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Sample records for acid trihydrate nat

  1. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-03-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  2. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  3. Heterogeneous Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds- Part 1: Nucleation of Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  4. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds-nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current theory, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring on the surface of dust or meteoritic particles. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along tens of thousands of trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT PSCs with these observations enables the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory and is simple to implement in models. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories.

  5. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Óscar; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-03-01

    The composition of high-altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates, but the exact phase composition of clouds and its formation mechanisms are still unknown. In this work, conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, alpha-nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT), is presented. This phase was characterized by a combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments, allowing a convincing structure solution. Furthermore, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong interaction between water ice and alpha-NAT was found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase-transition kinetics. On the basis of these results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT formation in high-altitude ice clouds.

  6. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Óscar; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The composition of high‐altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates, but the exact phase composition of clouds and its formation mechanisms are still unknown. In this work, conclusive evidence for a long‐predicted phase, alpha‐nitric acid trihydrate (alpha‐NAT), is presented. This phase was characterized by a combination of X‐ray and neutron diffraction experiments, allowing a convincing structure solution. Furthermore, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong interaction between water ice and alpha‐NAT was found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase‐transition kinetics. On the basis of these results, we propose a new three‐step mechanism for NAT formation in high‐altitude ice clouds. PMID:26879259

  7. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Oscar; Hölzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    The composition of high altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates. The identification and formation mechanisms, however, are still unknown but are essential to understand atmospheric processing such as the seasonal ozone depletion in the lower polar stratosphere or the radiation balance of planet Earth. We found conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, which has been named alpha nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT). This phase has been proven by combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments allowing a convincing structure solution. Additionally, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong affinity between water ice and alpha-NAT has been found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase transition kinetics essential for identification in the atmosphere. On the basis of our results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT-formation in high altitude ice clouds. F. Weiss et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, accepted, DOI:10.1002/anie.201510841

  8. A model for heterogeneous chemical processes on the surfaces of ice and nitric acid trihydrate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    The study presents a model that incorporates the physics and physical chemistry of ice surfaces relevant to polar stratospheric clouds. Surface concentrations of H2O, HCl, HOCl, ClONO2, and N2O5 on ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) crystals are computed, and surface reaction rates and reaction probabilities (sticking coefficients) are determined. For gas pressures of about 10 exp -7 torr and temperatures in the range of 180-200 K, HCl completely coats ice and water-rich NAT surfaces, while HOCl, ClOHO2, and N2O5 may cover 0.01-1 percent of these surfaces. The energy parameters are used to calculate surface temperatures such as adsorption and desorption constants, surface coverages, reaction rate coefficients, surface diffusion coefficients, and reaction probabilities for various species and chemical interactions on ice and NAT surfaces. Implications for chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds are discussed.

  9. A model for heterogeneous chemical processes on the surfaces of ice and nitric acid trihydrate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.

    1993-07-01

    The study presents a model that incorporates the physics and physical chemistry of ice surfaces relevant to polar stratospheric clouds. Surface concentrations of H2O, HCl, HOCl, ClONO2, and N2O5 on ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) crystals are computed, and surface reaction rates and reaction probabilities (sticking coefficients) are determined. For gas pressures of about 10 exp -7 torr and temperatures in the range of 180-200 K, HCl completely coats ice and water-rich NAT surfaces, while HOCl, ClOHO2, and N2O5 may cover 0.01-1 percent of these surfaces. The energy parameters are used to calculate surface temperatures such as adsorption and desorption constants, surface coverages, reaction rate coefficients, surface diffusion coefficients, and reaction probabilities for various species and chemical interactions on ice and NAT surfaces. Implications for chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds are discussed.

  10. Solubility and equilibrium vapor pressures of HC1 dissolved in polar stratospheric cloud materials - Ice and the trihydrate of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the pressure-solubility behavior of HC1 in water ice and in the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) crystal at 200 K are reported. It was found that HC1 is about 20 times more soluble in NAT than in ice for stratospheric conditions. A relation between HC1 pressure and substrate composition based on the Gibbs-Duhem equation is developed. This relation, along with other thermodynamic data, can be used to obtain the HC1 pressure-solubility behavior at different temperatures. Implications of these results for the south polar ozone hole are discussed.

  11. Spectroscopic Evidence Against Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) play a key role in the photochemical mechanism thought to be responsible for ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic. Reactions of PSC particles activate chlorine to forms that are capable of photochemical ozone destruction, and sequester nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would otherwise deactivate the chlorine. Although the heterogeneous chemistry is now well established, the composition of the clouds themselves is uncertain. It is commonly thought that they are composed of nitric acid trihydrate, although observations have left this question unresolved. Here we reanalyse infrared spectra of type 1 PSCs obtained in Antarctica in September 1987, using recently measured optical constants of the various compounds that might be present in PSCs. We find these PSCs were not composed of nitric acid trihydrate but instead had a more complex compositon, perhaps that of a ternary solution. Because cloud formation is sensitive to their composition, this finding will alter our understanding of the locations and conditions in which PSCs form. In addition, the extent of ozone loss depends on the ability of the PSCs to remove NOx permanently through sedimentation, The sedimentation rates depend on PSC particle size which in turn is controlled by the composition and formation mechanism.

  12. Spectroscopic Evidence Against Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) play a key role in the photochemical mechanisms thought to be responsible for ozone depletion in the Antarctic and the Arctic. Reactions on PSC particles activate chlorine to forms that are capable of photochemical ozone destruction, and sequester nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would otherwise deactivate the chlorine. Although the heterogeneous chemistry is now well established, the composition of the clouds themselves is uncertain. It is commonly thought that they are composed of nitric acid trihydrate, although observations have left this question unresolved. Here we reanalyse infrared spectra of type I PCS's obtained in Antarctica in September 1987, using recently measured optical constraints of the various compounds that might be present in PSC's. We find that these PSC's were not composed of nitric acid trihydrate but instead had a more complex composition perhaps that of a ternary solution. Because cloud formation is sensitive to their composition, this finding will alter our understanding of the locations and conditions in which PSCs form. In addition, the extent of ozone loss depends on the ability of the PSC's to remove NOx permanently through sedimentation. The sedimentation rates depend on PSC particle size which in turn is controlled by the composition and formation mechanism.

  13. Efficacy of Magnesium Trihydrate of Ursodeoxycholic Acid and Chenodeoxycholic Acid for Gallstone Dissolution: A Prospective Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck; Dong, Seok Ho; Lee, Seung-Ok; Ryu, Ji Kon; Lee, Don Haeng; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Lee, Jin; Koh, Dong Hee; Park, Eun Taek; Lee, Inseok; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Cholecystectomy is necessary for the treatment of symptomatic or complicated gallbladder (GB) stones, but oral litholysis with bile acids is an attractive alternative therapeutic option for asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of magnesium trihydrate of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) on gallstone dissolution and to investigate improvements in gallstone-related symptoms. Methods A prospective, multicenter, phase 4 clinical study to determine the efficacy of orally administered magnesium trihydrate of UDCA and CDCA was performed from January 2011 to June 2013. The inclusion criteria were GB stone diameter ≤15 mm, GB ejection fraction ≥50%, radiolucency on plain X-ray, and asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic patients. The patients were prescribed one capsule of magnesium trihydrate of UDCA and CDCA at breakfast and two capsules at bedtime for 6 months. The dissolution rate, response rate, and change in symptom score were evaluated. Results A total of 237 subjects were enrolled, and 195 subjects completed the treatment. The dissolution rate was 45.1% and the response rate was 47.2% (92/195) after 6 months of administration of magnesium trihydrate of UDCA and CDCA. Only the stone diameter was significantly associated with the response rate. Both the symptom score and the number of patients with symptoms significantly decreased regardless of stone dissolution. Adverse events necessitating discontinuation of the drug, surgery, or endoscopic management occurred in 2.5% (6/237) of patients. Conclusions Magnesium trihydrate of UDCA and CDCA is a well-tolerated bile acid that showed similar efficacy for gallstone dissolution and improvement of gallstone-related symptoms as that shown in previous studies. PMID:26087862

  14. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing, Product Disposition, and Donor Deferral... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NAT, on...

  15. Towards A Quantitative Understanding of Nat Formation and Its Impact On Denitrification and Polar Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Th.; Luo, B. P.; Fuglistaler, S.; Knopf, D.; Koop, T.; Buss, S.; Wernli, H.; Voigt, C.

    NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles play two important roles in polar ozone chem- istry: (i) heterogeneous reactions on their surface leads to activation of chlorine species, and (ii) sedimentation of large NAT particles may lead to denitrification and thus enhancement of chlorine-catalysed ozone depletion. Despite enormous labora- tory, field and modelling efforts, the formation of NAT particles is still highly contro- versial. While there is indication that small NAT particles at high number density, as observed downstream of ice clouds in mountain waves, might be explained as hetero- geneous NAT nucleation on ice, there is no precise understanding of the microphysics behind this process. Matters are complicated by the fact that ice nucleation, itself sub- ject to strong supercooling, requires a precision in temperature currently not provided by weather forecast models. The origin of large NAT particles at low number concen- trations, so-called NAT rocks, is even more uncertain. There is, however, laboratory evidence against homogeneous nucleation of NAT from supercooled solution droplets. While heterogeneous nucleation is in principle a possible pathway for NAT formation, there is observation-based modelling work suggesting that large NAT particles could be generated from high number density NAT clouds (mother clouds). The potential for predictions of denitrification in a colder future stratosphere will be discussed.

  16. [Viral safety of biologicals: evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) assay and development of concentration method of HCV for sensitive detection by NAT].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    The most important issue for the safety of biological products and blood products derived from human sources is how to prevent transmission of infectious agents. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence. HCV is mainly transmitted by exposure to blood and highly infectious during the early window period with extremely low viral loads. Therefore it is important to develop more sensitive detection methods for HCV. In the case of blood products, both serological test and nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) are required to detect HCV. Since NAT is highly sensitive, establishment of a new standard is required for validation of NAT assay. NAT guideline and establishment of the standard for HCV RNA and HCV genotype panel is introduced in this review. On the other hand, to enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by NAT, a novel viral concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads (PEI beads) was developed. PEI beads concentration method is applicable to a wide range of viruses including HCV. Studies using the national standard for HCV RNA, HCV genotype panel and seroconversion panel, suggest that virus concentration method using PEI-beads is useful for improvement of the sensitivity of HCV detection by NAT and applicable to donor screening for HCV.

  17. Laboratory studies of the nitric acid trihydrate - Implications for the south polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1988-01-01

    Vapor pressures of HNO3 and H2O have been measured over the trihydrate crystal, formed by vapor deposit on a glass surface. In the temperature range 190 to 205 K the two phase-equilibrium trihydrate/vapor was studied by adding and removing H2O. Coexistence equilibria vapor pressures of trihydrate/solid solutions of HNO3 in ice and of mono-/trihydrate were also measured. Results show that for typical mixing ratios of H2O and HNO3 found in the lower stratosphere (3 ppm H2O, 5 ppb HNO3) the trihydrate would start to form at temperatures about 7 K higher than the ice point. The pressure of atmospheric HNO3 would rapidly decrease as the atmosphere cools without large changes in partial pressures of H2O. These laboratory results provide information on the formation of polar stratospheric clouds containing H2O and HNO3.

  18. Laboratory simulations of NAT formation approaching stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, James; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1994-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies have established the stability conditions of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), of which type 1 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC 1) particles are thought to be composed. However, NAT samples in lab studies were almost always formed under conditions very different from those of the stratosphere. In order to better understand the in situ growth of PSC 1 particle populations, samples of water and nitric acid were deposited under conditions of temperature and pressure which more closely approximate the polar stratosphere. The compositions of the solids, measured shortly after deposition, depended on the H2O:HNO3 ratio in the vapor from which the solids were condensed. Solids formed from vapor mixtures that approached stratospheric contained significantly less HNO3 than the 25 mol percent expected of NAT.

  19. Antarctic NAT PSC Belt of June 2003: Observational Validation of the Mountain Wave Seeding Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Hoffmann, L.; Hoepfner, M.; Wu, D. L.; Alexander, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) over Antarctica in June 2003 revealed small nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles forming suddenly along the vortex edge. Models suggest the trigger was mountain waves over the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) forming ice for NAT nucleation. We test this hypothesis by analyzing perturbations in stratospheric radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). AIRS data show mountain waves over the AP on 10-14 June, with no resolved wave activity before or after. Peak wave temperature amplitudes derived from independent 40 hPa channels all return values of 10-12 K, in agreement with values used to model this NAT event. These observations support a NAT wake from a small region of mountain wave activity over the AP as the source of this circumpolar NAT outbreak.

  20. Lead acetate trihydrate precursor route to synthesize novel ultrafine lead oxide from spent lead acid battery pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Jiakuan; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xinfeng; Hu, Yuchen; Yang, Danni; Yuan, Xiqing; Yu, Wenhao; Dong, Jinxin; Wang, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Vasant Kumar, R.; Liang, Sha

    2014-12-01

    A novel green recycling process is investigated to prepare lead acetate trihydrate precursors and novel ultrafine lead oxide from spent lead acid battery pastes. The route contains the following four processes. (1) The spent lead pastes are desulphurized by (NH4)2CO3. (2) The desulphurized pastes are converted into lead acetate solution by leaching with acetic acid solution and H2O2; (3) The Pb(CH3COO)2·3H2O precursor is crystallized and purified from the lead acetate solution with the addition of glacial acetic acid; (4) The novel ultrafine lead oxide is prepared by the calcination of lead acetate trihydrate precursor in N2 or air at 320-400 °C. Both the lead acetate trihydrate and lead oxide products are characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, and SEM techniques. The calcination products are mainly α-PbO, β-PbO, and a small amount of metallic Pb. The particle size of the calcination products in air is significantly larger than that in N2. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of the novel ultrafine lead oxide products show good reversibility and cycle stability. The assembled batteries using the lead oxide products as cathode active materials show a good cyclic stability in 80 charge/discharge cycles with the depth of discharge (DOD) of 100%.

  1. Knockdown of a nutrient amino acid transporter gene LdNAT1 reduces free neutral amino acid contents and impairs Leptinotarsa decemlineata pupation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai-Yun; Guo, Wen-Chao; Ahmat, Tursun; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    A Leptinotarsa decemlineata SLC6 NAT gene (LdNAT1) was cloned. LdNAT1 was highly expressed in the larval alimentary canal especially midgut. LdNAT1 mRNA levels were high right after the molt and low just before the molt. JH and a JH analog pyriproxyfen activated LdNAT1 expression. RNAi of an allatostatin gene LdAS-C increased JH and upregulated LdNAT1 transcription. Conversely, silencing of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT decreased JH and reduced LdNAT1 expression. Moreover, 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide repressed LdNAT1 expression, whereas a decrease in 20E by RNAi of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD and disruption of 20E signaling by knockdown of LdE75 and LdFTZ-F1 activated LdNAT1 expression. Thus, LdNAT1 responded to both 20E and JH. Moreover, knockdown of LdNAT1 reduced the contents of cysteine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and serine in the larval bodies and increased the contents of these amino acids in the larval feces. Furthermore, RNAi of LdNAT1 inhibited insulin/target of rapamycin pathway, lowered 20E and JH titers, reduced 20E and JH signaling, retarded larval growth and impaired pupation. These data showed that LdNAT1 was involved in the absorption of several neutral amino acids critical for larval growth and metamorphosis. PMID:26657797

  2. Thermochemical Kinetics of H2O and HNO3 on crystalline Nitric Acid Hydrates (alpha-, beta-NAT, NAD) in the range 175-200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Iannarelli, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The growth of NAT (Nitric Acid Trihydrate, HNO3x3H2O) and NAD (Nitric Acid Dihydrate, HNO3x2H2O) on an ice substrate, the evaporative lifetime of NAT and NAD as well as the interconversion of alpha- and beta-NAT competing with evaporation and growth under UT/LS conditions depends on the interfacial kinetics of H2O and HNO3 vapor on the condensed phase. Despite the existence of some literature results we have embarked on a systematic investigation of the kinetics using a multidiagnostic experimental approach enabled by the simultaneous observation of both the gas (residual gas mass spectrometry) as well as the condensed phase (FTIR absorption in transmission). We report on thermochemically consistent mass accommodation coefficients alpha and absolute evaporation rates Rev/molecule s-1cm-3 as a function of temperature which yields the corresponding vapor pressures of both H2O and HNO3 in equilibrium with the crystalline phases, hence the term thermochemical kinetics. These results have been obtained using a stirred flow reactor (SFR) using a macroscopic pure ice film of 1 micron or so thickness as a starting substrate mimicking atmospheric ice particles and are reported in a phase diagram specifically addressing UT (Upper Troposphere)/LS (Lower Stratosphere) conditions as far as temperature and partial pressures are concerned. The experiments have been performed either at steady-state flow conditions or in transient supersaturation using a pulsed solenoid valve in order to generate gas pulses whose decay were subsequently monitored in real time. Special attention has been given to the effect of the stainless-steel vessel walls in that Langmuir adsorption isotherms for H2O and HNO3 have been used to correct for wall-adsorption of both probe gases. Typically, the accommodation coefficients of H2O and HNO3 are similar throughout the temperature range whereas the rates of evaporation Rev of H2O are significantly larger than for HNO3 thus leading to the difference in

  3. Denitrification by large NAT particles: the impact of reduced settling velocities and hints on particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, W.; Grooß, J.-U.; Oelhaf, H.; Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Ebersoldt, A.; Frey, W.; Gulde, T.; Khaykin, S.; Maucher, G.; Piesch, C.; Orphal, J.

    2014-03-01

    Vertical redistribution of HNO3 through condensation, sedimentation and evaporation of large HNO3-containing particles inside polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) plays an important role in the chemistry of the Arctic winter stratosphere. In situ observations by the particle probe FSSP-100 during the RECONCILE campaign indicate unexpected large potential NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles inside PSCs. The observations can hardly be explained assuming particles with compact morphology and spherical shape due to limited growing time at temperatures below the existence temperature of NAT (TNAT). Utilizing simulations by the CLaMS and measurements by the airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer MIPAS-STR we study the impact of reduced settling velocities of NAT particles on vertical HNO3 redistribution. Reduced settling velocities are expected for spherical NAT particles with low mass density or aspheric NAT particles that might explain the maximum sizes of the particles observed in situ. The results of our study support the hypothesis that denitrification is produced by significantly aspheric (i.e. columnar) compact NAT particles which are characterised by reduced settling velocities.

  4. Nucleic acid testing (NAT) in high prevalence-low resource settings.

    PubMed

    El Ekiaby, Magdy; Lelie, Nico; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Blood screening by NAT for major transfusion transmitted viral infections (TTIs) was originally intended to complement serology for detection of infected donations. Reports from developed countries showed limited marginal value to NAT blood screening in improving blood safety. Reports on NAT results from Europe indicated yield of 1:0.6 million donations for HBV, <1:M for HCV and HIV-1-related to low prevalence of TTI. In contrast, prevalence of TTI in resource-limited countries is almost always high. As a result, more incident cases can be expected among first-time blood donors. Most reports of NAT blood donation screening in these countries showed NAT confirmed yield as high as 1/2800 for HBV and 1/3100 blood donations for HCV as reported from Thailand and Egypt, respectively. The issues for low resource countries are mostly the high cost of NAT but also the requirements of staff qualification, adequate facilities, reagent procurement and maintenance of delicate equipment. Alternatives to commercial NAT are the use of combos antigen-antibody for HIV and HCV, anti-HBc for HBV and in-house NAT. Most of these alternatives have been reported but very few comparisons are available. Once yield data is available, models for estimation of feasibility and cost-effectiveness are proposed to help decision-making.

  5. Trajectory Studies of Large HNO3-Containing PSC Particles in the Arctic: Evidence for the Role of NAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinney, K. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Dhaniyala, S.; Fahey, D. W.; Northway, M. J.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Kleinboehl, A.; Sinnhuber, M.; Kuellmann, H.; Bremer, H.; Mahoney, M. J.; Bui, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Large (5 to >20 micron diameter) nitric-acid-containing polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were observed in the Arctic stratosphere during the winter of 1999-2000. We use a particle growth and sedimentation model to investigate the environment in which these particles grew and the likely phase of the largest particles. Particle trajectory calculations show that, while simulated nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) particle sizes are significantly smaller than the observed maximum particle sizes, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particle trajectories are consistent with the largest observed particle sizes.

  6. Functional characterization of NAT/NCS2 proteins of Aspergillus brasiliensis reveals a genuine xanthine-uric acid transporter and an intrinsically misfolded polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Krypotou, Emilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Diallinas, George

    2015-02-01

    The Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) family includes members in nearly all domains of life. Functionally characterized NAT transporters from bacteria, fungi, plants and mammals are ion-coupled symporters specific for the uptake of purines, pyrimidines and related analogues. The characterized mammalian NATs are specific for the uptake of L-ascorbic acid. In this work we identify in silico a group of fungal putative transporters, named UapD-like proteins, which represent a novel NAT subfamily. To understand the function and specificity of UapD proteins, we cloned and functionally characterized the two Aspergillus brasiliensis NAT members (named AbUapC and AbUapD) by heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans. AbUapC represents canonical NATs (UapC or UapA), while AbUapD represents the new subfamily. AbUapC is a high-affinity, high-capacity, H(+)/xanthine-uric acid transporter, which can also recognize other purines with very low affinity. No apparent transport function could be detected for AbUapD. GFP-tagging showed that, unlike AbUapC which is localized in the plasma membrane, AbUapD is ER-retained and degraded in the vacuoles, a characteristic of misfolded proteins. Chimeric UapA/AbUapD molecules are also turned-over in the vacuole, suggesting that UapD includes intrinsic peptidic sequences leading to misfolding. The possible evolutionary implication of such conserved, but inactive proteins is discussed.

  7. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  8. Interaction of HCl with a beta-NAT Surface: Prediction of the IR Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Llorente, B.; Escribano, R. M.; Fernandez-Torre, D.; Galvez, O.; Herrero, V. J.; Mate, B.; Moreno, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Heterogeneous reactions that take place over the surface of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles are thought to play an important role on stratospheric ozone depletion. Chlorine reservoir species, such as HCl and ClONO2, adsorbed on those particles, can be converted to reactive chlorine compounds, responsible for the destruction of ozone. The high temperature phase of nitric acid trihydrate (β-NAT) is one of the most important constituents of PSC. We present here a theoretical study of the system formed by HCl and β-NAT, by means of DFT calculations[1]. The adsorption of HCl on the most favourable site of the (001) surface of the β-NAT crystal[2] is simulated with a suitable model for the description of the vibrational properties of the system. Other possible adsorption sites will also be revised. An assignment of the different spectroscopic features, such as a small band at 2150 cm-1 attributed to the stretching of the adsorbed HCl molecule, is performed by comparing the predicted absorption spectrum with the experimental results[3] [1] J. M. Soler, E. Artacho, J. D. Gale, A. Garc

  9. Influence of mountain waves and NAT nucleation mechanisms on polar stratospheric cloud formation at local and synoptic scales during the 1999-2000 Arctic winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, S. H.; Larsen, N.; Knudsen, B.; Eckermann, S. D.; Browell, E. V.

    2005-03-01

    A scheme for introducing mountain wave-induced temperature pertubations in a microphysical PSC model has been developed. A data set of temperature fluctuations attributable to mountain waves as computed by the Mountain Wave Forecast Model (MWFM-2) has been used for the study. The PSC model has variable microphysics, enabling different nucleation mechanisms for nitric acid trihydrate, NAT, to be employed. In particular, the difference between the formation of NAT and ice particles in a scenario where NAT formation is not dependent on preexisting ice particles, allowing NAT to form at temperatures above the ice frost point, Tice, and a scenario, where NAT nucleation is dependent on preexisting ice particles, is examined. The performance of the microphysical model in the different microphysical scenarios and a number of temperature scenarios with and without the influence of mountain waves is tested through comparisons with lidar measurements of PSCs made from the NASA DC-8 on 23 and 25 January during the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign in the 1999-2000 winter and the effect of mountain waves on local PSC production is evaluated in the different microphysical scenarios. Mountain waves are seen to have a pronounced effect on the amount of ice particles formed in the simulations. Quantitative comparisons of the amount of solids seen in the observations and the amount of solids produced in the simulations show the best correspondence when NAT formation is allowed to take place at temperatures above Tice. Mountain wave-induced temperature fluctuations are introduced in vortex-covering model runs, extending the full 1999-2000 winter season, and the effect of mountain waves on large-scale PSC production is estimated in the different microphysical scenarios. It is seen that regardless of the choice of microphysics ice particles only form as a consequence of mountain waves whereas NAT particles form readily as a consequence of the synoptic conditions alone if NAT nucleation above

  10. Heterogeneous kinetics of H2O, HNO3 and HCl on HNO3 hydrates (α-NAT, β-NAT, NAD) in the range 175-200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.

    2016-09-01

    Experiments on the title compounds have been performed using a multidiagnostic stirred-flow reactor (SFR) in which the gas phase as well as the condensed phase has been simultaneously investigated under stratospheric temperatures in the range 175-200 K. Wall interactions of the title compounds have been taken into account using Langmuir adsorption isotherms in order to close the mass balance between deposited and desorbed (recovered) compounds. Thin solid films at 1 µm typical thickness have been used as a proxy for atmospheric ice particles and have been deposited on a Si window of the cryostat, with the optical element being the only cold point in the deposition chamber. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy in transmission as well as partial and total pressure measurement using residual gas mass spectrometry (MS) and sensitive pressure gauges have been employed in order to monitor growth and evaporation processes as a function of temperature using both pulsed and continuous gas admission and monitoring under SFR conditions. Thin solid H2O ice films were used as the starting point throughout, with the initial spontaneous formation of α-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) followed by the gradual transformation of α- to β-NAT at T > 185 K. Nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) was spontaneously formed at somewhat larger partial pressures of HNO3 deposited on pure H2O ice. In contrast to published reports, the formation of α-NAT proceeded without prior formation of an amorphous HNO3 / H2O layer and always resulted in β-NAT. For α- and β-NAT, the temperature-dependent accommodation coefficient α(H2O) and α(HNO3), the evaporation flux Jev(H2O) and Jev(HNO3) and the resulting saturation vapor pressure Peq(H2O) and Peq(HNO3) were measured and compared to binary phase diagrams of HNO3 / H2O in order to afford a thermochemical check of the kinetic parameters. The resulting kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of activation energies for evaporation (Eev) and

  11. Influence of mountain waves and NAT nucleation mechanisms on Polar Stratospheric Cloud formation at local and synoptic scales during the 1999 2000 Arctic winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, S. H.; Larsen, N.; Knudsen, B.; Eckermann, S. D.; Browell, E. V.

    2004-08-01

    A scheme for introducing mountain wave-induced temperature pertubations in a microphysical PSC model has been developed. A data set of temperature fluctuations attributable to mountain waves as computed by the Mountain Wave Forecast Model (MWFM-2) has been used for the study. The PSC model has variable microphysics, enabling different nucleation mechanisms for nitric acid trihydrate, NAT, to be employed. In particular, the difference between the formation of NAT and ice particles in a scenario where NAT formation is not dependent on preexisting ice particles, allowing NAT to form at temperatures above the ice frost point, Tice, and a scenario, where NAT nucleation is dependent on preexisting ice particles, is examined. The performance of the microphysical model in the different microphysical scenarios and a number of temperature scenarios with and without the influence of mountain waves is tested through comparisons with lidar measurements of PSCs made from the NASA DC-8 on 23 and 25 January during the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign in the 1999-2000 winter and the effect of mountain waves on local PSC production is evaluated in the different microphysical scenarios. Mountain wave-induced temperature fluctuations are introduced in vortex-covering model runs, extending the full 1999-2000 winter season, and the effect of mountain waves on large-scale PSC production is estimated in the different microphysical scenarios.

  12. Denitrification by large NAT particles: the impact of reduced settling velocities and hints on particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, W.; Grooß, J.-U.; Oelhaf, H.; Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Ebersoldt, A.; Frey, W.; Gulde, T.; Khaykin, S.; Maucher, G.; Piesch, C.; Orphal, J.

    2014-10-01

    Vertical redistribution of HNO3 through large HNO3-containing particles associated with polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) plays an important role in the chemistry of the Arctic winter stratosphere. During the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interactions) campaign, apparently very large NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles were observed by the airborne in situ probe FSSP-100 (Molleker et al., 2014). Our analysis shows that the FSSP-100 observations associated with the flight on 25 January 2010 cannot easily be explained assuming compact spherical NAT particles due to much too short growing time at temperatures below the existence temperature of NAT (TNAT). State-of-the-art simulations using CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere; Grooß et al., 2014) suggest considerably smaller particles. We consider the hypothesis that the simulation reproduces the NAT particle masses in a realistic way, but that real NAT particles may have larger apparent sizes compared to compact spherical particles, e.g. due to non-compact morphology or aspheric shape. Our study focuses on the consequence that such particles would have reduced settling velocities compared to compact spheres, altering the vertical redistribution of HNO3. Utilising CLaMS simulations, we investigate the impact of reduced settling velocities of NAT particles on vertical HNO3 redistribution and compare the results with observations of gas-phase HNO3 by the airborne Fourier transform spectrometer MIPAS-STR associated with two RECONCILE flights. The MIPAS-STR observations confirm conditions consistent with denitrification by NAT particles for the flight on 25 January 2010 and show good agreement with the simulations within the limitations of the comparison. Best agreement is found if settling velocities between 100 and 50% relative to compact spherical particles are considered (slight preference

  13. Validated stability-indicating spectrophotometric methods for the determination of cefixime trihydrate in the presence of its acid and alkali degradation products.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Nadia M; Abdel-Fattah, Laila; Weshahy, Soheir A; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Boltia, Shereen A

    2015-01-01

    Five simple, accurate, precise, and economical spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of cefixime trihydrate (CFX) in the presence of its acid and alkali degradation products without prior separation. In the first method, second derivative (2D) and first derivative (1D) spectrophotometry was applied to the absorption spectra of CFX and its acid (2D) or alkali (1D) degradation products by measuring the amplitude at 289 and 308 nm, respectively. The second method was a first derivative (1DD) ratio spectrophotometric method where the peak amplitudes were measured at 311 nm in presence of the acid degradation product, and 273 and 306 nm in presence of its alkali degradation product. The third method was ratio subtraction spectrophotometry where the drug is determined at 286 nm in laboratory-prepared mixtures of CFX and its acid or alkali degradation product. The fourth method was based on dual wavelength analysis; two wavelengths were selected at which the absorbances of one component were the same, so wavelengths 209 and 252 nm were used to determine CFX in presence of its acid degradation product and 310 and 321 nm in presence of its alkali degradation product. The fifth method was bivariate spectrophotometric calibration based on four linear regression equations obtained at the wavelengths 231 and 290 nm, and 231 and 285 nm for the binary mixture of CFX with either its acid or alkali degradation product, respectively. The developed methods were successfully applied to the analysis of CFX in laboratory-prepared mixtures and pharmaceutical formulations with good recoveries, and their validation was carried out following the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The results obtained were statistically compared with each other and showed no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  14. Fourier transform infrared studies of model polar stratospheric cloud surfaces - Growth and evaporation of ice and nitric acid/ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared surface studies are used to probe the microphysical properties of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and ice films representative of type I and II polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). Experiments indicate that, on initial exposure to 1.8 microtorr of HNO3, a layer of ice is quantitatively converted to NAT. However, conversion of ice to NAT does not proceed indefinitely, but rather the system reaches saturation. For longer exposures or higher HNO3 pressures, NAM becomes the dominant nitric acid containing species on the surface. Evaporation studies were performed to test the feasibility of a recent denitrification mechanism. The results indicate that ice coated with 0.20 micron of NAT evaporates at a temperature of about 4 C higher than uncoated ice.

  15. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  16. ISCCP TOVS NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-12

    ISCCP TOVS NAT Atmospheric Profiles, NATIVE file format Project Title:  ...   Parameters:  Cloud Amount Cloud Top Pressure Ozone Precipitable Water Profiles Surface Pressure Surface Temperature Temperature Profiles Tropopause Pressure ...

  17. Spectroscopic evidence of large aspherical β-NAT particles involved in denitrification in the December 2011 Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Bi, Lei; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Klingebiel, Marcus; Belyaev, Gennady; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Griessbach, Sabine; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Gulde, Thomas; Krämer, Martina; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Rolf, Christian; Sartorius, Christian; Spang, Reinhold; Orphal, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    We analyze polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) signatures in airborne MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) observations in the spectral regions from 725 to 990 and 1150 to 1350 cm-1 under conditions suitable for the existence of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) above northern Scandinavia on 11 December 2011. The high-resolution infrared limb emission spectra of MIPAS-STR show a characteristic "shoulder-like" signature in the spectral region around 820 cm-1, which is attributed to the ν2 symmetric deformation mode of NO3- in β-NAT. Using radiative transfer calculations involving Mie and T-Matrix methods, the spectral signatures of spherical and aspherical particles are simulated. The simulations are constrained using collocated in situ particle measurements. Simulations assuming highly aspherical spheroids with aspect ratios (AR) of 0.1 or 10.0 and a lognormal particle mode with a mode radius of 4.8 µm reproduce the observed spectra to a high degree. A smaller lognormal mode with a mode radius of 2.0 µm, which is also taken into account, plays only a minor role. Within the scenarios analyzed, the best overall agreement is found for elongated spheroids with AR = 0.1. Simulations of spherical particles and spheroids with AR = 0.5 and 2.0 return results very similar to each other and do not allow us to reproduce the signature around 820 cm-1. The observed "shoulder-like" signature is explained by the combination of the absorption/emission and scattering characteristics of large highly aspherical β-NAT particles. The size distribution supported by our results corresponds to ˜ 9 ppbv of gas-phase equivalent HNO3 at the flight altitude of ˜ 18.5 km. The results are compared with the size distributions derived from the in situ observations, a corresponding Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) simulation, and excess gas-phase HNO3 observed in a nitrification layer directly below the observed PSC. The

  18. Multiple hydrogen bonds in cytosinium zoledronate trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2011-03-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: 4-amino-2-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-1-ium 1-hydroxy-2-(1H,3H-imidazol-3-ium-1-yl)ethylidenediphosphonate trihydrate], C(4)H(6)N(3)O(+)·C(5)H(9)N(2)O(7)P(2)(-)·3H(2)O, contains one cytosinium cation, one zoledronate anion and three water molecules. The zoledronate anion has a zwitterionic character, in which each phosphonate group is singly deprotonated and an imidazole N atom is protonated. Furthermore, proton transfer takes place from one of the phosphonic acid groups of the zoledronate anion to one of the N atoms of the cytosinium cation. The cytosinium cation forms a C(6) chain, while the zoledronate anion forms a rectangular-shaped centrosymmetric dimer through N-H...O hydrogen bonds. The cations and anions are held together by N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds to form a one-dimensional polymeric tape. The three water molecules play a crucial role in hydrogen bonding, resulting in a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network.

  19. The discovery and significance of NAT particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauersberger, K.

    2003-04-01

    Shortly after the discovery of the ozone hole, stratospheric and laboratory research focused on the existence of particles above the frost point. Predictions were made that nitric acid and water can co-condense to form a stable hydrate. Thermodynamic properties of such a hydrate were measured with high precision in laboratory studies on macroscopic substrates. Indeed, for stratospheric partial pressures of HNO_3 and H_2O and low temperatures NAT particles should exist 5 to 7^oC above the frost point. NO_y measurements within the south polar vortex confirmed the predictions based on those results. Ten years have passed before particles with NAT molar ratios of 3 were actually measured above Scandinavia. In between, strong evidence from field experiments and theoretical studies emerged that showed the preferred existence of liquid particles whose range is lower and narrower in temperature. NAT particles are crucial for explaining the large ozone losses in the temperature-sensitive northern polar stratosphere. No other known particle can be present at such high temperatures and can grow to transport reactive nitrogen out of the polar lower stratosphere.

  20. The mid-IR Absorption Cross Sections of α- and β-NAT (HNO3 · 3H2O) in the range 170 to 185 K and of metastable NAD (HNO3 · 2H2O) in the range 172 to 182 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannarelli, R.; Rossi, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    Growth and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption in transmission of the title nitric acid hydrates have been performed in a stirred flow reactor (SFR) under tight control of the H2O and HNO3 deposition conditions affording a closed mass balance of the binary mixture. The gas and condensed phases have been simultaneously monitored using residual gas mass spectrometry and FTIR absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Barrierless nucleation of the metastable phases of both α-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) and NAD (nitric acid dihydrate) has been observed when HNO3 was admitted to the SFR in the presence of a macroscopic thin film of pure H2O ice of typically 1 µm thickness. The stable β-NAT phase was spontaneously formed from the precursor α-NAT phase through irreversible thermal rearrangement beginning at 185 K. This facile growth scheme of nitric acid hydrates requires the presence of H2O ice at thicknesses in excess of approximately hundred nanometers. Absolute absorption cross sections in the mid-IR spectral range (700-4000 cm-1) of all three title compounds have been obtained after spectral subtraction of excess pure ice at temperatures characteristic of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Prominent IR absorption frequencies correspond to the antisymmetric nitrate stretch vibration (ν3(NO3-)) in the range 1300 to 1420 cm-1 and the bands of hydrated protons in the range 1670 to 1850 cm-1 in addition to the antisymmetric O-H stretch vibration of bound H2O in the range 3380 to 3430 cm-1 for NAT.

  1. Aerosol silica as a possible candidate for the heterogeneous formation of nitric acid hydrates in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, A.; Kulmala, M.

    The liquid-solid phase transitions in nanometersize HNO3/H2O solution droplets obtained on fumed silica (a counterpart of aerosol silica) have been studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). “Soft” transitions, reduction in the freezing and melting temperatures, Tf and Tm, and enthalpies, ΔHf and ΔHm, are interpreted to be caused by very small size of droplets. The observed difference between ΔHf and ΔHm can serve as an evidence of temperature dependence of the enthalpy of fusion for hydrates. Freezing of droplets with stoichiometry close to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) at temperature 4 K warmer than the ice frost point indicates that, in the stratosphere, silica particles can serve as nuclei for heterogeneous freezing of NAT.

  2. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  3. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  4. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  5. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  6. 21 CFR 520.90e - Ampicillin trihydrate soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... trihydrate soluble powder. (a) Specifications. Each gram contains ampicillin trihydrate equivalent to 88.2... pound of body weight twice daily, orally by gavage or in drinking water for up to 5 days. (2... spp.) infections in swine up to 75 pounds of body weight, and bacterial pneumonia caused...

  7. 21 CFR 526.88 - Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. 526.88 Section 526.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 526.88 Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each single dose...

  8. 21 CFR 526.88 - Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. 526.88 Section 526.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each single dose syringe...

  9. 21 CFR 526.88 - Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. 526.88 Section 526.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 526.88 Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each single dose...

  10. 21 CFR 526.88 - Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. 526.88 Section 526.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 526.88 Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each single dose...

  11. 21 CFR 526.88 - Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. 526.88 Section 526.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 526.88 Amoxicillin trihydrate for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each single dose...

  12. Genetic Variation at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) Genes in Global Populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functional variability at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) genes is associated with adverse drug reactions and cancer susceptibility in humans. Previous studies of small sets of ethnic groups have indicated that the NAT genes have high levels of amino acid variation that differ in f...

