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Sample records for acid uric acid

  1. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  2. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  3. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test if you have had or are about to have certain types of chemotherapy. Rapid weight loss, which may occur with such treatments, can increase the amount of uric acid in ...

  4. Uric acid and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feig, Daniel I

    2011-09-01

    A link between serum uric acid and the development of hypertension was first hypothesized in the 1870s. Although numerous epidemiologic studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested an association, relatively little attention was paid to it until recently. Animal models have suggested a two-step pathogenesis by which uric acid initially activates the renin angiotensin system and suppresses nitric oxide, leading to uric acid-dependent increase in systemic vascular resistance, followed by a uric acid-mediated vasculopathy, involving renal afferent arterioles, resulting in a late sodium-sensitive hypertension. Initial clinical trials in young patients have supported these mechanisms in young patients but do not yet support pharmacologic reduction of serum uric acid as first-line therapy for hypertension.

  5. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2015-09-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  6. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  7. Uric acid transport and disease

    PubMed Central

    So, Alexander; Thorens, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism in humans. It has antioxidant properties that may be protective but can also be pro-oxidant, depending on its chemical microenvironment. Hyperuricemia predisposes to disease through the formation of urate crystals that cause gout, but hyperuricemia, independent of crystal formation, has also been linked with hypertension, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, and diabetes. We discuss here the biology of urate metabolism and its role in disease. We also cover the genetics of urate transport, including URAT1, and recent studies identifying SLC2A9, which encodes the glucose transporter family isoform Glut9, as a major determinant of plasma uric acid levels and of gout development. PMID:20516647

  8. Uric Acid and Antioxidant Effects of Wine

    PubMed Central

    Boban, Mladen; Modun, Darko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the role of uric acid in the context of antioxidant effects of wine and its potential implication to human health. We described and discussed the mechanisms of increase in plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of moderate amounts of wine. Because this effect is largely contributed by acute elevation in plasma uric acid, we paid special attention to wine constituents and metabolic processes that are likely to be involved in uric acid elevation. PMID:20162741

  9. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  10. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  12. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  13. Association of Renal Manifestations with Serum Uric Acid in Korean Adults with Normal Uric Acid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-Jae; Lee, Hye-Ree; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have reported that hyperuricemia is associated with the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidences also suggest that hyperuricemia may have a pathogenic role in the progression of renal disease. Paradoxically, uric acid is also widely accepted to have antioxidant activity in experimental studies. We aimed to investigate the association between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and uric acid in healthy individuals with a normal serum level of uric acid. We examined renal function determined by GFR and uric acid in 3,376 subjects (1,896 men; 1,480 women; aged 20-80 yr) who underwent medical examinations at Gangnam Severance Hospital from November 2006 to June 2007. Determinants for renal function and uric acid levels were also investigated. In both men and women, GFR was negatively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, uric acid, log transformed C reactive protein, and log transformed triglycerides. In multivariate regression analysis, total uric acid was found to be an independent factor associated with estimated GFR in both men and women. This result suggests that uric acid appears to contribute to renal impairment in subjects with normal serum level of uric acid. PMID:21165292

  14. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  15. Uric acid in the etiology of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M

    1981-01-01

    The potential etiologic relationship between uric acid in its microcrystalline monosodium urate form and psoriasis was examined by 1) substantiating the reported correlation between hyperuricemia and psoriasis using the phosphotungstate method; 2) examining psoriatic tissue samples for the presence of urates under a microscope using polarized light and a compensator; 3) attempting to induce psoriasis-like symptoms in laboratory animals with purine-to-uric acid metabolism by increasing serum uric acid level; and 4) observing psoriasis-hyperuricemic patients following treatment for their hyperuricemia with Allopurinol. As expected, both men and women psoriatics had higher uric acid levels than did their counterparts in a control group. Monosodium urate crystals were found in samples from psoriatic plaques by both methods used. They were clustered particularly around sweat pores and Munro abscesses, but were found only occasionally in epidermal tissue taken from nonpsoriatics. Psoriasis-like symptoms were induced in laboratory animals (the South American boa, Constrictor constrictor) when they were fed doses of uric acid. Patients with psoriasis and hyperuricemia showed marked improvement in psoriasis when treated for their hyperuricemia. Psoriasis, like gout, may be, at least partly, a result of disorder of purine metabolism and monosodium urate crystals may be responsible for the cell proliferation that is characteristic of psoriatic plaques. Monosodium urate crystals were found by the author to be strikingly segmented. This structure may result in ease of fragmentation, thus increasing the difficulty in identifying urates in any tissue.

  16. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  17. [Uric acid, kidney disease and nephrolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Hopfer, Helmut; Mayr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Different types of kidney disease are known to be associated with hyperuricemia. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms strongly vary, and different ways of therapeutic approach are therefore required. In tumor lysis syndrome, a rapid, excessive increase of serum uric acid level can cause an acute renal failure. For chronic urate nephropathy, on the other hand, constantly elevated serum uric acid level for a longer period seems to be important. Being still controversial as a disease entity however, the aetiology for putative chronic urate nephropathy might be in fact chronic lead intoxication, as suggested by quite an amount of association data. In terms of uric acid nephrolithiasis, the major risk factor is a urinary acidification defect with persistently acidic urine pH, and not necessarily hyperuricemia or hyperuricosuria. Evidence suggests that metabolic diseases with increased insulin resistance are strongly associated with urinary acidification defect. Patients with uric acid kidney stones should therefore be thoroughly evaluated for such metabolic diseases and in a positive case adequately treated.

  18. [Uric acid, kidney disease and nephrolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Hopfer, Helmut; Mayr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Different types of kidney disease are known to be associated with hyperuricemia. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms strongly vary, and different ways of therapeutic approach are therefore required. In tumor lysis syndrome, a rapid, excessive increase of serum uric acid level can cause an acute renal failure. For chronic urate nephropathy, on the other hand, constantly elevated serum uric acid level for a longer period seems to be important. Being still controversial as a disease entity however, the aetiology for putative chronic urate nephropathy might be in fact chronic lead intoxication, as suggested by quite an amount of association data. In terms of uric acid nephrolithiasis, the major risk factor is a urinary acidification defect with persistently acidic urine pH, and not necessarily hyperuricemia or hyperuricosuria. Evidence suggests that metabolic diseases with increased insulin resistance are strongly associated with urinary acidification defect. Patients with uric acid kidney stones should therefore be thoroughly evaluated for such metabolic diseases and in a positive case adequately treated. PMID:27008449

  19. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  1. Lower uric Acid linked with cognitive dysfunction in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Salas-Pacheco, José; Ruano-Calderón, Luis; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Barraza-Salas, Marcelo; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid has been associated as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recently, however, there is growing evidence that uric acid plays a role as antioxidant in the brain. In cognitive dysfunction, vascular and oxidative stress mechanisms play a role, but the link remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the link between serum uric acid-levels and cognitive function in 62 elderly subjects. The statistical analysis was adjusted to age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors. Here, we found that lower serum uric acid levels are linked to cognitive dysfunction. In a Mexican population, higher levels of uric acid are associated with a decreased risk of dementia. PMID:25925000

  2. [Outpatient care in uric acid disorders].

    PubMed

    Schwenke, R; Altus, R E; Kirschner, I

    1979-08-15

    In 35 patients with uricopathy (arthritis urica, essential hyperuricaemia) the serum uric acid values, consumption of alcohol, overweight, hypertension and liver enzyma under dietary and medicamentous therapy (allopurinol) were investigated. Here during an observation lasting 12--48 months allopurinol proved as a well tolerable uricostatic drug which was sufficiently effective also with a considerable exogenic purine application. We only insufficiently succeeded in influencing overweight and alcohol consumption as well as hypertension by rheumatic dispensary care and family doctor.

  3. [Uric acid and kidneys – Physiological and pathophysiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Mayr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys play a critical role in the excretion of uric acid. Improved knowledge of the renal tubular uric acid transport mechanisms helps to better understand, why hyper- or hypouricemia can develop without the external influence of purine intake. Besides the genetic mutations, several drugs and specific medical conditions can significantly influence the tubular excretion of uric acid and thus the serum uric acid level. It seems evident that the renal function per se has a relevant impact on the uric acid excretion. It is however not clear, whether uric acid has a causal role in the development of chronic kidney disease and if so, to what extent. In order to better understand the impact of hyper- and hypouricemia and especially their clinical relevance, further researches on the renal tubular physio- and pathophysiology and also high quality intervention studies are required.

  4. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. PMID:27180134

  5. [Uric acid and kidneys – Physiological and pathophysiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Mayr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys play a critical role in the excretion of uric acid. Improved knowledge of the renal tubular uric acid transport mechanisms helps to better understand, why hyper- or hypouricemia can develop without the external influence of purine intake. Besides the genetic mutations, several drugs and specific medical conditions can significantly influence the tubular excretion of uric acid and thus the serum uric acid level. It seems evident that the renal function per se has a relevant impact on the uric acid excretion. It is however not clear, whether uric acid has a causal role in the development of chronic kidney disease and if so, to what extent. In order to better understand the impact of hyper- and hypouricemia and especially their clinical relevance, further researches on the renal tubular physio- and pathophysiology and also high quality intervention studies are required. PMID:27008450

  6. [Serum uric acid levels and risk of developing preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Corominas, Ana I; Balconi, Silvia M; Palermo, Mario; Maskin, Bernardo; Damiano, Alicia E

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that preeclampsia is associated to high uric acid levels, but the clinical assessment of this relationship is still under consideration. Our research was to evaluate if periodic doses of uric acid during pregnancy might help to identify a high risk group prior to the onset of preeclampsia. We conducted a retrospective investigation in 79 primary gestates with normal blood pressure and 79 women with preeclampsia who were assisted at Hospital Nacional Posadas during 2010. Serum uric acid levels, creatininemia, uremia, and proteinuria data from the clinical records of the pregnant women were considered. Uric acid levels were similar in both groups during the first half of gestation. However, as of the 20th week, uric acid increased 1.5-times in preeclamptic women with no changes in creatinine and urea, confirming that these patients had no renal complications. Furthermore, we noted that higher levels of uric acid correlated with low birth weight. We also observed that pregnant women with a family history of hypertension were more likely to develop this condition. Moreover, we did not find a direct relationship with the fetal sex or the appearance of clinical symptoms. The analytical evidence suggests that changes in uric acid concentrations may be due to metabolic alterations at the initial stages of preeclampsia. Therefore, we propose that monitoring levels of uric acid during pregnancy might contribute to the early control of this condition.

  7. Serum Uric Acid Level among Acute Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, M; Das, S N; Haque, M F; Shikha, S S; Bhuiyan, A S; Saha, P L; Das, B R; Chowdhury, M; Jahan, M K; Rahman, M M

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed as well as developing countries like Bangladesh. Elevated serum uric acid levels may predict an increased risk for cerebro-vascular (CV) events including stroke. Aim of the study was to measure the serum uric acid level among stroke patients and determine the relationship between serum uric acid level and stroke. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out in Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh to measure serum uric acid level among 102 stroke patients in a period of one year by using non-probability sampling procedure. Finally, collected data were analyzed using SPSS software Version 17.0. It was observed that the mean age of patients was 60.87±8.05 years, of them 80(78.43%) patients were male and the rest 22(21.57%) were female. About 66(64.70%) of respondents were in age group 60 years and above, while 36(35.30%) were in age group 59 years and below. At least 23(22.55%) of stroke patients had elevated serum uric acid with a mean serum uric acid level of 5.18mg/dl and standard deviation 1.26mg/dl. About 23(27.38%) patients in ischemic stroke had elevated serum uric acid whereas 18(100%) patients in hemorrhagic stroke had normal uric acid level. Uric acid level was elevated in ischemic stroke than haemorrhagic stroke patients (p<0.001). High uric acid level may be considered as a risk factor in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27277350

  8. An Increase Incidence in Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Changing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Asha; Mittal, Pawan; Kumar, Rajender; Goel, Richa; Bansal, Piyush; Kumar, Himanshu Devender; Bhutani, Jaikrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nephrolithiasis is a complex disease affecting all age groups globally. As the causative factors for nephrolithiasis rises significantly, its incidence, prevalence and recurrence continues to baffle clinicians and patients. Aim To study the prevalence of different types of renal stones extracted by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and open surgical procedures. Materials and Methods Renal stones from 50 patients were retrieved by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL), Ureterorenoscopy (URS) and open surgical techniques for qualitative tests for detection of calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphate, ammonium ion, carbonate, cystine and xanthine. Results Three patients had stone removed by open surgery and rest had undergone PCNL. Nine of the stones were pure of calcium oxalate, 9 were of pure uric acid and 32 were mixed stones. Forty one stones had calcium. Among the mixed stones, oxalate was present in 25 samples (39 of total), uric acid was seen in 17 (25 of total stones), phosphate was present in 23 (23 of total) and carbonate was present in 4 stones (4 of total). Only 1 patient had triple phosphate stone. 12 were of staghorn appearance of which 6 were of struvite type, 6 were pure uric acid and remaining were mixed oxalate-phosphate stones. Conclusion Our study, though in a small number of hospital based patients, found much higher prevalence of uric acid stones and mixed stones than reported by previous hospital based studies in north India (oxalate stones~90%, uric acid~1% and mixed stones~3%). Biochemical analysis of renal stones is warranted in all cases. PMID:27630833

  9. An Increase Incidence in Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Changing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Asha; Mittal, Pawan; Kumar, Rajender; Goel, Richa; Bansal, Piyush; Kumar, Himanshu Devender; Bhutani, Jaikrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nephrolithiasis is a complex disease affecting all age groups globally. As the causative factors for nephrolithiasis rises significantly, its incidence, prevalence and recurrence continues to baffle clinicians and patients. Aim To study the prevalence of different types of renal stones extracted by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and open surgical procedures. Materials and Methods Renal stones from 50 patients were retrieved by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL), Ureterorenoscopy (URS) and open surgical techniques for qualitative tests for detection of calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphate, ammonium ion, carbonate, cystine and xanthine. Results Three patients had stone removed by open surgery and rest had undergone PCNL. Nine of the stones were pure of calcium oxalate, 9 were of pure uric acid and 32 were mixed stones. Forty one stones had calcium. Among the mixed stones, oxalate was present in 25 samples (39 of total), uric acid was seen in 17 (25 of total stones), phosphate was present in 23 (23 of total) and carbonate was present in 4 stones (4 of total). Only 1 patient had triple phosphate stone. 12 were of staghorn appearance of which 6 were of struvite type, 6 were pure uric acid and remaining were mixed oxalate-phosphate stones. Conclusion Our study, though in a small number of hospital based patients, found much higher prevalence of uric acid stones and mixed stones than reported by previous hospital based studies in north India (oxalate stones~90%, uric acid~1% and mixed stones~3%). Biochemical analysis of renal stones is warranted in all cases.

  10. Uric acid and chronic kidney disease: which is chasing which?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jalal, Diana; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Kang, Duk-Hee; Ritz, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    Serum uric acid is commonly elevated in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but was historically viewed as an issue of limited interest. Recently, uric acid has been resurrected as a potential contributory risk factor in the development and progression of CKD. Most studies documented that an elevated serum uric acid level independently predicts the development of CKD. Raising the uric acid level in rats can induce glomerular hypertension and renal disease as noted by the development of arteriolosclerosis, glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Pilot studies suggest that lowering plasma uric acid concentrations may slow the progression of renal disease in subjects with CKD. While further clinical trials are necessary, uric acid is emerging as a potentially modifiable risk factor for CKD. Gout was considered a cause of CKD in the mid-nineteenth century [1], and, prior to the availability of therapies to lower the uric acid level, the development of end-stage renal disease was common in gouty patients. In their large series of gouty subjects Talbott and Terplan found that nearly 100% had variable degrees of CKD at autopsy (arteriolosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis) [2]. Additional studies showed that during life impaired renal function occurred in half of these subjects [3]. As many of these subjects had urate crystals in their tubules and interstitium, especially in the outer renal medulla, the disease became known as gouty nephropathy. The identity of this condition fell in question as the presence of these crystals may occur in subjects without renal disease; furthermore, the focal location of the crystals could not explain the diffuse renal scarring present. In addition, many subjects with gout also had coexistent conditions such as hypertension and vascular disease, leading some experts to suggest that the renal injury in gout was secondary to these latter conditions rather than to uric acid per se [4]. Indeed, gout was

  11. Enhancement of renal excretion of uric acid during long-term thiazide therapy.

    PubMed

    Pak, C Y; Tolentino, R; Stewart, A; Galosy, R A

    1978-11-01

    The effect of thiazide (hydrochlorothiazide 100 mg per day orally in two divided doses for up to 3 years) on uric acid metabolism was examined in 21 patients with renal stones suffering from renal hypercalciuria or absorptive hypercalciuria. Serum concentration of uric acid increased during thiazide therapy in every patient. In 12 of 21 patients, there was a transient or persistent rise in urinary uric acid of more than 50 mg per day during treatment. The mean urinary uric acid produced by thiazide was positively correlated with the change in the renal clearance of uric acid. Thus, an increase in urinary uric acid was often associated with a rise in uric acid clearance. The results suggest that thiazide may either increase the production of uric acid or decrease the extrarenal disposal of uric acid, in some patients.

  12. Liver Enzymes and Uric acid in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Farveh; Rafighdoost, Abbas Ali; Rafighdoost, Amir Hossein; Amin, Ahmad; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute heart failure (AHF) is defined as the new onset or recurrence of gradual or rapidly worsening signs and symptoms of heart failure, requiring urgent or emergent therapy. Objectives: This study attempts to assess the association of liver function tests (LFT) and uric acid level with in hospital outcome and echocardiography parameters, in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients (aged 16 - 90 years, 60% men) admitted with AHF were enrolled. LFTs and uric acid levels were assessed on first day and before discharge, and patients were followed for 3 months. Results: In-hospital outcomes were considered. Mean Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) was 35% (20 - 45%). Mean Uric acid level was 8.4 mg/dL, significantly higher than chronic HF and normal groups (P < 0.02). Elevated liver enzymes were seen in 52% patients, mostly (87%) in transaminases. Liver enzymes were decreased in 85% patients before discharge. LFT and uric acid levels were inversely and significantly correlated with LVEF on echocardiography (P = 0.02), but not with diastolic parameters. Although there was no significant correlation between uric acid level and in-hospital mortality, risk of intubation and rehospitalization in 3 months, enzyme levels increased in these groups. Increased aspartate transaminase (AST level) was associated with inotrope infusion in AHF patients (42 vs. 82 mg/dL, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Abnormal transaminases and uric acid levels are seen in AHF patients. Increased AST levels may be a predictor of the need for inotrope during hospital course in these patients. PMID:26528447

  13. Relationship between Uric Acid Level and Achievement Motivation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ernst F.; French, John R. P., Jr.

    In an investigation of the relationship of uric acid (a metabolic end product) to achievement, this study hypothesized that a person's serum urate level (a factor often associated with gout) is positively related to achievement need as well as indicators of actual achievement. (Speed of promotion and number of yearly publications were chosen as…

  14. Sugar, uric acid, and the etiology of diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that "a calorie is just a calorie" and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease.

  15. Sugar, uric acid, and the etiology of diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that "a calorie is just a calorie" and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease. PMID:24065788

  16. The effect of uric acid on outdoor copper and bronze.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Bowden, D J; Brimblecombe, P; Kenneally, H; Morselli, L

    2009-03-15

    Bird droppings are often quoted as a decay agent for outdoor goods, in particular buildings and statues. Undoubtedly, they represent one of the major causes of aesthetic damage on outdoor materials, but the real chemical damage they are able to induce, in particular on metals, is not so well studied. This work focused on the short term role of uric acid, the main constituent of bird urine, with respect to copper, which make such an important contribution to architectural elements of buildings and outdoor sculpture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests and analyses on real exposed samples showed that uric acid chemically affects copper and bronzes: the surface of the metal is modified and copper urates formed. Also natural patina, formed on statues and roof, react with uric acid, even if it seems to afford some protection toward bird droppings. In general, experimental results confirm that the potential chemical damage by bird droppings is significant when considering external cultural heritage such as statues, metal monuments and buildings with historic copper roofs.

  17. Uric Acid as a Target of Therapy in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Chonchol, Michel; Chen, Wei; Targher, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has risen and will continue to rise in the United States and worldwide. This is alarming considering that CKD remains an irreversible condition and patients who progress to chronic kidney failure suffer reduced quality of life and high mortality rates. As such, it is imperative to identify modifiable risk factors to develop strategies to slow CKD progression. One such factor is hyperuricemia. Recent observational studies have associated hyperuricemia with kidney disease. In addition, hyperuricemia is largely prevalent in patients with CKD. Data from experimental studies have revealed several potential mechanisms by which hyperuricemia may contribute to the development and progression of CKD. In this manuscript we offer a critical review of the experimental evidence linking hyperuricemia to CKD, we highlight the gaps in our knowledge on the topic as it stands today, and we review the observational and interventional studies that have examined the potential nephro-protective effect of lowering uric acid in CKD patients . While uric acid may also be linked to cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with CKD, this review will focus only on uric acid as a potential therapeutic target to prevent kidney disease onset and progression. PMID:23058478

  18. Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L. Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Lanaspa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that “a calorie is just a calorie” and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease. PMID:24065788

  19. Precipitation diagrams and solubility of uric acid dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić-Ivančić, V.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Brown, W. E.; Gregory, T. M.

    1987-07-01

    The solubility of uric acid dihydrate (UA·2H 2O) and the precipitation of UA·2H 2O and anhydrous uric acid (UA) from solutions containing sodium hydroxide and hydrochloric acid have been investigated. For the solubility studies, crystals of pure UA·2H 2O were prepared and equilibrated with water and with solutions of HCl or NaOH for 60 min or 20 h, respectively. The equilibrium pH (pH = 2-6.25) and uric acid concentration were determined. For the precipitation experiments, commercial UA was dissolved in NaOH in a 1:1.1 molar ratio and UA·2H 2O and/or UA were precipitated with hydrochloric acid. The precipitates and/or supernatants were examined 24 h after sample preparation. The results are represented in the form of tables, precipitation diagrams and "chemical potential" diagrams. Solubility measurements with 60 min equilibration times yielded the solubility products of UA·2H 2O, K sp(298 K) = (0.926 ± 0.025) × 10 -9mol2dm-6 and K sp(310 K) = (2.25 ± 0.05) × 10 -9mol2dm-6 and the first dissociation constants of uric acid, K 1(298 K) = (2.45 ± 0.07) × 10 -6moldm-3 and K 1(310 K) = (3.63 ± 0.08) × 10 -6moldm-3. Precipitation diagrams show that under the given experimental conditions, at 298 K, UA·2H 2O is stable for 24 h while at 310 K this was true only for precipitates formed from solutions of high supersaturations. At lower supersaturations, mixtures of UA·2H 2O and UA formed. Consequently, while the Ksp value determined from precipitation data obtained at 298 K (K sp = 1.04 × 10 -9mol2dm-6) was consistent with the respective solubility product, the 310 K precipitation boundary yielded an ion activity product, AP, the value of which fulfills the conditions Ksp(UA) < AP < Ksp (UA·2H 2O). Similar ion activity products were obtained from solubility measurements in pure water at 20 h equilibration time.

  20. Perfluoroalkyl chemicals and elevated serum uric acid in US adults

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Anoop; Xiao, Jie; Ducatman, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, are man-made chemicals that have been detected in the blood of over 98% of the US population. Serum uric acid is a novel biomarker, even mild elevations of which has been implicated in the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. We examined the relationship of serum perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, and elevated uric acid levels in a representative sample of US adults. Methods: We examined 3883 participants from the 1999–2000 and 2003–2006 National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys, a representative, multiethnic population-based survey of noninstitutionalized US adults. Serum perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate were analyzed as quartiles. The main outcome was hyperuricemia. Results: We found that serum levels of perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, were positively associated with hyperuricemia. This association appeared to be independent of confounders such as age, gender, race-ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared with subjects in quartile 1 (referent), the multivariate odds ratio for hyperuricemia among subjects in quartile 4 was 1.97 (95% confidence interval 1.44–2.70, P < 0.0001) for perfluorooctanoic acid and 1.48% (95% confidence interval 0.99–2.22, P = 0.0433) for perfluorooctane sulfonate. This observed association persisted in subgroup analysis by gender and body mass index. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl chemicals are associated with hyperuricemia even at low perfluoroalkyl chemical exposure levels as seen in the US general population. PMID:22003309

  1. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player

    PubMed Central

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26703429

  2. Caecal decomposition of uric acid in captive and free ranging willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus lagopus).

    PubMed

    Mortensen, A; Tindall, A R

    1981-02-01

    Urine entering the caeca of birds contains significant amounts of uric acid. The discovery of great numbers of bacteria utilizing uric acid in the caeca has encouraged the discussion about nitrogen recycling in birds. In this work caecal decomposition of uric acid in wild and captive willow ptarmigan has been investigated using radioactively labelled uric acid injected directly into one of the caeca. The appearance of radioactive CO2 in the expired air was taken as an indication of uric acid breakdown. The decomposition occurred at a rate corresponding to a half-life of 26 min (11-36 min). The results are in accordance with the previously reported observations of huge numbers of uric acid utilizing bacteria in the caeca of a variety of birds, and also with the nitrogen recycling theory. However, no conclusion concerning the nitrogen recycling can be drawn. PMID:7282388

  3. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA.

  4. Two-stage magnetic orientation of uric acid crystals as gout initiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the magnetic behavior of uric acid crystals, which are responsible for gout. Under a sub-Tesla (T)-level magnetic field, rotational motion of the crystals, which were caused by diamagnetic torque, was observed. We used horizontal magnetic fields with a maximum magnitude of 500 mT generated by an electromagnet to observe the magnetic orientation of the uric acid microcrystals by a microscope. The uric acid crystals showed a perpendicular magnetic field orientation with a minimum threshold of 130 mT. We speculate that the distinct diamagnetic anisotropy in the uric acid crystals resulted in their rotational responses.

  5. Serum uric acid may not be involved in the development of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Lau, S; Tong, M; Wei, J; Shen, F; Zhao, J; Zhao, M

    2016-02-01

    Higher serum levels of uric acid are associated with preeclampsia and may signal an early change in preeclampsia. However there is less evidence suggesting there is a meaningful association between uric acid and the development of preeclampsia. A total of 877 women with preeclampsia at presentation and 580 normotensive pregnancies were retrospectively recruited from January 2009 to May 2014. In addition, 5556 pregnant women were also prospectively recruited from September 2012 to December 2013. Retrospective serum levels of uric acid were obtained from women with preeclampsia at the time of presentation (n=877), and serum levels of uric acid in the first, second and third trimester were prospectively collected in women who later developed preeclampsia (n=78), as well as those who did not (n=5478). The serum levels of uric acid were significantly increased in women with preeclampsia at presentation from retrospective samples and this increase correlated with the time of onset and the severity of preeclampsia. However, in prospective samples, serum levels of uric acid were not increased in the first and second trimesters in women who later developed preeclampsia compared with those who did not. The serum level of uric acid in the first and second trimesters in women who developed preeclampsia was not different. Our results demonstrate that the serum levels of uric acid were only increased after the presentation of clinical symptoms of preeclampsia. Therefore, it is likely that uric acid is not involved in the development of preeclampsia and cannot be an early prediction biomarker of this disease.

  6. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R.; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R.L.C.; Mercier, Patrick P.; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  7. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R L C; Mercier, Patrick P; Wang, Joseph

    2015-12-15

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications.

  8. Uric acid as one of the important factors in multifactorial disorders – facts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Pasalic, Daria; Marinkovic, Natalija; Feher-Turkovic, Lana

    2012-01-01

    With considering serum concentration of the uric acid in humans we are observing hyperuricemia and possible gout development. Many epidemiological studies have shown the relationship between the uric acid and different disorders such are obesity, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and coronary artery disease. Clinicians and investigators recognized serum uric acid concentration as very important diagnostic and prognostic factor of many multifactorial disorders. This review presented few clinical conditions which are not directly related to uric acid, but the concentrations of uric acid might have a great impact in observing, monitoring, prognosis and therapy of such disorders. Uric acid is recognized as a marker of oxidative stress. Production of the uric acid includes enzyme xanthine oxidase which is involved in producing of radical-oxigen species (ROS). As by-products ROS have a significant role in the increased vascular oxidative stress and might be involved in atherogenesis. Uric acid may inhibit endothelial function by inhibition of nitric oxide-function under conditions of oxidative stress. Down regulation of nitric oxide and induction of endothelial dysfunction might also be involved in pathogenesis of hypertension. The most important and well evidenced is possible predictive role of uric acid in predicting short-term outcome (mortality) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients and stroke. Nephrolithiasis of uric acid origin is significantly more common among patients with the metabolic syndrome and obesity. On contrary to this, uric acid also acts is an “antioxidant”, a free radical scavenger and a chelator of transitional metal ions which are converted to poorly reactive forms. PMID:22384520

  9. Extra-renal elimination of uric acid via intestinal efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Fujita, Takuya; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion accounts for two-thirds of total elimination of uric acid and the remainder is excreted in feces. However, the mechanism of extra-renal elimination is poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism and the extent of elimination of uric acid through liver and intestine using oxonate-treated rats and Caco-2 cells as a model of human intestinal epithelium. In oxonate-treated rats, significant amounts of externally administered and endogenous uric acid were recovered in the intestinal lumen, while biliary excretion was minimal. Accordingly, direct intestinal secretion was thought to be a substantial contributor to extra-renal elimination of uric acid. Since human efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2 accepts uric acid as a substrate and genetic polymorphism causing a decrease of BCRP activity is known to be associated with hyperuricemia and gout, the contribution of rBcrp to intestinal secretion was examined. rBcrp was confirmed to transport uric acid in a membrane vesicle study, and intestinal regional differences of expression of rBcrp mRNA were well correlated with uric acid secretory activity into the intestinal lumen. Bcrp1 knockout mice exhibited significantly decreased intestinal secretion and an increased plasma concentration of uric acid. Furthermore, a Bcrp inhibitor, elacridar, caused a decrease of intestinal secretion of uric acid. In Caco-2 cells, uric acid showed a polarized flux from the basolateral to apical side, and this flux was almost abolished in the presence of elacridar. These results demonstrate that BCRP contributes at least in part to the intestinal excretion of uric acid as extra-renal elimination pathway in humans and rats.

  10. Uric Acid: A Missing Link Between Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders and Future Cardiovascular Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Weissgerber, Tracey L.; Milic, Natasa M.; Turner, Stephen T.; Asad, Reem A.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Hanis, Craig L.; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether women who had a hypertensive pregnancy disorder (HPD) have elevated uric acid concentrations decades after pregnancy, when compared to women who had normotensive pregnancies. Patients and Methods The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study measured uric acid concentrations in Hispanic (30%), non-Hispanic white (28%), and non-Hispanic black (42%) women (60 ± 10 years of age). This cross-sectional study was conducted between July 1, 2000 and December 31, 2004. Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of diabetes, whereas non-Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of hypertension. This analysis compared uric acid concentrations in women with a history of normotensive (n=1,846) or hypertensive (n=408) pregnancies by logistic regression. Results Women who had a HPD had higher uric acid concentrations (Median: 5.7 vs. 5.3 mg/dL, P<.001) and were more likely to have uric acid concentrations above 5.5 mg/dl (54.4% vs. 42.4%, P=.001) than women who had normotensive pregnancies. These differences persisted after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, co-morbidities and other factors that affect uric acid concentrations. A family-based subgroup analysis comparing uric acid concentrations in women who had a HPD (n=308) and their parous sisters who had normotensive pregnancies (n=250) gave similar results (Median uric acid concentrations: 5.7 vs. 5.2 mg/dl, P=0.02; Proportion of women with uric acid >5.5 mg/dl: 54.0% vs. 40.3%, P<.001). Conclusion Decades after pregnancy, women who had a HPD have higher uric acid concentrations. This effect does not appear to be explained by a familial predisposition to elevated uric acid concentrations. PMID:26260220

  11. Characterization of the Complete Uric Acid Degradation Pathway in the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I. Russel; Yang, Liting; Sebetso, Gaseene; Allen, Rebecca; Doan, Thi H. N.; Blundell, Ross; Lui, Edmund Y. L.; Morrow, Carl A.; Fraser, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of purines to uric acid is generally conserved among organisms, however, the end product of uric acid degradation varies from species to species depending on the presence of active catabolic enzymes. In humans, most higher primates and birds, the urate oxidase gene is non-functional and hence uric acid is not further broken down. Uric acid in human blood plasma serves as an antioxidant and an immune enhancer; conversely, excessive amounts cause the common affliction gout. In contrast, uric acid is completely degraded to ammonia in most fungi. Currently, relatively little is known about uric acid catabolism in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans even though this yeast is commonly isolated from uric acid-rich pigeon guano. In addition, uric acid utilization enhances the production of the cryptococcal virulence factors capsule and urease, and may potentially modulate the host immune response during infection. Based on these important observations, we employed both Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis and bioinformatics to predict all the uric acid catabolic enzyme-encoding genes in the H99 genome. The candidate C. neoformans uric acid catabolic genes identified were named: URO1 (urate oxidase), URO2 (HIU hydrolase), URO3 (OHCU decarboxylase), DAL1 (allantoinase), DAL2,3,3 (allantoicase-ureidoglycolate hydrolase fusion protein), and URE1 (urease). All six ORFs were then deleted via homologous recombination; assaying of the deletion mutants' ability to assimilate uric acid and its pathway intermediates as the sole nitrogen source validated their enzymatic functions. While Uro1, Uro2, Uro3, Dal1 and Dal2,3,3 were demonstrated to be dispensable for virulence, the significance of using a modified animal model system of cryptococcosis for improved mimicking of human pathogenicity is discussed. PMID:23667704

  12. Xanthine oxidase-mediated denitrosation of N-nitroso-tryptophan by superoxide and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Viles, Kimberley; Mathai, Clinton; Jourd'heuil, Frances L; Jourd'heuil, David

    2013-01-15

    Recent studies indicate the formation of protein nitrosamines in vivo and tryptophan residues in proteins might represent important targets of nitrosative and oxidative stress. In the present work, we examined the mechanism by which xanthine oxidase (XO) denitrosates N-nitroso Trp residues and determined the applicability of the reactions involved to the detection of nitrosated Trp residues by tri-iodide-based chemiluminescence. We found that - in addition to superoxide - denitrosation of N-acetyl-nitroso Trp (NANT) by hypoxanthine and XO occurred via the intermediacy of uric acid. Zero-order dependence of NANT decay rate with uric acid was achieved with increasing concentrations of uric acid (k(0)∼6.0×10(-4)s(-1)) and generated nitric oxide. In contrast, S-nitrosoglutathione and nitrosyl-myoglobin were stable in the presence of uric acid. NANT decomposition by uric acid could be reproducibly measured using the tri-iodide-based chemiluminescence assay in the presence of excess nitrite upon pre-treatment with acidified sulfanilamide. N-nitrosated albumin was sensitive to uric acid-induced decomposition only after proteolytic degradation. In conclusion, XO decomposes nitrosated Trp through superoxide and uric acid pathways and in the case of uric acid generates free nitric oxide. Site-specificity of this reaction may possibly be used in combination with the tri-iodide-based chemiluminescence assay to discern between nitrosated Trp, S-nitrosothiols, and nitrosylated heme proteins. PMID:23099296

  13. The role of uric acid in the pathogenesis of hypertension in the young.

    PubMed

    Feig, Daniel I

    2012-06-01

    Uric acid has been suspected to be a risk factor for hypertension since the 1870s. Numerous epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between uric acid and both incident and prevalent hypertension in diverse populations. Studies in elderly patients have had more variable results, raising the possibility that uric acid may be more significant to hypertension in the young. Animal models support a two-phase mechanism for the development of hyperuricemic hypertension. Initially, uric acid induces vasoconstriction by activation of the renin-angiotensin system and reduction of circulating nitric oxide, which can be reversed by lowering uric acid. Over time, uric acid uptake into vascular smooth muscle cells causes cellular proliferation and secondary arteriolosclerosis that impairs pressure natriuresis, causing sodium-sensitive hypertension. Consistent with the animal model data, small clinical trials performed in adolescents with newly diagnosed essential hypertension demonstrate that at least in certain young patients, reduction of serum uric acid can mitigate blood pressure elevation. While more research is clearly necessary, the available data suggest that uric acid is likely causative in some cases of early-onset hypertension.

  14. Stored wheat insect infestation related to uric acid as determined by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wehling, R L; Wetzel, D L; Pedersen, J R

    1984-01-01

    Liquid chromatography is used to measure the uric acid content of wheat internally infested by various growth stages of granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius), rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae), and lesser grain borer (Ryzopertha dominica). Good correlation exists between numbers of insects and uric acid content of grain infested by a given stage of an internally infesting stored product insect, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.970 to 0.998. Uric acid content of infested grain increases as the insect life cycle progresses, with granary weevil producing the greatest quantities of uric acid followed in order by rice weevil and lesser grain borer. A detection limit for the analytical procedure of less than 1.0 ppm uric acid allows detection of infestation levels as low as one kernel per 100 g grain for late instar granary weevil larvae. This limit is sufficiently sensitive to detect levels of infestation that may be commonly encountered in commerce.

  15. Altered Serum Uric Acid Level in Lichen Planus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborti, Goutam; Biswas, Rabindranath; Chakraborti, Sandip; Sen, Pradyot Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a common disorder whose etiopathogenesis is not clear. Recently, it has been suggested that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in the underlying mechanism of LP. Objectives: The principal aim of this study was to evaluate serum uric acid (UA) levels as a measure of the antioxidant defense status in LP patients. Methods: Serum UA levels were determined in 58 LP patients and 61 controls. Results: Serum UA levels were significantly decreased in patients with respect to controls. Moreover, serum UA level was decreased according to increasing duration of disease. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that LP is associated with decrease of UA levels in serum. UA may be a potential, useful biomarker of antioxidant status in LP for elaboration of treatment strategy and monitoring. PMID:25484383

  16. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  17. Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles for selective recognition and assay of uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujahid, Adnan; Khan, Aimen Idrees; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Raza, Muhammad Hamid; Shah, Asma Tufail; uz Zaman, Waheed

    2015-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles are su ccessfully synthesized by sol-gel method for the selective recognition of uric acid. Atomic force microscopy is used to study the morphology of uric acid imprinted titania nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 100-150 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images of thick titania layer indicate the formation of fine network of titania nanoparticles with uniform distribution. Molecular imprinting of uric acid as well as its subsequent washing is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy measurements. Uric acid rebinding studies reveal the recognition capability of imprinted particles in the range of 0.01-0.095 mmol, which is applicable in monitoring normal to elevated levels of uric acid in human blood. The optical shift (signal) of imprinted particles is six times higher in comparison with non-imprinted particles for the same concentration of uric acid. Imprinted titania particles have shown substantially reduced binding affinity toward interfering and structurally related substances, e.g. ascorbic acid and guanine. These results suggest the possible application of titania nanoparticles in uric acid recognition and quantification in blood serum.

  18. Uric acid deposits and estivation in the invasive apple-snail, Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Abud, María A; Cueto, Juan A; Vega, Israel A; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2011-04-01

    The physiological ability to estivate is relevant for the maintenance of population size in the invasive Pomacea canaliculata. However, tissue reoxygenation during arousal from estivation poses the problem of acute oxidative stress. Uric acid is a potent antioxidant in several systems and it is stored in specialized tissues of P. canaliculata. Changes in tissue concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), uric acid and allantoin were measured during estivation and arousal in P. canaliculata. Both TBARS and uric acid increased two-fold during 45 days estivation, probably as a consequence of concomitant oxyradical production during uric acid synthesis by xanthine oxidase. However, after arousal was induced, uric acid and TBARS dropped to or near baseline levels within 20 min and remained low up to 24h after arousal induction, while the urate oxidation product allantoin continuously rose to a maximum at 24h after induction, indicating the participation of uric acid as an antioxidant during reoxygenation. Neither uric acid nor allantoin was detected in the excreta during this 24h period. Urate oxidase activity was also found in organs of active snails, but activity shut down during estivation and only a partial and sustained recovery was observed in the midgut gland.

  19. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Jacqueline E.; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and release of extracellular DNA from host cells. While uric acid alone was unable to trigger a chloride secretory response in intestinal monolayers, it did potentiate the secretory response to cyclic AMP agonists. Uric acid crystals were formed in vivo in the lumen of the gut in response to EPEC and STEC infections. While trying to visualize uric acid crystals formed during EPEC and STEC infections, we noticed that uric acid crystals became enmeshed in the neutrophilic extracellular traps (NETs) produced from host cells in response to bacteria in cultured cell systems and in the intestine in vivo. Uric acid levels in the gut lumen increased in response to exogenous DNA, and these increases were enhanced by the actions of DNase I. Interestingly, addition of DNase I reduced the numbers of EPEC bacteria recovered after a 20-h infection and protected against EPEC-induced histologic damage. PMID:26787720

  20. Preterm Birth is Associated with Higher Uric Acid Levels in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Lisa K.; Nixon, Patricia A.; Russell, Gregory B.; Snively, Beverly M.; O’Shea, T. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare serum uric acid levels in adolescents born prematurely and adolescents born at term and to assess the correlation between serum uric acid and blood pressure in those born prematurely. Study design In this observational cohort study, 124 adolescents born prematurely and 44 adolescents born at term were studied at 14 years of age. Multivariate analyses were used to describe the relationship of premature birth to serum uric acid, while adjusting for confounding variables. Pearson correlation was used to describe the relationship between uric acid and systolic blood pressure among those born prematurely. Results Adjusting for race, sex, maternal hypertension and fetal growth, preterm adolescents had higher serum uric acid levels than adolescents born at term [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval: 0.46 (0.10, 0.81) mg/dL, 27.4 (6, 48.2) μmol/L, p=0.012]. Among those born prematurely, uric acid was positively correlated with systolic blood pressure [Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.29 (0.12, 0.44; p= 0.0013). Conclusions Serum uric acid levels are higher in adolescents born prematurely than in those born at term and this difference could contribute to higher blood pressure among individuals born prematurely. PMID:25868431

  1. The association of vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and gout.

    PubMed

    Towiwat, Patapong; Li, Zhan-Guo

    2015-06-01

    About 2500 years ago, gout was observed by Hippocrates and many people suffered severe pain and deformity. Lifestyle and diet play a significant role in gout and serum uric acid levels. Epidemiological and research studies have supported this evidence. Many recommendations and guidelines from different parts of the world mention the impact of diet on gout. Recently, new research has shown associations between vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and the risk of gout. Our review summarizes recently published research regarding dietary impact on the risk of gout and serum uric acid levels.

  2. The association of vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and gout.

    PubMed

    Towiwat, Patapong; Li, Zhan-Guo

    2015-06-01

    About 2500 years ago, gout was observed by Hippocrates and many people suffered severe pain and deformity. Lifestyle and diet play a significant role in gout and serum uric acid levels. Epidemiological and research studies have supported this evidence. Many recommendations and guidelines from different parts of the world mention the impact of diet on gout. Recently, new research has shown associations between vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and the risk of gout. Our review summarizes recently published research regarding dietary impact on the risk of gout and serum uric acid levels. PMID:26082349

  3. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage. PMID:26656902

  4. Reduction of urinary uric acid excretion in patients with proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huiqing; Xiang, Mingfeng; Ye, Xinming; Xiong, Yuanzhen; Xie, Baogang; Shao, Jianghua

    2015-12-01

    Serum uric acid (UA) concentration is positively associated with proteinuria. However, the relationship between proteinuria and urinary metabolites of purine metabolism remains unknown. This study developed a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-based HPLC method with ultraviolet detection (UV) to quantify creatinine (Cr), UA, xanthine, and hypoxanthine in human urine simultaneously. The urinary concentrations of UA and Cr obtained by our method are consistent with those measured by an autoanalyzer. The HPLC-HILIC-UV method was validated as selective and robust with simple sample preparation for measuring UA, xanthine, hypoxanthine and Cr, which is suitable for large clinical studies. The UA/Cr ratios in random urine samples were 5.5 times lower in proteinuria patients (0.077±0.008) than in healthy individuals (0.424±0.037). Moreover, the UA/hypoxanthine ratio in proteinuria patients was approximately 10 times lower than that in healthy individuals. Our findings revealed a reduced urinary UA excretion, which is one of the factors leading to increased serum UA in proteinuria patients.

  5. Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as a potentiometric sensor for uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Widati, Alfa Akustia; Fitri, Sarita Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode (carbon paste-IZ) has been developed and applied to determine uric acid by potentiometry. The imprinted zeolite (IZ) was synthesized by the mole ratio of uric acid/Si of 0.0306. The modified electrode was manufactured by mass ratio of carbon, IZ and solid paraffin was 40:25:35. The modified electrode had shown the measurement range of 10-5 M to 10-2 M with Nernst factor of 28.6 mV/decade, the detection limit of 5.86 × 10-6 M and the accuracy of 95.3 - 105.0%. Response time of the electrode for uric acid 10-5 M - 10-2 M was 25 - 44 s. The developed electrode showed the high selectivity toward uric acid in the urea matrix. Life time of the carbon paste-IZ electrode was 10 weeks.

  6. [Advance in treatment of hyperuricemia by Chinese medicine based on uric acid transporterome].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Liu, Shu-min

    2015-11-01

    With the development of the quality of life, the morbidity of hyperuricemia is increasing year by year. At the same time, it appears that this disease attacks the young people currently. As the study of pathogenesis of hyperuricemia advanced, a series of uric acid transporters were found during this process. Meanwhile, the definition of transporterome was proposed. They were divided into three groups according to the functions: reabsorption proteins, excretion proteins and skeleton proteins. At moment, the drugs for hyperuricmia mainly include uric acid composition inhibitors and uric acid excretion promoters. Since the excretion of uric acid plays a leading role during the process of attack of hyperurecimia, it makes sense to explore Chinese medicines with clear mechanism targeting the transporterome. Therefore, this paper would focus on transporterome and summarize the mechanisms of Chinese medicines in treating hyperuricemia.

  7. Associations among Lead Dose Biomarkers, Uric Acid, and Renal Function in Korean Lead Workers

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Schwartz, Brian S.; Todd, Andrew C.; Ahn, Kyu-Dong; Lee, Sung-Soo; Wen, Jiayu; Parsons, Patrick J.; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2005-01-01

    Recent research suggests that both uric acid and lead may be nephrotoxic at lower levels than previously recognized. We analyzed data from 803 current and former lead workers to determine whether lead biomarkers were associated with uric acid and whether previously reported associations between lead dose and renal outcomes were altered after adjustment for uric acid. Outcomes included uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, measured and calculated creatinine clearances, and urinary N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) and retinol-binding protein. Mean (± SD) uric acid, tibia lead, and blood lead levels were 4.8 ± 1.2 mg/dL, 37.2 ± 40.4 μg/g bone mineral, and 32.0 ± 15.0 μg/dL, respectively. None of the lead measures (tibia, blood, and dimercaptosuccinic-acid–chelatable lead) was associated with uric acid, after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and alcohol use. However, when we examined effect modification by age on these relations, both blood and tibia lead were significantly associated (β= 0.0111, p < 0.01 and β= 0.0036, p = 0.04, respectively) in participants in the oldest age tertile. These associations decreased after adjustment for blood pressure and renal function, although blood lead remained significantly associated with uric acid (β= 0.0156, p = 0.01) when the population was restricted to the oldest tertile of workers with serum creatinine greater than the median (0.86 mg/dL). Next, in models of renal function in all workers, uric acid was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with all renal outcomes except NAG. Finally, in the oldest tertile of workers, associations between lead dose and NAG were unchanged, but fewer associations between the lead biomarkers and the clinical renal outcomes remained significant (p ≤0.05) after adjustment for uric acid. In conclusion, our data suggest that older workers comprise a susceptible population for increased uric acid due to lead. Uric acid may be one, but not the only, mechanism for

  8. A new approach for noninvasive transdermal determination of blood uric acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Yong, Kok-Khun; Yao, Yan-Dong; Shen, Huan-Ting; Hsieh, Shiu-Man; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Sun, Tai-Ping; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the most effective combination of physical forces from laser, electroporation, and reverse iontophoresis for noninvasive transdermal extraction of uric acid, and to develop a highly sensitive uric acid biosensor (UAB) for quantifying the uric acid extracted. It is believed that the combination of these physical forces has additional benefits for extraction of molecules other than uric acid from human skin. A diffusion cell with porcine skin was used to investigate the most effective combination of these physical forces. UABs coated with ZnO2 nanoparticles and constructed in an array configuration were developed in this study. The results showed that a combination of laser (0.7 W), electroporation (100 V/cm2), and reverse iontophoresis (0.5 mA/cm2) was the most effective and significantly enhanced transdermal extraction of uric acid. A custom-designed UAB coated with ZnO2 nanoparticles and constructed in a 1×3 array configuration (UAB-1×3-ZnO2) demonstrated enough sensitivity (9.4 μA/mM) for quantifying uric acid extracted by the combined physical forces of laser, electroporation, and RI. A good linear relationship (R2=0.894) was demonstrated to exist between the concentration of uric acid (0.2–0.8 mM) inside the diffusion cell and the current response of the UAB-1×3-ZnO2. In conclusion, a new approach to noninvasive transdermal extraction and quantification of uric acid has been established. PMID:25061289

  9. Uric acid promotes left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in mice fed a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; Bostick, Brian P; Ma, Lixin; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Hayden, Melvin R; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R

    2015-03-01

    The rising obesity rates parallel increased consumption of a Western diet, high in fat and fructose, which is associated with increased uric acid. Population-based data support that elevated serum uric acids are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. However, the mechanism by which excess uric acid promotes these maladaptive cardiac effects has not been explored. In assessing the role of Western diet-induced increases in uric acid, we hypothesized that reductions in uric acid would prevent Western diet-induced development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac stiffness, and impaired diastolic relaxation by reducing growth and profibrotic signaling pathways. Four-weeks-old C57BL6/J male mice were fed excess fat (46%) and fructose (17.5%) with or without allopurinol (125 mg/L), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, for 16 weeks. The Western diet-induced increases in serum uric acid along with increases in cardiac tissue xanthine oxidase activity temporally related to increases in body weight, fat mass, and insulin resistance without changes in blood pressure. The Western diet induced cardiomyocte hypertrophy, myocardial oxidative stress, interstitial fibrosis, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Further, the Western diet enhanced activation of the S6 kinase-1 growth pathway and the profibrotic transforming growth factor-β1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway and macrophage proinflammatory polarization. All results improved with allopurinol treatment, which lowered cardiac xanthine oxidase as well as serum uric acid levels. These findings support the notion that increased production of uric acid with intake of a Western diet promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, inflammation, and oxidative stress that lead to myocardial fibrosis and associated impaired diastolic relaxation.

