. Nearly all (97.7%) of the metagenome sequences that were recruited on all LAB genomes of GenBank mapped onto the six LAB strains; this high coverage rate indicated that this approach for assessing processes carried out by the kimchi microbiome was valid. Expressed mRNA sequences (as cDNA) were determined using Illumina GA IIx. Assignment of mRNA sequences to metabolic genes using MG-RAST revealed the prevalence of carbohydrate metabolism and lactic acid fermentation. The mRNA sequencing reads were mapped onto genomes of the six LAB strains, which showed that Lc. mesenteroides was most active during the early-stage fermentation, whereas gene expression by Lb. sakei and W. koreensis was high during later stages. However, gene expression by Lb. sakei decreased rapidly at 25 days of fermentation, which was possibly caused by bacteriophage infection of the Lactobacillus species. Many genes related to carbohydrate transport and hydrolysis and lactate fermentation were actively expressed, which indicated typical heterolactic acid fermentation. Mannitol dehydrogenase-encoding genes (mdh) were identified from all Leuconostoc species and especially Lc. mesenteroides, which harbored three copies (two copies on chromosome and one copy on plasmid) of mdh with different expression patterns. These results contribute to knowledge of the active populations and gene expression in the LAB community responsible for an important fermentation process. PMID

  14. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) Gene Family Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding. PMID:25310287

  15. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) gene family revisited.

    PubMed

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding. PMID:25310287

  16. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  17. Sulfate metabolism in Tuber borchii: characterization of a putative sulfate transporter and the homocysteine synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Zeppa, Sabrina; Marchionni, C; Saltarelli, R; Guidi, C; Ceccaroli, P; Pierleoni, R; Zambonelli, A; Stocchi, V

    2010-04-01

    The homocysteine synthase (tbhos) and putative sulfate transporter (tbsul1) genes have been characterized in order to understand the sulfate metabolism and regulation in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii. The analyses of tbsul1 and tbhos nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences led to the identification of the typical domains shown in homologous proteins. Sulfate starvation condition upregulates both genes. The real-time PCR assay of tbsul1 revealed that gene expression was about threefold higher in mycelia grown under sulfate starvation for 2 days than in the mycelial control and in the same starvation condition, the sulfate uptake increased. Real-time PCR and enzymatic assays showed regulation of tbhos when sulfur sources were lacking, suggesting that a transcriptional regulation of this gene rather than a post-transcriptional one occurred. Furthermore, the tbsul1 and tbhos expression patterns were evaluated during the truffle life cycle, revealing an over-expression in the mature ascomata for both genes. In the ectomycorrhizal tissue, only tbhos was upregulated suggesting its substantial role in T. borchii cysteine synthesis. The regulation of tbsul1 and tbhos occurs primarily at the transcriptional level both during vegetative and fruiting phases and these genes could be directly involved in VOCs production. PMID:20039042

  18. PDR-type ABC transporter mediates cellular uptake of the phytohormone abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohyun; Hwang, Jae-Ung; Kim, Yu-Young; Assmann, Sarah M.; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2010-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous phytohormone involved in many developmental processes and stress responses of plants. ABA moves within the plant, and intracellular receptors for ABA have been recently identified; however, no ABA transporter has been described to date. Here, we report the identification of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Arabidopsis thaliana Pleiotropic drug resistance transporter PDR12 (AtPDR12)/ABCG40 as a plasma membrane ABA uptake transporter. Uptake of ABA into yeast and BY2 cells expressing AtABCG40 was increased, whereas ABA uptake into protoplasts of atabcg40 plants was decreased compared with control cells. In response to exogenous ABA, the up-regulation of ABA responsive genes was strongly delayed in atabcg40 plants, indicating that ABCG40 is necessary for timely responses to ABA. Stomata of loss-of-function atabcg40 mutants closed more slowly in response to ABA, resulting in reduced drought tolerance. Our results integrate ABA-dependent signaling and transport processes and open another avenue for the engineering of drought-tolerant plants. PMID:20133880

  19. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers, which is consistent with the trend of human NTCP mRNA expression between men and women. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid increased Bsep mRNA expression. In silico analysis indicates that female-predominant mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression may be due to GH. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  20. A Plasma Membrane Association Module in Yeast Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-07-29

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in silico analyses and mutational studies we found that the C-terminal sequences of Gap1, Bap2, Hip1, Tat1, Tat2, Mmp1, Sam3, Agp1, and Gnp1 are about 50 residues long, associate with the PM, and have features that discriminate them from the termini of organellar amino acid transporters. We show that this sequence (named PMasseq) contains an amphipathic α-helix and the FWC signature, which is palmitoylated by palmitoyltransferase Pfa4. Variations of PMasseq, found in different AAPs, lead to different mobilities and localization patterns, whereas the disruption of the sequence has an adverse effect on cell viability. We propose that PMasseq modulates the function and localization of AAPs along the PM. PMasseq is one of the most complex protein signals for plasma membrane association across species and can be used as a delivery vehicle for the PM. PMID:27226538

  1. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  2. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  3. Extensive Intra-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfer Converging on a Fungal Fructose Transporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Marco A.; Gonçalves, Carla; Sampaio, José Paulo; Gonçalves, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Comparative genomics revealed in the last decade a scenario of rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among prokaryotes, but for fungi a clearly dominant pattern of vertical inheritance still stands, punctuated however by an increasing number of exceptions. In the present work, we studied the phylogenetic distribution and pattern of inheritance of a fungal gene encoding a fructose transporter (FSY1) with unique substrate selectivity. 109 FSY1 homologues were identified in two sub-phyla of the Ascomycota, in a survey that included 241 available fungal genomes. At least 10 independent inter-species instances of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) involving FSY1 were identified, supported by strong phylogenetic evidence and synteny analyses. The acquisition of FSY1 through HGT was sometimes suggestive of xenolog gene displacement, but several cases of pseudoparalogy were also uncovered. Moreover, evidence was found for successive HGT events, possibly including those responsible for transmission of the gene among yeast lineages. These occurrences do not seem to be driven by functional diversification of the Fsy1 proteins because Fsy1 homologues from widely distant lineages, including at least one acquired by HGT, appear to have similar biochemical properties. In summary, retracing the evolutionary path of the FSY1 gene brought to light an unparalleled number of independent HGT events involving a single fungal gene. We propose that the turbulent evolutionary history of the gene may be linked to the unique biochemical properties of the encoded transporter, whose predictable effect on fitness may be highly variable. In general, our results support the most recent views suggesting that inter-species HGT may have contributed much more substantially to shape fungal genomes than heretofore assumed. PMID:23818872

  4. Heteromeric amino acid transporters. In search of the molecular bases of transport cycle mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palacín, Manuel; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Rosell, Albert

    2016-06-15

    Heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are relevant targets for structural studies. On the one hand, HATs are involved in inherited and acquired human pathologies. On the other hand, these molecules are the only known examples of solute transporters composed of two subunits (heavy and light) linked by a disulfide bridge. Unfortunately, structural knowledge of HATs is scarce and limited to the atomic structure of the ectodomain of a heavy subunit (human 4F2hc-ED) and distant prokaryotic homologues of the light subunits that share a LeuT-fold. Recent data on human 4F2hc/LAT2 at nanometer resolution revealed 4F2hc-ED positioned on top of the external loops of the light subunit LAT2. Improved resolution of the structure of HATs, combined with conformational studies, is essential to establish the structural bases for light subunit recognition and to evaluate the functional relevance of heavy and light subunit interactions for the amino acid transport cycle. PMID:27284037

  5. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Zubo, Yan O.; Börner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis. PMID:24078671

  6. Gene therapy for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tseng, Sheng-Hong; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Lee, Ni-Chung; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Snyder, Richard O; Byrne, Barry J; Tai, Chun-Hwei; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2012-05-16

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) is required for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Children with defects in the AADC gene show compromised development, particularly in motor function. Drug therapy has only marginal effects on some of the symptoms and does not change early childhood mortality. Here, we performed adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of the human AADC gene bilaterally into the putamen of four patients 4 to 6 years of age. All of the patients showed improvements in motor performance: One patient was able to stand 16 months after gene transfer, and the other three patients achieved supported sitting 6 to 15 months after gene transfer. Choreic dyskinesia was observed in all patients, but this resolved after several months. Positron emission tomography revealed increased uptake by the putamen of 6-[(18)F]fluorodopa, a tracer for AADC. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased dopamine and serotonin levels after gene transfer. Thus, gene therapy targeting primary AADC deficiency is well tolerated and leads to improved motor function. PMID:22593174

  7. Genomic Analysis of Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Thraustochytrium sp. 26185.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianming; Dauenpen, Meesapyodsuk; Qu, Cunmin; Qiu, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Thraustochytrium sp. 26185 is a marine protist that can produce a large amount of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), an ω3 very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLCPUFA) of nutritional importance. However, the mechanism of how this fatty acid is synthesized and assembled into the storage lipid triacylglycerol is unclear. Here we report sequencing of the whole genome and genomic analysis of genes involved in the biosynthesis and assembly of the fatty acids in this species. Genome sequencing produced a total of 2,418,734,139 bp clean sequences with about 62 fold genome coverage. Annotation of the genome sequences revealed 10,797 coding genes. Among them, 10,216 genes could be assigned into 25 KOG classes where 451 genes were specifically assigned to the group of lipid transport and metabolism. Detailed analysis of these genes revealed co-existence of both aerobic pathway and anaerobic pathways for the biosynthesis of DHA in this species. However, in the aerobic pathway, a key gene encoding stearate Δ9 desaturase introducing the first double bond to long chain saturated fatty acid 18:0 was missing from the genome. Genomic survey of genes involved in the acyl trafficking among glycerolipids showed that, unlike plants, this protist did not possess phosphatidylcholine:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase, an important enzyme in bridging two types of glycerolipids, diacylglycerols (DAG) and phosphatidylcholines (PtdCho). These results shed new insight on the biosynthesis and assembly of VLCPUFA in the Thraustochytrium. PMID:27514858

  8. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  9. Combinations of mutant FAD2 and FAD3 genes to produce high oleic acid and low linolenic acid soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High oleic acid soybeans were produced by combining a mutant FAD2-1A and a mutant FAD2-1B gene. Despite having a high oleic acid content, the linolenic acid content of these soybeans was in the range of 4-6%. Therefore, a study was conducted to incorporate one or two mutant FAD3 genes into the high ...

  10. Tumor microenvironment promotes dicarboxylic acid carrier-mediated transport of succinate to fuel prostate cancer mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhunussova, Aigul; Sen, Bhaswati; Friedman, Leah; Tuleukhanov, Sultan; Brooks, Ari D; Sensenig, Richard; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells reprogram their metabolism, so that they support their elevated oxidative phosphorylation and promote a cancer friendly microenvironment. This work aimed to explore the mechanisms that cancer cells employ for fueling themselves with energy rich metabolites available in interstitial fluids. The mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation in metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells and normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells were studied by high-resolution respirometry. An important finding was that prostate cancer cells at acidic pH 6.8 are capable of consuming exogenous succinate, while physiological pH 7.4 was not favorable for this process. Using specific inhibitors, it was demonstrated that succinate is transported in cancer cells by the mechanism of plasma membrane Na+-dependent dycarboxylic acid transporter NaDC3 (SLC13A3 gene). Although the level of expression of SLC13A3 was not significantly altered when maintaining cells in the medium with lower pH, the respirometric activity of cells under acidic condition was elevated in the presence of succinate. In contrast, normal prostate cells while expressing NaDC3 mRNA do not produce NaDC3 protein. The mechanism of succinate influx via NaDC3 in metastatic prostate cancer cells could yield a novel target for anti-cancer therapy and has the potential to be used for imaging-based diagnostics to detect non-glycolytic tumors. PMID:26175936

  11. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  12. Expression of sialic acid and polysialic acid in serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis: divergent transcription of biosynthesis and transport operons through a common promoter region.

    PubMed Central

    Swartley, J S; Ahn, J H; Liu, L J; Kahler, C M; Stephens, D S

    1996-01-01

    We studied capsule-defective (Cap-) serogroup B meningococcal mutants created through Tn916 or omega-fragment mutagenesis. The Cap- phenotypes were the results of insertions in three of four linked genes (synX, synC, and synD) involved in CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid and polysialic acid capsule biosynthesis, and in ctrA the first of four linked genes involved in capsule membrane transport. Mutations in the CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid biosynthesis genes synX and synC caused defects in lipooligosaccharide sialylation but not mutations in the putative (alpha2 -> 8)-linked polysialyltransferase (synD) or in ctrA. Reverse transcriptase PCR studies indicated that the four biosynthesis genes (synX to -D) and the capsule transport genes (ctr to -D) were separately transcribed as operons. The operons were separated by a 134-bp intergenic region. Primer extension of synX and ctrA demonstrated that transcription of the operons was divergently initiated from adjacent start sites present in the intergenic region. Both transcriptional start sites were preceded by a perfect -10 Pribnow promoter binding region. The synX to -D, but not the ctrA to -D, transcriptional start site was preceded by a sequence bearing strong homology to the consensus sigma 70 -35 promoter binding sequence. Both promoters showed transcriptional activity when cloned behind a lacZ reporter gene in Escherichia coli. Our results confirm the intrinsic relationship between polysialic acid capsule biosynthesis and lipooligosaccharide sialylation pathways in group B Neisseria meningitidis. Our study also suggests that the intergenic region separating the synX to -D and ctrA to -D operons is an important control point for the regulation of group B capsule expression through coordinated transcriptional regulation of the synX to -D and drA to -D promoters. PMID:8763931

  13. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  14. The neuronal transporter gene SLC6A15 confers risk to major depression.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Martin A; Lucae, Susanne; Saemann, Philipp G; Schmidt, Mathias V; Demirkan, Ayse; Hek, Karin; Czamara, Darina; Alexander, Michael; Salyakina, Daria; Ripke, Stephan; Hoehn, David; Specht, Michael; Menke, Andreas; Hennings, Johannes; Heck, Angela; Wolf, Christiane; Ising, Marcus; Schreiber, Stefan; Czisch, Michael; Müller, Marianne B; Uhr, Manfred; Bettecken, Thomas; Becker, Albert; Schramm, Johannes; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven; Craig, Ian W; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn M; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2011-04-28

    Major depression (MD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and a leading cause of loss in work productivity. A combination of genetic and environmental risk factors probably contributes to MD. We present data from a genome-wide association study revealing a neuron-specific neutral amino acid transporter (SLC6A15) as a susceptibility gene for MD. Risk allele carrier status in humans and chronic stress in mice were associated with a downregulation of the expression of this gene in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the pathophysiology of MD. The same polymorphisms also showed associations with alterations in hippocampal volume and neuronal integrity. Thus, decreased SLC6A15 expression, due to genetic or environmental factors, might alter neuronal circuits related to the susceptibility for MD. Our convergent data from human genetics, expression studies, brain imaging, and animal models suggest a pathophysiological mechanism for MD that may be accessible to drug targeting. PMID:21521612

  15. The neuronal transporter gene SLC6A15 confers risk to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Martin A.; Lucae, Susanne; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Demirkan, Ayse; Hek, Karin; Czamara, Darina; Alexander, Michael; Salyakina, Daria; Ripke, Stephan; Hoehn, David; Specht, Michael; Menke, Andreas; Hennings, Johannes; Heck, Angela; Wolf, Christiane; Ising, Marcus; Schreiber, Stefan; Czisch, Michael; Müller, Marianne B.; Uhr, Manfred; Bettecken, Thomas; Becker, Albert; Schramm, Johannes; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Cichon, Sven; Craig, Ian W.; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Binder, Elisabeth B.

    2011-01-01

    Major depression (MD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and a leading cause of loss in work productivity. A combination of genetic and environmental risk factors likely contributes to MD. We present data from a genome-wide association study revealing a neuron-specific neutral amino acid transporter (SLC6A15) as a novel susceptibility gene for MD. Risk allele carrier status in humans and chronic stress in mice were associated with a downregulation of the expression of this gene in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the pathophysiology of MD. The same polymorphisms also showed associations with alterations in hippocampal volume and neuronal integrity. Thus, decreased SLC6A15 expression, due to genetic or environmental factors might alter neuronal circuits related to the susceptibility for MD. Our convergent data from human genetics, expression studies, brain imaging and animal models suggest a novel pathophysiological mechanism for MD that may be accessible to drug targeting. PMID:21521612

  16. Differential expression of several drug transporter genes in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Louisa, Melva; Suyatna, Frans D.; Wanandi, Septelia Inawati; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cell culture techniques have many advantages for investigation of drug transport to target organ like liver. HepG2 and Huh-7 are two cell lines available from hepatoma that can be used as a model for hepatic drug transport. The present study is aimed to analyze the expression level of several drug transporter genes in two hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh-7 and their response to inhibitors. Materials and Methods: This is an in vitro study using HepG2 and Huh-7 cells. The expression level of the following drug transporter genes was quantified: P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance protein 1, Organic Anionic Transporter Protein 1B1 (OATP1B1) and Organic Cationic Transporter-1 (OCT1). Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the cells using Tripure isolation reagent, then gene expression level of the transporters is quantified using Applied Biosystems quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Verapamil (P-glycoprotein inhibitor), nelfinavir (OATP1B1 inhibitor), quinidine (OCT1 inhibitor) were used to differentiate the inhibitory properties of these agents to the transporter expressions in HepG2 and Huh-7 cells. Results: Huh-7 shows a higher level of P-glycoprotein, OATP1B1 and OCT1 expressions compared with those of HepG2. Verapamil reduces the expressions of P-glycoprotein in HepG2 and Huh-7; nelfinavir reduces the expression of OATP1B1 in HepG2 and Huh-7; while quinidine reduces the OCT1 gene expressions in HepG2, but not in Huh-7 cells. Conclusion: This study indicates that HepG2 might be a more suitable in vitro model than Huh-7 to study drug transport in hepatocytes involving drug transporters. PMID:27376043

  17. Real-time functional characterization of cationic amino acid transporters using a new FRET sensor.

    PubMed

    Vanoaica, Liviu; Behera, Alok; Camargo, Simone M R; Forster, Ian C; Verrey, François

    2016-04-01

    L-arginine is a semi-essential amino acid that serves as precursor for the production of urea, nitric oxide (NO), polyamines, and other biologically important metabolites. Hence, a fast and reliable assessment of its intracellular concentration changes is highly desirable. Here, we report on a genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based arginine nanosensor that employs the arginine repressor/activator ahrC gene from Bacillus subtilis. This new nanosensor was expressed in HEK293T cells, and experiments with cell lysate showed that it binds L-arginine with high specificity and with a K d of ∼177 μM. Live imaging experiments showed that the nanosensor was expressed throughout the cytoplasm and displayed a half maximal FRET increase at an extracellular L-arginine concentration of ∼22 μM. By expressing the nanosensor together with SLC7A1, SLC7A2B, or SLC7A3 cationic amino acid transporters (CAT1-3), it was shown that L-arginine was imported at a similar rate via SLC7A1 and SLC7A2B and slower via SLC7A3. In contrast, upon withdrawal of extracellular L-arginine, intracellular levels decreased as fast in SLC7A3-expressing cells compared with SLC7A1, but the efflux was slower via SLC7A2B. SLC7A4 (CAT4) could not be convincingly shown to transport L-arginine. We also demonstrated the impact of membrane potential on L-arginine transport and showed that physiological concentrations of symmetrical and asymmetrical dimethylarginine do not significantly interfere with L-arginine transport through SLC7A1. Our results demonstrate that the FRET nanosensor can be used to assess L-arginine transport through plasma membrane in real time. PMID:26555760

  18. Impact of Microbial Growth on Subsurface Perfluoroalkyl Acid Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, T. S.; Higgins, C. P.; Sharp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and transport of poly and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the presence of active microbial communities has not been widely investigated. These emerging contaminants are commonly utilized in aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF) and have often been detected in groundwater. This study explores the transport of a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), in microbially active settings. Single point organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients derived by exposing inactive cellular material to PFASs result in more than an order of magnitude increase in sorption compared to soil organic carbon sorption coefficients found in literature. For example, the sorption coefficients for PFOS are 4.05±0.07 L/kg and 2.80±0.08 L/kg for cellular organic carbon and soil organic carbon respectively. This increase in sorption, coupled with enhanced extracellular polymeric substance production observed during growth of a common hydrocarbon degrading soil microbe exposed to source-level concentrations of PFASs (10 mg/L of 11 analytes, 110 mg/L total) may result in PFAS retardation in situ. To address the upscaling of this phenomenon, flow-through columns packed with low-organic carbon sediment and biostimulated with 10 mg/L glucose were exposed to PFAS concentrations from 15 μg/L to 10 mg/L of each 11 analytes. Breakthrough and tailing of each analyte was measured and modeled with Hydrus-1D to explore sorption coefficients over time for microbially active columns.

  19. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  20. Acid-base transport by the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Lara A.; Boron, Walter F.; Zhou, Yuehan

    2015-01-01

    Each day, the kidneys filter 180 L of blood plasma, equating to some 4,300 mmol of the major blood buffer, bicarbonate (HCO3−). The glomerular filtrate enters the lumen of the proximal tubule (PT), and the majority of filtered HCO3− is reclaimed along the early (S1) and convoluted (S2) portions of the PT in a manner coupled to the secretion of H+ into the lumen. The PT also uses the secreted H+ to titrate non-HCO3− buffers in the lumen, in the process creating “new HCO3−” for transport into the blood. Thus, the PT – along with more distal renal segments – is largely responsible for regulating plasma [HCO3−]. In this review we first focus on the milestone discoveries over the past 50+ years that define the mechanism and regulation of acid-base transport by the proximal tubule. Further on in the review, we will summarize research still in progress from our laboratory, work that addresses the problem of how the PT is able to finely adapt to acid–base disturbances by rapidly sensing changes in basolateral levels of HCO3− and CO2 (but not pH), and thereby to exert tight control over the acid–base composition of the blood plasma. PMID:21170887

  1. Butyric acid increases transepithelial transport of ferulic acid through upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4).

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Kerstin; Kerimi, Asimina; Poquet, Laure; Williamson, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Ferulic acid is released by microbial hydrolysis in the colon, where butyric acid, a major by-product of fermentation, constitutes the main energy source for colonic enterocytes. We investigated how varying concentrations of this short chain fatty acid may influence the absorption of the phenolic acid. Chronic treatment of Caco-2 cells with butyric acid resulted in increased mRNA and protein abundance of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4), previously proposed to facilitate ferulic acid absorption in addition to passive diffusion. Short term incubation with butyric acid only led to upregulation of MCT4 while both conditions increased transepithelial transport of ferulic acid in the apical to basolateral, but not basolateral to apical, direction. Chronic treatment also elevated intracellular concentrations of ferulic acid, which in turn gave rise to increased concentrations of ferulic acid metabolites. Immunofluorescence staining of cells revealed uniform distribution of MCT1 protein in the cell membrane, whereas MCT4 was only detected in the lateral plasma membrane sections of Caco-2 cells. We therefore propose that MCT1 may be acting as an uptake transporter and MCT4 as an efflux system across the basolateral membrane for ferulic acid, and that this process is stimulated by butyric acid. PMID:26854723

  2. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  3. Identification of genes regulated by UV/salicylic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Watson, C.; Milton, J.; Oryhon, J.; Salbego, D.; Milosavljevic, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; CuraGen Corp.

    2000-02-01

    Purpose : Previous work from the authors' group and others has demonstrated that some of the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression are modulated in response to the addition of salicylic acid to irradiated cells. The presumed effector molecule responsible for this modulation is NF-kappaB. In the experiments described here, differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify those cDNAs that are differentially modulated by UV radiation with and without the addition of salicylic acid. Materials and methods : Differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Results : Eight such cDNAs are presented: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-beta), nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADH ubiquinone reductase 24kDa (NDUFV2), elongation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), nuclear dots protein SP100, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor (IF1), a cDNA similar to a subunit of yeast CCAAT transcription factor HAP5, and two expressed sequence tags (AA187906 and AA513156). Conclusions : Sequences of four of these genes contained NF-kappaB DNA binding sites of the type that may attract transrepressor p55/p55 NF-kappaB homodimers. Down-regulation of these genes upon UV irradiation may contribute to increased cell survival via suppression of p53 independent apoptosis.

  4. Comparison of gene expression methods to identify genes responsive to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyue; Jones, Paul D; Decoen, Wim; Newsted, John L; Giesy, John P

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide expression techniques are being increasingly used to assess the effects of environmental contaminants. Oligonucleotide or cDNA microarray methods make possible the screening of large numbers of known sequences for a given model species, while differential display analysis makes possible analysis of the expression of all the genes from any species. We report a comparison of two currently popular methods for genome-wide expression analysis in rat hepatoma cells treated with perfluorooctane sulfonic acid. The two analyses provided 'complimentary' information. Approximately 5% of the 8000 genes analyzed by the GeneChip array, were altered by a factor of three or greater. Differential display results were more difficult to interpret, since multiple gene products were present in most gel bands so a probabilistic approach was used to determine which pathways were affected. The mechanistic interpretation derived from these two methods was in agreement, both showing similar alterations in a specific set of genes. PMID:21783471

  5. Possible involvement of lipoic acid in binding protein-dependent transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Richarme, G

    1985-04-01

    We describe the properties of the binding protein dependent-transport of ribose, galactose, and maltose and of the lactose permease, and the phosphoenolpyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase transport systems in a strain of Escherichia coli which is deficient in the synthesis of lipoic acid, a cofactor involved in alpha-keto acid dehydrogenation. Such a strain can grow in the absence of lipoic acid in minimal medium supplemented with acetate and succinate. Although the lactose permease and the phosphoenolypyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase are not affected by lipoic acid deprivation, the binding protein-dependent transports are reduced by 70% in conditions of lipoic acid deprivation when compared with their activity in conditions of lipoic acid supply. The remaining transport is not affected by arsenate but is inhibited by the uncoupler carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone; however the lipoic acid-dependent transport is completely inhibited by arsenate and only weakly inhibited by carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone. The known inhibitor of alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases, 5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, completely inhibits all binding protein-dependent transports whether in conditions of lipoic supply or deprivation; the results suggest a possible relation between binding protein-dependent transport and alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases and shed light on the inhibition of these transports by arsenicals and uncouplers. PMID:3920206

  6. Transport and signaling via the amino acid binding site of the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Bonini, Beatriz Monge; Versele, Matthias; Thevelein, Johan M

    2009-01-01

    Transporter-related nutrient sensors, called transceptors, mediate nutrient activation of signaling pathways through the plasma membrane. The mechanism of action of transporting and nontransporting transceptors is unknown. We have screened 319 amino acid analogs to identify compounds that act on Gap1, a transporting amino acid transceptor in yeast that triggers activation of the protein kinase A pathway. We identified competitive and noncompetitive inhibitors of transport, either with or without agonist action for signaling, including nontransported agonists. Using substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) analysis, we identified Ser388 and Val389 as being exposed into the amino acid binding site, and we show that agonist action for signaling uses the same binding site as used for transport. Our results provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the mechanism of action of transceptors. They indicate that signaling requires a ligand-induced specific conformational change that may be part of but does not require the complete transport cycle. PMID:19060912

  7. Evolutionary Descent of Prion Genes from the ZIP Family of Metal Ion Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Ehsani, Sepehr; Watts, Joel C.; Westaway, David; Wille, Holger

    2009-01-01

    In the more than twenty years since its discovery, both the phylogenetic origin and cellular function of the prion protein (PrP) have remained enigmatic. Insights into a possible function of PrP may be obtained through the characterization of its molecular neighborhood in cells. Quantitative interactome data demonstrated the spatial proximity of two metal ion transporters of the ZIP family, ZIP6 and ZIP10, to mammalian prion proteins in vivo. A subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed the unexpected presence of a PrP-like amino acid sequence within the N-terminal, extracellular domain of a distinct sub-branch of the ZIP protein family that includes ZIP5, ZIP6 and ZIP10. Additional structural threading and orthologous sequence alignment analyses argued that the prion gene family is phylogenetically derived from a ZIP-like ancestral molecule. The level of sequence homology and the presence of prion protein genes in most chordate species place the split from the ZIP-like ancestor gene at the base of the chordate lineage. This relationship explains structural and functional features found within mammalian prion proteins as elements of an ancient involvement in the transmembrane transport of divalent cations. The phylogenetic and spatial connection to ZIP proteins is expected to open new avenues of research to elucidate the biology of the prion protein in health and disease. PMID:19784368

  8. Branched-chain amino acid transport regulation in mutants blocked in tRNA maturation and transcriptional termination.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Lawther, R P; Hatfield, G W; Oxender, D L

    1978-01-01

    The regulation of branched-chain amino acid transport and binding protein biosynthesis was studied in Escherichia coli strains containing hisT (the structural gene for pseudouridine synthetase) and rho (the structural gene for the mRNA transcriptional termination factor rho) mutations. The results indicate that the hisT strain cannot be fully derepressed for transport and that the hisT rho double mutant is partially derepressed under excess leucine conditions, but cannot be further derepressed by leucine deprivation. These data are consistent with a model in which fully mature tRNALeu is required for derepression and in which rho interacts with tRNALeu in regulating transport by terminating transcription, especially in excess-leucine growth conditions. PMID:350834

  9. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli inhibits ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter ASBT.

