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Sample records for acid volumizing filler

  1. Biological properties of a new volumizing hyaluronic acid filler: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers are effective and safe for correction of facial rhytides. A new volumizing HA filler, 20 mg/ml HA dermal filler (Juvéderm® Voluma®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA), is the only HA filler with a FDA indication for facial volumization due to age-related facial volume loss. Evaluate the biological properties, including biochemical, biophysical and rheological, of this new 20 mg/ml HA dermal filler and discuss the importance of these properties in clinical applications. A systematic search of the computerized bibliographic databases Medline, Embase, Embal, Biosis, SciSearch, Pascal, HCAPlus, IPA, and Dissertation Abstracts with key term "Voluma." Four articles on the biological properties of this new 20 mg/ ml HA dermal filler were suitable for inclusion in this review. Biological analysis of elasticity and viscosity values of this new 20 mg/ml HA dermal filler demonstrated intermediate properties in three studies and high in one study compared to other HA dermal fillers. This 20 mg/ml HA dermal filler retained the highest elasticity and viscosity values at temperature of 37°C. Histology demonstrated that this 20 mg/ml HA dermal filler has an intermediate pattern of distribution within the superficial and deep reticular dermis. This 20 mg/ml HA dermal filler demonstrated volumizing ability, and maintaining viscosity and free-flowing characteristics for easy injection, tissue lifting, and molding. We hope future research incorporates biological properties analysis of this HA dermal filler in clinical trials.

  2. Correction of midface volume deficiency using hyaluronic acid filler and intradermal radiofrequency.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyuk; Park, Won-Seok; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are increasingly used for midface augmentation, which can be performed for facial rejuvenation. Previous study proved that radiofrequency (RF) treatment prior to HA filler injection may provide synergistic and long-lasting effects for the reduction of nasolabial fold wrinkles. Here, we report a case in which the efficacy of two different treatments using RF and HA filler and HA filler alone was assessed using a split-face design. In conclusion, the intradermal needle RF with HA filler may be a more safe and effective method than HA filler alone for correcting midface volume deficit. Appropriate volume loss replacement should correct the flattening and furrowing of the central area of the mid-cheek, which is a consequence of the aging process. Also, it will provide a more youthful appearance. Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are an established intervention for correcting facial volume deficiency. In a previous study ( 1 ), radiofrequency (RF) was used to overcome the short duration of HA fillers and resulted in a good outcome.

  3. Correction of Age-Related Midface Volume Loss With Low-Volume Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Monique Vanaman; Fabi, Sabrina Guillen; Greene, Ryan

    2017-03-01

    The pivotal approval trial for a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid filler demonstrated sustained aesthetic improvement, with a mean injection volume of 6.65 mL. In daily practice, however, it is not often practical or necessary to use large injection volumes to achieve the desired cosmetic outcome. To assess the efficacy, longevity, and patient satisfaction associated with correction of age-related midface volume loss using the low volumes of hyaluronic acid filler more commonly used in day-to-day practice. A 2-center, retrospective cohort study examined medical records of 61 healthy patients who underwent treatment for facial volume loss with hyaluronic acid filler from November 1, 2013, through April 31, 2014. Follow-up visits were conducted at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. Data were pooled from a private facial plastic surgery practice in Weston, Florida, and a private cosmetic dermatology practice in San Diego, California. Patients were treated with hyaluronic acid filler according to the investigator's usual practices. The main outcome measure was patient-graded Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale scores at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Scores range from 1 to 5; 1 indicates very much improved and 5, worse. A total of 61 consecutive, healthy adult patients (mean [SD] age, 57.4 [12.8] years) with mild to severe facial volume loss were enrolled in the study. A total of 46 patients (75%) were white, 3 (5%) were black/African American, 9 (15%) were Hispanic/Latino, 1 (2%) was Asian/Pacific Islander, and 2 (3%) were other. Three patients (5%) were male, and 58 (95%) were female. Mean initial treatment volume was 1.6 mL. At follow-up, 29 patients (48%) elected to have a touch-up treatment; mean total touch-up volume was 1.4 mL. The patient-graded Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale scores at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment demonstrated that 73% (41 of 56) to 89% (24 of 27) of the study patients reported being very

  4. Ultrasound and Histologic Examination after Subcutaneous Injection of Two Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Micheels, Patrick; Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier; Quinodoz, Pierre; Elias, Badwi; Safa, Marva; Vandeputte, Joan