  13. Infrared studies of sulfuric acid and its impact on polar and global ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura Tracy

    Sulfuric acid aerosols are present throughout the lower stratosphere and play an important role in both polar and global ozone depletion. In the polar regions, stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs) act as nuclei for the growth of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Heterogeneous reactions can occur on these PSCs, leading to chlorine activation and catalytic ozone destruction. This thesis addresses the issue of polar ozone depletion through laboratory studies which examine the nucleation of PSCs on sulfuric acid. In addition, chemistry which occurs directly on sulfate aerosols may impact ozone at midlatitudes, and studies describing one such reaction are presented as well. To study the growth of type I PSCs on sulfuric acid, thin H2SO4 films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors at stratospheric temperatures. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films which condensed. Supercooled liquid sulfuric acid films showed uptake of HNO3 to form ternary solutions, followed by crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). When crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films were exposed to nitric acid and water, condensation of a supercooled HNO3/H2O layer was often observed. As predicted by theory, some of the SAT crystal then dissolved, creating a ternary H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. From this solution, NAT nearly always crystallized, halting the phase change of sulfuric acid. If a supercooled nitric acid layer did not condense on frozen sulfuric acid, crystalline NAT was not deposited from the gas phase when SNAT/leq41. At significantly higher supersaturations, NAT could be forced to condense on sulfuric acid, regardless of its phase. Calculations of the contact parameter from experimental data indicate that m<0.79 for NAT on SAT, predicting a significant barrier to nucleation of NAT from the gas phase. While PSCs can form only in the cold polar regions of the stratosphere, sulfuric

  14. 40 CFR 721.10562 - Aluminum trihydrate and silane homopolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aluminum trihydrate and silane... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10562 Aluminum trihydrate and silane homopolymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as aluminum trihydrate and silane homopolymer (PMN P-07-375) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10562 - Aluminum trihydrate and silane homopolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aluminum trihydrate and silane... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10562 Aluminum trihydrate and silane homopolymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as aluminum trihydrate and silane homopolymer (PMN P-07-375) is subject to reporting under...

  16. The absolute absorption cross section of crystalline αg and βg HNO33H2O (NAT) and HNO32H2O (NAD) in the range 180 - 200 K in the mid-IR (4000 to 600 cm-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Iannarelli, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneous processing in the polar atmosphere requires the presence of polar stratospheric cloud particles (PSC's) that are the seat of interfacial chlorine and NOx chemistry. A subgroup of PSC's, namely PSC Ia, are known to consist of hydrates of nitric acid, mostly nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) as two polymorphs, α- and β-HNO33H2O occurring in the range 185 to 200 K under prevailing stratospheric partial pressure conditions of 10 ppb HNO3 or so. Despite the fact that reference IR spectra in the mid-IR range have been obtained some time ago (Ritzhaupt and Devlin (1991), Koehler et al. (1992)), no absolute absorption cross section of these important ice particles exist to date except a study of its refractive indices (Middlebrook et al. (1994), Berland et al. (1994)). Knowledge of optical cross sections would enable remote sensing of PSC's in the IR region using satellite and/or LIDAR platforms. We have embarked on a multidiagnostic research program aiming at studying the kinetics, thermodynamics and spectroscopy of PSC's using a stirred flow reactor equipped with FTIR absorption spectroscopy in transmission. The gas phase was monitored using electron-impact residual gas mass spectroscopy together with pulsed and steady-state gas admission and thorough characterization of the adsorption of HNO3, H2O and HCl onto the stainless-steel vessel walls under mass balance conditions using measured Langmuir adsorption isotherms. We have grown α- and β-NAT by doping thin (1 μm thick) ice films with metered amounts of HNO3. According to known phase diagrams we have obtained mixtures of pure ice with NAT whose IR spectrum was obtained after spectral subtraction of the pure ice phase. The concentration of HNO3 deposited on the ice film was determined by measuring the inflow and taking into account adsorption of HNO3 on the reactor walls as well as effusive loss out the reactor. We also independently checked the H2O concentration of α-NAT from the decrease of the pure H2O

  17. Cloning of an arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT1) from Drosophila melanogaster expressed in the nervous system and the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Hintermann, E; Grieder, N C; Amherd, R; Brodbeck, D; Meyer, U A

    1996-01-01

    In insects, neurotransmitter catabolism, melatonin precursor formation, and sclerotization involve arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT, EC 2.3.1.87) activity. It is not known if one or multiple aaNAT enzymes are responsible for these activities. We recently have purified an aaNAT from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we report the cloning of the corresponding aaNAT cDNA (aaNAT1) that upon COS cell expression acetylates dopamine, tryptamine, and the immediate melatonin precursor serotonin. aaNAT1 represents a novel gene family unrelated to known acetyl-transferases, except in two weakly conserved amino acid motifs. In situ hybridization studies of aaNAT1 mRNA in embryos reveal hybridization signals in the brain, the ventral cord, the gut, and probably in oenocytes, indicating a broad tissue distribution of aaNAT1 transcripts. Moreover, in day/ night studies we demonstrate a diurnal rhythm of melatonin concentration without a clear-cut change in aaNAT1 mRNA levels. The data suggest that tissue-specific regulation of aaNAT1 may be associated with different enzymatic functions and do not exclude the possibility of additional aaNAT genes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8901578

  18. 21 CFR 520.88d - Amoxicillin trihydrate soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate soluble powder. 520.88d Section 520.88d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88d...

  19. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. 520.88c Section 520.88c Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88c...

  20. 21 CFR 522.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ampicillin trihydrate. 522.90b Section 522.90b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  1. 21 CFR 522.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate for suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ampicillin trihydrate for suspension. 522.90b Section 522.90b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  2. 21 CFR 522.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ampicillin trihydrate. 522.90b Section 522.90b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  3. 21 CFR 522.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ampicillin trihydrate. 522.90b Section 522.90b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  4. Molecular Basis of Substrate Specific Acetylation by N-Terminal Acetyltransferase NatB.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Cai, Yongfei; Zhang, Shijun; Ding, Hongyan; Wang, Haitao; Han, Aidong

    2017-04-04

    The NatB N-terminal acetyltransferase specifically acetylates the N-terminal group of substrate protein peptides starting with Met-Asp/Glu/Asn/Gln. How NatB recognizes and acetylates these substrates remains unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of a NatB holoenzyme from Candida albicans in the presence of its co-factor CoA and substrate peptides. The auxiliary subunit Naa25 of NatB forms a horseshoe-like deck to hold specifically its catalytic subunit Naa20. The first two amino acids Met and Asp of a substrate peptide mediate the major interactions with the active site in the Naa20 subunit. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate Asp and pocket residues of Naa20 are essential to determine the NatB substrate specificity. Moreover, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the substrate Met and a carbonyl group in the Naa20 active site directly anchors the substrate toward acetyl-CoA. Together, these structures define a unique molecular mechanism of specific N-terminal acetylation acted by NatB.

  5. NAT THE RAT - PUPIL'S BOOK. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROJAS, PAULINE M.; AND OTHERS

    THE EXPERIMENTAL EDITION OF "NAT THE RAT" REPRESENTS LEVEL TWO OF THE "MIAMI LINGISTIC READERS" DESIGNED TO BE USED IN TEACHING BEGINNING READING TO PUPILS WHOSE PRESCHOOL LANGUAGE WAS OTHER THAN ENGLISH. THE FIVE MAJOR CHARACTERS IN THE STORY ARE INTRODUCED ON THE FIRST FIVE PAGES OF THE PUPILS' BOOK. ILLUSTRATIONS (BLACK AND…

  6. A Lagrangian method to study stratospheric nitric acid variations in the polar regions as measured by the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RivièRe, Emmanuel D.; Terao, Yukio; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2003-12-01

    Denitrification is well known to affect the severity of springtime ozone depletion in Polar Regions. In winter 1996/1997 in the Northern Hemisphere and winter 1997 in the Southern Hemisphere, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) detected denitrification in both hemispheres. Here the Match technique and a Lagrangian model are used to analyze the nitric acid variation between a pair of measurements belonging to the same air parcel. Eleven cases are studied in Antarctica and seventeen in the Arctic, permitting testing of the laboratory-measured homogeneous freezing rate of liquid ternary aerosol into nitric acid hydrates, thought to be the determining step of the denitrification process. Over the Antarctica, eight cases out of eleven lead to results in agreement with the measurements, taking into account uncertainties of the measurement and possible acceptable bias in the temperature field used for the modeling study. Over the Arctic, more cases remain unexplained even after taking into account the possible scavenging of nitric acid by large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles falling from the layers above. These disagreements are mainly due to relatively high temperatures along the trajectories that do not lead to significant NAT or nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) freezing. Thus it appears that some additional mechanisms are required to explain the denitrification in the Arctic winter. Moreover, the occurrence of denitrification due to the few NAT particles with very large radius (few μm), the so-called "NAT rocks," over the Antarctic winter in 1997 is suggested.

  7. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  8. The stability of amoxicillin trihydrate and potassium clavulanate combination in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Jerzsele, Akos; Nagy, Gábor

    2009-12-01

    The effect of various environmental factors on the stability of aqueous solutions of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination in a veterinary water-soluble powder product was investigated. In the swine industry, the combination is administered via the drinking water, where both substances are quickly decomposed depending on several environmental factors. The degradation rate of the substances was determined in solutions of different water hardness levels (German hardness of 2, 6 and 10) and pH values (3.0, 7.0 and 10.0), and in troughs made of different materials (metal or plastic). Increasing the water hardness decreased the stability of both substances, amoxicillin being more stable at each hardness value than clavulanate. Amoxicillin trihydrate proved to be most stable at an acidic pH, while increasing the pH decreased its stability (P < 0.05). Maximum stability of potassium clavulanate was experienced at neutral pH, while its decomposition rate was significantly higher at acidic and alkaline pH values (P < 0.01). The stability of the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination depends mainly on the less stable clavulanate, although the effect of metallic ions significantly increased the decomposition rate of amoxicillin, rendering it less stable in metal troughs than clavulanate (P < 0.05). Therefore, the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination should be administered to the animals in soft water, at neutral pH and in plastic troughs.

  9. Freezing of sulfuric and nitric acid solutions: Implications for polar stratospheric cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo Gonzalez, Dara

    2000-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play an important role in ozone chemistry during the polar winter. The magnitude of their effect depends on their phase, composition and formation mechanism, which are not fully understood yet. In order to understand how liquid PSCs freeze, two apparatus were designed to study the freezing behavior of small drops using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and an optical microscope. Sulfuric acid aqueous drops with composition of 10 to 50 wt % were studied with the FTIR apparatus. The surface on which the drops stand caused heterogeneous nucleation of ice, but not of the sulfuric acid hydrates. The more concentrated solutions (>40 wt %) supercooled to 130 K without freezing. Below 150 K these solutions formed an amorphous solid, which liquefied upon warming. Drops with composition of 40 to 64 wt % HNO3 were prepared and their phase transitions were detected with the optical microscope apparatus. Freezing temperatures of the drops were determined and homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (JNAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (JNAT) between 170 and 190 K were calculated. JNAT and JNAD depend predominantly on the saturation of the solid in the liquid solution: higher saturation ratios correspond to higher nucleation rates. Classical nucleation theory was used to parameterize this relation. Since the saturation ratios of NAD and NAT vary with temperature and composition in different ways, NAT or NAD can form preferentially under different conditions. Evidence was found that NAD catalyzes the nucleation of NAT below ~183 K. Mullite, cristobalite and alumina were tested as possible heterogeneous nuclei of volcanic origin for PSCs. They catalyze freezing of NAD and NAT at temperatures below 179 K, which are too low to be stratospherically important. The results suggest that the largest drops in a PSC will freeze homogeneously if the stratospheric temperature remains below the NAT condensation temperature for more

  10. Interannual variations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud formation and nitric acid observed by CALIOP and MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Alyn; Santee, Michelle L.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-12-01

    We use satellite-borne measurements collected over the last decade (2006-2015) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) to investigate the nitric acid distribution and the properties of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the early winter Antarctic vortex. Frequently, at the very start of the winter, we find that synoptic-scale depletion of HNO3 can be detected in the inner vortex before the first lidar detection of geophysically associated PSCs. The generation of "sub-visible" PSCs can be explained as arising from the development of a solid particle population with low number densities and large particle sizes. Assumed to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the sub-visible PSCs form at ambient temperatures well above the ice frost point, but also above the temperature at which supercooled ternary solution (STS) grows out of the background supercooled binary solution (SBS) distribution. The temperature regime of their formation, inferred from the simultaneous uptake of ambient HNO3 into NAT and their Lagrangian temperature histories, is at a depression of a few kelvin with respect to the NAT existence threshold, TNAT. Therefore, their nucleation requires a considerable supersaturation of HNO3 over NAT, and is consistent with a recently described heterogeneous nucleation process on solid foreign nuclei immersed in liquid aerosol. We make a detailed investigation of the comparative limits of detection of PSCs and the resulting sequestration of HNO3 imposed by lidar, mid-infrared, and microwave techniques. We find that the temperature history of air parcels, in addition to the local ambient temperature, is an important factor in the relative frequency of formation of liquid/solid PSCs. We conclude that the initiation of NAT nucleation and the subsequent development of large NAT particles capable of sedimentation and denitrification in the early winter do not emanate from an ice

  11. Do NAD and NAT form in liquid stratospheric aerosols by pseudoheterogeneous nucleation?

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A

    2006-05-04

    Laboratory data of the freezing of nitric acid hydrates (NAD, NAT) from HNO(3)/H(2)O and HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O solution droplets have been evaluated with respect to a "pseudoheterogeneous" (surface-induced) nucleation mechanism of NAD and NAT, which has been argued to possibly lead to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). In addition, a parametrization of pseudoheterogeneous nucleation of NAD and NAT suggested recently (Tabazadeh et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106, 10238-10246) has been analyzed, showing that this parametrization should not be used in stratospheric modeling studies. The analysis of several laboratory data sets yields an upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAD of 2.2 x 10(-5) cm(-2) s(-1). In contrast, the upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAT could not be constrained satisfactorily, since formation of NAT has not been observed at stratospheric conditions in laboratory experiments applying small droplets. Maximum NAD production rates of 9.6 x 10(-9) cm(-3) (air) h(-1) in the stratosphere have been estimated assuming a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism that is constrained by the experimental observations. If maximum NAD supersaturation persisted for 4 weeks in the polar stratosphere the corresponding NAD particle number densities are estimated to be about 6 x 10(-6) cm(-3). These particle number densities are 3 orders of magnitude lower than particle number densities recently observed in the stratosphere. In conclusion, on the basis of laboratory data it is found that a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism is not sufficient to explain recent observations of large nitric acid containing particles in the polar stratosphere.

  12. Heat storage material comprising lithium chlorate-trihydrate and a nucleating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Gawron, K.; Schroder, J.

    1980-02-19

    A heat storage material comprising lithium chlorate-trihydrate as the heat storage medium and potassium perchlorate and/or sodium, potassium or barium hexafluorosilicate as the nucleating agent to reduce supercooling.

  13. Real refractive indices of infrared-characterized nitric-acid/ice films: Implications for optical measurements of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Berland, Brian S.; George, Steven M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared spectra of nitric-acid/ice films representative of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were collected with simultaneous optical interference measurements to determine the real refractive indices at lambda = 632 nm. Ice and amphorous nitric-acid/ice films were prepared by condensation of water and nitric acid vapors onto a wedged Al2O3 substrate. The real refractive indices of these films were determined from the optical interference of a reflected helium-neon laser during film growth. The indices of the amphorous films varied smoothly from n = 1.30 for ice to n = 1.49 for nitric acid, similar to observations in previous work. We were unable to obtain the refractive index of crystlline films during adsorption because of optical scattering caused by surface roughness. Therefore crystlline nitric acid hydrate films were prepared by annealing amphorous nitric-acid/ice films. Further heating caused desorption of the crystalline hydrate films. During desorption, the refractive indices for ice, NAM (nitric acid monohydrate), alpha- and beta-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) films were measured using the optical interference technique. In agreement with earlier data, the real refractive indices for ice and NAM determined in desorption were n = 1.30 +/- 0.01 and n = 1.53 +/- 0.03, respectively. The real refractive indices for alpha- and beta-NAT were found to be n = 1.51 +/- 0.01 and n greater than or equal to 1.46, respectively. Our measurements also suggest that the shape of crystalline nitric acid particles may depend on whether they nucleate from the liquid or by vapor deposition. If confirmed by future studies, this observation may provide a means of distinguishing the nucleation mechanism of crystalline PSCs.

  14. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  15. Simulations of the Vertical Redistribution of HNO3 by NAT or NAD PSCs: The Sensitivity to the Number of Cloud Particles Formed and the Cloud Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Toon, Owen B.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Recent satellite and in situ measurements have indicated that limited denitrification can occur in the Arctic stratosphere. In situ measurements from the SOLVE campaign indicate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) composed of small numbers (about 3 x 10^ -4 cm^-3) of 10-20 micron particles (probably NAT or NAD). These observations raise the issue of whether low number density NAT PSCs can substantially denitrify the air with reasonable cloud lifetimes. In this study, we use a one dimensional cloud model to investigate the verticle redistribution of HNO3 by NAT/NAD PSCs. The cloud formation is driven by a temperature oscillation which drops the temperature below the NAT/NAD formation threshold (about 195 K) for a few days. We assume that a small fraction of the available aerosols act as NAT nuclei when the saturation ratio of HNO3 over NAT(NAD) exceeds 10(l.5). The result is a cloud between about 16 and 20 km in the model, with NAT/NAD particle effective radii as large as about 10 microns (in agreement with the SOLVE data). We find that for typical cloud lifetimes of 2-3 days or less, the net depletion of HNO3 is no more than 1-2 ppbv, regardless of the NAT or NAD particle number density. Repeated passes of the air column through the cold pool build up the denitrification to 3-4 ppbv, and the cloud altitude steadily decreases due to the downward transport of nitric acid. Increasing the cloud lifetime results in considerably more effective denitrification, even with very low cloud particle number densities. As expected, the degree of denitrification by NAT clouds is much larger than that by NAD Clouds. Significant denitrification by NAD Clouds is only possible if the cloud lifetime is several days or more. The clouds also cause a local maximum HNO3 mixing ratio at cloud base where the cloud particles sublimate.

  16. Cysteamine effects on somatostatin, catecholamines, pineal NAT and melatonin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.M.; Champney, T.H.; Steger, R.W.; Vaughan, M.K.; Reiter, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The thiol reagent cysteamine was administered to adult male rats with the aim of investigating its effect on different neural and pineal components. As expected, immunoreactive somatostatin decreased in the median eminence (ME) (p less than 0.05) and gastric antrum (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine; however, no significant change was observed in the pineal IRS content after drug treatment. A decrease in norepinephrine was observed in the ME (p less than 0.001), hypothalamus (p less than 0.001) and pineal gland (p less than 0.05), together with a rise in ME (p less than 0.005) and hypothalamic dopamine (p less than 0.005) content; these results are consistent with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibiting effect of cysteamine. No effect was observed on hypothalamic serotonin and 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid content. Pineal N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) after cysteamine than after saline, but no statistically significant effect was observed on pineal melatonin content. The mechanism involved in the NAT rise is presumably not related to the known stimulatory effect of norepinephrine, which fell after cysteamine. It is suggested that cysteamine may act at an intracellular level, inhibiting NAT degradation, an effect demonstrated in vitro and thought to be related to a thiol:disulfide exchange mechanism.

  17. Natural convection during a phase change of sodium acetate trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Yasunori; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    A latent heat storage system has higher storage capacity than a sensible heat storage system. Sodium acetate trihydrate has large latent heat at the temperature, 58°C, suitable for a hot-water supply system. The present study focused on convection in a phase change process to understand the heat transfer from the phase change material (PCM). The convection occurred only in certain conditions of supercooling temperature and PCM concentration. A spicular crystal grew quickly and the thermal convection couldn't be detected at large supercooling temperature with high concentration of PCM. In the range of 5 ~ 13°C of supercooling temperature, the buoyancy driven convection due to the latent heat of PCM was measured using the PIV. It was also observed that a part of CH3COONa-3H2O solution was sucked into the growing spicular crystals to supply CH3COONa at the condition with small concentration and at 5 ~ 13°C of supercooling temperature.

  18. The hydration number n of calcium dipicolinate trihydrate, CaDP center dot nH(2)O, and its effect on the IR spectra of sporulated Bacillus bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Stephen D.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Su, Yin-Fong

    2010-05-26

    Previous results have shown a unique "quartet" of peaks in the infrared spectra of the sporulated phase of Bacillus bacteria, the four peaks being observed reproducibly for many different species of Bacillus endospores. We consistently observe peaks at 766, 725, 701, and 659 cm-1 and with the same relative amplitudes, as well as other spore peaks at 1441, 1277, 1015 cm-1. We have previously suggested that the peaks arise from calcium dipicolinate, not the conjugate acid. In this paper we conduct a theoretical and experimental study to show that the IR peaks not only arise from the calcium dipicolinate, a known spore component, but specifically the trihydrate salt, CaDP•3H2O. This is shown by calculating the absolute IR intensities of the lone dipicolinate dianion, the calcium salt, as well as the mono-, di- and tri-hydrate salts of calcium dipicolinate. The quartet peaks arise from the crystalline trihydrate salt as we verify both experimentally as well as using quantum chemistry methods. Using a method whereby the calculated intensities are not normalized, only the trihydrate spectrum shows low frequency modes (below 1000 cm-1, including the quartet) having intensities comparable to those of the pyridine ring. The vibrational modes in this part of the spectrum are associated with many internal coordinate motions including contributions from the Ca2+ counterion and the three waters including Ca-O-H bends, H2O-Ca-O torsions and O-C-O bends. Index Headings: Infrared, calcium dipicolinate, Bacillus, Bacteria, Endospores

  19. PlantNATsDB: a comprehensive database of plant natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dijun; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Zhao; Bai, Lin; Meng, Yijun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), as one type of regulatory RNAs, occur prevalently in plant genomes and play significant roles in physiological and pathological processes. Although their important biological functions have been reported widely, a comprehensive database is lacking up to now. Consequently, we constructed a plant NAT database (PlantNATsDB) involving approximately 2 million NAT pairs in 69 plant species. GO annotation and high-throughput small RNA sequencing data currently available were integrated to investigate the biological function of NATs. PlantNATsDB provides various user-friendly web interfaces to facilitate the presentation of NATs and an integrated, graphical network browser to display the complex networks formed by different NATs. Moreover, a ‘Gene Set Analysis’ module based on GO annotation was designed to dig out the statistical significantly overrepresented GO categories from the specific NAT network. PlantNATsDB is currently the most comprehensive resource of NATs in the plant kingdom, which can serve as a reference database to investigate the regulatory function of NATs. The PlantNATsDB is freely available at http://bis.zju.edu.cn/pnatdb/. PMID:22058132

  20. Silica-alumina trihydrate filled epoxy castings resistant to arced SF.sub.6

    DOEpatents

    Chenoweth, Terrence E.; Yeoman, Frederick A.

    1978-01-01

    A cured, insulating, casting composition, having a coefficient of linear thermal expansion of below about 38 .times. 10.sup.-6 in./in./.degree. C and being resistant to arced sulfur hexafluoride gas, in contact with a metal surface in a sulfur hexafluoride gas environment, is made from hydantoin epoxy resin, anhydride curing agent and a filler combination of fused silica and alumina trihydrate.

  1. 21 CFR 522.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ampicillin trihydrate powder for injection. 522.90b Section 522.90b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  2. Arylamine N-acetyl Transferase (NAT) in the blue secretion of Telescopium telescopium: xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme as a biomarker for detection of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Gorain, Bapi; Chakraborty, Sumon; Pal, Murari Mohan; Sarkar, Ratul; Samanta, Samir Kumar; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2014-01-01

    Telescopium telescopium, a marine mollusc collected from Sundarban mangrove, belongs to the largest mollusca phylum in the world and exudes a blue secretion when stimulated mechanically. The blue secretion was found to metabolize (preferentially) para-amino benzoic acid, a substrate for N-acetyl transferase (NAT), thereby indicating acetyl transferase like activity of the secretion. Attempts were also made to characterise bioactive fraction of the blue secretion and to further use this as a biomarker for monitoring of marine pollution. NAT like enzyme from marine mollusc is a potential candidate for detoxification of different harmful chemicals. A partially purified extract of blue secretion was obtained by fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. From different fractions obtained by precipitation, the 0-30% fraction (30S) displayed NAT like activity (using para amino benzoic acid as a substrate with para nitrophenyl phosphate or acetyl coenzyme A as acetyl group donors). Maximum NAT like enzyme activity was attained at 25°C and at a pH of 6. The enzyme activity was found to be inhibited by 5 mM phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride. The divalent metal ions reduced NAT like activity of 30S. Moreover, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (at concentration of 1 mM) completely inhibited NAT activity. The thermal stability and bench-top stability studies were performed and it was found that the enzyme was stable at room temperature for more than 24 hours. Results from the present study further indicate that heavy metal content in blue secretion gradually decreased from pre-monsoon to post-monsoon season, which also corresponded to the change in NAT like activity. Therefore, this article stresses the importance of biomarker research for monitoring pollution.

  3. Production cross section of At radionuclides from 7Li+natPb and 9Be+natTl reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2011-12-01

    Earlier we reported theoretical studies on the probable production of astatine radionuclides from 6,7Li- and 9Be-induced reactions on natural lead and thallium targets, respectively. The production of astatine radionuclides were investigated experimentally with two heavy-ion-induced reactions: 9Be + natTl and 7Li + natPb. Formation cross sections of the evaporation residues, 207,208,209,210At, produced in the (HI,xn) channel, were measured by the stacked-foil technique followed by off-line γ spectrometry at low incident energies (<50 MeV). Measured excitation functions were interpreted in terms of a compound nuclear reaction mechanism using Weisskopf-Ewing and Hauser-Feshbach models. Measured cross-section values are lower than the respective theoretical predictions.

  4. An EPR and optical absorption study of Cu(2+) doped in disodium malonate trihydrate single crystal.

    PubMed

    Yarbaşi, Zeynep; Karabulut, Bünyamin; Karabulut, Abdulhalik

    2009-03-01

    Single crystals and powder electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Cu(2+)-doped disodium malonate trihydrate [C(3)H(2)O(4)Na(2).3H(2)O] have been carried out at room temperature. The angular variation of the disodium malonate trihydrate single crystal have shown that two different Cu(2+) complexes are located in different chemical environments, and each environment contains one magnetically inequivalent Cu(2+) sites in distinct orientations occupying substitutional positions in the lattice and show very high angular dependence. The principal values of the g and the hyperfine tensors were determined and were found to be in agreement with the literature values. Crystal field around the Cu(2+) ion is nearly rhombic. The optical absorption studies show two bands at 603nm (16584cm(-1)) and 890nm (11236cm(-1)) which confirm the rhombic symmetry. The crystals field parameters and than the wave function are determined.

  5. An EPR and optical absorption study of Cu 2+ doped in disodium malonate trihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbaşı, Zeynep; Karabulut, Bünyamin; Karabulut, Abdulhalik

    2009-03-01

    Single crystals and powder electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Cu 2+-doped disodium malonate trihydrate [C 3H 2O 4Na 2·3H 2O] have been carried out at room temperature. The angular variation of the disodium malonate trihydrate single crystal have shown that two different Cu 2+ complexes are located in different chemical environments, and each environment contains one magnetically inequivalent Cu 2+ sites in distinct orientations occupying substitutional positions in the lattice and show very high angular dependence. The principal values of the g and the hyperfine tensors were determined and were found to be in agreement with the literature values. Crystal field around the Cu 2+ ion is nearly rhombic. The optical absorption studies show two bands at 603 nm (16584 cm -1) and 890 nm (11236 cm -1) which confirm the rhombic symmetry. The crystals field parameters and than the wave function are determined.

  6. Association between polymorphisms at N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) & risk of oral leukoplakia & cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mousumi; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) are important enzymes for metabolism of tobacco carcinogens. Due to polymorphisms, improper activities of these enzymes might lead to the formation of DNA adducts that may modulate risk of tobacco related oral precancer and cancer. Previously, it was shown that NAT2 polymorphisms did not modulate the risk of oral precancer and cancer. We undertook this study to check whether polymorphisms at NAT1 can modulate the risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer either alone or in combination with NAT2. Methods: Genotypes at four SNPs on NAT1 were determined by TaqMan method in 389 controls, 224 leukoplakia and 310 cancer patients. Genotype data were analyzed to know haplotypes and acetylation status of individuals and, then to estimate the risk of diseases. Using our previously published NAT2 data, combination of NAT1 and NAT2 acetylation genotypes of patients and controls were also analyzed to estimate the risk of diseases. Results: Analysis of NAT1 genotype data revealed that 1088T and 1095C alleles exist in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2=0.97, P<0.0001) and SNPs are in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (P=0.1). Wild type or normal acetylating and variant or rapid acetylating alleles were two major alleles (frequencies 0.62 and 0.36, respectively) present in the control population. NAT1 rapid acetylation could not modulate the risk of leukoplakia and cancer (OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.6-1.3; OR=1.0, 95% CI: 0.7-1.4, respectively). Analysis of combined NAT1 and NAT2 acetylating data also showed no significant enhancement of the risk of diseases. Interpretation & conclusions: NAT1 rapid acetylation alone as well as combination of NAT1 rapid-NAT2 slow acetylation did not modulate the risk of oral precancer and cancer in our patient population. So, NAT1/NAT2 metabolized carcinogen products may not be involved in tobacco related oral precancer and cancer. It may be interpreted that large sample size as well as combination of

  7. NAT2 gene diversity and its evolutionary trajectory in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Bisso-Machado, R; Ramallo, V; Paixão-Côrtes, V R; Acuña-Alonzo, V; Demarchi, D A; Sandoval, J R S; Granara, A A S; Salzano, F M; Hünemeier, T; Bortolini, M C

    2016-11-01

    N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is responsible for metabolizing xenobiotics; NAT2 polymorphisms lead to three phenotypes: rapid, intermediate and slow acetylators. We aimed to investigate NAT2 diversity in Native Americans. NAT2 exon 2 was sequenced for 286 individuals from 21 populations (Native American and American Mestizos). Excluding the basal/rapid haplotype NAT2*4, the most frequent haplotypes are NAT2*5B (35.95%) in hunter-gatherers and NAT2*7B (20.61%) and NAT2*5B (19.08%) in agriculturalists that were related to the slow phenotype. A new haplotype was identified in two Amerindians. Data from the ~44 kb region surrounding NAT2 in 819 individuals from Africa, East-Asia, Europe and America were used in additional analyses. No significant differences in the acetylator NAT2 haplotype and phenotype distributions were found between Native American populations practicing farming and/or herding and those practicing hunting and gathering, probably because of the absence or weakness of selection pressures and presence of demographic and random processes preventing detection of any selection signal.

  8. Global analysis of cis-natural antisense transcripts and their heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brassica rapa includes several important leaf vegetable crops whose production is often damaged by high temperature. Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and cis-NATs-derived small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) play important roles in plant development and stress responses. However, genome-wide cis-NATs in B. rapa are not known. The NATs and nat-siRNAs that respond to heat stress have never been well studied in B. rapa. Here, we took advantage of RNA-seq and small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing technology to identify cis-NATs and heat responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa. Results Analyses of four RNA sequencing datasets revealed 1031 cis-NATs B. rapa ssp. chinensis cv Wut and B. rapa ssp. pekinensis cv. Bre. Based on sequence homology between Arabidopsis thaliana and B. rapa, 303 conserved cis-NATs in B. rapa were found to correspond to 280 cis-NATs in Arabidopsis; the remaining 728 novel cis-NATs were identified as Brassica-specific ones. Using six sRNA libraries, 4846 nat-siRNAs derived from 150 cis-NATs were detected. Differential expression analysis revealed that nat-siRNAs derived from 12 cis-NATs were responsive to heat stress, and most of them showed strand bias. Real-time PCR indicated that most of the transcripts generating heat-responsive nat-siRNAs were upregulated under heat stress, while the transcripts from the opposite strands of the same loci were downregulated. Conclusions Our results provide the first subsets of genome-wide cis-NATs and heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa; these sRNAs are potentially useful for the genetic improvement of heat tolerance in B. rapa and other crops. PMID:24320882

  9. Solid-state forms of zoledronic acid: polymorphism in hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ruscica, Romina; Bianchi, Micaela; Quintero, Mariano; Martinez, Andrea; Vega, Daniel R

    2010-12-01

    Solid-state forms of zoledronic acid, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate used for treatment of bone diseases are studied using different experimental techniques (DSC, TG, and XRD). Two degrees of hydration have been obtained, containing one and three water molecules per zoledronic acid molecule. The crystal structure of the trihydrated form is reported. Two different anhydrated forms have been obtained when the hydrated ones were heated. Besides, during the dehydration process, an amount of metastable amorphous phase appears, as a function of the dehydration rate. The stability of the obtained crystalline forms is examined under high humidity and a different trihydrated form was obtained, setting clear that the same degree of hydration (trihydrated) can be obtained in two different crystalline forms, and then very different thermal behaviors have been observed.

  10. A Study Guide for Stephen B. Oates' "The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This document is a study guide for Stephen B. Oates biography of Nat Turner, "The Fires of Jubilee." The book is a practical reading vehicle for introducing Nat Turner to secondary students in grades 11 and 12. Oates divides his work into four parts, which could provide the basis for four reading assignments, although the sections are…

  11. Nat1 promotes translation of specific proteins that induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Hayami; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Iwasaki, Mio; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Rand, Tim A.; Nakagawa, Masato; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    Novel APOBEC1 target 1 (Nat1) (also known as “p97,” “Dap5,” and “Eif4g2”) is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic protein that is homologous to the C-terminal two thirds of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (Eif4g1). We previously showed that Nat1-null mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) are resistant to differentiation. In the current study, we found that NAT1 and eIF4G1 share many binding proteins, such as the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF3 and eIF4A and ribosomal proteins. However, NAT1 did not bind to eIF4E or poly(A)-binding proteins, which are critical for cap-dependent translation initiation. In contrast, compared with eIF4G1, NAT1 preferentially interacted with eIF2, fragile X mental retardation proteins (FMR), and related proteins and especially with members of the proline-rich and coiled-coil–containing protein 2 (PRRC2) family. We also found that Nat1-null mES cells possess a transcriptional profile similar, although not identical, to the ground state, which is established in wild-type mES cells when treated with inhibitors of the ERK and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) signaling pathways. In Nat1-null mES cells, the ERK pathway is suppressed even without inhibitors. Ribosome profiling revealed that translation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (Map3k3) and son of sevenless homolog 1 (Sos1) is suppressed in the absence of Nat1. Forced expression of Map3k3 induced differentiation of Nat1-null mES cells. These data collectively show that Nat1 is involved in the translation of proteins that are required for cell differentiation. PMID:28003464

  12. Spectrophotometric Determination of Cefixime Trihydrate in Pharmaceutical Formulations Based on Ion-Pair Reaction with Bromophenol Blue

    PubMed Central

    Keskar, Mrudul R; Jugade, Ravin M

    2015-01-01

    Cefixime trihydrate is a broad spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections. Simple and rapid method has been developed for the determination of cefixime trihydrate in bulk and pharmaceutical formulations. This method was based on the formation of bluish-green ion-pair complex of cefixime trihydrate with bromophenol blue in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)–acetonitrile medium. Different parameters were studied and optimized. A 2:1 complex was formed between the drug and reagent almost instantaneously at room temperature which has λmax of 610 nm. Under optimum conditions, calibration curve was found to be linear over the range of 10–130 μg mL−1. The method was subjected to analytical quality control. The limit of detection was found to be 1.08 μg mL−1. Recovery studies and interference studies were carried out. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of cefixime trihydrate in bulk and pharmaceutical formulations with high precision and accuracy. PMID:26279621

  13. The Infrared Spectra of Bacillus Bacteria Part II: Sporulated Bacillus-the Effect of Vegetative Cells and Contributions of Calcium Dipicolinate Trihydrate, CaDP•3H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Stephen D.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Su, Yin-Fong

    2009-08-01

    Our previous paper showed that certain IR peaks, e.g. the peak at 1739 cm-1, are due to varying (trace) amounts of vegetative cells amongst the Bacillus spores and that these and other vegetative bands are associated with lipid-soluble compounds, likely phosphatidyl glycerol or phosphatidyl ethanolamine. This work investigates the infrared spectra of eight different sporulated Bacillus bacteria. For the endospores it is observed that peaks at 1441, 1277, 1015 cm-1 along with a distinct quartet of peaks at 766, 725, 701, and 659 cm-1 are clearly associated with calcium dipicolinate trihydrate, CaDP•3H2O. It is emphasized that the spore peaks, especially the quartet, arise from the calcium dipicolinate trihydrate and not from dipicolinic acid or other dipicolinate hydrate salts. The CaDP•3H2O vibrational peaks and the effects of hydration are studied using quantum chemistry in the PQS software package. The quartet is associated with many modes including contributions from the Ca2+ counterion and hydration waters including Ca-O-H bends, H2O-Ca-O torsions and O-C-O bends. The 1441 and 1015 cm-1 modes are planar pyridine modes with the 1441 mode primarily a ring C-N stretch and the 1015 mode primarily a ring C-C stretch.

  14. Daily Aa-nat gene expression in the camel (Camelus dromedarius) pineal gland.

    PubMed

    El Allali, Khalid; Sinitskaya, Natalia; Bothorel, Béatrice; Achaaban, Rachid; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2008-09-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) is the rhythm-generating enzyme for the synthesis of pineal melatonin. Molecular investigations have revealed two biological models for the activation of AA-NAT. In rodent species, Aa-nat gene transcription is turned off during the daytime and markedly activated at night. In primates, sheep, and cows, the Aa-nat gene is constitutively transcripted with no visible daily variations. This inter-species difference in Aa-nat gene regulation leads to different daily profiles in melatonin synthesis and release. Thus, the nighttime onset of the rise in circulating melatonin is delayed and slow in rodents, whereas it is fast and sharp in sheep. In the camel (Camelus dromedarius), we have observed that circulating melatonin rises immediately after sunset, suggesting AA-NAT activity is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. In agreement with this hypothesis, we report herein the amount of Aa-nat mRNA in the camel pineal gland is high, during both the day and night with no daily variations, while melatonin concentration in the same pineal tissue is five times higher during the night than daytime.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 91 - Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace C Appendix C to Part 91 Aeronautics and... North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace Section 1 NAT...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 91 - Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace C Appendix C to Part 91 Aeronautics and... North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace Section 1 NAT...

  17. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 91 - Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace C Appendix C to Part 91 Aeronautics and... North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace Section 1 NAT...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 91 - Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace C Appendix C to Part 91 Aeronautics and... North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace Section 1 NAT...