  10. Uric Acid Spherulites in the Reflector Layer of Firefly Light Organ

    PubMed Central

    Goh, King-Siang; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Hua, Tzu-En; Kang, Mei-Hua; Li, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background In firefly light organs, reflector layer is a specialized tissue which is believed to play a key role for increasing the bioluminescence intensity through reflection. However, the nature of this unique tissue remains elusive. In this report, we investigated the role, fine structure and nature of the reflector layer in the light organ of adult Luciola cerata. Principal Findings Our results indicated that the reflector layer is capable of reflecting bioluminescence, and contains abundant uric acid. Electron microscopy (EM) demonstrated that the cytosol of the reflector layer's cells is filled with densely packed spherical granules, which should be the uric acid granules. These granules are highly regular in size (∼700 nm in diameter), and exhibit a radial internal structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that an intense single peak pattern with a d-spacing value of 0.320 nm is specifically detected in the light organ, and is highly similar to the diffraction peak pattern and d-spacing value of needle-formed crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate. However, the molar ratio evaluation of uric acid to various cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) in the light organ deduced that only a few uric acid molecules were in the form of urate salts. Thus, non-salt uric acid should be the source of the diffraction signal detected in the light organ. Conclusions In the light organ, the intense single peak diffraction signal might come from a unique needle-like uric acid form, which is different from other known structures of non-salt uric acid form. The finding of a radial structure in the granules of reflector layer implies that the spherical uric acid granules might be formed by the radial arrangement of needle-formed packing matter. PMID:23441187

  11. A new approach for noninvasive transdermal determination of blood uric acid levels.

    PubMed

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Yong, Kok-Khun; Yao, Yan-Dong; Shen, Huan-Ting; Hsieh, Shiu-Man; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Sun, Tai-Ping; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the most effective combination of physical forces from laser, electroporation, and reverse iontophoresis for noninvasive transdermal extraction of uric acid, and to develop a highly sensitive uric acid biosensor (UAB) for quantifying the uric acid extracted. It is believed that the combination of these physical forces has additional benefits for extraction of molecules other than uric acid from human skin. A diffusion cell with porcine skin was used to investigate the most effective combination of these physical forces. UABs coated with ZnO₂ nanoparticles and constructed in an array configuration were developed in this study. The results showed that a combination of laser (0.7 W), electroporation (100 V/cm(2)), and reverse iontophoresis (0.5 mA/cm(2)) was the most effective and significantly enhanced transdermal extraction of uric acid. A custom-designed UAB coated with ZnO₂ nanoparticles and constructed in a 1×3 array configuration (UAB-1×3-ZnO₂) demonstrated enough sensitivity (9.4 μA/mM) for quantifying uric acid extracted by the combined physical forces of laser, electroporation, and RI. A good linear relationship (R(2)=0.894) was demonstrated to exist between the concentration of uric acid (0.2-0.8 mM) inside the diffusion cell and the current response of the UAB-1×3-ZnO₂. In conclusion, a new approach to noninvasive transdermal extraction and quantification of uric acid has been established.

  12. Uric Acid Level and Erectile Dysfunction In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Yalcin; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Perez-Pozo, Santos E.; Covic, Adrian; McFann, Kim; Johnson, Richard J.; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complaint of elderly subjects, and is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Uric acid is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease, raising the hypothesis that an increased serum uric acid might predict erectile dysfunction in patients who are at risk for coronary artery disease. Aim To evaluate the association of serum uric acid levels with presence and severity of ED in patients presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 312 adult male patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent exercise stress test (EST) for workup of chest pain and completed a sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) survey form to determine the presence and severity of ED. Routine serum biochemistry (and uric acid levels) were measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for ED. Main Outcome Measures The short version of the international index of erectile function (IIEF-5) questionnaire diagnosed ED (cutoff score ≤21). Serum Uric acid levels were determined. Patients with chest pain of suspected cardiac origin underwent an exercise stress test. Results 149 of 312 (47.7%) male subjects had ED by survey criteria. Patients with ED were older and had more frequent CAD, hypertension, diabetes, and impaired renal function, and also had significantly higher levels of uric acid, fibrinogen, glucose, CRP, triglycerides compared with patients without ED. Uric acid levels were associated with ED by univariate analysis (OR = 1.36, p = 0.002); however, this association was not observed in multivariate analysis adjusted for eGFR. Conclusion Subjects presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin are more likely to have ED if they have elevated uric acid levels. PMID:24433559

  13. The Role of Uric Acid in Kidney Fibrosis: Experimental Evidences for the Causal Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Young; Lee, Dong Won; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a common finding in chronic kidney disease due to decreased uric acid clearance. The role of uric acid as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease has been largely debated, and recent studies suggested a role of uric acid in the causation and progression of kidney fibrosis, a final common pathway in chronic kidney disease. Uric acid and xanthine oxidase may contribute to kidney fibrosis mainly by inducing inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Besides, hyperuricemia induces alterations in renal hemodynamics via afferent arteriolopathy and contributes to the onset and progression of kidney fibrosis. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors may prevent kidney damage via lowering uric acid and/or inhibiting xanthine oxidase. However, there is still no sufficient evidence from interventional clinical researches supporting the causal relationship between uric acid and kidney fibrosis. The effect and role of xanthine oxidase inhibitors in preventing kidney fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression must be further explored by performing future large scale clinical trials. PMID:24877124

  14. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  15. Heat Stress Nephropathy From Exercise-Induced Uric Acid Crystalluria: A Perspective on Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Barregard, Lars; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Wesseling, Catharina; Harra, Tamara; Aragón, Aurora; Grases, Felix; Jarquin, Emmanuel R; González, Marvin A; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN), an epidemic in Central America, is a chronic kidney disease of unknown cause. In this article, we argue that MeN may be a uric acid disorder. Individuals at risk for developing the disease are primarily male workers exposed to heat stress and physical exertion that predisposes to recurrent water and volume depletion, often accompanied by urinary concentration and acidification. Uric acid is generated during heat stress, in part consequent to nucleotide release from muscles. We hypothesize that working in the sugarcane fields may result in cyclic uricosuria in which uric acid concentrations exceed solubility, leading to the formation of dihydrate urate crystals and local injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, we present pilot data documenting the common presence of urate crystals in the urine of sugarcane workers from El Salvador. High end-of-workday urinary uric acid concentrations were common in a pilot study, particularly if urine pH was corrected to 7. Hyperuricemia may induce glomerular hypertension, whereas the increased urinary uric acid may directly injure renal tubules. Thus, MeN may result from exercise and heat stress associated with dehydration-induced hyperuricemia and uricosuria. Increased hydration with water and salt, urinary alkalinization, reduction in sugary beverage intake, and inhibitors of uric acid synthesis should be tested for disease prevention.

  16. Uric acid levels predict future blood pressure and new onset hypertension in the general Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Takase, H; Kimura, G; Dohi, Y

    2014-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that uric acid levels predict new-onset hypertension in the Japanese general population. Normotensive individuals who visited our hospital for a yearly health checkup (n=8157, men=61.0% and age=50.7±12.2 years) were enrolled in the present study. After baseline evaluation, participants were followed up for a median of 48.3 months (range 4.9-101.0 months), with the endpoint being the development of hypertension, defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) > or = 140 mm Hg, diastolic BP > or = 90 mm Hg or the use of antihypertensive medication. The impact of uric acid and other cardiovascular risk factors at baseline on future BP and development of hypertension was assessed. During follow-up, 19.0% of women (n=605) and 29.5% of men (n=1469) participants developed hypertension. Incident hypertension was increased across the quartiles for baseline uric acid levels (P<0.0001), and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed a significant and independent association between the uric acid level and the onset of hypertension in both men and women participants (P<0.05). Furthermore, uric acid was independently and positively correlated with future BP (P<0.05). Thus, uric acid is an independent predictor of new-onset hypertension in both women and men.

  17. Serum Uric Acid and Hypertension in Adults: a Paradoxical Relationship in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R. Paul; Sirota, Jeffrey C.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared to non-diabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in non-diabetic adults. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6-years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years, n=393) and without (38±9 years n=685) T1D in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In non-diabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable-models adjusted for cardiovascular risk-factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable-adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable-adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  18. Serum uric acid and hypertension in adults: a paradoxical relationship in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Paul Wadwa, R; Sirota, Jeffrey C; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M

    2014-04-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared with nondiabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in nondiabetic adults. The authors assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6 years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years [n=393]) and without (38±9 years [n=685]) type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In nondiabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in nondiabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  19. Effect of canagliflozin on serum uric acid in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Davies, M J; Trujillo, A; Vijapurkar, U; Damaraju, C V; Meininger, G

    2015-04-01

    Hyperuricaemia is associated with an increased risk of gout, kidney stones and cardiovascular disease. The present post hoc analysis of pooled data from four placebo-controlled phase III studies assessed the effect of canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on serum uric acid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and in a subset of patients with hyperuricaemia [defined as baseline serum uric acid ≥475 µmol/l (∼8 mg/dl)]. At week 26, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg were associated with a ∼13% reduction in serum uric acid compared with placebo. In the subset of patients with hyperuricaemia, placebo-subtracted percent reductions in serum uric acid were similar to those in the overall cohort. More patients in the hyperuricaemic group achieved a serum uric acid level of <360 µmol/l (∼6 mg/dl) with both canagliflozin 100 mg (23.5%) and 300 mg (32.4%) compared with placebo (3.1%). Incidences of gout and kidney stones were low and similar across groups. In conclusion, canagliflozin treatment decreased serum uric acid in patients with T2DM, including those with baseline hyperuricaemia.

  20. Genotype-based changes in serum uric acid affect blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Afshin; Brown, Eric; Weir, Matthew R.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; McArdle, Patrick F.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of uric acid consistently correlate with hypertension, but the directionality of the association remains debated. To help define this relationship, we used a controlled setting within a homogeneous Amish community and the Mendelian randomization of a nonsynonymous coding single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs16890979 (Val253Ile), in the SLC2A9 gene. This gene expresses the GLUT9 transporter that also transports uric acid and is associated with lower serum uric acid levels. We studied the unconfounded association between genotype and blood pressure in 516 Amish adults, each placed for 6 days on standardized diets, first with high sodium, followed by low sodium, with an intervening washout period. Blood pressure, measured using 24-h ambulatory monitoring, during both diet periods was used as the primary outcome. All participants were free of diuretic or other antihypertensive medications and the relationships between GLUT9 genotype and both serum uric acid and blood pressure were assessed. Each copy of the GLUT9 minor Ile allele was found to confer a significant 0.44 mg/dl reduction in serum uric acid and was associated with a significant mean decrease in the systolic blood pressure of 2.2 and 1.5 mm Hg on the high- and low-sodium diet, respectively. Thus, a Mendelian randomization analysis using variants in the GLUT9 gene indicates that a decrease in serum uric acid has a causal effect of lowering blood pressure. PMID:22189840

  1. An amperometric uric acid biosensor based on chitosan-carbon nanotubes electrospun nanofiber on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Numnuam, Apon; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-06-01

    A novel amperometric uric acid biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing uricase on an electrospun nanocomposite of chitosan-carbon nanotubes nanofiber (Chi-CNTsNF) covering an electrodeposited layer of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on a gold electrode (uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au). The uric acid response was determined at an optimum applied potential of -0.35 V vs Ag/AgCl in a flow-injection system based on the change of the reduction current for dissolved oxygen during oxidation of uric acid by the immobilized uricase. The response was directly proportional to the uric acid concentration. Under the optimum conditions, the fabricated uric acid biosensor had a very wide linear range, 1.0-400 μmol L(-1), with a very low limit of detection of 1.0 μmol L(-1) (s/n = 3). The operational stability of the uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au biosensor (up to 205 injections) was excellent and the storage life was more than six weeks. A low Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.21 mmol L(-1) indicated that the immobilized uricase had high affinity for uric acid. The presence of potential common interfering substances, for example ascorbic acid, glucose, and lactic acid, had negligible effects on the performance of the biosensor. When used for analysis of uric acid in serum samples, the results agreed well with those obtained by use of the standard enzymatic colorimetric method (P > 0.05). PMID:24718436

  2. Uric acid: a modulator of prostate cells and activin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sangkop, Febbie; Singh, Geeta; Rodrigues, Ely; Gold, Elspeth; Bahn, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) or urate is associated with inflammation and gout. Recent evidence has linked urate to cancers, but little is known about urate effects in prostate cancer. Activins are inflammatory cytokines and negative growth regulators in the prostate. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is activin insensitivity; however, mechanisms underlying this are unclear. We propose that elevated SUA is associated with prostate cancer counteracting the growth inhibitory effects of activins. The expression of activins A and B, urate transporter GLUT9 and tissue urate levels were examined in human prostate disease. Intracellular and secreted urate and GLUT9 expression were assessed in human prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the effects of urate and probenecid, a known urate transport inhibitor, were determined in combination with activin A. Activin A expression was increased in low-grade prostate cancer, whereas activin B expression was reduced in high-grade prostate cancer. Intracellular urate levels decreased in all prostate pathologies, while GLUT9 expression decreased in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis and high-grade prostate cancer. Activin responsive LNCaP cells had higher intracellular and lower secreted urate levels than activin-insensitive PC3 cells. GLUT9 expression in prostate cancer cells was progressively lower than in prostate epithelial cells. Elevated extracellular urate was growth promoting in vitro, which was abolished by the gout medication probenecid, and it antagonized the growth inhibitory effects of activins. This study shows for the first time that a change in plasma or intracellular urate levels, possibly involving GLUT9 and a urate efflux transporter, has an impact on prostate cancer cell growth, and that lowering SUA levels in prostate cancer is likely to be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:26910779

  3. Nanostructure Modified Microelectrode for Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine with Ascorbic Acid and Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong-Jun; Choi, Jin-Ha; Pyo, Su-Hyun; Yun, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Ji-Young; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Oh, Byung-Keun

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one kind of neurotransmitter in central nervous system which is indicator of neural disease. For this reason, determination of DA concentration in central nervous system is very important for early diagnosis of neural disease. In this study, we designed micro electrode array and fabricated by MEMS technology. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-D conducting nanostructure on electrode surface for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity due to increased surface area. Compared with macro and normal micro electrode, the 3-D nanostructure modified micro electrode shows better electrical performance. These surface modified pin type electrode was applied to detect low concentration of DA and successfully detect various concentration of DA from 100 μM to 1 μM with linear relationship in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid. From these results, our newly designed electrode shows possibility to be applied as brain biosensor for neural disease diagnosis such as Parkinson's diseases. PMID:27455760

  4. The Effects of Fructose Intake on Serum Uric Acid Vary among Controlled Dietary Trials1234

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D. David; Sievenpiper, John L.; de Souza, Russell J.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Ha, Vanessa; Cozma, Adrian I.; Mirrahimi, Arash; Yu, Matthew E.; Carleton, Amanda J.; Di Buono, Marco; Jenkins, Alexandra L.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Wolever, Thomas M. S.; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W. C.; Jenkins, David J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is linked to gout and features of metabolic syndrome. There is concern that dietary fructose may increase uric acid concentrations. To assess the effects of fructose on serum uric acid concentrations in people with and without diabetes, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials (through August 19, 2011). Analyses included all controlled feeding trials ≥7 d investigating the effect of fructose feeding on uric acid under isocaloric conditions, where fructose was isocalorically exchanged with other carbohydrate, or hypercaloric conditions, and where a control diet was supplemented with excess energy from fructose. Data were aggregated by the generic inverse variance method using random effects models and expressed as mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Q statistic and quantified by I2. A total of 21 trials in 425 participants met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric exchange of fructose for other carbohydrate did not affect serum uric acid in diabetic and nondiabetic participants [MD = 0.56 μmol/L (95% CI: −6.62, 7.74)], with no evidence of inter-study heterogeneity. Hypercaloric supplementation of control diets with fructose (+35% excess energy) at extreme doses (213–219 g/d) significantly increased serum uric acid compared with the control diets alone in nondiabetic participants [MD = 31.0 mmol/L (95% CI: 15.4, 46.5)] with no evidence of heterogeneity. Confounding from excess energy cannot be ruled out in the hypercaloric trials. These analyses do not support a uric acid-increasing effect of isocaloric fructose intake in nondiabetic and diabetic participants. Hypercaloric fructose intake may, however, increase uric acid concentrations. The effect of the interaction of energy and fructose remains unclear. Larger, well-designed trials of fructose feeding at “real world” doses are needed. PMID:22457397

  5. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Junior, Eduardo R.; Arruda, Talita A.; Lopes, Jose C.; Fontes, Cor J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with

  6. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48 h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (μmol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90 days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380 μmol/L) or lower UA levels (≤250 μmol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380 μmol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380 μmol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334 μmol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337 μmol/L were seven times more

  7. Lower serum uric acid level predicts mortality in dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eunjin; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Shin, Nara; Kim, Sun Moon; Yang, Seung Hee; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Hajeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the impact of serum uric acid (SUA) on mortality in patients with chronic dialysis. A total of 4132 adult patients on dialysis were enrolled prospectively between August 2008 and September 2014. Among them, we included 1738 patients who maintained dialysis for at least 3 months and had available SUA in the database. We categorized the time averaged-SUA (TA-SUA) into 5 groups: <5.5, 5.5–6.4, 6.5–7.4, 7.5–8.4, and ≥8.5 mg/dL. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality according to SUA group. The mean TA-SUA level was slightly higher in men than in women. Patients with lower TA-SUA level tended to have lower body mass index (BMI), phosphorus, serum albumin level, higher proportion of diabetes mellitus (DM), and higher proportion of malnourishment on the subjective global assessment (SGA). During a median follow-up of 43.9 months, 206 patients died. Patients with the highest SUA had a similar risk to the middle 3 TA-SUA groups, but the lowest TA-SUA group had a significantly elevated HR for mortality. The lowest TA-SUA group was significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.720; 95% confidence interval, 1.007–2.937; P = 0.047) even after adjusting for demographic, comorbid, nutritional covariables, and medication use that could affect SUA levels. This association was prominent in patients with well nourishment on the SGA, a preserved serum albumin level, a higher BMI, and concomitant DM although these parameters had no significant interaction in the TA-SUA-mortality relationship except DM. In conclusion, a lower TA-SUA level <5.5 mg/dL predicted all-cause mortality in patients with chronic dialysis. PMID:27310949

  8. Relation between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in subjects with cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hellen Abreu; Carraro, Júlia Cristina Cardoso; Bressan, Josefina; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify possible relations between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and its components in a population with cardiometabolic risk. Methods This cross-sectional study included 80 subjects (46 women), with mean age of 48±16 years, seen at the Cardiovascular Health Program. Results The prevalence of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome was 6.3% and 47.1%, respectively. Uric acid level was significantly higher in individuals with metabolic syndrome (5.1±1.6mg/dL), as compared to those with no syndrome or with pre-syndrome (3.9±1.2 and 4.1±1.3mg/dL, respectively; p<0.05). The uric acid levels were significantly higher in men presenting abdominal obesity, and among women with abdominal obesity, lower HDL-c levels and higher blood pressure (p<0.05). Conclusion Uric acid concentrations were positively related to the occurrence of metabolic syndrome and its components, and there were differences between genders. Our results indicate serum uric acid as a potential biomarker for patients with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:26018145

  9. A Comparative Study of Serum Uric Acid levels and Lipid Ratios in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sathiya, R.; Velu, V. Kuzhandai; Niranjan, G.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Amirtha, Ganesh B.; Ramesh, R.; Babu, M. Sathish; Saha, Subiman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) appears to be common in the Indian population of different geographical origins, religions and languages. Measurement of lipid fractions and ratios are widely recommended for risk assessment. A few studies have shown that serum uric acid plays a role in the development of cardiovascular morbidity. Very few reports are cited linking serum uric acid with the lipid fraction in CAD Objectives: To find the significance of non-HDL cholesterol, LDL-c/HDL-c ratio, TC/HDL ratio and serum uric acid level in CAD patients Subjects and Methodology: In this study, we included fifty CAD patients as subjects and an equal number of controls. Both subjects and controls were assessed for anthropometric, physiological and biochemical parameters Results: The present study showed significant increased levels of total cholesterol (p=0.002), TAGs (p<0.001), HDL (p=0.005), LDL (p<0.006) and non-HDL cholesterol (p<0.001). LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (p<0.001) and TC/HDL ratio (p<0.001) in CAD patients (subjects) were also significant when compared to controls. Uric acid level in CAD patients was increased (p<0.001). Conclusion: Serum Uric Acid, TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios could be regarded as objective markers, in association with existing atherogenic dyslipidemia in patients with CAD. PMID:25018681

  10. The role of uric acid in the insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Almeida, Guilherme Gomide; Martins, Raissa Isabelle Leão; Cunha, Mariana Botrel; Belo, Vanessa Almeida; dos Santos, José Eduardo Tanus; Mourão-Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Lanna, Carla Márcia Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 245 children and adolescents (134 obese and 111 controls), aged 8-18 years. The anthropometric variables (weight, height and waist circumference), blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected. The clinical characteristics of the groups were analyzed by t-test or chi-square test. To evaluate the association between uric acid levels and insulin resistance the Pearson's test and logistic regression were applied. Results: The prevalence of insulin resistance was 26.9%. The anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biochemical variables were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001), except for the high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. There was a positive and significant correlation between anthropometric variables and uric acid with HOMA-IR in the obese and in the control groups, which was higher in the obese group and in the total sample. The logistic regression model that included age, gender and obesity, showed an odds ratio of uric acid as a variable associated with insulin resistance of 1.91 (95%CI 1.40-2.62; p<−0.001). Conclusions: The increase in serum uric acid showed a positive statistical correlation with insulin resistance and it is associated with and increased risk of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. PMID:26300523

  11. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Zeenat A.; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L.; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  12. Inverse Association Between Serum Uric Acid Levels and Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Du, Na; Xu, Donghua; Hou, Xu; Song, Xuejia; Liu, Cancan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yangang; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The association between Alzheimer's disease and uric acid levels had gained great interest in recent years, but there was still lack of definite evidence. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Relevant studies published before October 26, 2014, were searched in PubMed, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases. Study-specific data were combined using random-effects or fixed-effects models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twenty-four studies (21 case-control and 3 cohort studies) were finally included into the meta-analysis. Those 21 case-control studies included a total of 1128 cases of Alzheimer's disease and 2498 controls without Alzheimer's disease. Those 3 cohort studies included a total of 7327 participants. Meta-analysis showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease had lower levels of uric acid than healthy controls (weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.77 mg/dl, 95% CI -2.28 to -0.36, P = 0.0002). High serum uric acid levels were significantly associated with decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (risk ratio (RR) = 0.66, 95% CI 0.52-0.85, P = 0.001). There was low risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. There is an inverse association between serum uric acid levels and Alzheimer's disease. High serum uric acid level is a protective factor of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Low Serum Uric Acid Level Is a Risk Factor for Death in Incident Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S.M. Kurt; Lee, Andrew L.; Winters, Thomas J.; Tam, Emily; Jaleel, Mohammed; Stenvinkel, Peter; Johnson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Background A reverse epidemiology of classic cardiovascular risk factors was observed in hemodialysis patients with a high comorbidity burden. We hypothesized that uric acid, a novel cardiovascular risk factor, also has an altered association with survival in these patients. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 168 consecutive outpatient hemodialysis patients over a 6-year period. Serum uric acid, albumin levels and relevant laboratory information were recorded monthly. The disease severity was assessed using Comorbidity Index (CoI) scores. Patients were stratified into 3 groups according to their serum uric acid concentrations: group I was the lowest quintile, group II was the middle 3 quintiles and group III was the highest quintile. The risks of death were calculated utilizing a Cox regression model. Results Using group II as a reference group, the hazard ratio of group I was 2.23 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–4.11, p = 0.01] and group III was 0.89 (95% CI 0.47–1.71, p = 0.74). The serum uric acid levels correlated inversely with CoI scores (r = −0.31, 95% CI −0.44 to −0.17, p < 0.0001) and positively with serum albumin levels (r = 0.35, 95% CI 0.21–0.48, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Low serum uric acid is a mortality risk factor in incident hemodialysis patients with a high comorbidity burden and hypoalbuminemia. PMID:18689987

  14. EDTA assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, P; Sekar, C

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been synthesized using EDTA as organic modifier by a simple microwave irradiation method and its application for the selective determination of uric acid (UA) has been demonstrated. Electrochemical behavior of uric acid at HA nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode (E-HA/GCE) has been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and amperometry. The E-HA modified electrode exhibits efficient electrochemical activity towards uric acid sensing without requiring enzyme or electron mediator. Amperometry studies revealed that the fabricated electrode has excellent sensitivity for uric acid with the lowest detection limit of 142 nM over a wide concentration range from 1 × 10(-7) to 3 × 10(-5)M. Moreover, the studied E-HA modified GC electrode exhibits a good reproducibility and long-term stability and an admirable selectivity towards the determination of UA even in the presence of potential interferents. The analytical performance of this sensor was evaluated for the detection of uric acid in human urine and blood serum samples.

  15. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  16. Genetic background of uric acid metabolism in a patient with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Petru, Lenka; Pavelcova, Katerina; Sebesta, Ivan; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2016-09-01

    Hyperuricemia depends on the balance of endogenous production and renal excretion of uric acid. Transporters for urate are located in the proximal tubule where uric acid is secreted and extensively reabsorbed: secretion is principally ensured by the highly variable ABCG2 gene. Enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) plays a central role in purine metabolism and its deficiency is an X-linked inherited metabolic disorder associated with clinical manifestations of purine overproduction. Here we report the case of a middle-aged man with severe chronic tophaceous gout with a poor response to allopurinol and requiring repeated surgical intervention. We identified the causal mutations in the HPRT1 gene, variant c.481G>T (p.A161S), and in the crucial urate transporter ABCG2, a heterozygous variant c.421C>A (p.Q141K). This case shows the value of an analysis of the genetic background of serum uric acid. PMID:27288985

  17. Stable isotope ratios and uric acid preservation in termites belonging to three feeding habits in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tayasu, I; Hyodo, F; Takematsu, Y; Sugimoto, A; Inoue, T; Kirtibutr, N; Abe, T

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios and uric acid concentrations in termites sampled from a dry evergreen forest in Thailand, were determined across three kinds of feeding habits. Feeding habits of Microcerotermes crassus, which is an abundant wood-feeder, and Dicuspiditermes makhamensis, a common soil-feeding termite, were confirmed by isotopic signatures. Lichen feeding termites (Hospitalitermes birmanicus, H. bicolor and H. ataramensis) were characterized by low delta15N values, suggesting that they assimilated nitrogen deposited from the atmosphere. There was also a significant difference in uric acid concentrations between termites representing different feeding habits. No significant relationships were found between uric acid concentrations and delta15N or delta13C in Hospitalitermes. However, delta15N values were correlated with C/N ratios in H. birmanicus, except in one colony of H. ataramensis. delta13C values in both species were negatively correlated with C/N ratios.

  18. The effect of erythropoietin on serum uric acid levels during renal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsompos, Constantinos; Panoulis, Constantinos; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Zografos, George; Papalois, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this experimental study was to assess the effect of erythropoietin on a rat model, particularly under a renal ischemia reperfusion protocol. The beneficial or lack of effects of that molecule on the excreted renal product of serum uric acid were studied biochemically. Material and methods: Forty rats were used with a mean weight of 247.7 gr. Serum uric acid levels were measured measured at 60 min after reperfusion (Groups A and C) and at 120 min after reperfusion (groups B and D). Results: 1) Erythropoietin administration non-significantly decreased the serum uric acid levels non-significantly by 0.02 mg/dL [−0.2415423 mg/dL-0.2015423 mg/dL] (p=0.8560), in accordance with the paired t-test (p=0.8438). Reperfusion time non-significantly increased the serum uric acid levels non-significantly by 0.17 mg/dL [−0.0444933 mg/dL-0.3844933 mg/dL] (p=0.1169), in accordance with the paired t-test (p=0.1648). 3) The interaction of erythropoietin administration and reperfusion time non-significantly increased the serum uric acid levels non-significantly by 0.1 mg/dL [−0.0295564 mg/dL-0.2295564 mg/dL] (p=0.1264). Conclusion: Erythropoietin administration, reperfusion time and their interaction have no significant short-term alterations on serum uric acid levels. Conclusions cannot be extracted by non-significant p-values within 2 hours. Obviously, longer study times may permit safer results. PMID:26328161

  19. Leptin and uric acid as predictors of metabolic syndrome in jordanian adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mousa N.; Haddad, Fares H.; Azzeh, Firas S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a set of interrelated metabolic risk factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Studies regarding the specificity and sensitivity of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of leptin and uric acid in terms of their specificity and sensitivity as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. SUBJECTS/METHODS In this cross sectional study, 630 adult subjects (308 men and 322 women) were recruited from the King Hussein Medical Center (Amman, Jordan). The diagnosis of MetS was made according to the 2005 International Diabetes Federation criteria. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the efficacy of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. RESULTS Study results showed that for identification of subjects with MetS risk, area under the curve (AUC) for leptin was 0.721 and 0.683 in men and women, respectively. Serum uric acid levels in men showed no significant association with any MetS risk factors and no significant AUC, while uric acid AUC was 0.706 in women. CONCLUSION Serum leptin levels can be useful biomarkers for evaluation of the risk of MetS independent of baseline obesity in both men and women. On the other hand, serum uric acid levels predicted the risk of MetS only in women. PMID:27478548

  20. Uric acid levels in subjects with bipolar disorder: A comparative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Francesco; Crocamo, Cristina; Mazza, Mario Gennaro; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has hypothesised increased uric acid levels, possibly because of an amplified purinergic metabolism and a reduced adenosine activity, in subjects with bipolar disorder. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at estimating if individuals with bipolar disorder had uric acid levels higher than both healthy controls and subjects with major depression (trait marker hypothesis). It also tested if uric acid levels could differ in different phases of bipolar disorder (state marker hypothesis). Meta-analyses were carried out generating pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs), using random-effects models. Heterogeneity between studies was estimated using the I(2) index. Relevant sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were conducted. We searched main Electronic Databases, identifying twelve studies that met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed increased uric acid levels in individuals with bipolar disorder as compared with both healthy controls (SMD = 0.65, p < 0.001, I(2) = 82.9%) and those with major depression (SMD = 0.46, p < 0.001; I(2) = 68.7%). However, meta-regression analyses confirmed this association only as compared with healthy controls. Finally, though uric acid levels were higher in manic/mixed phases as compared with depressive ones (SMD = 0.34; p = 0.04, I(2) = 58.8%), a sensitivity analysis did not confirm the association. In sum, our meta-analysis shows that subjects with bipolar disorder have uric acid levels higher than healthy controls. The potential role of factors that might clarify the nature of this association deserves additional research.

  1. Serum uric acid levels and long-term outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Mochizuki, Toshio; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but data regarding the relationship between serum uric acid levels and the long-term outcomes of CKD patients have been limited. The present study evaluated the associations between baseline serum uric acid levels with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The subjects of this study were 551 stage 2-4 CKD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid tertiles and all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, 50 % reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and development of ESRD, initially without adjustment, and then after adjusting for several groups of covariates. The mean age of the study subjects was 58.5 years, 59.3 % were men, and 10.0 % had diabetes. The mean eGFR was 42.02 ± 18.52 ml/min/1.73 m(2). In all subjects, the mean serum uric acid level was 6.57 ± 1.35 mg/dl, and 52.2 % of study subjects were on hypouricemic therapy (allopurinol; 48.3 %) at baseline. Thirty-one patients (6.1 %) died during a follow-up period of approximately 6 years. There was no significant association between serum uric acid level and all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR in the unadjusted Cox models. In the adjusted models, hyperuricemia was found to be associated with all-cause mortality and CVD mortality after adjustment with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol, but not associated with development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR. The results of this study showed that hyperuricemia but not serum uric acid levels were associated with all-cause mortality, CVD mortality after adjustments with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol in stage 2-4 CKD patients.

  2. Is hyperuricemia a risk factor for arteriosclerosis? Uric acid and arteriosclerosis in apolipoprotein e-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wakuda, Hirokazu; Uchida, Shinya; Ikeda, Masahiko; Tabuchi, Masaki; Akahoshi, Yasumitsu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    Although hyperlipidemia, high blood pressure, and diabetes increase the risk of arteriosclerosis, it is not clear whether hyperuricemia increases the risk of arteriosclerosis or not. We examined the effects of uric acid and curative drugs for hyperuricemia on atherosclerosis-susceptible C57BL/6J apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. Male apoE(-/-) mice (age: 6 weeks) were fed a normal diet (normal diet group) or a uric acid-enriched diet. Mice fed the uric acid-enriched diet were divided into three groups and administered a drinking vehicle (high uric acid diet group), allopurinol (20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), or benzbromarone (20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 10 weeks. Serum uric acid concentrations were higher in the high uric acid diet group than in the normal diet group, and concentrations in the allopurinol and benzbromarone groups were lower than in the high uric acid diet group. Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lower in the allopurinol group than in the high uric acid diet group. Oxidative stress was lower in the benzbromarone group than in the high uric acid diet group. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were smaller in the allopurinol and benzbromarone groups than in the high uric acid diet group. Thus, hyperuricemia may not be an independent risk factor for arteriosclerosis; however, the administration of allopurinol and benzbromarone prevented the development of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice fed a uric acid-enriched diet. The anti-atherosclerotic effect was in part due to lower total cholesterol and oxidative stress in the serum. Other possible mechanisms underlying this effect should be investigated.

  3. Tuna extract reduces serum uric acid in gout-free subjects with insignificantly high serum uric acid: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubomura, Daiki; Yamada, Masanori; Masui, Ayano

    2016-01-01

    Long-term reduction of serum urate levels is vital in the treatment of gout. However, it is difficult to convince gout-free individuals of the necessity of treatment as few appropriate over-the-counter remedies and dietary supplements are available. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the antihyperuricemic efficacy and safety of a tuna extract containing the imidazole compounds to evaluate its potential as a functional food ingredient. A randomized, 4-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted. A total of 48 male gout-free subjects with insignificantly high serum uric acid were randomly assigned to low- and high-dose tuna extract groups or a placebo group. The efficacy of the extract was assessed by measuring serum uric acid levels. Furthermore, a safety assessment was performed by physical parameters, hematology, blood biochemistry and urinalysis. The results indicated that the uric acid level was decreased at week 4 during the intervention in the tuna extract groups (low and high dose, −0.23 and −0.34 mg/dl, respectively) compared to the placebo group (−0.07 mg/dl). At week 4 after the intervention, a significant reduction in uric acid levels (−0.41 mg/dl; P<0.05) was observed in the high-dose tuna extract group compared with the placebo group (+0.11 mg/dl). No dose-related adverse events were observed during and following the intervention. Therefore, the present results suggest that oral administration of tuna extract containing the imidazole compounds has hypouricemic activity with no undesirable side effects. PMID:27446553

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of uric acid and some redeterminations of its solubility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Plunkett, M.A.; Richards, F.A.

    1954-01-01

    The present study was initiated in order to develop a rapid and accurate method for the determination of uric acid in fresh, brackish, and sea water. It was found that the spectrophotometric determination of uric acid based upon its reaction with arsenophosphotungstic acid reagent in the presence of cyanide ion meets this objective. The absorbancy of the blue complex was measured at 890 m??. Slight variations from Beer's law were generally found. The results show the effects of pH, reaction time, concentration of reagents, and temperature upon color development and precipitate formation. Disodium dihydrogen ethylenediamine tetraacetate (Versene) was used as a buffering and complexirig agent. The results are significant in that they give the absorption spectrum of the blue complex and the effects of variables upon its absorbancy. Studies were made with the method to determine the stability of reagents and standard solutions and to determine the rate of bacterial decomposition of uric acid. Measurements of the solubility of uric acid are reported.

  5. Uric acid accumulation in an Arabidopsis urate oxidase mutant impairs seedling establishment by blocking peroxisome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Oliver K; Scharnberg, Jana; Escobar, Nieves Medina; Wanner, Gerhard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2014-07-01

    Purine nucleotides can be fully catabolized by plants to recycle nutrients. We have isolated a urate oxidase (uox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that accumulates uric acid in all tissues, especially in the developing embryo. The mutant displays a reduced germination rate and is unable to establish autotrophic growth due to severe inhibition of cotyledon development and nutrient mobilization from the lipid reserves in the cotyledons. The uox mutant phenotype is suppressed in a xanthine dehydrogenase (xdh) uox double mutant, demonstrating that the underlying cause is not the defective purine base catabolism, or the lack of UOX per se, but the elevated uric acid concentration in the embryo. Remarkably, xanthine accumulates to similar levels in the xdh mutant without toxicity. This is paralleled in humans, where hyperuricemia is associated with many diseases whereas xanthinuria is asymptomatic. Searching for the molecular cause of uric acid toxicity, we discovered a local defect of peroxisomes (glyoxysomes) mostly confined to the cotyledons of the mature embryos, which resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids in dry seeds. The peroxisomal defect explains the developmental phenotypes of the uox mutant, drawing a novel link between uric acid and peroxisome function, which may be relevant beyond plants. PMID:25052714

  6. Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: The Viva La Familia Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it...

  7. Uric acid attenuates nitric oxide production by decreasing the interaction between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and calmodulin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: a mechanism for uric acid-induced cardiovascular disease development.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yoon Mi; Hwang, Soojin; Cho, Du-Hyong; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-08-01

    The elevated level of uric acid in the body is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, which is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood, although dysregulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production is likely to be involved. Using human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), we explored the molecular mechanism of uric acid on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. Although high dose of uric acid (12mg/dl for 24h treatment) significantly decreased eNOS activity and NO production, it did not alter eNOS expression and phosphorylations at eNOS-Ser(1177), eNOS-Thr(495) and eNOS-Ser(114). Under this condition, we also found no alterations in the dimerization and acetylation of eNOS, compared with the control. Furthermore, uric acid did not change the activity of arginase II, an enzyme degrading l-arginine, a substrate of eNOS, and intracellular level of calcium, a cofactor for eNOS activation. We also found that uric acid did not alter xanthine oxidase activity, suggesting no involvement of xanthine oxidase-derived O2(-) production in the observed inhibitory effects. In vitro and in cell coimmunoprecipitation studies, however, revealed that uric acid significantly decreased the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM), an eNOS activator, although it did not change the intracellular CaM level. Like in HUVEC, uric acid also decreased eNOS-CaM interaction in bovine aortic EC. Finally, uric acid attenuated ionomycin-induced increase in the interaction between eNOS and CaM. This study suggests firstly that uric acid decreased eNOS activity and NO production through reducing the binding between eNOS and CaM in EC. Our result may provide molecular mechanism by which uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction.

  8. Preliminary Use of Uric Acid as a Biomarker for Wading Birds on Everglades Tree Islands, Florida, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, Anne L.; Orem, William H.; Newman, Susan; Gawlik, Dale E.; Lerch, Harry E.; Corum, Margo D.; Van Winkle, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of organic biomarkers and concentrations of phosphorus in soil cores can potentially be used as proxies for historic population densities of wading birds on tree islands in the Florida Everglades. This report focuses on establishing a link between the organic biomarker uric acid found in wading bird guano and the high phosphorus concentrations in tree island soils in the Florida Everglades. Uric acid was determined in soil core sections, in surface samples, and in bird guano by using a method of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) developed for this purpose. Preliminary results show an overall correlation between uric acid and total phosphorus in three soil cores, with a general trend of decreasing concentrations of both uric acid and phosphorus with depth. However, we have also found no uric acid in a soil core having high concentrations of phosphorus. We believe that this result may be explained by different geochemical circumstances at that site.

  9. Determination of uric acid level by polyaniline and poly (allylamine): Based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wathoni, Nasrul; Hasanah, Aliya Nur; Gozali, Dolih; Wahyuni, Yeni; Fauziah, Lia Layusa

    2014-01-01

    The uric acid biosensor has been much developed by immobilizing uricase enzyme into the membrane of conductive polymer and the membrane of polyelectrolyte such as polyaniline (PANI) and poly (allylamine) (PAA) respectively. The purpose of this research was to create a new amperometric uric acid biosensor by immobilization of uricase in combination between PANI and PAA membranes. The working electrode was Pt plate (0.5 mm). The auxiliary and the reference electrode were Pt wire 0.4 mm and Ag/AgCl respectively. Uricase, uric acid, PAA, pyrrole and glutaraldehyde were supplied from Sigma. All other chemical was obtained from Merck. The biosensor was created by immobilizing of uricase by a glutaraldehyde crosslinking procedure on PANI composite film on the surface of a platinum electrode while the polyelectrolyte layer of PAA were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly on the electrode, functioning as H2O2-selective film. Standard of deviation, coefficient of variation (CV) and coefficient of correlation (r) analysis were used in this study. The biosensor had a good linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 and it could be used up to 27 times with the CV value of 3.97%. The presence of other compounds such as glucose and ascorbic acid gave 1.3 ± 1.13% and 3.27 ± 2.29% respectively on the interference effect toward the current response of uric acid biosensor. The polymer combination of PANI and PAA can be used as a selective matrix of uric acid biosensor. PMID:24696812

  10. Determination of uric acid level by polyaniline and poly (allylamine): Based biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Wathoni, Nasrul; Hasanah, Aliya Nur; Gozali, Dolih; Wahyuni, Yeni; Fauziah, Lia Layusa

    2014-01-01

    The uric acid biosensor has been much developed by immobilizing uricase enzyme into the membrane of conductive polymer and the membrane of polyelectrolyte such as polyaniline (PANI) and poly (allylamine) (PAA) respectively. The purpose of this research was to create a new amperometric uric acid biosensor by immobilization of uricase in combination between PANI and PAA membranes. The working electrode was Pt plate (0.5 mm). The auxiliary and the reference electrode were Pt wire 0.4 mm and Ag/AgCl respectively. Uricase, uric acid, PAA, pyrrole and glutaraldehyde were supplied from Sigma. All other chemical was obtained from Merck. The biosensor was created by immobilizing of uricase by a glutaraldehyde crosslinking procedure on PANI composite film on the surface of a platinum electrode while the polyelectrolyte layer of PAA were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly on the electrode, functioning as H2O2-selective film. Standard of deviation, coefficient of variation (CV) and coefficient of correlation (r) analysis were used in this study. The biosensor had a good linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 and it could be used up to 27 times with the CV value of 3.97%. The presence of other compounds such as glucose and ascorbic acid gave 1.3 ± 1.13% and 3.27 ± 2.29% respectively on the interference effect toward the current response of uric acid biosensor. The polymer combination of PANI and PAA can be used as a selective matrix of uric acid biosensor. PMID:24696812

  11. Volatile disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination of uric acid: implications for swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Lian, Lushi; E, Yue; Li, Jing; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2014-03-18

    Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) and trichloramine (NCl3) are important disinfection byproducts in chlorinated swimming pools. However, some unknowns exist regarding the precursors of their formation. In this study, uric acid is shown to be an efficient precursor to formation of CNCl and NCl3. The molar yields of CNCl and NCl3 were observed to be as high as 44% (pH = 6.0, chlorine/precursor molar ratio [Cl/P] = 6.4) and 108% (pH = 7.0, Cl/P = 30), respectively, both being strong functions of Cl/P, pH, and temperature. Analysis of swimming pool water samples, combined with the results of experiments involving chlorination of uric acid, and chlorination of body fluid analog mixtures, indicated that uric acid chlorination may account for a large fraction of CNCl formation in swimming pools. Moreover, given that uric acid introduction to pools is attributable to urination, a voluntary action for most swimmers, these findings indicate important benefits to pool water and air chemistry that could result from improved hygiene habits on the part of swimmers.

  12. Serum Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Body Mass Index in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Sheng-Ru; Chien, Wu-Chien; Loh, Ching-Hui; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the preset study were to describe the profile of serum uric acid, the prevalence of hyperuricemia and its risk factors among children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 941 children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (aged 4-18 years) who participated in annual health…

  13. Dietary fructose in relation to blood pressure and serum uric acid in adolescent boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Bobridge, K S; Haines, G L; Mori, T A; Beilin, L J; Oddy, W H; Sherriff, J; O'Sullivan, T A

    2013-04-01

    Evidence that fructose intake may modify blood pressure is generally limited to adult populations. This study examined cross-sectional associations between dietary intake of fructose, serum uric acid and blood pressure in 814 adolescents aged 13-15 years participating in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Energy-adjusted fructose intake was derived from 3-day food records, serum uric acid concentration was assessed using fasting blood and resting blood pressure was determined using repeated oscillometric readings. In multivariate linear regression models, we did not see a significant association between fructose and blood pressure in boys or girls. In boys, fructose intake was independently associated with serum uric acid (P<0.01), and serum uric acid was independently associated with systolic blood pressure (P<0.01) and mean arterial pressure (P<0.001). Although there are independent associations, there is no direct relationship between fructose intake and blood pressure. Our data suggest that gender may influence these relationships in adolescence, with significant associations observed more frequently in boys than girls.

  14. Effect of losartan on serum uric acid in hypertension treated with a diuretic: the COMFORT study.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Arima, Hisatomi; Tominaga, Mitsuhiro; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Koji; Fukuhara, Masayo; Uezono, Keiko; Morinaga, Yuki; Ohta, Yuko; Otonari, Takatoshi; Kawasaki, Junya; Kato, Isao; Tsuchihashi, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), reduces serum uric acid levels. However, the effects of losartan on serum uric acid levels in the patients treated with a thiazide diuretic have not been fully elucidated. We have investigated the effects of losartan compared with other ARBs on blood variables and blood pressure control in hypertensive patients treated with a thiazide diuretic using data from the COMFORT study. The present analysis included a total of 118 hypertensive subjects on combination treatment with ARBs except for losartan and a diuretic who were randomly assigned to a daily regimen of a combination pill (losartan 50 mg/hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg) or to continuation of two pills, an ARB except for losartan and a diuretic. Blood pressures were evaluated at 1, 3, and 6 months after randomization and changes in blood variables including serum uric acid were evaluated during 6 months treatment period. Mean follow-up blood pressure levels were not different between the combination pill (losartan treatment) group and the control (ARBs except for losartan) group. On the other hand, serum uric acid significantly decreased in the combination pill group compared with the control group (-0.44 versus + 0.10 mg/dl; p = 0.01), although hematocrit, serum creatinine, sodium and potassium were not different between the groups. These results suggest that the treatment regimen switched from a combination therapy of ARBs except for losartan and a diuretic to a combination pill (losartan/ hydrochlorothiazide) decreases serum uric acid without affecting blood pressure control.

  15. Uric acid concentration in subjects at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: relationship to components of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Igualá, I; Bedini, J; Quintó, L; Conget, I

    2002-03-01

    High uric acid concentration is a common finding in subjects with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including some characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. However, its exact role in this setting and in the progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is not well understood and could be affected by confounding factors such as hypertriglyceridemia. Our study aimed to establish the relationship between uric acid (avoiding the interference of high triglyceride levels), insulin sensitivity, and components of the metabolic syndrome in a group of subjects at high risk of developing DM. Among 201 subjects included in the study, 111 (55.2%) showed an abnormal oral glucose tolerance and uric acid levels higher than those measured in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. Body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and 2-hour glycemia in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) contributed independently to uric acid concentration (R2 =.59). However, uric acid did not affect either insulin sensitivity or glucose tolerance. The recovery tests revealed that a triglyceride concentration > or = 3 mmol/L interfered with the measurement of uric acid level when a colorimetric method was used, but not when a dry-chemistry method was used. In conclusion, uric acid concentration is higher in subjects at high risk of DM with abnormal glucose tolerance and is independently determined by various components of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads.

    PubMed

    Gertler, Christoph; Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Hai, Tran; Amer, Ranya A; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Malkawi, Hanan; Magagnini, Mirko; Cherif, Ameur; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N

    2015-10-01

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria.

  17. Uric Acid-Induced Adipocyte Dysfunction Is Attenuated by HO-1 Upregulation: Potential Role of Antioxidant Therapy to Target Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Komal; Hilgefort, Jordan; Banks, George; Gilliam, Chelsea; Stevens, Sarah; Ansinelli, Hayden A.; Getty, Morghan; Abraham, Nader G.; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Increased uric acid levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To examine the mechanisms by which this occurs, we hypothesized that an increase in heme oxygenase 1, a potent antioxidant gene, will decrease uric acid levels and adipocyte dysfunction via suppression of ROS and xanthine oxidase (XO) levels. We examined the effect of uric acid on adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the presence and absence of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO activity inhibitor. Uric acid increased adipogenesis by increasing NADPH oxidase expression and elevation in the adipogenesis markers C/EBPα, PPARγ, and Mest, while decreasing small lipid droplets and Wnt10b levels. We treated MSCs with fructose, a fuel source that increases uric acid levels. Our results showed that fructose increased XO expression as compared to the control and concomitant treatment with CoPP significantly decreased XO expression and uric acid levels. These beneficial effects of CoPP were reversed by SnMP, supporting a role for HO activity in mediating these effects. These findings demonstrate that increased levels of HO-1 appear crucial in modulating the phenotype of adipocytes exposed to uric acid and in downregulating XO and NADPH oxidase levels. PMID:26681956

  18. [EXPERIENCE OF USE OF BLEMAREN® IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS IN URIC ACID AND CALCIUM OXALATE UROLITHIASIS].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, O V; Yanenko, E K

    2015-01-01

    154 patients with urolithiasis were under outpatient observation for 2-8 years. Among them there were 76 women and 78 men aged 21-66 years, of which 46 patients with uric acid urolithiasis, and 88--with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Treatment of patients was carried out systematically, depending on their condition. Indications for the application of Blemaren® included the presence of uric acid stones, uric acid and/or oxalate crystalluria. The duration of treatment was 6.1 months. The dosage of the drug varied from 6 to 18 g per day and was selected individually, depending on the purpose of the appointment of Blemaren®. Reduction of the urine pH to 6.2- 6.8-7.2 was the criterion for properly selected dose. To dissolve uric acid stones in the presence of hyperuricemia and/or hyperuricuria, Blemaren® was administered in combination with allopurinol at a dose of 0.1 g 3-4 times a day. Besides pharmacotherapy, treatment included diet therapy. It was found that the morning urine pH in urate urolithiasis is sustainable and has a range of 5.0-6.0, in 80.4% of cases--range of 5.0-5.5. In calcium oxalate urolithiasis this parameter is also stable and has a range of 5.0-6.7, in 82.9% of cases--range of 5.5-6.0. Optimal urine pH to eliminate uric acid and oxalate crystalluria in patients with uric acid and calcium oxalate urolithiasis is the interval of 6.2-6.4. It was shown that Blemaren® is a highly effective agent for treatment and prevention of uric acid and calcium oxalate crystalluria in calcium oxalate and uric acid urolithiasis. Further, its effectiveness in dissolving of uric acid stones in the absence of an infectious inflammatory process is 82.3%. PMID:26859932

  19. Association between SLC2A9 transporter gene variants and uric acid phenotypes in African American and white families

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Matsumoto, Martha; Mosley, Tom H.; Kardia, Sharon; Turner, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. SLC2A9 gene variants associate with serum uric acid in white populations, but little is known about African American populations. Since SLC2A9 is a transporter, gene variants may be expected to associate more closely with the fractional excretion of urate, a measure of renal tubular transport, than with serum uric acid, which is influenced by production and extrarenal clearance. Methods. Genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the SLC2A9 gene were obtained in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy cohorts. The associations of SNPs with serum uric acid, fractional excretion of urate and urine urate-to-creatinine ratio were assessed with adjustments for age, sex, diuretic use, BMI, homocysteine and triglycerides. Results. We identified SLC2A9 gene variants that were associated with serum uric acid in 1155 African American subjects (53 SNPs) and 1132 white subjects (63 SNPs). The most statistically significant SNPs in African American subjects (rs13113918) and white subjects (rs11723439) were in the latter half of the gene and explained 2.7 and 2.8% of the variation in serum uric acid, respectively. After adjustment for this SNP in African Americans, 0.9% of the variation in serum uric acid was explained by an SNP (rs1568318) in the first half of the gene. Unexpectedly, SLC2A9 gene variants had stronger associations with serum uric acid than with fractional excretion of urate. Conclusions. These findings support two different loci by which SLC2A9 variants affect uric acid levels in African Americans and suggest SLC2A9 variants affect serum uric acid level via renal and extrarenal clearance. PMID:21186168

  20. Uric acid in the early risk stratification of ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Picariello, Claudio; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2012-02-01

    Controversy still exists about uric acid as a potential prognostic risk factor for outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction. We prospectively assessed, in 856 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STMI) consecutively admitted to our Intensive Cardiac Care Unit after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) whether uric acid (UA) levels are associated with in-hospital mortality and complications. Killip classes III-IV were more frequent in the 3° UA tertile that was associated with the highest values of peak Tn I (p = 0.005), NT-proBNP (p < 0.001), and fibrinogen (p = 0.036). Uric acid was associated with mortality (crude OR: 1.24; 95% CI 1.03-1.51; p = 0.025), but, when adjusted for Tn I and renal failure (as inferred by eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), uric acid lost its statistical significance, while Tn I (100 pg/ml step OR: 1.002; 95% CI 1.000-1.003; p = 0.007) and renal failure (OR 9.16; 95% CI 3.60-23.32; p < 0.001) were independent predictors for in-ICCU mortality. Uric acid remained as independent predictor for in-ICCU complications (1 mg/dl step OR: 1.11; 95% CI 1.01-1.21; p = 0.030) together with admission glycemia (1 g/dl step OR: 1.50; 95% CI 1.19-1.91; p < 0.001) and renal failure (OR: 1.46; 95% CI 0.99-2.16; p < 0.001). In STEMI patients submitted to PCI, increased uric acid levels identify a subgroup more prone to in-ICCU complications, probably because hyperuricemia stems from several complex mechanisms ranging from pre-existing risk factors to the degree of myocardial ischemia (as indicated by Killip class, ejection fraction) and to the acute metabolic response (as inferred by glucose levels). Hyperuricemia is not independently associated with early mortality when adjusted for renal function and the degree of myocardial damage.