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinking technology on the ultrasound and histologic behavior of HA fillers designed for subcutaneous injection. One subject received subcutaneous injections of 0.25 ml Cohesive Polydensified Matrix (CPM) and Vycross volumizing HA in tissue scheduled for abdominoplasty by bolus and retrograde fanning techniques. Ultrasound analyses were performed on days 0 and 8 and histologic analyses on days 0 and 21 after injection. A series of simple rheologic tests was also performed. Day 0 ultrasound images after bolus injection showed CPM and Vycross as hypoechogenic papules in the hypodermis. CPM appeared little changed after gentle massage, whereas Vycross appeared more hyperechogenic and diminished in size. Ultrasound images at day 8 were similar. On day 0, both gels appeared less hypoechogenic after retrograde fanning than after bolus injection. Vycross was interspersed with hyperechogenic areas (fibrous septa from the fat network structure) and unlike CPM became almost completely invisible after gentle massage. On day 8, CPM appeared as a hypoechogenic pool and Vycross as a long, thin rod. Day 0 histologic findings confirmed ultrasound results. Day 21 CPM histologic findings showed a discrete inflammatory reaction along the injection row after retrograde fanning. Vycross had a more pronounced inflammatory reaction, particularly after retrograde fanning, with macrophages and giant cells surrounding the implant. Rheologic tests showed CPM to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross. CPM HA volumizer appears to maintain greater tissue integrity than Vycross after subcutaneous injection with less inflammatory activity.

  5. Ultrasound and Histologic Examination after Subcutaneous Injection of Two Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier; Quinodoz, Pierre; Elias, Badwi; Safa, Marva; Vandeputte, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined the influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinking technology on the ultrasound and histologic behavior of HA fillers designed for subcutaneous injection. Methods: One subject received subcutaneous injections of 0.25 ml Cohesive Polydensified Matrix (CPM) and Vycross volumizing HA in tissue scheduled for abdominoplasty by bolus and retrograde fanning techniques. Ultrasound analyses were performed on days 0 and 8 and histologic analyses on days 0 and 21 after injection. A series of simple rheologic tests was also performed. Results: Day 0 ultrasound images after bolus injection showed CPM and Vycross as hypoechogenic papules in the hypodermis. CPM appeared little changed after gentle massage, whereas Vycross appeared more hyperechogenic and diminished in size. Ultrasound images at day 8 were similar. On day 0, both gels appeared less hypoechogenic after retrograde fanning than after bolus injection. Vycross was interspersed with hyperechogenic areas (fibrous septa from the fat network structure) and unlike CPM became almost completely invisible after gentle massage. On day 8, CPM appeared as a hypoechogenic pool and Vycross as a long, thin rod. Day 0 histologic findings confirmed ultrasound results. Day 21 CPM histologic findings showed a discrete inflammatory reaction along the injection row after retrograde fanning. Vycross had a more pronounced inflammatory reaction, particularly after retrograde fanning, with macrophages and giant cells surrounding the implant. Rheologic tests showed CPM to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross. Conclusions: CPM HA volumizer appears to maintain greater tissue integrity than Vycross after subcutaneous injection with less inflammatory activity. PMID:28280664

  6. Safety and Efficacy of a Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Treatment of HIV-Associated Facial Lipoatrophy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2017-01-01

    Facial lipoatrophy (FLA) is associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The condition is primarily characterized by facial volume loss that affects the contours of the cheeks, temples, and orbits and may negatively affect patients' adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy, psychological health, and quality of life. A single treatment of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler, 20 mg/mL, may provide an immediate, natural-appearing facial enhancement outcome. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an HA filler for treatment of HIV-associated FLA during a 12-month follow-up. Open-label, safety and efficacy study in patients with HIV-associated FLA, a Carruthers Lipoatrophy Severity Scale (CLSS) grade of 2 or greater (range, 1-4, with higher scores indicating greater severity), and no previous treatment for FLA during the past year received 1 treatment and an optional touch-up. Twenty patients were treated and followed up at the Sacramento Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mather, California, from March 5, 2015, to May 17, 2016. Midface (cheeks and temples) volumization was performed using the "smile-and-fill," fanning, and depot technique with an optional touch-up at the 2-week follow-up. Patients underwent evaluation at the initial visit and follow-up at 2 weeks and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Main outcome measures included safety (rate of treatment-related adverse events), CLSS grade, and Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale rating (5-point scale, ranging from worse to very much improved). Nineteen of the 20 patients (all men; mean [SD] age, 57 [10] years) completed all study visits. Baseline HIV-associated FLA severity was CLSS grade 2 in 16 patients; grade 3, in 3 patients; and grade 4, in 1 patient. The total mean (SD) volume of HA used was 6.1 (3.1) mL for grade 2 FLA; 9.3 (4.2) mL for grade 3 FLA; and 26.0 (0) mL for grade 4 FLA (1 mL equals 1 syringe of HA filler). All 19 patients maintained a