  19. Metabolic activation and analgesic effect of flupirtine in healthy subjects, influence of the polymorphic NAT2, UGT1A1 and GSTP1

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Werner; Modess, Christiane; Scheuch, Eberhard; Methling, Karen; Keiser, Markus; Nassif, Ali; Rosskopf, Dieter; Bednarski, Patrick J; Borlak, Jürgen; Terhaag, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Aims The rare association of flupirtine with liver injury is most likely caused by reactive quinone diimines and their oxidative formation may be influenced by the activities of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) that conjugate the less toxic metabolite D13223, and by glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) that generate stable terminal glucuronides and mercapturic acid derivatives, respectively. The influence of genetic polymorphisms of NAT2, UGT1A1 and GSTP1 on generation of the terminal mercapturic acid derivatives and analgesic effects was evaluated to identify potential genetic risk factors for hepatotoxicity of flupirtine. Methods Metabolic disposition of flupirtine was measured after intravenous administration (100 mg), after swallowing an immediate-release (IR) tablet (100 mg) and after repeated administration of modified release (MR) tablets (400 mg once daily 8 days) in 36 selected healthy subjects. Analgesic effects were measured using pain models (delayed onset of muscle soreness, electric pain). Results Flupirtine IR was rapidly but incompletely absorbed (∼72%). Repeated administration of flupirtine MR showed lower bioavailability (∼60%). Approximately 12% of bioavailable flupirtine IR and 8% of bioavailable flupiritine MR was eliminated as mercapturic acid derivatives into the urine independent of the UGT1A1, NAT2 and GSTP1 genotype. Carriers of variant GSTP1 alleles showed lower bioavailability but increased intestinal secretion of flupirtine and increased efficiency in experimental pain. Flupirtine was not a substrate for ABCB1 and ABCC2. Conclusions Formation of mercapturic acid derivatives is a major elimination route for flupirtine in man. However, the theoretically toxic pathway is not influenced by the frequent polymorphisms of UGT1A1, NAT2 and GSTP1. PMID:25264565

  20. Crystal structure of tin(II) perchlorate trihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Köhler, Martin; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, [Sn(H2O)3](ClO4)2, was synthesized by the redox reaction of copper(II) perchlorate hexa­hydrate and metallic tin in perchloric acid. Both the trigonal–pyramidal [Sn(H2O)3]2+ cations and tetra­hedral perchlorate anions lie on crystallographic threefold axes. In the crystal, the cations are linked to the anions by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating (001) sheets. PMID:25552969

  1. Agile Thermal Management STT-RX: Themophysical Properties of Lithium Nitrate Trihydrate from - 20 degrees C to 80 degrees C (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    lithium nitrate trihydrate-lithium nitrate eutectic point (Hfus = 264 ± 2 J·g-1, Tm = 28.3 °C). 15. SUBJECT TERMS salt hydrate, thermal energy...trihydrate (Hfus = 287 ± 7 J·g -1, Tm = 30.1 °C) and the lithium nitrate trihydrate-lithium nitrate eutectic point (Hfus = 264 ± 2 J·g -1, Tm = 28.3...heat of fusion of LiNO3-3H2O and the LiNO3-3H2O/LiNO3 eutectic point. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Lithium nitrate trihydrate (LiNO3-3H2O) samples were

  2. Expression of NAT2 in immune system cells and the relation of NAT2 gene polymorphisms in the anti-tuberculosis therapy in Mexican mestizo population.

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, R; Gómez, R; Romano-Moreno, S; Medellín-Garibay, S; Núñez-Ruíz, A; Magaña-Aquino, M; Milán-Segovia, R C; Portales-Pérez, D P

    2014-12-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) metabolizes isoniazid (INH) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) responsible for its activity has been reported. The aim of this study in the Mexican mestizo population was to evaluate NAT2 expression at the protein level in immune cells, as well as the distribution and frequency of six NAT2 SNPs and their association with anti-TB therapy, by measuring the plasma levels of INH and Acetyl-INH (AcINH). We performed genotyping assays of NAT2 SNPs in 40 TB patients and 121 healthy volunteers by real-time PCR. A method for detecting NAT2 in immune cells using flow cytometry was developed. Plasma concentrations of INH and AcINH were obtained by HPLC in TB patients and the Metabolic Ratio (MR) was calculated. The phenotypes obtained in the healthy volunteers were as follows; 18.87 % of subjects had the rapid acetylator phenotype, 45.45 % had the intermediate phenotype and 39.66 % exhibited the slow acetylator phenotype. In the TB patient group, 35 % of patients had the rapid acetylator phenotype, 32.5 % were intermediate and 32.5 % showed the slow acetylator phenotype. A higher expression level of NAT2 in innate immune cells from TB patients compared to those from healthy volunteers was detected (P < 0.013). In TB patients the MR showed a bimodal distribution with an antimode of 0.7, which was used as a threshold value for acetylator classification. A high correspondence between the rapid and slow acetylator phenotype with MR was demonstrated. In conclusion, the 282C>T, 341T>C, 481C>T, 590G>A, 803A>G, 857G>A SNPs of NAT2 gene provides accurate for prediction of the acetylator phenotype in Mexican mestizo population. A statistical difference was found in frequency of rapid metabolizer phenotype, which was higher in TB patients. In addition, the expression of NAT2 protein in immune cells can lead to further studies related to its functional role in the innate immune response against M. tuberculosis and other xenobiotics

  3. Persistent Water-Nitric Acid Condensate with Saturation Water Vapor Pressure Greater than That of Hexagonal Ice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ru-Shan; Gierczak, Tomasz; Thornberry, Troy D; Rollins, Andrew W; Burkholder, James B; Telg, Hagen; Voigt, Christiane; Peter, Thomas; Fahey, David W

    2016-03-10

    A laboratory chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH), exposed to an airstream containing water vapor (H2O) and nitric acid (HNO3), has been used to demonstrate the existence of a persistent water-nitric acid condensate that has a saturation H2O vapor pressure greater than that of hexagonal ice (Ih). The condensate was routinely formed on the mirror by removing HNO3 from the airstream following the formation of an initial condensate on the mirror that resembled nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). Typical conditions for the formation of the persistent condensate were a H2O mixing ratio greater than 18 ppm, pressure of 128 hPa, and mirror temperature between 202 and 216 K. In steady-state operation, a CMH maintains a condensate of constant optical diffusivity on a mirror through control of only the mirror temperature. Maintaining the persistent condensate on the mirror required that the mirror temperature be below the H2O saturation temperature with respect to Ih by as much as 3 K, corresponding to up to 63% H2O supersaturation with respect to Ih. The condensate was observed to persist in steady state for up to 16 h. Compositional analysis of the condensate confirmed the co-condensation of H2O and HNO3 and thereby strongly supports the conclusion that the Ih supersaturation is due to residual HNO3 in the condensate. Although the exact structure or stoichiometry of the condensate could not be determined, other known stable phases of HNO3 and H2O are excluded as possible condensates. This persistent condensate, if it also forms in the upper tropical troposphere, might explain some of the high Ih supersaturations in cirrus and contrails that have been reported in the tropical tropopause region.

  4. NAT2 gene polymorphisms in three indigenous groups in the Colombian Caribbean Coast region

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Isis; Lecompte, Nelly; Visbal, Lila; Curiel, Iliana; Hernández, Enio; Garavito, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the NAT2 gene polymorphisms 481T, 590A and 857A in the Chimila, Wiwa and Wayuu indigenous groups of the Colombian Caribbean to determine the frequencies of the alleles NAT2*4, NAT2*5, NAT2*6, and NAT2*7 and to determine the types of acetylators present in these populations. Methods: A total of 202 subjects were studied: 47 Chimila, 55 Wiwa, and 100 Wayuu. The polymorphisms were identified using a real-time PCR method for allelic discrimination designed using Taqman of Applied Biosystems. Results: The following alleles were found at the highest frequency in the following groups: the NAT2*4 allele (wild type) in the Wayuu group (55.3%), the NAT2*5 allele in the Wiwa group (34.5%), and the NAT2*7 allele in the Chimila group (24.2%). A higher frequency of the rapid acetylator status was found in the Wayuu group (31.3%) and Chimila group (29.5%) compared with the Wiwa group (12.7%). The intermediate acetylator status distribution was very similar in all three groups, and the frequency of the slow acetylator status was higher in the Wiwa group (32.7%) compared with the Chimila and Wayuu groups (20.5% and 21.2%, respectively). Conclusion: The results demonstrated the allelic distribution and pharmacogenetic differences of the three groups studied and revealed the most frequent acetylator status and phenotype. Because of the high prevalence of slow acetylators, a greater incidence of tuberculosis (TB) drug-induced hepatotoxicity is predicted in these populations, with a higher frequency in the Wiwa group. PMID:25767302

  5. DNA damage induces N-acetyltransferase NAT10 gene expression through transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijing; Ling, Yun; Gong, Yilei; Sun, Ying; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2007-06-01

    NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10) is a protein with histone acetylation activity and primarily identified to be involved in regulation of telomerase activity. The presented research shows its transcriptional activation by genotoxic agents and possible role in DNA damage. NAT10 mRNA could be markedly increased by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cisplatin in a dose- and time-dependent way, and the immunofluorescent staining revealed that the treatment of H2O2 or cisplatin induced focal accumulation of NAT10 protein in cellular nuclei. Both H2O2 and cisplatin could stimulate the transcriptional activity of the NAT10 promoter through the upstream sequences from -615 bp to +110 bp, with which some nuclear proteins interacted. Ectopic expression of NAT10 could enhance the number of survival cells in the presence of H2O2 or cisplatin. The above results suggested that NAT10 could be involved in DNA damage response and increased cellular resistance to genotoxicity.

  6. Phase-Change Characteristic Analysis of Partially Melted Sodium Acetate Trihydrate Using DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xing; Medina, Mario A.; Zhang, Xiaosong; Zhang, Shuanglong

    2014-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT), which is a kind of phase-change material, offers high potential for application in thermal energy storage. However, SAT has a natural tendency to supercool during its solidification process. Adding nucleating agents has been suggested as a possible solution. In this paper, the phase-change characteristics of the partially melted SAT were analyzed using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). A phenomenon related to SAT undergoing phase change was discovered and analyzed. The results showed that if SAT were cooled when it was partially melted, it would release heat and quickly solidify without adding any nucleating agents. Therefore, if the temperature range of SAT was controlled properly, supercooling could be significantly prevented.

  7. A new compound in kidney stones? Powder X-ray diffraction study of calcium glycinate trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Le Bail, Armel; Daudon, Michel; Bazin, Dominique

    2013-07-01

    The present identification of a new compound in kidney stones is relevant in clinical practice. Here, poly[[di-μ-aqua-bis(glycinato-κ(2)N,O)calcium(II)] monohydrate], {[Ca(C2H4NO2)2(H2O)2]·H2O}n, has been identified in a possible kidney concretion, although it could be a 'false calculus' associated with Munchausen syndrome. The crystal packing is characterized by an infinite zigzag chain of Ca atoms in [Ca(OW)4O2N2] (OW is a water O atom) square antiprisms, sharing edges formed by water molecules. An uncoordinated water molecule interconnects the parallel chains in a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding scheme. Similarities between the trihydrate and the monohydrate are described.

  8. N-terminal acetylome analyses and functional insights of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatB

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Petra; Lasa, Marta; Polevoda, Bogdan; Gazquez, Cristina; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Kim, Duk Soo; De Juan-Pardo, Elena; Demeyer, Kimberly; Hole, Kristine; Larrea, Esther; Timmerman, Evy; Prieto, Jesus; Arnesen, Thomas; Sherman, Fred; Gevaert, Kris; Aldabe, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) is an important mediator of protein function, stability, sorting, and localization. Although the responsible enzymes are thought to be fairly well characterized, the lack of identified in vivo substrates, the occurrence of Nt-acetylation substrates displaying yet uncharacterized N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) specificities, and emerging evidence of posttranslational Nt-acetylation, necessitate the use of genetic models and quantitative proteomics. NatB, which targets Met-Glu-, Met-Asp-, and Met-Asn-starting protein N termini, is presumed to Nt-acetylate 15% of all yeast and 18% of all human proteins. We here report on the evolutionary traits of NatB from yeast to human and demonstrate that ectopically expressed hNatB in a yNatB-Δ yeast strain partially complements the natB-Δ phenotypes and partially restores the yNatB Nt-acetylome. Overall, combining quantitative N-terminomics with yeast studies and knockdown of hNatB in human cell lines, led to the unambiguous identification of 180 human and 110 yeast NatB substrates. Interestingly, these substrates included Met-Gln- N-termini, which are thus now classified as in vivo NatB substrates. We also demonstrate the requirement of hNatB activity for maintaining the structure and function of actomyosin fibers and for proper cellular migration. In addition, expression of tropomyosin-1 restored the altered focal adhesions and cellular migration defects observed in hNatB-depleted HeLa cells, indicative for the conserved link between NatB, tropomyosin, and actin cable function from yeast to human. PMID:22814378

  9. Solubility of esomeprazole magnesium trihydrate in alcohols at temperatures from 298.15 to 318.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhesaniya, K.; Baluja, S.

    2013-12-01

    The solubility of esomeprazole magnesium trihydrate in methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol was determined at temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 318.15 K at atmospheric pressure using gravimetrical method. The highest solubility is found in 1-butanol and lowest in ethanol. The experimental solubility data are correlated by the modified Apelblat equation. Thermodynamic properties such as dissolution enthalpy, Gibb's energy, and entropy of mixing have been determined from the solubility data.

  10. NAT1 polymorphisms and cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kunyi; Gao, Lijuan; Wu, Yuqi; Chen, Jianyi; Lin, Chengguang; Liang, Shaohua; Su, Jianxin; Ye, Jinming; He, Xuyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between the N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) slow and rapid acetylation phenotypes with cancer risk based on a meta-analysis. Methods: Previously published case-control studies were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined to assess the relationship between NAT1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. Results: A total of 73 studies (24874 cases and 30226 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was identified between NAT1 polymorphisms (slow acetylation versus rapid acetylation genotypes: OR = 0.978, 95% CI = 0.927-1.030, P < 0.001 for heterogeneity, I2 = 45.5%) and cancer risk, whereas a significantly reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was identified in individuals with NAT1 slow acetylation genotype (OR = 0.856, 95% CI = 0.733-0.999, P =0.509 for heterogeneity, I2 = 0). When the NAT1 slow acetylation genotype was analysed on the basis of stratified analyses of ethnicity, a significantly reduced risk of head and neck cancers was found among Asian (OR=0.281, 95% CI = 0.127-0.622). When the NAT1 slow acetylation genotype was analysed on the basis of stratified analyses of source of control, only significantly reduced risks of colorectal cancer (OR = 0.882, 95% CI = 0.798- 0.974, P = 0.212 for heterogeneity, I2 = 22.9) and pancreatic cancer (OR=0.856, 95% CI = 0.733-0.999, P = 0.509 for heterogeneity, I2 = 0) were found among hospital-based studies. Conclusions: No significant association between the NAT1 polymorphisms and the risk of cancer was found except for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26309576

  11. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  12. Red meat intake, NAT2, and risk of colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of 11 studies

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Du, Mengmeng; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gallinger, Steven; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hou, Lifang; Hsu, Li; Jenkins, Mark A.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Nan, Hongmei; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ogino, Shuji; Potter, John D.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Thornquist, Mark; White, Emily; Wu, Kana; Peters, Ulrike; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Red meat intake has been associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), potentially mediated through heterocyclic amines. The metabolic efficiency of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) required for the metabolic activation of such amines is influenced by genetic variation. The interaction between red meat intake, NAT2 genotype, and CRC has been inconsistently reported. Methods We used pooled individual-level data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO). Red meat intake was collected by each study. We inferred NAT2 phenotype based on polymorphism at rs1495741, highly predictive of enzyme activity. Interaction was assessed using multiplicative interaction terms in multivariate-adjusted models. Results From 11 studies, 8,290 CRC cases and 9,115 controls were included. The highest quartile of red meat intake was associated with increased risk of CRC compared to the lowest quartile (OR 1.41, 95%CI 1.29 – 1.55). However, a significant association was observed only for studies with retrospective diet data, not for studies with diet prospectively assessed before cancer diagnosis. Combining all studies, high red meat intake was similarly associated with CRC in those with a rapid/intermediate NAT2 genotype (OR 1.38, 95%CI 1.20 – 1.59) as with a slow genotype (OR 1.43, 95%CI 1.28 – 1.61) (p- interaction=0.9). Conclusion We found that high red meat intake was associated with increased risk of CRC only from retrospective case-control studies and not modified by NAT2 enzyme activity. Impact Our results suggest no interaction between NAT2 genotype and red-meat intake in mediating risk of CRC. PMID:25342387

  13. Pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin trihydrate in male Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) following intramuscular administration.

    PubMed

    Sinphithakkul, P; Klangkaew, N; Sanyathitiseree, P; Giorgi, M; Kumagai, S; Poapolathep, A; Poapolathep, S

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of amoxicillin (AMX) trihydrate in male Asian elephants, Elephas maximus, following intramuscular administration at two dosages of 5.5 and 11 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Blood samples were collected from 0.5 up to 72 h. The concentration of AMX in elephant plasma was measured using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. AMX was measurable up to 24 h after administration at two dosages. Peak plasma concentration (Cmax ) was 1.20 ± 0.39 μg/mL after i.m. administration at a dosage of 5.5 mg/kg b.w., whereas it was 3.40 ± 0.63 μg/mL at a dosage of 11 mg/kg b.w. A noncompartment model was developed to describe the disposition of AMX in Asian elephants. Based on the preliminary findings found in this research, the dosage of 5.5 and 11 mg/kg b.w. produced drug plasma concentrations higher than 0.25 mg/mL for 24 h after i.m. administration. Thereafter, i.m. administration with AMX at a dosage of 5.5 mg/kg b.w. appeared a more suitable dose than 11 mg/kg b.w. However, more studies are needed to determine AMX clinical effectiveness in elephants.

  14. Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on the Thermal Properties of Sodium Acetate Trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay-Ramírez, B.; Cruz-Orea, A.; San Martín-Martínez, E.

    2015-06-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) is used as a phase change material (PCM) because of its high latent heat of fusion. Mixtures were prepared with SAT, a blend of the polymer sodium carboxymethil cellulose (CMC) and silica gel, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), and anhydrous sodium sulfate to form a composite-PCM (c-PCM) based on SAT; the relative proportions of CMC/silica gel in the blend and AgNP content were varied according to a central composite experimental design. The thermal properties were determined for raw SAT, CMC, , and c-PCM samples. The thermal effusivity of samples was evaluated by the inverse photopyroelectric technique. The thermal diffusivity was obtained for samples by the open photoacoustic cell technique. The thermal conductivity was calculated from the obtained and values. To assess the thermal performance of the c-PCM compared to raw SAT, samples were studied through differential scanning calorimetry which served to determine the latent heat recovery ( LHR). Properties , and LHR were analyzed by response surface methodology and compared. The SAT-based c-PCM was found to be more thermally conductive than raw SAT. The best LHR with good thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity was identified in the region of the central composite experimental design with medium-low AgNPs and higher proportions of CMC in the polymer blend.

  15. Two hydrate pseudopolymorphs of thiamine pyrophosphate: a dihydrate and a trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Qiang; Hu, Ning-Hai

    2013-07-01

    Two hydrate pseudopolymorphs of 3-[(4-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-1-ium-5-yl)methyl]-4-methyl-1,3-thiazol-3-ium-5-yl hydrogen pyrophosphate (TPP), viz. a dihydrate, C12H18N4O7P2S·2H2O, (I), and a trihydrate, C12H18N4O7P2S·3H2O, (II), were obtained during a structural study of vitamin B1 coenzyme. In both compounds, TPP is a neutral zwitterion, with its pyrophosphate group doubly deprotonated and its pyrimidine ring protonated, and it assumes the usual `F' conformation in terms of the two torsion angles about the bonds by which the methylene group links the thiazolium and pyrimidinium rings [1.1 (3) and 79.7 (3)° for (I), and 2.0 (3) and 75.5 (3)° for (II)]. In (I), two TPP molecules are linked by a pair of O-H···O hydrogen bonds into a phosphate-pairing dimer. N-H···O hydrogen bonds connect the dimers into a sheet parallel to (101). In (II), the TPP molecules are self-assembled solely by N-H···O hydrogen bonds, generating a tape structure along [001]. A comparison of the four known hydrate pseudopolymorphs of TPP shows that the phosphate-pairing dimers are basic building units for the formation of two-dimensional networks.

  16. Floating mucoadhesive alginate beads of amoxicillin trihydrate: A facile approach for H. pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sanjoy Kumar; De, Pintu Kumar; De, Arnab; Ojha, Souvik; De, Ronita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish Kumar; Samanta, Amalesh

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the design of sunflower oil entrapped floating and mucoadhesive beads of amoxicillin trihydrate using sodium alginate and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as matrix polymers and chitosan as coating polymer to localize the antibiotic at the stomach site against Helicobacter pylori. Beads prepared by ionotropic gellation technique were evaluated for different physicochemical, in-vitro and in-vivo properties. Beads of all batches were floated for >24h with a maximum lag time of 46.3±3.2s. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the beads were spherical in shape with few oil filled channels distributed throughout the surfaces and small pocket structures inside the matrix confirming oil entrapment. Prepared beads showed good mucoadhesiveness of 75.7±3.0% to 85.0±5.5%. The drug release profile was best fitted to Higuchi model with non fickian driven mechanism. The optimized batch showed 100% Helicobacter pylori growth inhibition in 15h in in-vitro culture. Furthermore, X-ray study in rabbit stomach confirmed the gastric retention of optimized formulation. The results exhibited that formulated beads may be preferred to localize the antibiotic in the gastric region to allow more availability of antibiotic at gastric mucus layer acting on Helicobacter pylori, thereby improving the therapeutic efficacy.

  17. Identification of the Substrate Recognition and Transport Pathway in a Eukaryotic Member of the Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) Family

    PubMed Central

    Kosti, Vasiliki; Lambrinidis, George; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Diallinas, George; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Using the crystal structure of the uracil transporter UraA of Escherichia coli, we constructed a 3D model of the Aspergillus nidulans uric acid-xanthine/H+ symporter UapA, which is a prototype member of the Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) family. The model consists of 14 transmembrane segments (TMSs) divided into a core and a gate domain, the later being distinctly different from that of UraA. By implementing Molecular Mechanics (MM) simulations and quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) approaches, we propose a model for the xanthine-UapA complex where the substrate binding site is formed by the polar side chains of residues E356 (TMS8) and Q408 (TMS10) and the backbones of A407 (TMS10) and F155 (TMS3). In addition, our model shows several polar interactions between TMS1-TMS10, TMS1-TMS3, TMS8-TMS10, which seem critical for UapA transport activity. Using extensive docking calculations we identify a cytoplasm-facing substrate trajectory (D360, A363, G411, T416, R417, V463 and A469) connecting the proposed substrate binding site with the cytoplasm, as well as, a possible outward-facing gate leading towards the substrate major binding site. Most importantly, re-evaluation of the plethora of available and analysis of a number of herein constructed UapA mutations strongly supports the UapA structural model. Furthermore, modeling and docking approaches with mammalian NAT homologues provided a molecular rationale on how specificity in this family of carriers might be determined, and further support the importance of selectivity gates acting independently from the major central substrate binding site. PMID:22848666

  18. Transcription factors may frame Aa-nat gene expression and melatonin synthesis at night in the Syrian hamster pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Garidou, Marie-Laure; Diaz, Elena; Calgari, Christiane; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2003-06-01

    Pineal melatonin synthesis is stimulated at night following an increase in arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Depending on the species, two mechanisms of enzyme activation have been described: a cAMP/phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein-dependent stimulation of Aa-nat gene transcription in the rat, presumed to occur in all rodents, or a posttranslational regulation of AA-NAT protein in ongulates. The present data obtained in the Syrian hamster indicate another route of AA-NAT regulation. Elevated nocturnal levels of Aa-nat mRNA were strongly suppressed following light exposure or adrenergic antagonist administration, demonstrating the involvement of norepinephrine in the stimulation of melatonin synthesis. However, administration of adrenergic agonists during the day did not increase Aa-nat mRNA unless a protein synthesis inhibitor was given during the previous night. This indicates that an inhibitory protein, synthesized at night, prevents melatonin synthesis during the day. By contrast, a protein synthesis inhibitor given at the beginning of the night markedly reduced Aa-nat mRNA, suggesting that a stimulatory protein (transcription factor?) is necessary for Aa-nat gene transcription at night. Noteworthy, hamsters raised in long photoperiod were responsive to adrenergic agonist injection only in the first hour after light onset, a response that may be important in this photoperiodic species in which the melatonin peak extends into the morning hours in a short photoperiod.

  19. Proper regulation of a sperm-specific cis-nat-siRNA is essential for double fertilization in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    /Cis/-nat-siRNAs are a recently characterized class of small regulatory RNAs that are widespread in eukaryotes. Despite their abundance the importance of their regulatory activity is largely unknown. The only functional role for eukaryotic /cis/-nat-siRNAs that has been described to date is in envir...

  20. AmeriFlux US-SP1 Slashpine-Austin Cary- 65yrs nat regen

    DOE Data Explorer

    Martin, Tim [University of Florida

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SP1 Slashpine-Austin Cary- 65yrs nat regen. Site Description - The ACMF site is a 67 hectare naturally regenerated Pinus palustris and Pinus elliottii mixed stand.

  1. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Nelson; Timothy Carr

    2009-03-31

    This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is

  2. Time-Resolved Infrared Reflectance Studies of the Dehydration-Induced Transformation of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to the Trihydrate Form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. The phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with but one in the hexahydrate.

  3. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; ...

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparationmore » and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. As a result, the phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with only one in the hexahydrate.« less

  4. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  5. Root cause evaluation of particulates in the lyophilized indomethacin sodium trihydrate plug for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Akhtar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Saeed R; Awotwe-Otoo, David; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-10-01

    Particulate growth in parenteral product frequently results in product recalls causing drug shortages. While this is mostly attributed to quality issues in a firm, particulates growth could also be due to inadequate product, process, or environmental understanding. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use indomethacin sodium trihydrate (drug) as a model drug for lyophilization and evaluates short-term stability with respect to particulate growth at different storage temperatures. Under aseptic condition, each vial filled with filtered drug solution was lyophilized, and stoppered in LyoStar3. Crimped vials were kept at 5°C, 15°C, 25°C, 25°C/60%RH, and 40°C/75%RH. At predefined time interval, samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal, and spectroscopic method. Lyophilized formulation showed four thermal events: 60-90°C demonstrating glass transition, 110-160°C showing recrystallization exotherm,170-220°C exhibiting endotherm of potential polymorph, and 250°C showing melting endotherm. XRPD of the lyophilized powder demonstrated peak at 2 θ 11.10. Spectroscopic studies of lyophilized powder indicated alteration in symmetric and asymmetric carboxylate peaks over time indicating initiation of crystallization and crystal growth. Reconstitution studies indicated higher reconstitution time after six weeks for sample stored at 40°C/75%RH. Furthermore, reconstituted solution showed presence of particulates after 8 weeks storage. These studies suggest that particulate growth can stem from poorly developed formulation and not necessarily due to frequently ascribed filtration issues.

  6. Opposing Functions of the N-terminal Acetyltransferases Naa50 and NatA in Sister-chromatid Cohesion.

    PubMed

    Rong, Ziye; Ouyang, Zhuqing; Magin, Robert S; Marmorstein, Ronen; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-09-02

    During the cell cycle, sister-chromatid cohesion tethers sister chromatids together from S phase to the metaphase-anaphase transition and ensures accurate segregation of chromatids into daughter cells. N-terminal acetylation is one of the most prevalent protein covalent modifications in eukaryotes and is mediated by a family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT). Naa50 (also called San) has previously been shown to play a role in sister-chromatid cohesion in metazoans. The mechanism by which Naa50 contributes to cohesion is not understood however. Here, we show that depletion of Naa50 in HeLa cells weakens the interaction between cohesin and its positive regulator sororin and causes cohesion defects in S phase, consistent with a role of Naa50 in cohesion establishment. Strikingly, co-depletion of NatA, a heterodimeric NAT complex that physically interacts with Naa50, rescues the sister-chromatid cohesion defects and the resulting mitotic arrest caused by Naa50 depletion, indicating that NatA and Naa50 play antagonistic roles in cohesion. Purified recombinant NatA and Naa50 do not affect each other's NAT activity in vitro Because NatA and Naa50 exhibit distinct substrate specificity, we propose that they modify different effectors and regulate sister-chromatid cohesion in opposing ways.

  7. Calibration factors for determination of relativistic particle induced fission rates in natU, 235U, 232Th, natPb and 197Au foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Zhuk, Igor; Potapenko, A.; Kievets, M.; Krivopustov, M. I.

    2012-02-01

    Calibration factors w, for determination of fission rate in metallic foils of natU, 235U, 232Th, natPb and 197Au were determined for foils in contact with synthetic mica track detectors. Proton-induced fission at proton energies of 0.7 GeV and 1.5 GeV were used. Using our experimental results as well as those of the other authors, w for different foil-mica systems were determined. Two methods were used to calculate w, relative to the calibration factor for uranium-mica system, which has been obtained in a standard neutron field of energy 14.7 MeV. One of these methods requires the knowledge of the mean range of the fission fragments in the foils of interest and other method needs information on the values of the fission cross-sections at the required energies as well as the density of the tracks recorded in the track detectors in contact with the foil surfaces. The obtained w-values were compared with Monte Carlo calculations and good agreements were found. It is shown that a calibration factor obtained at low energy neutron induced fissions in uranium isotopes deviates only by less than 10% from those obtained at relativistic proton induced fissions.

  8. DHA supplementation for late onset Stargardt disease: NAT-3 study

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Benlian, Pascale; Chanu, Bernard; Leveziel, Nicolas; Coscas, Gabriel; Soubrane, Gisele; Souied, Eric H

    2010-01-01

    Background: We analyzed the effects of a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation in patients affected with late onset Stargardt disease (STGD). Methods: DHA (840 mg/day) was given to 20 STGD patients for six months. A complete ophthalmologic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG), was performed at inclusion day 0 (D0) and at month 6 (M6). Results: Overall, no statistical differences have been observed at M6 vs D0 as regards BCVA and mfERG (P > 0.05). Mild Improvement of BCVA and improvement of mfERG was noted in seven/40 eyes of four/20 patients. In the first patient, the peak of the a wave increased from 66 nV/deg2 to 75.4 nV/deg2 in the right eye (RE) and 24.5 nV/deg2 to 49.1 nV/deg2 in the left eye (LE). The peak of the b wave improved from 122 nV/deg2 to 157 nV/deg2 in the RE, and 102 nV/deg2 to 149 nV/deg2 in the LE. In the second patient peaks of the a and b waves respectively increased from 11.8 nV/deg2 to 72.1 nV/deg2 and 53 nV/deg2 to 185 nV/deg2 in the RE. In the third patient the peak of the a wave increased from 37 nV/deg2 to 43 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 31 nV/deg2 to 45 nV/deg2 in the LE; the peak of the b wave improved from 70 nV/deg2 to 89 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 101 nV/deg2 to 108 nV/deg2 in the LE. In the fourth patient, the peak of the a wave increased from 39 nV/deg2 to 42 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 40 nV/deg2 to 43 nV/deg2 in the LE; the peak of the b wave improved from 86 nV/deg2 to 94 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 87 nV/deg2 to 107 nV/deg2 in the LE. Conclusion: DHA seems to influence some functional parameters in patients affected with STGD. However, no short-term benefit should be expected from DHA supplementation. PMID:20668719

  9. The NatCarb geoportal: Linking distributed data from the Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, T.R.; Rich, P.M.; Bartley, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships are generating the data for a "carbon atlas" of key geospatial data (carbon sources, potential sinks, etc.) required for rapid implementation of carbon sequestration on a broad scale. The NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb) provides Web-based, nation-wide data access. Distributed computing solutions link partnerships and other publicly accessible repositories of geological, geophysical, natural resource, infrastructure, and environmental data. Data are maintained and enhanced locally, but assembled and accessed through a single geoportal. NatCarb, as a first attempt at a national carbon cyberinfrastructure (NCCI), assembles the data required to address technical and policy challenges of carbon capture and storage. We present a path forward to design and implement a comprehensive and successful NCCI. ?? 2007 The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 5-MCA-NAT does not act through NQO2 to reduce intraocular pressure in New-Zealand white rabbit.

    PubMed

    Alarma-Estrany, Pilar; Crooke, Almudena; Pintor, Jesús

    2009-09-01

    Solid data support the idea that the MT(3) melatonin binding site is an enzyme, quinone reductase 2 (NQO2), rather than a membrane melatonin receptor. However, the melatonin analogue, 5-methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine (5-MCA-NAT), reduces intraocular pressure (IOP) via MT(3) melatonin receptors. Therefore, the aim of this work was to test whether the melatonin binding site, MT(3), is indeed the enzyme NQO2 in New Zealand rabbit eyes. To investigate this, the action of several substrates and inhibitors for NQO2 was compared to 5-MCA-NAT in their ability to modify IOP. Also, the effect of 5-MCA-NAT on IOP produced after NQO2 silencing by means of a siRNA was determinated. Altogether, the results led us to conclude that the in vivo effect of the MT(3) ligand 5-MCA-NAT on IOP is not mediated by the enzyme NQO2, suggesting the existence of another melatonin receptor.

  11. The profibrinolytic enzyme subtilisin NAT purified from Bacillus subtilis Cleaves and inactivates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Urano, T; Ihara, H; Umemura, K; Suzuki, Y; Oike, M; Akita, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Suzuki, I; Takada, A

    2001-07-06

    In this report, we demonstrate an interaction between subtilisin NAT (formerly designated BSP, or nattokinase), a profibrinolytic serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Subtilisin NAT was purified to homogeneity (molecular mass, 27.7 kDa) from a saline extract of B. subtilis (natto). Subtilisin NAT appeared to cleave active recombinant prokaryotic PAI-1 (rpPAI-1) into low molecular weight fragments. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in combination with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and peptide sequence analysis revealed that rpPAI-1 was cleaved at its reactive site (P1-P1': Arg(346)-Met(347)). rpPAI-1 lost its specific activity after subtilisin NAT treatment in a dose-dependent manner (0.02-1.0 nm; half-maximal effect at approximately 0.1 nm). Subtilisin NAT dose dependently (0.06-1 nm) enhanced tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced fibrin clot lysis both in the absence of rpPAI-1 (48 +/- 1.4% at 1 nm) and especially in the presence of rpPAI-1 (78 +/- 2.0% at 1 nm). The enhancement observed in the absence of PAI-1 seems to be induced through direct fibrin dissolution by subtilisin NAT. The stronger enhancement by subtilisin NAT of rpPAI-1-enriched fibrin clot lysis seems to involve the cleavage and inactivation of active rpPAI-1. This mechanism is suggested to be important for subtilisin NAT to potentiate fibrinolysis.

  12. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future.

  13. Collaborative study report: evaluation of the ATCC experimental mycoplasma reference strains panel prepared for comparison of NAT-based and conventional mycoplasma detection methods.

    PubMed

    Dabrazhynetskaya, Alena; Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Lin, Tsai-Lien; Beck, Brian; Gupta, Rajesh K; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    The main goal of this collaborative study was to evaluate the experimental panel of cryopreserved mycoplasma reference strains recently prepared by the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC(®)) in order to assess the viability and dispersion of cells in the mycoplasma stocks by measuring the ratio between the number of genomic copies (GC) and the number of colony forming units (CFU) in the reference preparations. The employment of microbial reference cultures with low GC/CFU ratios is critical for unbiased and reliable comparison of mycoplasma testing methods based on different methodological approaches, i.e., Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) and compendial culture-based techniques. The experimental panel included ten different mycoplasma species known to represent potential human and animal pathogens as well as common contaminants of mammalian and avian cell substrates used in research, development, and manufacture of biological products. Fifteen laboratories with expertise in field of mycoplasma titration and quantification of mycoplasmal genomic DNA participated in the study conducted from February to October of 2012. The results of this study demonstrated the feasibility of preparing highly viable and dispersed (possessing low GC/CFU ratios) frozen stocks of mycoplasma reference materials, required for reliable comparison of NAT-based and conventional mycoplasma detection methods.

  14. Collaborative study for the establishment of the Ph. Eur. Hepatitis E virus RNA for NAT testing biological reference preparation batch 1.

    PubMed

    Baylis, S A; Terao, E; Blümel, J; Hanschmann, K-M O

    2017-01-01

    A new European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) biological reference preparation (BRP) had to be established further to the decision to include nucleic acid testing (NAT) for the detection of hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA in the monograph Human plasma (pooled and treated for virus inactivation) (1646). To this purpose, an international collaborative study was launched in the framework of the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) and the Commission of the European Union (EU). The study was run in conjunction with the establishment of the 1(st) World Health Organization (WHO) international reference panel (IRP) for hepatitis E virus RNA genotypes (8578/13). Twenty-three laboratories used in-house developed and commercially available assays to calibrate a lyophilised candidate BRP prepared from a HEV 3f strain positive human plasma against the 1(st) WHO International Standard (IS) for HEV RNA (6329/10). Results from quantitative and qualitative assays were in good agreement and were combined to calculate an assigned potency. Real-time stability studies indicated that the candidate BRP is very stable at lower temperatures and is thus suitable for long-term use. Based on these results, in February 2016, the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted the candidate material as the hepatitis E virus RNA for NAT testing BRP batch 1, with an assigned unitage of 2.1 × 10(4) IU/vial (4.32 log10 IU/vial).

  15. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: covalent modification and inactivation of hamster NAT1 by bromoacetamido derivatives of aniline and 2-aminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhijun; Vath, Gregory M; Wagner, Carston R; Hanna, Patrick E

    2003-11-01

    Kinetic analysis of the inactiviation of hamster NAT1 by 2-(bromoacetylamino)fluorene (Br-AAF) and bromoacetanilide revealed that Br-AAF is an active site directed affinity label whereas bromoacetanilide acts as a bimolecular alkylating agent. ESI MS analysis of NAT1 treated with Br-AAF showed that a single molecule of 2-acetylaminofluorene had been incorporated. Proteolysis with pepsin followed by sequencing of adducted peptides by ESI MS/MS identified the modified residue as the catalytically essential Cys-68. ESI Q-TOF MS analysis of NAT1 that had been treated with bromoacetanilide resulted in identification of a monoadducted protein as the primary product and a diadducted protein as a minor product. Pepsin digestion of bromoacetanilide-inactivated NAT1 and sequencing by ESI MS/MS identified Cys-68 as the primary site of adduct formation. Additional proteolysis of the bromoacetanilide-treated NAT1 led to the identification of a second modified peptide which was adducted at Cys-44. The data reveal substantial differences in the interactions of small hydrophobic alkylating reagents with hamster NAT1.

  16. Inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme by subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) in natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Yamanaka, Naoki; Ohnishi, Katsunori; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2012-06-01

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) was inhibited by the culture medium of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto, which ferments boiled soy beans to natto, a Japanese traditional food. Subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) produced by B. subtilis also inhibited ACE, and the inhibition was markedly stimulated by heat treatment of subtilisin at 120 °C for 15 min. Inhibition of ACE by subtilisin was of a mixed type: the decrease in V(max) and the increase in K(m) value. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that heat treatment of subtilisin caused inactivation with fragmentation of the enzyme protein into small peptides. The inhibitory action of subtilisin was not due to an enzymatic action of protease, but may be ascribed to the potent ACE-inhibitory peptides such as LY and FY, amino acid sequences in subtilisin. HPLC-MS analysis of heat-inactivated subtilisin confirmed that LY and FY were liberated by fragmentation of the enzyme. Inhibition of ACE by subtilisin and its degradation peptides such as LY and FY may participate in the suppression of blood pressure by ingestion of natto.

  17. Theoretical studies of the local structure and EPR parameters for Cu2+ centers in disodium malonate trihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao-Ying, Li; Ying, Huang; Xue-Mei, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors gxx, gyy, gzz and hyperfine structure constants Axx, Ayy, Azz) of the two Cu2+ centers in disodium malonate trihydrate (DSMT) single crystal are theoretically interpreted using the high order perturbation formulas of these parameters for a 3d9 ions in rhombically elongated octahedra. In the calculation, the rhombic crystal-field parameters are determined from the superposition model and the admixture of d-orbitals in the ground state wave function are taking account, the results show that although the admixture of the | d z 2 > state to the ground state wave function is small, it should not be neglected in calculations of the EPR parameters. The theoretical EPR parameters show good agreement with the observed values. The results are discussed.