    PubMed

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Gill, Ravinder K; Ghosh, Amit; Saksena, Seema; Borthakur, Alip; Hecht, Gail A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Alrefai, Waddah A

    2012-05-15

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) is responsible for the absorption of bile acids from the intestine. A decrease in ASBT function and expression has been implicated in diarrhea associated with intestinal inflammation. Whether infection with pathogenic microorganisms such as the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) affect ASBT activity is not known. EPEC is a food-borne enteric pathogen that translocates bacterial effector molecules via type three secretion system (TTSS) into host cells and is a major cause of infantile diarrhea. We investigated the effects of EPEC infection on ileal ASBT function utilizing human intestinal Caco2 cells and HEK-293 cells stably transfected with ASBT-V5 fusion protein (2BT cells). ASBT activity was significantly inhibited following 60 min infection with EPEC but not with nonpathogenic E. coli. Mutations in bacterial escN, espA, espB, and espD, the genes encoding for the elements of bacterial TTSS, ablated EPEC inhibitory effect on ASBT function. Furthermore, mutation in the bacterial BFP gene encoding for bundle-forming pili abrogated the inhibition of ASBT by EPEC, indicating the essential role for bacterial aggregation and the early attachment. The inhibition by EPEC was associated with a significant decrease in the V(max) of the transporter and a reduction in the level of ASBT on the plasma membrane. The inhibition of ASBT by EPEC was blocked in the presence of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. Our studies provide novel evidence for the alterations in the activity of ASBT by EPEC infection and suggest a possible effect for EPEC in influencing intestinal bile acid homeostasis. PMID:22403793

  10. The glucuronic acid utilization gene cluster from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6.

    PubMed

    Shulami, S; Gat, O; Sonenshein, A L; Shoham, Y

    1999-06-01

    A lambda-EMBL3 genomic library of Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6 was screened for hemicellulolytic activities, and five independent clones exhibiting beta-xylosidase activity were isolated. The clones overlap each other and together represent a 23.5-kb chromosomal segment. The segment contains a cluster of xylan utilization genes, which are organized in at least three transcriptional units. These include the gene for the extracellular xylanase, xylanase T-6; part of an operon coding for an intracellular xylanase and a beta-xylosidase; and a putative 15.5-kb-long transcriptional unit, consisting of 12 genes involved in the utilization of alpha-D-glucuronic acid (GlcUA). The first four genes in the potential GlcUA operon (orf1, -2, -3, and -4) code for a putative sugar transport system with characteristic components of the binding-protein-dependent transport systems. The most likely natural substrate for this transport system is aldotetraouronic acid [2-O-alpha-(4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronosyl)-xylotriose] (MeGlcUAXyl3). The following two genes code for an intracellular alpha-glucuronidase (aguA) and a beta-xylosidase (xynB). Five more genes (kdgK, kdgA, uxaC, uxuA, and uxuB) encode proteins that are homologous to enzymes involved in galacturonate and glucuronate catabolism. The gene cluster also includes a potential regulatory gene, uxuR, the product of which resembles repressors of the GntR family. The apparent transcriptional start point of the cluster was determined by primer extension analysis and is located 349 bp from the initial ATG codon. The potential operator site is a perfect 12-bp inverted repeat located downstream from the promoter between nucleotides +170 and +181. Gel retardation assays indicated that UxuR binds specifically to this sequence and that this binding is efficiently prevented in vitro by MeGlcUAXyl3, the most likely molecular inducer. PMID:10368143

  11. Early-onset metabolic syndrome in mice lacking the intestinal uric acid transporter SLC2A9

    PubMed Central

    DeBosch, Brian J.; Kluth, Oliver; Fujiwara, Hideji; Schürmann, Annette; Moley, Kelle

    2015-01-01

    Excess circulating uric acid, a product of hepatic glycolysis and purine metabolism, often accompanies metabolic syndrome. However, whether hyperuricemia contributes to development of metabolic syndrome or is merely a by-product of other processes that cause this disorder has not been resolved. Additionally, how uric acid is cleared from the circulation is incompletely understood. Here, we present a genetic model of spontaneous, early-onset metabolic syndrome in mice lacking the enterocyte urate transporter Glut9 (encoded by the SLC2A9 gene). Glut9-deficient mice develop impaired enterocyte uric acid transport kinetics, hyperuricemia, hyperuricosuria, spontaneous hypertension, dyslipidemia, and elevated body fat. Allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, can reverse the hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. These data provide evidence that hyperuricemia per se could have deleterious metabolic sequelae. Moreover, these findings suggest that enterocytes may regulate whole-body metabolism, and that enterocyte urate metabolism could potentially be targeted to modulate or prevent metabolic syndrome. PMID:25100214

  12. Integrated Systems Biology Analysis of Transcriptomes Reveals Candidate Genes for Acidity Control in Developing Fruits of Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dingquan; Zhao, Yihong; Cao, Minghao; Qiao, Liang; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids, such as citrate and malate, are important contributors for the sensory traits of fleshy fruits. Although their biosynthesis has been illustrated, regulatory mechanisms of acid accumulation remain to be dissected. To provide transcriptional architecture and identify candidate genes for citrate accumulation in fruits, we have selected for transcriptome analysis four varieties of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) with varying fruit acidity, Succari (acidless), Bingtang (low acid), and Newhall and Xinhui (normal acid). Fruits of these varieties at 45 days post anthesis (DPA), which corresponds to Stage I (cell division), had similar acidity, but they displayed differential acid accumulation at 142 DPA (Stage II, cell expansion). Transcriptomes of fruits at 45 and 142 DPA were profiled using RNA sequencing and analyzed with three different algorithms (Pearson correlation, gene coexpression network and surrogate variable analysis). Our network analysis shows that the acid-correlated genes belong to three distinct network modules. Several of these candidate fruit acidity genes encode regulatory proteins involved in transport (such as AHA10), degradation (such as APD2) and transcription (such as AIL6) and act as hubs in the citrate accumulation gene networks. Taken together, our integrated systems biology analysis has provided new insights into the fruit citrate accumulation gene network and led to the identification of candidate genes likely associated with the fruit acidity control. PMID:27092171

  13. The D-amino acid transport by the invertebrate SLC6 transporters KAAT1 and CAATCH1 from Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Vollero, Alessandra; Imperiali, Francesca G; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Margheritis, Eleonora; Peres, Antonio; Bossi, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The ability of the SLC6 family members, the insect neutral amino acid cotransporter KAAT1(K(+)-coupled amino acid transporter 1) and its homologous CAATCH1(cation anion activated amino acid transporter/channel), to transport D-amino acids has been investigated through heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and electrophysiological techniques. In the presence of D-isomers of leucine, serine, and proline, the msKAAT1 generates inward, transport-associated, currents with variable relative potencies, depending on the driving ion Na(+) or K(+). Higher concentrations of D-leucine (≥1 mmol/L) give rise to an anomalous response that suggests the existence of a second binding site with inhibitory action on the transport process. msCAATCH1 is also able to transport the D-amino acids tested, including D-leucine, whereas L-leucine acts as a blocker. A similar behavior is exhibited by the KAAT1 mutant S308T, confirming the relevance of the residue in this position in L-leucine binding and the different interaction of D-leucine with residues involved in transport mechanism. D-leucine and D-serine on various vertebrate orthologs B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) elicited only a very small current and singular behavior was not observed, indicating that it is specific of the insect neutral amino acid transporters. These findings highlight the relevance of D-amino acid absorption in the insect nutrition and metabolism and may provide new evidences in the molecular transport mechanism of SLC6 family. PMID:26884475

  14. Inhibition of ileal apical but not basolateral bile acid transport reduces atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Haywood, Jamie; Dawson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids induces hepatic bile acid synthesis, increases hepatic cholesterol demand, and increases clearance of apoB-containing lipoproteins in plasma. Based on these effects, bile acid sequestrants have been used for many years to treat hypercholesterolemia and the associated atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of blocking ileal apical versus basolateral membrane bile acid transport on the development of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in mouse models. Methods and Results ApoE−/− and Ldlr−/− mice deficient in the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) or apoE−/− mice deficient in the basolateral bile acid transporter (Ostα) were fed an atherogenic diet for 16 weeks. Bile acid metabolism, cholesterol metabolism, gene expression, and development of atherosclerosis were examined. Mice deficient in Asbt exhibited the classic response to interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, including significant reductions in hepatic and plasma cholesterol levels, and reduced aortic cholesteryl ester content. Ileal Fibroblast Growth Factor-15 (FGF15) expression was significantly reduced in Asbt−/−apoE−/− mice and was inversely correlated with expression of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1). Ileal FGF15 expression was directly correlated with plasma cholesterol levels and aortic cholesterol content. In contrast, plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis development were not reduced in apoE−/− mice deficient in Ostα. Conclusions Decreases in ileal FGF15, with subsequent increases in hepatic Cyp7a1 expression and bile acid synthesis appear to be necessary for the plasma cholesterol-lowering and atheroprotective effects associated with blocking intestinal bile acid absorption. PMID:23880190

  15. A cryptic role of a glycolytic-gluconeogenic enzyme (aldolase) in amino acid transporter turnover in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Roumelioti, Katerina; Vangelatos, Ioannis; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2010-03-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans the fbaA1013 mutation results in reduced or total loss of growth on glycolytic and gluconeogenic carbon sources, respectively. It also negatively affects growth on several amino acids (including L-proline, L-glutamate or L-aspartate) that the fungus can use as nitrogen source on glycolytic carbon sources. Complementation of the fbaA1013 mutation using an A. nidulans genomic library resulted in cloning of the fbaA gene, which encodes a putative fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase (FBA), an enzyme involved in both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. The fbaA1013 mutation is a chromosome rearrangement in the 5' regulatory region of the fbaA gene resulting in reduced or total loss of transcription in response to glycolytic and gluconeogenic carbon sources respectively. The fbaA gene is essential for growth. A functional FbaA protein is necessary for plasma membrane localization of the AgtA acidic amino acid (L-glutamate/L-aspartate) transporter, as the fbaA1013 mutation results in targeting to and presumably subsequent degradation of AgtA in the vacuole. Our results support a novel role of the FbaA protein that is, involvement in the regulation of amino acids transporters. PMID:20026236

  16. Nucleic Acid Modifications in Regulation of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; He, Chuan

    2016-01-21

    Nucleic acids carry a wide range of different chemical modifications. In contrast to previous views that these modifications are static and only play fine-tuning functions, recent research advances paint a much more dynamic picture. Nucleic acids carry diverse modifications and employ these chemical marks to exert essential or critical influences in a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms. This review covers several nucleic acid modifications that play important regulatory roles in biological systems, especially in regulation of gene expression: 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and its oxidative derivatives, and N(6)-methyladenine (6mA) in DNA; N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), pseudouridine (Ψ), and 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) in mRNA and long non-coding RNA. Modifications in other non-coding RNAs, such as tRNA, miRNA, and snRNA, are also briefly summarized. We provide brief historical perspective of the field, and highlight recent progress in identifying diverse nucleic acid modifications and exploring their functions in different organisms. Overall, we believe that work in this field will yield additional layers of both chemical and biological complexity as we continue to uncover functional consequences of known nucleic acid modifications and discover new ones. PMID:26933737

  17. Expression of the Genes Encoding the Trk and Kdp Potassium Transport Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cholo, Moloko C.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Osman, Ayman G.; Anderson, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Two potassium (K+)-uptake systems, Trk and Kdp, are operative in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), but the environmental factors triggering their expression have not been determined. The current study has evaluated the expression of these genes in the Mtb wild-type and a trk-gene knockout strain at various stages of logarithmic growth in relation to extracellular K+ concentrations and pH. In both strains, mRNA levels of the K+-uptake encoding genes were relatively low compared to those of the housekeeping gene, sigA, at the early- and mid-log phases, increasing during late-log. Increased gene expression coincided with decreased K+ uptake in the context of a drop in extracellular pH and sustained high extracellular K+ concentrations. In an additional series of experiments, the pH of the growth medium was manipulated by the addition of 1N HCl/NaOH. Decreasing the pH resulted in reductions in both membrane potential and K+ uptake in the setting of significant induction of genes encoding both K+ transporters. These observations are consistent with induction of the genes encoding the active K+ transporters of Mtb as a strategy to compensate for loss of membrane potential-driven uptake of K+ at low extracellular pH. Induction of these genes may promote survival in the acidic environments of the intracellular vacuole and granuloma. PMID:26351637

  18. Recent progress in gene therapy to deliver nucleic acids with multivalent cationic vectors.

    PubMed

    Junquera, Elena; Aicart, Emilio

    2016-07-01

    Due to the potential use as transfecting agents of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), multivalent cationic non-viral vectors have received special attention in the last decade. Much effort has been addressed to synthesize more efficient and biocompatible gene vectors able to transport nucleic acids into the cells without provoking an immune response. Among them, the mostly explored to compact and transfect nucleic acids are: (a) gemini and multivalent cationic lipids, mixed with a helper lipid, by forming lipoplexes; and (b) cationic polymers, polycations, and polyrotaxanes, by forming polyplexes. This review is focused on the progress and recent advances experimented in this area, mainly during the present decade, devoting special attention to the lipoplexes and polyplexes, as follows: (a) to its biophysical characterization (mainly electrostatics, structure, size and morphology) using a wide variety of experimental methods; and (b) to its biological activity (transfection efficacy and cytotoxicity) addressed to confirm the optimum formulations and viability of these complexes as very promising gene vectors of nucleic acids in nanomedicine. PMID:26265376

  19. The genomic organization of a human creatine transporter (CRTR) gene located in Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, N.; Bauer, D.; Brenner, V.

    1996-07-15

    During the course of a large-scale sequencing project in Xq28, a human creatine transporter (CRTR) gene was discovered. The gene is located approximately 36 kb centromeric to ALD. The gene contains 13 exons and spans about 8.5 kb of genomic DNA. Since the creatine transporter has a prominent function in muscular physiology, it is a candidate gene for Barth syndrome and infantile cardiomyopathy mapped to Xq28. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Characterization of an N-system amino acid transporter expressed in retina and its involvement in glutamine transport.

    PubMed

    Gu, S; Roderick, H L; Camacho, P; Jiang, J X

    2001-06-29

    We report here on the characterization of a mouse N-system amino acid transporter protein, which is involved in the transport of glutamine. This protein of 485 amino acids shares 52% sequence homology with an N-system amino acid transporter, mouse N-system amino acid transporter (mNAT) and its orthologs. Because this protein shares a high degree of sequence homology and functional similarity to mNAT, we named it mNAT2. mNAT2 is predominately expressed in the retina and to a slightly lesser extent in the brain. In the retina, it is located in the axons of ganglion cells in the nerve fiber layer and in the bundles of the optic nerve. Functional analysis of mNAT2 expressed in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the strongest transport activities were specific for l-glutamine. In addition, mNAT2 is a Na(+)- and pH-dependent, high affinity transporter and partially tolerates substitution of Na(+) by Li(+). Additionally, mNAT2 functions as a carrier-mediated transporter that facilitates efflux. The unique expression pattern and selective glutamine transport properties of mNAT2 suggest that it plays a specific role in the uptake of glutamine involved in the generation of the neurotransmitter glutamate in retina. PMID:11325958

  1. Looking on the bright side of serotonin transporter gene variation.

    PubMed

    Homberg, Judith R; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2011-03-15

    Converging evidence indicates an association of the short (s), low-expressing variant of the repeat length polymorphism, serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), in the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT, SERT, SLC6A4) with anxiety-related traits and increased risk for depression in interaction with psychosocial adversity across the life span. However, genetically driven deficient serotonin transporter (5-HTT) function would not have been maintained throughout evolution if it only exerted negative effects without conveying any gain of function. Here, we review recent findings that humans and nonhuman primates carrying the s variant of the 5-HTTLPR outperform subjects carrying the long allele in an array of cognitive tasks and show increased social conformity. In addition, studies in 5-HTT knockout rodents are included that provide complementary insights in the beneficial effects of the 5-HTTLPR s-allele. We postulate that hypervigilance, mediated by hyperactivity in corticolimbic structures, may be the common denominator in the anxiety-related traits and (social) cognitive superiority of s-allele carriers and that environmental conditions determine whether a response will turn out to be negative (emotional) or positive (cognitive, in conformity with the social group). Taken together, these findings urge for a conceptual change in the current deficit-oriented connotation of the 5-HTTLPR variants. In fact, these factors may counterbalance or completely offset the negative consequences of the anxiety-related traits. This notion may not only explain the modest effect size of the 5-HTTLPR and inconsistent reports but may also lead to a more refined appreciation of allelic variation in 5-HTT function. PMID:21047622

  2. Enterobacteria modulate intestinal bile acid transport and homeostasis through apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) expression.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hamatsu, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    In our study, ampicillin (AMP)-mediated decrease of enterobacteria caused increases in hepatic bile acid concentration through (at least in part) elevation of bile acid synthesis in C57BL/6N mice. We investigated the involvement of enterobacteria on intestinal bile acid absorption in AMP-treated mice in the present study. Fecal enterobacterial levels and fecal bile acid excretion rates were markedly decreased in mice treated with AMP (100 mg/kg) for 3 days, whereas bile acid concentrations in portal blood were significantly increased compared with those in mice treated with a vehicle. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) mRNA levels and ileal SLC10A2 protein levels in brush-border membranes were significantly increased compared with those in mice treated with the vehicle. In AMP-treated mice, total bile acid levels were increased, whereas levels of enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and cholic acid were decreased in intestinal lumen. These phenomena were also observed in farnesoid X receptor-null mice treated with AMP for 3 days. Discontinuation of AMP administration after 3 days (vehicle administration for 4 days) increased levels of fecal enterobacteria, fecal bile acid excretion, and taurodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid in the intestinal lumen, whereas the discontinuation decreased ileal SLC10A2 expression and bile acid concentrations in the portal blood. Coadministration of taurodeoxycholic acid or cholic acid decreased ileal SLC10A2 expression in mice treated with AMP. These results suggest that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid biotransformation modulates intestinal bile acid transport and homeostasis through down-regulation of ileal SLC10A2 expression. PMID:20884752

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  4. Synthetic Fatty Acids Prevent Plasmid-Mediated Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Getino, María; Sanabria-Ríos, David J.; Fernández-López, Raúl; Campos-Gómez, Javier; Sánchez-López, José M.; Fernández, Antonio; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial conjugation constitutes a major horizontal gene transfer mechanism for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes among human pathogens. Antibiotic resistance spread could be halted or diminished by molecules that interfere with the conjugation process. In this work, synthetic 2-alkynoic fatty acids were identified as a novel class of conjugation inhibitors. Their chemical properties were investigated by using the prototype 2-hexadecynoic acid and its derivatives. Essential features of effective inhibitors were the carboxylic group, an optimal long aliphatic chain of 16 carbon atoms, and one unsaturation. Chemical modification of these groups led to inactive or less-active derivatives. Conjugation inhibitors were found to act on the donor cell, affecting a wide number of pathogenic bacterial hosts, including Escherichia, Salmonella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter spp. Conjugation inhibitors were active in inhibiting transfer of IncF, IncW, and IncH plasmids, moderately active against IncI, IncL/M, and IncX plasmids, and inactive against IncP and IncN plasmids. Importantly, the use of 2-hexadecynoic acid avoided the spread of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient population, demonstrating the feasibility of abolishing the dissemination of antimicrobial resistances by blocking bacterial conjugation. PMID:26330514

  5. Evolution of Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Genes and Their Regulation during Starvation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Stevie; Quentin, Yves; Coudray, Coralie; Texier, Pauline; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is a Gram-positive bacterium with a unique cell envelope composed of an essential outer membrane. Mycolic acids, which are very-long-chain (up to C100) fatty acids, are the major components of this mycomembrane. The enzymatic pathways involved in the biosynthesis and transport of mycolates are fairly well documented and are the targets of the major antituberculous drugs. In contrast, only fragmented information is available on the expression and regulation of the biosynthesis genes. In this study, we report that the hadA, hadB, and hadC genes, which code for the mycolate biosynthesis dehydratase enzymes, are coexpressed with three genes that encode proteins of the translational apparatus. Consistent with the well-established control of the translation potential by nutrient availability, starvation leads to downregulation of the hadABC genes along with most of the genes required for the synthesis, modification, and transport of mycolates. The downregulation of a subset of the biosynthesis genes is partially dependent on RelMtb, the key enzyme of the stringent response. We also report the phylogenetic evolution scenario that has shaped the current genetic organization, characterized by the coregulation of the hadABC operon with genes of the translational apparatus and with genes required for the modification of the mycolates. IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects one-third of the human population worldwide, and despite the available therapeutic arsenal, it continues to kill millions of people each year. There is therefore an urgent need to identify new targets and develop a better understanding of how the bacterium is adapting itself to host defenses during infection. A prerequisite of this understanding is knowledge of how this adaptive skill has been implanted by evolution. Nutrient scarcity is an environmental condition the bacterium has to cope with during infection. In many

  6. L-aspartic acid transport by cat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Preston, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Cat and dog red cells are unusual in that they have no Na/K ATPase and contain low K and high Na intracellularly. They also show significant Na dependent L-aspartate (L-asp) transport. The authors have characterized this system in cat RBCs. The influx of /sup 3/H-L-asp (typically 2..mu..M) was measured in washed RBCs incubated for 60 s at 37/sup 0/C in medium containing 140 mM NaCl, 5 mM Kcl, 2 mM CaCl/sub 2/, 15 mM MOPS pH 7.4, 5 mM glucose, and /sup 14/C-PEG as a space marker. The cells were washed 3 times in the medium immediately before incubation which was terminated by centrifuging the RBCs through a layer of dibutylphthalate. Over an L-asp concentration range of 0.5-1000..mu..M, influx obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a small added linear diffusion component. The Kt and Jmax of the saturable component were 5.40 +/- 0.34 ..mu..M and 148.8 +/- 7.2 ..mu..mol 1. cell/sup -1/h/sup -1/ respectively. Replacement of Na with Li, K, Rb, Cs or choline reduce influx to diffusion. With the addition of asp analogues (4/sup +/M L-asp, 40/sup +/M inhibitor), the following sequence of inhibition was observed (range 80% to 40% inhib.): L-glutamate > L-cysteine sulfonate > D-asp > L-cysteic acid > D-glutamate. Other amino acids such as L-alanine, L-proline, L-lysine, L-cysteine, and taurine showed no inhibition (<5%). These data suggest that cat red cells contain a high-affinity Na dependent transport system for L-asp, glutamate, and closely related analogues which resembles that found in the RBCs of other carnivores and in neural tissues.

  7. The Candida albicans CDR3 gene codes for an opaque-phase ABC transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Balan, I; Alarco, A M; Raymond, M

    1997-01-01

    We report the cloning and functional analysis of a third member of the CDR gene family in Candida albicans, named CDR3. This gene codes for an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter of 1,501 amino acids highly homologous to Cdr1p and Cdr2p (56 and 55% amino acid sequence identity, respectively), two transporters involved in fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. The predicted structure of Cdr3p is typical of the PDR/CDR family, with two similar halves, each comprising an N-terminal hydrophilic domain with consensus sequences for ATP binding and a C-terminal hydrophobic domain with six predicted transmembrane segments. Northern analysis showed that CDR3 expression is regulated in a cell-type-specific manner, with low levels of CDR3 mRNA in CAI4 yeast and hyphal cells, high levels in WO-1 opaque cells, and undetectable levels in WO-1 white cells. Disruption of both alleles of CDR3 in CAI4 resulted in no obvious changes in cell morphology, growth rate, or susceptibility to fluconazole. Overexpression of Cdr3p in C. albicans did not result in increased cellular resistance to fluconazole, cycloheximide, and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, which are known substrates for different transporters of the PDR/CDR family. These results indicate that despite a high degree of sequence conservation with C. albicans Cdr1p and Cdr2p, Cdr3p does not appear to be involved in drug resistance, at least to the compounds tested which include the clinically relevant antifungal agent fluconazole. Rather, the high level of Cdr3p expression in WO-1 opaque cells suggests an opaque-phase-associated biological function which remains to be identified. PMID:9393682

  8. Identification and characterization of a long-chain fatty acid transporter in the sophorolipid-producing strain Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashan; Xia, Chengqiang; Fang, Xiaoran; Xue, Haizhao; Song, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The sophorolipid-producing strain Starmerella bombicola CGMCC 1576 has a remarkable ability to produce sophorolipids (SLs) under the acidic and lactonic forms with almost equal proportion. In this study, we found the gene encoding for the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ALCS). This enzyme was putatively identified as a membrane-bound long-chain fatty acid transport protein and contributed to the uptake of long-chain fatty acids. Disruption of the alcs gene resulted in an impaired growth of the alcs-deleted mutant in minimal media containing different fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C22:0, and C24:0) as the sole carbon source and led to a dramatic decrease in the uptake of the fluorescent-tagged long-chain fatty acid analogue-boron dipyrromethene difluoride dodecanoic acid (BODIPY-3823). The absence of this alcs gene caused obvious phenotype changes. Compared with the wild-type strain, the yield and compositions of the SLs produced by the gene-deleted mutant of ∆alcs::six showed almost no lactonic form of SLs, and the acidic SLs were composed of medium-chain. The ALCS enzyme was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli JM109 (DE3) with pMAL-c2x-alcs. The enzyme was purified through a maltose-binding protein (MBP) affinity chromatography column and was confirmed to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE. The recombinant enzyme could catalyze the formation of the long-chain acyl-CoA when the long-chain fatty acids and the coenzyme A were used as substrates. PMID:27183996

  9. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  10. Associations between a fatty acid desaturase gene polymorphism and blood arachidonic acid compositions in Japanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Sayaka; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Sadahiko; Ishijima, Akiko; Minezaki, Takayuki; Baba, Mamiko; Kontai, Yoshiko; Horikawa, Chika; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Yasuo; Kawabata, Terue

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether the single nucleotide polymorphism rs174547 (T/C) of the fatty acid desaturase-1 gene, FADS1, is associated with changes in erythrocyte membrane and plasma phospholipid (PL) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) composition in elderly Japanese participants (n=124; 65 years or older; self-feeding and oral intake). The rs174547 C-allele carriers had significantly lower arachidonic acid (ARA; n-6 PUFA) and higher linoleic acid (LA, n-6 PUFA precursor) levels in erythrocyte membrane and plasma PL (15% and 6% ARA reduction, respectively, per C-allele), suggesting a low LA to ARA conversion rate in erythrocyte membrane and plasma PL of C-allele carriers. α-linolenic acid (n-3 PUFA precursor) levels were higher in the plasma PL of C-allele carriers, whereas levels of the n-3 LCPUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were unchanged in erythrocyte membrane and plasma PL. Thus, rs174547 genotypes were significantly associated with different ARA compositions of the blood of elderly Japanese. PMID:26869086

  11. Cationic liposome–nucleic acid complexes for gene delivery and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Kai K.; Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Leal, Cecília

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are studied worldwide as carriers of DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) for gene delivery and gene silencing, and related clinical trials are ongoing. Optimization of transfection efficiency and silencing efficiency by cationic liposome carriers requires a comprehensive understanding of the structures of CL–nucleic acid complexes and the nature of their interactions with cell membranes as well as events leading to release of active nucleic acids within the cytoplasm. Synchrotron x-ray scattering has revealed that CL–nucleic acid complexes spontaneously assemble into distinct liquid crystalline phases including the lamellar, inverse hexagonal, hexagonal, and gyroid cubic phases, and fluorescence microscopy has revealed CL–DNA pathways and interactions with cells. The combining of custom synthesis with characterization techniques and gene expression and silencing assays has begun to unveil structure–function relations in vitro. As a recent example, this review will briefly describe experiments with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL–DNA nanoparticles. The functionalization, which is achieved through custom synthesis, is intended to address and overcome cell targeting and endosomal escape barriers to nucleic acid delivery faced by PEGylated nanoparticles designed for in vivo applications. PMID:25587216

  12. Report membrane transport of lactic acid in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  13. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. PMID:25552535

  14. LeProT1, a transporter for proline, glycine betaine, and gamma-amino butyric acid in tomato pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, R; Grallath, S; Breitkreuz, K E; Stransky, E; Stransky, H; Frommer, W B; Rentsch, D

    1999-01-01

    During maturation, pollen undergoes a period of dehydration accompanied by the accumulation of compatible solutes. Solute import across the pollen plasma membrane, which occurs via proteinaceous transporters, is required to support pollen development and also for subsequent germination and pollen tube growth. Analysis of the free amino acid composition of various tissues in tomato revealed that the proline content in flowers was 60 times higher than in any other organ analyzed. Within the floral organs, proline was confined predominantly to pollen, where it represented >70% of total free amino acids. Uptake experiments demonstrated that mature as well as germinated pollen rapidly take up proline. To identify proline transporters in tomato pollen, we isolated genes homologous to Arabidopsis proline transporters. LeProT1 was specifically expressed both in mature and germinating pollen, as demonstrated by RNA in situ hybridization. Expression in a yeast mutant demonstrated that LeProT1 transports proline and gamma-amino butyric acid with low affinity and glycine betaine with high affinity. Direct uptake and competition studies demonstrate that LeProT1 constitutes a general transporter for compatible solutes. PMID:10072398

  15. Uncovering co-expression gene network regulating fruit acidity in diverse apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidity is a major contributor to fruit quality. Several organic acids are present in apple fruit, but malic acid is predominant and determines fruit acidity. The trait is largely controlled by the Malic acid (Ma) locus, underpinning which Ma1 that encodes an Aluminum-activated Malate Transporter1 (...