  1. [Two cases of uric acid stones unsuccessfully dissociated by oral chemolysis].

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Makoto; Yamada, Tetsuo; Murayama, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    We report two patients with renal uric acid (UA) stones in whom chemolysis by oral administration of alkaline citrate and allopurinol was unsuccessful. The stone in a 58-year old female did not dissolve because her urinary pH remained low throughout the day after alkaline citrate administration. The stone in a 50-year old man did not dissolve because his urinary pH was 5.5-6.0 after alkaline citrate administration. Alkalization of the urine helps reduce the stone size and the calcification of the stone. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was performed and the stone composition showed mixed calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. The indication of oral chemolysis of uric acid stones is discussed.

  2. Plasma urea, creatinine and uric acid concentrations in relation to feeding in peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus).

    PubMed

    Lumeij, J T; Remple, J D

    1991-03-01

    Significant post-prandial increases in plasma uric acid and plasma urea concentrations were observed in peregrine falcons. Post-prandial uric acid concentrations were similar to those in birds suffering from hyperuricaemia and gout and were well above the theoretical limit of solubility of sodium urate in plasma. It is not clear why under normal circumstances no urate deposits occur in peregrine falcons (and probably other raptorial birds), which show hyperuricaemia for at least 12 h after ingesting a natural meal. It is important to evaluate renal function in peregrine falcons (and perhaps other birds) after a 24-h fast to avoid misinterpretation due to physiological food-induced elevated concentrations of nonprotein nitrogen substances.

  3. Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differences in the Relationship between Uric Acid and Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents: An Analysis of NHANES 1999–2006

    PubMed Central

    DeBoer, Mark D.; Dong, Lili; Gurka, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Among adolescents uric acid is associated with insulin resistance, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and in adults high uric acid levels are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Objective Determine whether the relationship of uric acid with MetS varies in adolescents by race/ethnicity and gender. Methods We used linear regression to evaluate associations between uric acid and other MetS-associated clinical and laboratory measures among 3,296 non-Hispanic-white, non-Hispanic-black and Hispanic adolescents age 12–19y participating in the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey (1999–2006). Results Overall, non-Hispanic-white males and females had the highest uric acid levels among the three racial/ethnic groups. In each racial/ethnic group there were higher uric acid levels for those adolescents with vs. without MetS. However, the extent of the MetS-related increase in uric acid level varied by race and gender. Among males, MetS was associated with the greatest increases in uric acid among non-Hispanic whites. However, among females, the MetS-related increase in uric acid was greatest among non-whites. Non-Hispanic-white females exhibited the lowest degrees of correlation between levels of uric acid and MetS-associated variables. Uric acid levels did not correlate with insulin levels in non-Hispanic-white females. Conclusions These data suggest the relationship between uric acid and MetS varies by race/ethnicity and gender. In particular, non-Hispanic-white males exhibit a strong relationship and non-Hispanic-white females exhibit a relatively poor correlation between uric acid and MetS-related factors. These data may have implications for the use of uric acid as a marker of future risk among adolescents. PMID:22000606

  4. Serum and Urinary Malondialdehyde (MDA), Uric acid, and Protein as markers of perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    El Bana, Sawsan Mahmoud; Maher, Sheren Esam; Gaber, Amani Fawzy; Aly, Sanaa Shaker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is among the leading causes of neonatal morbidity and death in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aims of this research were to determine the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), urine MDA, uric acid, and protein in the cord blood of neonates with perinatal asphyxia and to determine their relationship with the severity of perinatal asphyxia. Methods This matched case-control study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2013. All of the cases and controls were selected from the Gynecology & Obstetrics Department and the NICUs, at Qous Central Hospital in Qena, Egypt. We allocated 20 full-term neonates who had perinatal asphyxia to the case group. Also, we selected 20 healthy neonates for the control group. The subjects were matched with respect to age and gender. At birth and 48 hours later, measurements were made of MDA in cord blood and urine, and uric acid, protein, and creatinine also were measured in both groups. The data were analyzed by SPSS, version 17, using the independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results At birth and 48 hr later, the newborns’ with PA had significantly higher levels of MDA in the cord blood, mean urinary uric acid/creatinine (UUA:Cr), protein/creatinine (UP:Cr), and MDA/creatinine ratio (UMDA:Cr) than the controls; their PA levels were correlated with the degree of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The babies who died due to PA had significantly higher levels of cord blood MDA, and they also had higher UUA:Cr, UP:Cr, and UMDA:Cr ratios than the babies who survived. Conclusion The concentration of MDA in cord blood can be used as a diagnostic marker of oxidative stress in asphyxiated neonates. The ratios of the urinary excretion rates of uric acid, protein, and MDA to creatinine increased as the severity of perinatal asphyxia and associated brain damage increased. PMID:27648187

  5. Serum and Urinary Malondialdehyde (MDA), Uric acid, and Protein as markers of perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    El Bana, Sawsan Mahmoud; Maher, Sheren Esam; Gaber, Amani Fawzy; Aly, Sanaa Shaker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is among the leading causes of neonatal morbidity and death in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aims of this research were to determine the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), urine MDA, uric acid, and protein in the cord blood of neonates with perinatal asphyxia and to determine their relationship with the severity of perinatal asphyxia. Methods This matched case-control study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2013. All of the cases and controls were selected from the Gynecology & Obstetrics Department and the NICUs, at Qous Central Hospital in Qena, Egypt. We allocated 20 full-term neonates who had perinatal asphyxia to the case group. Also, we selected 20 healthy neonates for the control group. The subjects were matched with respect to age and gender. At birth and 48 hours later, measurements were made of MDA in cord blood and urine, and uric acid, protein, and creatinine also were measured in both groups. The data were analyzed by SPSS, version 17, using the independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results At birth and 48 hr later, the newborns’ with PA had significantly higher levels of MDA in the cord blood, mean urinary uric acid/creatinine (UUA:Cr), protein/creatinine (UP:Cr), and MDA/creatinine ratio (UMDA:Cr) than the controls; their PA levels were correlated with the degree of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The babies who died due to PA had significantly higher levels of cord blood MDA, and they also had higher UUA:Cr, UP:Cr, and UMDA:Cr ratios than the babies who survived. Conclusion The concentration of MDA in cord blood can be used as a diagnostic marker of oxidative stress in asphyxiated neonates. The ratios of the urinary excretion rates of uric acid, protein, and MDA to creatinine increased as the severity of perinatal asphyxia and associated brain damage increased.

  6. Association of uric acid, atherogenic index of plasma and albuminuria in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Akbas, Emin Murat; Timuroglu, Aysu; Ozcicek, Adalet; Ozcicek, Fatih; Demirtas, Levent; Gungor, Adem; Akbas, Nergis

    2014-01-01

    Background: The associations of serum uric acid (UA), atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and albuminuria with cardiovascular disease have been shown. Several studies focused on association of serum UA and dyslipidemia, serum UA and renal impairment, dyslipidemia and renal impairment. However, to date, in literature, there have been no studies demonstrating the relationship between these parameters in diabetic patients together. Aims: We aimed to investigate the association between serum UA, albuminuria and AIP in diabetic patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving data of 645 diabetic patients. The patients were separated into groups according to their serum uric acid and AIP levels. The quantitative urine albumin/creatinine ratio in morning spot urine samples were used for standard albuminuria determination. Serum uric acid levels under 6 mg/dL were considered as normal. AIP was calculated as the logarithmically transformed ratio of triglyceride to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results: AIP and albuminuria levels were high in high serum UA group compared to normal UA group. Uric acid and albuminuria tended to increase with increasing AIP. Correlation analysis showed that albuminuria, AIP and UA were significantly correlated with each other. Additionally, in binary logistic regression analysis, AIP was found to be independently associated with high UA levels. Conclusions: Present study reveals that serum UA, AIP and albuminuria are closely related. Physicians should be aware that patients with concomitant hyperuricemia, albuminuria and high AIP are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Our study confirms that there is a need for larger prospective studies to determine the mechanisms underlying the association of serum UA, AIP and albuminuria. PMID:25664100

  7. Uric acid plasma level and urine pH in rats treated with ambroxol.

    PubMed

    Drewa, Tomasz; Wolski, Zbigniew; Gruszka, Marzena; Misterek, Bartosz; Lysik, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    It was a chance discovery that ambroxol parenteral administration led to urinary bladder stone formation in rats. This study was undertaken to examine the serum uric acid levels and urine pH in rats after ambroxol parenteral treatment. Ambroxol influence on the uric acid level was measured in 5 rats (Rattus sp.) treated with 60 mg/kg (dissolved in injection water, sc, daily) during 2 weeks. Ambroxol influence on urine pH was examined on 45 rats divided into 3 groups. Rats from the 1st and 2nd group received 30 and 60 mg/kg/24h ambroxol, respectively. Urine was collected once daily and measured with strip kit. All values were presented as the means with standard deviations. The Student t test was used to compare the means, p < 0.05 was considered as significant. Dynamics of pH changes was measured in 4 rats treated with 60 mg/kg/24h of ambroxol. Controls received 1 mL of injection water sc. Serum uric acid level increased up to 8.7 +/- 1.0 mg/dL vs. 5.7 +/- 1.0 mg/dL in control (p < 0.002). In the 1st and 2nd group urine pH increased up to 7.5 +/- 0.5 and 7.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 6.7 +/- 0.4 (p < 0.05). Ambroxol withdrawal resulted in sequential urine pH decrease. 11 days after interruption of ambroxol therapy pH reached the starting value. Urine pH changes and possible disturbances in uric acid metabolic pathway may influence on the stone formation in rats after ambroxol parenteral treatment. The influence of ambroxol on urinary tract GAG layer and the balance between xanthine and CaOx in the urine should be checked.

  8. Electrochemical detection of uric acid via uricase-immobilized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Omar, Muhamad Nadzmi; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Lim, Hong Ngee; Ahmad Tajudin, Asilah

    2016-09-15

    Measurement of the uric acid level in the body can be improved by biosensing with respect to the accuracy, sensitivity and time consumption. This study has reported the immobilization of uricase onto graphene oxide (GO) and its function for electrochemical detection of uric acid. Through chemical modification of GO using 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) as cross-linking reagents, the enzyme activity of the immobilized uricase was much comparable to the free enzyme with 88% of the activity retained. The modified GO-uricase (GOU) was then subjected to electrocatalytic detection of uric acid (UA) via cyclic voltammetry (CV). For that reason, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified by adhering the GO along with the immobilized uricase to facilitate the redox reaction between the enzyme and the substrate. The modified GOU/GCE outperformed a bare electrode through the electrocatalytic activity with an amplified electrical signal for the detection of UA. The electrocatalytic response showed a linear dependence on the UA concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.49 mM with a detection limit of 3.45 μM at 3σ/m. The resulting biosensor also exhibited a high selectivity towards UA in the presence of other interference as well as good reproducibility. PMID:27402177

  9. Prevention of comorbidity and acute attack of gout by uric acid lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kowoon; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Lim, Mie-Jin; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Hoyeon; Park, Won

    2014-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of uric acid lowering therapy in reducing the new development of comorbidities and the frequency of acute attacks in gout patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed to have gout with at least 3 yr of follow up. They were divided into 2 groups; 53 patients with mean serum uric acid level (sUA)<6 mg/dL and 147 patients with mean sUA≥6 mg/dL. Comorbidities of gout such as hypertension (HTN), type II diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and urolithiasis were compared in each group at baseline and at last follow-up visit. Frequency of acute gout attacks were also compared between the groups. During the mean follow up period of 7.6 yr, the yearly rate of acute attack and the new development of HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis was lower in the adequately treated group compared to the inadequately treated group. Tight control of uric acid decreases the incidence of acute gout attacks and comorbidities of gout such as HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis.

  10. Urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid levels in postmortem serum, vitreous humor, and pericardial fluid.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Mangin, Patrice

    2015-03-01

    Urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid are relatively stable in postmortem serum and may, therefore, be used for diagnostic purposes when chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure are investigated as causes of death. Nevertheless, uncertainties remain in defining the best alternative to postmortem serum for the identification and assessment of significantly decreased kidney function. In this study, we investigated urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid levels in postmortem serum, pericardial fluid, and vitreous humor in a series of medico-legal cases (500 autopsies) with various causes of death. No postmortem interval-related differences were observed in any of the investigated fluids for any analyzed parameter, confirming the biochemical stability of all compounds after death. Data analysis failed to reveal statistically significant differences between postmortem serum and pericardial fluid urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid concentrations. Conversely, statistically significant differences were observed in all analyzed biomarkers between postmortem serum and vitreous humor levels, with lower concentrations of all markers measured in vitreous. The results of this study suggest that, in order to estimate as accurately as possible blood analyte concentrations at the time of death, pericardial fluid should be preferred to vitreous humor.

  11. Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Laston, Sandra; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it is not known whether the association of serum uric acid with SLC2A9 polymorphisms manifests in children. Objective: The aim was to investigate whether variation in serum uric acid is under genetic influence and whether the association with SLC2A9 polymorphisms generalizes to Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study. Design: We conducted a genomewide association study with 1.1 million genetic markers in 815 children. Results: We found serum uric acid to be significantly heritable [h2 ± SD = 0.45 ± 0.08, P = 5.8 × 10−11] and associated with SLC2A9 variants (P values between 10−16 and 10−7). Several of the significantly associated polymorphisms were previously identified in studies in adults. We also found positive genetic correlations between serum uric acid and BMI z score (ρG = 0.45, P = 0.002), percentage of body fat (ρG = 0.28, P = 0.04), fat mass (ρG = 0.34, P = 0.02), waist circumference (ρG = 0.42, P = 0.003), and waist-to-height ratio (ρG = 0.46, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results show that variation in serum uric acid in Hispanic children is under considerable genetic influence and is associated with obesity-related phenotypes. As in adults, genetic variation in SLC2A9 is associated with serum uric acid concentrations, an important biomarker of renal and cardiovascular disease risk, in Hispanic children. PMID:25833971

  12. Associations of Uric Acid with Polymorphisms in the δ-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase, Vitamin D Receptor, and Nitric Oxide Synthase Genes in Korean Lead Workers

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Schwartz, Brian S.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Ahn, Kyu-Dong; Todd, Andrew C.; Lee, Sung-Soo; Kelsey, Karl T.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Lustberg, Mark E.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Wen, Jiayu; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2005-01-01

    Recent research suggests that uric acid may be nephrotoxic at lower levels than previously recognized and that it may be one mechanism for lead-related nephrotoxicity. Therefore, in understanding mechanisms for lead-related nephrotoxicity, it would be of value to determine whether genetic polymorphisms that are associated with renal outcomes in lead workers and/or modify associations between lead dose and renal function are also associated with uric acid and/or modify associations between lead dose and uric acid. We analyzed data on three such genetic polymorphisms: δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Mean (± SD) tibia, blood, and dimercaptosuccinic acid–chelatable lead levels were 37.2 ± 40.4 μg/g bone mineral, 32.0± 15.0 g/dL, and 0.77± 0.86 μg/mg creatinine, respectively, in 798 current and former lead workers. Participants with the eNOS Asp allele had lower mean serum uric acid compared with those with the Glu/Glu genotype. Among older workers (age ≥ median of 40.6 years), ALAD genotype modified associations between lead dose and uric acid levels. Higher lead dose was significantly associated with higher uric acid in workers with the ALAD1-1 genotype; associations were in the opposite direction in participants with the variant ALAD1-2 genotype. In contrast, higher tibia lead was associated with higher uric acid in those with the variant VDR B allele; however, modification was dependent on participants with the bb genotype and high tibia lead levels. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms may modify uric acid mediation of lead-related adverse renal effects. PMID:16263504

  13. Association of Serum Uric Acid Concentration with Diabetic Retinopathy and Albuminuria in Taiwanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ching-Chao; Lin, Pi-Chen; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Szu-Chia; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience chronic microvascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) during their lifetime. In clinical studies, serum uric acid concentration has been found to be associated with DR and DN. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the increases in serum uric acid level and the severity of DR and albuminuria in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. We recorded serum uric acid concentration, the severity of DR, and the severity of albuminuria by calculating urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in 385 patients with type 2 DM. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, a high uric acid concentration was a risk factor for albuminuria (odds ratio (OR), 1.227; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.015–1.482; p = 0.034) and DR (OR, 1.264; 95% CI = 1.084–1.473; p = 0.003). We also demonstrated that there was a higher concentration of serum uric acid in the patients with more severe albuminuria and DR. In conclusion, an increased serum uric acid level was significantly correlated with the severity of albuminuria and DR in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. PMID:27490538

  14. Mid-gestational serum uric acid concentration effect on neonate birth weight and insulin resistance in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Khadijeh; Razavi, Maryamsadat; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Reza; Mashhadi, Esmat; Chehrei, Ali; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between mid-gestational serum uric acid and birth weight in diabetic pregnant women with or without insulin resistance. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, fasting uric acid, blood glucose, and serum insulin were measured in 247 pregnant women between 20-22 weeks of gestational period. Insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Stratification analysis and independent t-test was used to assess the association between uric acid and birth weights regarding to insulin resistance. Results: The means of the mid-gestational serum uric acid concentrations were not significantly different in women with and without insulin resistance. But stratification analysis showed that there was a significant difference between uric acid concentration and macrosomic birth in diabetic women without insulin resistance. Conclusions: Higher mid – gestation serum uric acid concentration, even if it does not exceed the normal range, is accompanied by lower birth weight only in non-insulin resistance women. Insulin resistance could have a negative confounding effect on hyperuriemia and birth weight. PMID:25810959

  15. Glycation of aspartate aminotransferase by methylglyoxal, effect of hydroxycitric and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Bousová, Iva; Bacílková, Eliska; Dobrijević, Sanja; Drsata, Jaroslav

    2009-11-01

    Glycation is a process closely related to the aging and pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Reactive alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (e.g., methylglyoxal) are formed during middle stage of glycation reaction. Compounds that would inhibit the glycation process have been seeked for years. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of hydroxycitric (0.25-2.5 mM) and uric acid (0.4-1.2 mM) on middle stage of protein glycation in vitro using the model containing aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and 0.5 mM methylglyoxal. Hydroxycitric acid, at all tested concentrations, reduced AST activity decrease and formation of fluorescent AGEs during incubation of the enzyme with methylglyoxal at 37 degrees C. This compound also prevented formation of high-molecular weight protein cross-links and changes in molecular charge of AST caused by glycation. Uric acid showed no positive anti-glycation activity. The results support the hypothesis that hydroxycitric acid has beneficial effects in controlling protein glycation. PMID:19449196

  16. Optimization of pH values to formulate the bireagent kit for serum uric acid assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Chen, Yuanxiang; Yang, Xiaolan; Zhao, Hua; Hu, Xiaolei; Pu, Jun; Liao, Juan; Long, Gaobo; Liao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    A new formulation of the bireagent kit for serum uric acid assay was developed based on the effects of pH on enzyme stability. At 4 °C, half-lives of uricases from Bacillus fastidious and Arthrobacter globiforms were longer than 15 months at pH 9.2, but became shorter at pH below 8.0; half-lives of ascorbate oxidase and peroxidase were comparable at pH 6.5 and 7.0, but became much shorter at pH higher than 7.4. In the new formulation of the bireagent kit, Reagent A contained peroxidase, 4-aminoantipyrine, and ascorbate oxidase in 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 6.5; Reagent B contained B. fastidious or A. globiforms uricase in 50 mM sodium borate buffer at pH 9.2; Reagents A and B were mixed at 4:1 to produce a final pH from 7.2 to 7.6 for developing a stable color. The new bireagent kit consumed smaller quantities of three enzymes for the same shelf life. With the new bireagent kit, there were linear responses of absorbance at 546 nm to uric acid up to 34 mM in reaction mixtures and a good correlation of uric acid levels in clinical sera with those by a commercial kit, but stronger resistance to ascorbate. Therefore, the new formulation was advantageous.

  17. Phytochemicals from Tradescantia albiflora Kunth Extracts Reduce Serum Uric Acid Levels in Oxonate-induced Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Ling; Sheu, Shi-Yuan; Huang, Wen-Dar; Chuang, Ya-Ling; Tseng, Han-Chun; Hwang, Tzann-Shun; Fu, Yuan-Tsung; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tradescantia albiflora (TA) Kunth (Commelinaceae) has been used for treating gout and hyperuricemia as folklore remedies in Taiwan. Therefore, it is worthwhile to study the effect of TA extracts on lowering uric acid activity. The hypouricemic effects of TA extracts on potassium oxonate (PO)-induced acute hyperuricemia were investigated for the first time. Materials and Methods: All treatments at the same volume (1 ml) were orally administered to the abdominal cavity of PO-induced hyperuricemic rats. One milliliter of TA extract in n-hexane (HE), ethyl acetate (EA), n-butanol (BuOH), and water fractions has 0.28, 0.21, 0.28, and 1.03 mg TA, respectively; and the plasma uric acid (PUA) level was measured for a consecutive 4 h after administration. Results: All four fractions' extracts derived from TA were observed to significantly reduce PUA compared with the PO group. The EA-soluble fraction (TA-EA) exhibited the best xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity. Following column chromatography, 12 phytochemicals were isolated and identified from the EA fraction. The IC50 values of isolated phytochemicals indicated that bracteanolide A (AR11) showed the remarkable XO inhibitory effect (IC50 value of 76.4 μg/ml). These findings showed that the in vivo hypouricemic effect in hyperuricemic rats was consistent with in vitro XO inhibitory activity, indicating that TA extracts and derived phytochemicals could be potential candidates as hypouricemic agents. SUMMARY Tradescantia albiflora extracts possess in vivo hypouricemic action in hyperuricemic ratsT. albiflora extracts exhibited strong inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase (XO)Butenolide may play an important role in XO inhibitionThe extract bracteanolide A was demonstrated potent XO inhibitory activity in vitro. Abbreviations used: TA: Tradescantia albiflora, PO: potassium oxonate, HE: n-hexane, EA: ethyl acetate, BuOH: n-butanol, PUA: plasma uric acid, XO: xanthine oxidase, MeOH: methanol, IP

  18. Real-time in vivo uric acid biosensor system for biophysical monitoring of birds.

    PubMed

    Gumus, A; Lee, S; Karlsson, K; Gabrielson, R; Winkler, D W; Erickson, D

    2014-02-21

    Research on birds has long played an important role in ecological investigations, as birds are relatively easily observed, and their high metabolic rates and diurnal habits make them quite evidently responsive to changes in their environments. A mechanistic understanding of such avian responses requires a better understanding of how variation in physiological state conditions avian behavior and integrates the effects of recent environmental changes. There is a great need for sensor systems that will allow free-flying birds to interact with their environment and make unconstrained decisions about their spatial location at the same time that their physiological state is being monitored in real time. We have developed a miniature needle-based enzymatic sensor system suitable for continuous real-time amperometric monitoring of uric acid levels in unconstrained live birds. The sensor system was constructed with Pt/Ir wire and Ag/AgCl paste. Uricase enzyme was immobilized on a 0.7 mm sensing cavity of Nafion/cellulose inner membrane to minimize the influences of background interferents. The sensor response was linear from 0.05 to 0.6 mM uric acid, which spans the normal physiological range for most avian species. We developed a two-electrode potentiostat system that drives the biosensor, reads the output current, and wirelessly transmits the data. In addition to extensive characterization of the sensor and system, we also demonstrate autonomous operation of the system by collecting in vivo extracellular uric acid measurements on a domestic chicken. The results confirm our needle-type sensor system's potential for real-time monitoring of birds' physiological state. Successful application of the sensor in migratory birds could open up a new era of studying both the physiological preparation for migration and the consequences of sustained avian flight.

  19. Real-time in vivo uric acid biosensor system for biophysical monitoring of birds.

    PubMed

    Gumus, A; Lee, S; Karlsson, K; Gabrielson, R; Winkler, D W; Erickson, D

    2014-02-21

    Research on birds has long played an important role in ecological investigations, as birds are relatively easily observed, and their high metabolic rates and diurnal habits make them quite evidently responsive to changes in their environments. A mechanistic understanding of such avian responses requires a better understanding of how variation in physiological state conditions avian behavior and integrates the effects of recent environmental changes. There is a great need for sensor systems that will allow free-flying birds to interact with their environment and make unconstrained decisions about their spatial location at the same time that their physiological state is being monitored in real time. We have developed a miniature needle-based enzymatic sensor system suitable for continuous real-time amperometric monitoring of uric acid levels in unconstrained live birds. The sensor system was constructed with Pt/Ir wire and Ag/AgCl paste. Uricase enzyme was immobilized on a 0.7 mm sensing cavity of Nafion/cellulose inner membrane to minimize the influences of background interferents. The sensor response was linear from 0.05 to 0.6 mM uric acid, which spans the normal physiological range for most avian species. We developed a two-electrode potentiostat system that drives the biosensor, reads the output current, and wirelessly transmits the data. In addition to extensive characterization of the sensor and system, we also demonstrate autonomous operation of the system by collecting in vivo extracellular uric acid measurements on a domestic chicken. The results confirm our needle-type sensor system's potential for real-time monitoring of birds' physiological state. Successful application of the sensor in migratory birds could open up a new era of studying both the physiological preparation for migration and the consequences of sustained avian flight. PMID:24326318

  20. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    PubMed

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p < 0.001). Serum uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p < 0.001) and higher odds for hyperglycemia (8.036; 2.178-29.647, p = 0.001) as compared to individual rise of hs-CRP or uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS. PMID:27006878

  1. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  2. Effects of a fermented barley extract on subjects with slightly high serum uric acid or mild hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Hokazono, Hideki; Omori, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Akaoka, Ieo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2010-01-01

    The uric acid-lowering effect and safety of a fermented barley extract P (FBEP) prepared from barley-shochu distillery by-products were investigated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, double-blinded study. A total of 111 subjects with serum uric acid levels of 6.0-7.9 mg/dl were provided with either a drink containing 2 g/d of FBEP (test group) or a placebo drink. After 12 weeks, the serum uric acid levels changed by -0.21+/-0.56 mg/dl in the test group, showing a significant decrease in comparison to those of the placebo group (+0.02+/-0.54 mg/dl). Additionally, the uric acid clearance in the test group showed a tendency to increase after 12 weeks more than in the placebo group (p=0.054). No abnormalities in the physical and clinical tests were observed, and no adverse diagnostic findings were attributed to the intake of the test meal. These results demonstrated the benefits and safety of the FBEP treatment to subjects with slightly high serum uric acid or mild hyperuricemia.

  3. Renal clearance of uric acid is linked to insulin resistance and lower excretion of sodium in gout patients.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles; Herrero-Beites, Ana María; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Erauskin, Gorka Garcia; Merriman, Toni

    2015-09-01

    Inefficient renal excretion of uric acid is the main pathophysiological mechanism for hyperuricemia in gout patients. Polymorphisms of renal tubular transporters linked with sodium and monosaccharide transport have yet to be demonstrated. We intended to evaluate the impact of insulin resistance, evaluated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), through a transversal study of non-diabetic patients with gout, with normal renal function, not treated with any medication but colchicine as prophylaxis. One hundred and thirty-three patients were evaluated. Clearance of uric acid was inversely correlated with insulin resistance and directly correlated with fractional excretion of sodium. In multivariate analysis, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, in addition to insulin resistance and fractional excretion of sodium, were associated with renal clearance of uric acid. HOMA cutoff for efficient versus inefficient renal handling of uric acid was 2.72, close to that observed in studies of reference population. The impact of insulin resistance and renal handling of sodium on renal clearance of uric acid may help to explain why hyperuricemia is more commonly associated with diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25763991

  4. Spectroscopic analyses and studies on respective interaction of cyanuric acid and uric acid with bovine serum albumin and melamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dandan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Heng

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the fluorescence quenching was used to study the interaction of cyanuric acid (CYA) and uric acid (UA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two different temperatures (283 K and 310 K). The bimolecular quenching constant (Kq), apparent quenching constant (Ksv), effective binding constant (KA) and corresponding dissociation constant (KD), binding site number (n) and binding distance (r) were calculated by adopting Stern-Volmer, Lineweaver-Burk, Double logarithm and overlap integral equations. The results show that CYA and UA are both able to obviously bind to BSA, but the binding strength order is BSA + CYA < BSA + UA. And then, the interactions of CYA and UA with melamine (MEL) under the same conditions were also studied by using similar methods. The results indicates that both CYA and UA can bind together closely with melamine (MEL). It is wished that these research results would facilitate the understanding the formation of kidney stones and gout in the body after ingesting excess MEL.

  5. Relationship between High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Fingerprints and Uric Acid-Lowering Activities of Cichorium intybus L.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Wang, Xue-Jie; Zhou, Yue; Sun, Xiao-Xia; Xiao, Ming-Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the spectrum-effect relationships between high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprints and the uric acid-lowering activities of chicory. Chemical fingerprints of chicory samples from ten different sources were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and then investigated by similarity analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Pharmacodynamics experiments were conducted in animals to obtain the uric acid-lowering activity information of each chicory sample. The spectrum-effect relationships between chemical fingerprints and the uric acid-lowering activities of chicory were established by canonical correlation analysis. The structures of potential effective peaks were identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that a close correlation existed between the spectrum and effect of chicory. Aesculin, chlorogenic acid, chicoric acid, isochlorogenic acid A/B/C and 13,14-seco-stigma5(6),14(15)-diene-3α-ol might be the main effective constituents. This work provides a general model of the combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and uric acid-lowering activities to study the spectrum-effect relationships of chicory, which can be used to discover the principle components responsible for the bioactivity. PMID:26007193

  6. Relationship between High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Fingerprints and Uric Acid-Lowering Activities of Cichorium intybus L.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Wang, Xue-Jie; Zhou, Yue; Sun, Xiao-Xia; Xiao, Ming-Liang

    2015-05-22

    This study aimed to explore the spectrum-effect relationships between high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprints and the uric acid-lowering activities of chicory. Chemical fingerprints of chicory samples from ten different sources were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and then investigated by similarity analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Pharmacodynamics experiments were conducted in animals to obtain the uric acid-lowering activity information of each chicory sample. The spectrum-effect relationships between chemical fingerprints and the uric acid-lowering activities of chicory were established by canonical correlation analysis. The structures of potential effective peaks were identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that a close correlation existed between the spectrum and effect of chicory. Aesculin, chlorogenic acid, chicoric acid, isochlorogenic acid A/B/C and 13,14-seco-stigma5(6),14(15)-diene-3α-ol might be the main effective constituents. This work provides a general model of the combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and uric acid-lowering activities to study the spectrum-effect relationships of chicory, which can be used to discover the principle components responsible for the bioactivity.

  7. Bilateral uric acid nephrolithiasis and ureteral hypertrophy in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, Robert A.; Bildfell, Rob; Henny, Charles J.; Buhler, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first case of uric acid nephrolithiasis in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis). A 7 yr old male river otter collected from the Skagit River of western Washington (USA) had bilateral nephrolithiasis and severely enlarged ureters (one of 305 examined [0.33%]). The uroliths were 97% uric acid and 3% protein. Microscopic changes in the kidney were confined to expansion of renal calyces, minor loss of medullary tissue, and multifocal atrophy of the cortical tubules. No inflammation was observed in either kidney or the ureters. The ureters were enlarged due to marked hypertrophy of smooth muscle plus dilation of the lumen. Fusion of the major calyces into a single ureteral lumen was several cm distal to that of two adult male otters used as histopathologic control specimens. This case report is part of a large contaminant study of river otters collected from Oregon and Washington. It is important to understand diseases and lesions of the otter as part of our overall evaluation of this population.

  8. Comparison of plasma uric acid levels in five varieties of the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo.

    PubMed

    Hartman, S; Taleb, S A; Geng, T; Gyenai, K; Guan, X; Smith, E

    2006-10-01

    Plasma uric acid (PUA) is a consensus physiological biomarker for many phenotypes in vertebrates because it is a reliable indicator for processes such as oxidative stress and tubular function. In birds, it is considered a major antioxidant and is also the primary endproduct of nitrogen metabolism. Despite this importance, knowledge of baseline levels of PUA in physiologically normal birds, including the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, is limited. Here, we compared PUA levels in a total of 106 apparently normal male and female birds at 8 and 32 wk of age from 5 strains of the domestic turkey, including Bourbon Red, Narragansett, Blue Slate, Royal Palm, and Spanish Black. Though differences in PUA were not significant at 8 and 32 wk of age, BW, variety, and sex effects were highly significant. When adjusted for BW, female birds had, on average, a higher PUA per kilogram of BW than male birds. When adjusted for both sex and BW, Royal Palm birds had the lowest average PUA, and Blue Slate had the highest PUA. Results of these investigations represent the first comparative analysis of PUA in physiologically normal turkey varieties. They suggest that differences in basal plasma levels of uric acid in physiologically normal turkeys are influenced by sex, weight, and genetic background but may be independent of age.

  9. Comparatve uric acid lowering studies of allopurinol with an indigenous medicinal plant in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Imran Shair; Latif, Sana; Yar, Muhammad; Nasar, Faiza; Ahmad, Irshad; Naeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to carry out a comparative study of lowering of uric acid by the use of dried powder of Colchicum luteum and allopathic drug (allopurinol) in rabbits, to determine whether herbal drugs can be used by patients instead of allopathic drugs. The herbal medicine, dried corm powder of Colchicum luteum 2.5 mg/kg/day and dried powder of allopurinol 2 mg/kg/day an allopathic medicine, was used in the study. The results of these medicines were observed in animal model, using 12 adult rabbits, which were divided into three groups A, B and C, respectively, where group C was taken as control. The SPSS version 17 was used for statistical analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for comparing the data in different groups and the level of significance was 5%. It was resulted that dried corm of Colchicum luteum significantly reduced the uric acid in adult rabbits as reduced by allopathic medicine--allopurinol. In the light of present research we concluded that the herbal medicines can be used in lieu of allopathic drugs. Thus, the risk of side effects that are associated with the prolonged use of allopathic drugs can be minimized.

  10. Quantification of urinary uric acid in the presence of thymol and thimerosal by high-performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Whitson, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed as an alternative to automated enzymatic analysis of uric acid in human urine preserved with thymol and/or thimerosal. Uric acid (tR = 10 min) and creatinine (tR = 5 min) were separated and quantified during isocratic elution (0.025 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5) from a mu Bondapak C18 column. The uric-acid peak was identified chemically by incubating urine samples with uricase. The thymol/thimerosal peak appeared at 31 min during the washing step and did not interfere with the analysis. We validated the high-performance liquid chromatographic method for linearity, precision and accuracy, and the results were found to be excellent.

  11. Serum Uric Acid Level Predicts Progression of IgA Nephropathy in Females but Not in Males

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Shinzawa, Maki; Hasuike, Yukiko; Nagatoya, Katsuyuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Kuragano, Takayuki; Moriyama, Toshiki; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is one of most common forms of glomerulonephritis. At this point, the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on IgAN is not clear. The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on the progression of IgAN. Study Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting & Participants 935 IgAN patients who were diagnosed by kidney biopsy at Osaka University Hospital, Osaka General Hospital, and Osaka Rosai Hospital. were included in this study. Predictor Uric acid levels at renal biopsy. Outcomes The outcome of interest was the time from the kidney biopsy to the time when a 50% increase in the baseline serum creatinine level was observed, which was defined as "progression". Measurements The baseline characteristics according to the kidney biopsy at the time of diagnosis were collected from the medical records, and included age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (use of antidiabetic drugs), serum levels of creatinine, urinary protein, smoking status, RAAS blockers and steroid therapy. Results An elevated serum uric acid level was an independent risk factor for progression in female patients (per 1.0 mg/dL, multivariate-adjusted incident rate ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval 1.07, 1.64], P = 0.008) but not in male patients (1.02 [0.81, 1.29], P = 0.855). To control a confounding effect of renal function on an association between serum uric acid level and progression in female patients, age- and serum creatinine-matched and propensity score-matched analyses were performed, and these results also supported the effect by uric acid on kidney disease progression independent of basal kidney function. Limitations A cohort analyzed retorospectively. Conclusions This study revealed that an elevated uric acid level was an independent risk factor for ESKD in female IgAN patients. Therefore, uric acid might be a treatable target in female IgAN patients. PMID:27560997

  12. Increased Serum Uric Acid Levels Blunt the Antihypertensive Efficacy of Lifestyle Modifications in Children at Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Rebora, Paola; Giussani, Marco; Orlando, Antonina; Stella, Andrea; Antolini, Laura; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pontremoli, Roberto; Genovesi, Simonetta

    2016-05-01

    Primary hypertension is a growing concern in children because of the obesity epidemic largely attributable to western lifestyles. Serum uric acid is known to be influenced by dietary habits, correlates with obesity, and could represent a risk factor for hypertension. Preliminary studies in children highlighted uric acid as a potentially modifiable risk factor for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. The effect of lifestyle changes (increase of physical activity and dietary modifications) on blood pressure values, weight status, and serum uric acid levels in a cohort of 248 children referred for cardiovascular risk assessment were evaluated over a mean 1.5-year follow-up. At baseline, 48% of children were obese and 50% showed blood pressure values >90th percentile. At follow-up, a significant improvement in weight class (24% obese;P<0.0001) and blood pressure category (22% >90th percentile;P<0.0001) was found. Systolic blood pressure z-score (P<0.0001), uric acid value (P=0.0056), and puberty at baseline (P=0.0048) were independently associated with higher systolic blood pressure z-score at follow-up, whereas a negative association was observed with body mass index z-score decrease during follow-up (P=0.0033). The risk of hypertension at follow-up was associated with body mass index (P=0.0025) and systolic blood pressure (P<0.0001) z-score at baseline and inversely related to delta body mass index (P=0.0002), whereas the risk of showing hypertension ≥99th percentile was more than doubled for each baseline 1 mg/dL increase of serum uric acid (P=0.0130). Uric acid is a powerful determinant of blood pressure over time, independent of lifestyle modifications. PMID:27021006

  13. Photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods for uric acid detection in physiological fluids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qian; Li, Zai-Yong; Wei, Yu-Bo; Yang, Xia; Liu, Lan-Tao; Gong, Cheng-Bin; Ma, Xue-Bing; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2016-09-01

    A photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer for uric acid in physiological fluids was fabricated through a facile and effective method using bio-safe and biocompatible ZnO nanorods as a support. The strategy was carried out by introducing double bonds on the surface of the ZnO nanorods with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods was then prepared by surface polymerization using uric acid as template, water-soluble 5-[(4-(methacryloyloxy)phenyl)diazenyl]isophthalic acid as functional monomer, and triethanolamine trimethacryl ester as cross-linker. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods showed good photoresponsive properties, high recognition ability, and fast binding kinetics toward uric acid, with a dissociation constant of 3.22×10(-5)M in aqueous NaH2PO4 buffer at pH=7.0 and a maximal adsorption capacity of 1.45μmolg(-1). Upon alternate irradiation at 365 and 440nm, the surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods can quantitatively uptake and release uric acid. PMID:27207036

  14. The cockroach Blattella germanica obtains nitrogen from uric acid through a metabolic pathway shared with its bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Navarrete, Rafael; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Belles, Xavier; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo; Peretó, Juli

    2014-07-01

    Uric acid stored in the fat body of cockroaches is a nitrogen reservoir mobilized in times of scarcity. The discovery of urease in Blattabacterium cuenoti, the primary endosymbiont of cockroaches, suggests that the endosymbiont may participate in cockroach nitrogen economy. However, bacterial urease may only be one piece in the entire nitrogen recycling process from insect uric acid. Thus, in addition to the uricolytic pathway to urea, there must be glutamine synthetase assimilating the released ammonia by the urease reaction to enable the stored nitrogen to be metabolically usable. None of the Blattabacterium genomes sequenced to date possess genes encoding for those enzymes. To test the host's contribution to the process, we have sequenced and analysed Blattella germanica transcriptomes from the fat body. We identified transcripts corresponding to all genes necessary for the synthesis of uric acid and its catabolism to urea, as well as for the synthesis of glutamine, asparagine, proline and glycine, i.e. the amino acids required by the endosymbiont. We also explored the changes in gene expression with different dietary protein levels. It appears that the ability to use uric acid as a nitrogen reservoir emerged in cockroaches after its age-old symbiotic association with bacteria.

  15. The Relation between Serum Uric Acid and HbA1c Is Dependent upon Hyperinsulinemia in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuliang; Bu, Hemei; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to explore the dependent condition of the relationship between uric acid and blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods. We measured the HbA1c, serum uric acid, creatinine, lipids profiles, and so forth of 605 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were performed on each patient. The population was divided into high and low insulin groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between uric acid and HbA1c. Results. Serum uric acid and HbA1c levels were low in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients. However, we found no significant relationship between uric acid and HbA1c by regression analysis after adjusting total insulin. The concentration of uric acid was inversely correlated with HbA1c in the high insulin group, regardless of patient sex. However, no associations were found in low insulin group. Conclusions. The negative correlation between uric acid and HbA1c is conditional in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients and is related to hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, uric acid is likely only useful as a biomarker of blood glucose in patients exhibiting hyperinsulinemia. PMID:27403443

  16. [Clinical value of the sequential study of the uric acid in CSF in patients with cerebral diseases: Part I. Brain tumor and the effect of irradiation].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Wakisaka, S; Kinoshita, K; Adachi, H

    1984-03-01

    Uric acid is the end product of the purine metabolism in the human and is mainly excreted to the urine. The studies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) uric acid in patients with various neurological diseases were reported in the literature. In the present study the authors discussed the clinical value of the sequential study of the CSF uric acid content in patients with brain tumors. CSF was investigated for uric acid in 23 controls and 30 cases of brain tumor. The results were as follows: The mean value and standard deviation of the uric acid in CSF in controls was 0.23 +/- 0.13 mg/dl. The uric acid in CSF increased in patients with malignant brain tumor (0.49 +/- 0.22 mg/dl, p less than 0.005), but was in normal range in patients with benign brain tumor (0.32 +/- 0.13 mg/dl, 0.10 less than p less than 0.25). There was no significant correlation between CSF uric acid and CSF protein contents. Uric acid in the lumbar CSF was approximately 4 times higher than in the ventricular CSF in patients with brain tumor. The CSF uric acid had progressively increased during irradiation to the whole brain. The factors contributing to increase of the uric acid in CSF were thought to be increased permeability of blood-CSF barrier, global damage of brain tissue, increased nucleic acid catabolism in the central nervous system (CNS) for example in tumor, inflammation or immunoreaction, increased of xanthine, hypoxanthine or xanthine oxidase activity in the CNS, directly increased of plasma components into the CSF due to such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, bleeding in the tumor or surgical operation, dysfunction of the CSF dynamics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Validation of a multi-analyte HPLC-DAD method for determination of uric acid, creatinine, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid and 2-methylhippuric acid in human urine.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Grunwald, Soeren; Hoeke, Henrike; Mueller, Andrea; Roeder, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin; Wissenbach, Dirk K

    2015-08-15

    During the last decades exposure sciences and epidemiological studies attracts more attention to unravel the mechanisms for the development of chronic diseases. According to this an existing HPLC-DAD method for determination of creatinine in urine samples was expended for seven analytes and validated. Creatinine, uric acid, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were separated by gradient elution (formate buffer/methanol) using an Eclipse Plus C18 Rapid Resolution column (4.6mm×100mm). No interfering signals were detected in mobile phase. After injection of blank urine samples signals for the endogenous compounds but no interferences were detected. All analytes were linear in the selected calibration range and a non weighted calibration model was chosen. Bias, intra-day and inter-day precision for all analytes were below 20% for quality control (QC) low and below 10% for QC medium and high. The limits of quantification in mobile phase were in line with reported reference values but had to be adjusted in urine for homovanillic acid (45mg/L), niacinamide 58.5(mg/L), and indole-3-acetic acid (63mg/L). Comparison of creatinine data obtained by the existing method with those of the developed method showing differences from -120mg/L to +110mg/L with a mean of differences of 29.0mg/L for 50 authentic urine samples. Analyzing 50 authentic urine samples, uric acid, creatinine, hippuric acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were detected in (nearly) all samples. However, homovanillic acid was detected in 40%, niacinamide in 4% and indole-3-acetic acid was never detected within the selected samples.

  18. The Use of Serum Uric Acid Concentration as an Indicator of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Success

    PubMed Central

    Menenakos, Evangelos; Doulami, Georgia; Tzanetakou, Irene P.; Natoudi, Maria; Kokoroskos, Nikolaos; Almpanopoulos, Konstantinos; Leandros, Emmanouil; Zografos, George; Theodorou, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) effectively reduces weight by restricting gastric capacity and altering gut hormones levels. We designed a prospective study to investigate the correlation of serum uric acid (SUA) concentration and weight loss. SUA and body mass index (BMI) were measured preoperatively and on first postoperative month and year in patients who underwent LSG in our department of bariatric surgery. Data on 55 patients were analyzed. Preoperative SUA concentration had a significant positive correlation with percentage of total weight loss (TWL) on first postoperative month (P = 0.001) and year (P = 0.002). SUA concentration on first postoperative month had a positive correlation with percentage of TWL on first postoperative year (P = 0.004). SUA concentration could be used as a predictor of LSG's success and could help in early detection of patients with rapid loss of weight, in order to prevent complications. PMID:25594659

  19. Label-free and selective sensing of uric acid with gold nanoclusters as optical probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chang, Yong; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhang, Pu; Lie, Shao Qing; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-05-15

    Clinically, the amount of uric acid (UA) in biological fluids is closely related to some diseases such as hyperuricemia and gout, thus it is of great significance to sense UA in clinical samples. In this work, red gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with relatively high fluorescence quantum yield and strong fluorescence emission were facilely available using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as template. The fluorescence of BSA-protected AuNCs can be sensitively quenched by H2O2, which is further capable of sensing UA through the specific catalytic oxidation with uricase, since it generates stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 by-product. The proposed assay allows for the selective detection of UA in the range of 10-800 μM with a detection limit of 6.6 μM, which is applicable to sense UA in clinical samples with satisfactory results, suggesting its great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26992526

  20. Analytical methods for measuring uric acid in biological samples and food products.

    PubMed

    Pachla, L A; Reynolds, D L; Wright, D S; Kissinger, P T

    1987-01-01

    During the last 7 decades, uric acid methodology has kept pace with the introduction of state-of-the-art technology (e.g., spectroscopy, electrochemistry, chromatography) or the discovery of unique chemical processes (e.g., redox, enzymatic). We envision this practice will continue in the future. There never will be a single analytical method applicable for biofluids or foodstuffs. Therefore, it is imperative that the analyst not only understand the advantages and disadvantages of a procedure, but also thoroughly understand its underlying chemical and technological principles. Since many procedures available for analysis of biofluids and foodstuffs rely on identical chemical or technological principles, this report shall review both sample types and the available spectroscopic, electroanalytical, and chromatographic methods.

  1. Cu nanoparticles incorporated polypyrrole modified GCE for sensitive simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Ulubay, Sükriye; Dursun, Zekerya

    2010-01-15

    Cu nanoparticles have been electrochemically incorporated polypyrrole film that was used for modification of the glassy carbon electrode surface. The performance of the electrode has been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and atomic force microscopy. The electrode has shown high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) simultaneously in a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.00). The electrocatalytic oxidation currents of UA and DA were found linearly related to concentration over the range 1x10(-9) to 1x10(-5)M for UA and 1x10(-9) to 1x10(-7)M for DA using DPVs method. The detection limits were determined as 8x10(-10)M (s/n=3) for UA and 8.5x10(-10)M (s/n=3) for DA at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  2. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects.

  3. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects. PMID:27652270

  4. Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Drink and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in US Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fructose-induced hyperuricemia might have a causal role in metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and other chronic disease. However, no study has investigated whether sugar added to foods or sugar-sweetened beverages, which are major sources of fructose, are associated with serum uric acid concentration...

  5. Effect of processing parameters for electrocatalytic properties of SnO(2) thin film matrix for uric acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kashima; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2014-02-21

    RF sputtered tin oxide (SnO2) thin film matrix has been efficiently exploited for the detection of uric acid. The deposition parameters for SnO2 thin film have been optimized to yield better electrocatalytic properties. A correlation between its electrocatalytic properties with the structural and electrical properties has been made. SnO2 thin film prepared under optimized growth parameter (70% argon in reactive gas ambient of Ar and O2) exhibits higher mobility of charge carrier and high carrier concentration thereby resulting in enhanced charge transfer characteristics. High surface coverage of uricase onto SnO2 thin films (4.28 × 10(-4) mole cm(-2)), low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (km) 0.18 mM, good linearity in detection of uric acid in the range 0.05-1.00 mM and a fast response of 5 s are attractive features of prepared SnO2 thin film based bioelectrodes for efficient detection of uric acid. The nanoporous and rough surface morphology of SnO2 thin film besides its high carrier mobility in comparison to that of ITO is responsible for the obtained enhanced sensitivity (∼700 μA mM(-1)) and improved sensing response characteristics towards uric acid. PMID:24396852

  6. Potential Role of Uric Acid in Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension, Kidney Injury, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Is It Time for Reappraisal?

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Zohreh; Rasheed, Kashef; Kapusta, Daniel R.; Reisin, Efrain

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid concentration is a common laboratory finding in subjects with metabolic syndrome/obesity, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular events. Hyperuricemia has been attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and to decreased uric acid excretion in kidney dysfunction and is not acknowledged as a main mediator of metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder development. However, more recent investigations have altered this traditional view and shown by providing compelling evidence to support an independent link between hyperuricemia and increased risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorders. However, despite these new findings, controversy regarding the exact role of uric acid in inducing these diseases remains to be unfolded. Furthermore, recent data suggest that the high-fructose diet in the United State, as a major cause of hyperuricemia, may be contributing to the metabolic syndrome/obesity epidemic, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorder. Our focus in this review is to discuss the available evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder; and the potential pathophysiology mechanisms involved. PMID:23588856

  7. Are There Any Promising Biochemical Correlates of Achievement Behavior and Motivation? The Evidence for Serum Uric Acid and Serum Cholesterol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasl, Stanislav V.