  18. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Edward J. Mausolf; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Bruce K. McNamara

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the

  19. Introduction of the HAM-Nat examination--applicants and students admitted to the Medical Faculty in 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Werwick, Katrin; Winkler-Stuck, Kirstin; Hampe, Wolfgang; Albrecht, Peggy; Robra, Bernt-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund/Zielsetzung: Die Medizinische Fakultät Magdeburg hat zum Wintersemester 2012/13 einen Wissenstest zur Auswahl ihrer Studienbewerber eingeführt. Das Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für medizinische Studiengänge - Naturwissenschaftsteil (HAM-Nat) umfasst einen Multiple Choice-Test mit Fragen zu medizinisch relevanten Aspekten der Fächer Biologie, Physik, Chemie und Mathematik, der speziell für die Auswahl von Medizinbewerbern entwickelt wurde. Es wird untersucht, wie der HAM-Nat die Studierendenauswahl beeinflusst, aus welchen Gründen sich Studierende im Rahmen des Bewerbungsverfahrens für die Teilnahme am Test entscheiden und welche Erwartungen sie an das Studium haben.Methodik: Die Auswahlverfahren der Hochschule 2011 (ohne HAM-Nat) und 2012-2014 (mit HAM-Nat) werden verglichen. Aufbauend auf den Ergebnissen explorativer Interviews wurden erstmalig Studienanfänger des Wintersemesters 2013/2014 zur Wahl von Studienfach und Studienort sowie zu ihren Erwartungen an das Studium schriftlich befragt. Ergebnisse: Das um den HAM-Nat-Test erweiterte Auswahlverfahren wurde problemlos eingeführt. Der HAM-Nat hatte einen großen Einfluss auf die Auswahlentscheidung. Rund 65% der Zugelassenen hätten bei ausschließlicher Berücksichtigung der Abiturnote keinen Studienplatz erhalten. Männliche Bewerber zeigten im Durchschnitt bessere HAM-Nat-Ergebnisse als weibliche. Den Fragebogen beantworteten 147 von 191 Studienanfängern(77%). Für Studienbewerber aus Sachsen-Anhalt sind Hauptgründe für die Wahl der Landeshauptstadt die regionale Nähe, das vorhandene soziale Umfeld, die guten Studienbedingungen und der Wohlfühlcharakter am Studienort. Für die Mehrzahl der Bewerber, insbesondere für Bewerber aus anderen Bundesländern, standen dagegen die relativ guten Zulassungschancen in Magdeburg im Vordergrund. Schlussfolgerung: Die Medizinische Fakultät Magdeburg sieht im HAM-Nat ein geeignetes Instrument, um Bewerber mit hervorragenden naturwissenschaftlichen

  20. N-acetyltransferase (nat) is a critical conjunct of photoperiodism between the circadian system and endocrine axis in Antheraea pernyi.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed A M; Wang, Qiushi; Bembenek, Jadwiga; Ichihara, Naoyuki; Hiragaki, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Takeda, Makio

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1923, the biology of photoperiodism remains a mystery in many ways. We sought the link connecting the circadian system to an endocrine switch, using Antheraea pernyi. PER-, CLK- and CYC-ir were co-expressed in two pairs of dorsolateral neurons of the protocerebrum, suggesting that these are the circadian neurons that also express melatonin-, NAT- and HIOMT-ir. The results suggest that a melatonin pathway is present in the circadian neurons. Melatonin receptor (MT2 or MEL-1B-R)-ir in PTTH-ir neurons juxtaposing clock neurons suggests that melatonin gates PTTH release. RIA showed a melatonin rhythm with a peak four hours after lights off in adult brain both under LD16:8 (LD) and LD12:12 (SD), and both the peak and the baseline levels were higher under LD than SD, suggesting a photoperiodic influence. When pupae in diapause were exposed to 10 cycles of LD, or stored at 4 °C for 4 months under constant darkness, an increase of NAT activity was observed when PTTH released ecdysone. DNA sequence upstream of nat contained E-boxes to which CYC/CLK could bind, and nat transcription was turned off by clk or cyc dsRNA. dsRNA(NAT) caused dysfunction of photoperiodism. dsRNA(PER) upregulated nat transcription as anticipated, based on findings in the Drosophila melanogaster circadian system. Transcription of nat, cyc and clk peaked at ZT12. RIA showed that dsRNA(NAT) decreased melatonin while dsRNA(PER) increased melatonin. Thus nat, a clock controlled gene, is the critical link between the circadian clock and endocrine switch. MT-binding may release PTTH, resulting in termination of diapause. This study thus examined all of the basic functional units from the clock: a photoperiodic counter as an accumulator of mRNA(NAT), to endocrine switch for photoperiodism in A. pernyi showing this system is self-complete without additional device especially for photoperiodism.

  1. Methamphetamine induces Shati/Nat8L expression in the mouse nucleus accumbens via CREB- and dopamine D1 receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Toh; Sodeyama, Kengo; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Shati/Nat8L significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice after repeated methamphetamine (METH) treatment. We reported that Shati/Nat8L overexpression in mouse NAc attenuated METH-induced hyperlocomotion, locomotor sensitization, and conditioned place preference. We recently found that Shati/Nat8L overexpression in NAc regulates the dopaminergic neuronal system via the activation of group II mGluRs by elevated N-acetylaspartylglutamate following N-acetylaspartate increase due to the overexpression. These findings suggest that Shati/Nat8L suppresses METH-induced responses. However, the mechanism by which METH increases the Shati/Nat8L mRNA expression in NAc is unclear. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of Shati/Nat8L mRNA expression, we performed a mouse Shati/Nat8L luciferase assay using PC12 cells. Next, we investigated the response of METH to Shati/Nat8L expression and CREB activity using mouse brain slices of NAc, METH administration to mice, and western blotting for CREB activity of specific dopamine receptor signals in vivo and ex vivo. We found that METH activates CREB binding to the Shati/Nat8L promoter to induce the Shati/Nat8L mRNA expression. Furthermore, the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390, but not the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride, inhibited the upregulation of Shati/Nat8L and CREB activities in the mouse NAc slices. Thus, the administration of the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 increased the Shati/Nat8L mRNA expression in mouse NAc. These results showed that the Shati/Nat8L mRNA was increased by METH-induced CREB pathway via dopamine D1 receptor signaling in mouse NAc. These findings may contribute to development of a clinical tool for METH addiction. PMID:28319198

  2. Contribution of the N‐acetyltransferase 2 polymorphism NAT2*6A to age‐related hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Van Eyken, E; Van Camp, G; Fransen, E; Topsakal, V; Hendrickx, J J; Demeester, K; Van de Heyning, P; Mäki‐Torkko, E; Hannula, S; Sorri, M; Jensen, M; Parving, A; Bille, M; Baur, M; Pfister, M; Bonaconsa, A; Mazzoli, M; Orzan, E; Espeso, A; Stephens, D; Verbruggen, K; Huyghe, J; Dhooge, I; Huygen, P; Kremer, H; Cremers, C W R J; Kunst, S; Manninen, M; Pyykkö, I; Lacava, A; Steffens, M; Wienker, T F; Van Laer, L

    2007-01-01

    Background Age‐related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most common sensory impairment in older people, affecting 50% of those aged 80 years. The proportion of older people is increasing in the general population, and as a consequence, the number of people affected with ARHI is growing. ARHI is a complex disorder, with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to the disease. The first studies to elucidate these genetic factors were recently performed, resulting in the identification of the first two susceptibility genes for ARHI, NAT2 and KCNQ4. Methods In the present study, the association between ARHI and polymorphisms in genes that contribute to the defence against reactive oxygen species, including GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2, was tested. Samples originated from seven different countries and were combined into two test population samples, the general European population and the Finnish population. Two distinct phenotypes for ARHI were studied, Zlow and Zhigh, representing hearing in the low and high frequencies, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed for single polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2*5A, NAT2*6A, and NAT2*7A), haplotypes, and gene–environment and gene–gene interactions. Results We found an association between ARHI and GSTT1 and GSTM1 in the Finnish population sample, and with NAT2*6A in the general European population sample. The latter finding replicates previously published data. Conclusion As replication is considered the ultimate proof of true associations in the study of complex disorders, this study provides further support for the involvement of NAT2*6A in ARHI. PMID:17513527

  3. A national look at carbon capture and storage-National carbon sequestration database and geographical information system (NatCarb)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, T.R.; Iqbal, A.; Callaghan, N.; ,; Look, K.; Saving, S.; Nelson, K.

    2009-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are responsible for generating geospatial data for the maps displayed in the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada. Key geospatial data (carbon sources, potential storage sites, transportation, land use, etc.) are required for the Atlas, and for efficient implementation of carbon sequestration on a national and regional scale. The National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographical Information System (NatCarb) is a relational database and geographic information system (GIS) that integrates carbon storage data generated and maintained by the RCSPs and various other sources. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO2 emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project is working to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO2 carbon capture and storage data. NatCarb is organizing and enhancing the critical information about CO2 sources and developing the technology needed to access, query, model, analyze, display, and distribute natural resource data related to carbon management. Data are generated, maintained and enhanced locally at the RCSP level, or at specialized data warehouses, and assembled, accessed, and analyzed in real-time through a single geoportal. NatCarb is a functional demonstration of distributed data-management systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas. It forms the first step toward a functioning National Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (NCCI). NatCarb provides access to first-order information to evaluate the costs, economic potential and societal issues of

  4. Structures and functions of insect arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (iaaNAT); a key enzyme for physiological and behavioral switch in arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Hiragaki, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Mohamed, Ahmed A. M.; Takeda, Makio

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of N-acetyltransfeases (NATs) seems complex. Vertebrate arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT) has been extensively studied since it leads to the synthesis of melatonin, a multifunctional neurohormone prevalent in photoreceptor cells, and is known as a chemical token of the night. Melatonin also serves as a scavenger for reactive oxygen species. This is also true with invertebrates. NAT therefore has distinct functional implications in circadian function, as timezymes (aaNAT), and also xenobiotic reactions (arylamine NAT or simply NAT). NATs belong to a broader enzyme group, the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily. Due to low sequence homology and a seemingly fast rate of structural differentiation, the nomenclature for NATs can be confusing. The advent of bioinformatics, however, has helped to classify this group of enzymes; vertebrates have two distinct subgroups, the timezyme type and the xenobiotic type, which has a wider substrate range including imidazolamine, pharmacological drugs, environmental toxicants and even histone. Insect aaNAT (iaaNAT) form their own clade in the phylogeny, distinct from vertebrate aaNATs. Arthropods are unique, since the phylum has exoskeleton in which quinones derived from N-acetylated monoamines function in coupling chitin and arthropodins. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity is limited in insects, but NAT-mediated degradation prevails. However, unexpectedly iaaNAT occurs not only among arthropods but also among basal deuterostomia, and is therefore more apomorphic. Our analyses illustrate that iaaNATs has unique physiological roles but at the same time it plays a role in a timezyme function, at least in photoperiodism. Photoperiodism has been considered as a function of circadian system but the detailed molecular mechanism is not well understood. We propose a molecular hypothesis for photoperiodism in Antheraea pernyi based on the transcription regulation of NAT interlocked by the circadian system

  5. Measurement of excitation functions in alpha induced reactions on natCu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Zaman, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    The excitation functions of 66,67,68Ga, 62,63,65Zn, 61,64Cu, and 58,60Co radionuclides in the natCu(α, x) reaction were measured in the energy range from 15 to 42 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation method at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured results were compared with the literature data as well as the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 and TENDL-2014 libraries based on the TALYS-1.6 code. The integral yields for thick targets of the produced radionuclides were also determined from the measured excitation functions and the stopping power of natural copper.

  6. The Legacy of Nat Sternberg: The Genesis of Cre-lox Technology.

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, Michael; Hoess, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Cre-lox of bacteriophage P1 has become one of the most widely used tools for genetic engineering in eukaryotes. The origins of this tool date to more than 30 years ago when Nat L. Sternberg discovered the recombinase, Cre, and its specific locus of crossover, lox, while studying the maintenance of bacteriophage P1 as a stable plasmid. Recombinations mediated by Cre assist in cyclization of the DNA of infecting phage and in resolution of prophage multimers created by generalized recombination. Early in vitro work demonstrated that, although it shares similarities with the well-characterized bacteriophage λ integration, Cre-lox is in many ways far simpler in its requirements for carrying out recombination. These features would prove critical for its development as a powerful and versatile tool in genetic engineering. We review the history of the discovery and characterization of Cre-lox and touch upon the present direction of Cre-lox research.

  7. Experimental cross-sections for proton-induced nuclear reactions on natMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenák, Jaroslav; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the Co-ordinated Research Project of the IAEA, we measured in detail cross-sections of the nuclear reactions natMo(p,x)93gTc, 93mTc, 93m+gTc, 94gTc, 94mTc, 95gTc, 95mTc, 96m+gTc, 97mTc, 99mTc, 90Mo, 93mMo, 99Mo, 88gNb, 88mNb, 89gNb, 89mNb, 90m+gNb, 90m+gNbcum, 91mNb, 92mNb, 95gNb, 95mNb, 95m+gNb, 96Nb, 97m+gNb, 88m+gZrcum and 89m+gZrcum in the energy range of 6.9-35.8 MeV. The data for formation of 97mTc, 88gNb, 88mNb and 89mNb are reported for the first time. The obtained results were compared to the prediction of the nuclear reaction model code TALYS adopted from the TENDL-2015 library and to the previously published cross-sections. The thick target yields for all the radionuclides were calculated from the measured data. We suggest recommended cross-sections and thick target yields for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 100Mo(p,x)99Mo and natMo(p,x)96m+gTc nuclear reactions deduced from the selected experimental data.

  8. Combined effect of CYP2B6 and NAT2 genotype on plasma efavirenz exposure during rifampin-based antituberculosis therapy in the STRIDE study.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Rosenkranz, Susan L; Lu, Darlene; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanchez, Jorge; Ssemmanda, Michael; Sanne, Ian; McIlleron, Helen; Havlir, Diane V; Haas, David W

    2015-06-15

    In STRIDE, slow metabolizer CYP2B6 and NAT2 genotypes were each associated with increased plasma efavirenz concentrations during antituberculosis therapy. Concentrations were greater on therapy than off therapy in 58% with CYP2B6 and 93% with NAT2 slow metabolizer genotypes. Individuals with slow metabolizer genotypes in both genes had markedly elevated concentrations.

  9. Isolation of a thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides Strain, NAT, and its capacity for oil and chemical oxygen demand removal at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yosuke; Takeno, Kenji; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Sasaki, Ken

    2008-06-01

    A thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium NAT identified as Rhodobacter sphaeroides was isolated. When alginate-immobilized cells of strain NAT were used in high-temperature treatment of artificial sewage wastewater containing oil, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 80% and 76% of the oil was removed after 96 h of treatment at 55 degrees C. Lipase activity was observed in the culture.

  10. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  11. Performance of iron nano particles and bimetallic Ni/Fe nanoparticles in removal of amoxicillin trihydrate from synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Ahmad Reza; Daraei, Hasti; Rafiee, Mohamad; Kamali, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the degradation of amoxicillin trihydrate (AMT), using synthesized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and bimetallic Fe and Ni nanoparticles stabilized with chitosan (Cs-Fe/Ni), in water was investigated. A central composite design combined with response surface methodology and optimization was utilized for maximizing the AMT reduction by the nanoparticles-water system. The importance of the various variables and their interactions were analyzed using analysis of variance and t-test. The effects of independent parameters were tested and the results showed that the initial concentration of AMT, pH, and nanoparticles dosage were all significant factors. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy images indicated that chitosan acts as a stabilizer preventing the agglomeration of nanoparticles. Also, chitosan and Ni increased the specific surface area of Cs-Fe/Ni. X-ray diffraction confirmed the existence of Fe(0) in fresh samples and the presence of Fe(II) and Fe(III) after the reaction with AMT. This study demonstrates that the nZVI technology could be a promising approach for antibiotic wastewater treatment.

  12. Role of the size of particles of alumina trihydrate filler on the life of RTV silicone rubber coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.; Hackam, R.; Cherney, E.A. |

    1995-04-01

    The paper reports on a study of the influence of the size of the particles of Alumina trihydrate (ATH) filler on the life of RTV silicone rubber coating in a salt-fog chamber. The particle sizes examined include 1.0, 4.5, 13, 17 and 75{mu}m. The optimum size to give the lowest leakage current and the longest time to failure of the coating is determined. The particle size affects the roughness of the coating. This is determined by a high resolution surface roughness tester and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination. The roughness is enhanced after prolonged test in salt-fog. The leakage current affects the amount of silicone fluid on the surface. The amount of silicone fluid present on the surface after exposure to dry-band arcing in salt-fog is a function of the particle size. Measurements of surface roughness, the amount of silicone fluid on the surface and the leakage current combined with theoretical analysis of the heat conduction lead to identification of the mechanisms by which the size of the ATH particle impart resistance to tracking and erosion.

  13. N-acetyltransferase (nat) Is a Critical Conjunct of Photoperiodism between the Circadian System and Endocrine Axis in Antheraea pernyi

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jadwiga; Hiragaki, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Takeda, Makio

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1923, the biology of photoperiodism remains a mystery in many ways. We sought the link connecting the circadian system to an endocrine switch, using Antheraea pernyi. PER-, CLK- and CYC-ir were co-expressed in two pairs of dorsolateral neurons of the protocerebrum, suggesting that these are the circadian neurons that also express melatonin-, NAT- and HIOMT-ir. The results suggest that a melatonin pathway is present in the circadian neurons. Melatonin receptor (MT2 or MEL-1B-R)-ir in PTTH-ir neurons juxtaposing clock neurons suggests that melatonin gates PTTH release. RIA showed a melatonin rhythm with a peak four hours after lights off in adult brain both under LD16∶8 (LD) and LD12∶12 (SD), and both the peak and the baseline levels were higher under LD than SD, suggesting a photoperiodic influence. When pupae in diapause were exposed to 10 cycles of LD, or stored at 4°C for 4 months under constant darkness, an increase of NAT activity was observed when PTTH released ecdysone. DNA sequence upstream of nat contained E-boxes to which CYC/CLK could bind, and nat transcription was turned off by clk or cyc dsRNA. dsRNANAT caused dysfunction of photoperiodism. dsRNAPER upregulated nat transcription as anticipated, based on findings in the Drosophila melanogaster circadian system. Transcription of nat, cyc and clk peaked at ZT12. RIA showed that dsRNANAT decreased melatonin while dsRNAPER increased melatonin. Thus nat, a clock controlled gene, is the critical link between the circadian clock and endocrine switch. MT-binding may release PTTH, resulting in termination of diapause. This study thus examined all of the basic functional units from the clock: a photoperiodic counter as an accumulator of mRNANAT, to endocrine switch for photoperiodism in A. pernyi showing this system is self-complete without additional device especially for photoperiodism. PMID:24667367

  14. Sinusoidal 50-Hz magnetic fields depress rat pineal NAT activity and serum melatonin. Role of duration and intensity of exposure.

    PubMed

    Selmaoui, B; Touitou, Y

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the exposure to a 50-Hz sinusoidal magnetic field could influence serum melatonin concentration and pineal enzymes activities in rats. The effects of both duration and intensity of exposure were also looked at. Two groups of Wistar male rats were exposed to 50-Hz magnetic fields of either 1, 10 or 100 microT. The first group was exposed for 12 hours and the second for 30 days (18 hours per day). During this time the animals were kept under a standard 12:12 light: dark cycle with a temperature of 25 degrees C and a relative humidity of 45 to 50%. Control (Sham-exposed) animals were kept in a similar environment but without exposure to a magnetic field. The animals were sacrificed under red dim light. Serum melatonin concentration and pineal N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) activities were studied. Long-term exposure to a magnetic field (10 and 100 microT) significantly depressed the nocturne peak of serum melatonin concentration and pineal NAT activity whereas no effect was observed on HIOMT activity. Short-term exposure depressed both pineal NAT activity and nocturnal serum melatonin concentration but only with the highest intensity used (100 microT). Our results suggest that sinusoidal magnetic fields alter the production of melatonin through an inhibition of pineal NAT activity. Both duration and intensity of exposure play an important role in this effect. This work shows that, 1) sinusoidal magnetic field depresses NAT activity as static magnetic field does whereas HIOMT activity remains unaltered whatever the type of experiment and the intensity used, 2) the effect observed is related to both the duration of exposure and the intensity of magnetic fields, 3) the sensitivity threshold to magnetic fields vary with the duration of exposure which strongly suggests a cumulative effect of sinusoidal magnetic fields on pineal function.

  15. Enhancing international earth science competence in natural hazards through 'geoNatHaz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Clague, John J.

    2010-05-01

    "geoNatHaz" is a Transatlantic Exchange Partnership project (TEP 2009-2012) within the framework of the EU-Canada programme for co-operation in higher education, training, and youth. The project is structured to improve knowledge and skills required to assess and manage natural hazards in mountain regions. It provides student exchanges between European and Canadian universities in order to enhance international competence in natural hazard research. The university consortium is led by Simon Fraser University (Canada) and Università degli studi di Torino (Italy). Partner universities include the University of British Columbia, Queen's University, Università di Bologna, Université de Savoie, and the University of Athens. Université de Lausanne (Switzerland) supports the geoNatHaz advisory board through its bilateral agreements with Canadian partner universities. The geoNatHaz project promotes cross-cultural understanding and internationalization of university natural hazard curricula through common lectures, laboratory exercises, and field activities. Forty graduate students from the seven Canadian and European partner universities will benefit from the project between 2009 and 2012. Some students enrolled in graduate-level earth science and geologic engineering programs spend up to five months at the partner universities, taking courses and participating in research teams under the direction of project scientists. Other students engage in short-term (four-week) exchanges involving training in classic natural hazard case-studies in mountain regions of Canada and Europe. Joint courses are delivered in English, but complementary cultural activities are offered in the languages of the host countries. Supporting organizations offer internships and technical and scientific support. Students benefit from work-study programs with industry partners. Supporting organizations include government departments and agencies (Geological Survey of Canada; CNR-IRPI National

  16. Interaction between Red Meat Intake and NAT2 Genotype in Increasing the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Japanese and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansong; Iwasaki, Motoki; Haiman, Christopher A; Kono, Suminori; Wilkens, Lynne R; Keku, Temitope O; Berndt, Sonja I; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines formed in cooked meat may be an underlying mechanism for the red meat-colorectal cancer (CRC) association. These compounds require bioactivaction by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). An interaction effect between red meat consumption and NAT2 in increasing CRC risk has been inconsistently reported in whites. We investigated this interaction in two populations in which the high-activity rapid NAT2 phenotype is 10- and 2-fold more common than in whites. We meta-analyzed four studies of Japanese (2,217 cases, 3,788 controls) and three studies of African Americans (527 cases, 4,527 controls). NAT2 phenotype was inferred from an optimized seven-SNP genotyping panel. Processed and total red meat intakes were associated with an increased CRC risk in Japanese and in both ethnic groups combined (P's ≤ 0.002). We observed an interaction between processed meat intake and NAT2 in Japanese (P = 0.04), African Americans (P = 0.02), and in both groups combined (P = 0.006). The association of processed meat with CRC was strongest among individuals with the rapid NAT2 phenotype (combined analysis, OR for highest vs. lowest quartile: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.28-2.05; Ptrend = 8.0×10-5), intermediate among those with the intermediate NAT2 phenotype (1.29, 95% CI: 1.05-1.59; Ptrend = 0.05) and null among those with the slow phenotype (Ptrend = 0.45). A similar interaction was found for NAT2 and total red meat (Pinteraction = 0.03). Our findings support a role for NAT2 in modifying the association between red meat consumption and CRC in Japanese and African Americans.

  17. A naturally occurring -263G/C variant of the human AA-NAT gene and overnight melatonin production.

    PubMed

    Ying, Grace Wang; Lee, Caroline Guat Lay; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2004-01-01

    Several lines of evidence show that the daily amount of melatonin produced differs greatly between individuals. Any polymorphism in the gene of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT), a critical enzyme involved in melatonin biosynthesis, may contribute to the variability of melatonin production. The present study investigated the possible association between overnight melatonin excretion and a commonly occurring -263G/C polymorphism in the promoter region of the human AA-NAT gene. However, we found that -263G/C variant had no effect on the overnight 6-OHMS excretion. In this study, individual genotyping for -263G/C was determined by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and confirmed by sequencing. The overnight urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) excretion was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450s, GSTs, NATs, alcohol consumption and risk of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yonghong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Lan, Qing; Zahm, Shelia; Holford, Theodore; Zhao, Ping; Dai, Min; Leaderer, Brian; Rothman, Nat; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450s (CYPs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and N-acetyltransferases (NATs) genes modify the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) in a population-based case-control study including 1,115 Connecticut women. Although we did not find strong evidence that the genetic polymorphisms modify the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of NHL, we identified significant interactions for multiple GSTs and NATs and alcohol intake among persons with DLBCL. Our results confer support investigation of the gene-environment interaction in a larger study population of DLBCL. PMID:20131310

  19. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) mutations and their allelic linkage in unrelated caucasian individuals: Correlation with phenotypic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cascorbi, I.; Drakoulis, N.; Brockmoeller, J.

    1995-09-01

    The polymorphic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2; EC2.3.1.5) is supposed to be a susceptibility factor for several drug side effects and certain malignancies. A group of 844 unrelated German subjects was genotyped for their acetylation type, and 563 of them were also phenotyped. Seven mutations of the NAT2 gene were evaluated by allele-specific PCR (mutation 341C to T) and PCR-RFLP for mutations at nt positions 191, 282, 481, 590, 803, and 857. From the mutation pattern eight different alleles, including the wild type coding for rapid acetylation and seven alleles coding for slow phenotype, were determined. Four hundred ninety-seven subjects had a genotype of slow acetylation (58.9%; 95% confidence limits 55.5%-62.2%). Phenotypic acetylation capacity was expressed as the ratio of 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil and 1-methylxanthine in urine after caffeine intake. Some 6.7% of the cases deviated in genotype and phenotype, but sequencing DNA of these probands revealed no new mutations. Furthermore, linkage pattern of the mutations was always confirmed, as tested in 533 subjects. In vivo acetylation capacity of homozygous wild-type subjects (NAT2{sup *}4/{sup *}4) was significantly higher than in heterozygous genotypes (P = .001). All mutant alleles showed low in vivo acetylation capacities, including the previously not-yet-defined alleles {sup *}5A, {sup *}5C, and {sup *}13. Moreover, distinct slow genotypes differed significantly among each other, as reflected in lower acetylation capacity of {sup *}6A, {sup *}7B, and {sup *}13 alleles than the group of {sup *}5 alleles. The study demonstrated differential phenotypic activity of various NAT2 genes and gives a solid basis for clinical and molecular-epidemiological investigations. 34 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Structure and function of human Naa60 (NatF), a Golgi-localized bi-functional acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Liang; Cao, Chun-Ling; Li, Mei-Jun; Tan, Kemin; Yang, Xiaohan; Yun, Cai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation), carried out by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is a conserved and primary modification of nascent peptide chains. Naa60 (also named NatF) is a recently identified NAT found only in multicellular eukaryotes. This protein was shown to locate on the Golgi apparatus and mainly catalyze the Nt-acetylation of transmembrane proteins, and it also harbors lysine Nε-acetyltransferase (KAT) activity to catalyze the acetylation of lysine ε-amine. Here, we report the crystal structures of human Naa60 (hNaa60) in complex with Acetyl-Coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) or Coenzyme A (CoA). The hNaa60 protein contains an amphipathic helix following its GNAT domain that may contribute to Golgi localization of hNaa60, and the β7-β8 hairpin adopted different conformations in the hNaa60(1-242) and hNaa60(1-199) crystal structures. Remarkably, we found that the side-chain of Phe 34 can influence the position of the coenzyme, indicating a new regulatory mechanism involving enzyme, co-factor and substrates interactions. Moreover, structural comparison and biochemical studies indicated that Tyr 97 and His 138 are key residues for catalytic reaction and that a non-conserved β3-β4 long loop participates in the regulation of hNaa60 activity. PMID:27550639

  1. Structure and function of human Naa60 (NatF), a Golgi-localized bi-functional acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Liang; Cao, Chun-Ling; Li, Mei-Jun; Tan, Kemin; Yang, Xiaohan; Yun, Caihong

    2016-08-23

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation), carried out by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is a conserved and primary modification of nascent peptide chains. Naa60 (also named NatF) is a recently identified NAT found only in multicellular eukaryotes. This protein was shown to locate on the Golgi apparatus and mainly catalyze the Nt-acetylation of transmembrane proteins, and it also harbors lysine Nε -acetyltransferase (KAT) activity to catalyze the acetylation of lysine ε-amine. Here, we report the crystal structures of human Naa60 (hNaa60) in complex with Acetyl-Coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) or Coenzyme A (CoA). The hNaa60 protein contains an amphipathic helix following its GNAT domain that may contribute to Golgi localization of hNaa60, and the β7-β8 hairpin adopted different conformations in the hNaa60(1-242) and hNaa60(1-199) crystal structures. Remarkably, we found that the side-chain of Phe 34 can influence the position of the coenzyme, indicating a new regulatory mechanism involving enzyme, co-factor and substrates interactions. Moreover, structural comparison and biochemical studies indicated that Tyr 97 and His 138 are key residues for catalytic reaction and that a non-conserved β3-β4 long loop participates in the regulation of hNaa60 activity.

  2. Structure and function of human Naa60 (NatF), a Golgi-localized bi-functional acetyltransferase

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Liang; Cao, Chun-Ling; ...

    2016-08-23

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation), carried out by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is a conserved and primary modification of nascent peptide chains. Naa60 (also named NatF) is a recently identified NAT found only in multicellular eukaryotes. This protein was shown to locate on the Golgi apparatus and mainly catalyze the Nt-acetylation of transmembrane proteins, and it also harbors lysine Nε -acetyltransferase (KAT) activity to catalyze the acetylation of lysine ε-amine. Here, we report the crystal structures of human Naa60 (hNaa60) in complex with Acetyl-Coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) or Coenzyme A (CoA). The hNaa60 protein contains an amphipathic helix following its GNAT domain that maymore » contribute to Golgi localization of hNaa60, and the β7-β8 hairpin adopted different conformations in the hNaa60(1-242) and hNaa60(1-199) crystal structures. Remarkably, we found that the side-chain of Phe 34 can influence the position of the coenzyme, indicating a new regulatory mechanism involving enzyme, co-factor and substrates interactions. Moreover, structural comparison and biochemical studies indicated that Tyr 97 and His 138 are key residues for catalytic reaction and that a non-conserved β3-β4 long loop participates in the regulation of hNaa60 activity.« less

  3. Towards flash flood disaster prevention: the SciNetNat Haz proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinos, Papatheodorou; Elena, Tzanou; Carmen, Maftei; Ozgur, Kirca; Hafzullah, Aksoy

    2015-04-01

    Floods occur with a continuously increasing frequency due to climatic changes and cause serious damage in the wider Black Sea area, endangering human life and property. As societies continuously expand, these phenomena are expected to play an increasingly important role, blocking sustainable development unless properly tackled. Flash flood prevention seems at this point, to be the target of effectively mitigating the potential threat. Since in many cases, there is a cross-border character of the problem, collaborative efforts have to be made involving cooperation between countries. To this end, a variety of problems exist, including the "information gap" related to the unavailability of data and the multitude of methodologies used to assess flood hazard; a fact that renders comparison of hazard assessment results and cross border cooperation ineffective. An effort made within the context of the SciNetNatHaz project, suggests a two step approach to produce reliable the results which can lead to decision making regarding designing preventive measures. The first step aims at defining the flood prone areas on a regional scale, using geomorphometric models and readily available topographic data; thus overcoming the problem of data availability for any region of interest. The second step follows a vulnerability and risk assessment of the flood prone areas of interest and focuses on the calculation of flood parameters on a local scale using hydraulic models. Implementation of the full process is based on Open Source software tools so that it can be implemented with minimal costs by anyone interested. Implementation of the proposed procedure in three different cases in Greece and in Romania shows that it can provide accurate and reliable results to support decision making regarding the design of preventive measures. Keywords: Flash floods, hazard assessment, flood disaster prevention, HEC-RAS, SAGA GIS . Acknowledgements: This work is partially funded by the EU through the

  4. Probability density functions characterizing PSC particle size distribution parameters for NAT and STS derived from in situ measurements between 1989 and 2010 above McMurdo Station, Antarctica, and between 1991-2004 above Kiruna, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshler, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Balloon-borne optical particle counters were used to make in situ size resolved particle concentration measurements within polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) over 20 years in the Antarctic and over 10 years in the Arctic. The measurements were made primarily during the late winter in the Antarctic and in the early and mid-winter in the Arctic. Measurements in early and mid-winter were also made during 5 years in the Antarctic. For the analysis bimodal lognormal size distributions are fit to 250 meter averages of the particle concentration data. The characteristics of these fits, along with temperature, water and nitric acid vapor mixing ratios, are used to classify the PSC observations as either NAT, STS, ice, or some mixture of these. The vapor mixing ratios are obtained from satellite when possible, otherwise assumptions are made. This classification of the data is used to construct probability density functions for NAT, STS, and ice number concentration, median radius and distribution width for mid and late winter clouds in the Antarctic and for early and mid-winter clouds in the Arctic. Additional analysis is focused on characterizing the temperature histories associated with the particle classes and the different time periods. The results from theses analyses will be presented, and should be useful to set bounds for retrievals of PSC properties from remote measurements, and to constrain model representations of PSCs.

  5. Methamphetamine-induced neuronal protein NAT8L is the NAA biosynthetic enzyme: implications for specialized acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Moffett, John R; Manickam, Pachiappan; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Arun, Peethambaran; Nitta, Atsumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2010-06-04

    N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a concentrated, neuron-specific brain metabolite routinely used as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy marker for brain injury and disease. Despite decades of research, the functional roles of NAA remain unclear. Biochemical investigations over several decades have associated NAA with myelin lipid synthesis and energy metabolism. However, studies have been hampered by an inability to identify the gene for the NAA biosynthetic enzyme aspartate N-acetyltransferase (Asp-NAT). A very recent report has identified Nat8l as the gene encoding Asp-NAT and confirmed that the only child diagnosed with a lack of NAA on brain magnetic resonance spectrograms has a 19-bp deletion in this gene. Based on in vitro Nat8l expression studies the researchers concluded that many previous biochemical investigations have been technically flawed and that NAA may not be associated with brain energy or lipid metabolism. In studies done concurrently in our laboratory we have demonstrated via cloning, expression, specificity for acetylation of aspartate, responsiveness to methamphetamine treatment, molecular modeling and comparative immunolocalization that NAT8L is the NAA biosynthetic enzyme Asp-NAT. We conclude that NAA is a major storage and transport form of acetyl coenzyme A specific to the nervous system, thus linking it to both lipid synthesis and energy metabolism.

  6. Crystalline and liquid structure of zinc chloride trihydrate: a unique ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Robert J; Losey, Bradley P; Folmer, Jacob C W; Martin, James D; Zeller, Matthias; Sommer, Roger

    2015-02-02

    The water/ZnCl(2) phase diagram in the vicinity of the 75 mol % water composition is reported, demonstrating the existence of a congruently melting phase. Single crystals of this 3-equiv hydrate were grown, and the crystal structure of [Zn(OH(2))(6)][ZnCl(4)] was determined. Synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction and IR and Raman spectroscopy along with reverse Monte Carlo modeling demonstrate that a CsCl-type packing of the molecular ions persists into the liquid state. Consistent with the crystalline and liquid structural data, IR spectroscopy demonstrates that the O-H bonds of coordinated water do not exhibit strong intermolecular hydrogen ion bonding but are significantly weakened because of the water's coordination to Lewis acidic zinc ions. The O-H bond weakening makes this system a very strong hydrogen-bond donor, whereas the ionic packing along with the nonpolar geometry of the molecular ions makes this system a novel nonpolar, hydrogen-bonding, ionic liquid solvent.

  7. Characterization of ARGON-40 + Silver-Nat Reactions: Timescales and Emission Orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelderloos, Carl James

    Studies have been made of ejectile coincidences resulting from ^{40}Ar + ^{nat}Ag reactions at bombarding energies of 17A-34A MeV. Correlations at both large and small relative angles are used to characterize the emission of light charged particles and fragments on a timescale of ~10^ {-22} s. Average delay times and emission orders between ejectiles are inferred by comparison to simulation calculations. Correlation functions in relative momentum, and spectra of the velocity differences between ejectiles emitted at small relative angles have been used to infer reaction dynamics. Trajectories of ejectile coincidences are particularly sensitive to the initial spatial and temporal relationship between the ejectiles and source. As the excitation energy of the emitter increases, the time delays between emissions decrease. The excitation energy deposited in central collisions increases from ~3 MeV per emitter nucleon at 17A MeV to nearly 6A MeV at 34A MeV. The measured delay times between ejectiles decrease steadily over this range. A simulation was developed to probe the degree of equilibration that is achieved by the composite nuclear system. It consists of a statistical model description of the emission of particles and a trajectory model calculation of the three-body interactions. Empirical lifetimes are substantially shorter than those predicted by model calculations, suggesting a regime in which partial, but not complete, equilibration is achieved. A novel method is also developed for measuring the average emission order for different ejectile pairs. The interactions between ejectiles differentiate between coincident events with different velocity relationships. At small relative angles these interactions are sufficiently strong to preferentially select events of a particular emission order. This method provides a new experimental observable with which to further constrain model descriptions. It is implemented to test for differences in average emission order

  8. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphism as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication in tuberculous meningitis or tuberculoma patients having seizures - A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adole, Prashant S.; Kharbanda, Parampreet S.; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Simultaneous administration of phenytoin and isoniazid (INH) in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) or tuberculoma patients with seizures results in higher plasma phenytoin level and thus phenytoin intoxication. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) enzyme catalyses two acetylation reactions in INH metabolism and NAT2 gene polymorphism leads to slow and rapid acetylators. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of allelic variants of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene as a predisposing factor for phenytoin toxicity in patients with TBM or tuberculoma having seizures, and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously. Methods: Sixty patients with TBM or tuberculoma with seizures and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously for a minimum period of seven days were included in study. Plasma phenytoin was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. NAT2 gene polymorphism was studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele specific PCR. Results: The patients were grouped into those having phenytoin intoxication and those with normal phenytoin level, and also classified as rapid or slow acetylators by NAT2 genotyping. Genotypic analysis showed that of the seven SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) of NAT2 gene studied, six mutations were found to be associated with phenytoin intoxication. For rs1041983 (C282T), rs1799929 (C481T), rs1799931 (G857A), rs1799930 (G590A), rs1208 (A803G) and rs1801280 (T341C) allelic variants, the proportion of homozygous mutant was higher in phenytoin intoxicated group than in phenytoin non-intoxicated group. Interpretation & conclusions: Homozygous mutant allele of NAT2 gene at 481site may act as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication among TBM or tuberculoma patients having seizures. PMID:27488001

  9. Different crystal morphologies arising from different preparation methods of a same polymorphic form may result in different properties of the final materials: the case of diclofenac sodium trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Rodomonte, Andrea; Antoniella, Eleonora; Bertocchi, Paola; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Manna, Livia; Bartolomei, Monica

    2008-09-29

    Diclofenac sodium is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used in painful and inflammatory diseases. It can exist in different hydrate phases. Recently the physico-chemical and pharmaceutical properties of a trihydrate form, named DSH3 were reported by the same authors. This short communication discusses how samples of a same polymorphic form can display dissimilar analytical signatures when obtained by different routes. Data from hot-stage microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRDP) and thermal analysis were used to characterise the DSH3 samples prepared by different methods. Through the case study of diclofenac sodium, this work highlights how the method used to prepare a specific crystal modification can generate samples with different morphologies and therefore different properties and physical stability.

  10. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-07-15

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves.