  16. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre

  17. Regulatory signals for intestinal amino acid transporters and peptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, R.P.; Kwan, W.W.; Diamond, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Dietary protein ultimately regulates many processes involved in protein digestion, but it is often unclear whether proteins themselves, peptides, or amino acids (AAs) are the proximate regulatory signal. Hence the authors compared several processes involved in protein digestion in mice adapted to one of three rations, identical except for containing 54% of either casein, a partial hydrolysate of casein, or a free AA mixture simulating a complete hydrolysate of casein. The authors measured brush-border uptakes of seven AAs that variously serve as substrates for four AA transporters, and brush-border and cytosolic activities of four peptidases. The three rations yielded essentially the same AA uptake rates. Peptidase activities tended to be lower on the AA ration than on the protein ration. In other studies, all three rations yielded the same rates of brush-border peptide uptake; protein is only modestly more effective than AAs at inducing synthesis of pancreatic proteases; and, depending on the animal species, protein is either much less or much more effective than AAs at stimulating release of cholecystokinin and hence of pancreatic enzymes. Thus the regulators of each process involved in protein digestion are not necessarily that process's substrate.

  18. Higher transcription levels in ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes were associated with higher ascorbic acid accumulation in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Lei; Gu, Liang; Zhao, Wei; Su, Hongyan; Cheng, Xianhao

    2015-12-01

    In our preliminary study, the ripe fruits of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars, cv 'Berkeley' and cv 'Bluecrop', were found to contain different levels of ascorbic acid. However, factors responsible for these differences are still unknown. In the present study, ascorbic acid content in fruits was compared with expression profiles of ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes between 'Bluecrop' and 'Berkeley' cultivars. The results indicated that the l-galactose pathway was the predominant route of ascorbic acid biosynthesis in blueberry fruits. Moreover, higher expression levels of the ascorbic acid biosynthetic genes GME, GGP, and GLDH, as well as the recycling genes MDHAR and DHAR, were associated with higher ascorbic acid content in 'Bluecrop' compared with 'Berkeley', which indicated that a higher efficiency ascorbic acid biosynthesis and regeneration was likely to be responsible for the higher ascorbic acid accumulation in 'Bluecrop'. PMID:26041210

  19. A gene network engineering platform for lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wentao; Kapuganti, Venkata S.; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in synthetic biology have positioned lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for applications. To achieve the full potential of LAB, one fundamental prerequisite is the capacity for rapid engineering of complex gene networks, such as natural biosynthetic pathways and multicomponent synthetic circuits, into which cellular functions are encoded. Here, we present a synthetic biology platform for rapid construction and optimization of large-scale gene networks in LAB. The platform involves a copy-controlled shuttle for hosting target networks and two associated strategies that enable efficient genetic editing and phenotypic validation. By using a nisin biosynthesis pathway and its variants as examples, we demonstrated multiplex, continuous editing of small DNA parts, such as ribosome-binding sites, as well as efficient manipulation of large building blocks such as genes and operons. To showcase the platform, we applied it to expand the phenotypic diversity of the nisin pathway by quickly generating a library of 63 pathway variants. We further demonstrated its utility by altering the regulatory topology of the nisin pathway for constitutive bacteriocin biosynthesis. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and advanced engineering of gene networks in LAB, fostering their applications in biomedicine and other areas. PMID:26503255

  20. A gene network engineering platform for lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wentao; Kapuganti, Venkata S; Lu, Ting

    2016-02-29

    Recent developments in synthetic biology have positioned lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for applications. To achieve the full potential of LAB, one fundamental prerequisite is the capacity for rapid engineering of complex gene networks, such as natural biosynthetic pathways and multicomponent synthetic circuits, into which cellular functions are encoded. Here, we present a synthetic biology platform for rapid construction and optimization of large-scale gene networks in LAB. The platform involves a copy-controlled shuttle for hosting target networks and two associated strategies that enable efficient genetic editing and phenotypic validation. By using a nisin biosynthesis pathway and its variants as examples, we demonstrated multiplex, continuous editing of small DNA parts, such as ribosome-binding sites, as well as efficient manipulation of large building blocks such as genes and operons. To showcase the platform, we applied it to expand the phenotypic diversity of the nisin pathway by quickly generating a library of 63 pathway variants. We further demonstrated its utility by altering the regulatory topology of the nisin pathway for constitutive bacteriocin biosynthesis. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and advanced engineering of gene networks in LAB, fostering their applications in biomedicine and other areas. PMID:26503255

  1. The fatty acid transport protein Fat1p is involved in the export of fatty acids from lipid bodies in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Dulermo, Thierry; Thevenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2014-09-01

    In order to live, cells need to import different molecules, such as sugars, amino acids or lipids, using transporters. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ScFAT1 gene encodes the long-chain fatty acid transporter; however, the transport of fatty acids (FAs) in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has not yet been studied. In contrast to what has previously been found for ΔScfat1 strains, ΔYlfat1 yeast was still able to grow on substrates containing short-, medium- or long-chain FAs. We observed a notable difference in cell lipid content between wild-type (WT) and deletion mutant strains after 24 h of culture in minimal oleate medium: in the WT strain, lipids represented 24% of cell dry weight (CDW), while they accounted for 37% of CDW in the ΔYlfat1 strain. This result indicates that YlFat1p is not involved in cell lipid uptake. Moreover, we also observed that fatty acid remobilisation was decreased in the ΔYlfat1 strain and that fluorescence-tagged YlFat1p proteins localised to the interfaces between lipid bodies, which suggests that YlFat1p may play a role in the export of FAs from lipid bodies. PMID:24945074

  2. Essential amino acid transporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) is required for mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Guetg, Adriano; Mariotta, Luca; Bock, Lukas; Herzog, Brigitte; Fingerhut, Ralph; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, François

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) uniporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) mediates facilitated diffusion of branched-chain AAs, methionine and phenylalanine, although its physiological role and subcellular localization are not known. We report that Slc43a2 knockout mice were born at expected Mendelian frequency but displayed an ∼10% intrauterine growth retardation and low amniotic fluid AAs, suggesting defective transplacental transport. Postnatal growth was strongly reduced, with premature death occurring within 9 days such that further investigations were made within 3 days of birth. Lat4 immunofluorescence showed a strong basolateral signal in the small intestine, kidney proximal tubule and thick ascending limb epithelial cells of wild-type but not Slc43a2 null littermates and no signal in liver and skeletal muscle. Experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that Lat4 functioned as a symmetrical low affinity uniporter with a K0.5 of ∼5 mm for both in- and efflux. Plasma AA concentration was decreased in Slc43a2 null pups, in particular that of non-essential AAs alanine, serine, histidine and proline. Together with an increased level of plasma long chain acylcarnitines and a strong alteration of liver gene expression, this indicates malnutrition. Attempts to rescue pups by decreasing the litter size or by nutrients injected i.p. did not succeed. Radioactively labelled leucine but not lysine given per os accumulated in the small intestine of Slc43a2null pups, suggesting the defective transcellular transport of Lat4 substrates. In summary, Lat4 is a symmetrical uniporter for neutral essential AAs localizing at the basolateral side of (re)absorbing epithelia and is necessary for early nutrition and development. Key points Lat4 (Slc43a2) transports branched-chain amino acids, phenylalanine and methionine, and is expressed in kidney tubule and small intestine epithelial cells. Using a new knockout model as a negative control, it is shown that Lat4 is expressed at the basolateral

  3. Incorporation of D-alanine into lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid in Bacillus subtilis. Identification of genes and regulation.

    PubMed

    Perego, M; Glaser, P; Minutello, A; Strauch, M A; Leopold, K; Fischer, W

    1995-06-30

    The Bacillus subtilis dlt operon (D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid) is responsible for D-alanine esterification of both lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and wall teichoic acid (WTA). The dlt operon contains five genes, dltA-dltE. Insertional inactivation of dltA-dltD results in complete absence of D-alanine from both LTA and WTA. Based on protein sequence similarity with the Lactobacillus casei dlt gene products (Heaton, M. P., and Neuhaus, F. C. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 4707-4717), we propose that dltA encodes the D-alanine-D-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl) and dltC the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp). We further hypothesize that the products of dltB and dltD are concerned with the transport of activated D-alanine through the membrane and the final incorporation of D-alanine into LTA. The hydropathy profiles of the dltB and dltD gene products suggest a transmembrane location for the former and an amino-terminal signal peptide for the latter. The incorporation of D-alanine into LTA and WTA did not separate in any of the mutants studied which indicates that either one and the same enzyme is responsible for D-alanine incorporation into both polymers or a separate enzyme, encoded outside the dlt operon, transfers the D-alanyl residues from LTA to WTA (Haas, R., Koch, H.-U., and Fischer, W. (1984) FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 21, 27-31). Inactivation of dltE has no effect on D-alanine ester content of both LTA and WTA, and at present we cannot propose any function for its gene product. Transcription analysis shows that the dlt operon is transcribed from a sigma D-dependent promoter and follows the pattern of transcription of genes belonging to the sigma D regulon. However, the turn off of transcription observed before sporulation starts seems to be dependent on the Spo0A and AbrB sporulation proteins and results in a D-alanine-free purely anionic LTA in the spore membrane. The dlt operon is dispensable for cell growth; its inactivation does not affect cell growth or morphology as

  4. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  5. gamma-Glutamyl amino acids. Transport and conversion to 5-oxoproline in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.J.; Meister, A.

    1985-06-25

    Transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids, a step in the proposed glutathione-gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-mediated amino acid transport pathway, was examined in mouse kidney. The transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids was demonstrated in vitro in studies on kidney slices. Transport was followed by measuring uptake of /sup 35/S after incubation of the slices in media containing gamma-glutamyl methionine (/sup 35/S)sulfone. The experimental complication associated with extracellular conversion of the gamma-glutamyl amino acid to amino acid and uptake of the latter by slices was overcome by using 5-oxoproline formation (catalyzed by intracellular gamma-glutamyl-cyclotransferase) as an indicator of gamma-glutamyl amino acid transport. This method was also successfully applied to studies on transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids in vivo. Transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids in vitro and in vivo is inhibited by several inhibitors of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and also by high extracellular levels of glutathione. This seems to explain urinary excretion of gamma-glutamylcystine by humans with gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase deficiency and by mice treated with inhibitors of this enzyme. Mice depleted of glutathione by treatment with buthionine sulfoximine (which inhibits glutathione synthesis) or by treatment with 2,6-dimethyl-2,5-heptadiene-4-one (which effectively interacts with tissue glutathione) exhibited significantly less transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids than did untreated controls. The findings suggest that intracellular glutathione functions in transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids. Evidence was also obtained for transport of gamma-glutamyl gamma-glutamylphenylalanine into kidney slices.

  6. Iron-biofortification in rice by the introduction of three barley genes participated in mugineic acid biosynthesis with soybean ferritin gene

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Michiko; Aung, May S.; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a serious problem around the world, especially in developing countries. The production of iron-biofortified rice will help ameliorate this problem. Previously, expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, in rice using an endosperm-specific promoter resulted in a two-fold increase in iron concentration in the resultant transgenic seeds. However, further over expression of ferritin did not produce an additional increase in the seed iron concentration, and symptoms of iron deficiency were noted in the leaves of the transgenic plants. In the present study, we aimed to further increase the iron concentration in rice seeds without increasing the sensitivity to iron deficiency by enhancing the uptake and transport of iron via a ferric iron chelator, mugineic acid. To this end, we introduced the soybean ferritin gene (SoyferH2) driven by two endosperm-specific promoters, along with the barley nicotianamine synthase gene (HvNAS1), two nicotianamine aminotransferase genes (HvNAAT-A and -B), and a mugineic acid synthase gene (IDS3) to enhance mugineic acid production in rice plants. A marker-free vector was utilized as a means of increasing public acceptance. Representative lines were selected from 102 transformants based on the iron concentration in polished seeds and ferritin accumulation in the seeds. These lines were grown in both commercially supplied soil (iron-sufficient conditions) and calcareous soil (iron-deficient conditions). Lines expressing both ferritin and mugineic acid biosynthetic genes showed signs of iron-deficiency tolerance in calcareous soil. The iron concentration in polished T3 seeds was increased by 4 and 2.5 times, as compared to that in non-transgenic lines grown in normal and calcareous soil, respectively. These results indicate that the concomitant introduction of the ferritin gene and mugineic acid biosynthetic genes effectively increased the seed iron level without causing iron sensitivity under iron-limited conditions

  7. The GLUT9 Gene Is Associated with Serum Uric Acid Levels in Sardinia and Chianti Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Andrea; Busonero, Fabio; Usala, Gianluca; Mulas, Antonella; Lai, Sandra; Dei, Mariano; Orrù, Marco; Albai, Giuseppe; Bandinelli, Stefania; Schlessinger, David; Lakatta, Edward; Scuteri, Angelo; Najjar, Samer S; Guralnik, Jack; Naitza, Silvia; Crisponi, Laura; Cao, Antonio; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Ferrucci, Luigi; Uda, Manuela; Chen, Wei-Min; Nagaraja, Ramaiah

    2007-01-01

    High serum uric acid levels elevate pro-inflammatory–state gout crystal arthropathy and place individuals at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Genome-wide scans in the genetically isolated Sardinian population identified variants associated with serum uric acid levels as a quantitative trait. They mapped within GLUT9, a Chromosome 4 glucose transporter gene predominantly expressed in liver and kidney. SNP rs6855911 showed the strongest association (p = 1.84 × 10−16), along with eight others (p = 7.75 × 10−16 to 6.05 × 10−11). Individuals homozygous for the rare allele of rs6855911 (minor allele frequency = 0.26) had 0.6 mg/dl less uric acid than those homozygous for the common allele; the results were replicated in an unrelated cohort from Tuscany. Our results suggest that polymorphisms in GLUT9 could affect glucose metabolism and uric acid synthesis and/or renal reabsorption, influencing serum uric acid levels over a wide range of values. PMID:17997608

  8. A novel syndrome combining thyroid and neurological abnormalities is associated with mutations in a monocarboxylate transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Best, Thomas B; Brockmann, Knut; Refetoff, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are iodothyronines that control growth and development, as well as brain function and metabolism. Although thyroid hormone deficiency can be caused by defects of hormone synthesis and action, it has not been linked to a defect in cellular hormone transport. In fact, the physiological role of the several classes of membrane transporters remains unknown. We now report, for the first time, mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene, located on the X chromosome, that encodes a 613-amino acid protein with 12 predicted transmembrane domains. The propositi of two unrelated families are males with abnormal relative concentrations of three circulating iodothyronines, as well as neurological abnormalities, including global developmental delay, central hypotonia, spastic quadriplegia, dystonic movements, rotary nystagmus, and impaired gaze and hearing. Heterozygous females had a milder thyroid phenotype and no neurological defects. These findings establish the physiological importance of MCT8 as a thyroid hormone transporter. PMID:14661163

  9. Clustered Genes Involved in Cyclopiazonic Acid Production are Next to the Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an indole-tetramic acid toxin, is produced by many species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. In addition to CPA Aspergillus flavus produces polyketide-derived carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs). AF biosynthesis genes form a gene cluster in a subtelomeric region. Isolates of A. fla...

  10. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-01-01

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins. PMID:27525850

  11. The STM4195 Gene Product (PanS) Transports Coenzyme A Precursors in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Dustin C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous coenzyme involved in fundamental metabolic processes. CoA is synthesized from pantothenic acid by a pathway that is largely conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes and consists of five enzymatic steps. While higher organisms, including humans, must scavenge pantothenate from the environment, most bacteria and plants are capable of de novo pantothenate biosynthesis. In Salmonella enterica, precursors to pantothenate can be salvaged, but subsequent intermediates are not transported due to their phosphorylated state, and thus the pathway from pantothenate to CoA is considered essential. Genetic analyses identified the STM4195 gene product of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a transporter of pantothenate precursors, ketopantoate and pantoate and, to a lesser extent, pantothenate. Further results indicated that STM4195 transports a product of CoA degradation that serves as a precursor to CoA and enters the biosynthetic pathway between PanC and CoaBC (dfp). The relevant CoA derivative is distinguishable from pantothenate, pantetheine, and pantethine and has spectral properties indicating the adenine moiety of CoA is intact. Taken together, the results presented here provide evidence of a transport mechanism for the uptake of ketopantoate, pantoate, and pantothenate and demonstrate a role for STM4195 in the salvage of a CoA derivative of unknown structure. The STM4195 gene is renamed panS to reflect participation in pantothenate salvage that was uncovered herein. IMPORTANCE This manuscript describes a transporter for two pantothenate precursors in addition to the existence and transport of a salvageable coenzyme A (CoA) derivative. Specifically, these studies defined a function for an STM protein in S. enterica that was distinct from the annotated role and led to its designation as PanS (pantothenate salvage). The presence of a salvageable CoA derivative and a transporter for it suggests the possibility that this

  12. Cloning and expression of the sucrose transporter gene PsSUT1 from tree peony leaf.

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Guo, T; Cui, Y; Li, Y; He, D

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the cloning of a sucrose transporter gene, PsSUT1, from the leaf of tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Lind. cv 'Huhong'). Expression patterns were examined in different organs and at different developmental stages. The full-length cDNA of PsSUT1 consisted of a 2001-bp sequence containing a 1557-bp open reading frame, encoding 519 amino acids with a conserved domain typical of the glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide superfamily. The amino acid sequence of PsSUT1 in tree peony shared high homology with that of other plants. At different developmental stages, PsSUT1 was expressed in roots, stems, leaves, and petals. Its expression level in stems was 10.9-fold higher than in petals at the flowering stage. Expression of PsSUT1 at the flowering stage was highest during flower development. The significant differences in PsSUT1 expression observed among developmental stages and organs were closely related to changes in sucrose content during flower opening. These results form the basis for further research on the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate metabolism and transport during flower development in tree peony. PMID:26505390

  13. Herpes simplex virus vectors overexpressing the glucose transporter gene protect against seizure-induced neuron loss.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, M S; Ho, D Y; Dash, R; Sapolsky, R M

    1995-01-01

    We have generated herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors vIE1GT and v alpha 4GT bearing the GLUT-1 isoform of the rat brain glucose transporter (GT) under the control of the human cytomegalovirus ie1 and HSV alpha 4 promoters, respectively. We previously reported that such vectors enhance glucose uptake in hippocampal cultures and the hippocampus. In this study we demonstrate that such vectors can maintain neuronal metabolism and reduce the extent of neuron loss in cultures after a period of hypoglycemia. Microinfusion of GT vectors into the rat hippocampus also reduces kainic acid-induced seizure damage in the CA3 cell field. Furthermore, delivery of the vector even after onset of the seizure is protective, suggesting that HSV-mediated gene transfer for neuroprotection need not be carried out in anticipation of neurologic crises. Using the bicistronic vector v alpha 22 beta gal alpha 4GT, which coexpresses both GT and the Escherichia coli lacZ marker gene, we further demonstrate an inverse correlation between the extent of vector expression in the dentate and the amount of CA3 damage resulting from the simultaneous delivery of kainic acid. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7638175

  14. Adsorption and transport of polymaleic acid on Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone: Batch and transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durce, Delphine; Landesman, Catherine; Grambow, Bernd; Ribet, Solange; Giffaut, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) can affect the mobility of radionuclides in pore water of clay-rich geological formations, such as those intended to be used for nuclear waste disposal. The present work studies the adsorption and transport properties of a polycarboxylic acid, polymaleic acid (PMA, Mw = 1.9 kDa), on Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples (COx). Even though this molecule is rather different from the natural organic matter found in clay rock, the study of its retention properties on both dispersed and intact samples allows assessing to which extent organic acids may undergo sorption under natural conditions (pH 7) and what could be the impact on their mobility. PMA sorption and desorption were investigated in dispersed systems. The degree of sorption was measured after 1, 8 and 21 days and for a range of PMA initial concentrations from 4.5 × 10- 7 to 1.4 × 10- 3 mol.L- 1. The reversibility of the sorption process was estimated by desorption experiments performed after the sorption experiments. At the sorption steady state, the sorption was described by a two-site Langmuir model. A total sorption capacity of COx for PMA was found to be 1.01×10- 2 mol.kg- 1 distributed on two sorption sites, one weak and one strong. The desorption of PMA was incomplete, independently of the duration of the sorption phase. The amount of desorbable PMA even appeared to decrease for sorption phases from 1 to 21 days. To describe the apparent desorption hysteresis, two conceptual models were applied. The two-box diffusion model accounted for intraparticle diffusion and more generally for nonequilibrium processes. The two-box first-order non-reversible model accounted for a first-order non-reversible sorption and more generally for kinetically-controlled irreversible sorption processes. The use of the two models revealed that desorption hysteresis was not the result of nonequilibrium processes but was due to irreversible sorption. Irreversible sorption on the strong site was

  15. Light-induced expression of fatty acid desaturase genes

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Mihály; Zsiros, Otto; Farkas, Tibor; Wada, Hajime; Nagy, Ferenc; Gombos, Zoltán

    1998-01-01

    In cyanobacterial cells, fatty acid desaturation is one of the crucial steps in the acclimation processes to low-temperature conditions. The expression of all the four acyl lipid desaturase genes of Synechocystis PCC 6803 was studied as a function of temperature and separately as a function of light. We used cells grown at 25°C in light-activated heterotrophic growth conditions. In these cells, the production of α-linolenic acid and 18:4 fatty acids was negligible and the synthesis of γ-linolenic acid was remarkably suppressed compared with those of the cells grown photoautotrophically. The cells grown in the light in the presence of glucose showed no difference in fatty acid composition compared with cells grown photoautotrophically. The level of desC mRNA for Δ9 desaturase was not affected by either the temperature or the light. It was constitutively expressed at 25°C with and without illumination. The level of desB transcripts was negligible in the dark-grown cells and was enhanced about 10-fold by exposure of the cells to light. The maximum level of expression occurred within 15 min. The level of desA and desD mRNAs was higher in dark-grown cells than that of desB mRNA for ω3 desaturase. However, the induction of both desA and desD mRNAs for Δ12 and Δ6 desaturases, respectively, was enhanced by light about 10-fold. Rifampicin, chloramphenicol, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea completely blocked the induction of the expression of desA, desB, and desD. Consequently, we suggest the regulatory role of light via photosynthetic processes in the induction of the expression of acyl lipid desaturases. PMID:9539715

  16. Characterizing MttA as a mitochondrial cis-aconitic acid transporter by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Matthias G; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial carrier protein MttA is involved in the biosynthesis of itaconic acid in Aspergillus terreus. In this paper, the transport specificity of MttA is analyzed making use of different metabolically engineered Aspergillus niger strains. Furthermore, the mitochondrial localization of this protein is confirmed using fluorescence microscopy. It was found that MttA preferentially transports cis-aconitic acid over citric acid and does not transport itaconic acid. The expression of MttA in selected A. niger strains results in secretion of aconitic acid. MttA can be used in further strain engineering strategies to transport cis-aconitic acid to the cytosol to produce itaconic acid or related metabolites. The microbial production of aconitic acid (9g/L) is achieved in strains expressing this transport protein. Thus, metabolic engineering can be used for both the in vivo characterization of transport protein function like MttA and to make use of this protein by creating aconitic acid producing strains. PMID:26875555

  17. Characterization and allelic variation of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) genes in the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris).

    PubMed

    Gojanovich, Gregory S; Ross, Peter; Holmer, Savannah G; Holmes, Jennifer C; Hess, Paul R

    2013-12-01

    The function of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) complex is to shuttle antigenic peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum to load MHC class I molecules for CD8(+) T-cell immunosurveillance. Here we report the promoter and coding regions of the canine TAP1 and TAP2 genes, which encode the homologous subunits forming the TAP heterodimer. By sampling genetically divergent breeds, polymorphisms in both genes were identified, although there were few amino acid differences between alleles. Splice variants were also found. When aligned to TAP genes of other species, functional regions appeared conserved, and upon phylogenetic analysis, canine sequences segregated appropriately with their orthologs. Transfer of the canine TAP2 gene into a murine TAP2-defective cell line rescued surface MHC class I expression, confirming exporter function. This data should prove useful in investigating the association of specific TAP defects or alleles with immunity to intracellular pathogens and cancer in dogs. PMID:23892057

  18. Characterization and allelic variation of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) genes in the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Gojanovich, Gregory S.; Ross, Peter; Holmer, Savannah R.; Holmes, Jennifer C.; Hess, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The function of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) complex is to shuttle antigenic peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum to load MHC class I molecules for CD8+ T-cell immunosurveillance. Here we report the promoter and coding regions of the canine TAP1 and TAP2 genes, which encode the homologous subunits forming the TAP heterodimer. By sampling genetically divergent breeds, polymorphisms in both genes were identified, although there were few amino acid differences between alleles. Splice variants were also found. When aligned to TAP genes of other species, functional regions appeared conserved, and upon phylogenetic analysis, canine sequences segregated appropriately with their orthologs. Transfer of the canine TAP2 gene into a murine TAP2-defective cell line rescued surface MHC class I expression, confirming exporter function. This data should prove useful in investigating the association of specific TAP defects or alleles with immunity to intracellular pathogens and cancer in dogs. PMID:23892057

  19. Cationic liposome-nucleic acid nanoparticle assemblies with applications in gene delivery and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ramsey N; Ewert, Kai K; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2016-07-28

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are synthetic carriers of nucleic acids in gene delivery and gene silencing therapeutics. The introduction will describe the structures of distinct liquid crystalline phases of CL-nucleic acid complexes, which were revealed in earlier synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. When mixed with plasmid DNA, CLs containing lipids with distinct shapes spontaneously undergo topological transitions into self-assembled lamellar, inverse hexagonal, and hexagonal CL-DNA phases. CLs containing cubic phase lipids are observed to readily mix with short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules creating double gyroid CL-siRNA phases for gene silencing. Custom synthesis of multivalent lipids and a range of novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipids with attached targeting ligands and hydrolysable moieties have led to functionalized equilibrium nanoparticles (NPs) optimized for cell targeting, uptake or endosomal escape. Very recent experiments are described with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL-DNA NPs, including fluorescence microscopy colocalization with members of the Rab family of GTPases, which directly reveal interactions with cell membranes and NP pathways. In vitro optimization of CL-DNA and CL-siRNA NPs with relevant primary cancer cells is expected to impact nucleic acid therapeutics in vivo. This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298431

  20. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III)-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to diverse

  1. Novel nickel resistance genes from the rhizosphere metagenome of plants adapted to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; González-Pastor, Jose E

    2007-10-01

    Metal resistance determinants have traditionally been found in cultivated bacteria. To search for genes involved in nickel resistance, we analyzed the bacterial community of the rhizosphere of Erica andevalensis, an endemic heather which grows at the banks of the Tinto River, a naturally metal-enriched and extremely acidic environment in southwestern Spain. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of rhizosphere DNA revealed the presence of members of five phylogenetic groups of Bacteria and the two main groups of Archaea mostly associated with sites impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). The diversity observed and the presence of heavy metals in the rhizosphere led us to construct and screen five different metagenomic libraries hosted in Escherichia coli for searching novel nickel resistance determinants. A total of 13 positive clones were detected and analyzed. Insights about their possible mechanisms of resistance were obtained from cellular nickel content and sequence similarities. Two clones encoded putative ABC transporter components, and a novel mechanism of metal efflux is suggested. In addition, a nickel hyperaccumulation mechanism is proposed for a clone encoding a serine O-acetyltransferase. Five clones encoded proteins similar to well-characterized proteins but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance, and the remaining six clones encoded hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions. This is the first report documenting nickel resistance genes recovered from the metagenome of an AMD environment. PMID:17675438

  2. An in silico analysis of T-box regulated genes and T-box evolution in prokaryotes, with emphasis on prediction of substrate specificity of transporters