  7. Temporal fossa defects: techniques for injecting hyaluronic acid filler and complications after hyaluronic acid filler injection.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2015-09-01

    Facial changes with aging include thinning of the epidermis, loss of skin elasticity, atrophy of muscle, and subcutaneous fat and bony changes, all which result in a loss of volume. As temporal bones become more concave, and the temporalis atrophies and the temporal fat pad decreases, volume loss leads to an undesirable, gaunt appearance. By altering the temporal fossa and upper face with hyaluronic acid filler, those whose specialty is injecting filler can achieve a balanced and more youthful facial structure. Many techniques have been described to inject filler into the fossa including a "fanned" pattern of injections, highly diluted filler injection, and the method we describe using a three-injection approach. Complications of filler in the temporal fossa include bruising, tenderness, swelling, Tyndall effect, overcorrection, and chewing discomfort. Although rare, more serious complications include infection, foreign body granuloma, intravascular necrosis, and blindness due to embolization into the ophthalmic artery. Using reversible hyaluronic acid fillers, hyaluronidase can be used to relieve any discomfort felt by the patient. Injectors must be aware of the complications that may occur and provide treatment readily to avoid morbidities associated with filler injection into this sensitive area.

  8. Volumizing the face with soft tissue fillers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek

    2011-07-01

    This article discusses the role of injectable soft-tissue fillers in the aging face, and their clinical and chemical behavior. Temporary and permanent fillers are discussed, namely hyaluronic acids, calcium hydroxylapatite, poly-l-lactic acid, liquid silicone, and polymethylmethacrylate. Techniques and outcomes are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Facial volume augmentation in 2014: overview of different filler options.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2013-12-01

    Volume loss is considered to be one of the major contributors to facial aging. Therefore, the restoration of facial volume and contour changes has become an important treatment approach in aesthetic dermatology in recent years. In October 2013 the FDA approved for the first time ever an injectable dermal filler for the augmentation of age-related volume loss. This low-molecular-weight (LMW) 20 mg/ml hyaluronic acid (HA) filler competes on the market with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), that have been used off-label for many years to restore age-related volume loss. The safety profile and efficacy of all three injectables has been intensively evaluated in innumerous clinical studies. However, each volume filler has its benefits and disadvantages, including usage, method of action and duration of effect that are reviewed in this article.

  10. Quantitative Correlation Between Hyaluronic Acid Filler and Hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Euna; Song, You Seong

    2017-05-01

    The hyaluronic acid-based filler (HA filler) is used worldwide in various applications. In particular, the HA filler is used in the plastics and cosmetic medical field for facial rejuvenation and contouring. In this setting, it is injected into the skin or underlying tissue. Complications of HA filler injection have been relieved using hyaluronidase. However, there is no standard dose to adjust for undesirable HA filler lumpness. In this study, the authors tried to analyze any quantitative correlation between HA filler and hyaluronidase. The back of each rat (total 14 rats) was divided into 4 sites. A volume of 0.5 mL HA filler was injected into the subdermal layer at each site and HA filler nodules were created on the dorsum of each rat. Each nodule was allocated to groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 according to the different concentrations of hyaluronidase. As a result, the injected HA filler volume doubled within 4 days of injection, and then decreased slowly thereafter in group 1 (control group with normal saline only). A 30 unit hyaluronidase treatment compensated for the initial volume increase (approximately 30%) with HA filler (0.5 ml) at the fourth day. Sixty units of hyaluronidase reduced the initial volume (0.5 mL) of overinjected or misplaced HA filler on the fourth day. Approximately 90 units of hyaluronidase can reduce to the volume by 0.25 mL (50%) of the injected HA filler on the fourth day. The authors believe that this quantitative analysis of hyaluronidase concentration is helpful to plan the amount of hyaluronidase for correction of HA filler injection errors.