    1974-01-01

    This review examines the available evidence in support of the argument that serum uric acid (SUA) possesses considerable promise as an indicator of one type of biochemical influence on achievement behavior. The evidence arguing for further research into the role of serum cholesterol in achievement behavior is also examined. (Author/JR)

  8. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Chihiro; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects. PMID:27652270

  9. Effect of uric acid on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Zhou, Y; Cheng, S; Sun, J L; Yao, H; Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigated the effect of uric acid (UA) on hepatocyte mitochondria. Hepatocytes cultured in vitro were treated with varying concentrations of UA. The change in apoptotic activity was detected by flow cytometry. The DNA damage index 8-hydroxy-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG) and mitochondrial function indices succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome C oxidase (CCO), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were detected by enzyme assays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was confirmed by a dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate assay. We observed an increase in apoptotic activity, ROS accumulation, and 8-OHdG activity in hepatocytes treated with UA for extended periods, indicating DNA damage; specifically, we observed a significant increase in these activities 48, 72, and 96 h after UA addition, compared to those observed at 24 h (P < 0.05). Cells treated with 30 mg/dL UA for 96 h showed a peak in apoptotic activity. We also observed a significant decrease in ATP, SDH, and CCO activities with the increase in uric acid concentration over time. Cells treated with 30 mg/dL UA for 96 h showed the highest ATP levels, while SDH and CCO activities at 48, 72, and 96 h post-UA treatment were significantly lower than those at 24 h (P < 0.01). Moreover, cells treated with 30 mg/dL UA showed a 0.02 ± 0.02 and 0.15 ± 0.01 mmol/ mg/min decrease in SDH and CCO levels after 72 h. Therefore, we concluded that high concentrations of UA may induce oxidative stress in hepatocyte mitochondria, increasing ROS production and ultimately resulting in mitochondrial damage. PMID:27420973

  10. Changes in serum uric acid levels after allogeneic hematologic stem cell transplantation: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Hyun; Park, Jin Kyun; Lee, Eunyoung Emily; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background Since cell turnover in the hematopoietic system constitutes a major source of uric acid (UA) production, we investigated whether hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with significant changes in serum UA levels in patients with hematological disorders. Methods Patients who underwent HSCT at our institution between 2001 and 2012 were retrospectively enrolled. Serum UA levels at 3 months before, 1 week before, and 3 months and 1 year after HSCT were examined. Results Complete clinical and laboratory information including data regarding UA levels was available for 93 patients. At baseline, the mean UA level was 4.9±2.1 mg/dL, with an overall prevalence of hyperuricemia of 15% (defined as serum UA>6.8 mg/dL). Mean UA levels tended to be higher in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (4.8±2.0 mg/dL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (5.1±2.3 mg/dL) and lower in patients with aplastic anemia (mean, 4.2±1.8 mg/dL). UA levels dropped during myeloablative conditioning, reaching a nadir on the day of HSCT (3.27±1.4 mg/dL). Over the 3 months following HSCT, UA levels rose sharply (5.0±2.1 mg/dL) and remained stable up to 1 year after HSCT (5.5±1.6 mg/dL). UA levels in HSCT recipients at 12 months correlated with those of their respective graft donors (Pearson r=0.406, P=0.001). Conclusion HSCT is associated with significant changes in uric acid levels in patients with hematologic disorders. PMID:27722132

  11. Effect of serum uric acid on the positive predictive value of dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aribas, Alpay; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Alibasic, Hayrudin; Yildirim, Oguzhan; Sertdemir, Ahmet Lutfi; Karanfil, Mustafa; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2016-03-01

    There is controversial data regarding the relationship between uric acid (UA) and coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events. Despite the deleterious effects of hyperuricemia on endothelial function, the effect of UA on myocardial ischemia has not been previously studied. We aimed to investigate the relationship between UA and myocardial ischemia that was identified using dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). In this retrospective study, the laboratory and DSE reports of 548 patients were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of ischemia and further subdivided into three groups according to the extent of ischemia (none, ischemia in 1-3 segments, ischemia in >3 segments). Serum UA levels were compared. Determinants of ischemia were assessed using a regression model. UA was increased in patients with ischemia and was correlated with the number of ischemic segments (p < 0.001). A cutoff value of UA > 5 mg/dl had 63.9 % sensitivity, 62.0 % specificity, 42.5 % positive predictive value (PPV), and 79.6 % negative predictive value for ischemia. When the positive DSE exams were further sorted according to the UA cutoff, the PPV of DSE increased from 80.2 to 94.0 %. Uric acid (odds ratio 1.51; 95 % CI 1.14-1.99), diabetes mellitus, HDL and glomerular filtration rate were found to be independent determinants of myocardial ischemia in DSE. Increased UA is associated with both the presence and extent of DSE-identified myocardial ischemia. A UA cutoff may be a good method to improve the PPV of DSE.

  12. The Effects of Lead Exposure on Serum Uric Acid and Hyperuricemia in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haijiang; Huang, Zhijun; Deng, Qihong; Li, Ying; Xiao, Ting; Ning, Xingping; Lu, Yao; Yuan, Hong

    2015-08-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between blood lead levels and both serum uric acid and hyperuricemia in adult residents living within an area of China with lead pollution. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2120 subjects (1180 of whom were male) between the ages of 20 and 75 years who had undergone health examinations at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a lead-polluted area of China between January 2013 and August 2014. Blood lead was positively correlated with serum uric acid in both males (r = 0.095, p = 0.001) and females (r = 0.134, p < 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that for males, blood lead (p = 0.006), age (p = 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.012), education (p = 0.001), triglycerides (TG) (p < 0.001), and serum creatinine (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. For females, blood lead (p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.009), and TG (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. After multiple adjustments, blood lead was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when female subjects were categorized into quartiles (for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 2.190; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.106-4.338; p = 0.025); however, no such association was observed for male subjects. Continuous lead exposure has an independent impact on serum uric acid for both males and females, although this impact is more pronounced for females than for males. Lead exposure is significantly associated with hyperuricemia for females but not for males.

  13. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080

  14. Functionalized-graphene modified graphite electrode for the selective determination of dopamine in presence of uric acid and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Mallesha, Malledevaru; Manjunatha, Revanasiddappa; Nethravathi, C; Suresh, Gurukar Shivappa; Rajamathi, Michael; Melo, Jose Savio; Venkatesha, Thimmappa Venkatarangaiah

    2011-06-01

    Graphene is chemically synthesized by solvothermal reduction of colloidal dispersions of graphite oxide. Graphite electrode is modified with functionalized-graphene for electrochemical applications. Electrochemical characterization of functionalized-graphene modified graphite electrode (FGGE) is carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The behavior of FGGE towards ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) has been investigated by CV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and chronoamperommetry (CA). The FGGE showed excellent catalytic activity towards electrochemical oxidation of AA, DA and UA compared to that of the bare graphite electrode. The electrochemical oxidation signals of AA, DA and UA are well separated into three distinct peaks with peak potential separation of 193mv, 172mv and 264mV between AA-DA, DA-UA and AA-UA respectively in CV studies and the corresponding peak potential separations in DPV mode are 204mv, 141mv and 345mv. The FGGE is successfully used for the simultaneous detection of AA, DA and UA in their ternary mixture and DA in serum and pharmaceutical samples. The excellent electrocatalytic behavior of FGGE may lead to new applications in electrochemical analysis.

  15. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-02-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA.

  16. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  17. PEDOT-Au nanocomposite films for electrochemical sensing of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Mathiyarasu, J; Senthilkumar, S; Phani, K L N; Yegnaraman, V

    2007-06-01

    In this work, conducting polymer impregnated gold nanoparticles are synthesized through a sequence of chemical and electrochemical routes. The nanocomposite film is characterized using UV-vis, FTIR spectroscopy, and SEM techniques to study the formation of oxidized PEDOT and Au0. The advantages of these films are demonstrated for sensing biologically important compounds such as dopamine and uric acid in presence of excess ascorbic acid, one of the major interferants in the detection of DA and UA (mimicking the physiological conditions), with superior selectivity and sensitivity when compared to the polymer film alone. Simultaneous determination is realized at 115 mV and 246 mV for DA and UA, respectively. The PEDOT matrix is recognized to be responsible for the peak separation (selectivity) while also favouring catalytic oxidation of the above compounds and the nanometer-sized gold particles allow nanomolar sensing of DA and UA (sensitivity). Thus, it is possible to detect nanomolar levels of DA and UA in presence of excess of AA. The combined effect of Au nanoparticles and the PEDOT matrix is rationalized that the Aunano surrounded by a "hydrophobic sheath (PEDOT)" tending to reside within these hydrophobic regions of PEDOT, thus favouring the selectivity and sensitivity of the DA/UA detection. This new generation of nanocomposites is expected to enhance the value of electroanalytical techniques, as it is possible to tune their properties suiting the analytical needs.

  18. Uric Acid Induces Hepatic Steatosis by Generation of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Choi, Yea-Jin; Cicerchi, Christina; Kanbay, Mehmet; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Li, Nanxing; Marek, George; Duranay, Murat; Schreiner, George; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Kang, Duk-Hee; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome represents a collection of abnormalities that includes fatty liver, and it currently affects one-third of the United States population and has become a major health concern worldwide. Fructose intake, primarily from added sugars in soft drinks, can induce fatty liver in animals and is epidemiologically associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans. Fructose is considered lipogenic due to its ability to generate triglycerides as a direct consequence of the metabolism of the fructose molecule. Here, we show that fructose also stimulates triglyceride synthesis via a purine-degrading pathway that is triggered from the rapid phosphorylation of fructose by fructokinase. Generated AMP enters into the purine degradation pathway through the activation of AMP deaminase resulting in uric acid production and the generation of mitochondrial oxidants. Mitochondrial oxidative stress results in the inhibition of aconitase in the Krebs cycle, resulting in the accumulation of citrate and the stimulation of ATP citrate lyase and fatty-acid synthase leading to de novo lipogeneis. These studies provide new insights into the pathogenesis of hepatic fat accumulation under normal and diseased states. PMID:23035112

  19. The relationship between uric acid and its oxidative product allantoin: a potential indicator for the evaluation of oxidative stress in birds.

    PubMed

    Tsahar, Ella; Arad, Zeev; Izhaki, Ido; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2006-09-01

    Uric acid is the main nitrogenous waste product in birds but it is also known to be a potent antioxidant. Hominoid primates and birds lack the enzyme urate oxidase, which oxidizes uric acid to allantoin. Consequently, the presence of allantoin in their plasma results from non-enzymatic oxidation. In humans, the allantoin to uric acid ratio in plasma increases during oxidative stress, thus this ratio has been suggested to be an in vivo marker for oxidative stress in humans. We measured the concentrations of uric acid and allantoin in the plasma and ureteral urine of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) at rest, immediately after 30 min of exercise in a hop/hover wheel, and after 1 h of recovery. The plasma allantoin concentration and the allantoin to uric acid ratio did not increase during exercise but we found a positive relationship between the concentrations of uric acid and allantoin in the plasma and in the ureteral urine in the three activity phases. In the plasma, the slope of the regression describing the above positive relationships was significantly higher immediately after activity. We suggest that the slope indicates the rate of uric acid oxidation and that during activity this rate increases as a result of higher production of free radicals. The present study demonstrates that allantoin is present in the plasma and in the ureteral urine of white-crowned sparrows and therefore might be useful as an indicator of oxidative stress in birds.

  20. Effects of low birth weight in 8- to 13-year-old children: implications in endothelial function and uric acid levels.

    PubMed

    Franco, Maria C P; Christofalo, Dejaldo M J; Sawaya, Ana Lydia; Ajzen, Sérgio A; Sesso, Ricardo

    2006-07-01

    Low birth weight has been associated with an increased incidence of adult cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction and high levels of serum uric acid are associated with hypertension. In this study, we have determined whether uric acid is related to blood pressure and vascular function in children with low birth weight. We evaluated vascular function using high-resolution ultrasound, blood pressure, and uric acid levels in 78 children (35 girls, 43 boys, aged 8 to 13 years). Increasing levels of uric acid and systolic blood pressure were observed in children with low birth weight. Birth weight was inversely associated with both systolic blood pressure and uric acid; on the other hand, uric acid levels were directly correlated with systolic blood pressure in children of the entire cohort. Low birth weight was associated with reduced flow-mediated dilation (r=0.427, P<0.001). Because the children with low birth weight had elevated uric acid as well as higher systolic blood pressure levels, we evaluated the correlation between these variables. In the low birth weight group, multiple regression analysis revealed that uric acid (beta=-2.886; SE=1.393; P=0.040) had a graded inverse relationship with flow-mediated dilation, which was not affected in a model adjusting for race and gender. We conclude that children with a history of low birth weight show impaired endothelial function and increased blood pressure and uric acid levels. These findings may be early expressions of vascular compromise, contributing to susceptibility to disease in adult life. PMID:16682609

  1. A common non-synonymous variant in GLUT9 is a determinant of serum uric acid levels in Old Order Amish

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Patrick F.; Parsa, Afshin; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Weir, Matthew R.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Uric acid is the primary end product of purine metabolism. Increased serum uric acid has been associated with gouty arthritis as well as with a variety of cardiovascular related phenotypes. Methods A 500,000 SNP genome wide association study of serum uric acid levels was performed in a cohort of Old Order Amish from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Results The scan confirmed a previously identified region on chromosome 4 to be strongly associated with uric acid levels (p = 4.2×10−11 for rs10489070). Follow-up genotyping revealed a non-synonymous coding SNP (Val253Ile; rs16890979) in GLUT9 that was most strongly associated with uric acid levels, with each copy of the minor allele associated with 0.47 mg/dl less uric acid (95% confidence interval: 0.31 − 0.63; p = 1.43 × 10−11). The effect of this variant tended to be stronger in women than in men (p = 0.16 for sex × genotype interaction). The genotypic effect was not modified by the inclusion of several cardiovascular risk factors suggesting that GLUT9 is directly related to uric acid homeostasis. The same SNP (rs10489070) identified in the Amish genome wide scan was significantly associated with gout in the Framingham Heart Study (p = 0.004). Conclusions We conclude that GLUT9, which is expressed in the kidney may be a novel regulator of uric acid elimination and a common non-synonymous variant in this gene contributes to abnormalities in uric acid homeostasis and gout. PMID:18759275

  2. Serum Uric Acid and Renal Transplantation Outcomes: At Least 3-Year Post-transplant Retrospective Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Gao, Baoshan; Wang, Yuantao; Wang, Gang; Wang, Weigang; Zhu, Yaxiang; Yao, Liyu; Gu, Yiming; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Honglan; Fu, Yaowen

    2015-01-01

    Since the association of serum uric acid and kidney transplant graft outcome remains disputable, we sought to evaluate the predictive value of uric acid level for graft survival/function and the factors could affect uric acid as time varies. A consecutive cohort of five hundred and seventy three recipients transplanted during January 2008 to December 2011 were recruited. Data and laboratory values of our interest were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-transplant for analysis. Cox proportional hazard model, and multiple regression equation were built to adjust for the possible confounding variables and meet our goals as appropriate. The current cohort study lasts for 41.86 ± 15.49 months. Uric acid level is proven to be negatively associated with eGFR at different time point after adjustment for age, body mass index and male gender (standardized β ranges from -0.15 to -0.30 with all P<0.001).Males with low eGFR but high level of TG were on CSA, diuretics and RAS inhibitors and experienced at least one episode of acute rejection and diabetic issue were associated with a higher mean uric acid level. Hyperuricemia was significantly an independent predictor of pure graft failure (hazard ratio=4.01, 95% CI: 1.25-12.91, P=0.02) after adjustment. But it was no longer an independent risk factor for graft loss after adjustment. Interestingly, higher triglyceride level can make incidence of graft loss (hazard ratio=1.442, for each unit increase millimoles per liter 95% CI: 1.008-2.061, P=0.045) and death (hazard ratio=1.717, 95% CI: 1.105-2.665, P=0.016) more likely. The results of our study suggest that post-transplant elevated serum uric acid level is an independent predictor of long-term graft survival and graft function. Together with the high TG level impact on poor outcomes, further investigations for therapeutic effect are needed. PMID:26208103

  3. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization. PMID:27108970

  4. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  5. Serum Uric Acid and Its Association with Longitudinal Cognitive Change Among Urban Adults.

    PubMed

    Beydoun, May A; Canas, Jose-Atilio; Dore, Gregory A; Beydoun, Hind A; Rostant, Ola S; Fanelli-Kuczmarski, Marie T; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2016-04-21

    Uric acid, a waste metabolite among humans, was linked to various cognitive outcomes. We describe sex and age-group specific associations of baseline serum uric acid (SUAbase) and significant change in SUA (ΔSUA: 1 versus 0 = decrease versus no change; 2 versus 0 = increase versus no change) with longitudinal annual rate of cognitive change among a large sample of urban adults. Data from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study, 2004-2009 (visit 1) and 2009-2013 (visit 2) were used. Of 3,720 adults selected at baseline (age range: 30-64 y), complete data were available for N = 1,487-1,602 with a mean repeat of 1.5-1.7 visits/participant. Cognitive test domains spanned attention, processing speed, learning/memory, executive function, visuo-spatial/visuo-construction ability, language/verbal, and global cognitive function. SUA was measured at both visits. Multiple mixed-effects regression analyses were conducted. In the total population, a higher SUAbase was associated with a faster annual rate of decline on a measure of visual memory/visuo-construction ability (the Benton Visual Retention Test) by γ= 0.07 with a standard error of 0.02, p < 0.001. Among older men, a significant increase in SUA was associated with slower decline on a test of attention/processing speed, namely Trailmaking test, Part A, measured in seconds to completion (γ= -6.91 ± 1.73, p < 0.001). In sum, a higher SUAbase was associated with faster cognitive decline over-time in a visual memory/visuo-construction ability test. ΔSUA had particular beneficial effects of an increasing ΔSUA on the domain of attention/processing speed among older men. More longitudinal studies are needed to examine cognitive domain-specific effects of over-time change in SUA within sex and age groups. PMID:27104899

  6. ZnO-CuxO/polypyrrole nanocomposite modified electrode for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Kh; Hajheidari, N

    2015-03-15

    Novel zinc oxide (ZnO) nanosheets and copper oxide (CuxO, CuO, and Cu2O) decorated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers (ZnO-CuxO-PPy) have been successfully fabricated for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The morphology and structure of ZnO-CuxO-PPy nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. Compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE), PPy/GCE, CuxO-PPy/GCE, and ZnO-PPy/GCE, ZnO-CuxO-PPy/GCE exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activities toward the oxidation of AA, DA, and UA with increasing peak currents and decreasing oxidation overpotentials. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) results show that AA, DA, and UA could be detected selectively and sensitively at ZnO-CuxO-PPy/GCE with peak-to-peak separation of 150 and 154 mV for AA-DA and DA-UA, respectively. The calibration curves for AA, DA, and UA were obtained in the ranges of 0.2 to 1.0 mM, 0.1 to 130.0 μM, and 0.5 to 70.0 μM, respectively. The lowest detection limits (signal/noise=3) were 25.0, 0.04, and 0.2 μM for AA, DA, and UA, respectively. With good selectivity and sensitivity, the current method was applied to the determination of DA in injectable medicine and UA in urine samples.

  7. ZnO-CuxO/polypyrrole nanocomposite modified electrode for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Kh; Hajheidari, N

    2015-03-15

    Novel zinc oxide (ZnO) nanosheets and copper oxide (CuxO, CuO, and Cu2O) decorated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers (ZnO-CuxO-PPy) have been successfully fabricated for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The morphology and structure of ZnO-CuxO-PPy nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. Compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE), PPy/GCE, CuxO-PPy/GCE, and ZnO-PPy/GCE, ZnO-CuxO-PPy/GCE exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activities toward the oxidation of AA, DA, and UA with increasing peak currents and decreasing oxidation overpotentials. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) results show that AA, DA, and UA could be detected selectively and sensitively at ZnO-CuxO-PPy/GCE with peak-to-peak separation of 150 and 154 mV for AA-DA and DA-UA, respectively. The calibration curves for AA, DA, and UA were obtained in the ranges of 0.2 to 1.0 mM, 0.1 to 130.0 μM, and 0.5 to 70.0 μM, respectively. The lowest detection limits (signal/noise=3) were 25.0, 0.04, and 0.2 μM for AA, DA, and UA, respectively. With good selectivity and sensitivity, the current method was applied to the determination of DA in injectable medicine and UA in urine samples. PMID:25576954

  8. Conductimetric Biosensor for the Detection of Uric Acid by Immobilization Uricase on Nata de Coco Membrane—Pt Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Srihardiastutie, Arie

    2011-01-01

    A conductimetric enzyme biosensor for uric acid detection has been developed. The uricase, as enzyme, is isolated from Candida utilis and immobilized on a nata de coco membrane-Pt electrode. The biosensor demonstrates a linear response to urate over the concentration range 1–6 ppm and has good selectivity properties. The response is affected by the membrane thickness and pH change in the range 7.5–9.5. The response time is three minutes in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. Application of the biosensor to the determination of uric acid in human serum gave results that compared favourably with those obtained by medical laboratory. The operational stability of the biosensor was not less than three days and the relative error is smaller than 10%. PMID:21792276

  9. Conductimetric biosensor for the detection of uric Acid by immobilization uricase on nata de coco membrane-pt electrode.

    PubMed

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Srihardiastutie, Arie

    2011-01-01

    A conductimetric enzyme biosensor for uric acid detection has been developed. The uricase, as enzyme, is isolated from Candida utilis and immobilized on a nata de coco membrane-Pt electrode. The biosensor demonstrates a linear response to urate over the concentration range 1-6 ppm and has good selectivity properties. The response is affected by the membrane thickness and pH change in the range 7.5-9.5. The response time is three minutes in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. Application of the biosensor to the determination of uric acid in human serum gave results that compared favourably with those obtained by medical laboratory. The operational stability of the biosensor was not less than three days and the relative error is smaller than 10%.

  10. Uric acid and transforming growth factor in fructose-induced production of reactive oxygen species in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P; Maarman, Gerald J; Ojuka, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The consumption of fructose, a major constituent of the modern diet, has raised increasing concern about the effects of fructose on health. Research suggests that excessive intake of fructose (>50 g/d) causes hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, de novo lipogenesis by the liver, and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle. In a number of tissues, uric acid has been shown to stimulate the production of ROS via activation of transforming growth factor β1 and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 4. The role of uric acid in fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, however, has not been investigated. This review examines the evidence for fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, highlights proposed mechanisms, and identifies gaps in current knowledge.

  11. Hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D based on the uric acid metabolism enzymes PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Gang; Hou, Pi-Yong; Zhang, Xi; He, Yi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Anderson, Samantha; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Allopurinol is a commonly used medication to treat hyperuricemia and its complications. Pallidifloside D, a saponin glycoside constituent from the total saponins of Smilax riparia, had been proved to enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol based on uric acid metabolism enzyme XOD. In this study, we evaluated whether Pallidifloside D (5mg/kg) enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol (5mg/kg) related to others uric acid metabolism enzymes such as PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT. We found that, compared with allopurinol alone, the combination of allopurinol and Pallidifloside D significantly up-regulated HGPRT mRNA expression and down-regulated the mRNA expression of PRPS and PRPPAT in PC12 cells (all P<0.01). These results strongly suggest that hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D via numerous mechanisms and our data may have a potential value in clinical practice in the treatment of gout and other hyperuricemic conditions. PMID:27370097

  12. Uric acid and transforming growth factor in fructose-induced production of reactive oxygen species in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P; Maarman, Gerald J; Ojuka, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The consumption of fructose, a major constituent of the modern diet, has raised increasing concern about the effects of fructose on health. Research suggests that excessive intake of fructose (>50 g/d) causes hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, de novo lipogenesis by the liver, and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle. In a number of tissues, uric acid has been shown to stimulate the production of ROS via activation of transforming growth factor β1 and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 4. The role of uric acid in fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, however, has not been investigated. This review examines the evidence for fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, highlights proposed mechanisms, and identifies gaps in current knowledge. PMID:26946251

  13. Uric acid and cognition in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Annanmaki, Tua; Pohja, Marjatta; Parviainen, Tiina; Hakkinen, Paula; Murros, Kari

    2011-06-01

    Cognitive changes are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Low plasma uric acid (UA) level is associated with risk of PD and predicts faster progression of motor symptoms in established disease. Whether UA levels predict cognitive changes has not been studied. In a crossectional study, our group has previously shown an association of plasma and urine UA levels with cognition in PD. The aim of the present controlled longitudinal study was to examine the evolution of cognitive changes and the prognostic value of the UA levels on cognition in the previously reported PD-patient cohort. Of the original 40 patients, 31 were available for follow-up after three years. Both plasma and daily urine UA levels were measured, nutrition was evaluated using 4-day dietary recall diary and cognition was assessed by a thorough neuropsychological examination including computerized tasks with Cognispeed©. The plasma and urine UA levels of the patients remained stable during the follow-up. At the same time, the rate of cognitive decline was unexpectedly slow. A statistically significant deterioration was noted in verbal fluency (p=0.04) and in Cognispeed©'s vigilance task (p=0.0001). In forward linear regression analysis only the baseline daily urine UA level contributed to verbal fluency (p=0.01), picture completion (p=0.001), block design (p=0.006), vigilance (p=0.006), subtraction (p=0.01) and statement verification (p=0.04) tasks. The implications of the study results are discussed.

  14. Evaluation of postmortem urea nitrogen, creatinine and uric acid levels in pericardial fluid in forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Li; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Li, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Dong; Quan, Li; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2005-10-01

    In postmortem biochemistry, there is insufficient data available for the practical analysis of factors in the pericardial fluid. The aim of the present study was to examine postmortem pericardial fluid for urea nitrogen (UN), creatinine (Cr) and uric acid (UA) levels to investigate the pathophysiology of death in forensic autopsy cases (total, n = 409; within 48 h postmortem), which included blunt, sharp instrument injury, asphyxiation, drowning, fire fatalities, hyperthermia, hypothermia, methamphetamine-related fatalities, other poisoning, delayed death from trauma and natural diseases. There was a significant elevation in the three markers for chronic renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, hyperthermia, hypothermia, methamphetamine fatalities and delayed traumatic death, which was comparable with the clinical criteria for their serum levels. These postmortem findings showed azotemia due to renal failure, elevated protein catabolism and rhabdomyolysis. Although the pericardial levels were otherwise similar to the clinical serum reference ranges, only the drowning fatalities showed significantly lower levels for each marker. These observations suggested the stability of UN, Cr and UA in the pericardial fluid within 48 h postmortem and their usefulness for the pathophysiological investigation of death involving azotemia.

  15. Lonicera hypoglauca inhibits xanthine oxidase and reduces serum uric acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shih-Chang; Yang, Chen-Wei; Tseng, Yen-Hsueh; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2009-03-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and then to uric acid, and is a key enzyme in the pathogenesis of hyperuricemia. The ability of extracts of Lonicera hypoglauca (Caprifoliaceae) to inhibit XOD was investigated in this study. An ethanol extract (LH-crude) of the leaves of L. hypoglauca and its derived EtOAc soluble sub-fractions (LH-EA) significantly inhibited XOD activity, with IC50 values for LH-crude and LH-EA of 48.8 and 35.2 microg/mL. Moreover, LH-EA reduced serum urate levels IN VIVO in a potassium oxonate-induced hyperuricemic mouse model, by 70.1% and 93.7% of the hyperuricemic untreated group at doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg of LH-EA, respectively. Finally, we used bioactivity-guided fractionation to isolate a new bisflavonoid, loniceraflavone, which showed significant inhibition of XOD (IC50=0.85 microg/mL). These results suggest that L. hypoglauca and its extracts may have a considerable potential for development as an anti-hyperuricemia agent for clinical application.

  16. Fungal Community Associated with Dactylopius (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Dactylopiidae) and Its Role in Uric Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    We studied fungal species associated with the carmine cochineal Dactylopius coccus and other non-domesticated Dactylopius species using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Thirty seven fungi were isolated in various culture media from insect males and females from different developmental stages and Dactylopius species. 26S rRNA genes and ITS sequences, from cultured fungal isolates revealed different species of Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Debaryomyces, Trametes, and Penicillium, which are genera newly associated with Dactylopius. Uric acid (UA) and uricase activity were detected in tissues extracts from different insect developmental stages. However, accumulation of high UA levels and low uricase activities were found only after antifungal treatments, suggesting an important role of fungal species in its metabolism. Additionally, uricolytic fungal isolates were identified and characterized that presumably are involved in nitrogen recycling metabolism. After metagenomic analyses from D. coccus gut and hemolymph DNA and from two published data sets, we confirmed the presence of fungal genes involved in UA catabolism, suggesting that fungi help in the nitrogen recycling process in Dactylopius by uricolysis. All these results show the importance of fungal communities in scale insects such as Dactylopius. PMID:27446001

  17. Fungal Community Associated with Dactylopius (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Dactylopiidae) and Its Role in Uric Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    We studied fungal species associated with the carmine cochineal Dactylopius coccus and other non-domesticated Dactylopius species using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Thirty seven fungi were isolated in various culture media from insect males and females from different developmental stages and Dactylopius species. 26S rRNA genes and ITS sequences, from cultured fungal isolates revealed different species of Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Debaryomyces, Trametes, and Penicillium, which are genera newly associated with Dactylopius. Uric acid (UA) and uricase activity were detected in tissues extracts from different insect developmental stages. However, accumulation of high UA levels and low uricase activities were found only after antifungal treatments, suggesting an important role of fungal species in its metabolism. Additionally, uricolytic fungal isolates were identified and characterized that presumably are involved in nitrogen recycling metabolism. After metagenomic analyses from D. coccus gut and hemolymph DNA and from two published data sets, we confirmed the presence of fungal genes involved in UA catabolism, suggesting that fungi help in the nitrogen recycling process in Dactylopius by uricolysis. All these results show the importance of fungal communities in scale insects such as Dactylopius. PMID:27446001

  18. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Progression of Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Individuals Without Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Maahs, David M.; Johnson, Richard J.; Jalal, Diana I.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rivard, Christopher; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine uric acid (UA) as a possible predictor of the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) using data from the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CAC was measured by electron beam tomography at the baseline and at a follow-up 6.0 ± 0.5 years later. The study population included 443 participants with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects who were free of diagnosed coronary artery disease at baseline. The presence of renal disease was defined by the presence of albuminuria and/or low glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS In subjects without renal disease, serum UA predicted CAC progression (odds ratio 1.30 [95% CI 1.07–1.58], P = 0.007) independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and the presence of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Serum UA levels predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and may be useful in identifying who is at risk for vascular disease in the absence of significant chronic kidney disease. PMID:20798338

  19. Uric acid enhances the antitumor immunity of dendritic cell-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihan; Ma, Xuelei; Su, Chao; Peng, Bin; Du, Jing; Jia, Hongyuan; Luo, Min; Fang, Chunju; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) released from dying cells has been recognized by the immune system as a danger signal. In response to UA, dendritic cells (DC) in the immune system mature and enhance the T cell response to foreign antigens. It is conceivable that the antitumor immunity of a tumor vaccine could be promoted by the administration of UA. To test this concept, we applied UA as an adjuvant to a DC-based vaccine, and discovered that the administration of UA as an adjuvant significantly enhanced the ability of the tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine in delaying the tumor growth. The antitumor activity was achieved with adoptively transferred lymphocytes, and both CD8(+) T cells and NK cells were required to achieve effective immunity. This resulted in an increased accumulation of activated CD8(+) T cells and an elevated production of IFN-γ. Collectively, our study shows that the administration of UA enhances the antitumor activity of tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine, thus providing the preclinical rationale for the application of UA in DC-based vaccine strategies.

  20. Fungal Community Associated with Dactylopius (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Dactylopiidae) and Its Role in Uric Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    We studied fungal species associated with the carmine cochineal Dactylopius coccus and other non-domesticated Dactylopius species using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Thirty seven fungi were isolated in various culture media from insect males and females from different developmental stages and Dactylopius species. 26S rRNA genes and ITS sequences, from cultured fungal isolates revealed different species of Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Debaryomyces, Trametes, and Penicillium, which are genera newly associated with Dactylopius. Uric acid (UA) and uricase activity were detected in tissues extracts from different insect developmental stages. However, accumulation of high UA levels and low uricase activities were found only after antifungal treatments, suggesting an important role of fungal species in its metabolism. Additionally, uricolytic fungal isolates were identified and characterized that presumably are involved in nitrogen recycling metabolism. After metagenomic analyses from D. coccus gut and hemolymph DNA and from two published data sets, we confirmed the presence of fungal genes involved in UA catabolism, suggesting that fungi help in the nitrogen recycling process in Dactylopius by uricolysis. All these results show the importance of fungal communities in scale insects such as Dactylopius.

  1. The Relationship between Uric Acid Levels and Huntington’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Auinger, Peggy; Kieburtz, Karl; McDermott, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) may be associated with the progression of Parkinson’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions; however, its association with Huntington’s disease (HD) progression has not been explored. A secondary analysis of 347 subjects from the CARE-HD clinical trial was performed to examine the relationship between baseline UA levels and the level of functional decline in HD. Outcomes included change in scores at 30 months for the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale components. There was less worsening of total functional capacity over time with increasing baseline UA levels (adjusted mean worsening in scores: 3.17, 2.99, 2.95, 2.28, 2.21, from lowest to highest UA quintile, p=0.03). These data suggest a possible association between higher UA levels and slower HD progression, particularly as measured by total functional capacity. If confirmed, UA could be an important predictor and potentially modifiable factor affecting the rate of HD progression. PMID:20063429

  2. Role of Serum Uric Acid and Ferritin in the Development and Progression of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Pisano, Giuseppina; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MS), has emerged as a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since it is potentially progressive towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatic fibrosis, up to cirrhosis and its associated complications, the need for predictive factors of NAFLD and of its advanced forms is mandatory. Despite the current “gold standard” for the assessment of liver damage in NAFLD being liver biopsy, in recent years, several non-invasive tools have been designed as alternatives to histology, of which fibroscan seems the most promising. Among the different serum markers considered, serum uric acid (SUA) and ferritin have emerged as possible predictors of severity of liver damage in NAFLD. In fact, as widely described in this review, they share common pathogenetic pathways and are both associated with hepatic steatosis and MS, thus suggesting a likely synergistic action. Nevertheless, the power of these serum markers seems to be too low if considered alone, suggesting that they should be included in a wider perspective together with other metabolic and biochemical parameters in order to predict liver damage. PMID:27077854

  3. A novel screen-printed microfluidic paper-based electrochemical device for detection of glucose and uric acid in urine.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong; Zhang, Chunsun

    2016-10-01

    A novel screen-printed microfluidic paper-based analytical device with all-carbon electrode-enabled electrochemical assay (SP-ACE-EC-μPAD) has been developed. The fabrication of these devices involved wax screen-printing, which was simple, low-cost and energy-efficient. The working, counter and reference electrodes were screen-printed using carbon ink on the patterned paper devices. Different wax screen-printing processes were examined and optimized, which led to an improved method with a shorter heating time (~5 s) and a lower heating temperature (75 °C). Different printing screens were examined, with a 300-mesh polyester screen yielding the highest quality wax screen-prints. The carbon electrodes were screen-printed on the μPADs and then examined using cyclic voltammetry. The analytical performance of the SP-ACE-EC-μPADs for the detection of glucose and uric acid in standard solutions was investigated. The results were reproducible, with a linear relationship [R(2) = 0.9987 (glucose) or 0.9997 (uric acid)] within the concentration range of interest, and with detection limits as low as 0.35 mM (glucose) and 0.08 mM (uric acid). To determine the clinical utility of the μPADs, chronoamperometry was used to analyze glucose and uric acid in real urine samples using the standard addition method. Our devices were able to detect the analytes of interest in complex real-world biological samples, and have the potential for use in a wide variety of applications.

  4. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuai; Chen, Ying; Hou, Xu; Xu, Donghua; Che, Kui; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Wang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies suggested a possible association between serum uric acid levels and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, but no definite evidence was available. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies were performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases were searched for eligible studies. Study-specific data were combined using random-effect or fixed-effect models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twelve studies were finally included into the meta-analysis, which involved a total of 1388 type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and 4746 patients without peripheral neuropathy. Meta-analysis showed that there were obvious increased serum uric acid levels in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 50.03 μmol/L, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 22.14-77.93, P = 0.0004). Hyperuricemia was also significantly associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes (risk ratio [RR] = 2.83, 95%CI 2.13-3.76, P < 0.00001). Meta-analysis of two studies with adjusted risk estimates showed that hyperuricemia was independently associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients (RR = 1.95, 95%CI 1.23-3.11, P = 0.005). Type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy have obvious increased serum uric acid levels, and hyperuricemia is associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy. Further prospective cohort studies are needed to validate the impact of serum uric acid levels on peripheral neuropathy risk.

  5. A novel screen-printed microfluidic paper-based electrochemical device for detection of glucose and uric acid in urine.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong; Zhang, Chunsun

    2016-10-01

    A novel screen-printed microfluidic paper-based analytical device with all-carbon electrode-enabled electrochemical assay (SP-ACE-EC-μPAD) has been developed. The fabrication of these devices involved wax screen-printing, which was simple, low-cost and energy-efficient. The working, counter and reference electrodes were screen-printed using carbon ink on the patterned paper devices. Different wax screen-printing processes were examined and optimized, which led to an improved method with a shorter heating time (~5 s) and a lower heating temperature (75 °C). Different printing screens were examined, with a 300-mesh polyester screen yielding the highest quality wax screen-prints. The carbon electrodes were screen-printed on the μPADs and then examined using cyclic voltammetry. The analytical performance of the SP-ACE-EC-μPADs for the detection of glucose and uric acid in standard solutions was investigated. The results were reproducible, with a linear relationship [R(2) = 0.9987 (glucose) or 0.9997 (uric acid)] within the concentration range of interest, and with detection limits as low as 0.35 mM (glucose) and 0.08 mM (uric acid). To determine the clinical utility of the μPADs, chronoamperometry was used to analyze glucose and uric acid in real urine samples using the standard addition method. Our devices were able to detect the analytes of interest in complex real-world biological samples, and have the potential for use in a wide variety of applications. PMID:27628060

  6. The facile surface chemical modification of a single glass nanopore and its use in the nonenzymatic detection of uric acid.

    PubMed

    He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Wang, Ping; Chen, Lizhen; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-02-01

    A conical glass nanopore was first modified with ultrathin gold nanofilm via a simple and innovative chemical reduction of HAuCl4 on a surface-attached poly(L-histidine) monolayer in the presence of a mild reductant, NH2OH·HCl, followed by surface functionalization with 2-thiouracil, and exploited for the selective nonenzymatic detection of uric acid and especially for serum sample detection. PMID:25531580

  7. One-step electrochemical synthesis of ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets and their application to the detection of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiujun; Deng, Jianhui; Hou, Yuxin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu

    2015-08-01

    Ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C3N4) with a thickness of about 2 nm were synthesized by a one-step electrochemical method for the first time. The possible mechanism of the electrochemical synthesis was discussed. This as-synthesized g-C3N4 showed intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and was successfully applied for the detection of uric acid.

  8. Serum uric acid correlates in elderly men and women with special reference to body composition and dietary intake (Dutch Nutrition Surveillance System).

    PubMed

    Loenen, H M; Eshuis, H; Löwik, M R; Schouten, E G; Hulshof, K F; Odink, J; Kok, F J

    1990-01-01

    In 460 apparently healthy Dutch elderly, aged 65-79 years, serum uric acid correlates were studied by linear regression analyses, for men and women separately. Diuretic therapy, total serum cholesterol (women only) and creatinine clearance (in bivariate analysis only) were significantly associated with serum uric acid level. Positive associations of serum uric acid with body weight, body mass index, body fatness (men) and lean body mass (men) were observed, with and without adjustment for diuretic therapy, creatinine clearance and age. Serum uric acid levels, whether adjusted or not for these variables and for body mass index, were positively associated with alcohol intake (men) and consumption of meat and fish (women), and inversely with consumption of bread, margarine and milk products (women). These results indicate that limited medication with diuretics, weight control and restriction of alcohol use may help to prevent hyperuricemia in the elderly.

  9. Amperometric uric acid biosensor based on poly(vinylferrocene)-gelatin-carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Erden, Pınar Esra; Kaçar, Ceren; Öztürk, Funda; Kılıç, Esma

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a new uric acid biosensor was constructed based on ferrocene containing polymer poly(vinylferrocene) (PVF), carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT) and gelatin (GEL) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Uricase enzyme (UOx) was immobilized covalently through N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethyaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS) chemistry onto c-MWCNT/GEL/PVF/GCE. The c-MWCNT/GEL/PVF composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Various experimental parameters such as pH, applied potential, enzyme loading, PVF and c-MWCNT concentration were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions the dynamic linear range of uric acid was 2.0×10(-7) M-7.1×10(-4) M (R=0.9993) with the detection limit low to 2.3×10(-8) M. With good selectivity and sensitivity, the biosensor was successfully applied to determine the uric acid in human serum. The results of the biosensor were in good agreement with those obtained from standard method. Therefore, the presented biosensor could be a good promise for practical applications in real samples.

  10. Uric Acid Induces Trophoblast Il-1β Production Via The Inflammasome: Implications For The Pathogenesis Of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Melissa J.; Myrtolli, Kledia; Potter, Julie; Boeras, Crina; Kavathas, Paula B.; Sfakianaki, Anna K.; Tadesse, Serkelem; Norwitz, Errol R.; Guller, Seth; Abrahams, Vikki M.

    2010-01-01

    Problem Preeclampsia is associated with hyperuricemia, which correlates with the disease severity. Levels of circulating uric acid increase before the clinical manifestations, suggesting they may be causally related. Uric acid, or monosodium urate (MSU), activates the Nod-like receptor, Nalp3, leading to inflammasome activation and IL-1β processing. Since preeclampsia is associated with placental immune/inflammatory dysregulation, we sought to determine in the trophoblast, the presence of the Nalp3 inflammasome, and the effect of MSU on its activation. Method of Study Isolated first and third trimester trophoblast were assessed for expression of the inflammasome components, Nalp1, Nalp3 and ASC. First trimester trophoblast cells were incubated with or without MSU, after which, IL-1β secretion and processing and caspase-1 activation was determined. Results Trophoblast cells expressed Nalp1, Nalp3 and ASC under basal conditions. Following incubation with MSU, first trimester trophoblast IL-1β secretion was upregulated. This correlated with increased expression levels of active IL-1β and active caspase-1. ASC knockdown reduced MSU-induced IL-1β secretion. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that uric acid activates the inflammasome in the trophoblast, leading to IL-1β production. This may provide a novel mechanism for the induction of inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface leading to placental dysfunction and adverse pregnancy outcome, including preeclampsia. PMID:21352397

  11. Fructose containing sugars do not raise blood pressure or uric acid at normal levels of human consumption.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Theodore J; Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Rippe, James M

    2015-02-01

    The impact of fructose, commonly consumed with sugars by humans, on blood pressure and uric acid has yet to be defined. A total of 267 weight-stable participants drank sugar-sweetened milk every day for 10 weeks as part of their usual, mixed-nutrient diet. Groups 1 and 2 had 9% estimated caloric intake from fructose or glucose, respectively, added to milk. Groups 3 and 4 had 18% of estimated caloric intake from high fructose corn syrup or sucrose, respectively, added to the milk. Blood pressure and uric acid were determined prior to and after the 10-week intervention. There was no effect of sugar type on either blood pressure or uric acid (interaction P>.05), and a significant time effect for blood pressure was noted (P<.05). The authors conclude that 10 weeks of consumption of fructose at the 50th percentile level, whether consumed as pure fructose or with fructose-glucose-containing sugars, does not promote hyperuricemia or increase blood pressure. PMID:25496265

  12. High Uric Acid (UA) Negatively Affects Serum Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b) Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Yan; Xie, Erfu; Song, Wei-Juan; Yang, Rui-Xia; Yan, Cheng-Jing; Zhang, Bing-Feng; Xu, Hua-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone metastases often occur in the majority of patients with advanced cancer, such as prostate cancer, lung cancer and breast cancer. Serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b), a novel bone resorption marker, has been used gradually in the clinics as a specific and sensitive marker of bone resorption for the early diagnosis of cancer patients with bone metastasis. Here, we reported that high concentrations of uric acid (UA) lead to decrease of TRACP 5b levels and determined whether TRACP 5b level was associated with UA in interference experiment. Methods A total of 77 patients with high concentrations of UA and 77 healthy subjects were tested to evaluate the differences in their TRACP 5b levels. Serial dilutions of UA were respectively spiked with a known concentration of TRACP 5b standard sample, then Serum TRACP 5b was detected by using bone TRAP® Assay. A correction equation was set to eliminate UA-derived TRACP 5b false-decrease. The effect of this correction was evaluated in high-UA individuals. Results The average TRACP level of the high-UA individuals (1.47± 0.62 U/L) was significantly lower than that of the healthy subjects (2.62 ± 0.63 U/L) (t-test, p<0.0001). The UA correction equation derived: ΔTRACP 5b = -1.9751lgΔUA + 3.7365 with an R2 = 0.98899. Application of the UA correction equation resulted in a statistically non-significant difference in TRACP 5b values between the healthy subjects and high-UA individuals (p = 0.24). Conclusions High UA concentrations can falsely decrease TRACP 5b levels due to a method-related systematic error. To avoid misdiagnoses or inappropriate therapeutic decisions, increased attention should be paid to UA interference, when TRACP 5b is used for early diagnosis of cancer patients with bone metastasis, evaluation of the aggressiveness of osteosarcoma or prediction of survival in prostate cancer and breast cancer with bone metastases. PMID:26800211

  13. Upconversion ratiometric fluorescence and colorimetric dual-readout assay for uric acid.

    PubMed

    Fang, Aijin; Wu, Qiongqiong; Lu, Qiujun; Chen, Hongyu; Li, Haitao; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-12-15

    A new upconversion colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescence detection method for uric acid (UA) has been designed. Yb(3+), Er(3+) and Tm(3+) co-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles (UCNPs) was synthesized. The co-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles, emit upconversion fluorescence with four typical emission peaks centered at 490nm, 557nm, 670nm and 705nm under the 980nm near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. The ZnFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) possessing excellent peroxidase-like activity was prepared and used to catalyze oxidation the coupling of N-ethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-3-methylaniline sodium salt (TOPS) and 4-amino-antipyrine (4-AAP) in the presence of H2O2 to form purple products (compound 1) which has a characteristic absorption peak located at 550nm. The upconversion fluorescence at 557nm was quenched by the compound 1 while the upconversion emission at 705nm was essentially unchanged, the fluorescence ratio ((I557/I705)0/(I557/I705)) is positively proportional to UA concentration in existence of uricase. More importantly, colorimetric signal can be easily observed and applied to directly distinguish the concentration of UA by the naked eye. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescence sensing towards UA was 0.01-1mM, the detection limits were as low as 5.79μM and 2.86μM (S/N=3), respectively. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of UA in human serum. These results indicate that the colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescence dual-readout assay method has great potential for applications in physiological and pathological diagnosis. PMID:27471157

  14. Controlling serum uric acid using febuxostat in cancer patients at risk of tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takai, Mihoko; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Fujita, Kei; Lee, Shin; Ookura, Miyuki; Kishi, Shinji; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Yoshida, Akira; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ueda, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a life-threatening oncological emergency, in which control of serum uric acid (S-UA) levels is important. S-UA-lowering efficacy of a new xanthine oxidase inhibitor, febuxostat, was retrospectively evaluated in seven patients with hematological malignancies who were at an intermediate risk of developing TLS. A 10-mg dose of febuxostat was initiated and chemotherapy was started within 24 h of administering the first dose of febuxostat. Febuxostat was continued until at least day 7 of chemotherapy treatment. The UA-lowering treatment was considered effective if febuxostat reduced S-UA levels to ≤7.5 mg/dl by day 5. The mean S-UA level at base line was 6.4±2.6 mg/dl and, on day 5, the mean S-UA level was 4.7±1.8 mg/dl. All the patients achieved S-UA levels ≤7.5 mg/dl. Serum creatinine levels decreased from 0.93±0.25 to 0.85±0.25 mg/dl. The estimated glomerular filtration rate values increased from 69.7±24.5 to 76.9±26.2 ml/min. No adverse reactions were noted during the study period and no patients experienced progressive TLS. Successful control of S-UA and improved renal function were obtained in response to febuxostat treatment in cancer patients at a risk of TLS.

  15. Association between Serum Uric Acid and Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yu, Shasha; Sun, Guozhe; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Zhao; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both the serum uric acid (SUA) level and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) are related to metabolic syndrome. However, the association between SUA and elevated ALT has not been elucidated in the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between SUA and elevated ALT in the general population of China; Methods: A total of 11,572 adults (≥35 years of age) participated in this survey. Elevated ALT was defined as >40 U/L. SUA ≥ 7.0 mg/dL in males or ≥6.0 mg/dL in females was defined as hyperuricemia. SUA within the reference range was divided into quartiles, and its associations with elevated ALT were evaluated by logistic regressions; Results: A total of 7.4% participants had elevated ALT. The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 14.9% in males and 7.3% in females. There was a significantly positive dose-response association between SUA levels and the prevalence of elevated ALT. After adjusting for potential confounders, a positive relationship for elevated ALT was observed in subjects with hyperuricemia (odds ratio [OR]: 2.032, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.443–2.861 for men; OR: 2.045, 95% CI: 1.221–3.425 for women, both p < 0.05). Within the reference range, the association between SUA and elevated ALT persisted in the fourth quartile (OR: 1.467, 95% CI: 1.063–2.025 for men; OR: 1.721, 95% CI: 1.146–2.585 for women, both p < 0.05); Conclusions: Our results indicated that an increased SUA level, even within the reference range, was independently associated with elevated ALT in Chinese adults. PMID:27563918

  16. Serum uric acid and insulin sensitivity in adolescents and adults with and without type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Wadwa, R. Paul; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Decreased insulin sensitivity (IS) exists in type 1 diabetes. Serum uric acid (SUA), whose concentration is related to renal clearance, predicts vascular complications in type 1 diabetes. SUA is also inversely associated with IS in non-diabetics, but has not been examined in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized SUA would be associated with reduced IS in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of SUA with IS was investigated in 254 adolescents with type 1 diabetes and 70 without in the Determinants of Macrovascular Disease in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Study, and in 471 adults with type 1 diabetes and 571 without in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 diabetes (CACTI) study. Results SUA was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes (p<0.0001), but still remained inversely associated with IS after multivariable adjustments- in adolescents (β±SE: −1.99±0.62, p=0.001, R2=2%) and adults (β±SE:−0.91±0.33, p=0.006, R2=6%) with type 1 diabetes, though less strongly than in non-diabetic controls (adolescents: β±SE: −2.70±1.19, p=0.03, R2=15%, adults: β±SE:−5.99±0.75, p<0.0001, R2=39%). Conclusion We demonstrated a significantly weaker relationship between SUA and reduced IS in subjects with type 1 diabetes than non-diabetic controls. PMID:24461546

  17. Serum Uric Acid Is Positively Associated with Handgrip Strength among Japanese Community-Dwelling Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Kasai, Yoshihisa; Kusunoki, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Nobuyuki; Kumagi, Teru; Abe, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Serum uric acid (UA) has strong anti-oxidant properties. Muscle strength and mass decrease with age, and recently, this decrease has been defined as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia may be triggered by oxidative stress. We investigated whether serum UA is associated with handgrip strength (HGS), which is a useful indicator of sarcopenia, among Japanese community-dwelling elderly persons. The present study included 602 men aged 72 ± 7 years and 847 women aged 71 ± 6 years from a rural village. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between serum UA and HGS. In both genders, HGS increased significantly with increased serum UA levels. A multiple linear regression analysis using HGS as an objective variable and various confounding factors as explanatory variables showed that in men age, drinking status, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and estimated glomerular filtration ratio (eGFRCKDEPI) were independently and significantly associated with HGS, and in women, serum UA as well as age, body mass index, drinking status, diastolic blood pressure, and eGFRCKDEPI were independently and significantly associated with HGS. In women, age and multivariate-adjusted HGS were significantly higher in the Quartile-3 (4.8-5.4 mg/dL) and Quartile-4 groups (5.5-9.3 mg/dL) of serum UA than in the lower groups (0.7-4.7 mg/dL). These results suggest that serum UA may have a protective role in aging-associated decline in muscle strength in community-dwelling elderly women. PMID:27078883

  18. Lower Serum Bilirubin and Uric Acid Concentrations in Patients with Parkinson's Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Sun, Li; Hao, Meng-Wei; Hu, Zhao-Ting

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the correlation between bilirubin and uric acid (UA) concentrations and symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Chinese population. A total of 425 PD patients and 460 controls were included in the current study. Patients were diagnosed by a neurologist and assessed using the Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) scale. Venous blood samples were collected, and bilirubin and UA concentrations were analyzed. Compared to controls, indirect bilirubin (IBIL) and UA concentrations were lower in PD patients (P IBIL = 0.015, P UA = 0.000). Serum IBIL in different age subgroups and H&Y stage subgroups were also lower compared to the control group (P IBIL = 0.000, P UA = 0.000) but were not significantly different among these subgroups. Females in the control group had significantly lower serum IBIL and UA concentrations than males (P IBIL = 0.000, P UA = 0.000) and the PD group (P IBIL = 0.027, P UA = 0.000). In early PD (patients with <2-year medical history and no treatment), serum IBIL and UA concentrations were also lower than the controls (P IBIL = 0.013, P UA = 0.000). Although IBIL concentration was positively correlated with UA concentration in controls (R IBIL = 0.229, P IBIL = 0.004), this positive association was not observed in the PD group (R IBIL = -0.032, P IBIL = 0.724). Decreased levels of serum IBIL and UA were observed in PD patients. It is possible that individuals with decreased serum bilirubin and UA concentrations lack the endogenous defense system to prevent peroxynitrite and other free radicals from damaging and destroying dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra. Our results provide a basis for further investigation into the role of bilirubin in PD.