    PubMed Central

    Wels, Michiel; Kormelink, Tom Groot; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Siezen, Roland J; Francke, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Background T-box anti-termination is an elegant and sensitive mechanism by which many bacteria maintain constant levels of amino acid-charged tRNAs. The amino acid specificity of the regulatory element is related to a so-called specifier codon and can in principle be used to guide the functional annotation of the genes controlled via the T-box anti-termination mechanism. Results Hidden Markov Models were defined to search the T-box regulatory element and were applied to all completed prokaryotic genomes. The vast majority of the genes found downstream of the retrieved elements encoded functionalities related to transport and synthesis of amino acids and the charging of tRNA. This is completely in line with findings reported in literature and with the proposed biological role of the regulatory element. For several species, the functional annotation of a large number of genes encoding proteins involved in amino acid transport could be improved significantly on basis of the amino acid specificity of the identified T-boxes. In addition, these annotations could be extrapolated to a larger number of orthologous systems in other species. Analysis of T-box distribution confirmed that the element is restricted predominantly to species of the phylum Firmicutes. Furthermore, it appeared that the distribution was highly species specific and that in the case of amino acid transport some boxes seemed to "pop-up" only recently. Conclusion We have demonstrated that the identification of the molecular specificity of a regulatory element can be of great help in solving notoriously difficult annotation issues, e.g. by defining the substrate specificity of genes encoding amino acid transporters on basis of the amino acid specificity of the regulatory T-box. Furthermore, our analysis of the species-dependency of the occurrence of specific T-boxes indicated that these regulatory elements propagate in a semi-independent way from the genes that they control. PMID:18625071

  3. Skeletal muscle amino acid transporter expression is increased in young and older adults following resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Christopher S.; Glynn, Erin L.; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Gundermann, David M.; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid transporters and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling are important contributors to muscle protein anabolism. Aging is associated with reduced mTORC1 signaling following resistance exercise, but the role of amino acid transporters is unknown. Young (n = 13; 28 ± 2 yr) and older (n = 13; 68 ± 2 yr) subjects performed a bout of resistance exercise. Skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained at basal and 3, 6, and 24 h postexercise and were analyzed for amino acid transporter mRNA and protein expression and regulators of amino acid transporter transcription utilizing real-time PCR and Western blotting. We found that basal amino acid transporter expression was similar in young and older adults (P > 0.05). Exercise increased L-type amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, and cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1 mRNA expression in both young and older adults (P < 0.05). L-type amino acid transporter 1 and CD98 protein increased only in younger adults (P < 0.05). eukaryotic initiation factor 2 α-subunit (S52) increased similarly in young and older adults postexercise (P < 0.05). Ribosomal protein S6 (S240/244) and activating transcription factor 4 nuclear protein expression tended to be higher in the young, while nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (Y705) was higher in the older subjects postexercise (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the rapid upregulation of amino acid transporter expression following resistance exercise may be regulated differently between the age groups, but involves a combination of mTORC1, activating transcription factor 4, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 α-subunit, and STAT3. We propose an increase in amino acid transporter expression may contribute to enhanced amino acid sensitivity following exercise in young and older

  4. [Gene cloning and bioinformatics analysis of new gene for chlorogenic acid biosynthesis of Lonicera hypoglauca].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-lin; Huang, Lu-qi; Yuan, Yuan; Qi, Lin-jie; Liu, Da-hui

    2015-03-01

    To obtain the key genes for chlorogenic acid biosynthesis of Lonicera hypoglauca, four new genes ware obtained from the our dataset of L. hypoglauca. And we also predicted the structure and function of LHPAL4, LHHCT1 , LHHCT2 and LHHCT3 proteins. The phylogenetic tree showed that LHPAL4 was closely related with LHPAL1, LHHCT1 was closely related with LHHCT3, LHHCT2 clustered into a single group. By Real-time PCR to detect the gene expressed level in different organs of L. hypoglauca, we found that the transcripted level of LHPAL4, LHHCT1 and LHHCT3 was the highest in defeat flowers, and the transcripted level of LHHCT2 was the highest in leaves. These result provided a basis to further analysis the mechanism of active ingredients in different organs, as well as the element for in vitro biosynthesis of active ingredients. PMID:26087546

  5. Transporter-targeted cholic acid-cytarabine conjugates for improved oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Dongpo; Shang, Lei; He, Zhonggui; Sun, Jin

    2016-09-10

    Cytarabine has a poor oral absorption due to its rapid deamination and poor membrane permeability. Bile acid transporters are highly expressed both in enterocytes and hepatocytes and to increase the oral bioavailability and investigate the potential application of cytarabine for liver cancers, a transporter- recognizing prodrug strategy was applied to design and synthesize four conjugates of cytarabine with cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). The anticancer activities against HepG2 cells were evaluated by MTT assay and the role of bile acid transporters during cellular transport was investigated in a competitive inhibition experiment. The in vitro and in vivo metabolic stabilities of these conjugates were studied in rat plasma and liver homogenates. Finally, an oral bioavailability study was conducted in rats. All the cholic acid-cytarabine conjugates (40μM) showed potent antiproliferative activities (up to 70%) against HepG2 cells after incubation for 48h. The addition of bile acids could markedly reduce the antitumor activities of these conjugates. The N(4)-ursodeoxycholic acid conjugate of cytarabine (compound 5) exhibited optimal stability (t1/2=90min) in vitro and a 3.9-fold prolonged half-life of cytarabine in vivo. More importantly, compound 5 increased the oral bioavailability 2-fold compared with cytarabine. The results of the present study suggest that the prodrug strategy based on the bile acid transporters is suitable for improving the oral absorption and the clinical application of cytarabine. PMID:27377011

  6. Mfsd2a Is a Transporter for the Essential ω-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in Eye and Is Important for Photoreceptor Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bernice H; Chan, Jia Pei; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Poh, Rebecca W; Foo, Juat Chin; Galam, Dwight L A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nguyen, Long N; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Yeo, Sia W; Luu, Chi D; Wenk, Markus R; Silver, David L

    2016-05-13

    Eye photoreceptor membrane discs in outer rod segments are highly enriched in the visual pigment rhodopsin and the ω-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The eye acquires DHA from blood, but transporters for DHA uptake across the blood-retinal barrier or retinal pigment epithelium have not been identified. Mfsd2a is a newly described sodium-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) symporter expressed at the blood-brain barrier that transports LPCs containing DHA and other long-chain fatty acids. LPC transport via Mfsd2a has been shown to be necessary for human brain growth. Here we demonstrate that Mfsd2a is highly expressed in retinal pigment epithelium in embryonic eye, before the development of photoreceptors, and is the primary site of Mfsd2a expression in the eye. Eyes from whole body Mfsd2a-deficient (KO) mice, but not endothelium-specific Mfsd2a-deficient mice, were DHA-deficient and had significantly reduced LPC/DHA transport in vivo Fluorescein angiography indicated normal blood-retinal barrier function. Histological and electron microscopic analysis indicated that Mfsd2a KO mice exhibited a specific reduction in outer rod segment length, disorganized outer rod segment discs, and mislocalization of and reduction in rhodopsin early in postnatal development without loss of photoreceptors. Minor photoreceptor cell loss occurred in adult Mfsd2a KO mice, but electroretinography indicated visual function was normal. The developing eyes of Mfsd2a KO mice had activated microglia and up-regulation of lipogenic and cholesterogenic genes, likely adaptations to loss of LPC transport. These findings identify LPC transport via Mfsd2a as an important pathway for DHA uptake in eye and for development of photoreceptor membrane discs. PMID:27008858

  7. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Bergman, O; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M; Westberg, L; Eriksson, E

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotional stimuli. Amygdala reactivity was examined by comparing regional cerebral blood flow, measured with positron emission tomography and [(15)O]water, during exposure to angry and neutral faces, respectively, in a Swedish sample comprising 32 patients with social anxiety disorder and 17 healthy volunteers. In a separate US sample, comprising 85 healthy volunteers studied with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, amygdala reactivity was assessed by comparing the activity during exposure to threatening faces and neutral geometric shapes, respectively. In both the Swedish and the US sample, 9-repeat carriers displayed higher amygdala reactivity than 10-repeat homozygotes. The results suggest that this polymorphism contributes to individual variability in amygdala reactivity. PMID:25093598

  8. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, O; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M; Westberg, L; Eriksson, E

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3′ untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotional stimuli. Amygdala reactivity was examined by comparing regional cerebral blood flow, measured with positron emission tomography and [15O]water, during exposure to angry and neutral faces, respectively, in a Swedish sample comprising 32 patients with social anxiety disorder and 17 healthy volunteers. In a separate US sample, comprising 85 healthy volunteers studied with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, amygdala reactivity was assessed by comparing the activity during exposure to threatening faces and neutral geometric shapes, respectively. In both the Swedish and the US sample, 9-repeat carriers displayed higher amygdala reactivity than 10-repeat homozygotes. The results suggest that this polymorphism contributes to individual variability in amygdala reactivity. PMID:25093598

  9. Novel 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation Genes from Oligotrophic Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain HW13 Isolated from a Pristine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Wataru; Takami, Sachiko; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Masai, Eiji; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tiedje, James M.; Fukuda, Masao

    2002-01-01

    The tfd genes of Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 are the only well-characterized set of genes responsible for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) degradation among 2,4-D-degrading bacteria. A new family of 2,4-D degradation genes, cadRABKC, was cloned and characterized from Bradyrhizobium sp. strain HW13, a strain that was isolated from a buried Hawaiian soil that has never experienced anthropogenic chemicals. The cadR gene was inferred to encode an AraC/XylS type of transcriptional regulator from its deduced amino acid sequence. The cadABC genes were predicted to encode 2,4-D oxygenase subunits from their deduced amino acid sequences that showed 46, 44, and 37% identities with the TftA and TftB subunits of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) oxygenase of Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 and with a putative ferredoxin, ThcC, of Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21, respectively. They are thoroughly different from the 2,4-D dioxygenase gene, tfdA, of R. eutropha JMP134. The cadK gene was presumed to encode a 2,4-D transport protein from its deduced amino acid sequence that showed 60% identity with the 2,4-D transporter, TfdK, of strain JMP134. Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 cells containing cadRABKC transformed several phenoxyacetic acids, including 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, to corresponding phenol derivatives. Frameshift mutations indicated that each of the cadRABC genes was essential for 2,4-D conversion in strain Rm1021 but that cadK was not. Five 2,4-D degraders, including Bradyrhizobium and Sphingomonas strains, were found to have cadA gene homologs, suggesting that these 2,4-D degraders share 2,4-D degradation genes similar to those of strain HW13 cadABC. PMID:11751829

  10. Novel properties of the wheat aluminum tolerance organic acid transporter (TaALMT1) revealed by electrophysiological characterization in Xenopus oocytes: Functional and structural implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plant species avoid the phytotoxic effects of aluminum (Al) by exuding organic acid anions which chelate Al3+ and prevent its entry into the root. Several novel genes that encode membrane transporters from the ALMT and MATE families have recently been cloned and implicated in mediating the orga...

  11. Arabidopsis NIP2;1, a major intrinsic protein transporter of lactic acid induced by anoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Gyu; Roberts, Daniel M

    2007-08-17

    Nodulin 26 intrinsic proteins (NIPs) are plant-specific, highly conserved water and solute transport proteins with structural and functional homology to soybean nodulin 26. Arabidopsis thaliana contains nine NIP genes. In this study, it is shown that one of these, AtNIP2;1, is exquisitely sensitive to water logging and anoxia stress. Based on quantitative PCR and promoter::GUS experiments, AtNIP2;1 is expressed at a low basal level in the root tips and the vascular bundle of differentiated roots. Transcript levels are elevated acutely and rapidly upon water logging of root or leaf tissues, increasing 70-fold in roots within the 1st h of submersion. After this large initial increase, mRNA levels decline to steady state levels that remain over 10-fold higher by 6 h post-submersion. An even greater induction of AtNIP2;1 expression was observed upon anoxia challenge of Arabidopsis seedlings, with a 300-fold increase in AtNIP2;1 transcript observed by 2 h after the initiation of oxygen deprivation. Functional analysis of AtNIP2;1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes shows that the protein differs from soybean nodulin 26, showing minimal water and glycerol transport. Instead, AtNIP2;1 displays transport of lactic acid, with a preference for the protonated acidic form of this weak acid. Overall, the data suggest that AtNIP2;1 is an anaerobic-induced gene that encodes a lactic acid transporter and may play a role in adaptation to lactic fermentation under anaerobic stress. PMID:17584741

  12. Study of Lateral Gene Transfer in an Acid Mine Drainage Community Enabled by Comparative Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, P.; Croft, L.; Tyson, G. W.; Baker, B. J.; Detter, C.; Richardson, P. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    , suggesting independent LGT events between organisms living in the same, and adjacent habitats. In both cases, however, the majority of transferred genes are involved in metabolism, particularly energy production/conversion and amino acid transport/metabolism. The lack of genes transferred from the (sequenced) genomes of other prokaryotes is consistent with the hypothesis that extreme acidophiles have limited access to genes from organisms outside their ecotype. To date, no Sulfolobus species have been detected at Iron Mountain, suggesting two possibilities to explain the observed pattern of putatively transferred genes to Ferroplasma from Sulfolobus: 1) Sulfolobus is present at Iron Mountain but in regions currently inaccessible to sampling and/or 2) the transfers occurred prior to introduction of Ferroplasma into the current geological setting. As community genome data become available, we should be able to more accurately determine the extent and character of LGT between members of this extremely acidophilic community.

  13. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Geraldo; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Malosetti, Marcos; Viana, Joao Herbert Moreira; Menezes, Cicero Bezerra; Silva, Lidianne Assis; Guimaraes, Claudia Teixeira; Coelho, Antonio Marcos; Kochian, Leon V; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Magalhaes, Jurandir Vieira

    2016-02-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world's arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha(-1) grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha(-1) independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries. PMID:26681519

  14. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Geraldo; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Malosetti, Marcos; Viana, Joao Herbert Moreira; Menezes, Cicero Bezerra; Silva, Lidianne Assis; Guimaraes, Claudia Teixeira; Coelho, Antonio Marcos; Kochian, Leon V.; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Magalhaes, Jurandir Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world’s arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha–1 grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha–1 independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries. PMID:26681519

  15. Reduced naphthylphthalamic acid binding in the tir3 mutant of Arabidopsis is associated with a reduction in polar auxin transport and diverse morphological defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruegger, M.; Dewey, E.; Hobbie, L.; Brown, D.; Bernasconi, P.; Turner, J.; Muday, G.; Estelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and development. To identify genes involved in this process, we have developed a genetic procedure to screen for mutants of Arabidopsis that are altered in their response to auxin transport inhibitors. We recovered a total of 16 independent mutants that defined seven genes, called TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE (TIR) genes. Recessive mutations in one of these genes, TIR3, result in altered responses to transport inhibitors, a reduction in polar auxin transport, and a variety of morphological defects that can be ascribed to changes in indole-3-acetic acid distribution. Most dramatically, tir3 seedlings are strongly deficient in lateral root production, a process that is known to depend on polar auxin transport from the shoot into the root. In addition, tir3 plants display a reduction in apical dominance as well as decreased elongation of siliques, pedicels, roots, and the inflorescence. Biochemical studies indicate that tir3 plants have a reduced number of N-1-naphthylphthalamic (NPA) binding sites, suggesting that the TIR3 gene is required for expression, localization, or stabilization of the NPA binding protein (NBP). Alternatively, the TIR3 gene may encode the NBP. Because the tir3 mutants have a substantial defect in NPA binding, their phenotype provides genetic evidence for a role for the NBP in plant growth and development.

  16. Reduced naphthylphthalamic acid binding in the tir3 mutant of Arabidopsis is associated with a reduction in polar auxin transport and diverse morphological defects.

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, M; Dewey, E; Hobbie, L; Brown, D; Bernasconi, P; Turner, J; Muday, G; Estelle, M

    1997-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and development. To identify genes involved in this process, we have developed a genetic procedure to screen for mutants of Arabidopsis that are altered in their response to auxin transport inhibitors. We recovered a total of 16 independent mutants that defined seven genes, called TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE (TIR) genes. Recessive mutations in one of these genes, TIR3, result in altered responses to transport inhibitors, a reduction in polar auxin transport, and a variety of morphological defects that can be ascribed to changes in indole-3-acetic acid distribution. Most dramatically, tir3 seedlings are strongly deficient in lateral root production, a process that is known to depend on polar auxin transport from the shoot into the root. In addition, tir3 plants display a reduction in apical dominance as well as decreased elongation of siliques, pedicels, roots, and the inflorescence. Biochemical studies indicate that tir3 plants have a reduced number of N-1-naphthylphthalamic (NPA) binding sites, suggesting that the TIR3 gene is required for expression, localization, or stabilization of the NPA binding protein (NBP). Alternatively, the TIR3 gene may encode the NBP. Because the tir3 mutants have a substantial defect in NPA binding, their phenotype provides genetic evidence for a role for the NBP in plant growth and development. PMID:9165751

  17. Auxin Transport in Zea mays Coleoptiles II. Influence of Light on the Transport of Indoleacetic Acid-2-C.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, S M; Gordon, S A

    1967-01-01

    The effect of bilateral irradiation with white light (1000 Meter Candle Sec) on the basipetal transport of auxin has been investigated. Illumination of either the intact shoot or the excised coleoptile tip of the Zea seedling, decreased the amount of diffusible auxin obtained from the tip, and decreased Avena curvature response to unilaterally applied indoleacetic acid. Irradiation of the intact Zea seedling did not affect the absorption of (14)C-labeled indoleacetic acid from an agar block subsequently placed on the decapitated coleoptile. However, light caused a significant decrease in the amount of labeled auxin basipetally transported, without affecting materially the velocity of that transport. These and other observations are interpreted as support for the hypothesis that the primary hormonal phenomenon in first-positive phototropism is a light-induced impairment in the basipetal transport of auxin. PMID:16656477

  18. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  19. Increased Production of Fatty Acids and Triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by Enhancing Expressions of Fatty Acid Synthesis-Related Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Culley, David E.; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R.; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa

    2013-01-01

    Microbial production of fats and oils is being developedas a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillusoryzae. Examination of the A.oryzaegenome demonstrates that it contains twofatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhancedthe expressionof fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with thepromoter fromthe constitutively highly expressedgene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthasegenes we successfullyincreasedtheproduction of fatty acids and triglyceridesby more than two fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesteraseincreasedproductivity to a lesser extent.Increasing expression ofacetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored usingquantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our data demonstrates that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids.

  20. Gene expression studies for the analysis of domoic acid production in the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries Hasle (Hasle) (Ps-n) is distinctive among the ecologically important marine diatoms because it produces the neurotoxin domoic acid. Although the biology of Ps-n has been investigated intensely, the characterization of the genes and biochemical pathways leading to domoic acid biosynthesis has been limited. To identify transcripts whose levels correlate with domoic acid production, we analyzed Ps-n under conditions of high and low domoic acid production by cDNA microarray technology and reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) methods. Our goals included identifying and validating robust reference genes for Ps-n RNA expression analysis under these conditions. Results Through microarray analysis of exponential- and stationary-phase cultures with low and high domoic acid production, respectively, we identified candidate reference genes whose transcripts did not vary across conditions. We tested eleven potential reference genes for stability using RT-qPCR and GeNorm analyses. Our results indicated that transcripts encoding JmjC, dynein, and histone H3 proteins were the most suitable for normalization of expression data under conditions of silicon-limitation, in late-exponential through stationary phase. The microarray studies identified a number of genes that were up- and down-regulated under toxin-producing conditions. RT-qPCR analysis, using the validated controls, confirmed the up-regulation of transcripts predicted to encode a cycloisomerase, an SLC6 transporter, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, a small heat shock protein, and an aldo-keto reductase, as well as the down-regulation of a transcript encoding a fucoxanthin-chlorophyll a-c binding protein, under these conditions. Conclusion Our results provide a strong basis for further studies of RNA expression levels in Ps-n, which will contribute to our understanding of genes involved in the production and release of domoic acid, an important

  1. Role of constitutive androstane receptor in Toll-like receptor-mediated regulation of gene expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Guo, Tao; Moore, David D; Ghose, Romi

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of drug disposition in the liver during inflammation has been attributed to downregulation of gene expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters. Inflammatory responses in the liver are primarily mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We have recently shown that activation of TLR2 or TLR4 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively, leads to the downregulation of gene expression of DMEs/transporters. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this downregulation is not fully understood. The xenobiotic nuclear receptors, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), regulate the expression of DMEs/transporter genes. Downregulation of DMEs/transporters by LTA or LPS was associated with reduced expression of PXR and CAR genes. To determine the role of CAR, we injected CAR(+/+) and CAR(-/-) mice with LTA or LPS, which significantly downregulated (~40%-60%) RNA levels of the DMEs, cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11, Cyp2a4, Cyp2b10, uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1a1, amine N-sulfotransferase, and the transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, in CAR(+/+) mice. Suppression of most of these genes was attenuated in LTA-treated CAR(-/-) mice. In contrast, LPS-mediated downregulation of these genes was not attenuated in CAR(-/-) mice. Induction of these genes by mouse CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene was sustained in LTA- but not in LPS-treated mice. Similar observations were obtained in humanized CAR mice. We have replicated these results in primary hepatocytes as well. Thus, LPS can downregulate DME/transporter genes in the absence of CAR, whereas the effect of LTA on these genes is attenuated in the absence of CAR, indicating the potential involvement of CAR in LTA-mediated downregulation of DME/transporter genes. PMID:24194512

  2. Sex-dependent activity of the spinal excitatory amino acid transporter: Role of estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Felice, Valeria D; Golubeva, Anna V; Cryan, John F; O'Mahony, Siobhain M

    2016-10-01

    Females are more likely to experience visceral pain than males, yet mechanisms underlying this sex bias are not fully elucidated. Moreover, pain sensitivity can change throughout the menstrual cycle. Alterations in the glutamatergic system have been implicated in several pain-disorders; however, whether these are sex-dependent is unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate sex differences in the spinal cord glutamate uptake and how it varies across the estrous cycle. The activity of the glutamate transporters, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) was assessed using an ex vivo aspartate radioactive uptake assay in the lumbosacral spinal cord in Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. The gene expression of EAATs, glutamate receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B and the estrogen receptors ERα & ERβ in the spinal cord were also analyzed. EAAT activity was lower in females, particularly during the estrus phase, and this was the only cycle stage that was responsive to the pharmacological effects of the EAATs activator riluzole. Interestingly, EAAT1 mRNA expression was lower in high-estrogen and high-ERα states compared to diestrus in females. We conclude that the Spinal EAAT activity in females is different to that in males, and varies across the estrous cycle. Furthermore, the expression levels of estrogen receptors also showed a cycle-dependent pattern that may affect EAATs function and expression. PMID:27471194

  3. Role of organic anion-transporting polypeptides for cellular mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid) uptake.

    PubMed

    König, Jörg; Glaeser, Hartmut; Keiser, Markus; Mandery, Kathrin; Klotz, Ulrich; Fromm, Martin F

    2011-06-01

    The therapeutic effects and metabolism of mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease require intracellular accumulation of the drug in intestinal epithelial cells and hepatocytes. The molecular mechanisms of mesalazine uptake into cells have not been characterized so far. Using human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing uptake transporters of the organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) family, which are expressed in human intestine and/or liver, we found that mesalazine uptake is mediated by OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 but not by OATP1A2 and OATP4A1. Moreover, genetic variations (*1b, *5, *15) in the SLCO1B1 gene encoding OATP1B1 reduced the K(m) value for mesalazine uptake from 55.1 to 16.3, 24.3, and 32.4 μM, respectively, and the respective V(max) values. Finally, budesonide, cyclosporine, and rifampin were identified as inhibitors of OATP1B1-, OATP1B3-, and OATP2B1-meditated mesalazine uptake. These in vitro data indicate that OATP-mediated uptake and its modification by genetic factors and comedications may play a role for mesalazine effects. PMID:21430235

  4. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salicylic acid plays a critical role in activating plant defence responses after pathogen attack. Salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) modulates the level of salicylic acid by converting salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Here, we report that a SAMT gene from soybean (GmSAMT1) plays a role in s...

  5. The arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Rosen, E.; Caspar, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589-1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes.

  6. The Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rujin; Hilson, Pierre; Sedbrook, John; Rosen, Elizabeth; Caspar, Timothy; Masson, Patrick H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589–1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes. PMID:9844024

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Elicits Inflammatory Responses that Dysregulate Placental Amino Acid Transport

    PubMed Central

    Boeuf, Philippe; Aitken, Elizabeth H.; Chandrasiri, Upeksha; Chua, Caroline Lin Lin; McInerney, Bernie; McQuade, Leon; Duffy, Michael; Molyneux, Malcolm; Brown, Graham; Glazier, Jocelyn; Rogerson, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Placental malaria (PM) can lead to poor neonatal outcomes, including low birthweight due to fetal growth restriction (FGR), especially when associated with local inflammation (intervillositis or IV). The pathogenesis of PM-associated FGR is largely unknown, but in idiopathic FGR, impaired transplacental amino acid transport, especially through the system A group of amino acid transporters, has been implicated. We hypothesized that PM-associated FGR could result from impairment of transplacental amino acid transport triggered by IV. In a cohort of Malawian women and their infants, the expression and activity of system A (measured by Na+-dependent 14C-MeAIB uptake) were reduced in PM, especially when associated with IV, compared to uninfected placentas. In an in vitro model of PM with IV, placental cells exposed to monocyte/infected erythrocytes conditioned medium showed decreased system A activity. Amino acid concentrations analyzed by reversed phase ultra performance liquid chromatography in paired maternal and cord plasmas revealed specific alterations of amino acid transport by PM, especially with IV. Overall, our data suggest that the fetoplacental unit responds to PM by altering its placental amino acid transport to maintain adequate fetal growth. However, IV more profoundly compromises placental amino acid transport function, leading to FGR. Our study offers the first pathogenetic explanation for FGR in PM. PMID:23408887

  8. Antigen-specific stimulation of amino acid transport in bovine lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of bovine lymphocytes isolated from animals which were either infected with Mycobacterium bovis or sensitized to a purified protein derivative (PPD-B) from this organism induced an increase in the transport of a-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and a-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB). PPD-B did not stimulate these transport activities in lymphocytes from nonsensitized animals. The transport stimulation was first measurable after about 7 hours of treatment, reached about a two-fold enhancement after 20 hours, and continued to increase to 30- to 40-fold after 6 days. The stimulation of AIB transport was inhibited by both ouabain and cycloheximide. Experiments to determine transport system specificities in nonstimulated lymphocytes showed that MeAIB transport was primarily by the Na/sup +/-dependent, A-system,and leucine transport was mostly by Na/sup +/-independent system(s). In contrast, AIB transport was about 25% by the A-system, 25% by at least one Na/sup +/-dependent, non-A-system, and 50% by one or more Na/sup +/-independent system(s). Analysis of the three components of AIB transport after treatment with PPD-B showed that: 1) transport by both the A-system and the Na/sup +/-independent system(s) was stimulated; 2) A-system transport was stimulated to a larger extent than Na/sup +/-independent transport; and 3) Na/sup +/-dependent, non-A-system transport was not stimulated significantly.

  9. Expression of fatty acid synthesis genes and fatty acid accumulation in haematococcus pluvialis under different stressors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biofuel has been the focus of intensive global research over the past few years. The development of 4th generation biofuel production (algae-to-biofuels) based on metabolic engineering of algae is still in its infancy, one of the main barriers is our lacking of understanding of microalgal growth, metabolism and biofuel production. Although fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis pathway genes have been all cloned and biosynthesis pathway was built up in some higher plants, the molecular mechanism for its regulation in microalgae is far away from elucidation. Results We cloned main key genes for FA biosynthesis in Haematococcus pluvialis, a green microalga as a potential biodiesel feedstock, and investigated the correlations between their expression alternation and FA composition and content detected by GC-MS under different stress treatments, such as nitrogen depletion, salinity, high or low temperature. Our results showed that high temperature, high salinity, and nitrogen depletion treatments played significant roles in promoting microalgal FA synthesis, while FA qualities were not changed much. Correlation analysis showed that acyl carrier protein (ACP), 3-ketoacyl-ACP-synthase (KAS), and acyl-ACP thioesterase (FATA) gene expression had significant correlations with monounsaturated FA (MUFA) synthesis and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) synthesis. Conclusions We proposed that ACP, KAS, and FATA in H. pluvialis may play an important role in FA synthesis and may be rate limiting genes, which probably could be modified for the further study of metabolic engineering to improve microalgal biofuel quality and production. PMID:22448811

  10. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence gene chvE is part of a putative ABC-type sugar transport operon.