  11. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  12. Response of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers to amoxicillin trihydrate-clavulanate potassium therapy: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wildermuth, Brett E; Griffin, Craig E; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the treatment of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers with amoxicillin trihydrate-potassium clavulanate (Clavamox(®); Pfizer Animal Health). Nineteen cats with clinical and cytological findings consistent with eosinophilic plaques and/or lip ulcers were enrolled. Lesions were photographed and their areas measured in square centimetres before and after 21 days of therapy with either flavoured amoxicillin-clavulanate suspension or flavoured placebo suspension. Sixteen cats completed the study, with nine plaque lesions (four treatment and five placebo) and eight lip ulcer lesions (four treatment and four placebo) included in the analysis. All lesions were shown to have infection, with bacterial phagocytosis present on cytological examination. Coagulase-positive staphylococci were the most commonly isolated bacteria. The amoxicillin-clavulanate-treated eosinophilic plaque group had a statistically significant 96.2% reduction in mean lesion size (-7.60 cm(2), P = 0.0078) and an 80% reduction in mean percentage of microscopic fields demonstrating evidence of bacterial infection (P < 0.0001), whereas the placebo group did not. The amoxicillin-clavulanate-treated lip ulcer group had a 42.6% decrease in mean lesion size (-0.25 cm(2), P = 0.4125) and the placebo group a 36.6% increase (+0.49 cm(2), P = 0.1575), although neither change was statistically significant. The amoxicillin-clavulanate-treated lip ulcer group had a statistically significant 65.0% reduction in mean percentage of microscopic fields demonstrating evidence of bacterial infection (P < 0.0001), while no significant reduction was observed in the placebo group. A suspension of amoxicillin trihydrate-potassium clavulanate is an effective monotherapy for the treatment of feline eosinophilic plaques.

  13. Efficacy of ampicillin trihydrate or ceftiofur hydrochloride for treatment of metritis and subsequent fertility in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lima, F S; Vieira-Neto, A; Vasconcellos, G S F M; Mingoti, R D; Karakaya, E; Solé, E; Bisinotto, R S; Martinez, N; Risco, C A; Galvão, K N; Santos, J E P

    2014-09-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the efficacy of ampicillin trihydrate for the treatment of metritis in dairy cows compared with ceftiofur hydrochloride and the subsequent effects on pregnancy at first insemination (P/AI). Cows in the first 12 d in milk (DIM) with a uterine discharge score of 5 (watery, reddish or brownish discharge of foul smell) and rectal temperature <39.5°C were diagnosed with metritis based on the fetid discharge, and cows with metritis and rectal temperature ≥39.5°C were diagnosed as having puerperal metritis. Cows with metritis (n=528) were blocked by parity and type of metritis as fetid discharge or puerperal metritis and, within each block, assigned randomly to receive 11mg/kg of ampicillin (n=259) or 2.2mg/kg of ceftiofur (n=269) once daily for 5 d. Day of diagnosis of metritis was considered study d 1. A cohort of 268 cows without metritis was selected randomly at 12 DIM. Rectal temperature was measured in cows with metritis on study d 1 to 7, and 12, and vaginal discharge was scored on study d 5, 7, and 12. Metritis cure was characterized by vaginal discharge score of <5 or by vaginal discharge score of <5 and no fever. At 32±3 DIM, vaginal discharge was scored for diagnosis of purulent vaginal discharge. At 39±3 DIM, endometrial cytology was performed. At 53±3 and 67±3 DIM, ovaries were scanned to determine estrous cyclicity. Pregnancy was evaluated after the first AI. Cure of metritis based on vaginal discharge <5 was greater for ampicillin than ceftiofur on d 5 (37.1 vs. 25.2%) and 7 (57.2 vs. 46.3%), but not on d 12 (82.0 vs. 85.0%). Cure of metritis based on vaginal discharge <5 and no fever was greater for ampicillin than for ceftiofur only on d 7 (50.4 vs. 37.9%), but not on d 5 (23.1 vs. 17.6%) and 12 (66.1 vs. 67.4%). Cows with puerperal metritis had reduced cure compared with cows with fetid discharge on d 5 (30.5 vs. 12.8%), 7 (55.2 vs. 33.6%), and 12 (72.0 vs. 61.1%). The proportion of cows with fever on any day after

  14. Production cross sections of short-lived silver radionuclides from natPd(p,xn) nuclear processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun

    2012-03-01

    Production cross-sections of short-lived 103Ag, 104mAg and 104gAg radionuclides from proton-induced reactions on natural palladium (Pd) were measured up to 41 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The present results are compared with the available literature values as well as theoretical data calculated by the TALYS and the ALICE-IPPE computer codes. Note that production cross-sections of the 104mAg radionuclide from natPd(p,xn) processes has been measured here for the first time. Physical thick target yields for the investigated radionuclides were deduced from the respective threshold energy to 41 MeV taking into account that the total energy is absorbed in the targets. Measured data of the short-lived 103Ag radionuclide are noteworthy due to its possible applications as a precursor for the indirect production of widely used therapeutic 103Pd radionuclide via natPd(p,xn)103Ag → 103Pd processes. On the other hand, the investigated 104Ag radionuclide finds importance due to its potential use as a diagnostic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging analogue. Above all, measured data will enrich the literature database leading to various applications in science and technology.

  15. Enantioselective syntheses and configuration assignments of gamma-chiral butenolides from Plagiomnium undulatum: butenolide synthesis from tetronic acids.

    PubMed

    Kapferer, Tobias; Brückner, Reinhard; Herzig, Axel; König, Wilfried A

    2005-03-18

    Both enantiomers of the gamma-chiral alpha,beta-dimethylated butyrolactones nat-1 and nat-2 from the moss Plagiomnium undulatum were synthesized stereoselectively through butenolides and tetronic acids, respectively. The configuration of the natural products was determined by GLC comparisons with mono(3-O-acetyl-6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2-O-methyl)hexakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin as a stationary phase.

  16. Stratospheric meteorological conditions in the Arctic polar vortex, 1991 to 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M.; Nash, E. R.; Kelly, K.; Fahey, D. W.; Nagatani, R.; Toohey, D.; Avallone, L.; Anderson, J.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric meteorological conditions during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) presented excellent observational opportunities from Bangor, Maine, because the polar vortex was located over southeastern Canada for significant periods during the 1991-1992 winter. Temperature analyses showed that nitric acid trihydrates (NAT temperatures below 195 K) should have formed over small regions in early December. The temperatures in the polar vortex warmed beyond NAT temperatures by late January (earlier than normal). Perturbed chemistry was found to be associated with these cold temperatures.

  17. Calculation of the fission-fragment yields of the pre-actinide nuclei by the example of the natPb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslyuk, V. T.; Parlag, O. A.; Lendyel, O. I.; Marynets, T. I.; Romanyuk, M. I.; Shevchenko, O. S.; Ranyuk, Ju. Ju.; Dovbnya, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    The calculations of the fission-fragment yields (mass and charge spectra) carried out within the frameworks of the proposed statistical method for the pre-actinide nuclei by the example of natPb (20 isotopes) are presented. The role of neutron shells with N = 50 and N = 82 in realizing the single- and double-humped shape of the fission-fragment yields, respectively, for the neutron-deficit and neutron-excess Pb isotopes has been investigated. An explanation of the experimental results on the natPb fission was performed taking into account transformations to the ensemble of the long- and short-lived nuclear fragments.

  18. Yield and future issues of nucleic acid testing.

    PubMed

    Roth, W K; Seifried, E

    2001-06-01

    Despite the much lower actual yield than that estimated for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) nucleic acid testing (NAT)-only positives in the USA and Germany, look-back procedures have revealed that no HCV transmission has occurred in Germany since the introduction of NAT. This indicates sufficient sensitivity of the pool-PCR approach. The slow ramp-up of hepatitis B virus (HBV) however, may require a different approach. It has been shown in Germany that the pooling of samples followed by virus enrichment results in a significant yield. Single donation testing for HBV would not increase the yield, because virus enrichment from mini-pool results in a similar sensitivity to that of single donation testing. Both strategies may be useful for extending future NAT to HBV screening. New candidate viruses for NAT are Parvo B19 and hepatitis A virus (HAV) because of their extreme resistance to inactivation procedures. Their low pathogenicity and epidemiologic characteristics, however, make them candidate viruses only for pooled source plasma. The main future issues of NAT will be related to the automation of pooling, extraction and amplification as a single homogeneous process. Depending on the throughput, automated single donation NAT as demonstrated by the 'Tigris' system may be an option, as far as all transfusion-relevant viruses will be included. In the near future high throughput systems will rely on pooled donor samples, most probably in conjunction with efficient enrichment procedures. For these systems, automation of the extraction and amplification process will be one of the first steps. These procedures will also limitthe costs of NAT and keep it available for use with future candidate viruses.

  19. Inter-ethnic differences in genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP2D6, NAT1 and NAT2) in healthy populations: correlation with the functional in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Ben Salah, Ghada; Chakroun, Amine; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Rebai, Ahmed

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have shown that many polymorphisms of the xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) affect either enzymatic functions or are associated with various aspects of human health. Owing to the presence of these single nucleotide variants (SNVs), differences in detoxification capacity have been observed between many ethnicities. The aim of this investigation was to study the prevalence of four polymorphisms in XME among various ethnic groups. Attention was focused on polymorphisms of CYP2D6 (rs1058172, G>A, p.Arg365His), CYP1A1 (rs4646421, c.-26-728C>T), NAT1 (rs4921880, c.-85-1014T>A) and NAT2 (rs1208, A>G, p.Arg268Lys). These polymorphisms were analyzed in 261 healthy Tunisians individuals in comparison with different ethnic backgrounds from hapmap database. In addition, in silico functional prediction was also performed to determine the loss of function variants. Our results demonstrated that population's origins widely affect the genetic variability of XME enzymes and Tunisians show a characteristic pattern. In silico predictions showed a deleterious effect for p.Arg268Lys substitution on CYP2D6 function, findings confirmed its key role played in cancer susceptibility. These data show that detoxification genes structures depend on the studied population. This suggests that ethnic differences impact on disease risk or response to drugs and therefore should be taken into consideration in genetic association studies focusing on XME enzymes. Our results provide the first report on these SNV in Tunisian population and could be useful for further epidemiological investigations including targeted therapy.

  20. Comparative evaluation of a triplex nucleic acid test for detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA, with the Procleix Tigris System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xinglong; Zhai, Jianxin; Zeng, Jinfeng; Tian, Cong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Yigang

    2013-02-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) is valuable for screening blood donors for occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and infection during the window period in countries where HBV is endemic, such as China. An "in-house" NAT (Triplex NAT) was developed for screening for HBV DNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. Using the Triplex NAT, a head-to-head comparative clinical evaluation was carried out against the most common commercial NAT used for blood screening in China: the Procleix Tigris System. A total of 33,025 specimens which were negative for Hepatitis B surface antigen, HCV antibody and HIV-1 antibody/antigen from potential blood donors were tested for HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA by both the in-house Triplex assay and the commercially available Procleix Tigris System. Eleven specimens were detected as HBV positive by both NATs. Twelve specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Procleix Ultrio assay and the discriminatory assays, and not the Triplex. Twenty-eight specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Triplex and not the Procleix Ultrio. This study, combined with other data obtained in China, suggest that at least 50% HBV surface antigen negative but DNA-positive blood donations would be undetected using the current commercial NATs because of their insufficient sensitivity and/or Mini-Pool formatting strategies.

  1. Comparative genomic survey, exon-intron annotation and phylogenetic analysis of NAT-homologous sequences in archaea, protists, fungi, viruses, and invertebrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously published extensive genomic surveys [1-3], reporting NAT-homologous sequences in hundreds of sequenced bacterial, fungal and vertebrate genomes. We present here the results of our latest search of 2445 genomes, representing 1532 (70 archaeal, 1210 bacterial, 43 protist, 97 fungal,...

  2. Association of GSTT1 non-null and NAT1 slow/rapid genotypes with von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor gene transversions in sporadic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gallou, C; Longuemaux, S; Deloménie, C; Méjean, A; Martin, N; Martinet, S; Palais, G; Bouvier, R; Droz, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Junien, C; Béroud, C; Dupret, J M

    2001-08-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene is commonly mutated in renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type (CCRCC). We investigated the possible relationship between VHL mutations in sporadic CCRCC and polymorphism of genes encoding enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism: two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP1A1 and CYP2D6), one NAD[P]H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), three glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1) and two arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT1 and NAT2). We analysed DNA from tumour and nontumoural kidney tissue from 195 CCRCC patients. Single VHL mutations were identified in 88 patients and double mutations were present in two patients. Nine of 18 transversions were GC to TA, four were AT to TA, four were GC to CG and one was AT to CG. Ten of 19 transitions were GC to AT and nine were AT to GC. We also identified 53 frameshifts and two GC to AT at CpG. An excess of transversions was observed in a subset of patients with active GSTT1 [GSTT1 (+) genotype] and probably defective NAT1 (NAT1 S/R variant genotype). All 18 transversions were in GSTT1 (+) patients, whereas only 76% of transitions (P = 0.05) and 81% of the other mutations (P = 0.06) occurred in this genotype. We found that 28% of the transversions were in the NAT1 S/R genotype versus 12% of the transitions (P = 0.40) and 4% of the other mutations (P = 0.01). This suggests that pharmacogenetic polymorphisms may be associated with the type of acquired VHL mutation, which may modulate CCRCC development.

  3. Comparison of the Luminex xTAG respiratory viral panel with in-house nucleic acid amplification tests for diagnosis of respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pabbaraju, Kanti; Tokaryk, Kara L; Wong, Sallene; Fox, Julie D

    2008-09-01

    Detection of respiratory viruses using sensitive real-time nucleic acid amplification tests (NATs) is invaluable for patient and outbreak management. However, the wide range of potential respiratory virus pathogens makes testing using individual real-time NATs expensive and laborious. The objective of this study was to compare the detection of respiratory virus targets using the Luminex xTAG respiratory viral panel (RVP) assay with individual real-time NATs used at the Provincial Laboratory of Public Health, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The study included 1,530 specimens submitted for diagnosis of respiratory infections from December 2006 to May 2007. Direct-fluorescent-antigen-positive nasopharyngeal samples were excluded from this study. A total of 690 and 643 positives were detected by RVP and in-house NATs, respectively. Kappa correlation between in-house NATs and RVP for all targets ranged from 0.721 to 1.000. The majority of specimens missed by in-house NATs (96.7%) were positive for picornaviruses. Samples missed by RVP were mainly positive for adenovirus (51.7%) or respiratory syncytial virus (27.5%) by in-house NATs and in general had low viral loads. RVP allows for multiplex detection of 20 (and differentiation between 19) respiratory virus targets with considerable time and cost savings compared with alternative NATs. Although this first version of the RVP assay has lower sensitivity than in-house NATs for detection of adenovirus, it has good sensitivity for other targets. The identification of picornaviruses and coronaviruses and concurrent typing of influenza A virus by RVP, which are not currently included in our diagnostic testing algorithm, will improve our diagnosis of respiratory tract infections.

  4. Toxicity studies of amphetamine sulfate, ampicillin trihydrate, codeine, 8-methoxypsoralen, alpha-methyldopa, penicillin VK and propantheline bromide in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, J K; Elwell, M R

    1989-06-01

    Thirteen-week toxicity studies in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were conducted to determine general toxicity and target organ toxicity with amphetamine sulfate, ampicillin trihydrate, codeine, 8-methoxypsoralen, alpha-methyldopa sesquihydrate, penicillin VK, and propantheline bromide. This paper discusses the toxicity observed; use of the toxicity data to set dose levels for subsequent 2-year studies; and comparison of dose levels administered to rodents with doses used in the treatment of human disease. Drugs were administered orally in the feed or by gavage. The lowest doses in the 13-week studies were comparable to therapeutic doses in man on a mg/m2 (body surface area) basis or 5-10 times doses used in man on a mg/kg body weight basis. Little toxicity was seen at the low dose level with ampicillin, penicillin VK, 8-methoxypsoralen or propantheline bromide. At higher doses, target organ toxicity seen included the urinary bladder in male rats after propantheline bromide; the glandular stomach in rats and mice after penicillin VK; the liver and adrenals in rats after 8-methoxypsoralen; and the kidney in mice and rats after alpha-methyldopa. After amphetamine, codeine, or ampicillin administration, no target organ toxicity was seen in rats or mice, even at doses which caused body weight gain depression. The high doses chosen for subsequent 2-year studies were within 10 times human dose levels when compared on a mg/m2 body surface area.

  5. Excitation functions of the natCr(p,x)44Ti, 56Fe(p,x)44Ti, natNi(p,x)44Ti and 93Nb(p,x)44Ti reactions at energies up to 2.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Chauzova, M. V.; Balyuk, S. A.; Bebenin, P. V.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Mashnik, S. G.; Leray, S.; Boudard, A.; David, J. C.; Mancusi, D.; Cugnon, J.; Yariv, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kumawat, H.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the measured cumulative yields of 44Ti for natCr, 56Fe, natNi and 93Nb samples irradiated by protons at the energy range 0.04-2.6 GeV. The obtained excitation functions are compared with calculations of the well-known codes: ISABEL, Bertini, INCL4.2+ABLA, INCL4.5+ABLA07, PHITS, CASCADE07 and CEM03.02. The predictive power of these codes regarding the studied nuclides is analyzed.

  6. Day/night fluctuations in melatonin content, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity and NAT mRNA expression in the CNS, peripheral tissues and hemolymph of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Jadwiga; Sehadova, Hana; Ichihara, Naoyuki; Takeda, Makio

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin content measured by a radioenzymatic assay in the brain of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) showed a day/night fluctuation with higher levels at night under LD 12:12. The activity of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) in brain was also higher at night and this pattern continued in constant darkness. The results suggest that the rhythmicity in melatonin content can be caused by NAT. Melatonin content in hemolymph showed an even greater day/night difference, more than 12 times that in brain under LD 12:12. Melatonin levels in retina were also higher at night while NAT activity was not significantly higher at night than at daytime. Using a probe designed from NAT cloned from testes we performed Northern blot analysis of total RNA, which revealed that the level of NAT mRNA was higher in midgut, ovary and female accessory glands than in fat body and brain. The level of transcript in midgut was higher at night, but the levels in ovary and female accessory reproductive gland showed the opposite pattern. We also used the antibody to whole Drosophila melanogaster aaNAT1 protein, seeking a homologous antigen in the cephalic ganglia. NAT-like antigen was detected in several restricted populations of cells in the brain that were partially co-localized with PER-like antigen. The results suggest that NAT exists in multiple forms in various tissues of the cockroach and that its functions and regulations can vary among tissues. The results in the brain led to the conclusion that NAT could be a clock-controlled gene functioning as an output regulator of the circadian clock.

  7. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l, an N-acetyltransferase, in the nucleus accumbens attenuates the response to methamphetamine via activation of group II mGluRs in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Yudai; Iegaki, Noriyuki; Sumi, Kazuyuki; Fu, Kequan; Sato, Keiji; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Uno, Kyosuke; Nitta, Atsumi

    2014-08-01

    A novel N-acetyltransferase, Shati/Nat8l, was identified in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice with methamphetamine (METH) treatment. Previously we reported that suppression of Shati/Nat8l enhanced METH-induced behavioral alterations via dopaminergic neuronal regulation. However, the physiological mechanisms of Shati/Nat8l on the dopaminergic system in the brain are unclear. In this study, we injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing Shati/Nat8l into the NAc or dorsal striatum (dS) of mice, to increase Shati/Nat8l expression. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, attenuated METH-induced hyperlocomotion, locomotor sensitization, and conditioned place preference in mice. Moreover, the Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc attenuated the elevation of extracellular dopamine levels induced by METH in in vivo microdialysis experiments. These behavioral and neurochemical alterations due to Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc were inhibited by treatment with selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 and 3 (mGluR2/3) antagonist LY341495. In the AAV vector-injected NAc, the tissue contents of both N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), endogenous mGluR3 agonist, were elevated. The injection of peptidase inhibitor of NAAG or the perfusion of NAAG itself reduced the basal levels of extracellular dopamine in the NAc of naive mice. These results indicate that Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, plays an important suppressive role in the behavioral responses to METH by controlling the dopaminergic system via activation of group II mGluRs.

  8. Formation of model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1992-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to examine the competitive growth of films representative of polar stratospheric clouds. These experiments show that either crystalline nitric acid trihydrate (beta-NAT) or amorphous films with H2O:HNO3 ratios close to 3:1 formed at temperatures 3-7 K warmer than the ice frost point under stratospheric pressure conditions. In addition, with higher HNO3 pressure, we observed nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) formation at temperatures warmer than ice formation. However, our experiments also show that NAD surfaces converted to beta-NAT upon exposure to stratospheric water pressures. Finally, we determined that the net uptake coefficient for HNO3 on beta-NAT is close to unity, whereas the net uptake coefficient for H2O is much less.

  9. Independent isotopic yields in 25 MeV and 50 MeV proton-induced fission of natU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, H.; Gorelov, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Parkkonen, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Simutkin, V.; Sonoda, T.; Weber, C.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    Independent isotopic yields for elements from Zn to La in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were determined with the JYFLTRAP facility. In addition, isotopic yields for Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pd and Xe in the 50 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were measured. The deduced isotopic yield distributions are compared with a Rubchenya model, the GEF model with universal parameters and the semi-empirical Wahl model. Of these, the Rubchenya model gives the best overall agreement with the obtained data. Combining the isotopic yield data with mass yield data to obtain the absolute independent yields was attempted. The result depends on the mass yield distribution.

  10. A simple and cost-saving approach to optimize the production of subtilisin NAT by submerged cultivation of Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ting-Wei; Tsai, Ruei-Lan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2009-01-14

    Subtilisin NAT, formerly designated nattokinase or subtilisin BSP, is a potent cardiovascular drug because of its strong fibrinolytic activity and safety. In this study, one Bacillus subtilis natto strain with high fibrinolytic activity was isolated. We further studied the optimal conditions for subtilisin NAT production by submerged cultivation and three variables/three levels of response surface methodology (RSM) using various inoculum densities, glucose concentrations, and defatted soybean concentrations as the three variables. According to the RSM analysis, while culturing by 2.93% defatted soybean, 1.75% glucose, and 4.00% inoculum density, we obtained an activity of 13.78 SU/mL. Processing the batch fermentation with this optimal condition, the activity reached 13.69 SU/mL, which is equal to 99.3% of the predicted value.

  11. Active cigarette smoking and the risk of breast cancer at the level of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kasajova, Petra; Holubekova, Veronika; Mendelova, Andrea; Lasabova, Zora; Zubor, Pavol; Kudela, Erik; Biskupska-Bodova, Kristina; Danko, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the correlation between the tobacco exposure and NAT2 gene (rs1041983 C/T, rs1801280 T/C, rs1799930 G/A) polymorphisms in association with breast cancer development. We wanted to determine the prognostic clinical importance of these polymorphisms in association with smoking and breast cancer. For the detection of possible association between smoking, NAT2 gene polymorphisms, and the risk of breast cancer, we designed a case-controlled study with 198 patients enrolled, 98 breast cancer patients and 100 healthy controls. Ten milliliters of peripheral blood from the cubital vein was withdrawn from every patient. The HRM (high resolution melting) analysis was used for the detection of three abovementioned NAT2 gene polymorphisms. When comparing a group of women smoking more than 5 cigarettes a day with the patients smoking fewer than 5 cigarettes a day, we found out that if women were the carriers of aberrant AA genotype for rs1799930, the first group of women had higher risk of breast carcinoma than the second group. If patients were the carriers of aberrant TT genotype for rs1041983, for rs1801280CC genotype, and rs1799930AA genotype and they smoked more than 5 cigarettes a day, they had higher risk of malignant breast disease than never-smoking women. Our results confirm the hypothesis that NAT2 gene polymorphisms (rs1041983 C/T, rs1801280 T/C, and rs1799930 G/A) in association with long-period active smoking could be the possible individual risk-predicting factors for breast cancer development in the population of Slovak women.

  12. Identification of ta-siRNAs and Cis-nat-siRNAs in Cassava and Their Roles in Response to Cassava Bacterial Blight

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Andrés; Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; López, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) and natural cis-antisense siRNAs (cis-nat-siRNAs) are recently discovered small RNAs (sRNAs) involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. ta-siRNAs are transcribed from genomic loci and require processing by microRNAs (miRNAs). cis-nat-siRNAs are derived from antisense RNAs produced by the simultaneous transcription of overlapping antisense genes. Their roles in many plant processes, including pathogen response, are mostly unknown. In this work, we employed a bioinformatic approach to identify ta-siRNAs and cis-nat-siRNAs in cassava from two sRNA libraries, one constructed from healthy cassava plants and one from plants inoculated with the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam). A total of 54 possible ta-siRNA loci were identified in cassava, including a homolog of TAS3, the best studied plant ta-siRNA. Fifteen of these loci were induced, while 39 were repressed in response to Xam infection. In addition, 15 possible cis-natural antisense transcript (cis-NAT) loci producing siRNAs were identified from overlapping antisense regions in the genome, and were found to be differentially expressed upon Xam infection. Roles of sRNAs were predicted by sequence complementarity and our results showed that many sRNAs identified in this work might be directed against various transcription factors. This work represents a significant step toward understanding the roles of sRNAs in the immune response of cassava. PMID:23665476

  13. Coffee and tea consumption, genotype-based CYP1A2 and NAT2 activity and colorectal cancer risk-results from the EPIC cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dik, Vincent K; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Van Oijen, Martijn G H; Siersema, Peter D; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Van Gils, Carla H; Van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Cauchi, Stéphane; Yengo, Loic; Froguel, Philippe; Overvad, Kim; Bech, Bodil H; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Kühn, Tilman; Campa, Daniele; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Peppa, Eleni; Oikonomou, Eleni; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosaria; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H M; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Engeset, Dagrun; Braaten, Tonje; Dorronsoro, Miren; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Sánchez, María-José; Barricarte, Aurelio; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Argüelles, Marcial; Jirström, Karin; Wallström, Peter; Nilsson, Lena M; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Freisling, Heinz; Licaj, Idlir; Jenab, Mazda; Gunter, Marc J; Murphy, Neil; Romaguera-Bosch, Dora; Riboli, Elio

    2014-07-15

    Coffee and tea contain numerous antimutagenic and antioxidant components and high levels of caffeine that may protect against colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the association between coffee and tea consumption and CRC risk and studied potential effect modification by CYP1A2 and NAT2 genotypes, enzymes involved in the metabolization of caffeine. Data from 477,071 participants (70.2% female) of the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort study were analyzed. At baseline (1992-2000) habitual (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) coffee and tea consumption was assessed with dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratio's (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Potential effect modification by genotype-based CYP1A2 and NAT2 activity was studied in a nested case-control set of 1,252 cases and 2,175 controls. After a median follow-up of 11.6 years, 4,234 participants developed CRC (mean age 64.7 ± 8.3 years). Total coffee consumption (high vs. non/low) was not associated with CRC risk (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.95-1.18) or subsite cancers, and no significant associations were found for caffeinated (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.97-1.26) and decaffeinated coffee (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.84-1.11) and tea (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.86-1.09). High coffee and tea consuming subjects with slow CYP1A2 or NAT2 activity had a similar CRC risk compared to non/low coffee and tea consuming subjects with a fast CYP1A2 or NAT2 activity, which suggests that caffeine metabolism does not affect the link between coffee and tea consumption and CRC risk. This study shows that coffee and tea consumption is not likely to be associated with overall CRC.

  14. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of 1-(diaminomethylene) thiouron-1-ium benzoate and bis(1-(diaminomethylene)thiouron-1-ium) phthalate trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perpétuo, Genivaldo Julio; Janczak, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Two single crystals of 1-(diaminomethylene) thiouron-1-ium benzoate (1) and bis(1-(diaminomethylene)thiouron-1-ium) phthalate trihydrate (2) were grown using a solution growth technique. The compound 1 crystallises in the centrosymmetric P21/c space group of the monoclinic system, whereas the compound 2 in the centrosymmetric Pbcn space group of orthorhombic system. The solid-state organisation of 1 and 2 has been analysed with respect to cation-anion and hydrogen bonding interactions. The oppositely charged units interact via almost linear hydrogen bonds with the graphs of R22(8) and R21(6) forming molecular complexes. In the crystal 1 the R22(8) motif is formed by donation to the carboxylate group from amine group joined to C1 and from imine group and R21(6) motif is formed by donation to the O2 from amine group joined to C2 and from imine group, whereas in crystal 2 the graphs are formed oppositely. Interactions between the hydrogen-bonded molecular complexes in 1 lead to formation of layered 2D structure, whereas in 2, due to presence of hydrated water molecules lead to formation of 3D hydrogen-bonded supramolecular network. The obtained deuterated analogues of 1 and 2 crystallise similar as H-compound in the monoclinic and orthorhombic system with quite similar lattice parameters. The compounds were also characterised by the FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies. The characteristic bands of the functional and skeletal groups are discussed.

  15. Flexibility of CuCl4-tetrahedra in bis[cinchoninium tetrachlorocuprate(II)]trihydrate single crystals. X-ray diffraction and EPR studies.

    PubMed

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, A; Oleksyn, B J; Hoffmann, S K; Sliwiński, J; Borzecka-Prokop, B; Goslar, J; Hilczer, W

    2001-08-27

    Crystal structure of bis[cinchoninium tetrachlorocuprate(II)] trihydrate, [(C19H24N2O)CuCl4]2-3H2O, has been determined by X-ray diffraction at 100 K and reexamined at 293 K. The compound crystallizes in orthorhombic system with a P2(1)2(1)2(1) space group and unit cell parameters a = 15.3031(14), b = 36.415(3), and c = 7.8341(5) A at 100 K, and Z = 4. The asymmetric unit consists of two (CuCl4)(2-) tetrahedral anions linked by hydrogen bonds to two doubly protonated cinchonine molecules and three water molecules. The tetrahedra are strongly flattened, to approximately D(2d) symmetry, with different deformation for two inequivalent (CuCl4)(2-) -ions in the asymmetric unit. The deformation of (CuCl4)(2-) and cinchoninium cations varies with temperature due to a rearrangement of the bifurcated hydrogen bond network. This is a continuous process observed as a monotonic variation of the EPR spectral parameters and the unit cell dimensions. EPR spectra show that very weak exchange coupling J(12) = 0.0030 cm(-1) operates between Cu(2+) ions within asymmetric units, corresponding to the general formula of the compound, as well as between equivalent Cu(2+) sites of different molecules, whereas the coupling is negligible between inequivalent sites. The intermolecular J(12) coupling is temperature-independent indicating that the whole asymmetric unit behaves as a magnetic unit (pseudodimer) in the whole temperature range.

  16. Production of ⁶¹Cu by the natZn(p,α) reaction: Improved separation and specific activity determination by titration with three chelators

    SciTech Connect

    Asad, Ali H.; Smith, Suzanne V.; Morandeau, Laurence M.; Chan, Sun; Jeffery, Charmaine M.; Price, Roger I.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the cyclotron-based production of position-emitting ⁶¹Cu using the (p,α) reaction at 11.7 MeV was investigated starting from natural-zinc (natZn) and enriched ⁶⁴Zn-foil targets, as well as its subsequent purification. For natZn, a combination of three resins were assessed to separate ⁶¹Cu from contaminating 66,67,68Ga and natZn. The specific activity of the purified ⁶¹Cu determined using ICP-MS analysis ranged from 143.3±14.3(SD) to 506.2±50.6 MBq/μg while the titration method using p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and diamsar gave variable results (4.7±0.2 to 412.5±15.3 MBq/μg), with diamsar lying closest to the ICP-MS values. Results suggest that the p-SCN-Bn-DOTA and p-SCN-Bn-NOTA titration methods are significantly affected by the presence of trace-metal contaminants.

  17. Production of ⁶¹Cu by the natZn(p,α) reaction: Improved separation and specific activity determination by titration with three chelators

    DOE PAGES

    Asad, Ali H.; Smith, Suzanne V.; Morandeau, Laurence M.; ...

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the cyclotron-based production of position-emitting ⁶¹Cu using the (p,α) reaction at 11.7 MeV was investigated starting from natural-zinc (natZn) and enriched ⁶⁴Zn-foil targets, as well as its subsequent purification. For natZn, a combination of three resins were assessed to separate ⁶¹Cu from contaminating 66,67,68Ga and natZn. The specific activity of the purified ⁶¹Cu determined using ICP-MS analysis ranged from 143.3±14.3(SD) to 506.2±50.6 MBq/μg while the titration method using p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and diamsar gave variable results (4.7±0.2 to 412.5±15.3 MBq/μg), with diamsar lying closest to the ICP-MS values. Results suggest that the p-SCN-Bn-DOTA and p-SCN-Bn-NOTA titration methods aremore » significantly affected by the presence of trace-metal contaminants.« less

  18. Markers of genetic susceptibility in human environmental hygiene and toxicology: the role of selected CYP, NAT and GST genes.

    PubMed

    Thier, Ricarda; Brüning, Thomas; Roos, Peter H; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Golka, Klaus; Ko, Yon; Bolt, Hermann M

    2003-06-01

    Inherited genetic traits co-determine the susceptibility of an individual to a toxic chemical. Special emphasis has been put on individual responses to environmental and industrial carcinogens, but other chronic diseases are of increasing interest. Polymorphisms of relevant xenobiotic metabolising enzymes may be used as toxicological susceptibility markers. A growing number of genes encoding enzymes involved in biotransformation of toxicants and in cellular defence against toxicant-induced damage to the cells has been identified and cloned, leading to increased knowledge of allelic variants of genes and genetic defects that may result in a differential susceptibility toward environmental toxicants. "Low penetrating" polymorphisms in metabolism genes tend to be much more common in the population than allelic variants of "high penetrating" cancer genes, and are therefore of considerable importance from a public health point of view. Positive associations between cancer and CYP1A1 alleles, in particular the *2C I462V allele, were found for tissues following the aerodigestive tract. Again, in most cases, the effect of the variant CYP1A1 allele becomes apparent or clearer in connection with the GSTM1 null allele. The CYP1B1 codon 432 polymorphism (CYP1B1*3) has been identified as a susceptibility factor in smoking-related head-and-neck squameous cell cancer. The impact of this polymorphic variant of CYP1B1 on cancer risk was also reflected by an association with the frequency of somatic mutations of the p53 gene. Combined genotype analysis of CYP1B1 and the glutathione transferases GSTM1 or GSTT1 has also pointed to interactive effects. Of particular interest for the industrial and environmental field is the isozyme CYP2E1. Several genotypes of this isozyme have been characterised which seem to be associated with different levels of expression of enzyme activity. The acetylator status for NAT2 can be determined by genotyping or by phenotyping. In the pathogenesis of

  19. Pro-lipogenic Action of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    CA16059. REFERENCES 1. Menendez, J. A., and Lupu , R. (2007) Fatty acid synthase and the lipogenic phenotype in cancer pathogenesis. Nat. Rev. Cancer 7, 763...Colomer, R., and Lupu , R. (2004) Inhibition of tumor- associated fatty acid synthase activity enhances vinorelbine (Navelbine)- induced cytotoxicity and...cancer cell line LNCaP. Cancer Res. 57, 1086–1090 55. Menendez, J. A., Oza, B. P., Colomer, R., and Lupu , R. (2005) The estro- genic activity of

  20. Combined MIPAS (airborne/satellite), CALIPSO and in situ study on large potential NAT particles observed in early Arctic winter stratosphere in December 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Frey, Wiebke; Gulde, Thomas; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Sartorius, Christian; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the characteristics of large HNO3-containing particles (potential 'NAT-rocks') involved in vertical redistribution of HNO3 in the polar winter stratosphere is limited due to the difficult accessibility of these particles by observations. While robust polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) classification schemes exist for observations by the space-borne lidar aboard CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) as well as for the passive mid-infrared limb observations by MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), these observations are hardly exploited for the detection of large (diameter >10 μm) NAT particles. This is due to the facts that these particles have low overall number densities, resulting in weak detectable signatures, and that the physical characteristics of these particles (i.e. shape, morphology, HNO3-content and optical characteristics) are uncertain. We investigate collocated and complementary observations of a low-density potential large NAT particle field by the space-borne instruments CALIPSO and MIPAS-ENVISAT as well as the airborne observations by the limb-sounder MIPAS-STR and the in situ particle probe FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe 100) aboard the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The observations aboard the Geophysica on 11 December 2011 associated to ESSenCe (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) provided us the unique opportunity to study in detail the lower boundary region of a PSC where large potential NAT particles (>20 μm in diameter) were detected in situ. We analyse the ambient temperatures and gas-phase composition (HNO3 and H2O), the signatures of the observed particles in the CALIPSO and MIPAS observations, the HNO3-content of these particles suggested by the FSSP-100 and MIPAS-STR observations, and focus on the spectral fingerprint of these particles in the MIPAS-STR observations. While the spectral characterisation of the observed particles is subject

  1. ERBE S7 NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    ... Level:  L2 Platform:  ERBS, NOAA-9 & 10 Instrument:  NonScanner Spatial Coverage:  ... The measurements are continuous over the entire globe for NOAA-9 and NOAA-10, and between 57 degrees north and south latitudes for ERBS ...

  2. ERBE S8 NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    ... Level:  L2 Platform:  ERBS, NOAA 9 & 10 Instrument:  Scanner, NonScanner Spatial ... The measurements are continuous over the entire globe for NOAA-9 and NOAA-10, and between 57 degrees north and south latitudes for ERBS ...

  3. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease. PMID:25988157

  4. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease.

  5. Spectroscopic studies of model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study nitric-acid/ice films representative of type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These studies reveal that in addition to amorphous nitric acid/ice mixtures, there are three stable stoichiometric hydrates of nitric acid: nitric-acid monohydrate (NAM), dihydrate (NAD), and trihydrate (NAT). We also observe two distinct crystalline forms of the trihydrate, which we denote alpha- and beta-NAT. These two forms appear to differ in their concentration of crystalline defects, but not in their chemical composition. In addition to probing the composition of type I PSCs, we have also used FTIR spectroscopy to study the interaction of HCl with model PSC films. In this work we find that for HCl pressures in the range 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -7 Torr, HCl is taken up by ice at 155 K to form a thin layer of HCl.6H2O. At 193 K, the uptake of HCl by ice was consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage. Uptake of HCl by alpha and beta-NAT at 175 K was also consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage.

  6. Organ donor screening using parallel nucleic acid testing allows assessment of transmission risk and assay results in real time.

    PubMed

    Baleriola, C; Tu, E; Johal, H; Gillis, J; Ison, M G; Law, M; Coghlan, P; Rawlinson, W D

    2012-06-01

    Expansion of the donor pool may lead to utilization of donors with risk factors for viral infections. Donor laboratory screening relies on serological and nucleic acid testing (NAT). The increased sensitivity of NAT in low prevalence populations may result in false-positive results (FPR) and may cause unnecessary discard of organs.We developed a screening algorithm to deal, in real time, with potential FPR. Three NAT assays: COBAS AmpliScreen assay (CAS), AmpliPrep Total Nucleic Acid Isolation/CAS, and AmpliPrep/TaqMan assays, were validated and used in parallel for prospective screening of increased-risk donors (IRD), and the probability of FPR was calculated. The lower limit of detection of this algorithm was 9.79, 21.02, and 4.31 IU/mL for human immunodeficiency virus-1, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus, respectively, with an average turn-around-time of 7.67 h from sample receipt to result reporting. The probability that a donor is potentially infectious with two NAT concordant results was >90%. NAT screening of 35 IRD within 18 months resulted in transplantation of 102 additional organs that without screening would either not be used or used with restrictions in Australia. Using a parallel testing algorithm, real-time confirmation of seropositive donors allows use of organs from IRD and safer expansion of the donor pool.