  19. Total antioxidant status at high altitude in lowlanders and native highlanders: role of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanchari; Singh, Som Nath; Ray, Uday Sankar

    2009-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia causes oxidative stress and the antioxidant system of the body plays a vital role in controlling it. Urate contributes up to two-thirds of the antioxidant capacity of human blood. The urate production is catalyzed by xanthine oxidase with a concomitant release of free radicals. This study was designed to appraise the role of urate as an antioxidant at high altitude. The study was conducted on 92 male lowlanders and 66 highlanders after ascent to high altitude at 4560 m. Blood was collected at sea level and after 4 weeks of high altitude exposure. In lowlanders, a significant increase in levels of hydroperoxide (551.4 +/- 4.2 micromol/mL vs. 582.0 +/- 3.55, p < 0.001], protein carbonyl (2.4 +/- 0.11 micromol/mL/mg protein vs. 3.03 +/- 0.11, p < 0.001), TAS (1.02 +/- 0.01 mmol/L vs. 1.19 +/- 0.02, p < 0.001), and UA (298.0 +/- 6.68 micromol/L vs. 383.0 +/- 6.55, p < 0.001) was observed at high altitude. These measurements were significantly lower in highlanders than in lowlanders at high altitude. Total antioxidant status (TAS) and uric acid (UA) showed a positive correlation in lowlanders at sea level and in highlanders at high altitude. Hydroperoxide and TAS also showed a positive correlation in both groups at high altitude. This indicates increased oxidative stress at high altitude despite an increase in antioxidant capacity in lowlanders. To conclude, a hypoxia-induced increase in UA contributes an appreciable portion of plasma total antioxidant capacity, but may not be effective in preventing oxidative stress at high altitude. PMID:19775217

  20. Serum Uric Acid Is Positively Associated with Handgrip Strength among Japanese Community-Dwelling Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Kasai, Yoshihisa; Kusunoki, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Nobuyuki; Kumagi, Teru; Abe, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Serum uric acid (UA) has strong anti-oxidant properties. Muscle strength and mass decrease with age, and recently, this decrease has been defined as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia may be triggered by oxidative stress. We investigated whether serum UA is associated with handgrip strength (HGS), which is a useful indicator of sarcopenia, among Japanese community-dwelling elderly persons. The present study included 602 men aged 72 ± 7 years and 847 women aged 71 ± 6 years from a rural village. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between serum UA and HGS. In both genders, HGS increased significantly with increased serum UA levels. A multiple linear regression analysis using HGS as an objective variable and various confounding factors as explanatory variables showed that in men age, drinking status, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and estimated glomerular filtration ratio (eGFRCKDEPI) were independently and significantly associated with HGS, and in women, serum UA as well as age, body mass index, drinking status, diastolic blood pressure, and eGFRCKDEPI were independently and significantly associated with HGS. In women, age and multivariate-adjusted HGS were significantly higher in the Quartile-3 (4.8–5.4 mg/dL) and Quartile-4 groups (5.5–9.3 mg/dL) of serum UA than in the lower groups (0.7–4.7 mg/dL). These results suggest that serum UA may have a protective role in aging-associated decline in muscle strength in community-dwelling elderly women. PMID:27078883

  1. Influence of Salt Intake on Association of Blood Uric Acid with Hypertension and Related Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lei; Zhang, Mingtao; Han, Wei; Tang, Yong; Xue, Fang; Liang, Shaohua; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Weizhi; Asaiti, Kuliqian; Wang, Yanhong; Pang, Haiyu; Wang, Zixing; Wang, Yuyan; Qiu, Changchun; Jiang, Jingmei

    2016-01-01

    Background A relationship of blood uric acid (UA) with hypertension and cardiovascular risk is under debate thus salt intake is hypothesized to contribute to such associations. Methods In this cross-sectional study, stratified cluster random sampling elicited a sample of 1805 Kazakhs with 92.4% compliance. Hypertension and moderate-or-high total cardiovascular risk (mTCR) were defined according to guidelines. Sodium intake was assessed by urinary sodium excretion. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were used to express associations of UA with hypertension and mTCR. Results In the highest tertile of sodium intake in women, the adjusted PRs (95% confidence intervals) of low to high quartiles compared with the lowest quartile of UA, were 1.22(0.78–1.91), 1.18(0.75–1.85), and 1.65(1.09–2.51) for hypertension and 1.19(0.74–1.90), 1.39(0.91–2.11), and 1.65(1.10–2.47) for mTCR (P for trend <0.05). However, these findings were not shown for other sodium intake levels. There were similar results in men. PRs markedly increased with a concomitant increase in UA and sodium intake and there was a significant interaction (P = 0.010) for mTCR with PRs of 1.69(1.10–2.60) for men and 3.70(2.09–6.52) for women in those with the highest compared with the lowest quartile of UA and tertile of sodium intake. Similar findings were shown for hypertension. Conclusions This study implied that a high salt intake may enhance the associations of UA with hypertension and cardiovascular risk. PMID:27042828

  2. Uric acid in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a 2-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marcello; Lanzillo, Roberta; Costabile, Teresa; Russo, Cinzia; Carotenuto, Antonio; Sasso, Gabriella; Postiglione, Emanuela; De Luca Picione, Carla; Vastola, Michele; Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Palladino, Raffaele; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS), and possibly relates to MS outcomes, with lower UA levels in subjects experiencing a relapse or presenting higher disability scores. The present retrospective longitudinal study evaluated UA variations in MS, in relation to clinical relapses, disability progression, and cognitive functions. We included 141 subjects with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and performed expanded disability status scale (EDSS), symbol digit modalities test (SDMT) and UA evaluation at baseline visit and after 2-year follow-up. Paired t test showed significantly lower UA levels after 2-year follow-up than at baseline (3.987 ± 1.135 and 4.167 ± 1.207 mg/dL, respectively) (p = 0.001). The difference in UA levels between 2-year follow-up and baseline related to EDSS sustained progression (p < 0.001; OR = 0.099), and presented a trend for clinical relapses at logistic regression (p = 0.211; OR = 0.711) and for the time to relapse at Cox regression (p = 0.236; HR = 0.792). Analysis of variance showed reduced baseline UA levels in subjects with impaired SDMT at baseline (p = 0.045; adjusted R(2) = 0.473) and after 2-year follow-up (p = 0.034; adjusted R(2) = 0.470). This is the first study showing a progressive reduction of UA levels during the course of RRMS, suggesting a progressive decrease of antioxidant reserves, in relation to relapse risk, disability progression and cognitive function. PMID:25673130

  3. ABCG2 dysfunction increases serum uric acid by decreased intestinal urate excretion.

    PubMed

    Takada, Tappei; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Murakami, Keizo; Yamanashi, Yoshihide; Kasuga, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2), also known as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), is identified as a high-capacity urate exporter and its dysfunction has an association with serum uric acid (SUA) levels and gout/hyperuricemia risk. However, pathophysiologically important pathway(s) responsible for the ABCG2-mediated urate excretion were unknown. In this study, we investigated how ABCG2 dysfunction affected the urate excretion pathways. First, we revealed that mouse Abcg2 mediates urate transport using the membrane vesicle system. The export process by mouse Abcg2 was ATP-dependent and not saturable under the physiological concentration of urate. Then, we characterized the excretion of urate into urine, bile, and intestinal lumen using in vivo mouse model. SUA of Abcg2-knockout mice was significantly higher than that of control mice. Under this condition, the renal urate excretion was increased in Abcg2-knockout mice, whereas the urate excretion from the intestine was decreased to less than a half. Biliary urate excretion showed no significant difference regardless of Abcg2 genotype. From these results, we estimated the relative contribution of each pathway to total urate excretion; in wild-type mice, the renal excretion pathway contributes approximately two-thirds, the intestinal excretion pathway contributes one-third of the total urate excretion, and the urate excretion into bile is minor. Decreased intestinal excretion could account for the increased SUA of Abcg2-knockout mice. Thus, ABCG2 is suggested to have an important role in extra-renal urate excretion, especially in intestinal excretion. Accordingly, increased SUA in patients with ABCG2 dysfunction could be explained by the decreased excretion of urate from the intestine.

  4. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Declining of Circulating Proangiogenic Mononuclear Progenitor Cells in Chronic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Alexander E.; Kremzer, Alexander A.; Samura, Tatyana A.; Berezina, Tatyana A.; Martovitskaya, Yulia V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Serum uric acid (SUA) is considered a marker for natural progression of chronic heart failure (CHF) mediated cardiovascular remodelling. CHF associates with declining of circulating mononuclear progenitor cells (MPCs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the interrelationship between SUA concentrations and proangiogenic MPCs in ischemic CHF patients. Methods: The study population was structured retrospectively after determining the coronary artery disease (CAD) by contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography angiography in 126 subjects with symptomatic ischemic mild-to-severe CHF and 128 CAD subjects without CHF. Baseline biomarkers were measured in all patients. Cox proportional multivariate hazard ratio was calculated for predictors of MPCs declining in both CHF and non-CHF patient population predictors of MPCs declining in CHF subjects were examined in stepwise logistic regression. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices (IDI) and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results: Cox proportional adjusted hazard ratio analyses for CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs by SUA has shown that the higher quartiles (Q3 and Q4) of SUA compared to the lower quartiles (Q1 and Q2) are associated with increased risks of depletion of both CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. The addition of Q4 SUA to the ABC model improved the relative IDI by 13.8% for depletion of CD14+CD309+ MPCs and by 14.5% for depletion of CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. Conclusion: Circulating levels of proangiogenic MPCs are declined progressively depending on the levels of SUA in the HF subjects with CHF. We suggest that even mild elevations of SUA might be used to predict of relative depletion of proangiogenic MPCs among chronic HF patients. PMID:25320662

  5. Metabolic danger signals, uric acid and ATP, mediate inflammatory cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petrasek, Jan; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Saha, Banishree; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Kodys, Karen; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation defines the progression of ALD from reversible to advanced stages. Translocation of bacterial LPS to the liver from the gut is necessary for alcohol-induced liver inflammation. However, it is not known whether endogenous, metabolic danger signals are required for inflammation in ALD. Uric acid and ATP, 2 major proinflammatory danger signals, were evaluated in the serum of human volunteers exposed to a single dose of ethanol or in supernatants of primary human hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. In vitro studies were used to evaluate the role of uric acid and ATP in inflammatory cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells. The significance of signaling downstream of uric acid and ATP in the liver was evaluated in NLRP3-deficient mice fed a Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet. Exposure of healthy human volunteers to a single dose of ethanol resulted in increased serum levels of uric acid and ATP. In vitro, we identified hepatocytes as a significant source of these endogenous inflammatory signals. Uric acid and ATP mediated a paracrine inflammatory cross-talk between damaged hepatocytes and immune cells and significantly increased the expression of LPS-inducible cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α, by immune cells. Deficiency of NLRP3, a ligand-sensing component of the inflammasome recognizing uric acid and ATP, prevented the development of alcohol-induced liver inflammation in mice and significantly ameliorated liver damage and steatosis. Endogenous metabolic danger signals, uric acid, and ATP are involved in inflammatory cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells and play a crucial role in alcohol-induced liver inflammation.

  6. Serum uric acid is inversely proportional to estimated stroke volume and cardiac output in a large sample of pharmacologically untreated subjects: data from the Brisighella Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo Francesco Giuseppe; Rosticci, Martina; Parini, Angelo; Baronio, Cristina; D'Addato, Sergio; Borghi, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Serum uric acid is representative for xanthine-oxidase, the key enzyme involved in the production of uric acid, which is up-regulated in the failing heart, and may play an important role in the pathophysiologic process that leads to heart failure. In our study, we investigated the relation between stroke volume, cardiac output and serum uric acid in a large sample of overall healthy pharmacologically untreated subjects. The Brisighella Heart Study included 2,939 men and women between the ages of 14-84 without prior coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease who were not taking antihypertensive therapy at baseline. For this study, we selected 734 adult subjects enrolled in the last Brisighella population survey not taking antihypertensive, antidiabetic, lipid-lowering and uric acid-lowering drugs, and who were also not affected by chronic heart failure or by gout. The main predictors of cardiac functionality parameters were mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, SUA and age (all p < 0.001), while gender, BMI, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, physical activity and smoking habit were not significantly associated (all p > 0.05). In particular, there is a strong relation between estimated cardiac output and serum uric acid (B = -0.219, p < 0.001) and between stroke volume and serum uric acid (B = -3.684, p < 0.001). These observations might have an impact on future considerations about serum uric acid as an early inexpensive marker of heart function decline in the general population. PMID:24214336

  7. The xanthine oxidase inhibitor Febuxostat reduces tissue uric acid content and inhibits injury-induced inflammation in the liver and lung.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yang, Ke; Rock, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death in vivo induces a robust neutrophilic inflammatory response and the resulting inflammation can cause further tissue damage and disease. Dying cells induce this inflammation by releasing pro-inflammatory intracellular components, one of which is uric acid. Cells contain high levels of intracellular uric acid, which is produced when purines are oxidized by the enzyme xanthine oxidase. Here we test whether a non-nucleoside xanthine oxidase inhibitor, Febuxostat (FBX), can reduce intracellular uric acid levels and inhibit cell death-induced inflammation in two different murine tissue injury models; acid-induced acute lung injury and acetaminophen liver injury. Infiltration of inflammatory cells induced by acid injection into lungs or peritoneal administration of acetaminophen was evaluated by quantification with flow cytometry and tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the presence or absence of FBX treatment. Uric acid levels in serum and tissue were measured before giving the stimuli and during inflammation. The impact of FBX treatment on the peritoneal inflammation caused by the microbial stimulus, zymosan, was also analyzed to see whether FBX had a broad anti-inflammatory effect. We found that FBX reduced uric acid levels in acid-injured lung tissue and inhibited acute pulmonary inflammation triggered by lung injury. Similarly, FBX reduced uric acid levels in the liver and inhibited inflammation in response to acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury. In contrast, FBX did not reduce inflammation to zymosan, and therefore is not acting as a general anti-inflammatory agent. These results point to the potential of using agents like FBX to treat cell death-induced inflammation.

  8. Vitamin C, uric acid, and glutathione gradients in murine stratum corneum and their susceptibility to ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Weber, S U; Thiele, J J; Cross, C E; Packer, L

    1999-12-01

    The stratum corneum has been recognized as the main cutaneous oxidation target of atmospheric ozone (O3), a major part of photochemical smog. This study reports the presence and distribution of vitamin C, glutathione, and uric acid in murine stratum corneum, and evaluates their susceptibility to acute environmental exposure to O3. Based on tape stripping and a modified extraction method with high performance liquid chromatography electrochemical analysis, we detected vitamin C (208.0 +/- 82.5 pmol per 10 consecutive pooled tapes), glutathione (283.7 +/-96.3), and uric acid (286.4 +/-47.1) in murine stratum corneum as compared with only 16.5 +/- 1.4 pmol alpha-tocopherol. Vitamin C, glutathione (both p < 00.001), and urate (p < 0.01) were found to exhibit a gradient with the lowest concentrations in the outer layers and a steep increase in the deeper layers. To investigate the effect of O3 exposure on hydrophilic antioxidants, we exposed SKH-1 hairless mice to O3 concentrations of 0, 0.8, 1, and 10 p.p.m., and stratum corneum was analyzed before and after exposure. Whereas mock exposure with 0 p.p. m. for 2 h had no significant effect, O3 doses of 1 p.p.m. for 2 h and above showed depletion of all three antioxidants. Vitamin C was decreased to 80% +/- 15% of its pretreatment content (p < 0.05), GSH to 41% +/- 24% (p < 0.01), and uric acid to 44% +/- 28% (p < 0.01). This report demonstrates the previously unrecognized role of hydrophilic antioxidants in the stratum corneum and provides further evidence that O3 induces oxidative stress in this outer skin layer.

  9. Effects of acute creatine supplementation on iron homeostasis and uric acid-based antioxidant capacity of plasma after wingate test

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary creatine has been largely used as an ergogenic aid to improve strength and athletic performance, especially in short-term and high energy-demanding anaerobic exercise. Recent findings have also suggested a possible antioxidant role for creatine in muscle tissues during exercise. Here we evaluate the effects of a 1-week regimen of 20 g/day creatine supplementation on the plasma antioxidant capacity, free and heme iron content, and uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels of young subjects (23.1 ± 5.8 years old) immediately before and 5 and 60 min after the exhaustive Wingate test. Results Maximum anaerobic power was improved by acute creatine supplementation (10.5 %), but it was accompanied by a 2.4-fold increase in pro-oxidant free iron ions in the plasma. However, potential iron-driven oxidative insult was adequately counterbalanced by proportional increases in antioxidant ferric-reducing activity in plasma (FRAP), leading to unaltered lipid peroxidation levels. Interestingly, the FRAP index, found to be highly dependent on uric acid levels in the placebo group, also had an additional contribution from other circulating metabolites in creatine-fed subjects. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute creatine supplementation improved the anaerobic performance of athletes and limited short-term oxidative insults, since creatine-induced iron overload was efficiently circumvented by acquired FRAP capacity attributed to: overproduction of uric acid in energy-depleted muscles (as an end-product of purine metabolism and a powerful iron chelating agent) and inherent antioxidant activity of creatine. PMID:22691230

  10. Diclofenac toxicity in Gyps vulture is associated with decreased uric acid excretion and not renal portal vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Swan, G E

    2009-04-01

    Diclofenac (DF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is largely regarded as one of the most devastating environmental toxicant in recent times, after accidental exposure via their food-chain lead to massive mortalities in three vulture species on the Asian subcontinent. Although the use of diclofenac was recently banned on the Indian subcontinent, following the favourable safety profile of meloxicam, its mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. In an attempt to establish this mechanism, we test three hypotheses using models established from either the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus) or the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We demonstrate that both DF and meloxicam are toxic to renal tubular epithelial (RTE) cells following 12 h of exposure, due to an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could be temporarily ameliorated by pre-incubation with uric acid (UA). When cultures were incubated with either drug for only 2 h, meloxicam showed no toxicity in contrast to diclofenac. In both cases no increase in ROS production was evident. In addition, diclofenac decreased the transport of uric acid, by interfering with the p-amino-hippuric acid (PAH) channel. We conclude that vulture susceptibility to diclofenac results from a combination of an increased ROS, interference with UA transport and the duration of exposure.

  11. Relation of Lipid Content of Coronary Plaque to Level of Serum Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuichi; Nakayama, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kazumasa; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) level is known to be a prognostic factor in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, the pathogenesis of the relation between SUA level and coronary plaque characteristics has not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between SUA level and plaque composition of nonculprit lesions in patients with ACS. A total of 81 patients with ACS who underwent intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention were included. They were classified into 3 groups according to tertiles of SUA level. Using integrated backscatter (IB)-IVUS system, tissue components were classified into 4 categories: calcium deposits, dense fibrosis, fibrosis, and lipid. Tertiles of SUA level were as follows: low tertile <5.0 mg/dl; intermediate tertile 5.0 to 6.4 mg/dl; and high tertile >6.4 mg/dl. There was a trend toward greater vessel volume in the high tertile group than in the low and intermediate tertile groups (19.4 ± 3.7 vs 17.4 ± 4.4 vs 16.7 ± 4.1 mm(3)/mm, p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in lumen volume between the 3 groups. Plaque volume was significantly greater in the high than in the low tertile group (8.6 ± 2.4 vs 6.7 ± 2.2 mm(3)/mm, p = 0.01). IB-IVUS analysis demonstrated greater lipid (59.1 ± 9.1% vs 49.7 ± 10.9% vs 51.1 ± 9.3%, p = 0.001) and less fibrous components (36.8 ± 7.8% vs 44.3 ± 7.8% vs 43.2 ± 6.7%, p <0.001) in the high than in the low and intermediate tertile groups. Multivariate analysis showed high SUA as an independent predictor of increasing lipid volume. In conclusion, elevated SUA level is associated with greater lipid content of coronary plaque in patients with ACS than in patients with normal levels.

  12. Serum uric acid and subsequent cognitive performance in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Molshatzki, Noa; Weinstein, Galit; Streifler, Jonathan Y; Goldbourt, Uri; Tanne, David

    2015-01-01

    High serum uric acid (UA) levels are associated with numerous vascular risk factors, and vascular disease, that predispose patients to cognitive impairment, yet UA is also a major natural antioxidant and higher levels have been linked to slower progression of several neurodegenerative disease. In-order to test the association between UA and subsequent cognitive performance among patients that carry a high vascular burden, UA levels were determined by calorimetric enzymatic tests in a sub-cohort of patients with chronic cardiovascular disease who previously participating in a secondary prevention trial. After an average of 9.8±1.7 years, we assessed cognitive performance (Neurotrax Computerized Cognitive Battery) as well as cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Among 446 men (mean age 62.3±6.4 yrs) mean UA levels were 5.8±1.1 mg/dL. Adjusted linear regression models revealed that low UA levels (bottom quintile) were associated with poorer cognitive performance. Adjusted differences between the bottom quintile and grouped top UA quintiles were (B coefficient±SE) -4.23±1.28 for global cognitive scores (p = 0.001), -4.69±1.81 for memory scores (p = 0.010), -3.32±1.43 for executive scores (p = 0.020) and -3.43±1.97 for visual spatial scores (p = 0.082). Significant difference was also found for attention scores (p = 0.015). Additional adjustment for impaired CVR and high common carotid IMT slightly attenuated the relationship. Stronger UA effect on cognitive performance was found for older (age>65) patients with significant age interaction for global cognitive score (p = 0.016) and for executive (p = 0.018) and attention domains (p<0.001). In conclusion, we demonstrate that low UA levels in patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease are associated with poorer cognitive function a decade later. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of age

  13. Protective effect of iridoid glycosides from Paederia scandens (LOUR.) MERRILL (Rubiaceae) on uric acid nephropathy rats induced by yeast and potassium oxonate.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shi-xiang; Zhu, Wen-jing; Pang, Ming-qun; Jeffry, Joseph; Zhou, Lan-lan

    2014-02-01

    Iridoid glycosides of Paederia scandens (IGPS) are an active component isolated from Chinese herb P. scandens (LOUR.) MERRILL (Rubiaceae). Uric acid nephropathy (UAN) is caused by excessive uric acid, which results in damage of kidney tissue via urate crystals deposition in the kidneys. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of IGPS on UAN in rats induced by yeast and potassium oxonate. Treatment groups received different doses of IGPS and allopurinol (AP) daily for 35 days respectively. The results showed that treatment with IGPS significantly prevented the increases of uric acid in serum and the elevation of systolic blood pressure (SBP), attenuated renal tissue injury, improved renal function and reserved the biological activity of NOS-1. IGPS also inhibited the biological activity of TNF-α and TGF-β1, and suppressed the mRNA expressions of TNF-α and TGF-β1 in renal tissue. Taken together, the present and our previous findings suggest that IGPS exerts protective effects against kidney damage in UAN rats through its uric acid-lowering, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Furthermore, decreasing SBP by up regulation of NOS-1 expression and down regulation of TNF-α and TGF-β1 expression are involved in the effect of IGPS on high uric acid-induced nephropathy. PMID:24287205

  14. Urea, creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate spaces and their relationship to total body water during chronic hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, F.; Odar-Cederloef, I.E.; Eriksson, C.G.; Lindgren, S.; Kjellstrand, C.M.

    1988-07-01

    The authors determined total body water (TBW) with tritium in 11 patients on chronic hemodialysis and compared this space to that estimated by 60% of body weight, and removal spaces of urea, creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate (PO4). The latter spaces were determined by dividing the total amount of substance (measured in total dialysate) by pre- minus post-dialysis concentrations. Body water X 0.6 was more than 10% less than the tritium space, and showed a maximal variation of 10 liters, or 24%. The removal space of urea was 80% of the tritium space, but correlated closely with it. The difference between total body water and urea removal space was variable and dependent on fluid excess (edema) in the patients. Creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate removal spaces were highly variable and not correlated to total body water. The authors suggest that actual measured TBW should be used, rather than estimations using BW X 0.6, for V in K X T/V, where K = clearance, T = duration of dialysis, and V = the removal space of urea. Furthermore, one may need to introduce a correction factor for urea removal space over TBW in the equation to allow better quantification of dialysis in edematous patients and during very fast dialyses.

  15. Genome wide association study of uric acid in Indian population and interaction of identified variants with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Giri, Anil K; Banerjee, Priyanka; Chakraborty, Shraddha; Kauser, Yasmeen; Undru, Aditya; Roy, Suki; Parekatt, Vaisak; Ghosh, Saurabh; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2016-02-23

    Abnormal level of Serum Uric Acid (SUA) is an important marker and risk factor for complex diseases including Type 2 Diabetes. Since genetic determinant of uric acid in Indians is totally unexplored, we tried to identify common variants associated with SUA in Indians using Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS). Association of five known variants in SLC2A9 and SLC22A11 genes with SUA level in 4,834 normoglycemics (1,109 in discovery and 3,725 in validation phase) was revealed with different effect size in Indians compared to other major ethnic population of the world. Combined analysis of 1,077 T2DM subjects (772 in discovery and 305 in validation phase) and normoglycemics revealed additional GWAS signal in ABCG2 gene. Differences in effect sizes of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 gene variants were observed between normoglycemics and T2DM patients. We identified two novel variants near long non-coding RNA genes AL356739.1 and AC064865.1 with nearly genome wide significance level. Meta-analysis and in silico replication in 11,745 individuals from AUSTWIN consortium improved association for rs12206002 in AL356739.1 gene to sub-genome wide association level. Our results extends association of SLC2A9, SLC22A11 and ABCG2 genes with SUA level in Indians and enrich the assemblages of evidence for SUA level and T2DM interrelationship.

  16. Genome wide association study of uric acid in Indian population and interaction of identified variants with Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Anil K; Banerjee, Priyanka; Chakraborty, Shraddha; Kauser, Yasmeen; Undru, Aditya; Roy, Suki; Parekatt, Vaisak; Ghosh, Saurabh; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal level of Serum Uric Acid (SUA) is an important marker and risk factor for complex diseases including Type 2 Diabetes. Since genetic determinant of uric acid in Indians is totally unexplored, we tried to identify common variants associated with SUA in Indians using Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS). Association of five known variants in SLC2A9 and SLC22A11 genes with SUA level in 4,834 normoglycemics (1,109 in discovery and 3,725 in validation phase) was revealed with different effect size in Indians compared to other major ethnic population of the world. Combined analysis of 1,077 T2DM subjects (772 in discovery and 305 in validation phase) and normoglycemics revealed additional GWAS signal in ABCG2 gene. Differences in effect sizes of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 gene variants were observed between normoglycemics and T2DM patients. We identified two novel variants near long non-coding RNA genes AL356739.1 and AC064865.1 with nearly genome wide significance level. Meta-analysis and in silico replication in 11,745 individuals from AUSTWIN consortium improved association for rs12206002 in AL356739.1 gene to sub-genome wide association level. Our results extends association of SLC2A9, SLC22A11 and ABCG2 genes with SUA level in Indians and enrich the assemblages of evidence for SUA level and T2DM interrelationship. PMID:26902266

  17. Effects of acute exercise on the levels of iron, magnesium, and uric acid in liver and spleen tissues.

    PubMed

    Kaptanoğlu, B; Turgut, G; Genç, O; Enli, Y; Karabulut, I; Zencir, M; Turgut, S

    2003-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of acute exercise on tissue levels of iron, magnesium, and uric acid of rats. Twenty adult Wistar albino rats were used for the study. They were divided into two groups: controls (n=10) and the study group (n=10). The study group was left into a small water pool and allowed to do swimming exercise for 30 min while controls rested. All of the animals were sacrificed, and their livers and spleens removed and homogenized immediately. The iron, magnesium, and uric acid levels of the homogenates were measured by an autoanalyzer (ILAB 900, Italy) with commercial kits from the same company. Results were evaluated by the Mann-Whitney U-test. According to our results, the liver iron levels increased significantly with exercise, whereas spleen iron levels decreased significantly (p<0.05) compared to controls. We found no significant differences in the levels of the other two parameters with exercise. These results show that the iron distribution in organs changes with exercise. PMID:12719612

  18. Development and validation of a simple determination of urine metabolites (oxalate, citrate, uric acid and creatinine) by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Jose A; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel

    2010-04-15

    Oxalate, citrate, uric acid and creatinine are important urine markers for the evaluation and treatment of urolithiasic patients. They have been traditionally analysed by enzymatic and chromatographic techniques which present practical drawbacks, mainly in the sample pre-treatment step. The purpose of this study was to evaluate those markers in urine samples, by an easy multi-analyte assay using capillary zone electrophoresis. The four urine metabolites were determined, at 25 degrees C, by using a 50 cm x 75 microm capillary in 50 mmol l(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 6.5), at constant voltage of -30 kV and UV detection at 195 nm (for oxalate and citrate) or 30 kV and 234 nm (for creatinine and uric acid). The sample pre-treatment was minimum, 5- and 20-fold dilution of the urine sample and acidification to pH 3-4. Validation parameters (linear range, sensitivity, accuracy, precision and detection limits) were statistically comparable to those obtained with the official methods normally used in the clinical practice. The effect of freezing as a conservation method of urine samples is also discussed in terms of recoveries of the analytes. The analytical method developed is highly useful as a diagnostic tool for detecting metabolic renal disorders due to its simplicity, time consuming, easy automation, cost efficiency and analytical effectiveness, accomplishing with the clinical requirements.

  19. Use of immobilized enzymes in automated clinical analysis: determination of uric acid and glucose using immobilized enzymes in column form.

    PubMed

    Endo, J; Tabata, M; Okada, S; Murachi, T

    1979-07-16

    We studied the use of immobilized enzymes, covalently bound to alkylaminosilane derivative of porous glass, to automated clinical analysis on uric acid and glucose in blood, serum and urine. A microcolumn with an immobilized enzyme was prepared and used in an AutoAnalyzer I continuous flow system. Uricase (EC 1.7.3.3) from Candida utilis and glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) from Aspergillus niger were immobilized for the determination of uric acid and glucose, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide produced by these oxidases was colorimetrically determined using horse-radish peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and a hydrogen acceptor in solution. Sensitivity and wash charactertistics of a column with immobilized enzyme, 1.5 mm of inner diameter and up to 40 mm in length, were satisfactory at an assay speed of 50 samples per hour. The results correlated well with those obtained by other well established methods utilizing the AutoAnalyzer system. The immobilized enzymes were sufficiently stable for at least two months of 2000 tests when used repeatedly. Clinical trials proved that this method is capable of replacing the soluble enzyme method, giving reliable and reproducible results at lower cost.

  20. Uric acid: A Danger Signal from the RNA World that may have a role in the Epidemic of Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and CardioRenal Disease: Evolutionary Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    All humans are uricase knockouts; we lost the uricase gene due to a mutation that occurred in the mid Miocene approximately 15 million years ago. The consequence of being a uricase knockout is that we have higher serum uric acid levels that are less regulatable and can be readily influenced by diet. This increases our risk for gout and kidney stones, but there is also increasing evidence that uric acid increases our risk for hypertension, kidney disease, obesity and diabetes. This raises the question of why this mutation occurred. In this paper we review current hypotheses. We suggest that uric acid is a danger and survival signal carried over from the RNA world. The mutation of uricase that occurred during the food shortage and global cooling that occurred in the Miocene resulted in a survival advantage for early primates, particularly in Europe. Today, the loss of uricase functions as a thrifty gene, increasing our risk for obesity and cardiorenal disease. PMID:22000645

  1. The effect of coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption on serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jisuk; Park, Pil Sook; Chun, Byung-Yeol; Choi, Bo Youl; Kim, Mi Kyung; Shin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Hoon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2015-02-01

    Caffeine, a commonly consumed food constituent, is known to exert beneficial physiological effects in humans. There is a lack of comprehensive population data for the effects of caffeine intake on urate metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether coffee, tea, and caffeine intake influences serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in the Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort. We enrolled 9,400 participants in this study. An assessment of various dietary intake amounts of substances such as coffee and tea was performed using a food frequency questionnaire. The content of caffeine was calculated from coffee (74 mg/cup) and tea (15 mg/cup) intake information from the past year. Multivariate logistic regression models, multiple linear regression models, and analysis of covariance were applied to identify any association of dietary intake with serum uric acid levels or the risk of hyperuricemia. No trends for coffee, tea, or caffeine intake were found according to each quintile with serum uric acid in males, although there were weak, marginally significant trends between the content of coffee and caffeine intake and serum uric acid level in females (p = 0.07 for both). Tea intake in males and caffeine intake in females were significantly different between non-hyperuricemia and hyperuricemia (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). In addition, a significant association of serum uric acid level with tea intake in males (β = 0.0006, p = 0.02) and with tea intake and caffeine intake in females (β = 0.0003, p = 0.04 and β = 0.0006, p = 0.02, respectively) was observed. There was no effect of coffee, tea, or caffeine intake on the risk of hyperuricemia in either males or females. This study suggests that caffeine consumption might have an effect on serum uric acid in females. However, coffee, tea, and caffeine intake amounts were not associated with the risk of hyperuricemia.

  2. Study of photo-oxidative reactivity of sunscreening agents based on photo-oxidation of uric acid by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Moradmand Jalali, Hamed; Bashiri, Hadis; Rasa, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the mechanism of free radical production by light-reflective agents in sunscreens (TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2) was obtained by applying kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The values of the rate constants for each step of the suggested mechanism have been obtained by simulation. The effect of the initial concentration of mineral oxides and uric acid on the rate of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of some sun care agents has been studied. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental data for the production of free radicals by sun care agents.

  3. Highly sensitive and selective uric acid biosensor based on a three-dimensional graphene foam/indium tin oxide glass electrode.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hong Yan; Zhang, Hong; Chang, Jing; Gao, Xin; Huang, Shuo; Yao, Long Hui; Lin, Xuan Yu; Guo, Er Jun

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) continuous and interconnected network graphene foam (GF) was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using nickel foam as a template. The morphologies of the GF were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure of GF. The graphene with few layers and defect free was closely coated on the backbone of the 3D nickel foam. After etching nickel, the GF was transferred onto indium tin oxide (ITO) glass, which acted as an electrode to detect uric acid using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The GF/ITO electrode showed a high sensitivity for the detection of uric acid: approximately 9.44 mA mM(-1) in the range of 25 nM-0.1 μM and 1.85 mA mM(-1) in the range of 0.1-60 μM. The limit of detection of GF/ITO electrode for uric acid is 3 nM. The GF/ITO electrode also showed a high selectivity for the detection of uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid. This electrode will have a wide range of potential application prospects in electrochemical detection.

  4. Detection Of Uric Acid Based On Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Polymerized With A Layer Of Molecularly Imprinted PMAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Yen; Lin, Chia-Yu; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2009-05-01

    A molecularly imprinted poly-metharylic acid (PMAA), polymerizing on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), was synthesized. The MWCNT was modified by a layer of carboxylic acid and reacted with EDC and NHS to activate the carboxylic acid, which was prepared for the purpose of bonding allyl amine and getting an unsaturated side chain (-C=C). The resultant structure is abbreviated as MWCNTs-CH=CH2. It is well known that the vinyl group side chain provides good attachment between the MWCNTs and the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). The MIP based on PMAA was polymerized on the surface of MWCNTs-CH=CH2 with the addition of uric acid (UA). The non-imprinted polymer (NIP) was polymerized without adding UA. The adsorbed amount of UA approached the equilibrium value upon 60 min adsorption. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by immersing 10 mg of MIP or NIP in 5 mL aqueous solution containing different concentrations of UA. The adsorbed amounts were measured via a UV-Vis spectrometer at a wavelength of 292 nm. From the adsorption isotherm, it is seen that the MIP particles possess a good imprinting efficiency of about 4.41.

  5. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = −0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = −0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations. PMID:27328642

  6. Urinary Uric Acid/Creatinine Ratio as a Marker of Mortality and Unfavorable Outcome in NICU-Admitted Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Nariman, Shahin; Mosayebi, Ziba; Sagheb, Setareh; Rastad, Hadith; Hosseininodeh, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background The survival of neonates who have been admitted to the NICU, especially premature infants with few mortality and morbidity, is the most important attitude. Objectives We presumed whether urinary uric acid/creatinine (UUA/Cr) ratio can be a marker of mortality and adverse outcome in neonates which were admitted to the NICU. Patients and Methods All preterm infants admitted to our NICU after birth from March 2014 to April 2015 were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. UUA/Cr was measured during the first day of life. The severity of diseases (indicated by the need for high set-up of mechanical ventilation, complications of prematurity, and duration of stay in the NICU) and neonatal death were considered to be the final unfavorable outcomes. The relationship between the Log-transformation (Ln) urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio and the Apgar score at the first and 5th minute after birth and the duration of stay were analyzed by using linear regression. Statistical analysis was done by using STATA version 11 (STATA Corp, TX, USA). A P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results A total of 362 preterm infants with a mean gestational age of 32.7 (± 3.9) weeks were admitted to the NICU, out of whom 64 (17.6%) had severe disease and 43 (11.8%) died. The mean UUA/Cr ratio was significantly higher in the admitted neonates (3.30 ± 1.95 vs. 1.36 ± 0.42. P = 0.0001). There was a negative correlation between the UUA/Cr ratio and the 1-minute Apgar score (r = -0.17, P = 0.006) and the 5-minute Apgar score (r = -0.19, P = 0.003). The 1-minute Apgar scores were negatively correlated with the outcome (OR = 0.68; P < 0.001) and the duration of stay (β = -.28; P < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between 5-minute Apgar scores and the outcome. There was a significant positive correlation between the UUA/Cr ratio and an unfavorable outcome (OR = 1.24; CI %95: 1.06 to 1.43, P = 0.006) and increasing duration of stay (β = 0.17; P = 0

  7. Tuning Surface Charge and Morphology for the Efficient Detection of Dopamine under the Interferences of Uric Acid, Ascorbic Acid, and Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Luo, Shyh-Chyang

    2015-10-01

    In this research, we aimed to evaluate the impact of the surface charges and morphologies of electrodes on electrochemically detecting dopamine (DA) in the presence of protein adsorption, uric acid (UA), and ascorbic acid (AA). Through the electropolymerization of functionalized 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophenes (EDOT) directly on Au electrodes, we successfully created PEDOT-coated electrodes with three different functional groups and nanostructures. Negatively charged carboxylic acid groups attracted DA while reducing the interferences of UA and AA due to electrostatic effect. We used charge-free tetra(ethylene glycol) and zwitterionic phosphocholine groups are used to evaluate the interference of protein adsorption on DA sensing because they both can effectively prevent the nonspecific adsorption of proteins. These two electrodes can avoid protein adsorption, yet proved ineffective for DA sensing: both tetra(ethylene glycol) and the phosphocholine groups are electroneutral and have minimal electrostatic interactions with DA. We also used three proteins of different isoelectric points - bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and fibrinogen - to evaluate the influence of protein adsorption on DA detection. We found that for an electrode coated with carboxylic acid-functionalized PEDOT, the adsorption of positively charged lysozyme can promote the detection sensitivity of AA and UA, and that all protein adsorption lowers the sensitivity of DA. In contrast, nanostructures promote the detection sensitivity of all three molecules. All of our tested functionalized PEDOT-coated electrodes demonstrated good stability and functionality in buffers.

  8. The Role of Uric Acid and Methyl Derivatives in the Prevention of Age-Related Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Roy G; Camandola, Simonetta; Malott, Kelli F; Edelhauser, Maria A; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    High uric acid (UA levels have been correlated with a reduced risk of many neurodegenerative diseases through mechanisms involving chelating Fenton reaction transitional metals, antioxidant quenching of superoxide and hydroxyl free radicals, and as an electron donor that increases antioxidant enzyme activity (e.g. SOD. However, the clinical usefulness of UA is limited by its' low water solubility and propensity to form inflammatory crystals at hyperuricemic levels. This review focuses on the role of UA in neuroprotection, as well as potential strategies aimed at increasing UA levels in the soluble range, and the potential therapeutic use of more water-soluble methyl-UA derivatives from the natural catabolic end-products of dietary caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. PMID:26059354

  9. Electrochemical detection of uric acid using ruthenium-dioxide-coated carbon nanotube directly grown onto Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yi-Ting; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lin, Chung-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly grown onto a Si substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition were used in uric acid (UA) detection. The process is simple and formation is easy without the need for additional chemical treatments. However, CNTs lack selectivity and sensitivity to UA. To enhance the electrochemical analysis, ruthenium oxide was used as a catalytic mediator in the modification of electrodes. The electrochemical results show that RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs can strengthen the UA signal. The peak currents of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs linearly increase with increasing UA concentration, meaning that they can work as electrodes for UA detection. The lowest detection limit and highest sensitivity were 55 nM and 4.36 µA/µM, respectively. Moreover, the characteristics of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Effect of Oral Vitamin C Supplementation on Serum Uric Acid: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Miller, Edgar R.; Gelber, Allan C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of vitamin C supplementation on serum uric acid (SUA) by pooling the findings from published randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). Methods A total of 2,082 publications identified through systematic search were subjected to the following inclusion criteria: (1) RCTs conducted on human subjects; (2) reported end-trial SUA means and variance; (3) study design with oral vitamin C supplementation and concurrent control groups; and (4) trial duration of at least one week. Trials that enrolled children or patients on dialysis were excluded. Two investigators independently abstracted trial and participant characteristics. SUA effects were pooled by random-effects models and weighted by inverse variance. Results Thirteen RCTs were identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases. The total number of participants was 556, median dose of vitamin C was 500 mg/d, trial size ranged from 8 to 184 participants, and median study duration was 30 days. Pretreatment SUA values ranged from 2.9 to 7.0 mg/dL (SI: 172.5 – 416.4 μmol/L). The combined effect of these trials was a significant reduction in SUA of -0.35 mg/dL (95% CI: -0.66, -0.03; P = 0.032; SI: -20.8 μmol/L). Trial heterogeneity was significant (I2 = 77%; P < 0.01). Subgroup analyses based on trial characteristics indicated larger reductions in uric acid in trials that were placebo-controlled. Conclusions In aggregate, vitamin C supplementation significantly lowered SUA. Future trials are needed to determine whether vitamin C supplementation can reduce hyperuricemia or prevent incident and recurrent gout. PMID:21671418

  11. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  12. In vitro and in vivo studies on adlay-derived seed extracts: phenolic profiles, antioxidant activities, serum uric acid suppression, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mouming; Zhu, Dashuai; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Xiao; Dong, Yi

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polished adlay, brown adlay, adlay bran, and adlay hull to prevent and treat hyperuricemia. Brown adlay extract effectively decreased the serum uric acid levels of oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Free and bound phenolic extracts from these materials contained significant amounts of phenolics, with free phenolics dominated by chlorogenic acid and p-coumaric acid while bound phenolics dominated by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Free and bound phenolics of adlay bran exhibited significant xanthine oxidase inhibition activities, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, oxygen radical absorbance capacities, and superoxide radical scavenging activities. Adlay bran phenolics could be effective xanthine oxidase inhibitors and radical scavengers. p-Coumaric acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with strong superoxide radical scavenging activity. However, ferulic acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with weak superoxide radical scavenging activity. Chlorogenic acid is a superoxide radical scavenger with weak xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.

  13. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  14. Differentiation of human kidney stones induced by melamine and uric acid using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Sodhi, Rana N S; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Jianqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2011-03-01

    Clinically obtained human kidney stones of different pathogenesis were dissolved in acetic acid/methanol solutions and then rapidly analyzed by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (SDAPCI-MS) without any desalination treatment. The mass spectral fingerprints of six groups of kidney stone samples were rapidly recorded in the mass range of m/z 50-400. A set of ten melamine-induced kidney stone samples and nine uric acid derived kidney stone samples were successfully differentiated from other groups by principal component analysis of SDAPCI-MS fingerprints upon positive-ion detection mode. In contrast, the mass spectra recorded using negative-ion detection mode did not give enough information to differentiate those stone samples. The results showed that in addition to the melamine, the chemical compounds enwrapped in the melamine-induced kidney stone samples differed from other kidney stone samples, providing useful hints for studying on the formation mechanisms of melamine-induced kidney stones. This study also provides useful information on establishing a MS-based platform for rapid analysis of the melamine-induced human kidney stones at molecular levels.

  15. Uric Acid as a predictor of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in women hospitalized with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Joel R; Payne, Beth; Brown, Mark; Roberts, James M; Côté, Anne-Marie; Magee, Laura A; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Objectif : Bien qu’un taux sérique élevé d’acide urique soit couramment constaté chez les femmes qui présentent une prééclampsie, son utilité pour ce qui est de la prévision des issues indésirables a récemment été remise en question. Nous avions pour objectif d’analyser les données issues d’une importante cohorte de femmes présentant une prééclampsie, afin de déterminer l’utilité du taux sérique d’acide urique pour ce qui est de la prévision des issues indésirables maternelles et périnatales. Méthodes : Les données ont été tirées d’une étude prospective internationale toujours en cours qui porte sur des femmes hospitalisées présentant une prééclampsie (Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk). Une régression logistique univariée a été utilisée pour déterminer la relation entre la concentration sérique en acide urique (tant absolue que corrigée en fonction de l’âge gestationnel [score Z]) et les issues indésirables (maternelles et périnatales). Des analyses ont été menées pour comparer des cohortes de femmes présentant une prééclampsie définie par l’hypertension et la protéinurie à des cohortes de femmes présentant une prééclampsie définie par l’hypertension et l’hyperuricémie. Résultats : Le score Z quant à l’acide urique était associé à des issues périnatales indésirables (RC, 1,5; IC à 95 %, 1,4 - 1,7) et comptait une estimation ponctuelle > 0,7 (surface sous la courbe de la fonction d’efficacité de l’observateur, 0,72; IC à 95 %, 0,69 - 0,74). Une association significative a également été constatée entre la concentration sérique en acide urique et des issues indésirables maternelles; toutefois, l’estimation ponctuelle était < 0,7. Aucune différence significative n’a été constatée entre les groupes « prééclampsie définie par l’hypertension et la protéinurie » et « prééclampsie définie par l’hypertension et l

  16. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L-Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles-graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L-Cysteine (L-Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L-Cys peak potential at Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs-GCE or AgNPs-GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k‧, for the oxidation of L-Cys at the Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L-Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9-12.4 μM and 12.4-538.5 μM of L-Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L-Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L-Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  17. Electroanalysis and simultaneous determination of 6-thioguanine in the presence of uric acid and folic acid using a modified carbon nanotube paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Beitollahi, Hadi; Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh; Hosseinzadeh, Rahman

    2011-01-01

    The present work describes the preparation and characterization of a carbon nanotube paste electrode modified with 2,7-bis(ferrocenyl ethyl)fluoren-9-one (2,7-BF). This electrode showed an efficient catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of 6-thioguanine (6-TG), which leads to lowering 6-TG overpotential by more than 610 mV. Also, the values of catalytic rate constant (k = 2.7 × 10(3) mol(-1) L s(-1)), and diffusion coefficient (D = 2.7 × 10(-5) cm(2) s) were calculated. In 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.0, the oxidation current increased linearly with two concentration intervals of 6-TG, one is 0.06 to 10.0 µmol L(-1) and the other is 10.0 to 160.0 µmol L(-1). The detection limit (3σ) obtained by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was 22.0 nmol L(-1). DPV was used for simultaneous determination of 6-TG, uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) at the modified electrode, and for quantification of 6-TG, UA and FA in some real samples by the standard addition method.

  18. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine.

  19. Photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose at a ruthenium complex modified titanium dioxide electrode promoted by uric acid and ascorbic acid for photoelectrochemical fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuo-Jian; Ji, Shi-Bo; Liu, Jun-Chen; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) is first found to largely promote the photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose (GLU) at an indium-tin oxide (ITO) or TiO2 nanoparticles/ITO electrode modified with [Ru(tatp)3]2+ (tatp = 1,4,8,9-tetra-aza-triphenylene) possessing good redox activity and nanoparticle size distribution. A well-defined electrocatalytic peak for GLU oxidation is shown at 0.265 V (vs. SCE) under approximate physiological conditions upon incorporation of UA and AA. The [Ru(tatp)3]2+/ITO electrode exhibits attractive amperometric oxidation responses towards GLU, UA and AA, while controlled potentiostatically at 0.3 V, 0.7 V and 1.0 V, respectively, indicating high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. On basis of the photoelectrocatalysis of [Ru(tatp)3]2+/TiO2/ITO anode, a GLU concentration-dependent photoelectrochemical fuel cell vs. SCE is elaborately assembled. The proposed free-enzyme photoelectrochemical fuel cell employing 0.1 M GLU associated with 0.01 M UA and 0.01 M AA as fuel shows open-circuit photovoltage of 0.608 V, short-circuit photocurrent density of 124.5 μA cm-2 and maximum power density of 21.75 μW cm-2 at 0.455 V, fill factor of 0.32 and photoenergy conversion efficiency of 36.65%, respectively.

  20. Selective and sensitive determination of uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid and dopamine by PDDA functionalized graphene/graphite composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Xinchun; Pan, Jianbin

    2013-08-15

    In this work, a facile electrochemical sensor based on poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) functionalized graphene (PDDA-G) and graphite was fabricated. The composite electrode exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards uric acid (UA), owing to the electrocatalytic effect of graphene nanosheets and the electrostatic attractions between PDDA-G and UA. The anodic peak current of UA obtained by cyclic voltammetry (CV) increased over 10-fold compared with bare carbon paste electrode (CPE). And the reversibility of the oxidation process was improved significantly. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to determine UA in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA). It was found that all of oxidation peaks of three species could be well resolved, and the peak current of UA was much stronger than the other two components. More importantly, considerable-amount of AA and DA showed negligible interference to UA assay. The calibration curve for UA ranged from 0.5 to 20 μmol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9934. The constructed sensor has been employed to quantitatively determine UA in urine samples.

  1. Elevated levels of plasma uric acid and its relation to hypertension in arsenic-endemic human individuals in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Nazmul; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Rahman, Mashiur; Karim, Md. Rezaul; Islam, Khairul; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Md. Imam; Mohanto, Nayan Chandra; Alam, Shahnur; Aktar, Sharmin; Arefin, Afroza; Ali, Nurshad; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Aziz, Abdul; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2014-11-15

    Blood uric acid has been recognized as a putative marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). CVDs are the major causes of arsenic-related morbidity and mortality. However, the association of arsenic exposure with plasma uric acid (PUA) levels in relation to CVDs has not yet been explored. This study for the first time demonstrated the associations of arsenic exposure with PUA levels and its relationship with hypertension. A total of 483 subjects, 322 from arsenic-endemic and 161 from non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails of the study subjects were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. PUA levels were measured using a colorimetric method. We found that PUA levels were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in males and females living in arsenic-endemic areas than those in non-endemic area. Arsenic exposure (water, hair and nail arsenic) levels showed significant positive correlations with PUA levels. In multiple regression analyses, arsenic exposure levels were found to be the most significant contributors on PUA levels among the other variables that included age, body mass index, blood urea nitrogen, and smoking. There were dose–response relationships between arsenic exposure and PUA levels. Furthermore, diastolic and systolic blood pressure showed significant positive correlations with PUA levels. Finally, the average PUA levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive group than those in the normotensive group in both males and females living in arsenic-endemic areas. These results suggest that arsenic exposure-related elevation of PUA levels may be implicated in arsenic-induced CVDs. - Highlights: • PUA levels were higher in arsenic-endemic subjects than in non-endemic subjects. • Drinking water, hair and nail arsenic showed significant associations with PUA levels. • Drinking water, hair and nail arsenic showed dose–response relationships with

  2. Isolation and characterization of anaerobic bacteria for symbiotic recycling of uric acid nitrogen in the gut of various termites.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Arunee; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Kajiwara, Susumu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of the nitrogenous waste uric acid (UA) of wood-feeding termites by their gut bacteria is one of the significant aspects of symbiosis for the conservation of nitrogen sources. Diverse anaerobic UA-degrading bacteria comprising 16 species were isolated from the gut of eight termite species, and were assigned to Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and low G+C Gram-positive cocci. UA-degrading Clostridia had never been isolated from termite guts. UA-degrading ability was sporadically distributed among phylogenetically various culturable anaerobic bacteria from termite guts. A strain of Clostridium sp., which was commonly isolated from three termite species and represented a probable new species in cluster XIVa of clostridia, utilized UA as a nitrogen source but not as a sole carbon and energy source. This feature is in clear contrast to that of well-studied purinolytic clostridia or previously isolated UA degraders from termite guts, which also utilize UA as a sole carbon and energy source. Ammonia is the major nitrogenous product of UA degradation. Various purines stimulated the growth of this strain when added to an otherwise growth-limiting, nitrogen poor medium. The bacterial species involved the recycling of UA nitrogen in the gut microbial community of termites are more diverse in terms of both taxonomy and nutritional physiology than previously recognized. PMID:22791052

  3. Isolation and characterization of anaerobic bacteria for symbiotic recycling of uric acid nitrogen in the gut of various termites.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Arunee; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Kajiwara, Susumu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of the nitrogenous waste uric acid (UA) of wood-feeding termites by their gut bacteria is one of the significant aspects of symbiosis for the conservation of nitrogen sources. Diverse anaerobic UA-degrading bacteria comprising 16 species were isolated from the gut of eight termite species, and were assigned to Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and low G+C Gram-positive cocci. UA-degrading Clostridia had never been isolated from termite guts. UA-degrading ability was sporadically distributed among phylogenetically various culturable anaerobic bacteria from termite guts. A strain of Clostridium sp., which was commonly isolated from three termite species and represented a probable new species in cluster XIVa of clostridia, utilized UA as a nitrogen source but not as a sole carbon and energy source. This feature is in clear contrast to that of well-studied purinolytic clostridia or previously isolated UA degraders from termite guts, which also utilize UA as a sole carbon and energy source. Ammonia is the major nitrogenous product of UA degradation. Various purines stimulated the growth of this strain when added to an otherwise growth-limiting, nitrogen poor medium. The bacterial species involved the recycling of UA nitrogen in the gut microbial community of termites are more diverse in terms of both taxonomy and nutritional physiology than previously recognized.