    PubMed Central

    Kemner, J M; Liang, X; Nester, E W

    1997-01-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence determinant ChvE is a periplasmic binding protein which participates in chemotaxis and virulence gene induction in response to monosaccharides which occur in the plant wound environment. The region downstream of the A. tumefaciens chvE gene was cloned and sequenced for nucleotide and expression analysis. Three open reading frames transcribed in the same direction as chvE were revealed. The first two, together with chvE, encode putative proteins of a periplasmic binding protein-dependent sugar uptake system, or ABC-type (ATP binding cassette) transporter. The third open reading frame encodes a protein of unknown function. The deduced transporter gene products are related on the amino acid level to bacterial sugar transporters and probably function in glucose and galactose uptake. We have named these genes gguA, -B, and -C, for glucose galactose uptake. Mutations in gguA, gguB, or gguC do not affect virulence of A. tumefaciens on Kalanchoe diagremontiana; growth on 1 mM galactose, glucose, xylose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, or sucrose; or chemotaxis toward glucose, galactose, xylose, or arabinose. PMID:9079938

  11. Hybrubins: Bipyrrole Tetramic Acids Obtained by Crosstalk between a Truncated Undecylprodigiosin Pathway and Heterologous Tetramic Acid Biosynthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhilong; Shi, Ting; Xu, Min; Brock, Nelson L; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Yemin; Deng, Zixin; Pang, Xiuhua; Tao, Meifeng

    2016-02-01

    Heterologous expression of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the genomic library of Streptomyces variabilis Snt24 in Streptomyces lividans SBT5 which carried a truncated undecylprodigiosin biosynthetic gene cluster led to the identification of hybrubins A-C. The hybrubins represent a new carbon skeleton in which a tetramic acid moiety is fused to a 2,2'-dipyrrole building block. Gene knockout experiments confirmed that hybrubins are derived from two convergent biosynthetic pathways including the remaining genomic red genes of S. lividans SBT5 as well as the BAC encoded hbn genes for the production of 5-ethylidenetetramic acid. A possible biosynthetic pathway was also proposed. PMID:26800378

  12. Overexpression of the Aspergillus niger GatA transporter leads to preferential use of D-galacturonic acid over D-xylose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pectin is a structural heteropolysaccharide of the primary cell walls of plants and as such is a significant fraction of agricultural waste residues that is currently insufficiently used. Its main component, D-galacturonic acid, is an attractive substrate for bioconversion. The complete metabolic pathway is present in the genome of Aspergillus niger, that is used in this study. The objective was to identify the D-galacturonic acid transporter in A. niger and to use this transporter to study D-galacturonic acid metabolism. We have functionally characterized the gene An14g04280 that encodes the D-galacturonic acid transporter in A. niger. In a mixed sugar fermentation it was found that the An14g04280 overexpression strain, in contrast to the parent control strain, has a preference for D-galacturonic acid over D-xylose as substrate. Overexpression of this transporter in A. niger resulted in a strong increase of D-galacturonic acid uptake and induction of the D-galacturonic acid reductase activity, suggesting a metabolite controlled regulation of the endogenous D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway. PMID:25177540

  13. Genome Wide Identification, Phylogeny and Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Common Carp

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shuaisheng; Sun, Jinsheng; Xu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background Zinc is an essential trace element in organisms, which serves as a cofactor for hundreds of enzymes that are involved in many pivotal biological processes including growth, development, reproduction and immunity. Therefore, the homeostasis of zinc in the cell is fundamental. The zinc transporter gene family is a large gene family that encodes proteins which regulate the movement of zinc across cellular and intracellular membranes. However, studies on teleost zinc transporters are mainly limited to model species. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified a set of 37 zinc transporters in common carp genome, including 17 from SLC30 family (ZnT), and 20 from SLC39 family (ZIP). Phylogenetic and syntenic analysis revealed that most of the zinc transporters are highly conserved, though recent gene duplication and gene losses do exist. Through examining the copy number of zinc transporter genes across several vertebrate genomes, thirteen zinc transporters in common carp are found to have undergone the gene duplications, including SLC30A1, SLC30A2, SLC30A5, SLC30A7, SLC30A9, SLC30A10, SLC39A1, SLC39A3, SLC39A4, SLC39A5, SLC39A6, SLC39A7 and SLC39A9. The expression patterns of all zinc transporters were established in various tissues, including blood, brain, gill, heart, intestine, liver, muscle, skin, spleen and kidney, and showed that most of the zinc transporters were ubiquitously expressed, indicating the critical role of zinc transporters in common carp. Conclusions To some extent, examination of gene families with detailed phylogenetic or orthology analysis could verify the authenticity and accuracy of assembly and annotation of the recently published common carp whole genome sequences. The gene families are also considered as a unique source for evolutionary studies. Moreover, the whole set of common carp zinc transporters provides an important genomic resource for future biochemical, toxicological and physiological studies of zinc in teleost. PMID

  14. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    After more than 50 years of treating Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA, there are still no guidelines on setting the optimal dose for a given patient. The dopamine transporter type 1, now known as solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 3 (SLC6A3) is the most powerful determinant of dopamine neurotransmission and might therefore influence the treatment response. We recently demonstrated that methylphenidate (a dopamine transporter inhibitor) is effective in patients with Parkinson's disease with motor and gait disorders. The objective of the present study was to determine whether genetic variants of the dopamine transporter type 1-encoding gene (SLC6A3) are associated with differences in the response to treatment of motor symptoms and gait disorders with l-DOPA and methylphenidate (with respect to the demographic, the disease and the treatment parameters and the other genes involved in the dopaminergic neurotransmission). This analysis was part of a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease (Protocol ID:2008-005801-20; ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00914095). We scored the motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Stand-Walk-Sit Test before and after a standardized acute l-DOPA challenge before randomization and then after 3 months of methylphenidate treatment. Patients were screened for variants of genes involved in dopamine metabolism: rs28363170 and rs3836790 polymorphisms in the SLC6A3 gene, rs921451 and rs3837091 in the DDC gene (encoding the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase involved in the synthesis of dopamine from l-DOPA), rs1799836 in the MAOB gene (coding for monoamine oxidase B) and rs4680 in the COMT gene (coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase). Investigators and patients were blinded to the genotyping data throughout the study. Eighty-one subjects were genotyped and 61 were analysed for their acute motor response to l-DOPA. The SLC6A3

  15. BASIC AMINO ACID CARRIER 2 gene expression modulates arginine and urea content and stress recovery in Arabidopsis leaves

    PubMed Central

    Planchais, Séverine; Cabassa, Cécile; Toka, Iman; Justin, Anne-Marie; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Savouré, Arnould; Carol, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In plants, basic amino acids are important for the synthesis of proteins and signaling molecules and for nitrogen recycling. The Arabidopsis nuclear gene BASIC AMINO ACID CARRIER 2 (BAC2) encodes a mitochondria-located carrier that transports basic amino acids in vitro. We present here an analysis of the physiological and genetic function of BAC2 in planta. When BAC2 is overexpressed in vivo, it triggers catabolism of arginine, a basic amino acid, leading to arginine depletion and urea accumulation in leaves. BAC2 expression was known to be strongly induced by stress. We found that compared to wild type plants, bac2 null mutants (bac2-1) recover poorly from hyperosmotic stress when restarting leaf expansion. The bac2-1 transcriptome differs from the wild-type transcriptome in control conditions and under hyperosmotic stress. The expression of genes encoding stress-related transcription factors (TF), arginine metabolism enzymes, and transporters is particularly disturbed in bac2-1, and in control conditions, the bac2-1 transcriptome has some hallmarks of a wild-type stress transcriptome. The BAC2 carrier is therefore involved in controlling the balance of arginine and arginine-derived metabolites and its associated amino acid metabolism is physiologically important in equipping plants to respond to and recover from stress. PMID:25076951

  16. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene: correlation between sulfate transport activity and chondrodysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Karniski, L P

    2001-07-01

    The diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene encodes a transmembrane protein that transports sulfate into chondrocytes to maintain adequate sulfation of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene are responsible for four recessively inherited chondrodysplasias that include diastrophic dysplasia, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type 2 and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). To determine whether the DTDST mutations found in individuals with these chondrodysplasias differ functionally from each other, we compared the sulfate transport activity of 11 reported DTDST mutations. Five mutations, G255E, Delta a1751, L483P, R178X and N425D, had minimal sulfate transport function following expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two mutations, Delta V340 and R279W, transported sulfate at rates of 17 and 32%, respectively, of wild-type DTDST. Four mutations, A715V, C653S, Q454P and G678V, had rates of sulfate transport nearly equal to that of wild-type DTDST. Transport kinetics were not different among the four mutations with near-normal sulfate transport function and wild-type DTDST. When the sulfate transport function of the different DTDST mutations are grouped according to the general phenotypes, individuals with the most severe form, ACG-1B, tend to be homozygous for null mutations, individuals with the moderately severe atelosteogenesis type 2 have at least one allele with a loss-of-function mutation, and individuals with the mildest forms are typically homozygous for mutations with residual sulfate transport function. However, in the X.laevis oocyte expression system, the correlation between residual transport function and the severity of phenotype was not absolute, suggesting that factors in addition to the intrinsic sulfate transport properties of the DTDST protein may influence the phenotype in individuals with DTDST mutations. PMID:11448940

  17. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation. PMID:27118706

  18. Functional and transcript analysis of a novel metal transporter gene EpNramp from a dark septate endophyte (Exophiala pisciphila).

    PubMed

    Wei, Yun-Fang; Li, Tao; Li, Ling-Fei; Wang, Jun-Ling; Cao, Guan-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Various metal transporters mediate sub-cellular sequestration of diverse metal ions, contribute to cellular metal tolerance, and control metal partitioning, particularly under conditions of high rates of metal influx into organisms. In the current study, a ubiquitous and evolutionary conserved metal transporter gene, homology to natural resistance associated macrophage protein (Nramp), was cloned from a metal-tolerant isolate of dark septate endophyte (DSE, Exophiala pisciphila), and its functional and transcript characterization were analyzed. The full-length Nramp gene from E. pisciphila (named EpNramp) was 1716 bp and expected to encode a polypeptide of 571 amino acid residues. EpNramp fused to green fluorescent protein suggested that EpNramp was a plasma membrane metal transporter, which was consistent with the results of bioinformatics analysis with 11 transmembrane domains. Yeast functional complementation revealed that EpNramp could complement the growth defect of Fe-uptake yeast mutant (fet3fet4 double mutant) by mediating the transport of Fe(2+). Expression of EpNramp increased Cd(2+) sensitivity and Cd(2+) accumulation in yeast. In addition, qPCR data revealed that E. pisciphila significantly down-regulated EpNramp expression with elevated Cd(2+) exposure. Altogether, EpNramp is a bivalent cation transporter localized in cell membrane, which is necessary for efficient translocation of both Fe and Cd, and its activities partly attributed to the tolerance of DSE to toxic and excessive Cd(2+) supplements. PMID:26595509

  19. Characteristics of the transport of ascorbic acid into leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Raghoebar, M.; Huisman, J.A.M.; van den Berg, W.B.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-02-02

    The degree and the mode of association of (/sup 14/C)-ascorbic acid with leucocytes are examined. The degree of association of ascorbic acid with polymorphonuclear leucocytes (1-3 %) is dependent on cell type, extracellular concentration of ascorbic acid, incubation temperature, intactness of the cells and the extracellular pH. All experiments are performed according to strict protocols as these compounds are labile in aqueous solutions. Further it is noticed that in all experiments an outward gradient of leucocyte endogenic ascorbic acid exists. The results suggest that the association process comprises at least one saturable pathway. The activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes by phorbol myristate acetate increases the accumulation of ascorbic acid threefold. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Nuclear factor-κB regulates the expression of multiple genes encoding liver transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Suchy, Frederick J

    2016-04-15

    In this study we identified the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on the expression of genes encoding multiple liver transport proteins. Well-conserved NF-κB binding sites were found in the promoters of farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-target genes. An electromobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated the specific interaction between the NF-κB p65 protein and a (32)P-labeled BSEP NF-κB response element (NF-κBE). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed binding of NF-κB p65 to the BSEP locus but not the FXRE in vitro. NF-κB p65 overexpression in Huh-7 cells markedly repressed FXR/RXR transactivation of the BSEP, ABCG5/G8, MRP2, and FXR promoters, which was totally reversed by expression of the IκBα super-repressor. NF-κB interacted directly with FXR on coimmunoprecipitation, suggesting another level for the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on FXR-target genes. In vivo ChIP analysis with liver nuclei obtained from mice after 3 days of common bile duct ligation (BDL) or 6 h post-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection showed a markedly increased recruitment of NF-κB p65 to the Bsep promoter compared with controls. There was also increased recruitment of the corepressor silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC2 to the NF-κB sites. We also found that NF-κB p65 was recruited to NF-κB binding sites in the promoters of organic solute transporter, OSTα and OSTβ, and unexpectedly activated rather than repressed gene expression. In mouse liver after BDL NF-κB recruitment to Ostα and Ostβ promoters was associated with increased binding of the potent coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 to the NF-κBE and depletion of CBP/p300 at the FXR element. Overall, these studies demonstrate a novel role for NF-κB in adaptation to obstructive and LPS-induced cholestasis acting through recruitment to specific NF-κB binding sites in

  1. Regulation of amino acid transporters in pluripotent cell populations in the embryo and in culture; novel roles for sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boon Siang Nicholas; Rathjen, Peter D; Harvey, Alexandra J; Gardner, David K; Rathjen, Joy

    2016-08-01

    The developmental outcomes of preimplantation mammalian embryos are regulated directly by the surrounding microenvironment, and inappropriate concentrations of amino acids, or the loss of amino acid-sensing mechanisms, can be detrimental and impact further development. A specific role for l-proline in the differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells, a cell population derived from the blastocyst, has been shown in culture. l-proline acts as a signalling molecule, exerting its effects through cell uptake and subsequent metabolism. Uptake in ES cells occurs predominantly through the sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2, Slc38a2 (SNAT2). Dynamic expression of amino acid transporters has been shown in the early mammalian embryo, reflecting functional roles for amino acids in embryogenesis. The expression of SNAT2 and family member Slc38a1 (SNAT1) was determined in mouse embryos from the 2-cell stage through to the early post-implantation pre-gastrulation embryo. Key changes in expression were validated in cell culture models of development. Both transporters showed temporal dynamic expression patterns and changes in intracellular localisation as differentiation progressed. Changes in transporter expression likely reflect different amino acid requirements during development. Findings include the differential expression of SNAT1 in the inner and outer cells of the compacted morula and nuclear localisation of SNAT2 in the trophectoderm and placental lineages. Furthermore, SNAT2 expression was up-regulated in the epiblast prior to primitive ectoderm formation, an expression pattern consistent with a role for the transporter in later developmental decisions within the pluripotent lineage. We propose that the differential expression of SNAT2 in the epiblast provides evidence for an l-proline-mediated mechanism contributing to the regulation of embryonic development. PMID:27373508

  2. Gene Expression Variability in Human Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lun; Price, Elvin T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Li, Yan; Huang, Ying; Guo, Li-Wu; Guo, Yongli; Kaput, Jim; Shi, Leming; Ning, Baitang

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications. PMID:23637747

  3. The PH gene determines fruit acidity and contributes to the evolution of sweet melons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shahar; Itkin, Maxim; Yeselson, Yelena; Tzuri, Galil; Portnoy, Vitaly; Harel-Baja, Rotem; Lev, Shery; Sa'ar, Uzi; Davidovitz-Rikanati, Rachel; Baranes, Nadine; Bar, Einat; Wolf, Dalia; Petreikov, Marina; Shen, Shmuel; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Ast, Tslil; Schuldiner, Maya; Belausov, Eduard; Eshed, Ravit; Ophir, Ron; Sherman, Amir; Frei, Benedikt; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Xu, Yimin; Fei, Zhangjun; Giovannoni, Jim; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Tadmor, Yaakov; Paris, Harry S; Katzir, Nurit; Burger, Yosef; Schaffer, Arthur A

    2014-01-01

    Taste has been the subject of human selection in the evolution of agricultural crops, and acidity is one of the three major components of fleshy fruit taste, together with sugars and volatile flavour compounds. We identify a family of plant-specific genes with a major effect on fruit acidity by map-based cloning of C. melo PH gene (CmPH) from melon, Cucumis melo taking advantage of the novel natural genetic variation for both high and low fruit acidity in this species. Functional silencing of orthologous PH genes in two distantly related plant families, cucumber and tomato, produced low-acid, bland tasting fruit, showing that PH genes control fruit acidity across plant families. A four amino-acid duplication in CmPH distinguishes between primitive acidic varieties and modern dessert melons. This fortuitous mutation served as a preadaptive antecedent to the development of sweet melon cultigens in Central Asia over 1,000 years ago. PMID:24898284

  4. Hepatic and renal Bcrp transporter expression in mice treated with perfluorooctanoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Eldasher, Lobna M.; Wen, Xia; Little, Michael S.; Bircsak, Kristin M.; Yacovino, Lindsay L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2013-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) is an efflux transporter that participates in the biliary and renal excretion of drugs and environmental chemicals. Recent evidence suggests that pharmacological activation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) can up-regulate the hepatic expression of Bcrp. The current study investigated the regulation of hepatic and renal Bcrp mRNA and protein in mice treated with the PPARα agonist perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and the ability of PFOA to alter human BCRP function in vitro. Bcrp mRNA and protein expression were quantified in the livers and kidneys of male C57BL/6 mice treated with vehicle or PFOA (1 or 3 mg/kg/day oral gavage) for 7 days. PFOA treatment increased liver weights as well as the hepatic mRNA and protein expression of the PPARα target gene, cytochrome P450 4a14. Compared to vehicle-treated control mice, PFOA increased hepatic Bcrp mRNA and protein between 1.5- and 3-fold. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed enhanced canalicular Bcrp staining in liver sections from PFOA-treated mice. The kidney expression of cytochrome P450 4a14 mRNA, but not Bcrp, was increased in mice treated with PFOA. Micromolar concentrations of PFOA decreased human BCRP ATPase activity and inhibited BCRP-mediated transport in inverted membrane vesicles. Together, these studies demonstrate that PFOA induces hepatic Bcrp expression in mice and may inhibit human BCRP transporter function at concentrations that exceed levels observed in humans. PMID:23435180

  5. The biosynthetic gene cluster for coronamic acid, an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid, contains genes homologous to amino acid-activating enzymes and thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, M; Bender, C L

    1994-01-01

    Coronamic acid (CMA), an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid derived from isoleucine, functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of coronatine, a chlorosis-inducing phytotoxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180. The DNA required for CMA biosynthesis (6.9 kb) was sequenced, revealing three distinct open reading frames (ORFs) which share a common orientation for transcription. The deduced amino acid sequence of a 2.7-kb ORF designated cmaA contained six core sequences and two conserved motifs which are present in a variety of amino acid-activating enzymes, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Furthermore, CmaA contained a spatial arrangement of histidine, aspartate, and arginine residues which are conserved in the ferrous active site of some nonheme iron(II) enzymes which catalyze oxidative cyclizations. The deduced amino acid sequence of a 1.2-kb ORF designated cmaT was related to thioesterases of both procaryotic and eucaryotic origins. These data suggest that CMA assembly is similar to the thiotemplate mechanism of nonribosomal peptide synthesis. No significant similarities between a 0.9-kb ORF designated cmaU and other database entries were found. The start sites of two transcripts required for CMA biosynthesis were identified in the present study. pRG960sd, a vector containing a promoterless glucuronidase gene, was used to localize and study the promoter regions upstream of the two transcripts. Data obtained in the present study indicate that CMA biosynthesis is regulated at the transcriptional level by temperature. Images PMID:8002582

  6. Transport of hop bitter acids across intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cattoor, Ko; Bracke, Marc; Deforce, Dieter; De Keukeleire, Denis; Heyerick, Arne

    2010-04-14

    Several health-beneficial properties of hop bitter acids have been reported (inhibition of bone resorption and anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activities); however, scientific data on the bioavailability of these compounds are lacking. As a first approach to study the bioavailability, the epithelial transport of hop alpha- and beta-acids across Caco-2 monolayers was investigated. Hop acids were added either to the apical or to the basolateral chamber and, at various time points, amounts transported to the receiving compartment were determined. The monolayer integrity control was performed by using marker compounds (atenolol and propranolol), transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement, and determination of the fluorescein efflux. The TEER and fluorescein efflux confirmed the preservation of the monolayer integrity. The membrane permeability of the alpha-acids (apparent permeability coefficients for apical to basolateral transport (P(appAB)) ranged from 14 x 10(-6) to 41 x 10(-6) cm/s) was determined to be substantially higher than that of the beta-acids (P(appAB) values ranging from 0.9 x 10(-6) to 2.1 x 10(-6) cm/s). Notably, the beta-acids exhibited significantly different bidirectional P(app) values with efflux ratios around 10. The involvement of carrier-mediated transport for beta-acids (active efflux pathway by P-gp, BCRP, and/or MRP-2 type efflux pumps) could be confirmed by transport experiments with specific inhibitors (verapamil and indomethacin). It appears that alpha-acids are efficiently absorbed, whereas the permeability of beta-acids is low. Limiting factors in the absorption of beta-acids could involve P-gp and MRP-2 type efflux transporters and phase II metabolism. PMID:20329731

  7. Cloning and characterization of a phosphate transporter gene in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-He; Xia, Bing-Bing; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Jiao; Bai, Lin-Han

    2012-08-01

    The full-length cDNA of a Na(+) -dependent Pi transport gene (DsSPT1) in Dunaliella salina was cloned by 3' and 5' Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding 716 predicted amino acids, which exhibited 60.5% identity to that of Na(+) -dependent Pi transport 1 (DvSPT1) from Dunaliella viridis. Hydrophobicity and secondary structure prediction revealed 11 conserved transmembrane domains similar to those found in DvSPT1 from D. viridis and PHO89 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The result of real-time quantitative PCR showed that expression level of DsSPT1 was enhanced at first and reached its peak at 90 min after salt stress; however, D. salina cells rapidly absorbed extracellular inorganic phosphorus which was determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) during the first 5 min under salt stress. It suggested that D. salina on the absorption of inorganic phosphorus was regulated at DsSPTI posttranslational level. PMID:22052620

  8. Aphid amino acid transporter regulates glutamine supply to intracellular bacterial symbionts.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Feng, Honglin; Baker, James D; Bavan, Selvan; Luetje, Charles W; Wilson, Alex C C

    2014-01-01

    Endosymbiotic associations have played a major role in evolution. However, the molecular basis for the biochemical interdependence of these associations remains poorly understood. The aphid-Buchnera endosymbiosis provides a powerful system to elucidate how these symbioses are regulated. In aphids, the supply of essential amino acids depends on an ancient nutritional symbiotic association with the gamma-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola. Buchnera cells are densely packed in specialized aphid bacteriocyte cells. Here we confirm that five putative amino acid transporters are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in Acyrthosiphon pisum bacteriocyte tissues. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two bacteriocyte amino acid transporters displayed significant levels of glutamine uptake, with transporter ACYPI001018, LOC100159667 (named here as Acyrthosiphon pisum glutamine transporter 1, ApGLNT1) functioning as the most active glutamine transporter. Transporter ApGLNT1 has narrow substrate selectivity, with high glutamine and low arginine transport capacity. Notably, ApGLNT1 has high binding affinity for arginine, and arginine acts as a competitive inhibitor for glutamine transport. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that ApGLNT1 is localized predominantly to the bacteriocyte plasma membrane, a location consistent with the transport of glutamine from A. pisum hemolymph to the bacteriocyte cytoplasm. On the basis of functional transport data and localization, we propose a substrate feedback inhibition model in which the accumulation of the essential amino acid arginine in A. pisum hemolymph reduces the transport of the precursor glutamine into bacteriocytes, thereby regulating amino acid biosynthesis in the bacteriocyte. Structural similarities in the arrangement of hosts and symbionts across endosymbiotic systems suggest that substrate feedback inhibition may be mechanistically important in other endosymbioses. PMID:24367072

  9. The orally active antihyperglycemic drug beta-guanidinopropionic acid is transported by the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Linda; Dorn, Madlen; Markwardt, Fritz; Brandsch, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The orally administered creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA) decreases plasma glucose levels by increasing the sensitivity to insulin. This effect is based on a beta-GPA induced expression of mRNA and total protein content of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4. Although the oral availability of beta-GPA is well established, the underlying uptake mechanism has not yet been studied. We investigated whether the H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, which is expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells, accepts guanidine derivatives as substrates. Uptake of l-[(3)H]proline into Caco-2 cells expressing hPAT1 constitutively was strongly inhibited by beta-GPA and its derivatives guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and 4-guanidinobutyric acid (4-GBA). Competition assays revealed apparent affinity constants of about 1.5 mM. Electrophysiological measurements at hPAT1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes unequivocally demonstrated that beta-GPA, GAA and 4-GBA are effectively transported by this transport system in an electrogenic manner. We conclude that hPAT1 might be responsible for the intestinal absorption of beta-GPA thereby allowing its oral administration. Moreover, with beta-GPA we identified a new high affinity hPAT1 substrate that might be an interesting starting point for future drug design-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19358571

  10. Utilization of Lactic Acid by Fusarium oxysporum var. lini: Regulation of Transport and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ieso M.; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.