  7. Affinity of nat/68Ga-Labelled Curcumin and Curcuminoid Complexes for β-Amyloid Plaques: Towards the Development of New Metal-Curcumin Based Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Rubagotti, Sara; Croci, Stefania; Ferrari, Erika; Iori, Michele; Capponi, Pier C.; Lorenzini, Luca; Calzà, Laura; Versari, Annibale; Asti, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin derivatives labelled with fluorine-18 or technetium-99m have recently shown their potential as diagnostic tools for Alzheimer’s disease. Nevertheless, no study by exploiting the labelling with gallium-68 has been performed so far, in spite of its suitable properties (positron emitter, generator produced radionuclide). Herein, an evaluation of the affinity for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils and for amyloid plaques of three nat/68Ga-labelled curcumin analogues, namely curcumin curcumin (CUR), bis-dehydroxy-curcumin (bDHC) and diacetyl-curcumin (DAC), was performed. Affinity and specificity were tested in vitro on amyloid synthetic fibrils by using gallium-68 labelled compounds. Post-mortem brain cryosections from Tg2576 mice were used for the ex vivo visualization of amyloid plaques. The affinity of 68Ga(CUR)2+, 68Ga(DAC)2+, and 68Ga(bDHC)2+ for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils was moderate and their uptake could be observed in vitro. On the other hand, amyloid plaques could not be visualized on brain sections of Tg2576 mice after injection, probably due to the low stability of the complexes in vivo and of a hampered passage through the blood–brain barrier. Like curcumin, all nat/68Ga-curcuminoid complexes maintain a high affinity for β-amyloid plaques. However, structural modifications are still needed to improve their applicability as radiotracers in vivo. PMID:27608011

  8. Depth profile of production yields of natPb(p, xn) 206,205,204,203,202,201Bi nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila; Jung, Nam-Suk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Arim; Bae, Oryun; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-11-01

    Experimental and simulation studies on the depth profiles of production yields of natPb(p, xn) 206,205,204,203,202,201Bi nuclear reactions were carried out. Irradiation experiments were performed at the high-intensity proton linac facility (KOMAC) in Korea. The targets, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, were arranged in a stack consisting of natural Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by activation analysis method using 27Al(p, 3p1n)24Na, 197Au(p, p1n)196Au, and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au monitor reactions and also by Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in the natPb activation foils and monitor foils were measured by HPGe spectroscopy system. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by FLUKA, PHITS/DCHAIN-SP, and MCNPX/FISPACT codes and the calculated data were compared with the experimental results. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the simulations.

  9. Affinity of (nat/68)Ga-Labelled Curcumin and Curcuminoid Complexes for β-Amyloid Plaques: Towards the Development of New Metal-Curcumin Based Radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Rubagotti, Sara; Croci, Stefania; Ferrari, Erika; Iori, Michele; Capponi, Pier C; Lorenzini, Luca; Calzà, Laura; Versari, Annibale; Asti, Mattia

    2016-09-06

    Curcumin derivatives labelled with fluorine-18 or technetium-99m have recently shown their potential as diagnostic tools for Alzheimer's disease. Nevertheless, no study by exploiting the labelling with gallium-68 has been performed so far, in spite of its suitable properties (positron emitter, generator produced radionuclide). Herein, an evaluation of the affinity for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils and for amyloid plaques of three (nat/68)Ga-labelled curcumin analogues, namely curcumin curcumin (CUR), bis-dehydroxy-curcumin (bDHC) and diacetyl-curcumin (DAC), was performed. Affinity and specificity were tested in vitro on amyloid synthetic fibrils by using gallium-68 labelled compounds. Post-mortem brain cryosections from Tg2576 mice were used for the ex vivo visualization of amyloid plaques. The affinity of (68)Ga(CUR)₂⁺, (68)Ga(DAC)₂⁺, and (68)Ga(bDHC)₂⁺ for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils was moderate and their uptake could be observed in vitro. On the other hand, amyloid plaques could not be visualized on brain sections of Tg2576 mice after injection, probably due to the low stability of the complexes in vivo and of a hampered passage through the blood-brain barrier. Like curcumin, all (nat/68)Ga-curcuminoid complexes maintain a high affinity for β-amyloid plaques. However, structural modifications are still needed to improve their applicability as radiotracers in vivo.

  10. Measurement of natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re excitation function of natural tungsten by using a 100-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jungran; Lee, Jieun; Lee, Samyol

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the proton-induced excitation function for the natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re nuclear reaction has been measured in the energy region below 100 MeV by using the 100-MeV proton linear accelerator at the Korea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. The stacked foil activation technique was adopted in the present study. The gamma-rays generated from the proton-irradiated samples were measured by using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with a HPGe detector. The 27Al(p,3p+n)24Na reaction was used as a monitor reaction for proton flux monitoring. The nuclear reactions of natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re were observed in the present study. The proton-induced excitation functions of natural tungsten were derived from the delayed gamma-ray yield of the produced nucleus. The present results were compared with the previous experimental excitation function data of Yu. E. Titarenko et al. [1].

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2E1, GST, and NAT2 enzymes are not associated with risk of breast cancer in a sample of Lebanese women.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Nathalie K; Shamseddine, Ashraf A; Geryess, Eddy; Tfayli, Arafat; Bazarbachi, Ali; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Taher, Ali; El-Saghir, Nagi S

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are potentially associated with cancer risk. This relationship is attributed to their involvement in the bioactivation of multiple procarcinogens or the metabolism of multiple substrates including an array of xenobiotics and environmental carcinogens. 326 Lebanese women of whom 99 were cancer free (controls) and 227 were diagnosed with breast cancer (cases) were included. Blood for DNA was collected and medical charts were reviewed. Three genotyping methods were employed including: (1) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for CYP2E1*5B, CYP2E1*6, NAT2*5 and NAT2*6; (2) gel electrophoresis for GSTM1 and GSTT1; and (3) real-time PCR for GSTP1 Ile/Val polymorphism. We analyzed the relationship between genetic susceptibilities in selected xenobiotic metabolizing genes and breast cancer risk. Allele frequencies were fairly similar to previously reported values from neighboring populations with relevant migration routes. There were no statistically significant differences in the distribution of variant carcinogen metabolizing genes between cases and controls even after adjusting for age at diagnosis, menopausal status, smoking, and alcohol intake. Despite its limitations, this is the first study that assesses the role of genetic polymorphisms in DMEs with breast cancer in a sample of Lebanese women. Further studies are needed to determine the genetic predisposition and gene-environment interactions of breast cancer in this population.

  12. 77 FR 68133 - Guidance for Industry: Use of Nucleic Acid Tests on Pooled and Individual Samples From Donors of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Reduce the Risk of Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus,'' dated October 2012. The guidance document provides recommendations on the use of FDA- licensed nucleic acid tests (NAT) to screen blood donors for hepatitis B virus...

  13. 76 FR 72950 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Nucleic Acid Tests on Pooled and Individual Samples From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ..., to Reduce the Risk of Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Leukocytes) to Adequately and Appropriately Reduce the Risk of Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... recommendations on the use of FDA-licensed nucleic acid tests (NAT) to screen blood donors for hepatitis B...

  14. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Crutzen, Paul

    Theoretical calculations are presented for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing of sulfuric acid droplets under stratospheric conditions, based on classical nucleation theory. In contrast to previous results it is shown that a prominent candidate for freezing, sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT ≡ H2SO4·4H2O), does not freeze homogeneously. The theoretical results limit the homogeneous freezing rate at 200 K to much less than 1 cm-3s-1, a value that may be estimated from bulk phase laboratory experiments. This suggests that the experimental value is likely to be a measure of heterogeneous, not homogeneous nucleation. Thus, under statospheric conditions, freezing of SAT can only occur in the presence of suitable nuclei; however, even for heterogeneous nucleation experimental results impose strong constraints. Since a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) embryo probably needs a solid body for nucleation, these results put an important constraint on the theory of NAT formation in polar stratospheric clouds.

  15. Lipopeptide als natürliche Adjuvantien für Impfstoffe aus Gram-negativen Bakterien

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlecht, S.; Wiesmüller, K.-H.; Jung, G.; Bessler, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide, a variety of membrane proteins, murein, and lipoprotein can act as immunoadjuvants for bacterial vaccines, thus enhancing protection from bacterial infections. Synthetically prepared N-terminal parts of the lipoprotein from Enterobacteria carrying three fatty acid residues or lipopeptide analogs containing one to four aminoacids bound to S-glycerylcysteine act as potent immunoadjuvants in vivo in combination with or covalently linked to antiges. Here we demonstrate that the supplementation of Salmonella vaccines with these synthetic lipopeptides significantly enhances their vaccine efficiency in mice. Variations in the native lipopeptide structure regarding chain length and amino acid sequence of the peptide moiety, as well as modifications of the lipoamino acid, lead to reduction or even complete loss of the adjuvant activity. The immunoadjuvant properties of the lipopeptides as described here are mediated by an enhancement of the humoral immune response.

  16. Criticality Safety Analysis on the Mixed Be, Nat-U, and C (Graphite) Reflectors in 55-Gallon Waste Drums and Their Equivalents for HWM Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14

    The objective of this analysis is to develop and establish the technical basis on the criticality safety controls for the storage of mixed beryllium (Be), natural uranium (Nat-U), and carbon (C)/graphite reflectors in 55-gallon waste containers and/or their equivalents in Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on the criticality safety limits and controls outlined in Section 3.0, the operations involving the use of mixed-reflector drums satisfy the double-contingency principle as required by DOE Order 420.1 and are therefore criticality safe. The mixed-reflector mass limit is 120 grams for each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent. a reflector waiver of 50 grams is allowed for Be, Nat-U, or C/graphite combined. The waived reflectors may be excluded from the reflector mass calculations when determining if a drum is compliant. The mixed-reflector drums are allowed to mix with the typical 55-gallon one-reflector drums with a Pu mass limit of 120 grams. The fissile mass limit for the mixed-reflector container is 65 grams of Pu equivalent each. The corresponding reflector mass limits are 300 grams of Be, and/or 100 kilograms of Nat-U, and/or 110 kilograms of C/graphite for each container. All other unaffected control parameters for the one-reflector containers remain in effect for the mixed-reflector drums. For instance, Superior moderators, such as TrimSol, Superla white mineral oil No. 9, paraffin, and polyethylene, are allowed in unlimited quantities. Hydrogenous materials with a hydrogen density greater than 0.133 gram/cc are not allowed. Also, an isolation separation of no less than 76.2 cm (30-inch) is required between a mixed array and any other array. Waste containers in the action of being transported are exempted from this 76.2-cm (30-inch) separation requirement. All deviations from the CS controls and mass limits listed in Section 3.0 will require individual criticality safety analyses on a case-by-case basis for each of them to confirm their

  17. NO3- Coordination in Aqueous Solutions by 15N/14N and 18O/natO Isotopic Substitution: What Can We Learn from Molecular Simulation?

    DOE PAGES

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas

    2014-12-16

    We explore the deconvolution of the water-nitrate correlations by the first-order difference approach involving neutron diffraction of heavy- and null-aqueous solutions of KNO3 under 14N 15N and natON 18ON substitutions to achieve a full characterization of the first water coordination around the nitrate ion. For that purpose we performed isobaric-isothermal simulations of 3.5m KNO3 aqueous solutions at ambient conditions to generate the relevant radial distribution functions (RDF) required in the analysis (a) to identify the individual partial contributions to the total neutron weighted distribution function, (b) to isolate and assess the contribution of NO3 -!K+ pair formation, (c) to testmore » the accuracy of the NDIS-based coordination calculations and XRDbased assumptions, and (d) to describe the water coordination around both the nitrogen and oxygen sites of the nitrate ion.« less

  18. Neutron-induced fission cross section of natPb and Bi209 from threshold to 1 GeV: An improved parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Duran, I.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Paradela, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lederer, C.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Sarmento, R.; Savvidis, I.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-04-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for natPb and Bi209 were measured with a white-spectrum neutron source at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) facility. The experiment, using neutrons from threshold up to 1 GeV, provides the first results for these nuclei above 200 MeV. The cross sections were measured relative to U235 and U238 in a dedicated fission chamber with parallel plate avalanche counter detectors. Results are compared with previous experimental data. Upgraded parametrizations of the cross sections are presented, from threshold energy up to 1 GeV. The proposed new sets of fitting parameters improve former results along the whole energy range.

  19. Reaction and fusion cross sections for the near-symmetric system 129Xe+natSn from 8 A to 35 A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduci, L.; Lopez, O.; Chbihi, A.; Rivet, M. F.; Bougault, R.; Frankland, J. D.; Borderie, B.; Galichet, E.; La Commara, M.; Le Neindre, N.; Lombardo, I.; Pârlog, M.; Rosato, E.; Roy, R.; Verde, G.; Vient, E.; Indra Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Background: We study heavy-ion reactions from barrier up to Fermi energy. The data were acquired with the INDRA detector at the GANIL (Caen, France) facility. Purpose: We aim to determine the reaction and fusion cross sections for the reactions induced by 129Xe projectiles on natSn targets for incident energies ranging from 8 A to 35 A MeV. In particular, the evaluation of the fusion and incomplete fusion cross sections is the main purpose, altogether with the comparison with the systematics of Eudes et al. [Europhys. Lett. 104, 22001 (2013), 10.1209/0295-5075/104/22001]. Method: The reaction cross sections are evaluated at each beam energy with data acquired thanks to the INDRA 4 π array. The events are sorted with the help of the observable Eiso,max. We focus therefore our study on a selected sample of events, in such a way that the fusion and incomplete fusion cross sections can be estimated. Results: We present the excitation function of reaction and fusion cross sections for the heavy and nearly symmetric system 129Xe+natSn from 8 A to 35 A MeV. For the fusion excitation function the comparison with the systematics of Eudes et al. seems to be in a fair agreement starting from the beam energy 20 A MeV. For the lower beam energies (8 A and 12 A MeV) discrepancies are observed. Conclusions: The evaluated fusionlike cross sections show a good agrement with a recent systematics for beam energies greater than 20 A MeV. For low beam energies the cross-sectional values are lower than the expected ones. A probable reason for these low values is in the fusion hindrance at energies above or close to the barrier.

  20. Microphysical Modelling of the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter. 3; Impact of Homogeneous Freezing on PSCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.

    2003-01-01

    Simulations of the 1999-2000 winter have tested the effect on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of the homogeneous freezing of liquid ternary solutions into nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD). Proposed laboratory-derived volume-based and surface-based homogeneous freezing rates have both been examined, including different assumptions about the extrapolation of laboratory measurements to atmospheric conditions. Widespread PSC formation and denitrification are possible in several of the scenarios examined. However, the simulations are all unable to explain the solid-phase PSCs observed early in the 1999-2000 winter, and are unable to reproduce the measured extent of vortex denitrification. These problems can both be attributed to the relatively cold temperatures, more than 5 K below the NAT condensation point, necessary for effective homogeneous freezing. Therefore synoptic-scale homogeneous freezing appears unlikely to be the primary mechanism responsible for solid-phase PSC formation.

  1. A fully disposable and integrated paper-based device for nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruihua; Yang, Hui; Gong, Yan; You, MinLi; Liu, Zhi; Choi, Jane Ru; Wen, Ting; Qu, Zhiguo; Mei, Qibing; Xu, Feng

    2017-03-29

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) has been widely used for disease diagnosis, food safety control and environmental monitoring. At present, NAT mainly involves nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection steps that heavily rely on large equipment and skilled workers, making the test expensive, time-consuming, and thus less suitable for point-of-care (POC) applications. With advances in paper-based microfluidic technologies, various integrated paper-based devices have recently been developed for NAT, which however require off-chip reagent storage, complex operation steps and equipment-dependent nucleic acid amplification, restricting their use for POC testing. To overcome these challenges, we demonstrate a fully disposable and integrated paper-based sample-in-answer-out device for NAT by integrating nucleic acid extraction, helicase-dependent isothermal amplification and lateral flow assay detection into one paper device. This simple device allows on-chip dried reagent storage and equipment-free nucleic acid amplification with simple operation steps, which could be performed by untrained users in remote settings. The proposed device consists of a sponge-based reservoir and a paper-based valve for nucleic acid extraction, an integrated battery, a PTC ultrathin heater, temperature control switch and on-chip dried enzyme mix storage for isothermal amplification, and a lateral flow test strip for naked-eye detection. It can sensitively detect Salmonella typhimurium, as a model target, with a detection limit of as low as 10(2) CFU ml(-1) in wastewater and egg, and 10(3) CFU ml(-1) in milk and juice in about an hour. This fully disposable and integrated paper-based device has great potential for future POC applications in resource-limited settings.

  2. External quality assurance of malaria nucleic acid testing for clinical trials and eradication surveillance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Douglas, Alexander D; Edwards, Nick J; Petersen, Ines; Fahle, Gary A; Adams, Matthew; Berry, Andrea A; Billman, Zachary P; Gilbert, Sarah C; Laurens, Matthew B; Leroy, Odile; Lyke, Kristen E; Plowe, Christopher V; Seilie, Annette M; Strauss, Kathleen A; Teelen, Karina; Hill, Adrian V S; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) for malaria parasites is an increasingly recommended diagnostic endpoint in clinical trials of vaccine and drug candidates and is also important in surveillance of malaria control and elimination efforts. A variety of reported NAT assays have been described, yet no formal external quality assurance (EQA) program provides validation for the assays in use. Here, we report results of an EQA exercise for malaria NAT assays. Among five centers conducting controlled human malaria infection trials, all centers achieved 100% specificity and demonstrated limits of detection consistent with each laboratory's pre-stated expectations. Quantitative bias of reported results compared to expected results was generally <0.5 log10 parasites/mL except for one laboratory where the EQA effort identified likely reasons for a general quantitative shift. The within-laboratory variation for all assays was low at <10% coefficient of variation across a range of parasite densities. Based on this study, we propose to create a Molecular Malaria Quality Assessment program that fulfills the need for EQA of malaria NAT assays worldwide.

  3. CYP1A2 and NAT2 phenotyping and 3-aminobiphenyl and 4-aminobiphenyl hemoglobin adduct levels in smokers and non-smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Mohamadi; Stabbert, Regina; Kinser, Robin D.; Oey, Jan; Rustemeier, Klaus; Holt, Klaus von; Schepers, Georg; Walk, Roger A.; Roethig, Hans J.

    2006-06-15

    Some aromatic amines are considered to be putative bladder carcinogens. Hemoglobin (Hb) adducts of 3-aminobiphenyl (3-ABP) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) have been used as biomarkers of exposure to aromatic amines from cigarette smoke. One of the goals of this study was to determine intra- and inter-individual variability in 3-ABP and 4-ABP Hb adducts and to explore the predictability of ABP Hb adduct levels based on caffeine phenotyping. The study was conducted in adult smokers (S, n = 65) and non-smokers (NS, n 65). The subjects were phenotyped for CYP1A2 and NAT2 using urinary caffeine metabolites. Blood samples were collected twice within 6 weeks and adducts measured by GC/MS. The levels of 4-ABP Hb adducts were significantly (p < 0.0001) greater in S (34.5 {+-} 21.06 pg/g Hb) compared to NS (6.3 {+-} 3.02 pg/g Hb). The levels of 3-ABP Hb adducts were below the limit of quantification (BLOQ) in most (82%) of the NS and about 10-fold lower in S (3.6 {+-} 3.29 pg/g Hb) compared to 4-ABP Hb adducts. No differences were observed in the adduct levels between weeks 1 and 6 in the smokers, suggesting that a single sample would be adequate to monitor cigarette smoke exposure. The regression model developed with CYP1A2, NAT2 phenotype and number of cigarettes smoked (NCIG) accounted for 47% of the variability in 3-ABP adducts, whereas 32% variability in 4-ABP adducts was accounted by CYP1A2 and NCIG. The ratio of 4-ABP Hb adducts in adult S:NS was {approx} 5:1, whereas 3-ABP Hb adducts levels were BLOQ in some S, exhibited large interindividual variability ({approx} 91% compared to 57% for 4-ABP Hb) and poor dose response relationship. Therefore, 4-ABP Hb adduct levels may be a more useful biomarker of aminobiphenyl exposure from cigarette smoke.

  4. The effect of chronic morphine or methadone exposure and withdrawal on clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus and AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Pačesová, D; Novotný, J; Bendová, Z

    2016-07-18

    The circadian rhythms of many behavioral and physiological functions are regulated by the major circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Long-term opiate addiction and drug withdrawal may affect circadian rhythmicity of various hormones or the sleep/activity pattern of many experimental subjects; however, limited research has been done on the long-term effects of sustained opiate administration on the intrinsic rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and pineal gland. Here we compared the effects of repeated daily treatment of rats with morphine or methadone and subsequent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal on the expression of the Per1, Per2, and Avp mRNAs in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and on arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in the pineal gland. We revealed that 10-day administration and withdrawal of both these drugs failed to affect clock genes and Avp expression in the SCN. Our results indicate that opioid-induced changes in behavioral and physiological rhythms originate in brain structures downstream of the suprachiasmatic nucleus regulatory output pathway. Furthermore, we observed that acute withdrawal from methadone markedly extended the period of high night AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland. This suggests that withdrawal from methadone, a widely used drug for the treatment of opioid dependence, may have stronger impact on melatonin synthesis than withdrawal from morphine.

  5. NatB Domain-Containing CRA-1 Antagonizes Hydrolase ACER-1 Linking Acetyl-CoA Metabolism to the Initiation of Recombination during C. elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinmin; Kim, Hyun-Min; Elia, Andrew E.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) must take place during meiosis to ensure the formation of crossovers, which are required for accurate chromosome segregation, therefore avoiding aneuploidy. However, DSB formation must be tightly regulated to maintain genomic integrity. How this regulation operates in the context of different chromatin architectures and accessibility, and how it is linked to metabolic pathways, is not understood. We show here that global histone acetylation levels undergo changes throughout meiotic progression. Moreover, perturbations to global histone acetylation levels are accompanied by changes in the frequency of DSB formation in C. elegans. We provide evidence that the regulation of histone acetylation requires CRA-1, a NatB domain-containing protein homologous to human NAA25, which controls the levels of acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) by antagonizing ACER-1, a previously unknown and conserved acetyl-CoA hydrolase. CRA-1 is in turn negatively regulated by XND-1, an AT-hook containing protein. We propose that this newly defined protein network links acetyl-CoA metabolism to meiotic DSB formation via modulation of global histone acetylation. PMID:25768301

  6. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2015-10-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 10(2) to 4.30 × 10(3) IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(-) or IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(+)), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection.

  7. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthase in Prostate Cancer by Olristat, a Novel Therapeutic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    and other FAS inhibitors in prostate cancer through a multi-disciplinary approach combining cell biology, biochemistry and crystallography. 15... Devlin , C. M., Zhang, D., Harding, H. P., Sweeney, M., Rong, J. X., Kuriakose, G., Fisher, E. A., Marks, A. R., Ron, D., and Tabas, I. The... Biochemistry 1989;28:4523-30. 2. Asturias FJ, Chadick JZ, Cheung IK, et al. Structure and molecular organization of mammalian fatty acid synthase. Nat Struct

  8. Alpha particle induced reactions on natCr up to 39 MeV: Experimental cross-sections, comparison with theoretical calculations and thick target yields for medically relevant 52gFe production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2015-08-01

    Thin natCr targets were obtained by electroplating, using 23.75 μm Cu foils as backings. In five stacked foil irradiations, followed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy, the cross sections for production of 52gFe, 49,51cumCr, 52cum,54,56cumMn and 48cumV in Cr and 61Cu,68Ga in Cu were measured up to 39 MeV incident α-particle energy. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the natCu(α,x)67,66Ga monitor reactions over the whole energy range. Comparisons with the scarce literature values and results from the TENDL-2013 on-line library, based on the theoretical code family TALYS-1.6, were made. A discussion of the production routes for 52gFe with achievable yields and contamination rates was made.

  9. Yeast display evolution of a kinetically efficient 13-amino acid substrate for lipoic acid ligase

    PubMed Central

    Puthenveetil, Sujiet; Liu, Daniel S.; White, Katharine A.; Thompson, Samuel; Ting, Alice Y.

    2009-01-01

    E. coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) catalyzes ATP-dependent covalent ligation of lipoic acid onto specific lysine sidechains of three acceptor proteins involved in oxidative metabolism. Our lab has shown that LplA and engineered mutants can ligate useful small-molecule probes such as alkyl azides (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487) and photocrosslinkers (Angew. Chem Int. Ed Engl. 2008, 47, 7018–7021) in place of lipoic acid, facilitating imaging and proteomic studies. Both to further our understanding of lipoic acid metabolism, and to improve LplA’s utility as a biotechnological platform, we have engineered a novel 13-amino acid peptide substrate for LplA. LplA’s natural protein substrates have a conserved β-hairpin structure, a conformation that is difficult to recapitulate in a peptide, and thus we performed in vitro evolution to engineer the LplA peptide substrate, called “LplA Acceptor Peptide” (LAP). A ~107 library of LAP variants was displayed on the surface of yeast cells, labeled by LplA with either lipoic acid or bromoalkanoic acid, and the most efficiently labeled LAP clones were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Four rounds of evolution followed by additional rational mutagenesis produced a “LAP2” sequence with a kcat/Km of 0.99 μM−1min−1, >70-fold better than our previous rationally-designed 22-amino acid LAP1 sequence (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487), and only 8-fold worse than the kcat/Km values of natural lipoate and biotin acceptor proteins. The kinetic improvement over LAP1 allowed us to rapidly label cell surface peptide-fused receptors with quantum dots. PMID:19863063

  10. A collaborative study to establish the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus for nucleic acid amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jacqueline F; Heath, Alan B; Minor, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the performance of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays presents a significant problem in the diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Here we describe a collaborative study to evaluate the suitability of candidate reference materials to harmonize HCMV viral load measurements in a wide range of NAT assays. Candidate materials comprised lyophilized Merlin virus, liquid Merlin virus, liquid AD169 virus, and purified HCMV Merlin DNA cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. Variability in the laboratory mean HCMV concentrations determined for virus samples across the different assays was 2 log10. Variability for the purified DNA sample was higher (>3 log10). The agreement between laboratories was markedly improved when the potencies of the liquid virus samples were expressed relative to the lyophilized virus candidate. In contrast, the agreement between laboratories for the purified DNA sample was not improved. Results indicated the suitability of the lyophilized Merlin virus preparation as the 1st WHO International Standard for HCMV for NAT. It was established in October 2010, with an assigned potency of 5 × 10(6) International Units (IU) (NIBSC code 09/162). It is intended to be used to calibrate secondary references, used in HCMV NAT assays, in IU.

  11. Measurement of flux-weight average cross-sections of natZn(γ,xn) reactions in the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50, 55, 60, and 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Kwangsoo; Cho, Young-Sik; Lee, Young-Ok; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Lee, Man-Woo

    2017-04-01

    The flux-weighted average cross-sections of (γ , xn) reactions on natZn induced by the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50, 55, 60, and 65 MeV have been determined by activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique, using the 100 MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Pohang, Korea. The theoretical photon-induced reaction cross-sections of natZn as a function of photon energy were taken from TENDL-2014 nuclear data library based on TALYS 1.6 program. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were obtained from the literature data and the theoretical values of TENDL-2014 based on mono-energetic photon. The flux-weighted reaction cross-sections from the present work and literature data at different bremsstrahlung end-point energies are in good agreement with the theoretical values. It was found that the individual natZn(γ , xn) reaction cross-sections increase sharply from reaction threshold to certain values where the next reaction channel opens. There after it remains constant for a while, where the next reaction channel increases. Then it decreases slowly with increase of bremsstrahlung end-point energy due to opening of different reaction channels.

  12. Use of a standardized JaCVAM in vivo rat comet assay protocol to assess the genotoxicity of three coded test compounds; ampicillin trihydrate, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride, and N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), our laboratory examined ampicillin trihydrate (AMP), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDA) using a standard comet assay validation protocol (v14.2) developed by the JaCVAM validation management team (VMT). Coded samples were received by our laboratory along with basic MSDS information. Solubility analysis and range-finding experiments of the coded test compounds were conducted for dose selection. Animal dosing schedules, the comet assay processing and analysis, and statistical analysis were conducted in accordance with the standard protocol. Based upon our blinded evaluation, AMP was not found to exhibit evidence of genotoxicity in either the rat liver or stomach. However, both NDA and DMH were observed to cause a significant increase in % tail DNA in the rat liver at all dose levels tested. While acute hepatoxicity was observed for these compounds in the high dose group, in the investigators opinion there were a sufficient number of consistently damaged/measurable cells at the medium and low dose groups to judge these compounds as genotoxic. There was no evidence of genotoxicity from either NDA or DMH in the rat stomach. In conclusion, our laboratory observed increased DNA damage from two blinded test compounds in rat liver (later identified as genotoxic carcinogens), while no evidence of genotoxicity was observed for the third blinded test compound (later identified as a non-genotoxic, non-carcinogen). This data supports the use of a standardized protocol of the in vivo comet assay as a cost-effective alternative genotoxicity assay for regulatory testing purposes.

  13. Nucleation and growth of HNO3-3H2O particles in the polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Salawitch, Ross J.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    Growth of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles on background stratospheric aerosols is examined for an isolated air parcel cooled at a uniform rate. During the process of nucleation, the saturation ratio of HNO3 vapor reaches a maximum value between 2 and 15, corresponding to supercooling by 1-4 K. If cooling rates exceed 0.5-1 K/day, small particles of NAT are produced. A major fraction of the available condensation nuclei is activated and removal of HNO3 by gravitational settling is slow. If cooling rates are less than 0.5-1 K/day, the number of aerosols that nucleate is reduced, leading to differential growth of large NAT particles. Observations of 5 micron radius particles in clouds at temperatures above the water frost point may reflect condensation of NAT on ice particles that fall through a column of air as it is cooled. Rapid condensation of HNO3 on ice particles is promoted by the high supersaturation attained during nucleation and maintained during subsequent cooling. This process provides a mechanism for irreversible removal of HNO3.

  14. Denitrification and nitrification in the Arctic stratosphere during the winter of 1996-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Irie, H.; Koike, M.; Bodeker, G. E.

    2000-02-01

    The concentrations of HNO3, N2O, ozone, and aerosol in the lower stratosphere inside the Arctic vortex were observed by the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) in the winter of 1996-1997. These data demonstrate that irreversible loss of reactive nitrogen by sedimentation of HNO3 containing particles (denitrification) at 18-23 km occurred in mid-late February soon after the Arctic vortex cooled below ice saturation temperature (TICE). Denitrification exceeding 40% was observed only in air masses which experienced temperature below TICE. It occurred within 2 days in some of these air masses. Increases in HNO3 by evaporation of the particles (nitrification) at 13-15 km occurred 0-3 days after denitrification was observed, indicating particle radii of 5-10 µm or larger. It is likely that these particles were composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) or NAT-coated ice particles, given that the temperatures below 16 km were higher than TICE. Continued exposure of air masses below NAT saturation temperature for 1-4 days did not lead to any significant denitrification as long as the temperature did not fall below TICE, indicating that possible nucleation of NAT at these temperatures within 4 days did not play a significant role in causing denitrification. There was little change in the average HNO3 column from February 11 to 28 since HNO3 decreases at 18-23 km were almost completely offset by increases at 12-17 km.

  15. Hop rho iso-alpha acids, berberine, vitamin D3 and vitamin K1 favorably impact biomarkers of bone turnover in postmenopausal women in a 14-week trial.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F; Lamb, Joseph J; Lerman, Robert H; Konda, Veera R; Darland, Gary; Minich, Deanna M; Desai, Anuradha; Chen, Tai C; Austin, Melissa; Kornberg, Jacob; Chang, Jyh-Lurn; Hsi, Alex; Bland, Jeffrey S; Tripp, Matthew L

    2010-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health issue facing postmenopausal women. Increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting from declining estrogen leads to increased bone resorption. Nutrition can have a positive impact on osteoporosis prevention and amelioration. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of targeted phytochemicals and nutrients essential for bone health on bone turnover markers in healthy postmenopausal women. In this 14-week, single-blinded, 2-arm placebo-controlled pilot study, all women were instructed to consume a modified Mediterranean-style low-glycemic-load diet and to engage in limited aerobic exercise; 17 randomized to the placebo and 16 to the treatment arm (receiving 200 mg hop rho iso-alpha acids, 100 mg berberine sulfate trihydrate, 500 IU vitamin D(3) and 500 microg vitamin K(1), twice daily). Thirty-two women completed the study. Baseline nutrient intake did not differ between arms. At 14 weeks, the treatment arm exhibited an estimated 31% mean reduction (P = 0.02) in serum osteocalcin (a marker of bone turnover), whereas the placebo arm exhibited a 19% increase (P = 0.03) compared to baseline. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) increased by 13% (P = 0.24) in the treatment arm and decreased by 25% (P < 0.01) in the placebo arm. The between-arm differences for OC and 25(OH)D were statistically significant. Serum IGF-I was increased in both arms, but the increase was more significant in the treatment arm at 14 weeks (P < 0.01). Treatment with hop rho iso-alpha acids, berberine sulfate trihydrate, vitamin D(3) and vitamin K(1) produced a more favorable bone biomarker profile that supports a healthy bone metabolism.

  16. Genomic detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by nucleic acid amplification test in a frequent platelet donor during the pre-seroconversion period.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-11-01

    Since serological donor-screening tests for HIV were introduced in 1985, the safety of donated blood components has improved dramatically. However, these tests do not completely prevent the risk of transfusion-associated HIV infection related to the use of blood donated during the pre-seroconversion window period. Testing based on nucleic acid amplification is being implemented to screen for HIV-infected blood donated during this period, which has reduced the probability of transmitting HIV through transfusion by shortening the window period. This article describes a case of acute HIV-1 infection, detected using a nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) in a repeat blood donor who donated during the pre-seroconversion window period and whose antigen and anti-HIV antibody expression was observed after molecular marker detection. In addition, the possible route of infection is discussed based on the patient's history, and finally, the need for NAT technology for blood donor screening is emphasized.

  17. Nucleic acid-amplification testing for hepatitis B in cornea donors.

    PubMed

    Fornés, Maria Gema; Jiménez, Maria Angustias; Eisman, Marcela; Gómez Villagrán, Jose Luis; Villalba, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Careful donor selection and implementation of tests of appropriate sensitivity and specificity are of paramount importance for minimizing the risk of transmitting infectious diseases from donors to corneal allograft recipients. Reported cases of viral transmission with corneal grafts are very unusual. Nevertheless potential virus transmission through the engraftment cannot be ruled out. According to European Guideline 2006/17/EC, screening for antibodies for Hepatitis B core antigen (anti HBc) is mandatory, and when this test is positive, some criteria must be established before using corneas. Despite the continuous progress in screening tests, donors carrying an occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) can cause transplant-transmitted hepatitis B. To date, Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) is not an obligatory assay in corneal tissue setting neither in our country nor in the rest of European countries. Herein, we report three cornea donors that were rejected with the diagnosis of OBI through the testing of sensitive NAT and the serological profile of Hepatitis B virus. The aim of this report is to emphasize the need to include NAT in new reviews of EU Tissues and Cells Directives in order to increase level of security in tissue donation as well as not to reject a high number of donors with isolated profile of anti HBc in geographical areas with high prevalence of Hepatitis B, that could be rejected without a true criterion of Hepatitis B infection.

  18. Comparing simulated PSC optical properties with CALIPSO observations during the 2010 Antarctic winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunqian; Toon, Owen B.; Pitts, Michael C.; Lambert, Alyn; Bardeen, Charles; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2017-01-01

    We simulate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Antarctic winter of 2010 using the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model/Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (SD-WACCM/CARMA) model. The current PSC model contains microphysical schemes for supercooled ternary solutions (STS) and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, as well as a prognostic treatment for PSC ice particles and dehydration. Our simulations and CALIPSO satellite data suggest two major NAT particle formation mechanisms. The first mechanism is the nucleation of NAT from STS. Our model, with homogeneous nucleation rates of NAT from STS constrained by observations from the Arctic winter of 2010-2011, reproduces optical properties observed by CALIPSO over Antarctica in May and the timing of denitrification observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder within their uncertainties. On the other hand, the CALIPSO data indicate that our simulations are missing clouds containing small NAT particles with large number densities. We suggest these particles are most likely to form from ice clouds or STS in gravity waves, as found by previous investigations. The simulated cloud coverage agrees with the CALIPSO cloud coverage within a few percent on average with a correlation coefficient of 0.83. However, using the CALIPSO classification algorithm, simulated ice clouds often fall into Mix categories under the denitrified and dehydrated conditions. The model needs an improved ice microphysical representation, not only to allow ice particles to be a source of NAT but also to provide information on ice cloud particle number and size so that ice cloud optical properties can be more precisely calculated for comparison with CALIPSO data.

  19. Measurements of 67Ga production cross section induced by protons on natZn in the low energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, J. A.; Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S. A.; Correa, R.

    2015-02-01

    The experimental production cross section for the reaction natZn(p,x)67Ga has been measured in the energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV. The methodology used in this work is based on characteristic X-ray emitted after irradiation by the daughter nuclei that decays by electron capture (EC) and the use of a complementary PIXE experiment. By doing so, expressions needed to determine cross section values are simplified since experimental factors such as geometric setup and an detector efficiency are avoided. 67Ga is a radionuclide particularly suited for this method since it decays by electron capture in 100% and the subsequent characteristic X-ray emission is easily detected. Natural zinc targets were fabricated by PVD technique and afterwards their thicknesses were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Cross sections measurements were carried out by using the Van de Graaff accelerator located at Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile. It was found that our data for the natZn(p,x)67Ga reaction are, in general, in good agreement when compared to existing experimental data and to those calculated ALICE/ASH nuclear code. On the other hand, values predicted by Talys-1.6 are showing systematically lower magnitudes than our measured data.

  20. A physical adsorption model of the dependence of ClONO2 heterogeneous reactions on relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Bryan F.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Robinson, Jeanne M.

    We present a model of heterogeneous reactivity based on physical adsorption that describes the observed relative humidity dependence of the ClONO2 reaction probability with H2O and HCl on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate ice surfaces (SAT) and with H2O on nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). The laboratory data are modeled using only two parameters for a given system, the measured reaction probability on a neat H2O ice surface, and a constant from the BET theory which describes the fraction of an acid hydrate surface covered by H2O as a function of relative humidity. The model indicates that ClONO2 reactivity with both HCl and H2O on SAT and with H2 O on NAT is controlled by the surface coverage of H2O. In contrast, the reaction of ClONO2 +HCl on NAT is better described by an alternative model based on reactivity in solutions formed within a porous ice by capillary liquid absorption.

  1. A case of type I polar stratospheric cloud formation by heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 aircraft flew on January 24, 1989, from Stavanger to Spitsbergen, Norway, at the 430-440 K potential temperature surface (19.2-19.8 km pressure altitude). Aerosols were sampled continuously by an optical particle counter (PMS-FSSP300) for concentration and size analyses, and during five 10-min intervals by four wire and one replicator impactor for concentration, size, composition, and phase analysis. During sampling, the air saturation of H2O with respect to ice changed from 20 to 100 percent, and of HNO3 with respect to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) from subsaturation to supersaturation. Data from both instruments indicate a condensation of hydrochloric acid and, later, nitric acid on the background aerosol particles as the ambient temperature decreases along the flight track. This heterogeneous nucleation mechanism generates type I polar stratospheric cloud particles of 10-fold enhanced optical depth, which could play a role in stratospheric ozone depletion.

  2. How do Polar Stratospheric Clouds Form?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Gandrud, Bruce; Baumgardner, Darrel; Herman, Robert; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    SOLVE measurements have been compared with results from a microphysical model to understand the composition and formation of the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) observed during SOLVE. Evidence that the majority of the particles remain liquid throughout the winter will be presented. However, a small fraction of the particles do freeze, and the presence of these frozen particles can not be explained by current theories, in which the only freezing mechanism is homogeneous freezing to ice below the ice frost point. Alternative formation mechanisms, in particular homogeneous freezing above the ice frost point and heterogeneous freezing, have been explored using the microphysical model. Both nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) have been considered as possible compositions for the solid-phase nitric acid aerosols. Comparisons between the model results and the SOLVE measurements will be used to constrain the possible formation mechanisms. Other effects of these frozen particles will also be discussed, in particular denitrification.

  3. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  4. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  5. Condensed-Phase Nitric Acid in a Tropical Subvisible Cirrus Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, P. J.; Marcy, T. P.; Watts, O. A.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Herman, R. L.; Tropy, R. F.; Webster, C. r.; Christensen, L. E.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Voigt, C.; Kaercher, B.; Wilson, J. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jensen, E. J.; Bui, T. P.