  4. Mendelian randomization analysis associates increased serum urate, due to genetic variation in uric acid transporters, with improved renal function.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kim; Flynn, Tanya; de Zoysa, Janak; Dalbeth, Nicola; Merriman, Tony R

    2014-02-01

    Increased serum urate predicts chronic kidney disease independent of other risk factors. The use of xanthine oxidase inhibitors coincides with improved renal function. Whether this is due to reduced serum urate or reduced production of oxidants by xanthine oxidase or another physiological mechanism remains unresolved. Here we applied Mendelian randomization, a statistical genetics approach allowing disentangling of cause and effect in the presence of potential confounding, to determine whether lowering of serum urate by genetic modulation of renal excretion benefits renal function using data from 7979 patients of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities and Framingham Heart studies. Mendelian randomization by the two-stage least squares method was done with serum urate as the exposure, a uric acid transporter genetic risk score as instrumental variable, and estimated glomerular filtration rate and serum creatinine as the outcomes. Increased genetic risk score was associated with significantly improved renal function in men but not in women. Analysis of individual genetic variants showed the effect size associated with serum urate did not correlate with that associated with renal function in the Mendelian randomization model. This is consistent with the possibility that the physiological action of these genetic variants in raising serum urate correlates directly with improved renal function. Further studies are required to understand the mechanism of the potential renal function protection mediated by xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

  5. Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Carotid Plaques: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    NEOGI, TUHINA; ELLISON, R. CURTIS; HUNT, STEVEN; TERKELTAUB, ROBERT; FELSON, DAVID T.; ZHANG, YUQING

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of serum uric acid (SUA) with a marker of preclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD), carotid atherosclerotic plaques (PLQ), where early evidence of risk may be evident, focusing on individuals without CV risk factors. Methods The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. PLQ were assessed with carotid ultrasound. We conducted sex-specific logistic regression to assess the association of SUA with presence of PLQ, including analyses among persons without risk factors related to both CVD and hyperuricemia. Results In total, 4866 participants had both SUA and carotid ultrasound assessed (54% women, mean age 52 yrs, mean body mass index 27.6). The association of SUA with PLQ increased with increasing SUA levels, demonstrating a dose-response relation for men [OR 1.0, 1.29, 1.61, 1.75, for SUA categories < 5 (reference), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, ≥ 6.8 mg/dl, respectively; p = 0.002]. Similar associations were found in men without CV risk factors. We found no relation of SUA with PLQ in women. Conclusion In this large study, SUA was associated with carotid atherosclerotic plaques in men. Results were similar in the absence of CV risk factors. These results suggest that SUA may have a pathophysiologic role in atherosclerosis in men. (J Rheumatol First Release Nov 15 2008; doi:10.3899/jrheum.080646) PMID:19012359

  6. Impact of different adiposity measures on the relation between serum uric acid and blood pressure in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lyngdoh, T; Viswanathan, B; Myers, G J; Bochud, M; Bovet, P

    2012-11-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) concentration is independently associated with blood pressure (BP) in adults. We examined this association in young adults at an age where anti-hypertension treatment, other potential confounding factors and co-morbidity are unlikely to occur. We assessed BP, anthropometric variables including weight, height, waist circumference (WC), body fat percent (using bioimpedance), lifestyle behaviors, SUA and blood lipids in 549 participants aged 19-20 years from a population-based cohort study (Seychelles Child Development Study). Mean (s.d.) SUA was higher in males than females, 0.33 (0.08) and 0.24 (0.07) mmol l(-1), respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was higher in females than males but BP was markedly higher in males than in females. SUA was associated with both systolic and diastolic BP. However, the magnitude of the linear regression coefficients relating BP and SUA decreased by up to 50% upon adjustment for BMI, WC or body fat percent. The association between SUA and BP was not altered upon further adjustment for alcohol intake, smoking, triglycerides or renal function. In fully adjusted models, SUA remained associated with BP (P<0.05) in females. In conclusion, adiposity substantially decreased the association between SUA and BP in young adults, and BP was independently associated with SUA in females. These findings suggest a role of adiposity in the link between hyperuricemia and hypertension.

  7. Facet dependent binding and etching: ultra-sensitive colorimetric visualization of blood uric acid by unmodified silver nanoprisms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kanghui; Yang, Guang; Chen, Huide; Shen, Pengfei; Huang, Yucheng; Xia, Yunsheng

    2014-09-15

    By combination of experiments and density functional theory calculations, we present a simple but effective "facet dependent binding and etching" strategy for non-enzymatic and non-aggregated colorimetric sensing of blood uric acid (UA), using unmodified Ag nanoprisms as the signal readout. In the absence of UA, the triangular Ag nanoprisms are etched alongside (110) facets by H2O2 and form round nanodiscs, and a more than 160 nm surface plasmon resonance (SPR) blue shift is observed. Because of special affinity between UA and side facets of the Ag nanoprisms, pre-added UA can well protect the Ag nanoprisms from etching. Such protection effect can be used for well quantifying UA in the range of 10-3000 nM, based on the inverse proportion of the SPR blue shift with the added analyte. Due to very thin plate morphology (5 nm) and facet dependent binding/etching effects of the Ag nanoprisms, the sensing system has ultrahigh sensitivity. The detection limit is only 10nM, which is about 2 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of previous colorimetric sensing systems. In addition to accurate quantitation, the proposed strategy can conveniently discriminate the patient of hyperuricemia from normal person by naked eyes. So, the present simple, low-cost and visualized UA chemosensor has great potential in the applications for point-of-care diagnostics.

  8. Performance of in-vessel composting of food waste in the presence of coal ash and uric acid.

    PubMed

    An, Chun-Jiang; Huang, Guo-He; Yao, Yao; Sun, Wei; An, Kai

    2012-02-15

    Massive quantities of food waste often coexist with other agroindustrial and industrial waste, which might contain coal ash (CA) and uric acid (UA). This study investigated the influence of CA and UA on the composting of food waste in the in-vessel system. The patterns of food waste composting were compared among various combinations. The results showed that the temperature level was enhanced in the presence of CA and UA during the first 8 days. The significant drop in pH was observed in the treatment without any amendment. But the presence of CA could alleviate the drop of pH. More intensive organic mass reduction took place in the treatments with amended CA and UA in the first half of process. The O(2) uptake rate in the reactor with CA and UA was higher than that with only CA in the early stage. Both thermophilic and mesophilic microorganisms were present throughout the composting period. The populations of both thermophilic and mesophilic microorganisms were influenced when amended with CA and UA. The decreasing trend in C/N ratio was shown in all the reactors, while a relatively lower C/N ratio was obtained in the series with both CA and UA.

  9. Sex-Specific Association between Serum Uric Acid and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Nengguang; Zhang, Lijuan; Xia, Zhenhua; Peng, Liang; Wang, Yufan; Peng, Yongde

    2016-01-01

    Across-sectional study was performed in 541 type 2 diabetic patients to determine the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and NAFLD in type 2 diabetic patients. Clinical parameters including SUA were determined and NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography. SUA was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic subjects with NAFLD than in those without NAFLD in men, but not in women. Furthermore, the prevalence rate of NAFLD increased progressively across the sex-specific SUA tertiles only in men (37.9%, 58.6%, and 72.6%, resp., P for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, the odd ratios (95% CI) for NAFLD were 1 (reference), 2.93 (95%CI 1.25–6.88), and 3.93 (95% CI 1.55–9.98), respectively, across the tertiles of SUA in men. Contrastingly, SUA levels in women were not independently associated with the risk of NAFLD. Our data suggests that SUA is specifically associated with NAFLD in male type 2 diabetic subjects, independent of insulin resistance and other metabolic factors. PMID:27382573

  10. Determination of creatinine, uric and ascorbic acid in bovine milk and orange juice by hydrophilic interaction HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ruiting; Zhou, Si; Zuo, Yuegang; Deng, Yiwei

    2015-09-01

    Creatinine (Cr), uric (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) are common constituents in human fluids. Their abnormal concentrations in human fluids are associated with various diseases. Thus, apart from the endogenous formation in human body, it is also important to examine their sources from food products. In this study, a rapid and accurate HILIC method was developed for simultaneous determination of Cr, UA and AA in bovine milk and orange juice. Milk samples were pretreated by protein precipitation, centrifugation and filtration, followed by HPLC separation and quantification using a Waters Spherisorb S5NH2 column. The developed method has been successfully applied to determine the concentration of UA, AA and Cr in milk and fruit juice samples. The milk samples tested were found to contain UA and creatinine in the concentration range of 24.1-86.0 and 5.07-11.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The orange juices contain AA over 212 μg mL(-1).

  11. Association between serum free thyroxine (FT4) and uric acid levels in populations without overt thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yicong; Gai, Xiaorong; Xie, Hongzhi; Jiao, Li; Zhang, Shuyang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between thyroid function and serum uric acid (UA) levels in subjects without overt thyroid dysfunction. A total of 6,085 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Free thyroxine (FT4) levels were positively and linearly associated with serum UA levels (p<0.001), even after adjusting for age, thyroid-stimulating hormone, renal function, and other metabolic components (B 37.13; 95%CI 25.99-48.28; p<0.001). Furthermore, quartile analysis indicated that the prevalence of hyperuricemia was significantly elevated with increasing FT4 levels (quartile II: OR 1.232, 95%CI 1.022-1.486, p=0.029; quartile III: OR 1.234, 95%CI 1.025-1.486, p=0.026; quartile IV: OR 1.409, 95%CI 1.168-1.701, p<0.001). In summary, FT4 is linearly associated with serum UA levels in subjects lacking clinical thyroid dysfunction, and the prevalence of hyperuricemia is elevated with increasing FT4 levels. PMID:25696010

  12. Association between serum free thyroxine (FT4) and uric acid levels in populations without overt thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yicong; Gai, Xiaorong; Xie, Hongzhi; Jiao, Li; Zhang, Shuyang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between thyroid function and serum uric acid (UA) levels in subjects without overt thyroid dysfunction. A total of 6,085 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Free thyroxine (FT4) levels were positively and linearly associated with serum UA levels (p<0.001), even after adjusting for age, thyroid-stimulating hormone, renal function, and other metabolic components (B 37.13; 95%CI 25.99-48.28; p<0.001). Furthermore, quartile analysis indicated that the prevalence of hyperuricemia was significantly elevated with increasing FT4 levels (quartile II: OR 1.232, 95%CI 1.022-1.486, p=0.029; quartile III: OR 1.234, 95%CI 1.025-1.486, p=0.026; quartile IV: OR 1.409, 95%CI 1.168-1.701, p<0.001). In summary, FT4 is linearly associated with serum UA levels in subjects lacking clinical thyroid dysfunction, and the prevalence of hyperuricemia is elevated with increasing FT4 levels.

  13. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa1

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K.; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M.; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    While type 2 immune responses to environmental antigens are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. Here we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were produced quickly in the lungs of naïve mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and TSLP sensitized naïve animals to an innocuous airway antigen OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE antibody and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same antigen. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naïve animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  14. Associations between concentrations of uric acid with concentrations of vitamin A and beta-carotene among adults in the United States☆

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Earl S.; Choi, Hyon K.

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the cross-sectional associations between concentrations of vitamin A and beta-carotene, a major source of vitamin A, with concentrations of uric acid in a nationally representative sample of adults from the United States. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from up to 10893 participants aged ≥20 years of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001 to 2006. Concentrations of uric acid adjusted for numerous covariates increased from 305.8 μmol/L in the lowest quintile of vitamin A to 335.3 μmol/L in the highest quintile (p for linear trend <0.001). The prevalence ratio for hyperuricemia also increased progressively across quintiles of serum vitamin A reaching 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.52, 2.16; p for linear trend <0.001) in the top quintile in the maximally adjusted model. Adjusted mean concentrations of uric acid decreased progressively from quintile 1 (333.8 μmol/L) through quintile 4 of concentrations of beta-carotene and were similar for quintiles 4 (313.5 μmol/L) and 5 (313.8 μmol/L). Concentrations of beta-carotene were inversely associated with hyperuricemia (adjusted prevalence ratio comparing highest with lowest quintile = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.72; p for linear trend <0.001). Concentrations of uric acid were significantly and positively associated with concentrations of vitamin A and inversely with concentrations of beta-carotene. These cross-sectional findings require confirmation with experimental studies of vitamin A and beta-carotene supplementation. PMID:24267038

  15. Uric acid, indoxyl sulfate, and methylguanidine activate bulbospinal neurons in the RVLM via their specific transporters and by producing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Oshima, N; Onimaru, H; Matsubara, H; Uchida, T; Watanabe, A; Takechi, H; Nishida, Y; Kumagai, H

    2015-09-24

    Patients with chronic renal failure often have hypertension, but the cause of hypertension, other than an excess of body fluid, is not well known. We hypothesized that the bulbospinal neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are stimulated by uremic toxins in patients with chronic renal failure. To investigate whether RVLM neurons are sensitive to uremic toxins, such as uric acid, indoxyl sulfate, or methylguanidine, we examined changes in the membrane potentials (MPs) of bulbospinal RVLM neurons of Wister rats using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique during superfusion with these toxins. A brainstem-spinal cord preparation that preserved the sympathetic nervous system was used for the experiments. During uric acid, indoxyl sulfate, or methylguanidine superfusion, almost all the RVLM neurons were depolarized. To examine the transporters for these toxins on RVLM neurons, histological examinations were performed. The uric acid-, indoxyl sulfate-, and methylguanidine-depolarized RVLM neurons showed the presence of urate transporter 1 (URAT 1), organic anion transporter (OAT)1 or OAT3, and organic cation transporter (OCT)3, respectively. Furthermore, the toxin-induced activities of the RVLM neurons were suppressed by the addition of an anti-oxidation drug (VAS2870, an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor), and a histological examination revealed the presence of NAD(P)H oxidase (nox)2 and nox4 in these RVLM neurons. The present results show that uric acid, indoxyl sulfate, and methylguanidine directly stimulate bulbospinal RVLM neurons via specific transporters on these neurons and by producing oxidative stress. These uremic toxins may cause hypertension by activating RVLM neurons.

  16. Uric acid-dependent inhibition of AMP kinase induces hepatic glucose production in diabetes and starvation: evolutionary implications of the uricase loss in hominids.

    PubMed

    Cicerchi, Christina; Li, Nanxing; Kratzer, James; Garcia, Gabriela; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Hunter, Brandi; Rivard, Christopher J; Sautin, Yuri Y; Gaucher, Eric A; Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Reduced AMP kinase (AMPK) activity has been shown to play a key deleterious role in increased hepatic gluconeogenesis in diabetes, but the mechanism whereby this occurs remains unclear. In this article, we document that another AMP-dependent enzyme, AMP deaminase (AMPD) is activated in the liver of diabetic mice, which parallels with a significant reduction in AMPK activity and a significant increase in intracellular glucose accumulation in human HepG2 cells. AMPD activation is induced by a reduction in intracellular phosphate levels, which is characteristic of insulin resistance and diabetic states. Increased gluconeogenesis is mediated by reduced TORC2 phosphorylation at Ser171 by AMPK in these cells, as well as by the up-regulation of the rate-limiting enzymes PEPCK and G6Pc. The mechanism whereby AMPD controls AMPK activation depends on the production of a specific AMP downstream metabolite through AMPD, uric acid. In this regard, humans have higher uric acid levels than most mammals due to a mutation in uricase, the enzyme involved in uric acid degradation in most mammals, that developed during a period of famine in Europe 1.5 × 10(7) yr ago. Here, working with resurrected ancestral uricases obtained from early hominids, we show that their expression on HepG2 cells is enough to blunt gluconeogenesis in parallel with an up-regulation of AMPK activity. These studies identify a key role AMPD and uric acid in mediating hepatic gluconeogenesis in the diabetic state, via a mechanism involving AMPK down-regulation and overexpression of PEPCK and G6Pc. The uricase mutation in the Miocene likely provided a survival advantage to help maintain glucose levels under conditions of near starvation, but today likely has a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes.

  17. Essential oil from leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum acts as a xanthine oxidase inhibitor and reduces the serum uric acid levels in oxonate-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Yang, C W; Liao, J W; Zhen, W W; Chu, F H; Chang, S T

    2008-11-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity and anti-hyperuricemia effect in mice of Cinnamomum osmophloeum, which is an endemic tree in Taiwan, were evaluated in this study. The results demonstrated that the essential oil of C. osmophloeum leaves presented the strongest XOD inhibition activity (IC(50)=16.3 μg/ml); however, no significant XOD inhibition activities were found in ethanolic and hot water extracts. Furthermore, among the main compounds of essential oil, the cinnamaldehyde exhibited the potent XOD inhibition activity with an IC(50)=8.4 μg/ml. Besides, the reducing serum uric acid levels in oxonate-induced mice by cinnamaldehyde were further investigated. The hyperuricemic mice were oral administrated cinnamaldehyde at a dosage of 150 mg/kg, the uric acid value in serum was reduced from 5.25±0.63 to 2.10±0.04 mg/dl, the levels of serum uric acid in mice was lowered down by 84.48% as compared to the hyperuricemic control group. Based on the results obtained in this study, cinnamaldehyde may be a potential lead compound for developing the pharmaceutic for anti-hyperuricemia agent. PMID:18693097

  18. Electrochemical Co-Reduction Synthesis of AuPt Bimetallic Nanoparticles-Graphene Nanocomposites for Selective Detection of Dopamine in the Presence of Ascorbic Acid and Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zongya; Zhang, Mingming; Chen, Xiang; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2015-07-09

    In this paper, AuPt bimetallic nanoparticles-graphene nanocomposites were obtained by electrochemical co-reduction of graphene oxide (GO), HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6. The as-prepared AuPt bimetallic nanoparticles-graphene nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and other electrochemical methods. The morphology and composition of the nanocomposite could be easily controlled by adjusting the HAuCl4/H2PtCl6 concentration ratio. The electrochemical experiments showed that when the concentration ratio of HAuCl4/H2PtCl6 was 1:1, the obtained AuPt bimetallic nanoparticles-graphene nanocomposite (denoted as Au1Pt1NPs-GR) possessed the highest electrocatalytic activity toward dopamine (DA). As such, Au1Pt1NPs-GR nanocomposites were used to detect DA in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) using the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique and on the modified electrode, there were three separate DPV oxidation peaks with the peak potential separations of 177 mV, 130 mV and 307 mV for DA and AA, DA and UA, AA and UA, respectively. The linear range of the constructed DA sensor was from 1.6 μM to 39.7 μM with a detection limit of 0.1 μM (S/N = 3). The obtained DA sensor with good stability, high reproducibility and excellent selectivity made it possible to detect DA in human urine samples.

  19. Electrochemical Co-Reduction Synthesis of AuPt Bimetallic Nanoparticles-Graphene Nanocomposites for Selective Detection of Dopamine in the Presence of Ascorbic Acid and Uric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zongya; Zhang, Mingming; Chen, Xiang; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, AuPt bimetallic nanoparticles-graphene nanocomposites were obtained by electrochemical co-reduction of graphene oxide (GO), HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6. The as-prepared AuPt bimetallic nanoparticles-graphene nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and other electrochemical methods. The morphology and composition of the nanocomposite could be easily controlled by adjusting the HAuCl4/H2PtCl6 concentration ratio. The electrochemical experiments showed that when the concentration ratio of HAuCl4/H2PtCl6 was 1:1, the obtained AuPt bimetallic nanoparticles-graphene nanocomposite (denoted as Au1Pt1NPs-GR) possessed the highest electrocatalytic activity toward dopamine (DA). As such, Au1Pt1NPs-GR nanocomposites were used to detect DA in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) using the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique and on the modified electrode, there were three separate DPV oxidation peaks with the peak potential separations of 177 mV, 130 mV and 307 mV for DA and AA, DA and UA, AA and UA, respectively. The linear range of the constructed DA sensor was from 1.6 μM to 39.7 μM with a detection limit of 0.1 μM (S/N = 3). The obtained DA sensor with good stability, high reproducibility and excellent selectivity made it possible to detect DA in human urine samples. PMID:26184200

  20. A Pharmacist-Staffed, Virtual Gout Management Clinic for Achieving Target Serum Uric Acid Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldfien, Robert; Pressman, Alice; Jacobson, Alice; Ng, Michele; Avins, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context: Relatively few patients with gout receive appropriate treatment. Objective: To determine whether a pharmacist-staffed gout management program is more effective than usual care in achieving target serum uric acid (sUA) levels in gout patients. Design: A parallel-group, randomized controlled trial of a pharmacist-staffed, telephone-based program for managing hyperuricemia vs usual care. Trial duration was 26 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome measure was achieving sUA levels at or below 6 mg/dL at the 26-week visit. Secondary outcome was mean change in sUA levels in the control and intervention groups. Participants were adults with recurrent gout and sUA levels above 6.0 mg/dL. Participants were randomly assigned to management by a clinical pharmacist following protocol or to monitoring of sUA levels but management of their gout by their usual treating physician. Results: Of 102 patients who met eligibility criteria, 77 subjects obtained a baseline sUA measurement and were entered into the trial. Among 37 participants in the intervention group, 13 (35%) had sUA levels at or below 6.0 mg/dL at 26 weeks, compared with 5 (13%) of 40 participants in the control group (risk ratio = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1 to 7.1, p = 0.03). The mean change in sUA levels among controls was +0.1 mg/dL compared with −1.5 mg/dL in the intervention group (sUA difference = −1.6, 95% CI = −0.9 to −2.4, p < 0.001). Conclusions: A structured pharmacist-staffed program was more effective than usual care for achieving target sUA levels. These results suggest a structured program could greatly improve gout management. PMID:27352414

  1. Differences in postmortem urea nitrogen, creatinine and uric acid levels between blood and pericardial fluid in acute death.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Li; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Tanaka, Sayaka; Zhao, Dong; Li, Dong-Ri; Quan, Li; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2007-05-01

    Previous studies showed significant differences in postmortem urea nitrogen (UN), creatinine (Cr) and uric acid (UA) levels in heart blood depending on the causes of death, including acute death. In addition, the levels in pericardial fluid approximated the clinical serum reference ranges, and their elevations may be assessed based on clinical criteria. The present study investigated difference between blood and pericardial levels of these markers. Medicolegal autopsy cases (n=556, within 48h postmortem) of the following causes of death were examined: injury (n=136), asphyxiation (n=50), drowning (n=39), fire fatalities (n=99), hyperthermia (n=11), hypothermia (n=8), poisoning (n=26), delayed traumatic death (n=44) and natural diseases (n=143). When serum UN, Cr and UA levels were compared with the pericardial levels, there was an equivalency for delayed traumatic death and chronic renal failure, although each level was markedly elevated. Parallel increases in serum and pericardial UA and/or Cr levels were also observed for hypothermia and gastrointestinal bleeding. However, in drowning cases, the left cardiac and pericardial UN levels were lower than the right cardiac and peripheral levels, suggesting the influence of water aspiration. Significant elevations in serum and pericardial Cr and UA levels with a higher serum/pericardial UA ratio for fatal methamphetamine intoxication suggest progressive skeletal muscle damage due to advanced hypoxia/acidosis. Similar findings were often observed for other acute and subacute deaths. These findings suggest that a comparison between blood and pericardial nitrogenous compounds would be useful for investigating the cause and process of death.

  2. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  3. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  4. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N.; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  5. Lower Serum Levels of Uric Acid in Uterine Fibroids and Fibrocystic Breast Disease Patients in Dongying City, China

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Qicai; XIAO, Juan; ZHANG, Pengpeng; CHEN, Lili; CHEN, Xiaoxiao; WANG, Shumei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing serum levels of uric acid (SUA) after menopause in women brought up a hypothesis that estrogenic effect may protectively regulate SUA. Estrogenic effect is a major etiology of uterine fibroids and fibrocystic breast disease. The study aimed to explore SUA among patients suffering from these diseases to enhance the hypothesis. Methods: Overall, 1349 female participants were selected into three cases: Case I having uterine fibroids (n=568), Case II having fibrocycstic breast disease (n=608) and Case III having uterine fibroids combining with fibrocycstic breast disease (n=173); 4206 participants without these diseases were selected as controls. Based on health check-up data from 2011 to 2012, in Dongying Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, a cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the difference in SUA between the case and control. We adjusted covariates by generalized linear regression mode. Results: From 19 to 44 yr, SUA of Case I to Case III were lower than controls by 8.46 umol/L (P=0.011), 5.88umol/L (P=0.014) and 9.39 umol/L (P=0.059), respectively. From 45–54 yr, no significant differences were between three cases and controls. In Case I and its control: from 54–59 yr, differences were not significant; from 60 to 72 yr, SUA in Case I was lower than the control by 32.02umol/L (P=0.003). Conclusion: Participants of uterine fibroids and fibrocystic breast disease had a lower SUA except the stage of menopause, which indirectly supported that estrogenic effect, may protectively decrease SUA. PMID:27398332

  6. Association of serum uric acid level with mortality and morbidity of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Reza; Ghaffari, Samad; Salehi, Rezvanieh; Mazani, Sarvin; Aghavali, Sharmin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Investigating the clinical impact of serum uric acid (UA) and its lowering agents on the complications and mortality of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) can open a new era in STEMI treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of on admission serum UA level on the mortality and morbidity of patients admitted with STEMI. Methods: A number of 608 patients with STEMI were enrolled in this study from December 21, 2012 until February 19, 2014. Patients were followed for 20 months. Male to female ratio was 2.53, and the mean age of patients was 62.6±13.4. The relationship between the level of UA and patients’ mortality and morbidity, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), atrial and ventricular arrhythmia was analyzed. Results: Patients with high serum UA level had higher Killip class after STEMI (P=0.001). Mean LVEF was measured to be 39.5±9.6 in normal UA group and 34.6±11.6 in high UA group (P=0.001). In comparison with normal UA group, high UA group had significantly higher cTnI (2.68±0.09 vs 4.09±0.42, respectively, P=0.001), increased blood pressure (P=0.009), and higher atrial fibrillation (AF) occurrence (P=0.03), but no association was seen between ventricular tachycardia and serum UA level. Short term and midterm mortality were not different in two groups (P=0.44 and 0.31, respectively). Conclusion: In the current study, high serum UA level in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) was not associated with higher in-hospital or midterm mortality, but it was associated with lower LVEF, higher Killip class, elevated cTnI, creatinine, triglyceride, and higher AF. PMID:27489597

  7. Serum uric acid level and association with cognitive impairment and dementia: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamir A; Quinn, Terence J; Hewitt, Jonathan; Fan, Yuhua; Dawson, Jesse

    2016-02-01

    Serum uric acid (sUA) level may be associated with cognitive impairment/dementia. It is possible this relationship varies with dementia subtype, particularly between vascular dementias (VaD) and Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PDD)-related dementia. We aimed to present a synthesis of all published data on sUA and relationship with dementia/cognition through systematic review and meta-analysis. We included studies that assessed the association between sUA and any measure of cognitive function or a clinical diagnosis of dementia. We pre-defined subgroup analyses for patients with AD, VaD, PDD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and mixed or undifferentiated. We assessed risk of bias/generalizability, and where data allowed, we performed meta-analysis to describe pooled measures of association across studies. From 4811 titles, 46 papers (n = 16,688 participants) met our selection criteria. Compared to controls, sUA was lower in dementia (SDM -0.33 (95%CI)). There were differences in association by dementia type with apparent association for AD (SDM -0.33 (95%CI)) and PDD (SDM -0.67 (95%CI)) but not in cases of mixed dementia (SDM 0.19 (95%CI)) or VaD (SDM -0.05 (95%CI)). There was no correlation between scores on Mini-Mental State Examination and sUA level (summary r 0.08, p = 0.27), except in patients with PDD (r 0.16, p = 0.003). Our conclusions are limited by clinical heterogeneity and risk of bias in studies. Accepting this caveat, the relationship between sUA and dementia/cognitive impairment is not consistent across all dementia groups and in particular may differ in patients with VaD compared to other dementia subtypes.

  8. Association of serum uric acid with incident atrial fibrillation (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] study).

    PubMed

    Tamariz, Leonardo; Agarwal, Sunil; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Chamberlain, Alanna M; Prineas, Ronald; Folsom, Aaron R; Ambrose, Marietta; Alonso, Alvaro

    2011-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common arrhythmias seen in clinical practice. Current evidence suggests that serum uric acid (SUA) could be a marker of oxidative damage, a factor reported as a part of the mechanisms of AF. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether SUA predicted AF in the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) study. The present analysis included 15,382 AF-free black and white men and women, aged 45 to 64 years, from the ARIC study, a population-based prospective cohort in the United States. SUA was determined using the uricase-peroxidase method at baseline. The primary outcome was the incidence of AF, defined as the occurrence of AF detected using hospital discharge codes, scheduled study electrocardiograms, and/or death certificates during the follow-up period (1987 to 2004). We identified 1,085 cases of incident AF. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, gender, race, center, education, body mass index, serum glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alcohol use, prevalent coronary heart disease and heart failure, serum creatinine, diuretics, and P-wave duration on the electrocardiogram (as a measure of left atrial size) at baseline, the hazard ratio of AF associated with a SD increment in SUA was 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.26). The association of SUA with AF risk differed by race and gender (p for interaction <0.01). In conclusion, elevated SUA is associated with a greater risk of AF, particularly among blacks and women. Additional studies should replicate this association and explore potential mechanisms.

  9. Electrochemical detection of nanomolar dopamine in the presence of neurophysiological concentration of ascorbic acid and uric acid using charge-coated carbon nanotubes via facile and green preparation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong-Wook; Yoon, Yeo Woon; Heo, Jihye; Yu, Joonhee; Kim, Hasuck; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-15

    Negatively charged multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared using simple sonication technique with non-toxic citric acid (CA) for the electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA). CA/MWCNTs were placed on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes by drop-casting method and then electrochemical determinations of DA were performed in the presence of highly concentrated ascorbic acid (AA). For the comparison of the charge effect on MWCNTs surface, positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI)/MWCNT/GC electrode and pristine MWCNT/GC electrode were also prepared. Contrary to conventional GC electrode, all three types of MWCNT modified electrodes (CA/MWCNT/GC, PEI/MWCNT/GC, and pristine MWCNT/GC) can discriminate ~μM of DA from 1mM AA using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) due to the inherent electrocatalytic effect of MWCNTs. Compared to positively charged PEI/MWCNT/GC and pristine MWCNT/GC electrodes, negatively charged CA/MWCNT/GC electrode remarkably enhanced the electrochemical sensitivity and selectivity of DA, showing the linear relationship between DPV signal and DA concentration in the range of 10-1000nM even in the presence of ~10(5) times concentrated AA, which is attributed to the synergistic effect of the electrostatic interaction between cationic DA molecules and negatively charged MWCNTs and the inherent electrocatalytic property of MWCNT. As a result, the limit of detection (LOD) of DA for CA/MWCNT/GC electrode was 4.2nM, which is 5.2 and 16.5 times better than those for MWCNT/GC electrode and PEI/MWCNT/GC electrode even in the presence of 1mM AA. This LOD value for DA at CA/MWCNT/GC electrode is one of the lowest values compared to the previous reports and is low enough for the early diagnosis of neurological disorder in the presence of physiological AA concentration (~0.5mM). In addition, the high selectivity and sensitivity of DA at CA/MWCNT/GC electrode were well kept even in the presence of both 1mM AA and 10μM uric acid

  10. Electrochemical detection of nanomolar dopamine in the presence of neurophysiological concentration of ascorbic acid and uric acid using charge-coated carbon nanotubes via facile and green preparation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong-Wook; Yoon, Yeo Woon; Heo, Jihye; Yu, Joonhee; Kim, Hasuck; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-15

    Negatively charged multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared using simple sonication technique with non-toxic citric acid (CA) for the electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA). CA/MWCNTs were placed on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes by drop-casting method and then electrochemical determinations of DA were performed in the presence of highly concentrated ascorbic acid (AA). For the comparison of the charge effect on MWCNTs surface, positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI)/MWCNT/GC electrode and pristine MWCNT/GC electrode were also prepared. Contrary to conventional GC electrode, all three types of MWCNT modified electrodes (CA/MWCNT/GC, PEI/MWCNT/GC, and pristine MWCNT/GC) can discriminate ~μM of DA from 1mM AA using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) due to the inherent electrocatalytic effect of MWCNTs. Compared to positively charged PEI/MWCNT/GC and pristine MWCNT/GC electrodes, negatively charged CA/MWCNT/GC electrode remarkably enhanced the electrochemical sensitivity and selectivity of DA, showing the linear relationship between DPV signal and DA concentration in the range of 10-1000nM even in the presence of ~10(5) times concentrated AA, which is attributed to the synergistic effect of the electrostatic interaction between cationic DA molecules and negatively charged MWCNTs and the inherent electrocatalytic property of MWCNT. As a result, the limit of detection (LOD) of DA for CA/MWCNT/GC electrode was 4.2nM, which is 5.2 and 16.5 times better than those for MWCNT/GC electrode and PEI/MWCNT/GC electrode even in the presence of 1mM AA. This LOD value for DA at CA/MWCNT/GC electrode is one of the lowest values compared to the previous reports and is low enough for the early diagnosis of neurological disorder in the presence of physiological AA concentration (~0.5mM). In addition, the high selectivity and sensitivity of DA at CA/MWCNT/GC electrode were well kept even in the presence of both 1mM AA and 10μM uric acid

  11. Analysis of ABCG2 and other urate transporters in uric acid homeostasis in chronic kidney disease: potential role of remote sensing and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin L.; Wu, Wei; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Jeff, Janina; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD), altered extra-renal urate handling may be necessary to regulate plasma uric acid. The Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis (Nigam S. What do drug transporters really do? Nat Rev Drug Discov 2015; 14: 29–44) suggests that multispecific solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters in different tissues are part of an inter-organ communication system that maintains levels of urate and other metabolites after organ injury. Methods Data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC; n = 3598) were used to study associations between serum uric acid and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the following uric acid transporters: ABCG2 (BRCP), SLC22A6 (OAT1), SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A10 (OAT5), SLC22A11 (OAT4), SLC22A12 (URAT1), SLC22A13 (OAT10), SLC17A1-A3 (NPTs), SLC2A9 (GLUT9), ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCC4 (MRP4). Regression models, controlling for principal components age, gender and renal function, were run separately for those of European (EA) and African ancestry (AA), and P-values corrected for multiple comparisons. A twin cohort with participants of EA and normal renal function was used for comparison. Results Among those of EA in CRIC, statistically significant signals were observed for SNPs in ABCG2 (rs4148157; beta-coefficient = 0.68; P = 4.78E-13) and SNPs in SLC2A9 (rs13125646; beta-coefficient = −0.30; P = 1.06E-5). Among those of AA, the strongest (but not statistically significant) signals were observed for SNPs in SLC2A9, followed by SNPs in ABCG2. In the twin study (normal renal function), only SNPs in SLC2A9 were significant (rs4481233; beta-coefficient=−0.45; P = 7.0E-6). In CRIC, weaker associations were also found for SLC17A3 (NPT4) and gender-specific associations found for SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A11 (OAT4), and ABCC4 (MRP4). Conclusions In patients of EA with CKD (CRIC cohort), we found striking associations between uric acid and SNPs on ABCG2, a key transporter

  12. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Burns CM, Wortmann RL. Clinical features and treatment of gout. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, et al., eds. Kelly's Textbook of Rheumatology . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 95. ...

  13. Role of serum sodium in assessing hospital mortality in cancer patients with spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome inducing acute uric acid nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H-H; Chen, Y-C; Tian, Y-C; Chan, Y-L; Kuo, M-C; Tang, C-C; Fang, J-T; Lee, S-Y; Yang, C-W

    2009-05-01

    Spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome (STLS) inducing acute uric acid nephropathy, a rare and neglected disease, presents more insidiously than conventional post-treatment tumour lysis syndrome. Although STLS is a serious and potentially fatal complication in patients with neoplastic disorders, few investigations have addressed the relevance of clinical and laboratory features in assessing prognosis. A retrospective study was conducted, reviewing the records of all patients who developed acute renal failure (ARF) at Chang Gung memorial hospital between 1 July 1999 and 30 June 2003. STLS-induced acute uric acid nephropathy was identified in 12 of 1072 ARF patients (1.1%) during the study period. All patients had advanced stage tumours with large tumour burden, and 66.7% of cases had abdominal organ involvement. All 12 hyperuricemic patients became oliguric despite conservative therapy, and remained hyperuricemic (21.6 +/- 5.2 mg/dl) before dialysis therapy. Diuresis developed in eight patients (66.7%), with associated resolution of hyperuricemia, azotemia and metabolic derangements following dialysis initiation. Overall hospital mortality was 58.3%. Death in most patients was related to hyponatremia and hypoalbuminemia on admission. The serum sodium was found to have the best Youden index (0.86) and highest overall prediction accuracy (93%). Moreover, serum sodium and serum albumin for individual patients were significantly and positively correlated (r = 0.617, p = 0.032). This investigation confirms a grave prognosis for cancer patients with STLS inducing acute uric acid nephropathy. Hyponatremia and hypoalbuminemia on the first day of admission indicate poor prognosis in such patients.

  14. Targeting Uric Acid and the Inhibition of Progression to End-Stage Renal Disease—A Propensity Score Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Tatsuru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Kumagai, Takanori; Shibata, Shigeru; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Kaneko, Kiyoko; Shen, Zhong Yang; Fujimori, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of uric acid (UA) in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains controversial due to the unavoidable cause and result relationship. This study was aimed to clarify the independent impact of UA on the subsequent risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by a propensity score analysis. Methods A retrospective CKD cohort was used (n = 803). Baseline 23 covariates were subjected to a multivariate binary logistic regression with the targeted time-averaged UA of 6.0, 6.5 or 7.0 mg/dL. The participants trimmed 2.5 percentile from the extreme ends of the cohort underwent propensity score analyses consisting of matching, stratification on quintile and covariate adjustment. Covariate balances after 1:1 matching without replacement were tested for by paired analysis and standardized differences. A stratified Cox regression and a Cox regression adjusted for logit of propensity scores were examined. Results After propensity score matching, the higher UA showed elevated hazard ratios (HRs) by Kaplan-Meier analysis (≥6.0 mg/dL, HR 4.53, 95%CI 1.79–11.43; ≥6.5 mg/dL, HR 3.39, 95%CI 1.55–7.42; ≥7.0 mg/dL, HR 2.19, 95%CI 1.28–3.75). The number needed to treat was 8 to 9 over 5 years. A stratified Cox regression likewise showed significant crude HRs (≥6.0 mg/dL, HR 3.63, 95%CI 1.25–10.58; ≥6.5 mg/dL, HR 3.46, 95%CI 1.56–7.68; ≥7.0 mg/dL, HR 2.05, 95%CI 1.21–3.48). Adjusted HR lost its significance at 6.0 mg/dL. The adjustment for the logit of the propensity scores showed the similar results but with worse model fittings than the stratification method. Upon further adjustment for other covariates the significance was attained at 6.5 mg/dL. Conclusions Three different methods of the propensity score analysis showed consistent results that the higher UA accelerates the progression to the subsequent ESRD. A stratified Cox regression outperforms other methods in generalizability and adjusting for residual bias. Serum UA should be

  15. Short term tolvaptan increases water intake and effectively decreases urinary calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid supersaturations

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Erickson, Stephen B.; Rule, Andrew D.; Enders, Felicity; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many patients cannot effectively increase water intake and urine volume to prevent urinary stones. Tolvaptan, a V2 receptor antagonist, blocks water reabsorption in the collecting duct and should reduce urinary supersaturation (SS) of stone forming solutes, but this has never been proven. Materials and Methods We conducted a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 21 adult calcium urinary stone formers stratified as majority calcium oxalate(CaOx, n=10) or calcium phosphate(CaP, n=11). Patients received tolvaptan 45 mg/day or placebo for 1 week, followed by a washout week and crossover to tolvaptan or placebo for week 3. A 24h urines was collected at the end of weeks 1 and 3. Results Tolvaptan vs. placebo decreased urinary osmolality (204±96 vs 529±213 mOsm/kg, P<0.001) and increased urinary volume (4.8±2.9 vs 1.8±0.9 L, P<0.001). The majority of urinary solute excretion rates including sodium and calcium did not significantly change, although oxalate secretion slightly increased (23±8 to 15±8 mg/24h, P = 0.009). Urinary CaOx SS (−0.01±1.14 vs 0.95±0.87 DG, P<0.001), CaP SS (−1.66±1.17 vs −0.13±1.02 DG, P<0.001) and Uric Acid SS (−2.05±4.05 vs −5.24±3.12 DG, P=0.04) all dramatically decreased. Effects did not differ between CaOx and CaP groups (P>0.05 for all interactions). Conclusions Tolvaptan increases urine volume and decreases urinary SS in calcium stone formers. Further study is needed to determine if long term use of V2 receptor antagonists results in fewer stone events. PMID:26598423

  16. [Simultaneous determination of creatinine, pseudouridine and uric acid in serum and urine by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Peng, Z; Wang, C; Li, C; Gao, Q; Wang, Z; Zhang, G; Zhang, J; Li, X; Peng, J

    1998-03-01

    In this paper a sensitive, rapid and simple HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of creatinine (Cr), pseudouridine (Pu) and uric acid(UA) has been established. We have evaluated clinical value of the method in the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Separation was obtained using Shim-pack CLC-ODS 15 x 0.6 cm column and mobile phase of buffer solution of phosphate (pH 3.0, 0.02 mol/L) with flow rate of 1 mL/min. Detection was performed with UV detector at an automatic adjustment of wavelength. The recoveries of Cr, Pu and UA were 101.4%, 104.9% and 105.0% respectively. The calibration curves were linear within the concentration range of 8.6-274.6 mumol/L for Cr, 0.72-22.93 mumol/L for Pu and 19.1-612.7 mumol/L for UA (n = 6, r > 0.999, p < 0.01). The CV for within day and between day measurements were < 2.5% and < 5.0% respectively. In addition, Pu, Cr and UA were simultaneously determined in serum and urine of 39 patients with diabetic mellitus (DM). 15 patients with nephrotic syndrome (NS) and 53 normal subjects by the method. Results include: 1. the levels of serum Pu in all DM patients (100%) with microalbuminuria (MiAU) and macroalbuminuria (MaAU) were greater than maximum of normal subjects (X + 2S). In addition, in 9 DM patients (41%) with normal albuminuria (NAU) the levels were also greater than the maximum. 2. In patients with DM, there was no correlation between the serum Pu and the urinary albumin excretion (UAE), whereas the serum Pu correlated closely with the serum Cr. However, the incidence for serum Pu increase was significantly greater in patients. 3. The levels of serum Pu in patients with NS were greater than those in control subjects and patients with DM. Conclusion is that the determination of serum Pu could be used as sensitivity index for the early diagnosis of DN.

  17. Overview of Serum Uric Acid Treatment Targets in Gout: Why Less Than 6 mg/dL?

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Gary; Edwards, N Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    Gout is a progressive, painful, debilitating form of inflammatory arthritis. It is caused by factors that elevate the concentration of serum uric acid (sUA), leading to hyperuricemia (sUA >6.8 mg/dL). Continued elevated sUA can result in monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition in joints and soft tissues, and can cause acute and chronic inflammation. The prevalence of hyperuricemia and gout has increased over the last few decades, likely due to an aging population, changes in lifestyles and diet, and an increase in gout-associated comorbidities. Untreated or improperly treated gout can lead to chronic manifestation of the disease, including persistent inflammation, increased number of flares, development of tophi, and structural joint damage. Data show that even when patients are asymptomatic, ongoing inflammation and subsequent damage occurs locally at the joint and systemically. The aim of long-term treatment of gout is to reduce sUA levels to <6 mg/dL, which is below the saturation point of MSU (6.8 mg/dL), to inhibit formation of new crystals and to promote dissolution of existing crystals. Gout treatment should improve disease outcomes by eliminating gout flares, inducing long-term resolution of tophi, and more effectively managing comorbidities, many of which are associated with hyperuricemia. A number of studies have demonstrated that treating to the target of <6 mg/dL, by using effective therapies to lower sUA, results in reduction in the incidence of gout flares as well as shrinkage and eventual disappearance of tophi. Gout is often poorly managed due to a number of factors including lack of physician and patient adherence to treatment guidelines. Patients need to be educated about their diagnosis and management of the disease, such as the influence of diet and the importance of compliance with long-term treatment. With treatment, regular sUA monitoring, and patient adherence, gout is a curable disease. PMID:27558643

  18. Association Between Sex-Specific Serum Uric Acid and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Jie; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Ye, Bo-Zhi; Kong, Fan-Qi; Zheng, Zai-Xing; Zou, Hai; Shi, Ke-Qing; Lin, Lu; Braddock, Martin; Huang, Wei-Jian; Chen, Yong-Ping; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the association between sex-specific serum uric acid (sUA) levels and NAFLD in a large population-based study. A total of 60,455 subjects from 2 separate medical centers were included. Sex-specific sUA quartiles (Q1–Q4) were defined: ≤330, 331–380, 381–435, and ≥436 μmol/L for male; ≤230, 231–270, 271–310, and ≥311 μmol/L for female. The odds ratios (ORs), hazard ratios (HRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for NAFLD were calculated across each quartile of sUA, using the Q1 as reference. After adjusting for known confounding variables in this study, the ORs for NAFLD in the cross-sectional population were 1.211 (95% CI 1.109–1.322), 1.519 (95% CI 1.395–1.654), 1.903 (95% CI 1.748–2.072) for Q2, Q3, and Q4, respectively. In the longitudinal population, compared with the reference group, those in Q2, Q3, and Q4 had HRs of 1.127 (95% CI 0.956–1.330), 1.380 (95% CI 1.157–1.644), 1.589 (95% CI 1.310–1.927) for NAFLD, respectively. Analysis for the sex-specific subgroup showed the adjusted ORs for Q4 versus Q1 were 2.898 (95% CI 2.36–3.588) in female and 1.887 (95% CI 1.718–2.072) in male in the cross-sectional population. In the longitudinal population, the HRs for the Q4 were 2.355 (95% CI 1.702–3.259) in female and 1.249 (95% CI 0.975–1.601) in male, compared with Q1. We report that a sex-specific sUA level is independently associated with NAFLD. The association between sUA and NAFLD was significantly greater in females than in males. PMID:25929934

  19. An 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)-immobilized electrode for the simultaneous detection of dopamine and uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Chih, Yi-Kai; Yang, Ming-Chang

    2013-06-01

    An 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS)-immobilized carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode was used to simultaneously detect dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) with differential pulse voltammetry. When ABTS was immobilized onto the CNT electrode in the presence of DA, UA and 100 μM AA, the sensitivity to DA increased from 0.600 (±0.013) to 1.334 (±0.010) μA/μM in the concentration ranges of 0.90-10 μM and 1.87-20 μM, respectively, and the sensitivity to UA increased from 0.030 (±0.005) to 0.078 (±0.006) μA/μM in the concentration ranges of 2.16-240 μM and 3.07-400 μM, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the ABTS-immobilized CNT electrode attained a higher sensitivity to UA and also a wider linear range of concentrations.

  20. Selective detection of uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid at physiological pH by using a beta-cyclodextrin modified copolymer of sulfanilic acid and N-acetylaniline.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shouguo; Wang, Taoling; Gao, Zongyong; Xu, Haihong; Zhou, Baineng; Wang, Chuanqin

    2008-07-15

    A beta-cyclodextrin (CD) modified copolymer membrane of sulfanilic acid (p-ASA) and N-acetylaniline (SPNAANI) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was prepared and used to determine uric acid (UA) in the presence of a large excess of ascorbic acid (AA) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The properties of the copolymer were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The oxidation peaks of AA and UA were well separated at the composite membrane modified electrode in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). A linear relationship between the peak current and the concentration of UA was obtained in the range from 1.0 x 10(-5) to 3.5 x 10(-4)mol L(-1), and the detection limit was 2.7 x 10(-6)mol L(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Two hundred and fifty-fold excess of AA did not interfere with the determination of UA. The application of the prepared electrode was demonstrated by measuring UA in human serum samples without any pretreatment, and the results were comparatively in agreement with the spectrometric clinical assay method.

  1. ELEVATED SERUM URIC ACID LEVELS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE INDEPENDENTLY OF METABOLIC SYNDROME FEATURES IN THE UNITED STATES: LIVER ULTRASOUND DATA FROM THE NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Jeffrey C.; McFann, Kim; Targher, Giovanni; Johnson, Richard J.; Chonchol, Michel; Jalal, Diana I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Experimental and observational studies suggest a role for uric acid in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the association between serum uric acid levels and NAFLD in a large population-based study from the United States. Materials/Methods A cross-sectional analysis of 10,732 nondiabetic adults who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1988–1994. Sex specific uric acid quartiles were defined: ≤5.2, 5.3–6.0, 6.1–6.9, and >6.9 mg/dL for men and ≤3.7, 3.8–4.5, 4.6–5.3, and >5.3 mg/dL for women. NAFLD presence and severity were defined by ultrasonographic detection of steatosis in the absence of other liver diseases. We modeled the probability that more severe NAFLD would be associated with the highest quartiles of uric acid. Results Compared to the 1st quartile, the odds ratio for NAFLD was 1.79 (95% C.I. 1.49–2.15, p < 0.001) and 3.14 (95% C.I. 2.63–3.75, p < 0.001) for the 3rd and 4th quartiles, respectively. After adjusting for demographics, hypertension, waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and aspartate aminotransferase, uric acid (4th quartile) was significantly associated with NAFLD (odds ratio 1.43; 95% C.I. 1.16–1.76, p < 0.001). Positive parameter estimates suggest increasing uric acid is associated with greater severity of NAFLD. Conclusions Elevated uric acid level is independently associated with ultrasound-diagnosed NAFLD in a nationally representative sample of United States nondiabetic adults. Increasing uric acid is associated with increasing severity of NAFLD on ultrasonography. These findings warrant further studies on the role of uric acid in NAFLD. PMID:23036645

  2. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase and uric acid plasma concentrations during foie gras production in male mule ducks (Anas platyrhynchos × Cairina moschata).