    1994-01-01

    Lactic acid was transported in Fusarium oxysporum var. lini ATCC 10960 by a saturable transport system that had a half-saturation constant of 56.6 ± 7.5 μM and a maximum velocity of 0.61 ± 0.10 mmol h-1 g-1 (dry weight) at 26°C and pH 5.0. This transport system was inducible and was not expressed in the presence of a repressing substrate. Evidence is presented that the anionic form lactate- was taken up by the cells. Propionic, acetic, pyruvic, and bromoacetic acids but not succinic acid competitively inhibited the transport of lactic acid. Bromoacetic acid, which was not metabolized, was taken up to a steady-state level when intracellular and extracellular concentrations were identical, indicating that the transport system was not accumulative. The enzymatic activity that was physiologically more relevant in the metabolism of lactic acid was lactate: ferricytochrome c oxidase. This enzyme did not exhibit stereospecifity and was induced by lactic acid. PMID:16349143

  11. Role of organic acids in promoting colloidal transport of mercury from mine tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slowey, A.J.; Johnson, S.B.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A number of factors affect the transport of dissolved and paniculate mercury (Hg) from inoperative Hg mines, including the presence of organic acids in the rooting zone of vegetated mine waste. We examined the role of the two most common organic acids in soils (oxalic and citric acid) on Hg transport from such waste by pumping a mixed organic acid solution (pH 5.7) at 1 mL/min through Hg mine tailings columns. For the two total organic acid concentrations investigated (20 ??M and 1 mM), particle-associated Hg was mobilized, with the onset of paniculate Hg transport occurring later for the lower organic acid concentration. Chemical analyses of column effluent indicate that 98 wt % of Hg mobilized from the column was paniculate. Hg speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, showing that HgS minerals are dominant in the mobilized particles. Hg adsorbed to colloids is another likely mode of transport due to the abundance of Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides, Fe-sulfides, alunite, and jarosite in the tailings to which Hg(II) adsorbs. Organic acids produced by plants are likely to enhance the transport of colloid-associated Hg from vegetated Hg mine tailings by dissolving cements to enable colloid release. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  12. Characterization of methylaminoisobutyric acid transport by system A in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Tovar, A R; Avila, E; DeSantiago, S; Torres, N

    2000-07-01

    During lactation, the mammary gland has a large demand for amino acids for the synthesis of milk proteins and fatty acids. Arteriovenous differences in amino acids across the mammary gland show an elevated uptake of small neutral amino acids that are mainly transported via system A. The purpose of this study was to characterize the transport of methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), an amino acid analog used to model transport by system A in lactating rat mammary gland explants. MeAIB accumulation in mammary gland cells increased steadily, and after 3 hours of incubation, the intracellular concentration of the analog was 8-fold higher than the concentration in the medium. MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants showed a Km of 3.3 +/- 0.4 mmol/L and a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 555 +/- 23 pmol/microL intracellular fluid (ICF) x min, indicating a system with high capacity but low affinity for its substrate. MeAIB transport into mammary tissue depended highly on Na+, and the uptake was inhibited by addition of natural and analog small neutral amino acids. Cationic, anionic, and large neutral amino acids did not reduce MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants. Preincubation of mammary gland explants in an amino acid-free medium stimulated MeAIB transport, suggesting an adaptive regulation. The addition of an equimolar mixture of alanine, glycine, and serine to the preincubation medium inhibited stimulation of MeAIB transport. Furthermore, stimulation of MeAIB uptake by amino acid starvation was also prevented by the addition of actinomycin D, cycloheximide, tunicamycin, and colchicine. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increased MeAIB uptake, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) did not stimulate MeAIB transport. During the first postweaning days, kinetic analyses showed a decrease of 27% in the Vmax. Injection of rat lactating mammary gland mRNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes induced expression of the MeAIB transport system; however, the

  13. Regulation of amino acid transport in Escherichia coli by transcription termination factor rho.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Oxender, D L

    1977-01-01

    Amino acid transport rates and amino acid binding proteins were examined in a strain containing the rho-120 mutation (formerly SuA), which has been shown to lower the rho-dependent, ribonucleic acid-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity to 9% of the rho activity in the isogenic wild-type strain. Tryptophan and proline transport, which occur by membrane-bound systems, were not altered. On the other hand, arginine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine transport were variably increased by a factor of 1.4 to 5.0. Kinetics of leucine transport showed that the LIV (leucine, isoleucine, and valine)-I (binding protein-associated) transport system is increased 8.5-fold, whereas the LIV-II (membrane-bound) system is increased 1.5-fold in the rho mutant under leucine-limited growth conditions. The leucine binding protein is increased fourfold under the same growth conditions. The difference in leucine transport in these strains was greatest during leucine-limited growth; growth on complex media repressed both strains to the same transport activity. We propose that rho-dependent transcriptional termination is important for leucine-specific repression of branched-chain amino acid transport, although rho-independent regulation, presumably by a corepressor-aporepressor-type mechanism, must also occur. PMID:324970

  14. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  15. Transport genes and chemotaxis in Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laribacter hongkongensis is a Gram-negative, sea gull-shaped rod associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis. The bacterium has been found in diverse freshwater environments including fish, frogs and drinking water reservoirs. Using the complete genome sequence data of L. hongkongensis, we performed a comprehensive analysis of putative transport-related genes and genes related to chemotaxis, motility and quorum sensing, which may help the bacterium adapt to the changing environments and combat harmful substances. Results A genome-wide analysis using Transport Classification Database TCDB, similarity and keyword searches revealed the presence of a large diversity of transporters (n = 457) and genes related to chemotaxis (n = 52) and flagellar biosynthesis (n = 40) in the L. hongkongensis genome. The transporters included those from all seven major transporter categories, which may allow the uptake of essential nutrients or ions, and extrusion of metabolic end products and hazardous substances. L. hongkongensis is unique among closely related members of Neisseriaceae family in possessing higher number of proteins related to transport of ammonium, urea and dicarboxylate, which may reflect the importance of nitrogen and dicarboxylate metabolism in this assacharolytic bacterium. Structural modeling of two C4-dicarboxylate transporters showed that they possessed similar structures to the determined structures of other DctP-TRAP transporters, with one having an unusual disulfide bond. Diverse mechanisms for iron transport, including hemin transporters for iron acquisition from host proteins, were also identified. In addition to the chemotaxis and flagella-related genes, the L. hongkongensis genome also contained two copies of qseB/qseC homologues of the AI-3 quorum sensing system. Conclusions The large number of diverse transporters and genes involved in chemotaxis, motility and quorum sensing suggested that the bacterium may utilize a complex system to

  16. Adaptation of nutrient supply to fetal demand in the mouse involves interaction between the Igf2 gene and placental transporter systems

    PubMed Central

    Constância, Miguel; Angiolini, Emily; Sandovici, Ionel; Smith, Paul; Smith, Rachel; Kelsey, Gavin; Dean, Wendy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne; Sibley, Colin P.; Reik, Wolf; Fowden, Abigail

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian fetus is unique in its dependence during gestation on the supply of maternal nutrients through the placenta. Maternal supply and fetal demand for nutrients need to be fine tuned for healthy growth and development of the fetus along its genetic trajectory. An altered balance between supply and demand can lead to deviations from this trajectory with long-term consequences for health. We have previously shown that in a knockout lacking the imprinted placental-specific Igf2 transcript (P0), growth of the placenta is compromised from early gestation but fetal growth is normal until late gestation, suggesting functional adaptation of the placenta to meet the fetal demands. Here, we show that placental transport of glucose and amino acids are increased in the Igf2 P0+/- null and that this up-regulation of transport occurs, at least in part, through increased expression of the transporter genes Slc2a3 and Slc38a4, the imprinted member of the System A amino acid transporter gene family. Decreasing fetal demand genetically by removal of fetal Igf2 abolished up-regulation of both transport systems and reduced placental System A amino acid transport activity and expression of Slc38a2 in late gestation. Our results provide direct evidence that the placenta can respond to fetal demand signals through regulation of expression of specific placental transport systems. Thus, crosstalk between an imprinted growth demand gene (Igf2) and placental supply transporter genes (Slc38a4, Slc38a2, and Slc2a3) may be a component of the genetic control of nutrient supply and demand during mammalian development. PMID:16365304

  17. Isolation of a spontaneous CHO amino acid transport mutant by a combination of tritium suicide and replica plating

    SciTech Connect

    Dantzig, A.H.; Slayman, C.W.; Adelberg, E.A.

    1982-07-01

    A spontaneous transport mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells, CHY-1, was isolated by a combination of (/sup 3/H)proline suicide and replica plating. The mutant took up less tritium than the parent, resulting in a lower killing rate during storage. Transport by four separate amino acid transport systems (A, ASC, L, Ly+) was examined. The CHY-1 mutant exhibited normal uptake via the ASC, L, and Ly+ systems. By contrast, uptake of the most specific substrate of the A system, 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid, was significantly reduced at low, but not high, concentrations, due to a 3.5-fold increase in Km and a 1.5-fold increase in Vmax. Taken together, these data suggest that the CHY-1 mutation may be in the structural gene coding for the A transport protein. The tritium suicide procedure is discussed, and general equations are derived to predict the maximum storage time for the survival of one mutant cell and the optimum size of the cell population for maximum mutant enrichment.

  18. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  19. The rice OsLpa1 gene encodse a novel protein involved in phytic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice low phytic acid 1 (OsLpa1) gene was originally identified using a forward genetics approach. Mutation of this gene resulted in a 45% reduction in rice seed phytic acid with a molar-equivalent increase in inorganic phosphorus; however, the rice lpa1 mutant does not appear to differ significa...

  20. Identifying and assessing the impact of wine acid-related genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chidi, Boredi S; Rossouw, Debra; Bauer, Florian F

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for winemaking show a wide range of fermentation phenotypes, and the genetic background of individual strains contributes significantly to the organoleptic properties of wine. This strain-dependent impact extends to the organic acid composition of the wine, an important quality parameter. However, little is known about the genes which may impact on organic acids during grape must fermentation. To generate novel insights into the genetic regulation of this metabolic network, a subset of genes was identified based on a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes and organic acid profiles of different yeast strains showing different production levels of organic acids. These genes showed significant inter-strain differences in their transcription levels at one or more stages of fermentation and were also considered likely to influence organic acid metabolism based on existing functional annotations. Genes selected in this manner were ADH3, AAD6, SER33, ICL1, GLY1, SFC1, SER1, KGD1, AGX1, OSM1 and GPD2. Yeast strains carrying deletions for these genes were used to conduct fermentations and determine organic acid levels at various stages of alcoholic fermentation in synthetic grape must. The impact of these deletions on organic acid profiles was quantified, leading to novel insights and hypothesis generation regarding the role/s of these genes in wine yeast acid metabolism under fermentative conditions. Overall, the data contribute to our understanding of the roles of selected genes in yeast metabolism in general and of organic acid metabolism in particular. PMID:26040556

  1. Gene expression profiles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) liver after acute exposure to okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nai-sheng; Li, Hong-ye; Liu, Jie-sheng; Yang, Wei-dong

    2014-03-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a main component of diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins, is a strong and specific inhibitor of the serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. However, not all of the OA-induced effects can be explained by this phosphatase inhibition, and controversial results on OA are increasing. To provide clues on potential mechanisms of OA other than phosphatase inhibition, here, acute toxicity of OA was evaluated in zebrafish, and changes in gene expression in zebrafish liver tissues upon exposure to OA were observed by microarray. The i.p. ED50 (6 h) of OA on zebrafish was 1.54 μg OA/g body weight (bw). Among the genes analyzed on the zebrafish array, 55 genes were significantly up-regulated and 36 down-regulated in the fish liver tissue upon exposure to 0.176 μg OA/g bw (low-dose group, LD) compared with the low ethanol control (LE). However, there were no obvious functional clusters for them. On the contrary, fish exposure to 1.760 μg OA/g bw (high-dose group, HD) yielded a great number of differential expressed genes (700 up and 285 down) compared with high ethanol control (HE), which clustered in several functional terms such as p53 signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, glutathione metabolism and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, etc. These genes were involved in protein phosphatase activity, translation factor activity, heat shock protein binding, as well as transmembrane transporter activity. Our findings may give some useful information on the pathways of OA-induced injury in fish. PMID:24637248

  2. Branched-chain-amino-acid biosynthesis in plants: molecular cloning and characterization of the gene encoding acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase (ketol-acid reductoisomerase) from Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress).

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, R; Curien, G; DeRose, R T; Douce, R

    1993-01-01

    Towards the goal of gaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling branched-chain-amino-acid biosynthesis in plants, we have isolated, sequenced and characterized a gene encoding acetohydroxy acid isomero-reductase (ketol-acid reductoisomerase) from Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress). Comparison between the acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase cDNA and the genomic sequence has allowed us to determine the exon structure of the coding region. The isolated acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase gene is distributed over approx. 4.5 kbp and contains nine introns (79-347 bp). The transcriptional start site was found to be 52 bp upstream of the translational initiation site. Southern-blot analysis of A. thaliana genomic DNA shows that the acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase is encoded by a single-copy gene. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8379936

  3. Ion Transport Dynamics in Acid Variable Charge Subsoils

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Sumner, Malcolm E.; Toma, Mitsuru

    2005-06-06

    This is a mini-review of the research work conducted by the authors with the objective of studying ion transport in variable charge subsoils collected from different areas around the world. An attempt is made in these studies to relate the unique behavior manifested during ionic transport in these subsoils with their mineralogical, physical and chemical properties, which are markedly different from those in soils from temperate regions. The variable charge subsoils have a relatively high salt sorption capacity and anion exchange capacity (AEC) that retards anions downward movement. The AEC correlates closely with the anion retardation coefficients. Ca2+ applied with gypsum in topsoil may be transported to the subsoil and may improve the subsoil chemical properties. These results may help in developing appropriate management strategies under a range of mineralogical, physical, and chemical conditions.

  4. The SLC36 family of proton-coupled amino acid transporters and their potential role in drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, David T; Anderson, Catriona MH

    2011-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier (SLC) 36 family are involved in transmembrane movement of amino acids and derivatives. SLC36 consists of four members. SLC36A1 and SLC36A2 both function as H+-coupled amino acid symporters. SLC36A1 is expressed at the luminal surface of the small intestine but is also commonly found in lysosomes in many cell types (including neurones), suggesting that it is a multipurpose carrier with distinct roles in different cells including absorption in the small intestine and as an efflux pathway following intralysosomal protein breakdown. SLC36A1 has a relatively low affinity (Km 1–10 mM) for its substrates, which include zwitterionic amino and imino acids, heterocyclic amino acids and amino acid-based drugs and derivatives used experimentally and/or clinically to treat epilepsy, schizophrenia, bacterial infections, hyperglycaemia and cancer. SLC36A2 is expressed at the apical surface of the human renal proximal tubule where it functions in the reabsorption of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. SLC36A2 also transports amino acid derivatives but has a narrower substrate selectivity and higher affinity (Km 0.1–0.7 mM) than SLC36A1. Mutations in SLC36A2 lead to hyperglycinuria and iminoglycinuria. SLC36A3 is expressed only in testes and is an orphan transporter with no known function. SLC36A4 is widely distributed at the mRNA level and is a high-affinity (Km 2–3 µM) transporter for proline and tryptophan. We have much to learn about this family of transporters, but from current knowledge, it seems likely that their function will influence the pharmacokinetic profiles of amino acid-based drugs by mediating transport in both the small intestine and kidney. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Transporters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-7 PMID:21501141

  5. Self-assembled ternary complexes stabilized with hyaluronic acid-green tea catechin conjugates for targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kun; Bae, Ki Hyun; Lee, Fan; Xu, Keming; Chung, Joo Eun; Gao, Shu Jun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2016-03-28

    Nanosized polyelectrolyte complexes are attractive delivery vehicles for the transfer of therapeutic genes to diseased cells. Here we report the application of self-assembled ternary complexes constructed with plasmid DNA, branched polyethylenimine and hyaluronic acid-green tea catechin conjugates for targeted gene delivery. These conjugates not only stabilize plasmid DNA/polyethylenimine complexes via the strong DNA-binding affinity of green tea catechin, but also facilitate their transport into CD44-overexpressing cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The hydrodynamic size, surface charge and physical stability of the complexes are characterized. We demonstrate that the stabilized ternary complexes display enhanced resistance to nuclease attack and polyanion-induced dissociation. Moreover, the ternary complexes can efficiently transfect the difficult-to-transfect HCT-116 colon cancer cell line even in serum-supplemented media due to their enhanced stability and CD44-targeting ability. Confocal microscopic analysis demonstrates that the stabilized ternary complexes are able to promote the nuclear transport of plasmid DNA more effectively than binary complexes and hyaluronic acid-coated ternary complexes. The present study suggests that the ternary complexes stabilized with hyaluronic acid-green tea catechin conjugates can be widely utilized for CD44-targeted delivery of nucleic acid-based therapeutics. PMID:26855049

  6. Characterization of the role of ABCG2 as a bile acid transporter in liver and placenta.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Alba G; Briz, Oscar; Romero, Marta R; Rosales, Ruben; Monte, Maria J; Vaquero, Javier; Macias, Rocio I R; Cassio, Doris; Marin, Jose J G

    2012-02-01

    ABCG2 is involved in epithelial transport/barrier functions. Here, we have investigated its ability to transport bile acids in liver and placenta. Cholylglycylamido fluorescein (CGamF) was exported by WIF-B9/R cells, which do not express the bile salt export pump (BSEP). Sensitivity to typical inhibitors suggested that CGamF export was mainly mediated by ABCG2. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells), coexpression of rat Oatp1a1 and human ABCG2 enhanced the uptake and efflux, respectively, of CGamF, cholic acid (CA), glycoCA (GCA), tauroCA, and taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate. The ability of ABCG2 to export these bile acids was confirmed by microinjecting them together with inulin in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing this pump. ABCG2-mediated bile acid transport was inhibited by estradiol 17β-d-glucuronide and fumitremorgin C. Placental barrier for bile acids accounted for <2-fold increase in fetal cholanemia despite >14-fold increased maternal cholanemia induced by obstructive cholestasis in pregnant rats. In rat placenta, the expression of Abcg2, which was much higher than that of Bsep, was not affected by short-term cholestasis. In pregnant rats, fumitremorgin C did not affect uptake/secretion of GCA by the liver but inhibited its fetal-maternal transfer. Compared with wild-type mice, obstructive cholestasis in pregnant Abcg2(-/-) knockout mice induced similar bile acid accumulation in maternal serum but higher accumulation in placenta, fetal serum, and liver. In conclusion, ABCG2 is able to transport bile acids. The importance of this function depends on the relative expression in the same epithelium of other bile acid exporters. Thus, ABCG2 may play a key role in bile acid transport in placenta, as BSEP does in liver. PMID:22096226

  7. Substrate specificity and transport mechanism of amino-acid transceptor Slimfast from Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Boudko, Dmitri Y; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Rodriguez, Stacy D; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Price, David P; Drake, Lisa L; Hansen, Immo A

    2015-01-01

    Anautogenous mosquitoes depend on vertebrate blood as nutrient source for their eggs. A highly efficient set of membrane transporters mediates the massive movement of nutrient amino acids between mosquito tissues after a blood meal. Here we report the characterization of the amino-acid transporter Slimfast (Slif) from the yellow-fever mosquito Aedes aegypti using codon-optimized heterologous expression. Slif is a well-known component of the target-of-rapamycin signalling pathway and fat body nutrient sensor, but its substrate specificity and transport mechanism were unknown. We found that Slif transports essential cationic and neutral amino acids with preference for arginine. It has an unusual dual-affinity mechanism with only the high affinity being Na(+) dependent. Tissue-specific expression and blood meal-dependent regulation of Slif are consistent with conveyance of essential amino acids from gut to fat body. Slif represents a novel transport system and type of transceptor for sensing and transporting essential amino acids during mosquito reproduction. PMID:26449545

  8. Substrate specificity and transport mechanism of amino-acid transceptor Slimfast from Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Rodriguez, Stacy D.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Price, David P.; Drake, Lisa L.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2015-01-01

    Anautogenous mosquitoes depend on vertebrate blood as nutrient source for their eggs. A highly efficient set of membrane transporters mediates the massive movement of nutrient amino acids between mosquito tissues after a blood meal. Here we report the characterization of the amino-acid transporter Slimfast (Slif) from the yellow-fever mosquito Aedes aegypti using codon-optimized heterologous expression. Slif is a well-known component of the target-of-rapamycin signalling pathway and fat body nutrient sensor, but its substrate specificity and transport mechanism were unknown. We found that Slif transports essential cationic and neutral amino acids with preference for arginine. It has an unusual dual-affinity mechanism with only the high affinity being Na+ dependent. Tissue-specific expression and blood meal-dependent regulation of Slif are consistent with conveyance of essential amino acids from gut to fat body. Slif represents a novel transport system and type of transceptor for sensing and transporting essential amino acids during mosquito reproduction. PMID:26449545

  9. Role for Ion Transport in Porcine Vocal Fold Epithelial Defense to Acid Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Levendoski, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, M. Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Objective The vocal fold epithelium is routinely exposed to gastric contents, including acid and pepsin, during laryngopharyngeal reflux events. The epithelium may possess intrinsic defenses to reflux. The first objective of the current study was to examine whether vocal fold epithelial ion transport is one potential mechanism of defense to gastric contents. The second objective was to determine whether ion transport in response to gastric contents is associated with the secretion of bicarbonate. Study Design Prospective design in excised porcine larynges. Setting Laboratory. Subjects and Methods Porcine vocal folds (N = 56) were exposed on the luminal surface to acid, pepsin, or sham challenges. Ion transport at baseline and following challenge exposure was measured using electrophysiological techniques. To examine specific ion transport mechanisms, vocal folds were pretreated with either a sodium channel blocker or bicarbonate channel blocker. Results Within 60 seconds of acid but not pepsin exposure, there was a significant increase in ion transport. This rapid increase in ion transport was transient and related to bicarbonate secretion. Conclusion The current data suggest that porcine vocal folds immediately increase bicarbonate secretion following exposure to acid. Bicarbonate secretion may act to neutralize acid. These findings contribute to the identification of the mechanisms underlying vocal fold defense to reflux and offer implications for the development of treatments for reflux-induced vocal fold injury. PMID:22086905

  10. Pyrazinamide Induced Rat Cholestatic Liver Injury through Inhibition of FXR Regulatory Effect on Bile Acid Synthesis and Transport.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong-Li; Hassan, Hozeifa M; Zhang, Yun; Dong, Si-Zhe; Ding, Ping-Ping; Wang, Tao; Sun, Li-Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an indispensable first-line drug used for the treatment of tuberculosis which may cause serious hepatotoxicity; however, the mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Cholestasis plays an important role in drug-induced liver injury. Since there were no previous published works reported cholestasis and PZA hepatotoxicity relationship, this study aimed to identify whether PZA can induce liver injury with characterized evidences of cholestasis and to clarify expression changes of proteins related to both bile acid synthesis and transport in PZA-induced liver injury. PZA (2 g/kg) was administered for 7 consecutive days by oral gavage. Results showed there were 2-fold elevation in both ALT and AST serum levels in PZA-treated rats. In addition, a 10-fold increment in serum total bile acid was observed after PZA administration. The mRNA and protein expressions of bile acid synthesis and transport parameters were markedly altered, in which FXR, Bsep, Mrp2, Mdr2, Ostα/β, Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Cyp8b1 were decreased (P < .05), while Mrp3, Ntcp, Oatp1a4, and Cyp7a1 were increased (P < .05). Moreover, treatment with the FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) generated obvious reductions in serum ALT, AST, and TBA levels in PZA-treated rats. Those effects were due to transcriptional regulation of pre-mentioned target genes by OCA. Taken together, these results suggested that PZA-induced cholestatic liver injury was related to FXR inhibition, leading to the dysfunction in bile acid synthesis and transport. PMID:27255380

  11. Differential effects of cyclosporin A on transport of bile acids by rat hepatocytes: relationship to individual serum bile acid levels.

    PubMed

    Azer, S A; Stacey, N H

    1994-02-01

    Cyclosporin A treatment has been reported to induce hepatotoxicity marked by a rise in total serum bile acid and total bilirubin. The mechanism of cyclosporin A-induced hepatotoxicity seems to be related to interference with hepatocellular transport of these substrates although this remains to be fully substantiated. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the hepatocellular uptake of the different bile acids, in the presence of cyclosporin A, is consistent with the changes in their respective individual serum bile acid concentrations. High-performance liquid chromatography has been used to assay individual serum bile acids in cyclosporin A-treated rats at doses of 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg/day for 4 days. Control rats were treated with Cremophor (1 ml/kg/day). At the higher doses, cyclosporin A produced a significant increase in levels of cholic acid, taurocholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and deoxycholic acid compared with controls. Serum glycocholate was unaffected even at the highest dose. Inhibition of initial rate of uptake and accumulation of [14C]cholic acid, [14C]chenodeoxycholic acid, and [14C]deoxycholic acid by isolated rat hepatocytes was consistent with the changes in their respective serum bile acids. Coincubation of rat hepatocytes with unlabeled cholic acid (100 microM), the major serum bile acid in cyclosporin A-treated rats, showed a further inhibitory effect on [14C]cholic acid and [14C]deoxycholic acid accumulation. The initial rate of uptake of [14C]glycocholate was also inhibited. However, accumulation of glycocholic acid did not show significant changes at the longer incubation times (2-30 min). In addition, coincubation of rat hepatocytes with unlabeled cholic acid (100 microM) plus cyclosporin A did not induce any inhibition of glycocholate accumulation. Together, these differences provide an explanation for the unchanged serum levels of glycocholate. In conclusion, the changes in individual serum bile acids in cyclosporin A

  12. Amino Acid Transport Associated to Cluster of Differentiation 98 Heavy Chain (CD98hc) Is at the Cross-road of Oxidative Stress and Amino Acid Availability.

    PubMed

    de la Ballina, Laura R; Cano-Crespo, Sara; González-Muñoz, Elena; Bial, Susanna; Estrach, Soline; Cailleteau, Laurence; Tissot, Floriane; Daniel, Hannelore; Zorzano, Antonio; Ginsberg, Mark H; Palacín, Manuel; Féral, Chloé C

    2016-04-29

    CD98hc functions as an amino acid (AA) transporter (together with another subunit) and integrin signaling enhancer. It is overexpressed in highly proliferative cells in both physiological and pathological conditions. CD98hc deletion induces strong impairment of cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro Here, we investigate CD98hc-associated AA transport in cell survival and proliferation. By using chimeric versions of CD98hc, the two functions of the protein can be uncoupled. Although recovering the CD98hc AA transport capacity restores the in vivo and in vitro proliferation of CD98hc-null cells, reconstitution of the integrin signaling function of CD98hc is unable to restore in vitro proliferation of those cells. CD98hc-associated transporters (i.e. xCT, LAT1, and y(+)LAT2 in wild-type cells) are crucial to control reactive oxygen species and intracellular AA levels, thus sustaining cell survival and proliferation. Moreover, in CD98hc-null cells the deficiency of CD98hc/xCT cannot be compensated, leading to cell death by ferroptosis. Supplementation of culture media with β-mercaptoethanol rescues CD98hc-deficient cell survival. Under such conditions null cells show oxidative stress and intracellular AA imbalance and, consequently, limited proliferation. CD98hc-null cells also present reduced intracellular levels of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAAs and ARO AAs, respectively) and induced expression of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Interestingly, external supply of dipeptides containing BCAAs and ARO AAs rescues cell proliferation and compensates for impaired uptake of CD98hc/LAT1 and CD98hc/y(+)LAT2. Our data establish CD98hc as a master protective gene at the cross-road of redox control and AA availability, making it a relevant therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:26945935

  13. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  14. Herbivory-induced glucose transporter gene expression in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Shingo; Nakamura, Yuki; Hattori, Makoto; Sato, Ryoichi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Noda, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Nilaparvata lugens, the brown planthopper (BPH) feeds on rice phloem sap, containing high amounts of sucrose as a carbon source. Nutrients such as sugars in the digestive tract are incorporated into the body cavity via transporters with substrate selectivity. Eighteen sugar transporter genes of BPH (Nlst) were reported and three transporters have been functionally characterized. However, individual characteristics of NlST members associated with sugar transport remain poorly understood. Comparative gene expression analyses using oligo-microarray and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the sugar transporter gene Nlst16 was markedly up-regulated during BPH feeding. Expression of Nlst16 was induced 2 h after BPH feeding on rice plants. Nlst16, mainly expressed in the midgut, appears to be involved in carbohydrate incorporation from the gut cavity into the hemolymph. Nlst1 (NlHT1), the most highly expressed sugar transporter gene in the midgut was not up-regulated during BPH feeding. The biochemical function of NlST16 was shown as facilitative glucose transport along gradients. Glucose uptake activity by NlST16 was higher than that of NlST1 in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. At least two NlST members are responsible for glucose uptake in the BPH midgut, suggesting that the midgut of BPH is equipped with various types of transporters having diversified manner for sugar uptake. PMID:26226652

  15. Myosin 1b Regulates Amino Acid Transport by Associating Transporters with the Apical Plasma Membrane of Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Komaba, Shigeru; Coluccio, Lynne M.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATers) in the brush border of the apical plasma membrane (APM) of renal proximal tubule (PT) cells mediate amino acid transport (AAT). We found that the membrane-associated class I myosin myosin 1b (Myo1b) localized at the apical brush border membrane of PTs. In opossum kidney (OK) 3B/2 epithelial cells, which are derived from PTs, expressed rat Myo1b-GFP colocalized in patched microvilli with expressed mouse V5-tagged SIT1 (SIT1-V5), which mediates neutral amino acid transport in OK cells. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of opossum Myo1b-specific shRNA resulted in knockdown (kd) of Myo1b expression, less SIT1-V5 at the APM as determined by localization studies, and a decrease in neutral AAT as determined by radioactive uptake assays. Myo1b kd had no effect on Pi transport or noticeable change in microvilli structure as determined by rhodamine phalloidin staining. The studies are the first to define a physiological role for Myo1b, that of regulating renal AAT by modulating the association of AATers with the APM. PMID:26361046

  16. Bibliography for acid-rock drainage and selected acid-mine drainage issues related to acid-rock drainage from transportation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-rock drainage occurs through the interaction of rainfall on pyrite-bearing formations. When pyrite (FeS2) is exposed to oxygen and water in mine workings or roadcuts, the mineral decomposes and sulfur may react to form sulfuric acid, which often results in environmental problems and potential damage to the transportation infrastructure. The accelerated oxidation of pyrite and other sulfidic minerals generates low pH water with potentially high concentrations of trace metals. Much attention has been given to contamination arising from acid mine drainage, but studies related to acid-rock drainage from road construction are relatively limited. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling acid-rock drainage and contaminant transport from roadcuts in Tennessee. The basic components of acid-rock drainage resulting from transportation activities are described and a bibliography, organized by relevant categories (remediation, geochemical, microbial, biological impact, and secondary mineralization) is presented.