    2007-01-01

    In situ observations in a tropical subvisible cirrus cloud during the Costa Rica Aura Validation Experiment on 2 February 2006 show the presence of condensed-phase nitric acid. The cloud was observed near the tropopause at altitudes of 16.3-17.7 km in an extremely cold (183-191 K) and dry 5 ppm H2O) air mass. Relative humidities with respect to ice ranged from 150-250% throughout most of the cloud. Optical particle measurements indicate the presence of ice crystals as large as 90 microns in diameter. Condensed RN031H20 molar ratios observed in the cloud particles were 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than ratios observed previously in cirrus clouds at similar RN03 partial pressures. Nitric acid trihydrate saturation ratios were 10 or greater during much of the cloud encounter, indicating that RN03 may be present in the cloud particles as a stable condensate and not simply physically adsorbed on or trapped in the particles.

  6. An SLC6 transporter of the novel B0,− system aids in absorption and detection of nutrient amino acids in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Ryan; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Fox, Jeffrey; Kim, Hongkyun; Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Nutrient amino acid transporters (NATs) of solute carrier family 6 (SLC6) mediate uptake of essential amino acids in mammals and insects. Phylogenomic analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) SLC6 family identifies five genes paralogous to an insect-specific NAT subfamily. Here we cloned and characterized the first representative of the identified nematode-specific transporters, SNF-5. SNF-5 mediates broad spectrum cation-coupled transport of neutral amino acids with submillimolar affinities and stoichiometry of 1 AA:1 Na+, except for 1 l-Pro:2 Na+. Unexpectedly, it transports acidic l-Glu− and l-Asp− (1 AA−:3 Na+), revealing it to be the first member of a new B0,− system among characterized SLC6 transporters. This activity correlates with a unique positively charged His+ 377 in the substrate-binding pocket. snf-5 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescent protein labels intestinal cells INT1-9 and three pairs of amphid sensory neurons: ASI, ADF and ASK. These cells are intimately involved in control of dauer diapause, development, metabolism and longevity. The snf-5 deletion mutants do not show apparent morphological disorders, but increase dauer formation while reducing dauer maintenance upon starvation. Overall, the present study characterized the first nematode-specific NAT and revealed important structural and functional aspects of this transporter. In addition to the predictable role in alimentary amino acid absorption, our results indicate possible neuronal roles of SNF-5 as an amino acid provider to specific neuronal functions, including sensing of amino acid availability. PMID:23580723

  7. Solid-state photochemistry as a formation mechanism for Titan's stratospheric C4N2 ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Yung, Y. L.; McLain, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We propose that C4N2 ice clouds observed in Titan's springtime polar stratosphere arise due to solid-state photochemistry occurring within extant ice cloud particles of HCN-HC3N mixtures. This formation process resembles the halogen-induced ice particle surface chemistry that leads to condensed nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles and ozone depletion in Earth's polar stratosphere. As our analysis of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer 478 cm-1 ice emission feature demonstrates, this solid-state photochemistry mechanism eliminates the need for the relatively high C4N2 saturation vapor pressures required (even though they are not observed) when the ice is produced through the usual procedure of direct condensation from the vapor.

  8. Solid-State Photochemistry as a Formation Mechanism for Titan's Stratospheric C4N2 Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Yung, Y. L.; McLain, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose that C4N2 ice clouds observed in Titan's springtime polar stratosphere arise due to solid-state photochemistry occurring within extant ice cloud particles of HCN-HC3N mixtures. This formation process resembles the halogen-induced ice particle surface chemistry that leads to condensed nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles and ozone depletion in Earth's polar stratosphere. As our analysis of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer 478 per centimeter ice emission feature demonstrates, this solid-state photochemistry mechanism eliminates the need for the relatively high C4N2 saturation vapor pressures required (even though they are not observed) when the ice is produced through the usual procedure of direct condensation from the vapor.

  9. Redistribution of nitric acid in the Arctic lower stratosphere during the winter of 1996-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Bodeker, G. E.; Danilin, M. Y.; Sasano, Y.

    2001-10-01

    Vertical profiles of HNO3, N2O, O3, and the aerosol extinction coefficient at 780 nm were observed by the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) during the Arctic winter of 1996-1997. Irreversible redistribution of HNO3 is evaluated using HNO3-N2O and HNO3-O3 correlations. Denitrification and nitrification started to be observed just after the Arctic vortex cooled to below the ice frost point (TICE) on February 10. Trajectory analyses show that denitrification occurred only in air masses, which were once cooled to near TICE and were kept at temperatures below the nitric acid trihydrate saturation threshold continuously for more than 4 days. Such a temperature history provides the necessary conditions for nucleation and growth of particles causing denitrification. The average extent of denitrification at 19 km reached 43% at the center of the vortex, suggesting that stratospheric ozone could be affected by denitrification deep inside the vortex. Denitrification (>2 ppbv) and nitrification (>1 ppbv) covered 40±10% and 35±10% of the vortex area, respectively. Redistributed numbers of HNO3 molecules at each altitude were calculated by integrating the area-weighted changes in the HNO3 concentration. The decreases in total HNO3 concentration at 17-21 km in late February and early March agreed with the increases at 12-15 km to within 25%, confirming conservation of HNO3 during sedimentation and evaporation of HNO3-containing polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  10. Exclusive studies of 130-270 MeV {sup 3}He- and 200-MeV proton-induced reactions on {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup 197}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Ginger, D. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Hsi, W.-C.; Hudan, S.; Cornell, E.; Souza, R. T. de; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.

    2008-09-15

    Exclusive light-charged-particle and IMF spectra have been measured with the ISiS detector array for bombardments of {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup 197}Au nuclei with 130-270-MeV {sup 3}He and 200-MeV protons. The results are consistent with previous interpretations based on inclusive data that describe the global yield of complex fragments in terms of a time-dependent process. The emission mechanism for energetic nonequilibrium fragments observed at forward angles with momenta up to twice the beam momentum is also investigated. This poorly understood mechanism, for which the angular distributions indicate formation on a time scale comparable to the nuclear transit time, are accompanied primarily by thermal-like emissions. The data are most consistent with a schematic picture in which nonequilibrium fragments are formed in a localized region of the target nucleus at an early stage in the energy-dissipation process, where the combined effects of high energy density and Fermi motion produce the observed suprathermal spectra.

  11. NO3- Coordination in Aqueous Solutions by 15N/14N and 18O/natO Isotopic Substitution: What Can We Learn from Molecular Simulation?

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas

    2014-12-16

    We explore the deconvolution of the water-nitrate correlations by the first-order difference approach involving neutron diffraction of heavy- and null-aqueous solutions of KNO3 under 14N 15N and natON 18ON substitutions to achieve a full characterization of the first water coordination around the nitrate ion. For that purpose we performed isobaric-isothermal simulations of 3.5m KNO3 aqueous solutions at ambient conditions to generate the relevant radial distribution functions (RDF) required in the analysis (a) to identify the individual partial contributions to the total neutron weighted distribution function, (b) to isolate and assess the contribution of NO3 -!K+ pair formation, (c) to test the accuracy of the NDIS-based coordination calculations and XRDbased assumptions, and (d) to describe the water coordination around both the nitrogen and oxygen sites of the nitrate ion.

  12. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-10-01

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV-24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. The difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  13. Experimental cross-sections of deuteron-induced reaction on 89Y up to 20 MeV; comparison of natTi(d,x)48V and 27Al(d,x)24Na monitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan

    2015-10-01

    We measured cross-sections of the deuteron-induced reactions on 89Y in the energy range of 3.9-19.5 MeV. Excitation functions for formation of 88Zr, 89mZr, 89Zr, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were determined and compared with previously published data and prediction of the TALYS code. Thick target yields for production of 88Zr, 89Zrcum, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were calculated from the measured cross-sections. Achievable activity versus radionuclidic purity of medically relevant 89Zr is discussed and compared with the production via the 89Y(p,n) reaction. Parallel use of titanium and aluminium beam monitors revealed systematic difference between the recommended cross-sections of both monitoring reactions and provided new cross-section data for formation of 24Na, 27Mg, 43Sc, 44mSc, 44Sc, 46Sc, 47Sc and 48Sc. The cross-sections for the natTi(d,x)46Sc reactions agree very well with recently proposed recommended values.

  14. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE PAGES

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; ...

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  15. Production of 61Cu using natural cobalt target and its separation using ascorbic acid and common anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujata Saha; Chattopadhyay, Sankha; Barua, Luna; Das, Malay Kanti

    2012-02-01

    (61)Cu was produced by (nat)Co(α, xn)(61)Cu reaction. (61)Cu production yield was 89.5 MBq/μAh (2.42 mCi/μAh) at the end of irradiation (EOI). A simple radiochemical separation method using anion exchange resin and ascorbic acid has been employed to separate the product radionuclide from inactive target material and co-produced non-isotopic impurities. The radiochemical separation yield was about 90%. Radiochemical purity of (61)Cu was >99% 1 h after EOI. Final product was suitable for making complex with N(2)S(2) type of ligands.

  16. Metastable Phases in Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Fabian; Baloh, Philipp; Kubel, Frank; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Cirrus Clouds contain both, pure water ice and phases of nitric acid hydrates. Preferentially for the latter, the thermodynamically stable phases have intensively been investigated in the past (e.g. nitric acid trihydrate, beta-NAT). As shown by Peter et al. [1] the water activity inside clouds is higher than expected, which might be explained by the presence of metastable stable phases (e.g. cubic ice). However, also metastable nitric acid hydrates might be important due to the inherent non-equilibrium freezing conditions in the upper atmosphere. The delta ice theory of Gao et al. [2] presents a model approach to solve this problem by involving both metastable ice and NAT as well. So it is of high interest to investigate the metastable phase of NAT (i.e. alpha-NAT), the structure of which was unknown up to the presence. In our laboratory a production procedure for metastable alpha-NAT has been developed, which gives access to neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements, where sample quantities of several Gramm are required. The diffraction techniques were used to solve the unknown crystalline structure of metastable alpha-NAT, which in turn allows the calculation of the vibrational spectra, which have also been recorded by us in the past. Rerefences [1] Peter, T., C. Marcolli, P. Spichtinger, T. Corti, M. B. Baker, and T. Koop. When dry air is too humid. Science, 314:1399-1402, 2006. [2] Gao, R., P. Popp, D. Fahey, T. Marcy, R. L. Herman, E. Weinstock, D. Baumgardener, T. Garrett, K. Rosenlof, T. Thompson, T. P. Bui, B. Ridley, S. C. Wofsy, O. B. Toon, M. Tolbert, B. Kärcher, Th. Peter, P. K. Hudson, A. Weinheimer, and A. Heymsfield. Evidence That Nitric Acid Increases Relative Humidity in Low-Temperature Cirrus Clouds, Science, 303:516-520, 2004. [3] Tizek, H., E. Knözinger, and H. Grothe. Formation and phase distribution of nitric acid hydrates in the mole fraction range xHNO3<0.25: A combined XRD and IR study, PCCP, 6

  17. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Isoniazid, Acetylisoniazid, and Isonicotinic Acid in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Seng, Kok-Yong; Hee, Kim-Hor; Soon, Gaik-Hong; Chew, Nicholas; Khoo, Saye H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to quantify the effects of the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) phenotype on isoniazid (INH) metabolism in vivo and identify other sources of pharmacokinetic variability following single-dose administration in healthy Asian adults. The concentrations of INH and its metabolites acetylisoniazid (AcINH) and isonicotinic acid (INA) in plasma were evaluated in 33 healthy Asians who were also given efavirenz and rifampin. The pharmacokinetics of INH, AcINH, and INA were analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) to estimate the population pharmacokinetic parameters and evaluate the relationships between the parameters and the elimination status (fast, intermediate, and slow acetylators), demographic status, and measures of renal and hepatic function. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption best described the INH pharmacokinetics. AcINH and INA data were best described by a two- and a one-compartment model, respectively, linked to the INH model. In the final model for INH, the derived metabolic phenotypes for NAT2 were identified as a significant covariate in the INH clearance, reducing its interindividual variability from 86% to 14%. The INH clearance in fast eliminators was 1.9- and 7.7-fold higher than in intermediate and slow eliminators, respectively (65 versus 35 and 8 liters/h). Creatinine clearance was confirmed as a significant covariate for AcINH clearance. Simulations suggested that the current dosing guidelines (200 mg for 30 to 45 kg and 300 mg for >45 kg) may be suboptimal (3 mg/liter ≤ Cmax ≤ 6 mg/liter) irrespective of the acetylator class. The analysis established a model that adequately characterizes INH, AcINH, and INA pharmacokinetics in healthy Asians. Our results refine the NAT2 phenotype-based predictions of the pharmacokinetics for INH. PMID:26282412

  18. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  19. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  1. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  2. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 2: Nucleation of ice on synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Hoyle, C. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Peter, T.

    2013-04-01

    This paper provides unprecedented evidence for the importance of heterogeneous nucleation, likely on solid particles of meteoritic origin, and of small-scale temperature fluctuations, for the formation of ice particles in the Arctic stratosphere. During January 2010, ice PSCs (Polar Stratospheric Clouds) were shown by CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) to have occurred on a synoptic scale (~ 1000 km dimension). CALIPSO observations also showed widespread PSCs containing nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles in December 2009, prior to the occurrence of synoptic-scale regions of ice PSCs during mid-January 2010. We demonstrate by means of detailed microphysical modeling along air parcel trajectories that the formation of these PSCs is not readily reconciled with expectations from the conventional understanding of PSC nucleation mechanisms. The measurements are at odds with the previous laboratory-based understanding of PSC formation, which deemed direct heterogeneous nucleation of NAT and ice on preexisting solid particles unlikely. While a companion paper (Part 1) addresses the heterogeneous nucleation of NAT during December 2009, before the existence of ice PSCs, this paper shows that also the large-scale occurrence of stratospheric ice in January 2010 cannot be explained merely by homogeneous ice nucleation but requires the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, e.g. on meteoritic dust or preexisting NAT particles. The required efficiency of the ice nuclei is surprisingly high, namely comparable to that of known tropospheric ice nuclei such as mineral dust particles. To gain model agreement with the ice number densities inferred from observations, the presence of small-scale temperature fluctuations, with wavelengths unresolved by the numerical weather prediction models, is required. With the derived rate parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation we are able to explain and reproduce CALIPSO observations throughout the

  3. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 2: Nucleation of ice on synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Hoyle, C. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Peter, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides compelling evidence for the importance of heterogeneous nucleation, likely on solid particles of meteoritic origin, and of small-scale temperature fluctuations, for the formation of ice particles in the Arctic stratosphere. During January 2010, ice PSCs (polar stratospheric clouds) were shown by CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) to have occurred on a synoptic scale (~1000 km dimension). CALIPSO observations also showed widespread PSCs containing NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles in December 2009, prior to the occurrence of synoptic-scale regions of ice PSCs during mid-January 2010. We demonstrate by means of detailed microphysical modeling along air parcel trajectories that the formation of these PSCs is not readily reconciled with expectations from the conventional understanding of PSC nucleation mechanisms. The measurements are at odds with the previous laboratory-based understanding of PSC formation, which deemed direct heterogeneous nucleation of NAT and ice on preexisting solid particles unlikely. While a companion paper (Part 1) addresses the heterogeneous nucleation of NAT during December 2009, before the existence of ice PSCs, this paper shows that also the large-scale occurrence of stratospheric ice in January 2010 cannot be explained merely by homogeneous ice nucleation but requires the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, e.g. on meteoritic dust or preexisting NAT particles. The required efficiency of the ice nuclei is surprisingly high, namely comparable to that of known tropospheric ice nuclei such as mineral dust particles. To gain model agreement with the ice number densities inferred from observations, the presence of small-scale temperature fluctuations, with wavelengths unresolved by the numerical weather prediction models, is required. With the derived rate parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation we are able to explain and reproduce CALIPSO observations throughout the

  4. 9+ Years of CALIPSO PSC Observations: An Evolving Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2015-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a crucial role in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIPSO is an excellent platform for studying polar processes with CALIOP acquiring, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55o and 82o in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we will provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC detection and composition classification algorithm and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine-year data

  5. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  6. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  7. ERBE S10 WFOV SF NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-13

    ... Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds The results of the study demonstrate the present shortcoming in the current knowledge of cloud ... continuously view the earth disc (plus a small ring of space). The measurements are continuous over the entire globe for NOAA-9 and ...

  8. ERBE S10 WFOV NF NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-09

    ... atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning may offset global warming caused by greenhouse gases. Absorption of Solar Radiation by ... Instruments: these two fixed detectors continuously view the earth disc (plus a small ring of space). The measurements are continuous over ...

  9. ERBE S10 MFOV NF NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-09

    ... atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning may offset global warming caused by greenhouse gases. Absorption of Solar Radiation by ... Instruments: these two fixed detectors continuously view the earth disc (plus a small ring of space). The measurements are continuous over ...

  10. ERBE S10 MFOV SF NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-09

    ... atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning may offset global warming caused by greenhouse gases. Absorption of Solar Radiation by ... Instruments: these two fixed detectors continuously view the earth disc (plus a small ring of space). The measurements are continuous over ...

  11. ERBE S10N WFV NF NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-13

    ... continuously view the earth disc (plus a small ring of space). The measurements are continuous over the entire globe for NOAA-9 and ... scanner instruments on board the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 satellites provide global coverage, while the ERBE scanner instrument onboard ...

  12. ERBE S10N WFV SF NAT

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-14

    ... Level:  L3 Platform:  ERBS, NOAA-9 and -10 Instrument:  NonScanner Spatial ... The measurements are continuous over the entire globe for NOAA-9 and NOAA-10, and between 57 degrees north and south latitudes for ERBS ...

  13. Fourier transform infrared studies of the interaction of HCl with model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Birgit G.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1993-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions involving hydrochloric acid adsorbed on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are postulated to contribute to polar ozone loss. Using FTIR spectroscopy to probe the condensed phase, we have examined the interaction of HCl with ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) films representative of types II and I PSCs, respectively. For HCl pressures in the range of 10 exp -7 to 10 exp -5 Torr, our FTIR studies show that a small amount of crystalline HCl-6H2O formed on or in ice at 155 K. However, for higher HCl pressures, we observed that the entire film of ice rapidly converted into an amorphous 4:1 H2O:HCl mixture. From HCl-uptake experiments with P(HCl) = 8 x 10 exp -7 Torr, we estimate roughly that the diffusion coefficient of HCl in ice is around 2 x 10 exp -12 sq cm/s at 158 K. For higher temperatures more closely approximating those found in the stratosphere, we were unable to detect bulk HCl uptake by ice. Indirect evidence suggests that HCl adsorption onto the surface of model PSC films inhibited the evaporation of both ice and NAT by 3-5 K.

  14. Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus From Organ Donors Despite Nucleic Acid Test Screening.

    PubMed

    Suryaprasad, A; Basavaraju, S V; Hocevar, S N; Theodoropoulos, N; Zuckerman, R A; Hayden, T; Forbi, J C; Pegues, D; Levine, M; Martin, S I; Kuehnert, M J; Blumberg, E A

    2015-07-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is recommended for screening of organ donors, yet not all donor infections may be detected. We describe three US clusters of HCV transmission from donors at increased risk for HCV infection. Donor's and recipients' medical records were reviewed. Newly infected recipients were interviewed. Donor-derived HCV infection was considered when infection was newly detected after transplantation in recipients of organs from increased risk donors. Stored donor sera and tissue samples were tested for HCV RNA with high-sensitivity quantitative PCR. Posttransplant and pretransplant recipient sera were tested for HCV RNA. Quasispecies analysis of hypervariable region-1 was used to establish genetic relatedness of recipient HCV variants. Each donor had evidence of injection drug use preceding death. Of 12 recipients, 8 were HCV-infected-6 were newly diagnosed posttransplant. HCV RNA was retrospectively detected in stored samples from donor immunologic tissue collected at organ procurement. Phylogenetic analysis showed two clusters of closely related HCV variants from recipients. These investigations identified the first known HCV transmissions from increased risk organ donors with negative NAT screening, indicating very recent donor infection. Recipient informed consent and posttransplant screening for blood-borne pathogens are essential when considering increased risk donors.

  15. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  16. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  17. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  18. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  19. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  20. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  1. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  2. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  3. New Approaches to Target the Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway for the Development of Tuberculosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    North, E. Jeffrey; Jackson, Mary; Lee, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycolic acids are the major lipid component of the unique mycobacterial cell wall responsible for the protection of the tuberculosis bacilli from many outside threats. Mycolic acids are synthesized in the cytoplasm and transported to the outer membrane as trehalose-containing glycolipids before being esterified to the arabinogalactan portion of the cell wall and outer membrane glycolipids. The large size of these unique fatty acids is a result of a huge metabolic investment that has been evolutionarily conserved, indicating the importance of these lipids to the mycobacterial cellular survival. There are many key enzymes involved in the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway, including fatty acid synthesis (KasA, KasB, MabA, InhA, HadABC), mycolic acid modifying enzymes (SAM-dependent methyltransferases, aNAT), fatty acid activating and condensing enzymes (FadD32, Acc, Pks13), transporters (MmpL3) and tranferases (Antigen 85A-C) all of which are excellent potential drug targets. Not surprisingly, in recent years many new compounds have been reported to inhibit specific portions of this pathway, discovered through both phenotypic screening and target enzyme screening. In this review, we analyze the new and emerging inhibitors of this pathway discovered in the post-genomic era of tuberculosis drug discovery, several of which show great promise as selective tuberculosis therapeutics. PMID:24245756

  4. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  5. Physical chemistry of the H2SO4/HNO3/H2O system - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Zhang, R.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Mcmahon, J. R.; Kim, J. E.; Chang, H. Y.; Beyer, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Surface-catalyzed reactions on PSC particles generate chlorine compounds that photolyze readily to yield chlorine radicals, which in turn destroy ozone very efficiently. The most prevalent PSCs form at temperatures several degrees above the ice frost point and are believed to consist of HNO3 hydrates; however, their formation mechanism is unclear. Results of laboratory experiments are presented which indicate that the background stratospheric H2SO4/H2O aerosols provide an essential link in this mechanism: These liquid aerosols absorb significant amounts of HNO3 vapor, leading most likely to the crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). The frozen particles then grow to form PSCs by condensation of additional amounts of HNO3 and H2O vapor. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements reveal that the chlorine radical precursors are formed readily at polar stratospheric temperatures not just on NAT and ice crystals, but also on liquid H2SO4 solutions and on solid H2SO4 hydrates. These results imply that the chlorine activation efficiency of the aerosol particles increases rapidly as the temperature approaches the ice frost point regardless of the phase or composition of the particles.

  6. 9+ Years of CALIOP PSC Data: An Evolving Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2015-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play key roles in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation, which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of PSC processes, particularly concerning the details of NAT particle formation. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs on unprecedented vortex-wide scales. In this paper, we examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Antarctic and Arctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine-year data record.

  7. Determination of polar stratospheric cloud particle refractive indices by use of in situ optical measurements and T-matrix calculations.

    PubMed

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Adriani, Alberto; Cairo, Francesco; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Buontempo, Carlo; Snels, Marcel; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Deshler, Terry; Larsen, Niels; Luo, Beiping; Mauersberger, Konrad; Ovarlez, Joelle; Rosen, Jim; Schreiner, Jochen

    2005-06-01

    A new algorithm to infer structural parameters such as refractive index and asphericity of cloud particles has been developed by use of in situ observations taken by a laser backscattersonde and an optical particle counter during balloon stratospheric flights. All three main particles, liquid, ice, and a no-ice solid (NAT, nitric acid trihydrate) of polar stratospheric clouds, were observed during two winter flights performed from Kiruna, Sweden. The technique is based on use of the T-matrix code developed for aspherical particles to calculate the backscattering coefficient and particle depolarizing properties on the basis of size distribution and concentration measurements. The results of the calculations are compared with observations to estimated refractive indices and particle asphericity. The method has also been used in cases when the liquid and solid phases coexist with comparable influence on the optical behavior of the cloud to estimate refractive indices. The main results prove that the index of refraction for NAT particles is in the range of 1.37-1.45 at 532 nm. Such particles would be slightly prolate spheroids. The calculated refractive indices for liquid and ice particles are 1.51-1.55 and 1.31-1.33, respectively. The results for solid particles confirm previous measurements taken in Antarctica during 1992 and obtained by a comparison of lidar and optical particle counter data.

  8. Determination of polar stratospheric cloud particle refractive indices by use of in situ optical measurements and T-matrix calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Adriani, Alberto; Cairo, Francesco; di Donfrancesco, Guido; Buontempo, Carlo; Snels, Marcel; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Deshler, Terry; Larsen, Niels; Luo, Beiping; Mauersberger, Konrad; Ovarlez, Joelle; Rosen, Jim; Schreiner, Jochen

    2005-06-01

    A new algorithm to infer structural parameters such as refractive index and asphericity of cloud particles has been developed by use of in situ observations taken by a laser backscattersonde and an optical particle counter during balloon stratospheric flights. All three main particles, liquid, ice, and a no-ice solid (NAT, nitric acid trihydrate) of polar stratospheric clouds, were observed during two winter flights performed from Kiruna, Sweden. The technique is based on use of the T-matrix code developed for aspherical particles to calculate the backscattering coefficient and particle depolarizing properties on the basis of size distribution and concentration measurements. The results of the calculations are compared with observations to estimated refractive indices and particle asphericity. The method has also been used in cases when the liquid and solid phases coexist with comparable influence on the optical behavior of the cloud to estimate refractive indices. The main results prove that the index of refraction for NAT particles is in the range of 1.37-1.45 at 532 nm. Such particles would be slightly prolate spheroids. The calculated refractive indices for liquid and ice particles are 1.51-1.55 and 1.31-1.33, respectively. The results for solid particles confirm previous measurements taken in Antarctica during 1992 and obtained by a comparison of lidar and optical particle counter data.

  9. Metabolomics Suggests That Soil Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Decreased Free Amino Acid Content in Roots of Durum Wheat Grown under N-Limited, P-Rich Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Ruisi, Paolo; Fileccia, Veronica; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Amato, Gaetano; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have a major impact on plant nutrition, defence against pathogens, a plant’s reaction to stressful environments, soil fertility, and a plant’s relationship with other microorganisms. Such effects imply a broad reprogramming of the plant’s metabolic activity. However, little information is available regarding the role of AMF and their relation to other soil plant growth—promoting microorganisms in the plant metabolome, especially under realistic field conditions. In the present experiment, we evaluated the effects of inoculation with AMF, either alone or in combination with plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), on the metabolome and changes in metabolic pathways in the roots of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) grown under N-limited agronomic conditions in a P-rich environment. These two treatments were compared to infection by the natural AMF population (NAT). Soil inoculation with AMF almost doubled wheat root colonization by AMF and decreased the root concentrations of most compounds in all metabolic pathways, especially amino acids (AA) and saturated fatty acids, whereas inoculation with AMF+PGPR increased the concentrations of such compounds compared to inoculation with AMF alone. Enrichment metabolomics analyses showed that AA metabolic pathways were mostly changed by the treatments, with reduced amination activity in roots most likely due to a shift from the biosynthesis of common AA to γ-amino butyric acid. The root metabolome differed between AMF and NAT but not AMF+PGPR and AMF or NAT. Because the PGPR used were potent mineralisers, and AMF can retain most nitrogen (N) taken as organic compounds for their own growth, it is likely that this result was due to an increased concentration of mineral N in soil inoculated with AMF+PGPR compared to AMF alone. PMID:26067663

  10. Nucleic Acid Amplification Based Diagnostic of Lyme (Neuro-)borreliosis - Lost in the Jungle of Methods, Targets, and Assays?

    PubMed

    Nolte, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory based diagnosis of infectious diseases usually relies on culture of the disease causing micro-organism, followed by identification and susceptibility testing. Since Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, requires very specific culture conditions (e.g. specific liquid media, long term cul-ture) traditional bacteriology is often not done on a routine basis. Instead, confirmation of the clinical diagnosis needs ei-ther indirect techniques (like serology or measurement of cellular activity in the presence of antigens) or direct but culture independent techniques, like microscopy or nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT), with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) being the most frequently applied NAT method in routine laboratories. NAT uses nucleic acids of the disease causing micro-organism as template for amplification, isolated from various sources of clinical specimens. Although the underlying principle, adoption of the enzymatic process running during DNA duplication prior to prokaryotic cell division, is comparatively easy, a couple of 'pitfalls' is associated with the technique itself as well as with interpretation of the results. At present, no commercial, CE-marked and sufficiently validated PCR assay is available. A number of homebrew assays have been published, which are different in terms of target (i.e. the gene targeted by the amplification primers), method (nested PCR, PCR followed by hybridization, real-time PCR) and validation criteria. Inhibitory compounds may lead to false negative results, if no appropriate internal control is included. Carry-over of amplicons, insufficient handling and workflow and/or insufficiently validated targets/primers may result in false positive results. Different targets may yield different analytical sensitivity, depending, among other factors, of the redundancy of a target gene in the genome. Per-formance characteristics (e.g. analytical sensitivity and

  11. Nucleic Acid Amplification Based Diagnostic of Lyme (Neuro-)borreliosis – Lost in the Jungle of Methods, Targets, and Assays?

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory based diagnosis of infectious diseases usually relies on culture of the disease causing micro-organism, followed by identification and susceptibility testing. Since Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, requires very specific culture conditions (e.g. specific liquid media, long term cul-ture) traditional bacteriology is often not done on a routine basis. Instead, confirmation of the clinical diagnosis needs ei-ther indirect techniques (like serology or measurement of cellular activity in the presence of antigens) or direct but culture independent techniques, like microscopy or nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT), with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) being the most frequently applied NAT method in routine laboratories. NAT uses nucleic acids of the disease causing micro-organism as template for amplification, isolated from various sources of clinical specimens. Although the underlying principle, adoption of the enzymatic process running during DNA duplication prior to prokaryotic cell division, is comparatively easy, a couple of ‘pitfalls’ is associated with the technique itself as well as with interpretation of the results. At present, no commercial, CE-marked and sufficiently validated PCR assay is available. A number of homebrew assays have been published, which are different in terms of target (i.e. the gene targeted by the amplification primers), method (nested PCR, PCR followed by hybridization, real-time PCR) and validation criteria. Inhibitory compounds may lead to false negative results, if no appropriate internal control is included. Carry-over of amplicons, insufficient handling and workflow and/or insufficiently validated targets/primers may result in false positive results. Different targets may yield different analytical sensitivity, depending, among other factors, of the redundancy of a target gene in the genome. Per-formance characteristics (e.g. analytical sensitivity and

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  13. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  14. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  15. Inferring the Observed PSC Composition Using the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) Data Along With Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, N.; Hayashida, S.; Sasano, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) captured many polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter and early spring of 1997. We identified about 250 events in 65 profiles as PSCs in the Arctic. Preliminary analysis made it clear that the ILAS also observed many PSC events during the early winter of 1997 in the Southern Hemisphere. The ILAS aerosol extinction coefficient and nitric acid data were compared with the theoretically predicted values for supercooled ternary solution (STS), nitric acid dihydrate (NAD), and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles at thermodynamic equilibrium to infer the chemical composition of the observed PSC particles. In mid-January of 1997, both the extinction coefficient and nitric acid values of some of the observed PSC events showed better agreement with the theoretical values for STS than with those of NAT or NAD. Although a few PSCs were observed in March, most of the PSCs observed late in the PSC season had features of nitric-acid-containing hydrates. An intensive analysis of the temperature histories suggested that most of the STS particles observed in January had experienced the thermal conditions necessary for the formation of liquid particles. The nitric-acid-containing solid PSC events observed in early March experienced temperatures below TNAT for more than several days, and sometimes fell below Tice during the 20-day period. They had not passed over typical mountainous area before their measurements, so the formation mechanisms of these solid particles should be explained from their synoptic scale temperature histories, without considering lee waves. They maintained relatively high nitric acid hydrate saturation ratios along their trajectory, which suggests their homogeneous nucleation.

  16. Expression and purification of a functional uric acid-xanthine transporter (UapA).

    PubMed

    Leung, James; Karachaliou, Mayia; Alves, Claudia; Diallinas, George; Byrne, Bernadette

    2010-07-01

    The Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporters (NATs) family includes carriers with fundamental functions in uptake of key cellular metabolites, such as uric acid or vitamin C. The best studied example of a NAT transporter is the uric acid-xanthine permease (UapA) from the model ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans. Detailed genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed much about the mechanism of action of this protein; however, the difficulties associated with handling eukaryotic membrane proteins have limited efforts to elucidate the precise structure-function relationships of UapA by structural analysis. In this manuscript, we describe the heterologous overexpression of functional UapA as a fusion with GFP in different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The UapA-GFP construct expressed to 2.3 mg/L in a pep4Delta deletion strain lacking a key vacuolar endopeptidase and 3.8 mg/L in an npi1-1 mutant strain with defective Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase activity. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that the UapA-GFP was predominately localized to the plasma membrane in both strains, although a higher intensity of fluorescence was observed for the npi1-1 mutant strain plasma membrane. In agreement with these observations, the npi1-1 mutant strain demonstrated a approximately 5-fold increase in uptake of [(3)H]-xanthine compared to the pep4Delta deletion strain. Despite yielding the best results for functional expression, in-gel fluorescence of the UapA-GFP expressed in the npi1-1 mutant strain revealed that the protein was subject to significant proteolytic degradation. Large scale expression of the protein using the pep4Delta deletion strain followed by purification produced mg quantities of pure, monodispersed protein suitable for further structural and functional studies. In addition, this work has generated a yeast cell based system for performing reverse genetics and other targeted approaches, in order to further understand the mechanism of action of this important model protein.

  17. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  18. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  19. Acid Rain

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA Is Doing Acid Rain Program Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Progress Reports Educational Resources Kid's Site for ... Monitoring National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Exit Interstate Air Pollution Transport Contact Us to ask a question, provide ...

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid can hide signs that you lack vitamin B12, which can cause nerve damage. 10 Do I ... Rosenberg, I.H., et al. (2007). Folate and vitamin B12 status in relation to anemia, macrocytosis and cognitive ...

  1. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  2. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  3. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  4. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  5. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  6. A Synopsis of CALIPSO PSC Observations from 2006-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Lamont; Pitts, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are known to play key roles in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. The observational database on PSCs has been augmented tremendously in recent years by data from the polarization-sensitive CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar system onboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) spacecraft. CALIOP began data collection in mid-June 2006 and has since acquired, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55o and 82o in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are also separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). The composition classification scheme has been modified recently to account for denitrification, the primary effect of which is the misclassification of ice clouds as liquid/NAT mixtures. This paper will use these CALIOP

  7. Factors in enhancing blood safety by nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, Venkatakrishna

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades through an awareness of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI), a majority of countries have mandated serology based blood screening assays for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, despite improved serology assays, the transfusion transmission of HIV, HCV, and HBV continues, primarily due to release of serology negative units that are infectious because of the window period (WP) and occult HBV infections (OBI). Effective mode of nucleic acid technology (NAT) testing of the viruses can be used to minimize the risk of TTIs. This review compiles the examples of NAT testing failures for all three viruses; analyzes the causes for failure, and the suggestions from retrospective studies to minimize such failures. The results suggest the safest path to be individual donation testing (ID) format for highest sensitivity, and detection of multiple regions for rapidly mutating and recombining viruses. The role of blood screening in the context of the donation and transfusion practices in India, the donor population, and the epidemiology is also discussed. World wide, as the public awareness of TTIs increases, as the recipient rights for safe blood are legally upheld, as the possibility to manage diseases such as hepatitis through expensive and prolonged treatment becomes accessible, and the societal responsibility to shoulder the health costs as in the case for HIV becomes routine, there is much to gain by preventing infections than treating diseases. PMID:24678167

  8. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  9. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 007 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 79 - 43 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revi

  10. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 003F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 76 - 03 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2011 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has

  11. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  12. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  13. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  14. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  15. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  16. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  17. Azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro-Porro, M

    1987-12-01

    This review is an update on the literature accumulated over the past 10 years following the original observation that azelaic acid, a naturally occurring and nontoxic C9 dicarboxylic acid, possesses significant biologic properties and a potential as a therapeutic agent. These studies have shown that azelaic acid is a reversible inhibitor of tyrosinase and other oxidoreductases in vitro and that it inhibits mitochondrial respiration. It can also inhibit anaerobic glycolysis. Both in vitro and in vivo it has an antimicrobial effect on both aerobic and anaerobic (Propionibacterium acnes) microorganisms. In tissue culture it exerts a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on malignant melanocytes, associated with mitochondrial damage and inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis. Tumoral cell lines not containing tyrosinase are equally affected. Normal cells in culture exposed to the same concentrations of the diacid that are toxic for tumoral cells are in general not damaged. Radioactive azelaic acid has been shown to penetrate tumoral cells at a higher level than normal cells of the corresponding line. Topically applied (a 20% cream), it has been shown to be of therapeutic value in skin disorders of different etiologies. Its beneficial effect on various forms of acne (comedogenic, papulopustular, nodulocystic) has been clearly demonstrated. Particularly important is its action on abnormal melanocytes, which has led to the possibility of obtaining good results on melasma and highly durable therapeutic responses on lentigo maligna. It is also capable of causing regression of cutaneous malignant melanoma, but its role in melanoma therapy remains to be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-03

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  19. [N-(Carboxylatomethyl)aspartato(3-)](ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Maderová, Jana; Marek, Jaromír; Pavelcík, Frantisek

    2003-05-01

    The mononuclear title complex, [Co(C(6)H(6)NO(6))(C(2)H(8)N(2))].3H(2)O, contains an octahedrally coordinated Co(III) atom. The N-(carboxymethyl)aspartate moiety is coordinated as a tetradentate ligand, providing an OONO-donor set and forming two trans five-membered chelate rings and one six-membered chelate ring. A seven-membered chelate ring is also formed, which consists of part of the six-membered chelate ring and part of one of the five-membered chelate rings. The crystal structure of the complex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with three water molecules.

  20. 21 CFR 520.90c - Ampicillin trihydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... penicillinase-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for...-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for use...

  1. 21 CFR 520.90c - Ampicillin trihydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... penicillinase-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for...-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for use...

  2. 21 CFR 520.90c - Ampicillin trihydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... penicillinase-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for...-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for use...

  3. 21 CFR 520.90c - Ampicillin trihydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... penicillinase-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for...-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for use...

  4. 21 CFR 520.90c - Ampicillin trihydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... penicillinase-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for...-producing organisms and for use in animals known to be allergic to any of the penicillins. Not for use...

  5. 21 CFR 520.90e - Ampicillin trihydrate soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. Oral treatment of porcine colibacillosis (Escherichia coli) and salmonellosis (Salmonella... Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Salmonella spp. (3) Limitations. For...

  6. 21 CFR 520.90e - Ampicillin trihydrate soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. Oral treatment of porcine colibacillosis (Escherichia coli) and salmonellosis (Salmonella... Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Salmonella spp. (3) Limitations. For...

  7. 21 CFR 520.90e - Ampicillin trihydrate soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. Oral treatment of porcine colibacillosis (Escherichia coli) and salmonellosis (Salmonella... Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Salmonella spp. (3) Limitations. For...

  8. 21 CFR 520.90e - Ampicillin trihydrate soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. Oral treatment of porcine colibacillosis (Escherichia coli) and salmonellosis (Salmonella... Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Salmonella spp. (3) Limitations. For...

  9. 21 CFR 522.88 - Sterile amoxicillin trihydrate for suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary infections (cystitis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal infections (bacterial gastroenteritis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis due to...

  10. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  11. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  12. 21 CFR 522.88 - Sterile amoxicillin trihydrate for suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary infections (cystitis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal infections (bacterial gastroenteritis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis due to...