    PubMed

    Flament, A; Delleur, V; Poulipoulis, A; Marlier, D

    2012-01-01

    1. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and uric acid (UA) plasma concentration were measured at 8 (7 days after group housing), 12 (after 7 days of force feeding) and 13 weeks of age (at slaughter after 12 days of force feeding), and 45 min after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test at 8 weeks of age in 12 male mule ducks in an on-farm experiment. 2. No significant increase of corticosterone was found during the force-feeding period compared with the concentration after housing. 3. Comparison of corticosterone and cortisol values indicates that cortisol can be considered as a reliable acute stress indicator in future routine examinations. 4. Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and aspartate aminotransferase increased progressively from pre-force feeding period to slaughtering. 5. Plasma concentrations of uric acid increased from the start at 8 weeks of age to the mid-force feeding period but no difference was noticed between the mid-force feeding period and slaughtering. 6. It is concluded that acute stress induced by force-feeding is similar at the beginning and end of the commercial production of foie gras.

  3. Determination of uric acid in urine, saliva and calcium oxalate renal calculi by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perelló, Joan; Sanchis, Pilar; Grases, Félix

    2005-09-25

    A very simple and direct method for determination of uric acid, in various biological matrices, based on high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry is described. Chromatographic separations were performed with a stationary phase Zorbax Sax Column, an anion exchange resin, with 50% sodium citrate 1 mM at pH 6.5 and 50% acetonitrile as mobile phase delivered at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The detector counted negative ions by monitoring m/z 167.1, which corresponds to the urate anion. The method does not use an internal standard but quality control samples were used. Intra-day precision ranged between 1.1 and 1.5%, whereas inter-day precision was between 1.3 and 2.8% (n=5) working with some selected standards. Recovery tests of added standard have been successfully performed in urine and saliva samples, thus showing an appropriate accuracy of the method. The limit of quantitation found was 70 microg/l. Different urine and saliva samples were analyzed using an alternative analytical methodology based on an enzymatic reaction and photometric detection at 520 nm, resulting both methods comparable at a 95% confidence level. The method has been also applied to the determination of trace amounts of uric acid in the core of some selected calcium oxalate renal calculi. PMID:16061429

  4. Association between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular risk among university workers from the State of Mexico: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that serum uric acid (SUA) can be an inexpensive and easy-to-obtain indicator of cardiovascular risk (CR). This is especially important in developing countries with high prevalence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between SUA levels and 10-year global CR among university workers from the State of Mexico, Mexico. Methods A case–control study nested within a cohort was conducted between 2004 and 2006. Anthropometric measures, lifestyle variables, family background and CR factors were assessed. The analysis estimated odds ratios using conditional logistic regression. Results The study included 319 cases with CR and 638 controls. Subjects in the upper tertile of SUA had 48.0% higher odds of having an elevated CR than those in the lower tertile (OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04 - 2.10) in the crude analysis, but the association was non-significant when adjusting for other covariates. Among physically inactive individuals, being in the third tertile of SUA doubled the odds of high CR, compared with those who perform physical activity three or more hours per week being in the first tertile of SUA (OR = 2.35, 95% CI: 1.24 - 4.45). Conclusion Serum concentration of uric acid is associated with 10-year global CR among individuals with high levels of physical inactivity. PMID:23631758

  5. Acute consumption of organic and conventional tropical grape juices (Vitis labrusca L.) increases antioxidants in plasma and erythrocytes, but not glucose and uric acid levels, in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Cruz, Fernanda Alves; da Silva, Edson Luiz; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2016-08-01

    Bioactive polyphenols in grapes are influenced by grape variety and cultivation conditions. The Vitis labrusca L. varieties are cultivated in tropical regions and used for grape juice production. We hypothesized that polyphenols from tropical grape juices would beneficially affect redox homeostasis in humans. Therefore, the effects of acute consumption of organic and conventional grape juices from V labrusca L. on antioxidants biomarkers were investigated in healthy individuals. In a controlled, randomized, crossover, intervention trial, 24 individuals were assigned to drink 400 mL of conventional juice, organic juice, or water. Each intervention was followed by a 14-day washout period. Blood samples were obtained before and 1 hour after acute intake and analyzed for erythrocyte reduced glutathione, serum total antioxidant capacity, antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes, and glucose and uric acid in serum. The ingestion of both grape juices resulted in elevated levels of reduced glutathione (P< .001) and serum total antioxidant capacity (P< .05) and increased activity of catalase (P< .001), superoxide dismutase (P< .001), and glutathione peroxidase (P< .05) compared with the control intervention, with no significant differences between grape juices (P< .05). The intake of juices did not affect significantly the concentrations of glucose or uric acid. Grape juice polyphenols were associated with increased antioxidants, and the chemical differences between organic and conventional juices were not predictive of the observed responses. The results suggest a bioactive potential of V labrusca L. juices to improve redox homeostasis, which is involved in defense against oxidative stress in humans. PMID:27440535

  6. Mutation of a novel ABC transporter gene is responsible for the failure to incorporate uric acid in the epidermis of ok mutants of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyan; Kiuchi, Takashi; Fujii, Tsuguru; Daimon, Takaaki; Li, Muwang; Banno, Yutaka; Kikuta, Shingo; Kikawada, Takahiro; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2013-07-01

    ok mutants of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, exhibit highly translucent larval skin resulting from the inability to incorporate uric acid into the epidermal cells. Here we report the identification of a gene responsible for the ok mutation using positional cloning and RNAi experiments. In two independent ok mutant strains, we found a 49-bp deletion and a 233-bp duplication, respectively, in mRNAs of a novel gene, Bm-ok, which encodes a half-type ABC transporter, each of which results in translation of a truncated protein in each mutant. Although the Bm-ok sequence was homologous to well-known transporter genes, white, scarlet, and brown in Drosophila, the discovery of novel orthologs in the genomes of lepidopteran, hymenopteran, and hemipteran insects identifies it as a member of a new distinct subfamily of transporters. Embryonic RNAi of Bm-ok demonstrated that repression of Bm-ok causes a translucent phenotype in the first-instar silkworm larva. We discuss the possibility that Bm-ok forms a heterodimer with another half-type ABC transporter, Bmwh3, and acts as a uric acid transporter in the silkworm epidermis.

  7. Human nails metabolite analysis: A rapid and simple method for quantification of uric acid in human fingernail by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Ling; Li, Gao; Jiang, Ying-Zi; Kang, Dongzhou; Jin, Cheng Hua; Shi, Qing; Jin, Toufeng; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Min, Jun Zhe

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and simple analytical method for the quantification of uric acid (UA) in human fingernails by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection is described. UA was extracted from human fingernail samples at 90°C for 20min, then separated on an Inertsil ODS-2 column (250×4.6mm I.D., 5.0μm, GL Sciences) by isocratic elution using methanol: 74mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.2) 2:98 (v/v). An UV detector was used to monitor at 284nm. The results indicated that under optimized measurement conditions results were achieved within 8.0min, and a good linearity was achieved from the calibration curves (r(2)>0.9999) in the range of 1.0-10000ng; the limit of detection (S/N=3) was 2.0pg, the inter-day and intra-day assay precisions were all less than 0.46% and the mean recoveries (%) of the uric acid spiked in the human fingernail were 101.95%. The amounts of UA in the fingernails of healthy volunteers were determined.

  8. Acute consumption of organic and conventional tropical grape juices (Vitis labrusca L.) increases antioxidants in plasma and erythrocytes, but not glucose and uric acid levels, in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Cruz, Fernanda Alves; da Silva, Edson Luiz; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2016-08-01

    Bioactive polyphenols in grapes are influenced by grape variety and cultivation conditions. The Vitis labrusca L. varieties are cultivated in tropical regions and used for grape juice production. We hypothesized that polyphenols from tropical grape juices would beneficially affect redox homeostasis in humans. Therefore, the effects of acute consumption of organic and conventional grape juices from V labrusca L. on antioxidants biomarkers were investigated in healthy individuals. In a controlled, randomized, crossover, intervention trial, 24 individuals were assigned to drink 400 mL of conventional juice, organic juice, or water. Each intervention was followed by a 14-day washout period. Blood samples were obtained before and 1 hour after acute intake and analyzed for erythrocyte reduced glutathione, serum total antioxidant capacity, antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes, and glucose and uric acid in serum. The ingestion of both grape juices resulted in elevated levels of reduced glutathione (P< .001) and serum total antioxidant capacity (P< .05) and increased activity of catalase (P< .001), superoxide dismutase (P< .001), and glutathione peroxidase (P< .05) compared with the control intervention, with no significant differences between grape juices (P< .05). The intake of juices did not affect significantly the concentrations of glucose or uric acid. Grape juice polyphenols were associated with increased antioxidants, and the chemical differences between organic and conventional juices were not predictive of the observed responses. The results suggest a bioactive potential of V labrusca L. juices to improve redox homeostasis, which is involved in defense against oxidative stress in humans.

  9. Electrochemical Sensor Based on Fe Doped Hydroxyapatite-Carbon Nanotubes Composite for L-Dopa Detection in the Presence of Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, P; Radhakrishnan, S; Navaneethan, M; Arivanandhan, M; Hayakawa, Y; Sekar, C

    2016-06-01

    A novel amperometric sensor based on iron doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HA) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been fabricated. The hybrid composite made of Fe-HA nanoparticles and CNT promotes electron transfer kinetics between the analyte levodopa (L-dopa) and the modified GC electrode. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated sensor gave a linear response range of 1.0 x 10(-7)-1.1 x 10(-6) M with the detection limit as low as 62 nM. The Fe-HA/CNT modified electrode showed good selectivity towards the determination of L-dopa in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and other common interferents. The sensor displays a high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability and it was successfully applied for the detection of L-dopa in pharmaceutical and medicinal plant samples. PMID:27427688

  10. Peroxynitrite-mediated formation of free radicals in human plasma: EPR detection of ascorbyl, albumin-thiyl and uric acid-derived free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Vivar, J; Santos, A M; Junqueira, V B; Augusto, O

    1996-01-01

    Formation of peroxynitrite by the fast reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide anion may represent a critical control point in cells producing both species, leading to either down-regulation of the physiological effects of superoxide anion and nitric oxide by forming an inert product, nitrate, or to potentiation of their toxic effects by oxidation of nearby molecules by peroxynitrite. (The term peroxynitrite is used to refer to the sum of all possible forms of peroxynitrite anion and peroxynitrous acid unless otherwise specified.) In this report we demonstrate that, in spite of all the antioxidant defences present in human plasma, its interaction with peroxynitrite leads to generation of free radical intermediates such as (i) the ascorbyl radical, detected by direct EPR, (ii) the albumin-thiyl radical, detected by spin-trapping experiments with both N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and (iii) a uric acid-derived free radical, detected as the DMPO radical adduct in plasma whose thiol groups were previously blocked with 5,5-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The identity of the latter adduct was confirmed by parallel experiments demonstrating that it is not detectable in plasma pretreated with uricase, whereas it is formed in incubations of peroxynitrite with uric acid. Peroxynitrite-mediated oxidations were also followed by oxygen consumption and ascorbate and plasma-thiol depletion. Our results support the view that peroxynitrite-mediated one-electron oxidation of biomolecules may be an important event in its cytotoxic mechanism. In addition, the data have methodological implications by providing support for the use of EPR methodologies for monitoring both free radical reactions and ascorbate concentrations in biological fluids. PMID:8615782

  11. Plasma Uric Acid Levels Correlate with Inflammation and Disease Severity in Malian Children with Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lopera-Mesa, Tatiana M.; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; van de Hoef, Diana L.; Doumbia, Saibou; Konaté, Drissa; Doumbouya, Mory; Gu, Wenjuan; Traoré, Karim; Diakité, Seidina A. S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Rodriguez, Ana; Fay, Michael P.; Long, Carole A.; Diakité, Mahamadou; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum elicits host inflammatory responses that cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. One proposed mechanism involves formation of immunostimulatory uric acid (UA) precipitates, which are released from sequestered schizonts into microvessels. Another involves hypoxanthine and xanthine, which accumulate in parasitized red blood cells (RBCs) and may be converted by plasma xanthine oxidase to UA at schizont rupture. These two forms of ‘parasite-derived’ UA stimulate immune cells to produce inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Methods and Findings We measured plasma levels of soluble UA and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-6, IL-10, sTNFRII, MCP-1, IL-8, TNFα, IP-10, IFNγ, GM-CSF, IL-1β) in 470 Malian children presenting with uncomplicated malaria (UM), non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM) or cerebral malaria (CM). UA levels were elevated in children with NCSM (median 5.74 mg/dl, 1.21-fold increase, 95% CI 1.09–1.35, n = 23, p = 0.0007) and CM (median 5.69 mg/dl, 1.19-fold increase, 95% CI 0.97–1.41, n = 9, p = 0.0890) compared to those with UM (median 4.60 mg/dl, n = 438). In children with UM, parasite density and plasma creatinine levels correlated with UA levels. These UA levels correlated with the levels of seven cytokines [IL-6 (r = 0.259, p<0.00001), IL-10 (r = 0.242, p<0.00001), sTNFRII (r = 0.221, p<0.00001), MCP-1 (r = 0.220, p<0.00001), IL-8 (r = 0.147, p = 0.002), TNFα (r = 0.132, p = 0.006) and IP-10 (r = 0.120, p = 0.012)]. In 39 children, UA levels were 1.49-fold (95% CI 1.34–1.65; p<0.0001) higher during their malaria episode [geometric mean titer (GMT) 4.67 mg/dl] than when they were previously healthy and aparasitemic (GMT 3.14 mg/dl). Conclusions Elevated UA levels may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. falciparum malaria by activating immune cells to produce inflammatory cytokines. While this study cannot identify the cause of

  12. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-12-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer pH 7.0 at -0.20 and +0.30 V vs. SCE, respectively, and the results were compared with other similarly modified electrodes existing in the literature. An interference study and recovery measurements in natural samples were successfully performed, indicating these architectures to be good and promising biosensor platforms.

  13. Effects of anthocyanins from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. cultivar Eshu No. 8) on the serum uric acid level and xanthine oxidase activity in hyperuricemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Cheng; Su, Guan-Hua; Luo, Chun-Li; Pang, Ya-Lu; Wang, Lin; Li, Xing; Wen, Jia-Hao; Zhang, Jiu-Liang

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the hypouricemic effect of the anthocyanin-rich purple sweet potato extract (APSPE). In vitro, APSPE has been proved to significantly inhibit XO activity in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, APSPE could not only inhibit the XO activity in mouse liver, but also reduce the serum uric acid level in hyperuricemic mice and affect the expression of mRNA levels of related renal transporters, such as mURAT1, mGLUT9, mOAT1 and mOCTN2. Moreover, APSPE could effectively regulate BUN and Cr levels to normal and decrease the inflammatory cellular influx in the tubule of the hyperuricemic mice. This study indicates the potential clinical utility of APSPE as a safe and effective anti-hyperuricemia bioactive agent or functional food. PMID:26201407

  14. Effects of anthocyanins from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. cultivar Eshu No. 8) on the serum uric acid level and xanthine oxidase activity in hyperuricemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Cheng; Su, Guan-Hua; Luo, Chun-Li; Pang, Ya-Lu; Wang, Lin; Li, Xing; Wen, Jia-Hao; Zhang, Jiu-Liang

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the hypouricemic effect of the anthocyanin-rich purple sweet potato extract (APSPE). In vitro, APSPE has been proved to significantly inhibit XO activity in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, APSPE could not only inhibit the XO activity in mouse liver, but also reduce the serum uric acid level in hyperuricemic mice and affect the expression of mRNA levels of related renal transporters, such as mURAT1, mGLUT9, mOAT1 and mOCTN2. Moreover, APSPE could effectively regulate BUN and Cr levels to normal and decrease the inflammatory cellular influx in the tubule of the hyperuricemic mice. This study indicates the potential clinical utility of APSPE as a safe and effective anti-hyperuricemia bioactive agent or functional food.

  15. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-12-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer pH 7.0 at -0.20 and +0.30 V vs. SCE, respectively, and the results were compared with other similarly modified electrodes existing in the literature. An interference study and recovery measurements in natural samples were successfully performed, indicating these architectures to be good and promising biosensor platforms. PMID:25159399

  16. A novel third generation uric acid biosensor using uricase electro-activated with ferrocene on a Nafion coated glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tanushree; Sarkar, Priyabrata; Turner, Anthony P F

    2015-04-01

    A new uric acid biosensor was constructed using ferrocene (Fc) induced electro-activated uricase (UOx) deposited within Nafion (Naf) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Electro-activation of UOx was successfully achieved by cyclic voltammetry through the electrostatic interaction of Fc with Trp residues within the hydrophobic pockets in UOx. The Naf/UOx/Fc composite was characterised by AFM, FTIR and EDX to ensure proper immobilisation. The interaction of Fc with the enzyme was analysed by Trp fluorescence spectroscopy and the α-helicity of the protein was measured by CD spectropolarimetry. The charge transfer resistance (Rct), calculated from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, for the modified sensor was lowered (1.39 kΩ) and the enzyme efficiency was enhanced by more than two fold as a result of Fc incorporation. Cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and amperometry all demonstrated the excellent response of the Naf/UOx/Fc/GCE biosensor to uric acid. The sensor system generated a linear response over a range of 500 nM to 600 μM UA, with a sensitivity and limit of detection of 1.78 μA μM(-1) and 230 nM, respectively. The heterogeneous rate constant (ks) for UA oxidation was much higher for Naf/UOx/Fc/GCE (1.0 × 10(-4) cm s(-1)) than for Naf/UOx/GCE (8.2 × 10(-5) cm s(-1)). Real samples, i.e. human blood, were tested for serum UA and the sensor yielded accurate results at a 95% confidence limit.

  17. Uric Acid and Coronary Artery Disease, Two Sides of a Single Coin: A Determinant of Antioxidant System or a Factor in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Babak; Zargari, Mehryar; Meshkini, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Kolsoum; Mokhberi, Vahid; Azizi, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uric acid has antioxidant activity and it is expected to protect against coronary artery disease (CAD). Contradictory, it is a component of metabolic syndrome and so a risk factor for CAD. The associations of plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) and uric acid (UA) as well as other risk factors were investigated relative to the occurrence and severity of CAD. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 148 males and 152 females aged 35-76 years who were classified as CAD cases and controls according to the results of coronary angiography. The severity of CAD was scored on the basis of the number and the extent of lesions at coronary arteries. The concentrations of UA and TAOC were measured by using of FRAP and enzymatic uricase methods. Results The prevalence of hypertension, cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus was more frequent in CAD cases than controls. Patients with CAD when compared with the controls had increased levels of glucose, triglycerides, creatinine, UA, TAOC and decreased levels of HDL- cholesterol. Serum UA was high positive correlate of serum total and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine, BUN, bilirubin, TAOC and negative correlate of glucose and HDL-C. TAOC and its major determinant UA but not bilirubin and albumin are significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of CAD. In multivariate analysis and in the absence of hypertension, UA but not TAOC would remain and be associated with CAD by the OR of 1.57 (1.07-2.29), p=0.02. If the results adjusted for all major risk factors including hypertension, neither TAOC nor UA would remain in the regression equation. Conclusion The results suggest that TAOC and UA but not bilirubin and albumin are associated with CAD significantly. But, the correlation is not independent and is attributed to the metabolic syndrome. The measurement of UA and TAOC will not improve the prognostic power beyond the classical risk factors. PMID:27042498

  18. Glassy carbon electrodes sequentially modified by cysteamine-capped gold nanoparticles and poly(amidoamine) dendrimers generation 4.5 for detecting uric acid in human serum without ascorbic acid interference.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Segovia, A S; Banda-Alemán, J A; Gutiérrez-Granados, S; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, F J; Godínez, Luis A; Bustos, E; Manríquez, J

    2014-02-17

    Glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were sequentially modified by cysteamine-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNp@cysteamine) and PAMAM dendrimers generation 4.5 bearing 128-COOH peripheral groups (GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM), in order to explore their capabilities as electrochemical detectors of uric acid (UA) in human serum samples at pH 2. The results showed that concentrations of UA detected by cyclic voltammetry with GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM were comparable (deviation <±10%; limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 1.7×10(-4) and 5.8×10(-4) mg dL(-1), respectively) to those concentrations obtained using the uricase-based enzymatic-colorimetric method. It was also observed that the presence of dendrimers in the GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM system minimizes ascorbic acid (AA) interference during UA oxidation, thus improving the electrocatalytic activity of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:24491759

  19. Serum uric acid levels predict the development of albuminuria over 6 years in patients with type 1 diabetes: Findings from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Recent studies suggest that uric acid is a mediator of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesized that elevated serum uric acid levels are a strong predictor of albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. We analyzed data from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study, a prospective observational study. A stepwise logistic regression model was applied to predict the development of micro- or macroalbuminuria after 6 years of follow-up in 324 participants who had no evidence of micro- or macroalbuminuria at baseline. A P-value <0.1 was used as the criteria for entry into and removal from the model. Results. The following factors were selected in the stepwise multivariate model as predictors of micro- or macroalbuminuria at the 6-year follow-up visit: baseline serum uric acid levels, HbA1c and pre-albuminuria. For every 1-mg/dl increase in serum uric acid levels at baseline, there was an 80% increased risk of developing micro- or macroalbuminuria at 6 years (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 2.8; P = 0.005). Additional covariates considered in the stepwise model were sex, age, duration of diabetes, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking, serum creatinine, cystatin C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusion. Elevated serum uric acid levels are a strong predictor of the development of albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20064950

  20. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities.

  1. Capillary ion electrophoresis of inorganic anions and uric acid in human saliva using a polyvinyl alcohol coated capillary column and hexamethonium chloride as additive of background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Yamamoto, Tsukasa; Kaseda, Maki; Yamada, Sachiko; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2012-03-01

    A combination of polyvinyl alcohol chemically coated capillary (PVA capillary) and background electrolyte (BGE) with ion-pair reagent (hexamethonium dichloride, HMC) was used on capillary ion electrophoresis-UV detection (CIE-UV) for analysis of Br⁻, I⁻, NO₂⁻, NO₃⁻, SCN⁻ and uric acid in human saliva. The PVA capillary prepared in our laboratory minimized electro-osmotic flow (EOF) at the BGE in pH 3-10, and did not affect the UV detection at 210 nm by the PVA-layer on capillary wall. Therefore, use of the PVA capillary was suitable for sensitive UV detection for analyte anions, as well as suppression of protein adsorption. In this study, we optimized the BGE of 10 mM phosphate plus 10 mM HMC with applying a voltage of -15 kV. HMC as an additive to BGE could manipulate the electrophoretic mobility of anions, without electrostatic adsorption to the PVA capillary. The CIE-UV could separate and determine analyte anions in human saliva containing proteins by the direct injection without pretreatments such as dilution or deproteinization within 13 min. The relative standard deviations (n=10) were ranged of 0.5-1.6% in migration times, 2.2-6.8% in peak heights and 2.8-8.4% in peak areas. The limits of detection (S/N=3) were ranged of 3.42-6.87 μM. The peak height of anions in this system was gradually decreased through the successive injections of saliva samples, but the problem was successfully solved by periodically conditioning the PVA capillary. The quantifiability of anions in human saliva samples by the CIE-UV was evaluated through the recoveries by standard addition methods and comparison of other representative analytical methods, as well as identification by ion chromatography (IC). From the anion analyses in 12 different saliva samples, the CIE-UV demonstrated that can obtain obvious differences in concentrations of SCN⁻ between of smoker and non-smoker and those of uric acid between male and female with satisfactory results.

  2. Is Uric Acid a Missing Link between Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes at a Later Time of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Fronczyk, Aneta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Majkowska, Lilianna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A high level of uric acid (UA) is a strong, independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between UA levels and the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) remains unclear. The aim of study was to evaluate the UA levels in pGDM women in relation to their current nutritional status and carbohydrate metabolism. Material and Methods 199 women with pGDM diagnoses based on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) 5–12 years previously and a control group of 50 women without pGDM. The assessment included anthropometric parameters, body composition (Tanita SC-330S), current OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-%B), HbA1c, lipids, and uric acid. Results No differences between groups were found in terms of age, time from the index pregnancy, anthropometric parameters, lipids or creatinine levels. The incidences of overweight and obesity were similar. Carbohydrate abnormalities were more frequent in the pGDM group than the control group (43.2% vs 12.0% p<0.001). The women with pGDM had significantly higher fasting glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin levels in the OGTTs, but similar HOMA-IR values. Their UA levels were significantly higher (258±58 vs 230±50 μmol/L, p<0.005) and correlated with BMI and the severity of carbohydrate disorders. The normal weight and normoglycemic pGDM women also demonstrated higher UA levels than a similar control subgroup (232±48 vs 208±48 μmol/L, p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations of UA level with BMI (β = 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.51, p<0.0001), creatinine level (β = 0.23, 95% CI 0.11–0.35, p<0.0005), triglycerides (β = 0.20, 95% CI 0.07–0.33, p<0.005) and family history of diabetes (β = 0.13, 95% CI 0.01–0.25, p<0.05). In logistic regression analysis, the association between higher UA level (defined as value ≥297 μmol/L) and presence of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder (IFG, IGT or

  3. Interaction between Marine-Derived n-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Uric Acid on Glucose Metabolism and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Kelei; Wu, Kejian; Zhao, Yimin; Huang, Tao; Lou, Dajun; Yu, Xiaomei; Li, Duo

    2015-08-26

    The present case-control study explored the interaction between marine-derived n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC PUFAs) and uric acid (UA) on glucose metabolism and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Two hundred and eleven healthy subjects in control group and 268 T2DM subjects in case group were included. Plasma phospholipid (PL) fatty acids and biochemical parameters were detected by standard methods. Plasma PL C22:6n-3 was significantly lower in case group than in control group, and was negatively correlated with fasting glucose (r = -0.177, p < 0.001). Higher plasma PL C22:6n-3 was associated with lower risk of T2DM, and the OR was 0.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.12 to 0.80; p = 0.016) for per unit increase of C22:6n-3. UA was significantly lower in case group than in control group. UA was positively correlated with fasting glucose in healthy subjects, but this correlation became negative in T2DM subjects. A significant interaction was observed between C22:6n-3 and UA on fasting glucose (p for interaction = 0.005): the lowering effect of C22:6n-3 was only significant in subjects with a lower level of UA. In conclusion, C22:6n-3 interacts with UA to modulate glucose metabolism.

  4. An ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid based on Co doped CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, N; Sekar, C; Murugan, R; Ravi, G

    2016-08-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor has been fabricated using Co doped CeO2 nanoparticles for selective and simultaneous determination of xanthine (XA), hypoxanthine (HXA) and uric acid (UA) in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH5.0) for the first time. The Co-CeO2 NPs have been prepared by microwave irradiation method and characterized by Powder XRD, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM and VSM measurements. The electrochemical behaviours of XA, HXA and UA at the Co-CeO2 NPs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry methods. The modified electrode exhibited remarkably well-separated anodic peaks corresponding to the oxidation of XA, HXA and UA over the concentration range of 0.1-1000, 1-600 and 1-2200μM with detection limits of 0.096, 0.36, and 0.12μM (S/N=3), respectively. For simultaneous detection by synchronous change of the concentrations of XA, HXA and UA, the linear responses were in the range of 1-400μM each with the detection limits of 0.47, 0.26, and 0.43μM (S/N=3), respectively. The fabricated sensor was further applied to the detection of XA, HXA and UA in human urine samples with good selectivity and high reproducibility.

  5. The impact of serum uric acid on the natural history of glomerular filtration rate: a retrospective study in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Xiang; Sun, Xiaohe

    2016-01-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) level has been proposed to have important connections with chronic kidney disease (CKD), while the impact of SUA level on the natural history of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline remains unknown. The present study aims to study the association of the SUA level with the GFR decline in a general population. Two thousand, seven hundred and eighty-nine subjects who visited the Health Checkup Clinic both at 2008 and 2013 were identified. A significant inverse correlation was observed between change in SUA from 2008–2013 (ΔSUA) and change in eGFR (ΔeGFR) during the same period. Multivariate regression analysis of ΔeGFR indicated that the increase in SUA over time were a negative predictor of the change in eGFR. Our result indicates that the decline of eGFR over years is larger in subjects with an increased SUA level, which helps to underline the importance of SUA level management in the context of kidney function preservation. PMID:27069799

  6. High loading of uniformly dispersed Pt nanoparticles on polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes and its application in simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mouhong; Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Yingju; Liang, Canjian; Fei, Shidong; Chen, Xiaofen; Ni, Chunlin

    2013-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were homogeneously covered with a bio-functional polydopamine (PDOP) by a simple dip-coating approach in mild basic solution. Then, uniformly dispersed and highly loaded platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) were deposited on MWCNT@PDOP by a mild reductant, and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Afterwards, this nanocomposite was modified on the glass carbon electrode and applied to simultaneously determine dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Results showed that a linear electro-oxidation response was found for DA and UA in the range of 0.25-20 μM and 0.3-13 μM with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.08 μM and 0.12 μM, respectively. In addition, the detection sensitivities for DA and UA by DPV were 1.03 μA μM-1 and 2.09 μA μM-1, respectively, which were much higher than those from a cyclic voltammogram. Finally, the reproducibility and stability of the nanocomposite were also evaluated, demonstrating that such MWCNT@PDOP@PtNPs can be a promising candidate for advanced electrode material in electrochemical sensing and other electrocatalytic applications.

  7. Effect of Soy Sauce on Serum Uric Acid Levels in Hyperuricemic Rats and Identification of Flazin as a Potent Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Huipin; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-15

    This is the first report on the ability of soy sauce to effectively reduce the serum uric acid levels and xanthine oxidase (XOD) activities of hyperuricemic rats. Soy sauce was partitioned sequentially into ethyl acetate and water fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction with strong XOD inhibition effect was purified further. On the basis of xanthine oxidase inhibitory (XOI) activity-guided purification, nine compounds including 3,4-dihydroxy ethyl cinnamate, diisobutyl terephthalate, harman, daidzein, flazin, catechol, thymine, genistein, and uracil were obtained. It was the first time that 3,4-dihydroxy ethyl cinnamate and diisobutyl terephthalate had been identified from soy sauce. Flazin with hydroxymethyl furan ketone group at C-1 and carboxyl at C-3 exhibited the strongest XOI activity (IC50 = 0.51 ± 0.05 mM). According to fluorescence quenching and molecular docking experiments, flazin could enter into the catalytic center of XOD to interact with Lys1045, Gln1194, and Arg912 mainly by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. Flazin, catechol, and genistein not only were potent XOD inhibitors but also held certain antioxidant activities. According to ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) simulation in silico, flazin had good oral bioavailability in vivo. PMID:27181598

  8. Total saponins from dioscorea septemloba thunb reduce serum uric acid levels in rats with hyperuricemia through OATP1A1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiao-lin; Xiang, Ting; Sun, Bao-guo; Luo, Hao-xuan; Liu, Meng-ting; Chen, Ze-xiong; Zhang, Shi-jun; Wang, Chang-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of total saponins of Dioscorea (TSD), an extract of the Chinese herbal Bi Xie, on hyperuricemia and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The rat hyperuricemia model was established by administration of adenine. Thirty-two rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups: model group, low/high-dose TSD-treated groups, and allopurinol-treated group. Meanwhile, 8 rats were used as normal controls. Serum uric acid (UA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A1 (OATP1A1) levels were measured. Comparison between the model group and treatment (allopurinol and TSD) groups showed the serum UA levels were significantly decreased in treatment groups. TSD had similar effects to allopurinol. It was found that the OATP1A1 protein expression levels in treatment groups were higher than in model group and normal controls. And different from the allopurinol-treated groups, TSD-treated group had elevated OATP1A1 expression levels in the stomach, liver, small intestine and large intestine tissues. It was suggested that TSD may facilitate the excretion of UA and lower UA levels by up-regulating OATP1A1 expression.

  9. In vitro Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Studies of Lippia nodiflora and Isolated Flavonoids and Phenylethanoid Glycosides as Potential Uric Acid-lowering Agents.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lee-Chuen; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2015-06-01

    Lippia nodiflora has been traditionally used for treatment of knee joint pain. Hitherto, no studies have been reported on the effective use of L. nodiflora against hyperuricemia, gout or other metabolic disorders. In this present study, L. nodiflora was examined for its ability to lower uric acid levels using an in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory assay. The whole plant methanolic extract was subjected to bioactivity-guided fractionation to yield 4 fractions (F1-F4). F3 displayed the highest potency and was further purified by column chromatography to afford two phenylethanoid glycosides, arenarioside (1) and verbascoside (2), and three flavonoids, 6-hydroxyluteolin (3), 6-hydroxyluteolin-7-O-glycoside (4), and nodifloretin (5). These compounds inhibited xanthine oxidase activity, with IC50 values between 7.52 ± 0.01 and 130.00 ± 2.25 μM, of which 3 was the most potent. In contrast, allopurinol, serving as a positive control, was 0.22 ± 0.00 μM. Thus, L. nodiflora, and its chemical constituents are worthy of further studies as potential anti-hyperuricemic agents.

  10. Delayed uric Acid accumulation in plasma provides additional anti-oxidant protection against iron-triggered oxidative stress after a wingate test.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Tp; Lorenço-Lima, L; Ganini, D; Vardaris, Cv; Polotow, Tg; Barros, Mp

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species are produced during anaerobic exercise mostly by Fe ions released into plasma and endothelial/muscle xanthine oxidase activation that generates uric acid (UA) as the endpoint metabolite. Paradoxically, UA is considered a major antioxidant by virtue of being able to chelate pro-oxidative iron ions. This work aimed to evaluate the relationship between UA and plasma markers of oxidative stress following the exhaustive Wingate test. Plasma samples of 17 male undergraduate students were collected before, 5 and 60 min after maximal anaerobic effort for the measurement of total iron, haem iron, UA, ferric-reducing antioxidant activity in plasma (FRAP), and malondialdehyde (MDA, biomarker of lipoperoxidation). Iron and FRAP showed similar kinetics in plasma, demonstrating an adequate pro-/antioxidant balance immediately after exercise and during the recovery period (5-60 min). Slight variations of haem iron concentrations did not support a relevant contribution of rhabdomyolysis or haemolysis for iron overload following exercise. UA concentration did not vary immediately after exercise but rather increased 29% during the recovery period. Unaltered MDA levels were concomitantly measured. We propose that delayed UA accumulation in plasma is an auxiliary antioxidant response to post-exercise (iron-mediated) oxidative stress, and the high correlation between total UA and FRAP in plasma (R-Square = 0.636; p = 0.00582) supports this hypothesis. PMID:25435669

  11. Serum Uric Acid and Prehypertension Among Adults Free of Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: Baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Lotufo, Paulo A; Baena, Cristina P; Santos, Itamar S; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2016-02-01

    The association between serum uric acid (SUA) and prehypertension was evaluated in a racially admixed sample of civil servants aged 35 to 74 years, enrolled (2008-2010) in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Health (ELSA-Brasil). Of the 15 105 patients who enrolled in the study, we analyzed 3412 after excluding those who reported previous cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or hypertension; were heavy drinkers; or had a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2). Among the men, logistic regression, adjusted for age, race, income, birth weight, salt intake, insulin resistance, BMI, and renal function revealed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of prehypertension from the bottom quartile (referent) to the top quartile of SUA levels as follows: 0.84 (95% CI, 0.61-1.38), 0.97 (0.71-1.34) and 1.44 (1.04-2.0; P for trend .01). Analyzing for 1-standard deviation of change in SUA, the ORs were 1.19 (1.06-1.32). This association persisted in the subgroup analysis consisting of patients who were white, overweight, with a high salt intake but with normal renal function, and without metabolic syndrome. No association was found among women. In conclusion, SUA levels were associated with prehypertension among men.

  12. Electrocatalytic determination of dopamine in the presence of uric acid using an indenedione derivative and multiwall carbon nanotubes spiked in carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Nasirizadeh, Navid; Shekari, Zahra; Zare, Hamid R; Makarem, Somayeh

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, a modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes and an indenedione derivative(IMWCNT-CPE) was constructed and was successfully used for dopamine(DA) electrocatalytic oxidation and simultaneous determination of DA and uric acid (UA). Cyclic voltammograms of the IMWCNT-CPE show a pair of well-defined and reversible redox. The obtained results indicate that the peak potential of DA oxidation at IMWCNT-CPE shifted by about 65 and 185 mV toward the negative values compared with that at a MWCNT and indenedione modified CPE, respectively. The electron transfer coefficient, α, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k', for the oxidation of DA at IMWCNT-CPE were calculated 0.4±0.01 and (1.13±0.03)×10(-3) cm s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) exhibits two linear dynamic ranges of 1.9-79.4 μM, and 79.4-714.3 μM and a detection limit of 0.52 μM for DA determination. Then IMWCNT-CPE was applied to the simultaneous determination of DA and UA with DPV. Finally, the activity of the modified electrode was also investigated for determination of DA and UA in real samples, such as injection solution of DA and urine, with satisfactory results.

  13. Serum Uric Acid and Prehypertension Among Adults Free of Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: Baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Lotufo, Paulo A; Baena, Cristina P; Santos, Itamar S; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2016-02-01

    The association between serum uric acid (SUA) and prehypertension was evaluated in a racially admixed sample of civil servants aged 35 to 74 years, enrolled (2008-2010) in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Health (ELSA-Brasil). Of the 15 105 patients who enrolled in the study, we analyzed 3412 after excluding those who reported previous cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or hypertension; were heavy drinkers; or had a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2). Among the men, logistic regression, adjusted for age, race, income, birth weight, salt intake, insulin resistance, BMI, and renal function revealed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of prehypertension from the bottom quartile (referent) to the top quartile of SUA levels as follows: 0.84 (95% CI, 0.61-1.38), 0.97 (0.71-1.34) and 1.44 (1.04-2.0; P for trend .01). Analyzing for 1-standard deviation of change in SUA, the ORs were 1.19 (1.06-1.32). This association persisted in the subgroup analysis consisting of patients who were white, overweight, with a high salt intake but with normal renal function, and without metabolic syndrome. No association was found among women. In conclusion, SUA levels were associated with prehypertension among men. PMID:25972396

  14. DELAYED URIC ACID ACCUMULATION IN PLASMA PROVIDES ADDITIONAL ANTI-OXIDANT PROTECTION AGAINST IRON-TRIGGERED OXIDATIVE STRESS AFTER A WINGATE TEST

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Junior, TP; Lorenço-Lima, L; Ganini, D; Vardaris, CV; Polotow, TG

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are produced during anaerobic exercise mostly by Fe ions released into plasma and endothelial/muscle xanthine oxidase activation that generates uric acid (UA) as the endpoint metabolite. Paradoxically, UA is considered a major antioxidant by virtue of being able to chelate pro-oxidative iron ions. This work aimed to evaluate the relationship between UA and plasma markers of oxidative stress following the exhaustive Wingate test. Plasma samples of 17 male undergraduate students were collected before, 5 and 60 min after maximal anaerobic effort for the measurement of total iron, haem iron, UA, ferric-reducing antioxidant activity in plasma (FRAP), and malondialdehyde (MDA, biomarker of lipoperoxidation). Iron and FRAP showed similar kinetics in plasma, demonstrating an adequate pro-/antioxidant balance immediately after exercise and during the recovery period (5–60 min). Slight variations of haem iron concentrations did not support a relevant contribution of rhabdomyolysis or haemolysis for iron overload following exercise. UA concentration did not vary immediately after exercise but rather increased 29% during the recovery period. Unaltered MDA levels were concomitantly measured. We propose that delayed UA accumulation in plasma is an auxiliary antioxidant response to post-exercise (iron-mediated) oxidative stress, and the high correlation between total UA and FRAP in plasma (R-Square = 0.636; p = 0.00582) supports this hypothesis. PMID:25435669

  15. Magnetic core-shell Fe₃O₄@SiO₂/MWCNT nanocomposite modified carbon paste electrode for amplified electrochemical sensing of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Majid; Hassannezhad, Morassa

    2014-03-01

    A new type of nanocomposite based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2/MWCNTs) was prepared and used to fabricate a modified carbon paste electrode (CPE). The nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Electrochemical behavior of uric acid (UA) was investigated on Fe3O4@SiO2/MWCNTs-CPE by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) in phosphate buffer solution (pH6.0). Under the optimized conditions, the peak currents increased linearly with the concentration of UA in the range from 0.60 to 100.0 μM, with a detection limit of 0.13 μM. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for the determination of UA in biological fluids.

  16. Long-chain-substituted uric acid and 5,6-diaminouracil derivatives as novel agents against free radical processes: synthesis and in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Fraisse, L; Verlhac, J B; Roche, B; Rascle, M C; Rabion, A; Seris, J L

    1993-05-14

    A new series of N-alkylated uric acids (2,6,8-purinetrione) and 5,6-diaminouracils (5,6-diamino-2,4-pyrimidinedione) were synthesized, and their activities against free radicals were evaluated. Long-chain derivatives of both series exhibited a large inhibitory activity against oxygen radical induced lipid peroxidation in bovine heart mitochondria (IC50 lower than 1 microM), compared to the reference antioxidants trolox C or alpha-tocopherol. This activity appeared related to (i) the ability of these compounds to reduce the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and (ii) their lipophilicity estimated by log P determination. In order to study the scavenging mechanisms of diaminouracils and urate derivatives against lipid radicals, they were also tested against the azo-initiated peroxidation of either methyl linoleate in organic solvents or a liposomal suspension of dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Urate derivatives reacted moderately with lipid radicals and were slowly consumed, significantly affecting the propagation of the peroxidation. Diaminouracils strongly reduced the propagation rate. They were quickly consumed and were able to deactivate about 1 mol of lipid radical per mole of compound in organic solvent. Dodecyl urates and decyl- and dodecyldiaminouracils were chosen for further in vitro investigation and in vivo evaluation.

  17. Effects of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and its Flavonol Constituents, Kaempferol and Quercetin, on Serum Uric Acid Levels, Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Liver Xanthine Oxidoreductase Aactivity inOxonate-Induced Hyperuricemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Haidari, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Seid Ali; Mohammad Shahi, Majid; Mahboob, Soltan-Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Increased serum uric acid is known to be a major risk related to the development of several oxidative stress diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of parsley, quercetin and kaempferol on serum uric acid levels, liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity and two non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration) in normal and oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into ten equal groups; including 5 normal groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol) and 5 hyperuricemic groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol). Parsley (5 g/Kg), quercetin (5 mg/Kg), kaempferol (5 mg/Kg) and allopurinol (5 mg/Kg) were administrated to the corresponding groups by oral gavage once a day for 2 weeks. The results showed that parsley and its flavonol did not cause any significant reduction in the serum uric acid levels in normal rats, but significantly reduced the serum uric acid levels of hyperuricemic rats in a time-dependent manner. All treatments significantly inhibited liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity. Parsley, kaempferol and quercetin treatment led also to a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and decrease in malondialdehyde concentration in hyperuricemic rats. Although the hypouricemic effect of allopurinol was much higher than that of parsley and its flavonol constituents, it could not significantly change oxidative stress biomarkers. These features of parsley and its flavonols make them as a possible alternative for allopurinol, or at least in combination therapy to minimize the side effects of allopurinol to treat hyperuricemia and oxidative stress diseases.

  18. PDK2 and ABCG2 genes polymorphisms are correlated with blood glucose levels and uric acid in Tibetan gout patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y C; Jin, T B; Sun, X D; Geng, T T; Zhang, M X; Wang, L; Feng, T; Kang, L L; Chen, C

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the PDK2 and ABCG2 genes play important roles in many aspects of gout development in European populations. However, a detailed genotype-phenotype analysis was not performed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential association between variants in these two genes and metabolism-related quantitative phenotypes relevant to gout in a Chinese Tibetan population. In total, 316 Chinese Tibetan gout patients were recruited from rheumatology outpatient clinics and 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in PDK2 and ABCG2 were genotyped, which were possible etiologic variants as identified in the HapMap Chinese Han Beijing population. A significant difference in blood glucose levels was detected between different genotypes of rs2728109 (P = 0.005) in the PDK2 gene. We also detected a significant difference in the mean serum uric levels between different genotypes of rs3114018 (P = 0.004) in the ABCG2 gene. All P values remained significant after Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing. Our data demonstrate potential roles for PDK2 and ABCG2 polymorphisms in the metabolic phenotypes of Tibetan gout patients, which may provide new insights into the etiology of gout. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26909964

  19. Voltammetric behavior of uric acid on carbon paste electrode modified with salmon sperm dsDNA and its application as label-free electrochemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Mohamadi, Maryam; Mostafavi, Ali; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2014-04-15

    A simple and sensitive label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was proposed for the rapid determination of uric acid (UA) using a carbon nano tube paste electrode (CNTPE) modified with salmon sperm dsDNA. At first, the interaction between UA and the DNA was studied using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The addition of the DNA to UA solution resulted in a decrease in the peak current of UA and at the same time, a positive shift in the peak potential indicating an intercalative interaction. Then, the voltammetric response of a DNA-immobilized CNTPE was investigated for the determination of UA. The immobilization of the DNA was carried out using acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes and studied using Fe(CN)6(3-)/Fe(CN)6(4-) redox indicator. Compared with unmodified CNTPE, the oxidation signal of UA showed a significant increase at the DNA-coated electrode, and shifted to more positive potentials attributed to the pre-concentration of UA at the electrode surface due to interaction with the surface-confined DNA layer. This interaction was used for the fabrication of a simple and sensitive biosensor for determining UA. After the optimization of operational parameters, a linear dependence of the peak current on the UA concentration was observed in the range of 7.0×10(-7) to 1.1×10(-4) mol L(-1), with the detection and quantification limits of 1.8×10(-7) and 5.8×10(-7) mol L(-1), respectively. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied to validate its capability for the analysis of UA in human serum and urine samples.

  20. Flower-like ZnO decorated polyaniline/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Kh; Moloudi, M

    2016-11-01

    A novel sensor was fabricated by electrochemical deposition of ZnO flower-like/polyaniline nanofiber/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (ZnO/PANI/RGO) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for direct detection of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) in the presence of fixed concentration of ascorbic acid (AA). Surface morphology and characterization of the modified electrodes were confirmed by field emission scanning microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies. For individual detection, the linear responses were in the two concentration ranges of 0.001-1 μM and 1-1000 μM with detection limit 0.8 nM (S/N = 3) for DA, and also 0.1-100 μM and 100-1000 μM with detection limit 0.042 μM (S/N = 3) for UA. Simultaneous determination of these species in their mixture solution showed the linear responses in the two concentration ranges of 0.1-90 μM and 90-1000 μM with detection limit 0.017 μM (S/N = 3) for DA and also showed two linear range of 0.5-90 μM and 100-1000 μM with detection limit 0.12 μM (S/N = 3) for UA, with coexistence of 1000 μM AA. The applicability of sensor for the analysis of DA, and UA in dopamine injection solution, human serum and human urine samples was successfully demonstrated.

  1. Flower-like ZnO decorated polyaniline/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Kh; Moloudi, M

    2016-11-01

    A novel sensor was fabricated by electrochemical deposition of ZnO flower-like/polyaniline nanofiber/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (ZnO/PANI/RGO) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for direct detection of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) in the presence of fixed concentration of ascorbic acid (AA). Surface morphology and characterization of the modified electrodes were confirmed by field emission scanning microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies. For individual detection, the linear responses were in the two concentration ranges of 0.001-1 μM and 1-1000 μM with detection limit 0.8 nM (S/N = 3) for DA, and also 0.1-100 μM and 100-1000 μM with detection limit 0.042 μM (S/N = 3) for UA. Simultaneous determination of these species in their mixture solution showed the linear responses in the two concentration ranges of 0.1-90 μM and 90-1000 μM with detection limit 0.017 μM (S/N = 3) for DA and also showed two linear range of 0.5-90 μM and 100-1000 μM with detection limit 0.12 μM (S/N = 3) for UA, with coexistence of 1000 μM AA. The applicability of sensor for the analysis of DA, and UA in dopamine injection solution, human serum and human urine samples was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27555438

  2. Electrodeposition of gold nanoclusters on overoxidized polypyrrole film modified glassy carbon electrode and its application for the simultaneous determination of epinephrine and uric acid under coexistence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lin, Xiang-Qin

    2007-07-23

    A novel biosensor was fabricated by electrochemical deposition of gold nanoclusters on ultrathin overoxidized polypyrrole (PPyox) film, formed a nano-Au/PPyox composite on glassy carbon electrode (nano-Au/PPyox/GCE). The properties of the nanocomposite have been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemical investigations. The nano-Au/PPyox/GCE had strongly catalytic activity toward the oxidation of epinephrine (EP), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA), and resolved the overlapping voltammetric response of EP, UA and AA into three well-defined peaks with a large anodic peak difference. The catalytic peak currents obtained from differential pulse voltammetry increased linearly with increasing EP and UA concentrations in the range of 3.0x10(-7) to 2.1x10(-5) M and 5.0x10(-8) to 2.8x10(-5) M with a detection limit of 3.0x10(-8) and 1.2x10(-8) M (s/n=3), respectively. The results showed that the modified electrode can selectively determine EP and UA in the coexistence of a large amount of AA. In addition, the sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability. The nano-Au/PPyox/GCE has been applied to determination of EP in epinephrine hydrochloride injection and UA in urine samples with satisfactory results.

  3. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of L-DOPA for mono-/bi-enzyme immobilization and amperometric biosensing of H2O2 and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mengzhen; Huang, Ting; Chao, Long; Xie, Qingji; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Meng, Wenhua

    2016-03-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed polymerization of L-DOPA (vs. dopamine) in the presence of H2O2 (and uricase (UOx)) was exploited to immobilize mono-/bi-enzymes for hydroquinone-mediated amperometric biosensing of H2O2 and uric acid (UA). The relevant polymeric biocomposites (PBCs) were prepared in phosphate buffer solution containing HRP and L-DOPA (or plus UOx) after adding H2O2. The mono-/bi-enzyme amperometric biosensors were prepared simply by casting some of the PBCs on Au-plated Au (Au(plate)/Au) electrodes, followed by coating with an outer-layer chitosan (CS) film for each. UV-vis spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. The HRP immobilized by enzyme catalysis well preserved its bioactivity, as confirmed by UV-vis spectrophotometry. Under optimized conditions, the monoenzyme CS/HRP-poly(L-DOPA) (PD)/Au(plate)/Au electrode potentiostated at -0.1V responded linearly to H2O2 concentration from 0.001 to 1.25mM with a sensitivity of 700μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1μM, and the bienzyme CS/UOx-HRP-PD/Au(plate)/Au electrode at -0.1V responded linearly to UA concentration from 0.001 to 0.4mM with a sensitivity of 349μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and a LOD of 0.1μM. The mono-/bi-enzyme biosensors based on biosynthesized PD performed better than many reported analogues and those based on similarly biosynthesized polydopamine. PMID:26717822

  4. The seasonal glucocorticoid response of male Rufous-winged Sparrows to acute stress correlates with changes in plasma uric acid, but neither glucose nor testosterone.