  17. Microsomal Omega-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes in Low Linolenic Acid Soybean Line RG10 and Validation of Major Linolenic Acid QTL

    PubMed Central

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Pauls, K. Peter

    2016-01-01

    High levels of linolenic acid (80 g kg−1) are associated with the development of off-flavors and poor stability in soybean oil. The development of low linolenic acid lines such as RG10 (20 g kg−1 linolenic acid) can reduce these problems. The level of linolenic acid in seed oil is determined by the activities of microsomal omega-3 fatty acid desaturases (FAD3). A major linolenic acid QTL (>70% of variation) on linkage group B2 (chromosome Gm14) was previously detected in a recombinant inbred line population from the RG10 × OX948 cross. The objectives of this study were to validate the major linolenic acid QTL in an independent population and characterize all the soybean FAD3 genes. Four FAD3 genes were sequenced and localized in RG10 and OX948 and compared to the genes in the reference Williams 82 genome. The FAD3A gene sequences mapped to the locus Glyma.14g194300 [on the chromosome Gm14 (B2)], which is syntenic to the FAD3B gene (locus Glyma.02g227200) on the chromosome Gm02 (D1b). The location of the FAD3A gene is the same as was previously determined for the fan allele, that conditions low linolenic acid content and several linolenic acid QTL, including Linolen 3-3, mapped previously with the RG10 × OX948 population and confirmed in the PI 361088B × OX948 population as Linolen-PO (FAD3A). The FAD3B gene-based marker, developed previously, was mapped to the chromosome Gm02 (D1b) in a region containing a newly detected linolenic acid QTL [Linolen-RO(FAD3B)] in the RG10 × OX948 genetic map and corresponds well with the in silico position of the FAD3B gene sequences. FAD3C and FAD3D gene sequences, mapped to syntenic regions on chromosomes Gm18 (locus Glyma.18g062000) and Gm11 (locus Glyma.11g227200), respectively. Association of linolenic acid QTL with the desaturase genes FAD3A and FAD3B, their validation in an independent population, and development of FAD3 gene-specific markers should simplify and accelerate breeding for low linolenic acid soybean

  18. The solute carrier family 10 (SLC10): beyond bile acid transport

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Polli, James E.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier (SLC) family 10 (SLC10) comprises influx transporters of bile acids, steroidal hormones, various drugs, and several other substrates. Because the seminal transporters of this family, namely, sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2), were primarily bile acid transporters, the term “sodium bile salt cotransporting family” was used for the SLC10 family. However, this notion became obsolete with the finding of other SLC10 members that do not transport bile acids. For example, the sodium-dependent organic anion transporter (SOAT; SLC10A6) transports primarily sulfated steroids. Moreover, NTCP was shown to also transport steroids and xenobiotics, including HMG-CoA inhibitors (statins). The SLC10 family contains four additional members, namely, P3 (SLC10A3; SLC10A3), P4 (SLC10A4; SLC10A4), P5 (SLC10A5; SLC10A5) and SLC10A7 (SLC10A7), several of which were unknown or considered hypothetical until approximately a decade ago. While their substrate specificity remains undetermined, great progress has been made towards their characterization in recent years. SLC10A4 may participate in vesicular storage or exocytosis of neurotransmitters or mastocyte mediators, whereas SLC10A5 and SLC10A7 may be involved in solute transport and SLC10A3 may have a role as a housekeeping protein. Finally, the newly found role of bile acids in glucose and energy homeostasis, via the TGR5 receptor, sheds new light on the clinical relevance of ASBT and NTCP. The present mini-review provides a brief summary of recent progress on members of the SLC10 family. PMID:23506869

  19. Growth of embryo and gene expression of nutrient transporters in the small intestine of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia)*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-xia; Li, Xiang-guang; Yang, Jun-xian; Gao, Chun-qi; Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiu-qi; Yan, Hui-chao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between gene expression of nutrient (amino acid, peptide, sodium and proton) transporters in the small intestine and embryonic growth in domestic pigeons (Columba livia). One hundred and twenty-five fertilized eggs were randomly assigned into five groups and were incubated under optimal conditions (temperature of 38.1 °C and relative humidity of 55%). Twenty embryos/birds from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation on embryonic day (E) 9, 11, 13, 15 and day of hatch (DOH). The eggs, embryos (without yolk sac), and organs (head, brain, heart, liver, lungs, kidney, gizzard, small intestine, legs, and thorax) were dissected, cleaned, and weighed. Small intestine samples were collected for RNA isolation. The mRNA abundance of intestinal nutrient transporters was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We classified these ten organs into four types according to the changes in relative weight during embryonic development. In addition, the gene expression of nutrient transporters was differentially regulated by embryonic day. The mRNA abundances of b0,+AT, EAAT3, y+LAT2, PepT1, LAT4, NHE2, and NHE3 increased linearly with age, whereas mRNA abundances of CAT1, CAT2, LAT1, EAAT2, SNAT1, and SNAT2 were increased to higher levels on E9 or E11 and then decreased to lower levels until DOH. The results of correlation analysis showed that the gene expressions of b0,+AT, EAAT3, PepT1, LAT4, NHE2, NHE3, and y+LAT2 had positive correlations with body weight (0.71gene expressions of b0,+AT, EAAT3, LAT4, PepT1, NHE2, NHE3, and y+LAT2 showed positive correlations with intestinal weight (0.80

  20. Growth of embryo and gene expression of nutrient transporters in the small intestine of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-xia; Li, Xiang-guang; Yang, Jun-xian; Gao, Chun-qi; Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiu-qi; Yan, Hui-chao

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between gene expression of nutrient (amino acid, peptide, sodium and proton) transporters in the small intestine and embryonic growth in domestic pigeons (Columba livia). One hundred and twenty-five fertilized eggs were randomly assigned into five groups and were incubated under optimal conditions (temperature of 38.1 °C and relative humidity of 55%). Twenty embryos/birds from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation on embryonic day (E) 9, 11, 13, 15 and day of hatch (DOH). The eggs, embryos (without yolk sac), and organs (head, brain, heart, liver, lungs, kidney, gizzard, small intestine, legs, and thorax) were dissected, cleaned, and weighed. Small intestine samples were collected for RNA isolation. The mRNA abundance of intestinal nutrient transporters was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We classified these ten organs into four types according to the changes in relative weight during embryonic development. In addition, the gene expression of nutrient transporters was differentially regulated by embryonic day. The mRNA abundances of b(0,+)AT, EAAT3, y(+)LAT2, PepT1, LAT4, NHE2, and NHE3 increased linearly with age, whereas mRNA abundances of CAT1, CAT2, LAT1, EAAT2, SNAT1, and SNAT2 were increased to higher levels on E9 or E11 and then decreased to lower levels until DOH. The results of correlation analysis showed that the gene expressions of b(0,+)AT, EAAT3, PepT1, LAT4, NHE2, NHE3, and y(+)LAT2 had positive correlations with body weight (0.71gene expressions of b(0,+)AT, EAAT3, LAT4, PepT1, NHE2, NHE3, and y(+)LAT2 showed positive correlations with intestinal weight (0.80

  1. PARAMETRIC METHODOLOGIES OF CLOUD VERTICAL TRANSPORT FOR ACID DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A CUmulus VENTing (CUVENT) cloud module has been developed that calculates the vertical flux of mass from the boundary layer to the cloud layer by an ensemble of nonprecipitating subgrid-scale air mass clouds. This model will be integrated into the Regional Acid Deposition Model ...

  2. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic sugar transporter genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-29

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for transporting sugars across cell membranes using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  3. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic sugar transporter genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-05

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for transporting sugars across cell membranes using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  4. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic sugar transporter genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-15

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for transporting sugars across cell membranes using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  5. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic sugar transporter genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-12-06

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for transporting sugars across cell membranes using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  6. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic sugar transporter genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-06-14

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for transporting sugars across cell membranes using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  7. The glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family: physiological and pharmacological implications.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-10-31

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) is composed of five high affinity glutamate transporters, which exhibit the properties of the previously described system XAG-, as well as two Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporters with characteristics of the so-called "ASC" (alanine, serine and cysteine). The SLC1 family members are structurally similar, with almost identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane topologies. The transporters have eight transmembrane domains and a structure reminiscent of a pore loop between the seventh and eighth domains [Neuron 21 (1998) 623]. However, each of these transporters exhibits distinct functional properties. Glutamate transporters mediate transport of L-Glu, L-Asp and D-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na+ and one 1 H+, and the countertransport of 1 K+, whereas ASC transporters mediate Na+-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. Given the high concentrating capacity provided by the unique ion coupling pattern of glutamate transporters, they play crucial roles in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). The regulation and manipulation of their function is a critical issue in the pathogenesis and treatment of CNS disorders involving glutamate excitotoxicity. Loss of function of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), resulting in damage of adjacent motor neurons. The importance of glial glutamate transporters in protecting neurons from extracellular glutamate was further demonstrated in studies of the slc1A2 glutamate transporter knockout mouse. The findings suggest that therapeutic upregulation of GLT1 may be beneficial in a variety of pathological conditions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) but not the glial glutamate transporters may be of therapeutic interest, allowing blockage of glutamate exit from

  8. The PH gene determines fruit acidity and contributes to the evolution of sweet melons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acids are one of the three major components of fleshy fruit taste, together with sugars and volatile flavor compounds. However, the molecular-genetic control of acid accumulation in fruit is poorly understood and, to date, no genes responsible for acid accumulation in fleshy fruit have been function...

  9. Biosynthesis of Essential Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Wheat Triggered by Expression of Artificial Gene.

    PubMed

    Mihálik, Daniel; Klčová, Lenka; Ondreičková, Katarína; Hudcovicová, Martina; Gubišová, Marcela; Klempová, Tatiana; Čertík, Milan; Pauk, János; Kraic, Ján

    2015-01-01

    The artificial gene D6D encoding the enzyme ∆⁶desaturase was designed and synthesized using the sequence of the same gene from the fungus Thamnidium elegans. The original start codon was replaced by the signal sequence derived from the wheat gene for high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit and the codon usage was completely changed for optimal expression in wheat. Synthesized artificial D6D gene was delivered into plants of the spring wheat line CY-45 and the gene itself, as well as transcribed D6D mRNA were confirmed in plants of T₀ and T₁ generations. The desired product of the wheat genetic modification by artificial D6D gene was the γ-linolenic acid. Its presence was confirmed in mature grains of transgenic wheat plants in the amount 0.04%-0.32% (v/v) of the total amount of fatty acids. Both newly synthesized γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid have been detected also in leaves, stems, roots, awns, paleas, rachillas, and immature grains of the T₁ generation as well as in immature and mature grains of the T₂ generation. Contents of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid varied in range 0%-1.40% (v/v) and 0%-1.53% (v/v) from the total amount of fatty acids, respectively. This approach has opened the pathway of desaturation of fatty acids and production of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids in wheat. PMID:26694368

  10. Biosynthesis of Essential Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Wheat Triggered by Expression of Artificial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Mihálik, Daniel; Klčová, Lenka; Ondreičková, Katarína; Hudcovicová, Martina; Gubišová, Marcela; Klempová, Tatiana; Čertík, Milan; Pauk, János; Kraic, Ján

    2015-01-01

    The artificial gene D6D encoding the enzyme ∆6desaturase was designed and synthesized using the sequence of the same gene from the fungus Thamnidium elegans. The original start codon was replaced by the signal sequence derived from the wheat gene for high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit and the codon usage was completely changed for optimal expression in wheat. Synthesized artificial D6D gene was delivered into plants of the spring wheat line CY-45 and the gene itself, as well as transcribed D6D mRNA were confirmed in plants of T0 and T1 generations. The desired product of the wheat genetic modification by artificial D6D gene was the γ-linolenic acid. Its presence was confirmed in mature grains of transgenic wheat plants in the amount 0.04%–0.32% (v/v) of the total amount of fatty acids. Both newly synthesized γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid have been detected also in leaves, stems, roots, awns, paleas, rachillas, and immature grains of the T1 generation as well as in immature and mature grains of the T2 generation. Contents of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid varied in range 0%–1.40% (v/v) and 0%–1.53% (v/v) from the total amount of fatty acids, respectively. This approach has opened the pathway of desaturation of fatty acids and production of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids in wheat. PMID:26694368

  11. Role of ion transporters in the bile acid-induced esophageal injury.

    PubMed

    Laczkó, Dorottya; Rosztóczy, András; Birkás, Klaudia; Katona, Máté; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Róka, Richárd; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter; Venglovecz, Viktória

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is considered to be the most severe complication of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which the prolonged, repetitive episodes of combined acidic and biliary reflux result in the replacement of the squamous esophageal lining by columnar epithelium. Therefore, the acid-extruding mechanisms of esophageal epithelial cells (EECs) may play an important role in the defense. Our aim was to identify the presence of acid/base transporters on EECs and to investigate the effect of bile acids on their expressions and functions. Human EEC lines (CP-A and CP-D) were acutely exposed to bile acid cocktail (BAC) and the changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were measured by microfluorometry. mRNA and protein expression of ion transporters was investigated by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We have identified the presence of a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC), and a Cl(-)-dependent HCO3 (-) secretory mechanism in CP-A and CP-D cells. Acute administration of BAC stimulated HCO3 (-) secretion in both cell lines and the NHE activity in CP-D cells by an inositol triphosphate-dependent calcium release. Chronic administration of BAC to EECs increased the expression of ion transporters compared with nontreated cells. A similar expression pattern was observed in biopsy samples from BE compared with normal epithelium. We have shown that acute administration of bile acids differently alters ion transport mechanisms of EECs, whereas chronic exposure to bile acids increases the expression of acid/base transporters. We speculate that these adaptive processes of EECs represent an important mucosal defense against the bile acid-induced epithelial injury. PMID:27198194

  12. Novel ABC Transporter Gene, vga(C), Located on a Multiresistance Plasmid from a Porcine Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Strain ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kadlec, Kristina; Schwarz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    A novel ABC transporter gene, vga(C), was identified on the 14,365-bp multiresistance plasmid pKKS825 in a porcine methicillin (meticillin)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate of sequence type 398. The vga(C) gene encodes a 523-amino-acid protein which confers resistance not only to streptogramin A antibiotics but also to lincosamides and pleuromutilins. Plasmid pKKS825 also carries the resistance genes aadD, tet(L), and dfrK, which may enable the coselection of vga(C) under selective pressure by kanamycin/neomycin, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim. PMID:19470508

  13. Rco-3, a Gene Involved in Glucose Transport and Conidiation in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Madi, L.; McBride, S. A.; Bailey, L. A.; Ebbole, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Macroconidiation in Neurospora crassa is influenced by a number of environmental cues, including the nutritional status of the growing organism. Conidia formation is normally observed when the fungus is exposed to air. However, carbon limitation can induce conidiation in mycelia submerged in an aerated liquid medium. A mutant was previously isolated that could conidiate in submerged culture without imposing nutrient limitation and the gene responsible for this phenotype (rco-3) has now been cloned. RCO3 exhibits sequence similarity to members of the sugar transporter gene superfamily, with greatest similarity to glucose transporters of yeast. Consistent with this structural similarity, we find that glucose transport activity is altered in the mutant. However, growth of the mutant in media containing alternate carbon sources does not suppress conidiation in submerged culture. The properties of the mutant suggest that RCO3 is required for expression of glucose transport activity, glucose regulation of gene expression, and general carbon repression of development. PMID:9178001

  14. Physiological and regulatory properties of the general amino acid transport system of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, R M; DeBusk, A G

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental properties of the general amino acid transport system of Neurospora crassa were investigated in the conidial stage of the life cycle. The transport activity was found to be under genetic control, and an isogenic set of mutants deficient for the neutral, basic, or general amino acid transport systems and combinations thereof was constructed and used for analyzing the properties specific to the general permease. Amino acid transport by this system was found to be a carrier-mediated active process with broad specificity for the neutral and basic amino acids. Kinetic analysis revealed that a common binding site functioned to transport both neutral and basic amino acids and that the permease had a high affinity for its substrates. The kinetic parameters Km, Vmax, and Ki were defined for several substrates. Two modes of regulation were detected: substrate inhibition and ammonium repression. Activity of the general system was enhanced by the removal of ammonium ions from the incubation medium with a concomitant decline in either neutral or basic permease activity, suggesting that a common component exists between the neutral and the general systems and between the basic and the general systems. PMID:6447141

  15. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  16. Proton-dependent glutamine uptake by aphid bacteriocyte amino acid transporter ApGLNT1.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Wilson, Alex C C; Luetje, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Aphids house large populations of the gammaproteobacterial symbiont Buchnera aphidicola in specialized bacteriocyte cells. The combined biosynthetic capability of the holobiont (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Buchnera) is sufficient for biosynthesis of all twenty protein coding amino acids, including amino acids that animals alone cannot synthesize; and that are present at low concentrations in A. pisum's plant phloem sap diet. Collaborative holobiont amino acid biosynthesis depends on glutamine import into bacteriocytes, which serves as a nitrogen-rich amino donor for biosynthesis of other amino acids. Recently, we characterized A. pisum glutamine transporter 1 (ApGLNT1), a member of the amino acid/auxin permease family, as the dominant bacteriocyte plasma membrane glutamine transporter. Here we show ApGLNT1 to be structurally and functionally related to mammalian proton-dependent amino acid transporters (PATs 1-4). Using functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, combined with two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we demonstrate that ApGLNT1 is electrogenic and that glutamine induces large inward currents. ApGLNT1 glutamine induced currents are dependent on external glutamine concentration, proton (H+) gradient across the membrane, and membrane potential. Based on these transport properties, ApGLNT1-mediated glutamine uptake into A. pisum bacteriocytes can be regulated by changes in either proton gradients across the plasma membrane or membrane potential. PMID:26028424

  17. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  18. Perfluoroalkyl Acid Concentrations in Blood Samples Subjected to Transportation and Processing Delay

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Cathrine Carlsen; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Bossi, Rossana; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Fuglsang, Jens; Olsen, Jørn; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    Background In studies of perfluoroalkyl acids, the validity and comparability of measured concentrations may be affected by differences in the handling of biospecimens. We aimed to investigate whether measured plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl acids differed between blood samples subjected to delay and transportation prior to processing and samples with immediate processing and freezing. Methods Pregnant women recruited at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, (n = 88) provided paired blood samples. For each pair of samples, one was immediately processed and plasma was frozen, and the other was delayed and transported as whole blood before processing and freezing of plasma (similar to the Danish National Birth Cohort). We measured 12 perfluoroalkyl acids and present results for compounds with more than 50% of samples above the lower limit of quantification. Results For samples taken in the winter, relative differences between the paired samples ranged between -77 and +38% for individual perfluoroalkyl acids. In most cases concentrations were lower in the delayed and transported samples, e.g. the relative difference was -29% (95% confidence interval -30; -27) for perfluorooctane sulfonate. For perfluorooctanoate there was no difference between the two setups [corresponding estimate 1% (0, 3)]. Differences were negligible in the summer for all compounds. Conclusions Transport of blood samples and processing delay, similar to conditions applied in some large, population-based studies, may affect measured perfluoroalkyl acid concentrations, mainly when outdoor temperatures are low. Attention to processing conditions is needed in studies of perfluoroalkyl acid exposure in humans. PMID:26356420

  19. Role of uhp genes in expression of the Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Weston, L A; Kadner, R J

    1988-01-01

    The uhpABCT locus of Escherichia coli is responsible for expression of the sugar-phosphate transport system and its induction by external glucose 6-phosphate. Expression of uhpT-lacZ fusions depended on the function of uhpA, uhpB, and uhpC but not of uhpT. A plasmid carrying only uhpT conferred transport activity in a host strain deleted for the uhp region. Thus, uhpT encodes the polypeptide required for transport function, and the other three uhp genes regulate uhpT transcription. The presence of uhpA at elevated copy number resulted in a substantial increase in uhpT expression. This elevated expression was only about 50% of the level seen in induced haploid cells, and no further increase occurred after addition of inducer. Activation by multicopy uhpA was not affected by the status of uhpC but was decreased in the absence of uhpB, suggesting a role for UhpB in directly activating UhpA. Transcription of uhpA, monitored by expression of a uhpA-lacZ fusion, was not affected by either inducer or the presence of the wild-type uhpA allele. The presence of multiple copies of the uhpT promoter region reduced uhpT expression in strains with uhpA in single copy number but not in those with multiple copies, consistent with competition for the activator. Amino acid sequence comparisons showed that UhpA was homologous to a family of bacterial regulatory proteins, some of which act as transcriptional activators (OmpR, PhoB, NtrC, and DctD). The C-terminal portion of UhpB displayed matches to the corresponding portions of another family of proteins (EnvZ, PhoMR, NtrB, and DctB) that participate in regulation of gene expression in response to environmental factors. PMID:3042748

  20. Evidence that the transport-related proteins BAT and 4F2hc are not specific for amino acids: induction of Na+-dependent uridine and pyruvate transport activity by recombinant BAT and 4F2hc expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yao, S Y; Muzyka, W R; Cass, C E; Cheeseman, C I; Young, J D

    1998-01-01

    Members of the BAT and 4F2hc gene family have one or, in the case of BAT, up to four transmembane domains and induce amino acid transport systems b(o,+) (BAT) and y+L (4F2hc) when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. System b(o,+) is a Na+-independent process with a broad tolerance for cationic and zwitterionic amino acids, whereas y+L exhibits Na+-independent transport of cationic amino acids (e.g., lysine) and Na+-dependent transport of zwitterionic amino acids (e.g., leucine). Mutations in the human BAT gene are associated with type I cystinuria, a genetic disease affecting the ability of intestinal and renal brush border membranes to transport cationic amino acids and cystine. An unresolved question is whether BAT and 4F2hc themselves have catalytic (i.e., transporting) activity or whether they operate as activators of other, as yet unidentified, transporter proteins. In this report, we have investigated the transport of representatives of four different classes of organic substrates in Xenopus oocytes following injection with rat BAT or 4F2hc RNA transcripts: leucine (a control amino acid substrate), uridine (a nucleoside), pyruvate (a monocarboxylate), and choline (an amine). Both recombinant proteins induced small, statistically significant Na+-dependent fluxes of uridine and pyruvate but had no effect on choline uptake. In contrast, control oocytes injected with transcripts for conventional nucleoside and cationic amino acid transporters (rat CNT1 and murine CAT1, respectively) showed no induction of transport of either leucine or pyruvate (CNT1) or uridine or pyruvate (CAT1). These findings support the idea that BAT and 4F2hc are transport activators and minimize the possibility that they have intrinsic transport capability. The transport-regulating functions of these proteins may extend to permeants other than amino acids. PMID:10353721

  1. Gene Activation in Eukaryotes: Are Nuclear Acidic Proteins the Cause or the Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear acidic proteins have been implicated in the positive control of gene transcription in eukaryotes. This hypothesis was examined in greater detail by analysis of these proteins during experimental gene activation by a technique for fractionating nuclei into chromatin and the ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous nuclear RNA. When synthesis of rat-liver heterogeneous nuclear RNA was stimulated by administration of hydrocortisone, there was a parallel increase in the labeling of acidic proteins in ribonucleoprotein particles. However, there was no detectable effect on the labeling of either acidic chromatin proteins or histones. Thus, the nuclear acidic proteins that respond to the hormone are concerned with a post-transcriptional event, namely the assembly and processing of ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous RNA, rather than with direct gene activation. Increases in synthesis of “chromatin” acidic proteins during gene activation observed by others may reflect the presence of these ribonucleoprotein particles in crude chromatin preparations. Images PMID:4522777

  2. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX ); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. )

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  3. Induction of nodD Gene in a Betarhizobium Isolate, Cupriavidus sp. of Mimosa pudica, by Root Nodule Phenolic Acids.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Chakraborty, Dipjyoti; Dutta, Suhrid R; Ghosh, Ananta K; Pati, Bikas R; Korpole, Suresh; Paul, Debarati

    2016-06-01

    A range of phenolic acids, viz., p-coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and cinnamic acid have been isolated and identified by LC-MS analysis in the roots and root nodules of Mimosa pudica. The effects of identified phenolic acids on the regulation of nodulation (nod) genes have been evaluated in a betarhizobium isolate of M. pudica root nodule. Protocatechuic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid were most effective in inducing nod gene, whereas caffeic acid had no significant effect. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase activities were estimated, indicating regulation and metabolism of phenolic acids in root nodules. These results showed that nodD gene expression of betarhizobium is regulated by simple phenolic acids such as protocatechuic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid present in host root nodule and sustains nodule organogenesis. PMID:26897126

  4. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  5. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. PMID:25912312

  6. Fecal bile acid excretion and messenger RNA expression levels of ileal transporters in high risk gallstone patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cholesterol gallstone disease (GS) is highly prevalent among Hispanics and American Indians. In GS, the pool of bile acids (BA) is decreased, suggesting that BA absorption is impaired. In Caucasian GS patients, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporters are decreased. We aimed to determine fecal BA excretion rates, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporter genes and of regulatory genes of BA synthesis in Hispanic GS patients. Results Excretion of fecal BA was measured in seven GS females and in ten GS-free individuals, all with a body mass index < 29. Participants ingested the stool marker Cr2O3 (300 mg/day) for 10 days, and fecal specimens were collected on the last 3 days. Chromium was measured by a colorimetric method, and BA was quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Intake of calories, nutrients, fiber and cholesterol were similar in the GS and GS-free subjects. Mean BA excretion levels were 520 ± 80 mg/day for the GS-free group, and 461 ± 105 mg/day for the GS group. Messenger RNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR on biopsy samples obtained from ileum during diagnostic colonoscopy (14 GS-free controls and 16 GS patients) and from liver during surgery performed at 8 and 10 AM (12 GS and 10 GS-free patients operated on for gastrointestinal malignancies), all with a body mass index < 29. Messenger RNA level of the BA transporter genes for ileal lipid binding protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, organic solute transporter alpha, and organic solute transporter beta were similar in GS and GS-free subjects. Messenger RNA level of Cyp27A1, encoding the enzyme 27α-hydroxylase, the short heterodimer partner and farnesoid X receptor remained unchanged, whereas the mRNA level of Cyp7A1, the rate limiting step of BA synthesis, was increased more than 400% (p < 0.01) in the liver of GS compared to GS-free subjects. Conclusion Hispanics with GS have fecal BA excretion rates and mRNA levels of genes for ileal BA transporters that

  7. Functional expression of a Δ12 fatty acid desaturase gene from spinach in transgenic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Kinoshita, Mikio; Suzuki, Iwane; Tasaka, Yasushi; Kano, Koichiro; Taguchi, Yoshitomo; Mikami, Koji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Kashiwazaki, Naomi; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Murata, Norio; Iritani, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Linoleic acid (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) are polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for mammalian nutrition, because mammals lack the desaturases required for synthesis of Δ12 (n-6) and n-3 fatty acids. Many plants can synthesize these fatty acids and, therefore, to examine the effects of a plant desaturase in mammals, we generated transgenic pigs that carried the fatty acid desaturation 2 gene for a Δ12 fatty acid desaturase from spinach. Levels of linoleic acid (18:2n-6) in adipocytes that had differentiated in vitro from cells derived from the transgenic pigs were ≈10 times higher than those from wild-type pigs. In addition, the white adipose tissue of transgenic pigs contained ≈20% more linoleic acid (18:2n-6) than that of wild-type pigs. These results demonstrate the functional expression of a plant gene for a fatty acid desaturase in mammals, opening up the possibility of modifying the fatty acid composition of products from domestic animals by transgenic technology, using plant genes for fatty acid desaturases. PMID:15067141

  8. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT2 PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P < 0.00263). In RSM in IBS-D patients compared with controls, mRNA expression of GUC2AB, PDZD3, and PR2Y4 was increased, whereas CLDN1 and FN1 were decreased. One immune-related gene was upregulated (C4BP4) and one downregulated (CCL20). There was increased expression of a selected ion transport protein (PDZD3) on immunohistochemistry and Western blot in IBS-D compared with controls (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in mucosal mRNA in 20 IBS-D patients with high compared with 27 IBS-D patients with normal BA excretion. GPBAR1 (P < 0.05) was associated with colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion. PMID:25930081

  9. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-07-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT(2) PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥ 2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P < 0.00263). In RSM in IBS-D patients compared with controls, mRNA expression of GUC2AB, PDZD3, and PR2Y4 was increased, whereas CLDN1 and FN1 were decreased. One immune-related gene was upregulated (C4BP4) and one downregulated (CCL20). There was increased expression of a selected ion transport protein (PDZD3) on immunohistochemistry and Western blot in IBS-D compared with controls (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in mucosal mRNA in 20 IBS-D patients with high compared with 27 IBS-D patients with normal BA excretion. GPBAR1 (P < 0.05) was associated with colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion. PMID:25930081

  10. Disruption of a sugar transporter gene cluster in a hyperthermophilic archaeon using a host-marker system based on antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Rie; Manabe, Kenji; Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a gene disruption system in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis using the antibiotic simvastatin and a fusion gene designed to overexpress the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene (hmg(Tk)) with the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter. With this system, we disrupted the T. kodakaraensis amylopullulanase gene (apu(Tk)) or a gene cluster which includes apu(Tk) and genes encoding components of a putative sugar transporter. Disruption plasmids were introduced into wild-type T. kodakaraensis KOD1 cells, and transformants exhibiting resistance to 4 microM simvastatin were isolated. The transformants exhibited growth in the presence of 20 microM simvastatin, and we observed a 30-fold increase in intracellular HMG-CoA reductase activity. The expected gene disruption via double-crossover recombination occurred at the target locus, but we also observed recombination events at the hmg(Tk) locus when the endogenous hmg(Tk) gene was used. This could be avoided by using the corresponding gene from Pyrococcus furiosus (hmg(Pf)) or by linearizing the plasmid prior to transformation. While both gene disruption strains displayed normal growth on amino acids or pyruvate, cells without the sugar transporter genes could not grow on maltooligosaccharides or polysaccharides, indicating that the gene cluster encodes the only sugar transporter involved in the uptake of these compounds. The Deltaapu(Tk) strain could not grow on pullulan and displayed only low levels of growth on amylose, suggesting that Apu(Tk) is a major polysaccharide-degrading enzyme in T. kodakaraensis. PMID:17259314

  11. Photosynthetic electron transport controls nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria by means of posttranslational modification of the glnB gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Tsinoremas, N F; Castets, A M; Harrison, M A; Allen, J F; Tandeau de Marsac, N

    1991-01-01

    A glnB gene is identified in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942, and its gene product is found to be covalently modified as a result of imbalance in electron transfer in photosynthesis, where photosystem II is favored over photosystem I. The gene was cloned and sequenced and found to encode a polypeptide of 112 amino acid residues, whose sequence shows a high degree of similarity to the Escherichia coli regulatory protein, PII. In E. coli, PII is involved in signal transduction in transcriptional and post-translational regulation of nitrogen assimilation. Increase in ammonium ion concentration is shown to decrease covalent modification of the Synechococcus PII protein, as in enteric bacteria. We therefore propose that the photosynthetic electron transport chain may regulate the pathway of nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria by means of posttranslational, covalent modification of the glnB gene product. The existence of the glnB gene in different strains of cyanobacteria is demonstrated and its implications are discussed. Images PMID:1905010

  12. The identification of oppA gene homologues as part of the oligopeptide transport system in mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Wium, Martha; Botes, Annelise; Bellstedt, Dirk U

    2015-03-01

    The lack of an annotated oppA gene as part of many oligopeptide permease (opp) operons has questioned the necessity of the oligopeptide-binding domain (OppA) as a part of the Opp transport system in mycoplasmas. This study investigated the occurrence of an oppA gene as part of the oppBCDF operon in 42 mycoplasma genomes. Except for hemoplasma, all mycoplasmas were found to possess one or more copies of the oppBCDF operon and with the help of similarity searches their oppA genes could be identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined OppABCDF amino acid sequences allowed them to be grouped into three types. Each type has a unique set of conserved motifs, which are likely to reflect substrate preference and adaption strategies. Our approach allowed the identification of oppA gene homologues for all mycoplasma opp operons and thereby provides a method for re-evaluating the current annotation of oppA genes in mycoplasma genomes. PMID:25528211

  13. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 is involved in bile acid homeostasis by modulating fatty acid transport protein-5 in the liver of micea

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Carlos A.; Morgan, Stuart A.; Rose, Adam J.; Herzig, Stephan; Lavery, Gareth G.; Odermatt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1) plays a key role in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Besides, it metabolizes some oxysterols and bile acids (BAs). The GR regulates BA homeostasis; however, the impact of impaired 11β-HSD1 activity remained unknown. We profiled plasma and liver BAs in liver-specific and global 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. 11β-HSD1-deficiency resulted in elevated circulating unconjugated BAs, an effect more pronounced in global than liver-specific knockout mice. Gene expression analyses revealed decreased expression of the BA-CoA ligase Fatp5, suggesting impaired BA amidation. Reduced organic anion-transporting polypeptide-1A1 (Oatp1a1) and enhanced organic solute-transporter-β (Ostb) mRNA expression were observed in livers from global 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. The impact of 11β-HSD1-deficiency on BA homeostasis seems to be GR-independent because intrahepatic corticosterone and GR target gene expression were not substantially decreased in livers from global knockout mice. Moreover, Fatp5 expression in livers from hepatocyte-specific GR knockout mice was unchanged. The results revealed a role for 11β-HSD1 in BA homeostasis. PMID:25061560

  14. Gene expression profile of Xenopus A6 cells cultured under random positioning machine shows downregulation of ion transporter genes and inhibition of dome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuzawa, Masayuki; Akiduki, Saori; Asashima, Makoto

    Random positioning machine (RPM) devices that generate a simulated microgravity environment of approximately 0 g prevent the formation of dome structures in Xenopus kidney-derived A6 cells. In the present study, the gene expression profile of A6 cells cultured under RPM was determined using the Xenopus 22K scale microarray, and those genes up- or downregulated twofold or more were investigated. We identified 29 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 4 genes) on day 5, 68 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 43 genes) on day 8, 111 genes (up, 69 genes; down, 42 genes) on day 10, and 283 genes (up, 153 genes; down, 130 genes) on day 15 of culture under RPM. These genes were classified according to categories described in the KOG database, such as "extracellular structure", "cytoskeleton", and "transcription". Almost all the genes involved in "inorganic ion transport and metabolism" were downregulated under RPM. Our study further investigated some of these including the epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) and Na +/K +-ATPase transporter genes. A specific inhibitor of Na +/K +-ATPases, ouabain, inhibited dome formation in the A6 cells, even under control culturing conditions of 1 g (the static condition). Together these data suggested that downregulation of sodium ion transporter gene expression plays a significant role in the RPM-dependent prevention of the dome formation in kidney epithelial cells.