  13. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  14. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  15. 21 CFR 522.88 - Sterile amoxicillin trihydrate for suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary infections (cystitis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal infections (bacterial gastroenteritis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis due to...

  16. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  17. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  18. 21 CFR 520.90f - Ampicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... daily for up to 5 days. (i) Indications for use. Oral treatment of colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli, bacterial enteritis caused by Salmonella spp., and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp... enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli. (ii) Limitations. Treated calves must not be slaughtered...

  19. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  20. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. For treatment of bacterial enteritis in calves caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial... for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli and bacterial pneumonia...—(A) Treatment of respiratory tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus...

  1. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  2. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  3. 21 CFR 520.90f - Ampicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... daily for up to 5 days. (i) Indications for use. Oral treatment of colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli, bacterial enteritis caused by Salmonella spp., and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp... enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli. (ii) Limitations. Treated calves must not be slaughtered...

  4. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  5. 21 CFR 520.90f - Ampicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... daily for up to 5 days. (i) Indications for use. Oral treatment of colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli, bacterial enteritis caused by Salmonella spp., and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp... enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli. (ii) Limitations. Treated calves must not be slaughtered...

  6. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  7. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  8. 21 CFR 520.90f - Ampicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... daily for up to 5 days. (i) Indications for use. Oral treatment of colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli, bacterial enteritis caused by Salmonella spp., and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp... enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli. (ii) Limitations. Treated calves must not be slaughtered...

  9. 21 CFR 520.90f - Ampicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... daily for up to 5 days. (i) Indications for use. Oral treatment of colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli, bacterial enteritis caused by Salmonella spp., and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp... enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli. (ii) Limitations. Treated calves must not be slaughtered...

  10. 21 CFR 522.88 - Sterile amoxicillin trihydrate for suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary infections (cystitis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal infections (bacterial gastroenteritis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis due to...

  11. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  12. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  13. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88e Amoxicillin...) Limitations. For oral use in preruminating calves including veal calves only, not for use in other...

  14. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of a 33-34 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling and the application of chemical box modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, William I.; Millard, G.A.; Mather, T.A.; Hunton, D.E.; Anderson, B.; Oppenheimer, C.; Thornton, B.F.; Gerlach, T.M.; Viggiano, A.A.; Kondo, Y.; Miller, T.M.; Ballenthin, J.O.

    2006-01-01

    On 28 February 2000, a volcanic cloud from Hekla volcano, Iceland, was serendipitously sampled by a DC-8 research aircraft during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE I). It was encountered at night at 10.4 km above sea level (in the lower stratosphere) and 33-34 hours after emission. The cloud is readily identified by abundant SO2 (???1 ppmv), HCl (???70 ppbv), HF (???60 ppbv), and particles (which may have included fine silicate ash). We compare observed and modeled cloud compositions to understand its chemical evolution. Abundances of sulfur and halogen species indicate some oxidation of sulfur gases but limited scavenging and removal of halides. Chemical modeling suggests that cloud concentrations of water vapor and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201-203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT), and liquid ternary solution H2SO4/H2O/HNO3 (STS) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated volcanogenic halogens in the cloud producing >2 ppbv ClOx. This would have destroyed ozone during an earlier period of daylight, consistent with the very low levels of ozone observed. This combination of volcanogenic PSCs and chlorine destroyed ozone at much faster rates than other PSCs that Arctic winter. Elevated levels of HNO3 and NOy in the cloud can be explained by atmospheric nitrogen fixation in the eruption column due to high temperatures and/or volcanic lightning. However, observed elevated levels of HOx remain unexplained given that the cloud was sampled at night. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  17. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  18. Production of 93mMo through natY(7Li, 3n) reaction and subsequent studies on separation and extraction behaviour of no-carrier-added 93mMo from an yttrium target.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2008-12-01

    The present work reports heavy-ion-assisted production of (93m)Mo from a natural yttrium target using the (89)Y((7)Li, 3n)(93m)Mo reaction. Three different methodologies based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLX), aqueous biphasic extraction and precipitation, have been developed for separation and extraction of no-carrier-added (nca) (93m)Mo (T(1/2)=6.85h) radionuclide from bulk yttrium target. Complete separation of nca Mo from the target Y has been achieved by employing LLX technique with 0.1M trioctylamine (TOA) dissolved in cyclohexane and 8M HCl. Quantitative separation of (93m)Mo from the yttrium target is also possible by precipitating bulk yttrium with 1M oxalic acid. However, for this particular case, studies have shown that the aqueous biphasic extraction is not the method of choice for separation of nca Mo. Nevertheless, the extraction pattern is important in the context of simulation experiments for studying the behaviour of (106)Sg. Similarity or dissimilarity between the extraction patterns in various analytical systems will be helpful to decisively place Sg in the right position in the periodic table.

  19. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  20. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  1. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  2. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.H.; Boyle, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain, says Boyle is a chemical leprosy eating into the face of North America and Europe, perhaps the major ecological problem of our time. Boyle describes the causes and scope of the phenomenon; the effects on man, wildlife, water, and our cultural heritage. He probes the delays of politicians and the frequent self-serving arguments advanced by industry in the face of what scientists have proved. The solutions he offers are to strengthen the Clean Air Act and require emission reductions that can be accomplished by establishing emission standards on a regional or bubble basis, burn low-sulfur coal, install scrubbers at critical plants, and invest in alternative energy sources. 73 references, 1 figure.

  3. Microphysical Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Compared with Calipso and MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Toon, O. B.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lambert, A.; Brakebusch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form in the lower stratosphere during the polar night due to the cold temperature inside the polar vortex. PSCs are important to understand because they are responsible for the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole and the ozone depletion over the Arctic. In this work, we explore the formation and evolution of STS particles (Super-cooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric-acid Trihydrate) particles using the SD-WACCM/CARMA model. SD-WACCM/CARMA couples the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model using Specific Dynamics with the microphysics model (CARMA). The 2010-2011 Arctic winter has been simulated because the Arctic vortex remained cold enough for PSCs from December until the end of March (Manney et al., 2011). The unusual length of this cold period and the presence of PSCs caused strong ozone depletion. This model simulates the growth and evaporation of the STS particles instead of considering them as being in equilibrium as other models do (Carslaw et al., 1995). This work also explores the homogeneous nucleation of NAT particles and derives a scheme for NAT formation based on the observed denitrification during the winter 2010-2011. The simulated microphysical features (particle volumes, size distributions, etc.) of both STS (Supercooled Ternary Solutions) and NAT particles show a consistent comparison with historical observations. The modeled evolution of PSCs and gas phase ozone related chemicals inside the vortex such as HCl and ClONO2 are compared with the observations from MLS, MIPAS and CALIPSO over this winter. The denitrification history indicate the surface nucleation rate from Tabazadeh et al. (2002) removes too much HNO3 over the winter. With a small modification of the free energy term of the equation, the denitification and the PSC backscattering features are much closer to the observations. H2O, HCl, O3 and ClONO2 are very close to MLS and MIPAS observations inside the vortex. The model underestimates ozone

  4. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  5. Organic acids tunably catalyze carbonic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-07-10

    Density functional theory calculations predict that the gas-phase decomposition of carbonic acid, a high-energy, 1,3-hydrogen atom transfer reaction, can be catalyzed by a monocarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid, including carbonic acid itself. Carboxylic acids are found to be more effective catalysts than water. Among the carboxylic acids, the monocarboxylic acids outperform the dicarboxylic ones wherein the presence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond hampers the hydrogen transfer. Further, the calculations reveal a direct correlation between the catalytic activity of a monocarboxylic acid and its pKa, in contrast to prior assumptions about carboxylic-acid-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions. The catalytic efficacy of a dicarboxylic acid, on the other hand, is significantly affected by the strength of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Transition-state theory estimates indicate that effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed decomposition are four orders-of-magnitude larger than those for the water-catalyzed reaction. These results offer new insights into the determinants of general acid catalysis with potentially broad implications.

  6. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  7. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  8. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  9. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  10. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  11. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  12. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  13. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  14. A synopsis of CALIPSO Polar Stratospheric Cloud Observations from 2006-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2014-10-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are known to play key roles in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation, which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIOP began data collection in mid-June 2006 and has since acquired, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55° and 82° in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles as enhancements above the background aerosol in either 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) or 532-nm perpendicular-polarized backscatter. CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes based on the ensemble 532- nm scattering ratio and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC measurements and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than eight-year data record.

  15. Relationship between PSC types and ozone destruction quantified from CALIPSO and MLS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Pitts, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    The stratospheric ozone destruction in the Arctic has been smaller than that of Antarctic for years. The main cause of this can be attributed to its higher winter minimum temperature of ~10-20 K than that of Antarctic stratosphere owing to topography. The average winter minimum stratospheric temperature in the Arctic is just around the threshold temperature of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation. This results in the appearance of intermittent PSC formation, which is the key factor of severe ozone depletion. Several types of PSCs are reported. The major ones are nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), supercooled ternary solution (STS), and water ice. However, it still remains unknown whether different types of PSCs have different ability of chlorine activation and ozone destruction efficiency or not. In order to clarify the above question, we made satellite match analysis using CALIPSO and MLS data. Pitts et al. [2009] and [2011] developed a method to categorize the PSC types from 532 nm backscatter ratio and depolarization data from CALIPSO data. They categorized the PSC types into 6 types; i.e., Mix1, Mix2, Mix2-enhanced, Ice, Wave-ice, and STS. Mix denotes the mixture of NAT and STS. We made satellite match analysis from the location of certain type of PSC categorized by CALIPSO. On the forward and backward trajectories, MLS measurement locations were searched within 150 km and +/- 3 hours difference. As a result, ozone destruction rate was estimated in terms of sunlit hours on the trajectory. We analyzed Antarctic winter/spring in 2007, and Arctic winter/spring in 2010 and 2011. Difference in ozone destruction efficiency was found for both Antarctic and Arctic cases. Reference: Pitts, M. C., et al., [2009], Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 7577-7589. Pitts, M. C., et al., [2011], Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 2161-2177.

  16. Relationship between PSC types and ozone destruction rate quantified with CALIPSO and MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Pitts, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    The stratospheric ozone destruction in the Arctic has been smaller than that of Antarctic for years. The main cause of this can be attributed to its higher winter minimum temperature of ~10-20 K than that of Antarctic stratosphere owing to topography. The average winter minimum stratospheric temperature in the Arctic is just around the threshold temperature of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation. This results in the appearance of intermittent PSC formation, which is the key factor of severe ozone depletion. Several types of PSCs are reported. The major ones are nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), supercooled ternary solution (STS), and water ice. However, it still remains unknown whether different types of PSCs have different ability of chlorine activation and ozone destruction efficiency or not. In order to clarify the above question, we made satellite match analysis using CALIPSO and MLS data. Pitts et al. [2009] and [2011] developed a method to categorize the PSC types from 532 nm backscatter ratio and depolarization data from CALIPSO data. They categorized the PSC types into 6 types; i.e., Mix1, Mix2, Mix2-enhanced, Ice, Wave-ice, and STS. Mix denotes the mixture of NAT and STS. We made satellite match analysis from the location of certain type of PSC categorized by CALIPSO. On the forward and backward trajectories, MLS measurement locations were searched within 150 km and +/- 3 hours difference. As a result, ozone destruction rate was estimated in terms of sunlit hours on the trajectory. We analyzed Antarctic winter/spring in 2007, and Arctic winter/spring in 2010 and 2011. It was found that the ozone destruction rate was the greatest for Mix, followed by STS and ICE PSCs. Hemispheric difference for ozone destruction rate was found.

  17. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along five-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode: (1) the individual CLAES ClONO2 and MLS ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm(exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme, However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and UK Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  18. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode (1) the individual CLAES version 9 ClONO2 and MLS version 5 ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm (exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme. However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and U.K. Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  19. Long-term measurements of Polar Stratospheric Clouds with the Esrange lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, Peggy; Tesche, Matthias; Blum, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play a key role for ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere whose magnitude depends on the type of PSC and its lifetime and extent. PSCs are classified into three types (PSC Ia: nitric acid di- or trihydrate crystals, NAD or NAT; PSC Ib: supercooled liquid ternary solutions, STS; PSC II: ice) according to their particle composition and to their physical phase. This study presents long-term statistics of PSC occurrence from measurements with the lidar system at the Esrange Space Centre (68°N, 21°E), northern Sweden. The study gives an overview of the occurrence frequency of different PSC types in connection to the prevailing meteorological conditions for the northern hemispheric winters from 1996/97 to 2013/14. During these 18 years, most of the measurements were conducted in January. The geographical location of Esrange in the lee of the Scandinavian mountain range allows for the observation of a wide range of PSC growth conditions due to mountain-wave activity. The Esrange lidar data set contains hourly mean values of the parallel and perpendicularly polarized backscatter ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio - all measured at 532 nm. These parameters are used for PSC classification. The lowest occurrence frequency is found for PSCs of type II (6% for the entire period). This low occurrence rate is reasonable since PSCs of type II are formed at temperatures below the ice-frost point. Such temperatures are rarely reached in the Arctic polar vortex. Most of the observations between 1997 and 2014 showed low particle depolarization ratios and low backscatter ratios according to which observed PSCs were classified as type Ib (47%) or mixtures (33%). The remaining 13% of the observation were classified as type Ia PSCs (NAT particles).

  20. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  1. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  2. A cold pool reference frame for analyzing polar stratospheric clouds and tropospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    The dominance of synoptic scale tropospheric forcing as a driver for Arctic PSC existence has been established for a single season [Teitelbaum et al., 2001, J. Geophys. Res.] and over the entire SAM II, POAM II, POAM III era [Fromm et al. 2003, J. Geophys. Res.]. These results suggest that a meteorological context for PSC occurrence and composition, based on synoptic-scale dynamics, is appropriate and useful for unified PSC studies. Here we analyze satellite PSC observations in a new geospatial context: the cold pool reference frame (CPRF). We present a CPRF using the canonical nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) saturation isotherm as the boundary, with isotherms for liquid ternary aerosol condensation and the water-ice frost point for inner PSC-composition "latitudes." The temperature minimum and the longitude of the temperature minimum mark the pole and axis of the CPRF, respectively. The CPRF also incorporates the air flow through the cold pool with the Montgomery stream function. With such information, we relate SAGE and POAM occurrence of PSCs with respect to the cold pool axis and the upwind/downwind PSC-composition latitude belts. The CPRF model, and a justification based on monthly average December 2002 meteorological analyses, is presented. To illustrate, we show the case of 19 December 2002 as well as monthly PSC results. We also apply the CPRF to PSC observations from the Arctic winter of 2010/2011.

  3. Modelling Liquid Particle Composition In Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) are thought to be composed of solid ni- tric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, water ice particles, or supercooled liquid HNO3/H2SO4/H2O particles under different conditions and depending on the ther- mal history of the air mass. The solid particles are believed to form by the freezing of the liquid particles, the rate of which depends on the composition and size of the liquid particles. Lagrangian-in-radius-space numerical schemes have been used be- fore to study particle composition across the PSC size spectrum, in simple box model runs and in domain-filling Lagrangian studies. However these models were not de- signed to be compatible with global chemistry and transport models (CTMs), which currently model PSCs by assuming equilibrium with the atmosphere.We report here on an adaptation of a continuous (Eulerian-in-radius) distribution scheme, modelling the evolution of liquid PSC particles in non-equilibrium conditions. It uses an effi- cient numerical scheme, designed to be compatible with CTMs. Results from the new scheme have been validated against analytical solutions, and corroborate the compo- sition gradients across the size distribution under rapid cooling conditions that were reported in earlier studies.

  4. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M.Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approximately 46 mb) and 585 K (approximately 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER. photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: (1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the UKMO temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; (2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; (3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  5. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements Showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec. 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 mb) and 585 K (approxi. 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: 1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; 2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; 3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  6. Analysis of the physical state of one Arctic polar stratospheric cloud based on observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R. P.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Dye, J. E.; Twohy, C.; Baumgardner, D.

    1994-01-01

    During the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) simultaneous measurements of aerosol size distribution and NO(y)(HN03 + NO + NO2 + 2(N205)) were made along ER-2 flight paths. The flow characteristics of the NO(y) instrument allow us to derive the condensed NO(y) amount (assumed to be HN03) present during polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events. Analysis of the January 24th flight indicates that this condensed HN03 amount does not agree well with the aerosol volume if the observed PSCs are composed of solid nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), as is generally assumed. However, the composition agrees well with that predicted for liquid H2S04/HN03/H20 solution droplets using a new Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model (APCM). The agreement corresponds in detail to variations in temperature and humidity. The weight percentages of H2SO4, HN03, and H2O derived from the measurements all correspond to those predicted for ternary, liquid solutions.

  7. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  8. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  9. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  10. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  11. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  12. Substrate Selectivity of YgfU, a Uric Acid Transporter from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Papakostas, Konstantinos; Frillingos, Stathis

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT/NCS2) family includes more than 2,000 members, but only 15 have been characterized experimentally. Escherichia coli has 10 members, of which the uracil permease UraA and the xanthine permeases XanQ and XanP are functionally known. Of the remaining members, YgfU is closely related in sequence and genomic locus with XanQ. We analyzed YgfU and showed that it is a proton-gradient dependent, low-affinity (Km 0.5 mm), and high-capacity transporter for uric acid. It also shows a low capacity for transport of xanthine at 37 °C but not at 25 °C. Based on the set of positions delineated as important from our previous Cys-scanning analysis of permease XanQ, we subjected YgfU to rationally designed site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the conserved His-37 (TM1), Glu-270 (TM8), Asp-298 (TM9), and Gln-318 and Asn-319 (TM10) are functionally irreplaceable, and Thr-100 (TM3) is essential for the uric acid selectivity because its replacement with Ala allows efficient uptake of xanthine. The key role of these residues is corroborated by the conservation pattern and homology modeling on the recently described x-ray structure of permease UraA. In addition, site-specific replacements at TM8 (S271A, M274D, V282S) impair expression in the membrane, and V320N (TM10) inactivates the permease, whereas R327G (TM10) or S426N (TM14) reduces the affinity for uric acid (4-fold increased Km). Our study shows that comprehensive analysis of structure-function relationships in a newly characterized transporter can be accomplished with relatively few site-directed replacements, based on the knowledge available from Cys-scanning mutagenesis of a prototypic homolog. PMID:22437829

  13. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine evidence for the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched for articles on the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. Level I and II evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in improving cardiovascular outcomes. MAIN MESSAGE Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids has declined by 80% during the last 100 years, while intake of omega-6 fatty acids has greatly increased. Omega-3 fatty acids are cardioprotective mainly due to beneficial effects on arrhythmias, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and thrombosis. There is also evidence that they improve endothelial function, lower blood pressure, and significantly lower triglycerides. CONCLUSION There is good evidence in the literature that increasing intake of omega-3 fatty acids improves cardiac outcomes. Physicians need to integrate dietary recommendations for consumption of omega-3 fatty acids into their usual cardiovascular care. PMID:16812965

  15. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  16. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Lactate test ... test. Exercise can cause a temporary increase in lactic acid levels. ... not getting enough oxygen. Conditions that can increase lactic acid levels include: Heart failure Liver disease Lung disease ...

  17. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  18. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  19. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  20. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  1. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  2. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  3. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  4. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  5. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  6. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  7. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  8. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  9. Refining Lurgi tar acids

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, N.P.

    1984-04-17

    There is disclosed a process for removing tar bases and neutral oils from the Lurgi tar acids by treating the tar acids with aqueous sodium bisulfate to change the tar bases to salts and to hydrolyze the neutral oils to hydrolysis products and distilling the tar acids to obtain refined tar acid as the distillate while the tar base salts and neutral oil hydrolysis products remain as residue.

  10. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  11. 78 FR 20029 - Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic..., polymer with adipic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid and ricinoleic acid (CAS Reg. No. 1357486-09- 9) when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide formulation. Advance Polymer Technology submitted a...

  12. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  13. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  14. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  15. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  16. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  17. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  18. Analysis of Antarctic Denitrification in 2003 Winter Observed by ILAS-II Onboard the ADEOS-II Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Saeki, K.; Sugita, T.

    2005-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) play an important role in ozone destruction in both Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere in winter. They take up gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) and grow up when temperature is below nitric acid saturation temperature (TNAT). When PSC becomes large, it starts to descend and nitric acid is removed from the air mass, resulting in denitrification. The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II (ILAS-II) onboard the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II (ADEOS-II) successfully made measurements for the whole Antarctic winter in 2003. ILAS-II measured vertical profiles of O3, HNO3, NO2, H2O, N2O, CH4, ClONO2, N2O5, etc. in addition to the aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm. In this study, we analyzed denitrification from ILAS-II HNO3 and N2O data in regard to temperature history on the trajectory. The quantity of denitrification was estimated from the difference between measured HNO3 and HNO3* assumed from HNO3-- N2O correlation. In this analysis, it was found that denitrification was observed only for those airmass that experienced temperature below TICE (ice saturation temperature) in late June, 2003. In late July, it was found that most airmass inside the polar vortex was denitrified regardless of temperature history. This suggests that permanent denitrification has occurred in June-July period. The transition of relationship between denitrification and airmass temperature history was discovered from the ILAS-II data. Also, major types of PSC have found to be changed from nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in June to ice in July, from the ILAS-II data. This is considered to be due to the lack of nitric acid in the airmass due to the denitrification in July.

  19. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  1. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  2. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  6. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  7. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  8. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  9. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  10. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  11. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  12. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  13. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  14. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  15. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  16. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  17. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  18. Diterpenoid acids from Grindelia nana.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A A; Ahmed, A A; Tanaka, T; Iinuma, M

    2000-03-01

    Two new norditerpenoid acids of the labdane-type (norgrindelic acids), 4,5-dehydro-6-oxo-18-norgrindelic acid (1) and 4beta-hydroxy-6-oxo-19-norgrindelic acid (2), as well as a new grindelic acid derivative, 18-hydroxy-6-oxogrindelic acid (3), were isolated from the aerial parts of Grindelia nana. In addition, the known compounds, 6-oxogrindelic acid, grindelic acid, methyl grindeloate, 7alpha,8alpha-epoxygrindelic acid, and 4alpha-carboxygrindelic acid were also isolated. The structures of the new compounds were characterized on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  19. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  20. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2014-12-31

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa.

  1. Patterns of Evolutionary Conservation of Ascorbic Acid-Related Genes Following Whole-Genome Triplication in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase–ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12–18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. PMID:25552535

  2. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid ... > For Parents > Folic Acid and Pregnancy A A A What's ...

  3. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  4. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  5. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...

  6. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  7. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  9. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  10. Production of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2012-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative production route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains productive for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. Production via fermentation is increasing. Other production methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, production in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed.

  11. Fatty acid production from amino acids and alpha-keto acids by Brevibacterium linens BL2.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Seefeldt, Kimberly; Weimer, Bart C

    2004-11-01

    Low concentrations of branched-chain fatty acids, such as isobutyric and isovaleric acids, develop during the ripening of hard cheeses and contribute to the beneficial flavor profile. Catabolism of amino acids, such as branched-chain amino acids, by bacteria via aminotransferase reactions and alpha-keto acids is one mechanism to generate these flavorful compounds; however, metabolism of alpha-keto acids to flavor-associated compounds is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of Brevibacterium linens BL2 to produce fatty acids from amino acids and alpha-keto acids and determine the occurrence of the likely genes in the draft genome sequence. BL2 catabolized amino acids to fatty acids only under carbohydrate starvation conditions. The primary fatty acid end products from leucine were isovaleric acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid. In contrast, logarithmic-phase cells of BL2 produced fatty acids from alpha-keto acids only. BL2 also converted alpha-keto acids to branched-chain fatty acids after carbohydrate starvation was achieved. At least 100 genes are potentially involved in five different metabolic pathways. The genome of B. linens ATCC 9174 contained these genes for production and degradation of fatty acids. These data indicate that brevibacteria have the ability to produce fatty acids from amino and alpha-keto acids and that carbon metabolism is important in regulating this event.

  12. Internal control for nucleic acid testing based on the use of purified Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores.

    PubMed

    Picard, François J; Gagnon, Martin; Bernier, Marthe R; Parham, Nicholas J; Bastien, Martine; Boissinot, Maurice; Peytavi, Régis; Bergeron, Michel G

    2009-03-01

    Commonly used internal controls (ICs) to monitor the efficiency of nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays do not allow verification of nucleic acid extraction efficiency. Since microbial cells are often difficult to lyse, it is important to ensure that nucleic acids are efficiently extracted from any target organism. For this purpose, we developed a cellular IC based on the use of nonpathogenic Bacillus spores. Purified Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii (referred to hereafter as simply B. atrophaeus) spores were added to vaginal and anal samples, which were then subjected to rapid DNA extraction and subsequent PCR amplification. The proof of concept of this cellular IC was made through the use of both manual and automated DNA extraction methods, using vaginal or anal samples spiked with B. atrophaeus spores, combined with a multiplex real-time PCR assay for the specific detection of group B streptococci (GBS) and B. atrophaeus. The performance of the cellular IC was compared to that of a standard IC plasmid added to PCRs. Approximately 500 B. atrophaeus spores per PCR was found to be optimal since this did not interfere significantly with GBS detection for either DNA extraction method and yielded reproducible amplification and/or detection of B. atrophaeus genomic DNA serving as an IC template. Performance of the cellular IC was comparable to that of the standard IC. This novel IC system using nonpathogenic and hard-to-lyse B. atrophaeus spores allowed validation of both the DNA extraction procedure and the amplification and detection process. Use of a spore-based control also provides a universal control for microbial cell lysis.

  13. Total syntheses of cis-cyclopropane fatty acids: dihydromalvalic acid, dihydrosterculic acid, lactobacillic acid, and 9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sayali; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-12-14

    cis-Cyclopropane fatty acids (cis-CFAs) are widespread constituents of the seed oils of subtropical plants, membrane components of bacteria and protozoa, and the fats and phospholipids of animals. We describe a systematic approach to the synthesis of enantiomeric pairs of four cis-CFAs: cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid, lactobacillic acid, dihydromalvalic acid, and dihydrosterculic acid. The approach commences with Rh2(OAc)4-catalyzed cyclopropenation of 1-octyne and 1-decyne, and hinges on the preparative scale chromatographic resolution of racemic 2-alkylcycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylic acids using a homochiral Evan's auxiliary. Saturation of the individual diastereomeric N-cycloprop-2-ene-1-carbonylacyloxazolidines, followed by elaboration to alkylcyclopropylmethylsulfones, allowed Julia-Kocienski olefination with various ω-aldehyde-esters. Finally, saponification and diimide reduction afforded the individual cis-CFA enantiomers.

  14. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  15. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  16. Gluconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G

    2007-01-01

    Gluconic acid, the oxidation product of glucose, is a mild neither caustic nor corrosive, non toxic and readily biodegradable organic acid of great interest for many applications. As a multifunctional carbonic acid belonging to the bulk chemicals and due to its physiological and chemical characteristics, gluconic acid itself, its salts (e.g. alkali metal salts, in especially sodium gluconate) and the gluconolactone form have found extensively versatile uses in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, construction and other industries. Present review article presents the comprehensive information of patent bibliography for the production of gluconic acid and compares the advantages and disadvantages of known processes. Numerous manufacturing processes are described in the international bibliography and patent literature of the last 100 years for the production of gluconic acid from glucose, including chemical and electrochemical catalysis, enzymatic biocatalysis by free or immobilized enzymes in specialized enzyme bioreactors as well as discontinuous and continuous fermentation processes using free growing or immobilized cells of various microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast-like fungi and fungi. Alternatively, new superior fermentation processes have been developed and extensively described for the continuous and discontinuous production of gluconic acid by isolated strains of yeast-like mold Aureobasidium pullulans, offering numerous advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi processes.

  17. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  18. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin that result from exposure to sunlight and can develop into skin cancer) of the ... acid will make your skin very sensitive to sunlight (likely to get sunburn). Avoid exposure of treated ...

  19. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  20. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider ...

  1. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  2. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amoxicillin is in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth ... allergic to amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), clavulanic acid, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medications.tell your doctor ...

  3. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  4. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  5. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The normal range is 320 ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  6. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  7. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  8. The linoleic acid and trans fatty acids of margarines.

    PubMed

    Beare-Rogers, J L; Gray, L M; Hollywood, R

    1979-09-01

    Fifty brands of margarine were analysed for cis-polyunsaturated acids by lipoxidase, for trans fatty acid by infared spectroscopy, and for fatty acid composition by gas-liquid chromatography. High concentrations of trans fatty acids tended to be associated with low concentrations of linoleic acid. Later analyses on eight of the brands, respresenting various proportions of linoleic to trans fatty acids, indicated that two of them contained still higher levels of trans fatty acids (greater than 60%) and negligible amounts of linoleic acid. It is proposed that margarine could be a vehicle for the distribution of some dietary linoleic acid and that the level of linoleic acid and the summation of the saturated plus trans fatty acids be known to ascertain nutritional characteristics.

  9. Laboratory studies on the heterogeneous chemistry of clay minerals in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, Courtney Dyan

    initial uptake was found to be independent of organic acid pressure, linear dependence of the initial uptake on clay mass was observed. However, the organic acid content was found to increase significantly with increasing acid pressure. A significant enhancement in the organic acid content, water content and the initial uptake coefficients was observed as the RH was raised. Additionally, the presence of organic acids was found to slightly enhance the water content of the clay above 45% RH. Results suggest that that heterogeneous uptake of organic acids on swelling clay minerals is an important heterogeneous removal mechanism for carboxylic acids in the atmosphere at all RH values studied, and probably more so at higher humidities. The heterogeneous uptake of nitric acid on Na-montmorillonite clay at low temperatures as a function of RH, nitric acid pressure and clay mass has also been studied. Below 16% RH, uptake of nitric acid on Na-montmorillonite was below the detection limit. However, similar to the organic acids, the nitric acid content, water content and initial uptake coefficient all increase with increasing RH. Additionally, these values were all found to be independent of temperature from 210 to 232 K and independent of pressure from 1x10 -5 to 3x10-4 Torr nitric acid. However, a linear dependence on mass was observed for small sample masses. The adsorbed water content of Na-montmorillonite clay was also significantly enhanced compared to experiments performed when only water was present. Results suggest that heterogeneous uptake of nitric acid on swelling clay minerals is an important heterogeneous removal mechanism in the troposphere under humid conditions when clay is expected to be swollen. Higher in the atmosphere, it is currently questionable as to whether mineral particles are effective nuclei for polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which play a crucial role in polar ozone loss. The heterogeneous formation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) on Na

  10. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  11. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  12. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  13. Mechanistic studies of the immunochemical termination of self-tolerance with unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Jan; Hunt, Grady S; Dong, Liqun; Niessen, Frank; Wen, Ben G; Tsao, Meng-Lin; Perera, Roshan; Kang, Mingchao; Laffitte, Bryan A; Azarian, Sassan; Ruf, Wolfram; Nasoff, Marc; Lerner, Richard A; Schultz, Peter G; Smider, Vaughn V

    2009-03-17

    For more than 2 centuries active immunotherapy has been at the forefront of efforts to prevent infectious disease [Waldmann TA (2003) Nat Med 9:269-277]. However, the decreased ability of the immune system to mount a robust immune response to self-antigens has made it more difficult to generate therapeutic vaccines against cancer or chronic degenerative diseases. Recently, we showed that the site-specific incorporation of an immunogenic unnatural amino acid into an autologous protein offers a simple and effective approach to overcome self-tolerance. Here, we characterize the nature and durability of the polyclonal IgG antibody response and begin to establish the generality of p-nitrophenylalanine (pNO(2)Phe)-induced loss of self-tolerance. Mutation of several surface residues of murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (mTNF-alpha) independently to pNO(2)Phe leads to a T cell-dependent polyclonal and sustainable anti-mTNF-alpha IgG autoantibody response that lasts for at least 40 weeks. The antibodies bind multiple epitopes on mTNF-alpha and protect mice from severe endotoxemia induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Immunization of mice with a pNO(2)Phe(43) mutant of murine retinol-binding protein (RBP4) also elicited a high titer IgG antibody response, which was cross-reactive with wild-type mRBP4. These findings suggest that this may be a relatively general approach to generate effective immunotherapeutics against cancer-associated or other weakly immunogenic antigens.

  14. The second acidic constant of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Porto, Raffaella; De Tommaso, Gaetano; Furia, Emilia

    2005-01-01

    The second dissociation constant of salicylic acid (H2L) has been determined, at 25 degrees C, in NaCl ionic media by UV spectrophotometric measurements. The investigated ionic strength values were 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 M. The protolysis constants calculated at the different ionic strengths yielded, with the Specific Interaction Theory, the infinite dilution constant, log beta1(0) = 13.62 +/- 0.03, for the equilibrium L2- + H+ <==> HL-. The interaction coefficient between Na+ and L2-, b(Na+, L2-) = 0.02 +/- 0.07, has been also calculated.

  15. Differential activation of pregnane X receptor by carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Seow, Chun Ling; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2017-03-10

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the expression of many genes, including those involved in drug metabolism and transport, and has been linked to various diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we determined whether carnosic acid and other chemicals in rosemary extract (carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid) are PXR activators. As assessed in dual-luciferase reporter gene assays, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, activated human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR), whereas carnosol and ursolic acid, but not carnosic acid or rosmarinic acid, activated rat PXR (rPXR). Dose-response experiments indicated that carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid activated hPXR with EC50 values of 0.79, 2.22, and 10.77μM, respectively. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, transactivated the ligand-binding domain of hPXR and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), SRC-2, and SRC-3 to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, increased hPXR target gene expression, as shown by an increase in CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and ABCB1 mRNA expression in LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Rosmarinic acid did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting it is not an antagonist of hPXR. Overall, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, are hPXR agonists, and carnosic acid shows species-dependent activation of hPXR and mPXR, but not rPXR. The findings provide new mechanistic insight on the effects of carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid on PXR-mediated biological effects.

  16. Discovery of essential fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat was recognized as a good source of energy and fat-soluble vitamins by the first part of the 20th century, but fatty acids were not considered to be essential nutrients because they could be synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. This well-established view was challenged in 1929 by George and Mildred Burr who reported that dietary fatty acid was required to prevent a deficiency disease that occurred in rats fed a fat-free diet. They concluded that fatty acids were essential nutrients and showed that linoleic acid prevented the disease and is an essential fatty acid. The Burrs surmised that other unsaturated fatty acids were essential and subsequently demonstrated that linolenic acid, the omega-3 fatty acid analog of linoleic acid, is also an essential fatty acid. The discovery of essential fatty acids was a paradigm-changing finding, and it is now considered to be one of the landmark discoveries in lipid research. PMID:25339684

  17. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  18. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  19. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  20. Recurrent uric acid stones.

    PubMed

    Kamel, K S; Cheema-Dhadli, S; Shafiee, M A; Davids, M R; Halperin, M L

    2005-01-01

    A 46-year-old female had a history of recurrent uric acid stone formation, but the reason why uric acid precipitated in her urine was not obvious, because the rate of urate excretion was not high, urine volume was not low, and the pH in her 24-h urine was not low enough. In his discussion of the case, Professor McCance provided new insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stone formation. He illustrated that measuring the pH in a 24-h urine might obscure the fact that the urine pH was low enough to cause uric acid to precipitate during most of the day. Because he found a low rate of excretion of NH(4)(+) relative to that of sulphate anions, as well as a high rate of citrate excretion, he speculated that the low urine pH would be due to a more alkaline pH in proximal convoluted tubule cells. He went on to suspect that there was a problem in our understanding of the function of renal medullary NH(3) shunt pathway, and he suggested that its major function might be to ensure a urine pH close to 6.0 throughout the day, to minimize the likelihood of forming uric acid kidney stones.

  1. Hydrogen production by fermentation using acetic acid and lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Microbial hydrogen production from sho-chu post-distillation slurry solution (slurry solution) containing large amounts of organic acids was investigated. The highest hydrogen producer, Clostridium diolis JPCC H-3, was isolated from natural environment and produced hydrogen at 6.03+/-0.15 ml from 5 ml slurry solution in 30 h. Interestingly, the concentration of acetic acid and lactic acid in the slurry solution decreased during hydrogen production. The substrates for hydrogen production by C. diolis JPCC H-3, in particular organic acids, were investigated in an artificial medium. No hydrogen was produced from acetic acid, propionic acid, succinic acid, or citric acid on their own. Hydrogen and butyric acid were produced from a mixture of acetic acid and lactic acid, showing that C. diolis. JPCC H-3 could produce hydrogen from acetic acid and lactic acid. Furthermore, calculation of the Gibbs free energy strongly suggests that this reaction would proceed. In this paper, we describe for the first time microbial hydrogen production from acetic acid and lactic acid by fermentation.

  2. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  3. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  4. [Aristolochic acid nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy is a chronic, fibrosing, interstitial nephritis caused by aristolochic acid (AA), which is a component of the plants of Aristolochiacae family. It was first reported in 1993, in Belgium as a Chinese herb nephropathy, in patients who received a slimming regimen containing AA. The term aristolochic acid nephropathy also includes Balcan endemic nephropathy and other endemic tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Moreover, AA is a human carcinogen which induces urothelial cancer. The AA-containing herbs are banned in many countries and FDA published the warnings concerning the safety of AA-containing botanical remedies in 2000. Regarding the increasing interest in herbal medicines, uncontrolled access to botanical remedies and replacement of one herb by another AA-containing compounds makes thousands of people all around the world at risk of this grave disease.

  5. Calorimetry of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Rozners, Eriks; Pilch, Daniel S; Egli, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This unit describes the application of calorimetry to characterize the thermodynamics of nucleic acids, specifically, the two major calorimetric methodologies that are currently employed: differential scanning (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DSC is used to study thermally induced order-disorder transitions in nucleic acids. A DSC instrument measures, as a function of temperature (T), the excess heat capacity (C(p)(ex)) of a nucleic acid solution relative to the same amount of buffer solution. From a single curve of C(p)(ex) versus T, one can derive the following information: the transition enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), free energy (ΔG), and heat capacity (ΔCp); the state of the transition (two-state versus multistate); and the average size of the molecule that melts as a single thermodynamic entity (e.g., the duplex). ITC is used to study the hybridization of nucleic acid molecules at constant temperature. In an ITC experiment, small aliquots of a titrant nucleic acid solution (strand 1) are added to an analyte nucleic acid solution (strand 2), and the released heat is monitored. ITC yields the stoichiometry of the association reaction (n), the enthalpy of association (ΔH), the equilibrium association constant (K), and thus the free energy of association (ΔG). Once ΔH and ΔG are known, ΔS can also be derived. Repetition of the ITC experiment at a number of different temperatures yields the ΔCp for the association reaction from the temperature dependence of ΔH.

  6. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  7. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for its usage are presented.

  8. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for its usage are presented. PMID:24966721

  9. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  10. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  11. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A; Miller, Wilson H; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L John

    2009-02-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at -30 degrees C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function.

  12. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  13. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  14. Effect of domoic acid on brain amino acid levels.

    PubMed

    Durán, R; Arufe, M C; Arias, B; Alfonso, M

    1995-03-01

    The administration of Domoic Acid (Dom) in a 0.2 mg/kg i.p. dose induces changes in the levels of amino acids of neurochemical interest (Asp, Glu, Gly, Tau, Ala, GABA) in different rat brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, cortex and midbrain). The most affected amino acid is the GABA, the main inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter, whereas glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid, is not affected. The rat brain regions that seem to be the main target of the Dom action belong to the limbic system (hippocampus, amygdala). The possible implication of the amino acids in the actions of Dom is also discussed.

  15. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Chemical Emergencies: Case Definition: Hydrofluoric Acid . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services; 2005. Goldfrank LR, ed. Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies . 8th ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill; 2006. Wax PM, Young A. ...

  16. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; van de Loo, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  17. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  18. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  19. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  20. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)