    PubMed

    Deviche, Pierre; Valle, Shelley; Gao, Sisi; Davies, Scott; Bittner, Stephanie; Carpentier, Elodie

    2016-09-01

    We sought to clarify functional relationships between baseline and acute stress-induced changes in plasma levels of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) and the reproductive hormone testosterone (T), and those of two main metabolites, uric acid (UA) and glucose (GLU). Acute stress in vertebrates generally stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which in birds is primarily CORT. This stimulation is thought to promote behavioral and metabolic changes, including increased glycemia. However, limited information in free-ranging birds supports the view that acutely elevated plasma CORT stimulates glycemia. Acute stress also often decreases the secretion of reproductive hormones (e.g., T in males), but the role of CORT in this decrease and the contribution of T to the regulation of plasma GLU remain poorly understood. We measured initial (pre-stress) and acute stress-induced plasma CORT and T as well as GLU in adult male Rufous-winged Sparrows, Peucaea carpalis, sampled during the pre-breeding, breeding, post-breeding molt, and non-breeding stages. Stress increased plasma CORT and the magnitude of this increase did not differ across life history stages. The stress-induced elevation of plasma CORT was consistently associated with decreased plasma UA, suggesting a role for CORT in the regulation of plasma UA during stress. During stress plasma GLU either increased (pre-breeding), did not change (breeding), or decreased (molt and non-breeding), and plasma T either decreased (pre-breeding and breeding) or did not change (molt and non-breeding). These data provide only partial support to the hypothesis that CORT secretion during acute stress exerts a hyperglycemic action or is responsible for the observed decrease in plasma T taking place at certain life history stages. They also do not support the hypothesis that rapid changes in plasma T influence glycemia. PMID:27292791

  5. Synthesis of [¹¹C]uric acid, using [¹¹C]phosgene, as a possible biomarker in PET imaging for diagnosis of gout.

    PubMed

    Yashio, Keiji; Katayama, Yumiko; Takashima, Tadayuki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Doi, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Wada, Yasuhiro; Tamai, Ikumi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and in vivo evaluation of (11)C -labeled uric acid ([(11)C]1), a potential imaging agent for the diagnosis of urate-related life-style diseases, was performed using positron emission tomography (PET) image analysis. First, the synthesis of [(11)C]1 was achieved by reacting 5,6-diaminouracil (2) with (11)C-labeled phosgene ([(11)C]COCl(2)). The radiochemical yield of [(11)C]1 was 37±7% (decay-corrected based on [(11)C]COCl(2)) with specific radioactivities of 96-152GBq/μmol at the end of synthesis (n=6). The average time of radiosynthesis from the end of bombardment, including formulation, was about 30min with >98% radiochemical purity. Second, the synthetic approach to [(11)C]1 was optimized using 5,6-diaminouracil sulfate (3) with [(11)C]COCl(2) in the presence of 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene. [(11)C]1 was synthesized in 36±6% radiochemical yield, 89-142GBq/μmol of specific radioactivities, and 98% radiochemical purity by this method (n=5). This allowed the synthesis of [(11)C]1 to be carried out repeatedly and the radiochemical yield, specific radioactivities, average time of synthesis, and radiochemical purity of [(11)C]1 were similar to those obtained using 2. PET studies in rats showed large differences in the accumulation of radioligand in the limbs under normal and hyperuricemic conditions. Thus, an efficient and convenient automated synthesis of [(11)C]1 has been developed, and preliminary PET evaluation of [(11)C]1 confirmed the increased accumulation of radioactivity in the limbs of a rat model of hyperuricemia.

  6. Modeling and Simulation for Estimating the Influence of Renal Dysfunction on the Hypouricemic Effect of Febuxostat in Hyperuricemic Patients Due to Overproduction or Underexcretion of Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshinori; Kimura, Toshimi; Echizen, Hirotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Whether renal dysfunction influences the hypouricemic effect of febuxostat, a xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, in patients with hyperuricemia due to overproduction or underexcretion of uric acid (UA) remains unclear. We aimed to address this question with a modeling and simulation approach. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of febuxostat were analyzed using data from the literature. A kinetic model of UA was retrieved from a previous human study. Renal UA clearance was estimated as a function of creatinine clearance (CLcr) but non-renal UA clearance was assumed constant. A reversible inhibition model for bovine XO was adopted. Integrating these kinetic formulas, we developed a PK-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for estimating the time course of the hypouricemic effect of febuxostat as a function of baseline UA level, febuxostat dose, treatment duration, body weight, and CLcr. Using the Monte Carlo simulation method, we examined the performance of the model by comparing predicted UA levels with those reported in the literature. We also modified the models for application to hyperuricemia due to UA overproduction or underexcretion. Thirty-nine data sets comprising 735 volunteers or patients were retrieved from the literature. A good correlation was observed between the hypouricemic effects of febuxostat estimated by our PK-PD model and those reported in the articles (observed) (r=0.89, p<0.001). The hypouricemic effect was estimated to be augmented in patients with renal dysfunction irrespective of the etiology of hyperuricemia. While validation in clinical studies is needed, the modeling and simulation approach may be useful for individualizing febuxostat doses in patients with various clinical characteristics.

  7. Reduction in Serum Uric Acid May Be Related to Methotrexate Efficacy in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Data from the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason J.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Dresser, George K.; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Thorne, Carter; Tin, Diane; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C.; Pope, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The mechanism of action of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex. It may increase adenosine levels by blocking its conversion to uric acid (UA). This study was done to determine if methotrexate lowers UA in early RA (ERA). METHODS Data were obtained from Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort, an incident ERA cohort. All ERA patients with serial UA measurements were included, comparing those with methotrexate use vs. no methotrexate exposure (controls). Analyses were exploratory. Patients with concomitant gout or taking UA-lowering therapies were excluded. RESULTS In total, 49 of the 2,524 ERA patients were identified with data available for both pre-methotrexate UA levels and post-methotrexate UA levels (300 µmol/L and 273 µmol/L, respectively; P = 0.035). The control group not taking methotrexate had a mean baseline UA level of 280 µmol/L and a follow-up level of 282 µmol/L (P = 0.448); mean change in UA with methotrexate was −26.8 µmol/L vs. 2.3 µmol/L in the no methotrexate group (P = 0.042). Methotrexate users with a decrease in UA had a disease activity score of 2.37 for 28 joints when compared with the controls (3.26) at 18 months (P = 0.042). Methotrexate users with decreased UA had a lower swollen joint count (SJC) of 0.9 at 18 months, whereas methotrexate users without lowering of UA had an SJC of 4.5 (P = 0.035). Other analyses were not significant. CONCLUSIONS Methotrexate response is associated with lowering of serum UA in ERA compared to nonusers. This may be due to changes in adenosine levels. Methotrexate response is associated with lower UA and fewer swollen joints compared to nonresponders. PMID:27081318

  8. Abundant local interactions in the 4p16.1 region suggest functional mechanisms underlying SLC2A9 associations with human serum uric acid

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Guo, Yunfei; Kindt, Alida S.D.; Merriman, Tony R.; Semple, Colin A.; Wang, Kai; Haley, Chris S.

    2014-01-01

    Human serum uric acid concentration (SUA) is a complex trait. A recent meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified 28 loci associated with SUA jointly explaining only 7.7% of the SUA variance, with 3.4% explained by two major loci (SLC2A9 and ABCG2). Here we examined whether gene–gene interactions had any roles in regulating SUA using two large GWAS cohorts included in the meta-analysis [the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort (ARIC) and the Framingham Heart Study cohort (FHS)]. We found abundant genome-wide significant local interactions in ARIC in the 4p16.1 region located mostly in an intergenic area near SLC2A9 that were not driven by linkage disequilibrium and were replicated in FHS. Taking the forward selection approach, we constructed a model of five SNPs with marginal effects and three epistatic SNP pairs in ARIC—three marginal SNPs were located within SLC2A9 and the remaining SNPs were all located in the nearby intergenic area. The full model explained 1.5% more SUA variance than that explained by the lead SNP alone, but only 0.3% was contributed by the marginal and epistatic effects of the SNPs in the intergenic area. Functional analysis revealed strong evidence that the epistatically interacting SNPs in the intergenic area were unusually enriched at enhancers active in ENCODE hepatic (HepG2, P = 4.7E−05) and precursor red blood (K562, P = 5.0E−06) cells, putatively regulating transcription of WDR1 and SLC2A9. These results suggest that exploring epistatic interactions is valuable in uncovering the complex functional mechanisms underlying the 4p16.1 region. PMID:24821702

  9. Serum uric acid predicts vascular complications in adults with type 1 diabetes: the coronary artery calcification in type 1 diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M; Rivard, Christopher J; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association's ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study participants (N = 652) were 19-56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6 years later. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3 %/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root-transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2-2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1-3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1-1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4-3.0) and CACp (1.5, 1.1-1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6 years. SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  10. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Vascular Complications in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Epidemiologic evidence support a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years, and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association’s ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed-tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root transformed CAC-volume ≥ 2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated-discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1–3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1–1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4–3.0) and CACp (1.5 (1.1–1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6-years. Conclusion SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes, and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  11. Elevated Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Greater Bone Mineral Density and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Juan; Wang, Chen; Qiu, Rui; Chen, Yu-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Previous studies have suggested a positive link between serum uric acid (UA) and bone mineral density (BMD). In this study, we re-examined the association between UA and BMD and further explored whether this was mediated by skeletal muscle mass in a general Chinese population. Method This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 3079 (963 men and 2116 women) Chinese adults aged 40–75 years. Face-to-face interviews and laboratory analyses were performed to determine serum UA and various covariates. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess the BMD and appendicular skeletal muscle mass. The skeletal muscle mass index (SMI = ASM/Height2, kg/m2) for the total limbs, arms, and legs was then calculated. Results The serum UA was graded and, in general, was significantly and positively associated with the BMD and muscle mass, after adjustment for multiple covariates in the total sample. Compared with participants in lowest quartile of UA, those participants in highest quartile showed a 2.3%(whole body), 4.1%(lumbar spine), 2.4%(total hip), and 2.0% (femoral neck) greater BMDs. The mean SMIs in the highest (vs. lowest) quartile increased by 2.7% (total), 2.5% (arm), 2.7% (leg) respectively. In addition, path analysis suggested that the favorable association between UA and BMD might be mediated by increasing SMI. Conclusion The elevated serum UA was associated with a higher BMD and a greater muscle mass in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population and the UA-BMD association was partly mediated by muscle mass. PMID:27144737

  12. A facile one-pot synthesis of carbon nitride dots-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for simultaneous enhanced detecting of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziyin; Zheng, Xiaohui; Li, Zhi; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we described the facile synthesis of carbon nitride dots-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites (CNDs-rGO) and their application for the enhanced electrochemical determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). CNDs-rGO were synthesized for the first time through a green and facile one-step approach, carried out by hydrothermal heat-treatment of an aqueous solution containing GO and chitosan without introduction of other reducing agents or surface modifier. Then, the morphology and composition of CNDs-rGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. TEM observations revealed that CNDs with a size of about 5.0 nm were homogeneously and densely distributed on the surface of rGO. Electrochemical investigations indicated that CNDs-rGO nanocomposites exhibited an excellent performance toward DA and UA. The linear range for DA was estimated to be from 80 nM to 227 μM with a sensitivity of 154.3 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.03 μM. Meanwhile, the linear range for UA was estimated to be from 80 nM to 328 μM with a high sensitivity of 178.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.05 μM. Therefore, CNDs-rGO nanocomposites showed great application potential for constructing electrochemical sensors for the detection of DA and UA.

  13. Serum uric acid is associated with increased risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolism in high HDL-C population: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    YU, MIAO; LING, KEN; TENG, YUNFEI; LI, QIN; MEI, FEI; LI, YIQING; OUYANG, CHENXI

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that metabolic disorders are positively correlated with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE), whereas the risk factor serum uric acid (SUA) for idiopathic VTE has yet to be investigated. In this retrospective case-control study, 276 idiopathic VTE patients and 536 gender- and age-matched control subjects were included. The subjects in the case and control groups exhibiting common known VTE risk factors and the patients with a first VTE onset in one month were excluded. For the control group, primary and secondary VTE patients were excluded. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and current smoking were significantly associated with idiopathic VTE in the univariate analysis. Hyperuricemia was detected in 56/276 (20.29%) idiopathic patients compared with 71/536 (13.25%) in the control group. HDL-C was considered the most prominent interactive factor for SUA in idiopathic VTE by the interaction analysis. After testing for the interaction terms, SUA was closely associated with idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population (P=0.0026 for interaction), while there was no such correlation in the low HDL-C group. The results indicated no obvious correlation between triglyceride and hypertension to idiopathic VTE. In conclusion, SUA is closely associated with an increased risk of idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population. The abnormality of SUA may act as an important linkage between atherosclerosis and idiopathic VTE through HDL-C. PMID:27284315

  14. Graphitic carbon nitrides modified hollow fiber solid phase microextraction for extraction and determination of uric acid in urine and serum coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-pei; Chen, Juan; Qi, Huan-yang; Shi, Yan-ping

    2015-11-01

    An elevated uric acid (UA) in urine or serum can affect renal function and blood pressure, which is an indicator of gout, cardiovascular and renal diseases, hypertension, etc. In this work, a new type of mixed matrix membrane (MMM), based on graphitic carbon nitrides (g-CNs) and hollow fiber (HF), was prepared and combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) mode to determine UA in urine and serum followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The porous g-CNs were dispersed in ammonia, and then the exfoliated g-CNs nanosheets were held in the pores of HF by capillary forces and sonification. The prepared g-CNs modified HF (g-CNs-HF) was immersed in biofluid directly to extract UA with SPME mode and the solvent-free mode is convenient for further derivatization and analysis. To achieve the highest extraction efficiency (EF), main extraction and derivatization parameters, such as g-CNs-HF immobilizing time, sonification power and time of extraction, derivatization and desorption time, were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a favorable linearity of UA was obtained in the range 0.1-200μgmL(-1) with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990, and the average recoveries at three spiked levels of UA in urine and serum ranged from 80.7% to 121.6%, from 84.7% to 101.1%, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated the developed g-CNs-HF-SPME is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, solvent-free method for the analysis of UA in biofluid.

  15. Graphitic carbon nitrides modified hollow fiber solid phase microextraction for extraction and determination of uric acid in urine and serum coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-pei; Chen, Juan; Qi, Huan-yang; Shi, Yan-ping

    2015-11-01

    An elevated uric acid (UA) in urine or serum can affect renal function and blood pressure, which is an indicator of gout, cardiovascular and renal diseases, hypertension, etc. In this work, a new type of mixed matrix membrane (MMM), based on graphitic carbon nitrides (g-CNs) and hollow fiber (HF), was prepared and combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) mode to determine UA in urine and serum followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The porous g-CNs were dispersed in ammonia, and then the exfoliated g-CNs nanosheets were held in the pores of HF by capillary forces and sonification. The prepared g-CNs modified HF (g-CNs-HF) was immersed in biofluid directly to extract UA with SPME mode and the solvent-free mode is convenient for further derivatization and analysis. To achieve the highest extraction efficiency (EF), main extraction and derivatization parameters, such as g-CNs-HF immobilizing time, sonification power and time of extraction, derivatization and desorption time, were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a favorable linearity of UA was obtained in the range 0.1-200μgmL(-1) with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990, and the average recoveries at three spiked levels of UA in urine and serum ranged from 80.7% to 121.6%, from 84.7% to 101.1%, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated the developed g-CNs-HF-SPME is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, solvent-free method for the analysis of UA in biofluid. PMID:26444336

  16. {sup 13}C-enrichment at carbons 8 and 2 of uric acid after {sup 13}C-labeled folate dose in man

    SciTech Connect

    Baggott, Joseph E.; Gorman, Gregory S.; Morgan, Sarah L.; Tamura, Tsunenobu . E-mail: tamurat@uab.edu

    2007-09-21

    To evaluate folate-dependent carbon incorporation into the purine ring, we measured {sup 13}C-enrichment independently at C{sub 2} and C{sub 8} of urinary uric acid (the final catabolite of purines) in a healthy male after an independent oral dose of [6RS]-5-[{sup 13}C]-formyltetrahydrofolate ([6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate) or 10-H{sup 13}CO-7,8-dihydrofolate (10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate). The C{sub 2} position was {sup 13}C-enriched more than C{sub 8} after [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate, and C{sub 2} was exclusively enriched after 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate. The enrichment of C{sub 2} was greater from [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate than 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate using equimolar bioactive doses. Our data suggest that formyl C of [6RS]-10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate was not equally utilized by glycinamide ribotide transformylase (enriches C{sub 8}) and aminoimidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) transformylase (enriches C{sub 2}), and the formyl C of 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate was exclusively used by AICAR transformylase. 10-HCO-H{sub 2}folate may function in vivo as the predominant substrate for AICAR transformylase in humans.

  17. Sunlight assisted synthesis of silver nanoparticles in zeolite matrix and study of its application on electrochemical detection of dopamine and uric acid in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, S; Devi, S; Pandian, K; Devendiran, R; Selvaraj, M

    2016-12-01

    Sunlight assisted reduction of silver ions were accomplished for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles incorporated within the mesoporous silicate framework of zeolite Y. The zeolite-Y and AgNP/Zeo-Y were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption BET isotherm and X-ray diffraction techniques. The incorporation of silver nanoparticles within the porous framework was further confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. An enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation of biologically important molecules like dopamine and uric acid using AgNP/Zeo-Y modified glassy carbon electrode has been developed. A simultaneous oxidation of DA and UA peaks were obtained at +0.31V and +0.43V (vs. Ag/AgCl) using AgNP/Zeo-Y/GCE under the optimum experimental condition. A well-resolved peak potential window (~120mV) for the oxidation of both DA and UA were observed at AgNP/Zeo-Y/GCE system. The calibration curves for DA and UA were obtained within the dynamic linear range of 0.02×10(-6) to 0.18×10(-6)M (R(2)=0.9899) and 0.05×10(-6) to 0.7×10(-6)M (R(2)=0.9996) and the detection limits were found to be 1.6×10(-8)M and 2.51×10(-8)M by using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of both DA and UA in human urine samples with a related standard deviation was <3%, and n=5 using the standard addition method. PMID:27612692

  18. Higher serum uric acid level increases risk of prehypertension in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, but not pre-diabetes and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, I-H; Wu, J-S; Sun, Z-J; Lu, F-H; Chang, C-S; Chang, C-J; Yang, Y-C

    2016-08-01

    Although the association between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and prehypertension has been reported in previous studies, it is unknown whether their relationship is similar in subjects with diabetes, pre-diabetes and normal glucose tolerance (NGT). This study thus aimed to investigate the relationship between SUA and prehypertension in subjects with different glycemic status, including NGT, pre-diabetes and diabetes. A total of 12 010 participants were included after excluding subjects with blood pressure ⩾140/90 mm Hg, history of hypertension, leukaemia, lymphoma, hypothyroidism, medication for hypertension and hyperuricemia and missing data. Subjects were divided into four groups based on SUA quartiles (male Q1: ⩽345.0, Q2: 345.0-392.6, Q3: 392.6-440.2, Q4: ⩾440.2 μmol l(-1) and female Q1: ⩽249.8, Q2: 249.8-285.5, Q3: 285.5-333.1, Q4: ⩾333.1 μmol l(-1)). Diabetes, pre-diabetes and NGT were assessed according to the 2010 American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Normotension and prehypertension were defined according to the JNC-7 (The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure) criteria. The SUA was significantly higher in prehypertensive subjects as compared with normotensive subjects. SUA, as a continuous variable, was positively associated with prehypertension in subjects with NGT but not pre-diabetes and diabetes. Besides, NGT subjects with the highest quartile of SUA exhibited a higher risk of prehypertension after adjustment for other confounding factors. In pre-diabetes and diabetes groups, none of SUA quartiles was significantly related to prehypertension. SUA was significantly associated with an increased risk of prehypertension in subjects with NGT but insignificantly in subjects with pre-diabetes and diabetes. PMID:26911534

  19. Emergent Biomarkers of Residual Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Low HDL-c and/or High Triglycerides and Average LDL-c Concentrations: Focus on HDL Subpopulations, Oxidized LDL, Adiponectin, and Uric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, José; Freitas, Isabel; Isabel-Mendonça, Maria; Pinto, Rui; Teixeira, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to determine the impact of HDL-c and/or TGs levels on patients with average LDL-c concentration, focusing on lipidic, oxidative, inflammatory, and angiogenic profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) were divided into 4 subgroups, combining normal and low HDL-c with normal and high TGs patients. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose, Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized-LDL, total HDL-c and HDL subpopulations, paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF-α, adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. The two populations with increased TGs levels, regardless of the normal or low HDL-c, presented obesity and higher waist circumference, Total-c, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, and uric acid. Adiponectin concentration was significantly lower and VEGF was higher in the population with cumulative low values of HDL-c and high values of TGs, while HDL quality was reduced in the populations with impaired values of HDL-c and/or TGs, viewed by reduced large and increased small HDL subfractions. In conclusion, in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, low HDL-c and/or high TGs concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile, despite average LDL-c levels. This condition, often called residual risk, is better evidenced by using both traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including large and small HDL subfractions, Ox-LDL, adiponectin, VEGF, and uric acid. PMID:24319364

  20. Relation of serum uric acid to severity and progression of coronary artery calcium in postmenopausal White and Filipino women (from the Rancho Bernardo study).

    PubMed

    Calvo, Richard Y; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Laughlin, Gail A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (UA) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) but its association with coronary artery calcium (CAC) is inconsistent. This study examined ethnic differences in the association of UA levels with CAC severity and progression. Participants included 202 white and 166 Filipino postmenopausal women without known CVD. White women originated from the Rancho Bernardo cohort study, whereas Filipino women were convenience sampled from comparable localities. Baseline UA levels and CVD risk factors were measured in 1995 to 1999. CAC was assessed by electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in 2000 to 2002 (EBCT1) and repeated in 2005 to 2007 (EBCT2). EBCT1 CAC density scores were categorized by severity: minimal 0 to 10, mild 11 to 100, moderate 101 to 399, and severe ≥400. Progression was defined as CAC volume score increases of ≥2.5 mm3 between scans. White women were older at baseline than Filipinas (64.6 vs 59.3 years, p<0.001). Filipinas had increased UA levels (235.8 vs 294.2 μmol/L, p<0.001), diabetes (35.5% vs 5.2%, p<0.001), hypertension (69.6% vs 45.2%, p<0.001), and statin use (32.8% vs 18.7%, p=0.002). CAC severity did not vary by ethnicity (p=0.502), but Filipinas experienced more CAC progression than whites (53.0% vs 39.1%, p=0.016). Adjustment for CVD risk factors identified a positive association between UA levels and increasing CAC severity at EBCT1 in Filipinas (odds ratio [OR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05 to 1.71) but not whites (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.25). Higher UA levels predicted CAC progression in both cohorts (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.56). In conclusion, these results support use of UA as an ethnicity-specific marker of CAC severity and as a marker of CAC progression among postmenopausal women. PMID:24513465

  1. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  2. Preparation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers modified pencil graphite electrode and investigation of over-oxidation conditions for the selective and sensitive determination of uric acid in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Ali; İlkbaş, Salih

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we have performed the preparation of over-oxidized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers modified pencil graphite electrode (Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE) to develop a selective and sensitive voltammetric uric acid (UA) sensor. It was noted that the over-oxidation potential and time had a prominent effect on the UA response of the Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE. Characterizations of PEDOT-nf/PGE and Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE have been performed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The highest voltammetric response of UA was obtained at pH 2.0. A linear relationship between the concentration of UA and oxidation peak currents was observed in the concentration range of 0.01-20.0 μM. The detection limit (1.3 nM according to S/N = 3) and reproducibility (RSD: 4.6 % for N:10) have also been determined. The effects of different substances on the determination of UA have been investigated. A very high peak separation value of 423 mV was obtained between UA and ascorbic acid which is the major interfering substance for UA. The use of Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE has been successfully tested in the determination of UA in human blood serum and urine samples for the first time in the literature.

  3. Novelty in hypertension in children and adolescents: focus on hypertension during the first year of life, use and interpretation of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, role of physical activity in prevention and treatment, simple carbohydrates and uric acid as risk factors.

    PubMed

    Strambi, Mirella; Giussani, Marco; Ambruzzi, Maria Amalia; Brambilla, Paolo; Corrado, Ciro; Giordano, Ugo; Maffeis, Claudio; Maringhin, Silvio; Matteucci, Maria Chiara; Menghetti, Ettore; Salice, Patrizia; Schena, Federico; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Valerio, Giuliana; Viazzi, Francesca; Virdis, Raffaele; Genovesi, Simonetta

    2016-07-16

    The present article intends to provide an update of the article "Focus on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in children and adolescents" published in 2013 (Spagnolo et al., Ital J Pediatr 39:20, 2013) in this journal. This revision is justified by the fact that during the last years there have been several new scientific contributions to the problem of hypertension in pediatric age and during adolescence. Nevertheless, for what regards some aspects of the previous article, the newly acquired information did not require substantial changes to what was already published, both from a cultural and from a clinical point of view. We felt, however, the necessity to rewrite and/or to extend other parts in the light of the most recent scientific publications. More specifically, we updated and extended the chapters on the diagnosis and management of hypertension in newborns and unweaned babies, on the use and interpretation of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and on the usefulness of and indications for physical activity. Furthermore, we added an entirely new section on the role that simple carbohydrates (fructose in particular) and uric acid may play in the pathogenesis of hypertension in pediatric age.

  4. Simultaneous determination of cysteine, uric acid and tyrosine using Au-nanoparticles/poly(E)-4-(p-tolyldiazenyl)benzene-1,2,3-triol film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Taei, M; Hasanpour, F; Salavati, H; Banitaba, S H; Kazemi, F

    2016-02-01

    A novel Au nanoparticles/poly(E)-4-(p-tolyldiazenyl)benzene-1,2,3-triol (AuNPs/PTAT) film modified glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/PTAT/GCE) was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of three antioxidants named, cysteine (Cys), uric acid (UA) and tyrosine (Tyr). The bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) fails to separate the oxidation peak potentials of these molecules, while PTAT film modified electrode can resolve them. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study indicates that the charge transfer resistance of bare electrode increased as (E)-4-(p-tolyldiazenyl)benzene-1,2,3-triol was electropolymerized at the bare electrode. Furthermore, EIS exhibits enhancement of electron transfer kinetics between analytes and electrode after electrodeposition of Au nanoparticles. Differential pulse voltammetry results show that the electrocatalytic current increases linearly in the ranges of 2-540μmolL(-1) for Cys, 5-820μmolL(-1) for UA and 10-560μmolL(-1) for Tyr with detection limits (S/N=3) of 0.04μmolL(-1), 0.1μmolL(-1) and 2μmolL(-1) for Cys, UA and Tyr, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for simultaneous determination of Cys, UA and Tyr in human urine samples.

  5. Effect of a reduction in uric acid on renal outcomes during losartan treatment: a post hoc analysis of the reduction of endpoints in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan Trial.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yan; Ottenbros, Stefan A; Laverman, Goos D; Brenner, Barry M; Cooper, Mark E; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Grobbee, Diederick E; Shahinfar, Shahnaz; de Zeeuw, Dick; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J

    2011-07-01

    Emerging data show that increased serum uric acid (SUA) concentration is an independent risk factor for end-stage renal disease. Treatment with the antihypertensive drug losartan lowers SUA. Whether reductions in SUA during losartan therapy are associated with renoprotection is unclear. We therefore tested this hypothesis. In a post hoc analysis of 1342 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nephropathy participating in the Reduction of Endpoints in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus With the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan Trial, we determined the relationship between month 6 change in SUA and renal endpoints, defined as a doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease. Baseline SUA was 6.7 mg/dL in placebo and losartan-treated subjects. During the first 6 months, losartan lowered SUA by -0.16 mg/dL (95% CI: -0.30 to -0.01; P=0.031) as compared with placebo. The risk of renal events was decreased by 6% (95% CI: 10% to 3%) per 0.5-mg/dL decrement in SUA during the first 6 months. This effect was independent of other risk markers, including estimate glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria. Adjustment of the overall treatment effects for SUA attenuated losartan's renoprotective effect from 22% (95% CI: 6% to 35%) to 17% (95% CI: 1% to 31%), suggesting that approximately one fifth of losartan's renoprotective effect could be attributed to its effect on SUA. Losartan lowers SUA levels compared with placebo treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nephropathy. The degree of reduction in SUA is subsequently associated with the degree in long-term renal risk reduction and explains part of losartan's renoprotective effect. These findings support the view that SUA may be a modifiable risk factor for renal disease.

  6. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  7. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  8. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acids are: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan , and valine. Nonessential amino acids "Nonessential" means that our bodies produce an amino ...

  9. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report has four parts: they discuss acid rain in relation to acid soils, agriculture, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Among findings: modern sources of acid deposition from the atmosphere for all the acid soils in the world, nor even chiefly responsible for those of northern U.S. Agriculture has its problems, but acid precipitation is probably not one of them. More research is needed to determine to what extent acid precipitation is responsible for forest declines and for smaller detrimental effects on forest growth where no damage to the foliage is evident. Many lakes and streams are extremely sensitive to added acids.

  11. Relation of serum uric acid levels and outcomes among patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (from the efficacy of vasopressin antagonism in heart failure outcome study with tolvaptan trial).

    PubMed

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Mentz, Robert J; Subacius, Haris P; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Maggioni, Aldo P; Swedberg, Karl; Zannad, Faiez; Konstam, Marvin A; Senni, Michele; Givertz, Michael M; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the clinical profiles associated with serum uric acid (sUA) levels in a large cohort of patients hospitalized for worsening chronic heart failure with ejection fraction (EF) ≤40%, with specific focus on gender, race, and renal function based interactions. In 3,955 of 4,133 patients (96%) with baseline sUA data, clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared across sUA quartiles. The primary end points were all-cause mortality and a composite of cardiovascular mortality or heart failure hospitalization. Interaction analyses were performed for gender, race, and baseline renal function. Median follow-up was 9.9 months. Mean sUA was 9.1 ± 2.8 mg/dl and was higher in men than in women (9.3 ± 2.7 vs 8.7 ± 3.0 mg/dl, p <0.001) and in blacks than in whites (10.0 ± 2.7 vs 9.0 ± 2.8 mg/dl, p <0.001). Higher sUA was associated with lower systolic blood pressure and EF, higher natriuretic peptides, and more impaired renal function. After accounting for 24 baseline covariates, in patients with enrollment estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), sUA was strongly associated with increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 1.69, p <0.001) and the composite end point (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.26 to 1.64, p <0.001). However, in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), sUA was not related with either end point (both p >0.4). Adjusted interaction analyses for gender, race, and admission allopurinol use were not significant. In conclusion, sUA is commonly elevated in patients hospitalized for worsening chronic heart failure and reduced EF, especially in men and blacks. The prognostic use of sUA differs by baseline renal function, suggesting different biologic and pathophysiologic significance of sUA among those with and without significant renal dysfunction. PMID:25312638

  12. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  13. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  14. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  15. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  16. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  17. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  18. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as soybeans, garbanzo beans, and lentils Peanuts, almonds, walnuts, and flaxseeds Animal ...

  19. Usnic acid.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K

    2002-12-01

    Since its first isolation in 1844, usnic acid [2,6-diacetyl-7,9-dihydroxy-8,9b-dimethyl-1,3(2H,9bH)-dibenzo-furandione] has become the most extensively studied lichen metabolite and one of the few that is commercially available. Usnic acid is uniquely found in lichens, and is especially abundant in genera such as Alectoria, Cladonia, Usnea, Lecanora, Ramalina and Evernia. Many lichens and extracts containing usnic acid have been utilized for medicinal, perfumery, cosmetic as well as ecological applications. Usnic acid as a pure substance has been formulated in creams, toothpaste, mouthwash, deodorants and sunscreen products, in some cases as an active principle, in others as a preservative. In addition to antimicrobial activity against human and plant pathogens, usnic acid has been shown to exhibit antiviral, antiprotozoal, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. Ecological effects, such as antigrowth, antiherbivore and anti-insect properties, have also been demonstrated. A difference in biological activity has in some cases been observed between the two enantiomeric forms of usnic acid. Recently health food supplements containing usnic acid have been promoted for use in weight reduction, with little scientific support. The emphasis of the current review is on the chemistry and biological activity of usnic acid and its derivatives in addition to rational and ecologically acceptable methods for provision of this natural compound on a large scale.

  20. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  1. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  2. How Acidic Is Carbonic Acid?

    PubMed

    Pines, Dina; Ditkovich, Julia; Mukra, Tzach; Miller, Yifat; Kiefer, Philip M; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Hynes, James T; Pines, Ehud

    2016-03-10

    Carbonic, lactic, and pyruvic acids have been generated in aqueous solution by the transient protonation of their corresponding conjugate bases by a tailor-made photoacid, the 6-hydroxy-1-sulfonate pyrene sodium salt molecule. A particular goal is to establish the pK(a) of carbonic acid H2CO3. The on-contact proton transfer (PT) reaction rate from the optically excited photoacid to the carboxylic bases was derived, with unprecedented precision, from time-correlated single-photon-counting measurements of the fluorescence lifetime of the photoacid in the presence of the proton acceptors. The time-dependent diffusion-assisted PT rate was analyzed using the Szabo-Collins-Kimball equation with a radiation boundary condition. The on-contact PT rates were found to follow the acidity order of the carboxylic acids: the stronger was the acid, the slower was the PT reaction to its conjugate base. The pK(a) of carbonic acid was found to be 3.49 ± 0.05 using both the Marcus and Kiefer-Hynes free energy correlations. This establishes H2CO3 as being 0.37 pK(a) units stronger and about 1 pK(a) unit weaker, respectively, than the physiologically important lactic and pyruvic acids. The considerable acid strength of intact carbonic acid indicates that it is an important protonation agent under physiological conditions. PMID:26862781

  3. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  4. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  5. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The acid rain problem in the northeastern U.S. has been growing in severity and geographical areas affected. Acid rain has damaged, or will result in damage to visibility, physical structures and materials, aquatic life, timber, crops, and soils. The principal causes of acid rain in the northeastern U.S. are sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from large power plants and smelters in the Ohio River Valley. Immediate corrective action and appropriate research are needed to reduce acid precipitation. Short-term programs that will define the rate of environmental deterioration, remaining environmental capacity to resist sudden deterioration, mechanisms of acid rain formation, and costs of various control options must be developed. (3 maps, 13 references, 1 table)

  6. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  7. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  8. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  9. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  10. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  11. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  12. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  13. Acid-base metabolism: implications for kidney stones formation.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The physiology and pathophysiology of renal H+ ion excretion and urinary buffer systems are reviewed. The main focus is on the two major conditions related to acid-base metabolism that cause kidney stone formation, i.e., distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and abnormally low urine pH with subsequent uric acid stone formation. Both the entities can be seen on the background of disturbances of the major urinary buffer system, NH3+ <--> NH4+. On the one hand, reduced distal tubular secretion of H+ ions results in an abnormally high urinary pH and either incomplete or complete dRTA. On the other hand, reduced production/availability of NH4+ is the cause of an abnormally low urinary pH, which predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Most recent research indicates that the latter abnormality may be a renal manifestation of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Despite opposite deviations from normal urinary pH values, both the dRTA and uric acid stone formation due to low urinary pH require the same treatment, i.e., alkali. In the dRTA, alkali is needed for improving the body's buffer capacity, whereas the goal of alkali treatment in uric acid stone formers is to increase the urinary pH to 6.2-6.8 in order to minimize uric acid crystallization.

  14. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  15. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  16. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  17. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  18. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  19. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  20. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  1. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  2. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  3. [Hyaluronic acid].

    PubMed

    Pomarede, N

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronic Acid (HA) is now a leader product in esthetic procedures for the treatment of wrinkles and volumes. The structure of HA, its metabolism, its physiological function are foremost breaking down then its use in aesthetic dermatology: steps of injection, possible side effects, benefits and downsides of the use of HA in aesthetic dermatology.

  4. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  5. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  6. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  7. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  8. Precipitation: its acidic nature.

    PubMed

    Frohliger, J O; Kane, R

    1975-08-01

    A comparison of the free hydrogen ion concentration and the total hydrogen ion concentration of rain samples shows that rain is a weak acid. The weak acid nature of rain casts doubt on the concepts that the acidity of rain is increasing and that these increases are due to strong acids such as sulfuric acid.

  9. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  10. Carbolic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Phenol poisoning; Phenylic acid poisoning; Hydroxybenzene poisoning; Phenic acid poisoning; Benzenol poisoning ... Below are symptoms of carbolic acid poisoning in different parts of the ... urine Decreased urine output No urine output EYES, EARS, ...

  11. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  12. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  13. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  14. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  15. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  16. Bioconversions of ferulic acid, an hydroxycinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sindhu; Abraham, T Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Ferulic acid is the most abundant hydroxycinnamic acid in the plant world and is ester linked to arabinose, in various plant polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans and pectins. It is a precursor to vanillin, one of the most important aromatic flavor compound used in foods, beverages, pharmaceuticals, and perfumes. This article presents an overview of the various biocatalytic routes, focusing on the relevant biotransformations of ferulic acid using plant sources, microorganisms, and enzymes.

  17. Uric acid and thiocyanate as competing substrates of lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Antonia; Parker, Heather; Turner, Rufus; Dickerhof, Nina; Khalilova, Irada S; Wilbanks, Sigurd M; Kettle, Anthony J; Jameson, Guy N L

    2014-08-01

    The physiological function of urate is poorly understood. It may act as a danger signal, an antioxidant, or a substrate for heme peroxidases. Whether it reacts sufficiently rapidly with lactoperoxidase (LPO) to act as a physiological substrate remains unknown. LPO is a mammalian peroxidase that plays a key role in the innate immune defense by oxidizing thiocyanate to the bactericidal and fungicidal agent hypothiocyanite. We now demonstrate that urate is a good substrate for bovine LPO. Urate was oxidized by LPO to produce the electrophilic intermediates dehydrourate and 5-hydroxyisourate, which decayed to allantoin. In the presence of superoxide, high yields of hydroperoxides were formed by LPO and urate. Using stopped-flow spectroscopy, we determined rate constants for the reaction of urate with compound I (k1 = 1.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) and compound II (k2 = 8.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). During urate oxidation, LPO was diverted from its peroxidase cycle because hydrogen peroxide reacted with compound II to give compound III. At physiologically relevant concentrations, urate competed effectively with thiocyanate, the main substrate of LPO for oxidation, and inhibited production of hypothiocyanite. Similarly, hypothiocyanite-dependent killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was inhibited by urate. Allantoin was present in human saliva and associated with the concentration of LPO. When hydrogen peroxide was added to saliva, oxidation of urate was dependent on its concentration and peroxidase activity. Our findings establish urate as a likely physiological substrate for LPO that will influence host defense and give rise to reactive electrophilic metabolites.

  18. Uric Acid and Thiocyanate as Competing Substrates of Lactoperoxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Antonia; Parker, Heather; Turner, Rufus; Dickerhof, Nina; Khalilova, Irada S.; Wilbanks, Sigurd M.; Kettle, Anthony J.; Jameson, Guy N. L.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological function of urate is poorly understood. It may act as a danger signal, an antioxidant, or a substrate for heme peroxidases. Whether it reacts sufficiently rapidly with lactoperoxidase (LPO) to act as a physiological substrate remains unknown. LPO is a mammalian peroxidase that plays a key role in the innate immune defense by oxidizing thiocyanate to the bactericidal and fungicidal agent hypothiocyanite. We now demonstrate that urate is a good substrate for bovine LPO. Urate was oxidized by LPO to produce the electrophilic intermediates dehydrourate and 5-hydroxyisourate, which decayed to allantoin. In the presence of superoxide, high yields of hydroperoxides were formed by LPO and urate. Using stopped-flow spectroscopy, we determined rate constants for the reaction of urate with compound I (k1 = 1.1 × 107 m−1 s−1) and compound II (k2 = 8.5 × 103 m−1 s−1). During urate oxidation, LPO was diverted from its peroxidase cycle because hydrogen peroxide reacted with compound II to give compound III. At physiologically relevant concentrations, urate competed effectively with thiocyanate, the main substrate of LPO for oxidation, and inhibited production of hypothiocyanite. Similarly, hypothiocyanite-dependent killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was inhibited by urate. Allantoin was present in human saliva and associated with the concentration of LPO. When hydrogen peroxide was added to saliva, oxidation of urate was dependent on its concentration and peroxidase activity. Our findings establish urate as a likely physiological substrate for LPO that will influence host defense and give rise to reactive electrophilic metabolites. PMID:24928513

  19. THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SERUM FERRITIN AND URIC ACID IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: Urate forms a coordination complex with Fe(3+) which does not support electron transport. The only enzymatic source of urate is xanthine oxidoreductase. If a major purpose of xanthine oxidoreductase is the production of urate to function as an iron chelator and antioxi...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... and treatment of numerous renal and metabolic disorders, including renal failure, gout,...

  1. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  2. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  3. Some Organic Acids Acting as Stimulants of Recruitment and Feeding for the Formosan Subterranean Termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feeding stimulating properties of 3 organic acids (salicylic, oxalic, and glucuronic acids) and 2 nitrogen containing compounds (uric acid, and glucosamine) for the Formosan subterranean termite were tested. A two choice test between cellulosic matrices with the compounds and blanks showed that...

  4. Retinol oxidation to retinoic acid in human thyroid glandular cells.

    PubMed

    Taibi, Gennaro; Gueli, Maria Concetta; Nicotra, Concetta M A; Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Retinoic acid is regarded as the retinol metabolite that controls proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) in retinoic acid biosynthesis in human thyroid glandular cells (HTGC). In particular, we observed that cellular retinoids binding proteins (CRBPs) are also implicated in the biosynthetic pathway leading to retinoic acid formation in primary cultures of HTGC, as we have already reported for human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). After partial protein purification, the enzyme responsible for retinoic acid biosynthesis was identified and quantified as XDH by immunoassay, by its ability to oxidize xanthine to uric acid and its sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of oxypurinol. The evidence of XDH-driven formation of retinoic acid in HTGC cultures further corroborates the potential role of XDH in retinoic acid biosynthesis in the epithelia. PMID:24506204

  5. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  6. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  7. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  8. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  9. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  10. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and ... Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in men, and to prevent or treat osteoporosis ...

  11. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  12. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do ...

  13. Mixed Acid Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.A.

    1999-10-26

    Several non-thermal processes have been developed to destroy organic waste compounds using chemicals with high oxidation potentials. These efforts have focused on developing technologies that work at low temperatures, relative to incineration, to overcome many of the regulatory issues associated with obtaining permits for waste incinerators. One such technique with great flexibility is mixed acid oxidation. Mixed acid oxidation, developed at the Savannah River Site, uses a mixture of an oxidant (nitric acid) and a carrier acid (phosphoric acid). The carrier acid acts as a non-volatile holding medium for the somewhat volatile oxidant. The combination of acids allows appreciable amounts of the concentrated oxidant to remain in the carrier acid well above the oxidant''s normal boiling point.

  14. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  15. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  16. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  17. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  18. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  19. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  20. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  1. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  6. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  7. [Safety of folic acid].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Wolters, Maike; Hahn, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Improving dietary folate intake is a central public health goal. However, critical voices have become louder warning of too high intake of folic acid. Safety concerns of a high folic acid exposure are usually limited to synthetic folic acid contained in drugs and food supplements. Against this background, the present article focuses on two matters: (a) How do the absorption and metabolism of synthetic folic acid differ from that of other folates? (b) How has the longterm safety of folic acid to be judged, especially regarding the risk of colorectal cancer, autism, asthma, impaired immune defence, masking vitamin B12 deficiency and interactions with the methotrexate metabolism?

  8. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  9. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  10. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  11. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  12. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  13. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  14. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  15. Determination of organic acids during the fermentation and cold storage of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Garcia, E; McGregor, J U

    1994-10-01

    The objective of the present study was the separation and quantification of orotic, citric, pyruvic, lactic, uric, formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and hippuric acids in a single isocratic analysis by HPLC. Two methods of extraction were compared: 1) acetonitrile and water and 2) .01N H2SO4. Recoveries of orotic, lactic, acetic, and propionic acids were 90% for both methods. Recoveries of citric, pyruvic, uric, butyric, and hippuric acids were not satisfactory with the acetonitrile method, but were acceptable using the H2SO4 extraction procedure. Yogurts were manufactured under laboratory-scale conditions, and samples were analyzed during fermentation and after storage at 4 degrees C. Samples were analyzed for pH and organic acids. All of the organic acids exhibited varying degrees of increases and decreases during fermentation and storage. Formic and butyric acids were not detected under the conditions of this study.

  16. Well acidizing compositions and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B. L.

    1980-12-23

    Gelled acidic compositions suitable for matrix acidizing or fracture acidizing of subterranean formations are provided comprising water, a water-dispersible polymeric viscosifier such as a polymer of acrylamide, an acid, and a polyphenolic material such as lignite.

  17. Bile acids but not acidic acids induce Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Gai, Zhibo; Song, Xiaoming; Jia, Xinyong; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Bile acids (BAs) refluxing into the esophagus contribute to esophageal injury, which results in BE and subsequent EAC. We developed two animal models to test the role of BAs in the pathogenesis of BE. We surgically generated BA reflux, with or without gastric acid, in rats. In a second experiment, we fed animals separately with BAs and gastric acid. Pathologic changes were examined and the expression of Muc2 and Cdx2 in BE tissue was tested by immunostaining. Inflammatory factors in the plasma, as well as differentiation genes in BE were examined through highly sensitive ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that BAs are sufficient for the induction of esophagitis and Barrett's-like metaplasia in the esophagus. Overexpression of inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-α was observed both in animals fed with BAs and surgically generated BA reflux. Furthermore, elevated levels of Cdx2, Muc2, Bmp4, Kit19, and Tff2 (differentiation genes in BE) were found in BA-treated rats. In conclusion, BAs, but not gastric acid, are a major causative factor for BE. We confirmed that BAs contribute to the development of BE by inducing the inflammatory response in the esophagus. Inhibiting BAs may be a promising therapy for BE.

  18. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  19. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  20. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  1. Enzymatic gallic acid esterification.

    PubMed

    Weetal, H H

    1985-02-01

    Gallic acid esters of n-propyl and amyl alcohols have been produced by enzymatic synthesis in organic solvents using immobilized tannase. Studies indicate that maximum esterification of gallic acid occurs with amyl alcohol. The enzyme shows broad alcohol specificity. However, the enzyme exhibits absolute specificity for the acid portion of the ester. Studies were carried out on K(m), V(max), pH, and temperature optima.

  2. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  3. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  4. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  5. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  6. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  7. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  8. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perfluoroalkyl acids(PFAAs) area a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perflurinated carbon backbone (4-12in length) and a acidic functional moiety (Carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and have numerous industr...

  9. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  10. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  12. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  13. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat skin conditions that involve scaling or overgrowth of skin ... water for 15 minutes.Do not apply topical salicylic acid to skin that is broken, red, swollen, irritated, or infected. ...

  14. Biosynthesis of pulcherriminic acid

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. Candida pulcherrima was grown on a complex medium to which various compounds had been added to determine their effect on the biosynthesis of pulcherriminic acid. Most of the pulcherriminic acid synthesized by C. pulcherrima PRL2019 was derived from the l-[1-14C]leucine added to the medium. 2. The cyclic dipeptide of l-leucine (cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl) was shown, by trapping experiments involving cycloleucyl-leucyl isomers, to be synthesized by strain PRL2019. Cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl was derived from l-leucine and was converted into pulcherriminic acid. Cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl was a precursor of pulcherriminic acid in strain PRL2007 also. 3. The results supported the hypothesis that pulcherriminic acid is derived from l-leucine and that cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl is an intermediate in the biosynthesis. PMID:5837792

  15. Total syntheses of cis-cyclopropane fatty acids: dihydromalvalic acid, dihydrosterculic acid, lactobacillic acid, and 9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sayali; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-12-14

    cis-Cyclopropane fatty acids (cis-CFAs) are widespread constituents of the seed oils of subtropical plants, membrane components of bacteria and protozoa, and the fats and phospholipids of animals. We describe a systematic approach to the synthesis of enantiomeric pairs of four cis-CFAs: cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid, lactobacillic acid, dihydromalvalic acid, and dihydrosterculic acid. The approach commences with Rh2(OAc)4-catalyzed cyclopropenation of 1-octyne and 1-decyne, and hinges on the preparative scale chromatographic resolution of racemic 2-alkylcycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylic acids using a homochiral Evan's auxiliary. Saturation of the individual diastereomeric N-cycloprop-2-ene-1-carbonylacyloxazolidines, followed by elaboration to alkylcyclopropylmethylsulfones, allowed Julia-Kocienski olefination with various ω-aldehyde-esters. Finally, saponification and diimide reduction afforded the individual cis-CFA enantiomers. PMID:25321346

  16. Gluconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G

    2007-01-01

    Gluconic acid, the oxidation product of glucose, is a mild neither caustic nor corrosive, non toxic and readily biodegradable organic acid of great interest for many applications. As a multifunctional carbonic acid belonging to the bulk chemicals and due to its physiological and chemical characteristics, gluconic acid itself, its salts (e.g. alkali metal salts, in especially sodium gluconate) and the gluconolactone form have found extensively versatile uses in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, construction and other industries. Present review article presents the comprehensive information of patent bibliography for the production of gluconic acid and compares the advantages and disadvantages of known processes. Numerous manufacturing processes are described in the international bibliography and patent literature of the last 100 years for the production of gluconic acid from glucose, including chemical and electrochemical catalysis, enzymatic biocatalysis by free or immobilized enzymes in specialized enzyme bioreactors as well as discontinuous and continuous fermentation processes using free growing or immobilized cells of various microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast-like fungi and fungi. Alternatively, new superior fermentation processes have been developed and extensively described for the continuous and discontinuous production of gluconic acid by isolated strains of yeast-like mold Aureobasidium pullulans, offering numerous advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi processes.

  17. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  18. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  19. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  20. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  1. Understanding Acid Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2015-10-01

    The concentration of hydrogen ions is regulated in biologic solutions. There are currently 3 recognized approaches to assess changes in acid base status. First is the traditional Henderson-Hasselbalch approach, also called the physiologic approach, which uses the relationship between HCO3(-) and Pco2; the second is the standard base excess approach based on the Van Slyke equation. The third approach is the quantitative or Stewart approach, which uses the strong ion difference and the total weak acids. This article explores the origins of the current concepts framing the existing methods to analyze acid base balance.

  2. Acid rain and soil.

    PubMed

    vanLoon, G W

    1984-08-01

    A summary of important chemical properties of soil is given and the way in which acid rain may affect these properties is discussed. Acid rain may suppress microbiological decomposition and nitrification processes, thus influencing the nutrient status of soils. It has also been found that soil organic matter is less soluble in more acid solutions. Changed nutrient availability patterns are predicted in a low pH environment and enhanced leaching of essential elements from the soil exchange complex has been observed. Increased solubility of potentially toxic elements such as aluminium may also occur from soils which have been exposed to acidified rainfall.

  3. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  4. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as other nutrients, are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by the Food and Nutrition Board ... level that is thought to ensure enough nutrition. Dietary Reference Intakes for pantothenic acid: Age 0 to 6 months: ...

  5. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  6. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  7. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider ...

  8. Nitric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms from swallowing nitric acid may include: Abdominal pain - severe Burns to skin or mouth Drooling Fever Mouth pain - severe Rapid drop in blood pressure (shock) Throat swelling, which leads to breathing difficulty ...

  9. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated. PMID:27189091

  10. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  11. Hyaluronic acid fillers.

    PubMed

    Monheit, Gary D; Coleman, Kyle M

    2006-01-01

    Although hyaluronic acids are a relatively new treatment for facial lines and wrinkles, they have provided numerous advances in the area of cosmetic surgery. This article discusses the inherent properties of hyaluronic acid fillers that make them ideal for treatment of facial lines. It encompasses a review of the current literature on U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved hyaluronic acid fillers and the role that each of these fillers currently has in facial cosmetics. This article also discusses the potential pitfalls and adverse effects that can be associated with using hyaluronic acids for filling facial lines. Finally, it serves as an overview of current techniques for clinical assessment of patients as well as administration and treatment of facial lines and wrinkles.

  12. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Borax poisoning ... The main symptoms of boric acid poisoning are blue-green vomit, diarrhea, and a bright red rash on the skin. Other symptoms may include: Blisters Collapse Coma Convulsions Drowsiness ...

  13. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  14. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin that result from exposure to sunlight and can develop into skin cancer) of the ... acid will make your skin very sensitive to sunlight (likely to get sunburn). Avoid exposure of treated ...

  15. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  16. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  17. Folic acid in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... a regular supply of the vitamin in the foods you eat. ... vitamins have been added to the food. Many foods are now fortified with folic acid. Some of these are enriched breads, cereals, flours, ...

  18. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the treatment of epilepsy, and to treat bipolar disorder and migraines. I have been taking valproic acid ... that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual problems and difficulty getting pregnant. ...

  19. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The ... level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. ...

  20. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... more easily than natural food folate. Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Folic acid reduces the risk for spina ... g., orange juice and green vegetables). Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Spina bifida and anencephaly are neural tube ...