  15. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Jessica A; Rickel, Kirby E; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A; Carlisle, Gabriel B; Nelson, Heidi J; Cardillo, Andrew L; Weber, Emily A; Vitiello, Peter F; Pearce, David A; Vitiello, Seasson P

    2016-01-01

    Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  16. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Jessica A.; Rickel, Kirby E.; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A.; Carlisle, Gabriel B.; Nelson, Heidi J.; Cardillo, Andrew L.; Weber, Emily A.; Vitiello, Peter F.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  17. The gusBC Genes of Escherichia coli Encode a Glucuronide Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wei-Jun; Wilson, Kate J.; Xie, Hao; Knol, Jan; Suzuki, Shun'ichi; Rutherford, Nicholas G.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Jefferson, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Two genes, gusB and gusC, from a natural fecal isolate of Escherichia coli are shown to encode proteins responsible for transport of β-glucuronides with synthetic [14C]phenyl-1-thio-β-d-glucuronide as the substrate. These genes are located in the gus operon downstream of the gusA gene on the E. coli genome, and their expression is induced by a variety of β-d-glucuronides. Measurements of transport in right-side-out subcellular vesicles show the system has the characteristics of secondary active transport energized by the respiration-generated proton motive force. When the genes were cloned together downstream of the tac operator-promoter in the plasmid pTTQ18 expression vector, transport activity was increased considerably with isopropylthiogalactopyranoside as the inducer. Amplified expression of the GusB and GusC proteins enabled visualization and identification by N-terminal sequencing of both proteins, which migrated at ca. 32 kDa and 44 kDa, respectively. Separate expression of the GusB protein showed that it is essential for glucuronide transport and is located in the inner membrane, while the GusC protein does not catalyze transport but assists in an as yet unknown manner and is located in the outer membrane. The output of glucuronides as waste by mammals and uptake for nutrition by gut bacteria or reabsorption by the mammalian host is discussed. PMID:15774881

  18. Hepatic transport of bile acid and effect of conjugation.

    PubMed

    Kitani, K

    1995-06-01

    Biliary transport of bile salts was investigated by measuring: 1) biliary transport maxima values (Tm) for different conjugated bile salts; and 2) biliary excretion of unconjugated bile salts relative to their conjugates under the continuous i.v. infusion of various unconjugated bile salts. The order of Tm values found in the rat of both sexes was tauro (and glyco) ursodeoxycholate (TUDC, GUDC), tauro alpha- and beta-muricholate (T alpha-MC, T beta-MC) > taurocholate(TC) > taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC), while in female hamsters it was TC > TCDC > TUDC. The differences in the Tm order between rats and hamsters cast doubt on the currently proposed view that the apparent Tm values of bile salts are primarily determined by their physical-chemical properties (detergent property in particular). The biliary excretion of unconjugated bile salts was most efficient with ursocholate (UC) and alpha-MC followed by beta-MC, with UDC (and probably 7 ketolithocholate) being the least efficient for excretion. Thus, while for some bile salts such as cholate and UC, the amidation is not a prerequisite to their efficient excretion, for other bile salts such as UDC, the amidation is an excellent mechanism for facilitating the biliary excretion. In an attempt to explain the above order for the efficacy of the biliary excretion of unconjugated bile salts on the basis of their physical-chemical properties, we must remember that unlike rats, the biliary excretion of dehydrocholate and cholate in dogs is more limited than their respective taurine conjugates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8541581

  19. The ABC gene family in arthropods: comparative genomics and role in insecticide transport and resistance.

    PubMed

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    About a 100 years ago, the Drosophila white mutant marked the birth of Drosophila genetics. The white gene turned out to encode the first well studied ABC transporter in arthropods. The ABC gene family is now recognized as one of the largest transporter families in all kingdoms of life. The majority of ABC proteins function as primary-active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP while transporting a large diversity of substrates across lipid membranes. Although extremely well studied in vertebrates for their role in drug resistance, less is known about the role of this family in the transport of endogenous and exogenous substances in arthropods. The ABC families of five insect species, a crustacean and a chelicerate have been annotated in some detail. We conducted a thorough phylogenetic analysis of the seven arthropod and human ABC protein subfamilies, to infer orthologous relationships that might suggest conserved function. Most orthologous relationships were found in the ABCB half transporter, ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies, but specific expansions within species and lineages are frequently observed and discussed. We next surveyed the role of ABC transporters in the transport of xenobiotics/plant allelochemicals and their involvement in insecticide resistance. The involvement of ABC transporters in xenobiotic resistance in arthropods is historically not well documented, but an increasing number of studies using unbiased differential gene expression analysis now points to their importance. We give an overview of methods that can be used to link ABC transporters to resistance. ABC proteins have also recently been implicated in the mode of action and resistance to Bt toxins in Lepidoptera. Given the enormous interest in Bt toxicology in transgenic crops, such findings will provide an impetus to further reveal the role of ABC transporters in arthropods. PMID:24291285

  20. A new role for a classical gene: white transports cyclic GMP.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer M; Day, Jonathan P; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-Anne

    2008-03-01

    Guanosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) are important regulators of cell and tissue function. However, cGMP and cAMP transport have received relatively limited attention, especially in model organisms where such studies can be conducted in vivo. The Drosophila Malpighian (renal) tubule transports cGMP and cAMP and utilises these as signalling molecules. We show here via substrate competition and drug inhibition studies that cAMP transport - but not cGMP transport - requires the presence of di- or tri-carboxylates; and that transport of both cyclic nucleotides occurs via ATP binding cassette sub-family G2 (ABCG2), but not via ABC sub-family C (ABCC), transporters. In Drosophila, the white (w) gene is known for the classic eye colour mutation. However, gene expression data show that of all adult tissues, w is most highly expressed in Malpighian tubules. Furthermore, as White is a member of the ABCG2 transporter class, it is a potential candidate for a tubule cGMP transporter. Assay of cGMP transport in w(-) (mutant) tubules shows that w is required for cGMP transport but not cAMP transport. Targeted over-expression of w in w(-) tubule principal cells significantly increases cGMP transport compared with that in w(-) controls. Conversely, treatment of wild-type tubules with cGMP increases w mRNA expression levels, implying that cGMP is a physiologically relevant substrate for White. Immunocytochemical localisation reveals that White is expressed in intracellular vesicles in tubule principal cells, suggesting that White participates in vesicular transepithelial transport of cGMP. PMID:18310115

  1. Identification of differentially expressed genes in SHSY5Y cells exposed to okadaic acid by suppression subtractive hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Okadaic acid (OA), a toxin produced by several dinoflagellate species is responsible for frequent food poisonings associated to shellfish consumption. Although several studies have documented the OA effects on different processes such as cell transformation, apoptosis, DNA repair or embryogenesis, the molecular mechanistic basis for these and other effects is not completely understood and the number of controversial data on OA is increasing in the literature. Results In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization in SHSY5Y cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed after OA exposure for different times (3, 24 and 48 h). A total of 247 subtracted clones which shared high homology with known genes were isolated. Among these, 5 specific genes associated with cytoskeleton and neurotransmission processes (NEFM, TUBB, SEPT7, SYT4 and NPY) were selected to confirm their expression levels by real-time PCR. Significant down-regulation of these genes was obtained at the short term (3 and 24 h OA exposure), excepting for NEFM, but their expression was similar to the controls at 48 h. Conclusions From all the obtained genes, 114 genes were up-regulated and 133 were down-regulated. Based on the NCBI GenBank and Gene Ontology databases, most of these genes are involved in relevant cell functions such as metabolism, transport, translation, signal transduction and cell cycle. After quantitative PCR analysis, the observed underexpression of the selected genes could underlie the previously reported OA-induced cytoskeleton disruption, neurotransmission alterations and in vivo neurotoxic effects. The basal expression levels obtained at 48 h suggested that surviving cells were able to recover from OA-caused gene expression alterations. PMID:22284234

  2. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH < pK). Steady states were achieved with different extracellular levels of fumaric acid, obtained by adding different amounts of fumaric acid to the feed medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26683700

  3. DeltapH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves: II. Evidence for Multiple Aliphatic, Neutral Amino Acid Symports.

    PubMed

    Li, Z C; Bush, D R

    1991-08-01

    Proton-coupled aliphatic, neutral amino acid transport was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv Great Western) leaves. Two neutral amino acid symport systems were resolved based on inter-amino acid transport competition and on large variations in the specific activity of each porter in different species. Competitive inhibition was observed for transport competition between alanine, methionine, glutamine, and leucine (the alanine group) and between isoleucine, valine, and threonine (the isoleucine group). The apparent K(m) and K(i) values were similar for transport competition among amino acids within the alanine group. In contrast, the kinetics of transport competition between these two groups of amino acids did not fit a simple competitive model. Furthermore, members of the isoleucine group were weak transport antagonists of the alanine group. These results are consistent with two independent neutral amino acid porters. In support of that conclusion, the ratio of the specific activity of alanine transport versus isoleucine transport varied from two- to 13-fold in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from different plant species. This ratio would be expected to remain relatively stable if these amino acids were moving through a single transport system and, indeed, the ratio of alanine to glutamine transport varied less than twofold. Analysis of the predicted structure of the aliphatic, neutral amino acids in solution shows that isoleucine, valine, and threonine contain a branched methyl or hydroxyl group at the beta-carbon position that places a dense electron cloud close to the alpha-amino group. This does not occur for the unbranched amino acids or those that branch further away, e.g. leucine. We hypothesize that this structural feature of isoleucine, valine, and threonine results in unfavorable steric interactions with the alanine transport system that limits their flux through this porter. Hydrophobicity and

  4. Clock genes, intestinal transport and plasma lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2009-05-01

    Light and food are two major environmental factors that impact daily life. Light entrainment is centrally controlled by suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Food entrainment might require cooperation between the intestine and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Clock genes that are essential for light entrainment also play a part in food entrainment. Understanding the role of clock genes in the entrainment of intestinal functions, as well as in gut-brain communication during food entrainment, will enhance our understanding of gastrointestinal and metabolic disorders. This review highlights recent studies examining light- and food-entrained regulation of plasma lipids and of various intestinal activities and offers insight into the role of the intestine in food entrainment. PMID:19349191

  5. The compact root architecture1 gene regulates lignification, flavonoid production, and polar auxin transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Carole; Blanchet, Sandrine; Lapierre, Catherine; Brocard, Lysiane; Ratet, Pascal; Crespi, Martin; Mathesius, Ulrike; Frugier, Florian

    2010-08-01

    The root system architecture is crucial to adapt plant growth to changing soil environmental conditions and consequently to maintain crop yield. In addition to root branching through lateral roots, legumes can develop another organ, the nitrogen-fixing nodule, upon a symbiotic bacterial interaction. A mutant, cra1, showing compact root architecture was identified in the model legume Medicago truncatula. cra1 roots were short and thick due to defects in cell elongation, whereas densities of lateral roots and symbiotic nodules were similar to the wild type. Grafting experiments showed that a lengthened life cycle in cra1 was due to the smaller root system and not to the pleiotropic shoot phenotypes observed in the mutant. Analysis of the cra1 transcriptome at a similar early developmental stage revealed few significant changes, mainly related to cell wall metabolism. The most down-regulated gene in the cra1 mutant encodes a Caffeic Acid O-Methyl Transferase, an enzyme involved in lignin biosynthesis; accordingly, whole lignin content was decreased in cra1 roots. This correlated with differential accumulation of specific flavonoids and decreased polar auxin transport in cra1 mutants. Exogenous application of the isoflavone formononetin to wild-type plants mimicked the cra1 root phenotype, whereas decreasing flavonoid content through silencing chalcone synthases restored the polar auxin transport capacity of the cra1 mutant. The CRA1 gene, therefore, may control legume root growth through the regulation of lignin and flavonoid profiles, leading to changes in polar auxin transport. PMID:20522723

  6. Characterization of mouse amino acid transporter B0AT1 (slc6a19)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of the mouse (m)B0AT1 (slc6a19) transporter was studied in detail using two electrode voltage-clamp techniques and tracer studies in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. All neutral amino acids induced inward currents at physiological potentials, but large neutral non-aromatic amino acids were the preferred substrates of mB0AT1. Substrates were transported with K0.5 values ranging from approx. 1 mM to approx. 10 mM. The transporter mediates Na+–amino acid co-transport with a stoichiometry of 1:1. No other ions were involved in the transport mechanism. An increase in the extracellular Na+ concentration reduced the K0.5 for leucine, and vice versa. Moreover, the K0.5 values and Vmax values of both substrates varied with the membrane potential. As a result, K0.5 and Vmax values are a complex function of the concentration of substrate and co-substrate and the membrane potential. A model is presented assuming random binding order and a positive charge associated with the ternary [Na+–substrate–transporter] complex, which is consistent with the experimental data. PMID:15804236

  7. A novel peculiar mutation in the sodium/iodide symporter gene in spanish siblings with iodide transport defect.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shinji; Okamoto, Hiroomi; Tamada, Aiko; Sanchez-Franco, F

    2002-08-01

    Previously, we reported two Spanish siblings with congenital hypothyroidism due to total failure of iodide transport. These were the only cases reported to date who received long-term iodide treatment over 10 yr. We examined the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene of these patients. A large deletion was observed by long and accurate PCR using primers derived from introns 2 and 7 of the NIS gene. PCR-direct sequencing revealed a deletion of 6192 bases spanning from exon 3 to intron 7 and an inverted insertion of a 431-base fragment spanning from exon 5 to intron 5 of the NIS gene. The patients were homozygous for the mutation, and their mother was heterozygous. In the mutant, deletion of exons 3-7 was suggested by analysis using programs to predict exon/intron organization, resulting in an in-frame 182-amino acid deletion from Met(142) in the fourth transmembrane domain to Gln(323) in the fourth exoplasmic loop. The mutant showed no iodide uptake activity when transfected into COS-7 cells, confirming that the mutation was the direct cause of the iodide transport defect in these patients. Further, the mutant NIS protein was synthesized, but not properly expressed, on the cell surface, but was mostly accumulated in the cytoplasm, suggesting impaired targeting to the plasma membrane. PMID:12161518

  8. Identification and Expression Profiles of Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis and Transport Related Genes in Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xiu-Yun; Fang, Li-Ping; He, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Geng; Sun, Liang; Ye, Zhan-Feng; Deng, Dao-Gui; Li, Jin-Bu

    2015-01-01

    Although the general pathway of sex pheromone synthesis in moth species has been established, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The common cutworm Spodoptera litura is an important agricultural pest worldwide and causes huge economic losses annually. The female sex pheromone of S. litura comprises Z9,E11-14:OAc, Z9,E12-14:OAc, Z9-14:OAc, and E11-14:OAc. By sequencing and analyzing the transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands, we identified 94 candidate genes related to pheromone biosynthesis (55 genes) or chemoreception (39 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that two desaturase genes (SlitDes5 and SlitDes11) and one fatty acyl reductase gene (SlitFAR3) showed pheromone gland (PG) biased or specific expression, and clustered with genes known to be involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Furthermore, 4 chemoreception related genes (SlitOBP6, SlitOBP11, SlitCSP3, and SlitCSP14) also showed higher expression in the PG, and could be additional candidate genes involved in sex pheromone transport. This study provides the first solid background information that should facilitate further elucidation of sex pheromone biosynthesis and transport, and indicates potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. litura for a novel pest management strategy. PMID:26445454

  9. Identification and Expression Profiles of Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis and Transport Related Genes in Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xiu-Yun; Fang, Li-Ping; He, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Geng; Sun, Liang; Ye, Zhan-Feng; Deng, Dao-Gui; Li, Jin-Bu

    2015-01-01

    Although the general pathway of sex pheromone synthesis in moth species has been established, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The common cutworm Spodoptera litura is an important agricultural pest worldwide and causes huge economic losses annually. The female sex pheromone of S. litura comprises Z9,E11-14:OAc, Z9,E12-14:OAc, Z9-14:OAc, and E11-14:OAc. By sequencing and analyzing the transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands, we identified 94 candidate genes related to pheromone biosynthesis (55 genes) or chemoreception (39 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that two desaturase genes (SlitDes5 and SlitDes11) and one fatty acyl reductase gene (SlitFAR3) showed pheromone gland (PG) biased or specific expression, and clustered with genes known to be involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Furthermore, 4 chemoreception related genes (SlitOBP6, SlitOBP11, SlitCSP3, and SlitCSP14) also showed higher expression in the PG, and could be additional candidate genes involved in sex pheromone transport. This study provides the first solid background information that should facilitate further elucidation of sex pheromone biosynthesis and transport, and indicates potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. litura for a novel pest management strategy. PMID:26445454

  10. Fruit load induces changes in global gene expression and in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole acetic acid (IAA) homeostasis in citrus buds.

    PubMed

    Shalom, Liron; Samuels, Sivan; Zur, Naftali; Shlizerman, Lyudmila; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2014-07-01

    Many fruit trees undergo cycles of heavy fruit load (ON-Crop) in one year, followed by low fruit load (OFF-Crop) the following year, a phenomenon known as alternate bearing (AB). The mechanism by which fruit load affects flowering induction during the following year (return bloom) is still unclear. Although not proven, it is commonly accepted that the fruit or an organ which senses fruit presence generates an inhibitory signal that moves into the bud and inhibits apical meristem transition. Indeed, fruit removal from ON-Crop trees (de-fruiting) induces return bloom. Identification of regulatory or metabolic processes modified in the bud in association with altered fruit load might shed light on the nature of the AB signalling process. The bud transcriptome of de-fruited citrus trees was compared with those of ON- and OFF-Crop trees. Fruit removal resulted in relatively rapid changes in global gene expression, including induction of photosynthetic genes and proteins. Altered regulatory mechanisms included abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and auxin polar transport. Genes of ABA biosynthesis were induced; however, hormone analyses showed that the ABA level was reduced in OFF-Crop buds and in buds shortly following fruit removal. Additionally, genes associated with Ca(2+)-dependent auxin polar transport were remarkably induced in buds of OFF-Crop and de-fruited trees. Hormone analyses showed that auxin levels were reduced in these buds as compared with ON-Crop buds. In view of the auxin transport autoinhibition theory, the possibility that auxin distribution plays a role in determining bud fate is discussed. PMID:24706719

  11. Fruit load induces changes in global gene expression and in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole acetic acid (IAA) homeostasis in citrus buds

    PubMed Central

    Shalom, Liron; Samuels, Sivan; Zur, Naftali; Shlizerman, Lyudmila; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Many fruit trees undergo cycles of heavy fruit load (ON-Crop) in one year, followed by low fruit load (OFF-Crop) the following year, a phenomenon known as alternate bearing (AB). The mechanism by which fruit load affects flowering induction during the following year (return bloom) is still unclear. Although not proven, it is commonly accepted that the fruit or an organ which senses fruit presence generates an inhibitory signal that moves into the bud and inhibits apical meristem transition. Indeed, fruit removal from ON-Crop trees (de-fruiting) induces return bloom. Identification of regulatory or metabolic processes modified in the bud in association with altered fruit load might shed light on the nature of the AB signalling process. The bud transcriptome of de-fruited citrus trees was compared with those of ON- and OFF-Crop trees. Fruit removal resulted in relatively rapid changes in global gene expression, including induction of photosynthetic genes and proteins. Altered regulatory mechanisms included abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and auxin polar transport. Genes of ABA biosynthesis were induced; however, hormone analyses showed that the ABA level was reduced in OFF-Crop buds and in buds shortly following fruit removal. Additionally, genes associated with Ca2+-dependent auxin polar transport were remarkably induced in buds of OFF-Crop and de-fruited trees. Hormone analyses showed that auxin levels were reduced in these buds as compared with ON-Crop buds. In view of the auxin transport autoinhibition theory, the possibility that auxin distribution plays a role in determining bud fate is discussed. PMID:24706719

  12. Living without DAT: Loss and compensation of the dopamine transporter gene in sauropsids (birds and reptiles)

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, P. V.; Kasimi, B.; Carleton, J.; Velho, T. A.; Mello, C. V.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a major regulator of synaptic dopamine (DA) availability. It plays key roles in motor control and motor learning, memory formation, and reward-seeking behavior, is a major target of cocaine and methamphetamines, and has been assumed to be conserved among vertebrates. We have found, however, that birds, crocodiles, and lizards lack the DAT gene. We also found that the unprecedented loss of this important gene is compensated for by the expression of the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) gene, and not the serotonin transporter genes, in dopaminergic cells, which explains the peculiar pharmacology of the DA reuptake activity previously noted in bird striatum. This unexpected pattern contrasts with that of ancestral vertebrates (e.g. fish) and mammals, where the NAT gene is selectively expressed in noradrenergic cells. DA circuits in birds/reptiles and mammals thus operate with an analogous reuptake mechanism exerted by different genes, bringing new insights into gene expression regulation in dopaminergic cells and the evolution of a key molecular player in reward and addiction pathways. PMID:26364979

  13. Distribution and Functions of Phosphotransferase System Genes in the Genome of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Oenococcus oeni

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Zohra; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Thibau, François; Dutilh, Lucie; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Ballestra, Patricia; Le Marrec, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni, the lactic acid bacterium primarily responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine, is able to grow on a large variety of carbohydrates, but the pathways by which substrates are transported and phosphorylated in this species have been poorly studied. We show that the genes encoding the general phosphotransferase proteins, enzyme I (EI) and histidine protein (HPr), as well as 21 permease genes (3 isolated ones and 18 clustered into 6 distinct loci), are highly conserved among the strains studied and may form part of the O. oeni core genome. Additional permease genes differentiate the strains and may have been acquired or lost by horizontal gene transfer events. The core pts genes are expressed, and permease gene expression is modulated by the nature of the bacterial growth substrate. Decryptified O. oeni cells are able to phosphorylate glucose, cellobiose, trehalose, and mannose at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate. These substrates are present at low concentrations in wine at the end of alcoholic fermentation. The phosphotransferase system (PTS) may contribute to the perfect adaptation of O. oeni to its singular ecological niche. PMID:23524676

  14. Gymnemic acids inhibit sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Dawid, Corinna; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-06-25

    To evaluate the activity of botanicals used in Chinese Traditional Medicine as hypoglycemic agents for diabetes type II prevention and/or treatment, extracts prepared from 26 medicinal herbs were screened for their inhibitory activity on sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) by using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording of glucose uptake in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with cRNA for SGLT1. Showing by far the strongest SGLT1 inhibitory effect, the phytochemicals extracted from Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult were located by means of activity-guided fractionation and identified as 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-tigloyl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (1) and 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-methylbutyryl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (2) by means of LC-MS/MS, UPLC-TOF/MS, and 1D/2D-NMR experiments. Both saponins exhibited low IC50 values of 5.97 (1) and 0.17 μM (2), the latter of which was in the same range as found for the high-affinity inhibitor phlorizin (0.21 μM). As SGLT1 is found in high levels in brush-border membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, these findings demonstrate for the first time the potential of these saponins for inhibiting electrogenic glucose uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24856809

  15. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  16. High-throughput genome sequencing of lichenizing fungi to assess gene loss in the ammonium transporter/ammonia permease gene family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer has shaped the evolution of the ammonium transporter/ammonia permease gene family. Horizontal transfers of ammonium transporter/ammonia permease genes into the fungi include one transfer from archaea to the filamentous ascomycetes associated with the adaptive radiation of the leotiomyceta. The horizontally transferred gene has subsequently been lost in most of the group but has been selectively retained in lichenizing fungi. However, some groups of lichens appear to have secondarily lost the archaeal ammonium transporter. Definitive assessment of gene loss can only be made via whole genome sequencing. Results Ammonium transporter/ammonia permease gene sequences were recovered from the assembled genomes of eight lichenizing fungi in key clades including the Caliciales, the Peltigerales, the Ostropomycetidae, the Acarosporomycetidae, the Verrucariales, the Arthoniomycetidae and the Lichinales. The genes recovered were included in a refined phylogenetic analysis. The hypothesis that lichens symbiotic with a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium as a primary photobiont or lichens living in high nitrogen environments lose the plant-like ammonium transporters was upheld, but did not account for additional losses of ammonium transporters/ammonia permeases in the lichens from the Acarosporomycetidae, Chaetotheriomycetes and Arthoniomycetes. In addition, the four ammonium transporter/ammonia permease genes from Cladonia grayi were shown to be functional by expressing the lichen genes in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which all three native ammonium transporters were deleted, and assaying for growth on limiting ammonia as a sole nitrogen source. Conclusions Given sufficient coverage, next-generation sequencing technology can definitively address the loss of a gene in a genome when using environmental DNA isolated from lichen thalli collected from their natural habitats. Lichen-forming fungi have been losing ammonium transporters