  11. Low filler volume concentration composite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Lynell Joy

    One avenue for synthesizing a high energy density capacitor while circumventing the manufacturing problems and low breakdown strength associated with dense, sintered ceramics, is to incorporate low volume concentrations of well dispersed high permittivity filler, such as barium titanate, in conjunction with polymers, naturally high breakdown strength materials. The focus of this work was to examine the factors that influence the energy density of a composite: the breakdown strength and dielectric constant. First, the breakdown strength of composites synthesized with low filler volume concentrations of particles, barium titanate and titanium dioxide, in an epoxy matrix, was determined. The impact of commercial dispersants, phosphate esters and menhaden fish oil particle size, and solvent polarity on the electrical performance of the epoxy based composite was assessed by thermogravimetrie analysis, and Weibull distributions of the breakdown strength data. The surface of BaTiO3 was found to contain BaCO3 using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Dispersion quality of acid washed BaTiO3 improved over as-received powder with comparable incorporation of dispersant and solvent system. T1O2 was used as a model to simulate the Ti-rich surface created after acid washing. A range of solids loading, from 5 to 40% volume, for a BaTiO3/epoxy composite system was used to determine the optimum trade-off in factors influencing energy density, dielectric constant or breakdown strength. The composites' components and electrical properties were characterized. Sample and electrode geometry were modified to impart a calculated dielectric constant without the influence of enhanced electric field lines.

  12. A Multicenter, Single-Blind Randomized, Controlled Study of a Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Midface Volume Deficit: Patient-Reported Outcomes at 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Few, Julius; Cox, Sue Ellen; Paradkar-Mitragotri, Deepali; Murphy, Diane K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Juvéderm Voluma XC is a volumizing hyaluronic acid filler used for correction of age-related midface volume deficit (MVD). Objectives The effectiveness of Juvéderm Voluma XC was examined from the patient perspective. Methods Patients with moderate to severe age-related MVD (N = 235) received Juvéderm Voluma XC. At quarterly follow-up visits for 2 years, patients rated treatment outcomes on the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS), overall satisfaction with facial appearance, satisfaction with midfacial regions, achievement of treatment goal, Look and Feel of the Midface (LAFM), and Self-Perception of Age (SPA). Patients recorded treatment-site responses in 30-day diaries. Results At 6 months and 2 years after treatment, 92.8% and 79.0% of patients, respectively, rated their cheek volume as improved/much improved on the GAIS. Improvement in satisfaction with facial appearance was noted by 89.8% of patients at 6 months and 75.8% at 2 years. Increased satisfaction with outer and lower cheek areas and cheek-bone projection and clinically significant improvements in LAFM were noted through month 24. Treatment goals were achieved by 67.8% of patients at 6 months and 49.0% at 2 years. Patients reported looking, on average, 5 years younger at 6 months and 3 years younger at 2 years. The most common treatment site responses were tenderness, swelling, firmness, and lumps/bumps; most were mild to moderate in severity and lasted ≤2 weeks. Conclusions Juvéderm Voluma XC for age-related MVD is effective and well-tolerated from the patient perspective, with results lasting up to 2 years. Level of Evidence 4 Therapeutic PMID:25964628

  13. Patient Reported Outcomes from HIV Facial Lipoatrophy Treatment With a Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Filler: A Prospective, Open-Label, Phase I and II Study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facial lipoatrophy (FLA) is associated with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and HIV disease. HIV FLA is primarily characterized by midface (cheeks and temples) volume loss, resulting in a "sunken" and aged appearance. Filler agents for treatment of HIV FLA can provide midface volumization and improve quality-of-life (QOL). A 20 mg/ml hyaluronic acid (HA) filler (Juvéderm Voluma® XC, Allergan plc, Irvine, CA) may provide an immediate, natural appearing facial enhancement outcome in one treatment. We hypothesized that this HA filler for treatment of HIV FLA is safe and efficacious and may help improve patients' QOL.
    To provide patient reported outcomes from HA filler for treatment of HIV FLA and suggest recommendations on use of validated QOL outcome measures to assess patient concerns specific to HIV FLA.
    This was a prospective, open-label, phase I and II study to evaluate patient reported outcomes, in addition to safety and efficacy, of this HA filler for treatment of HIV FLA in 20 subjects at the Sacramento Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mather, CA (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02342223). Outcome measures include the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and a subject satisfaction questionnaire (SSQ).
    Nineteen subjects completed the 12-month follow-up. There was no significant improvement of DLQI score. Subject comments revealed high degree of satisfaction and there were no negative comments on the SSQ.
    In this study, we report that all subjects that completed this study were satisfied and had subjective improvement of their QOL post-treatment. We recommend against use of DLQI in the future as it may not fully encompass the emotional and mental health aspects that may be affected from HIV FLA. We recommend use of the Facial Appearance Inventory (FAI) and FACE-Q in future studies for HA filler treatment of HIV FLA.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1064-1069.

  14. Anatomic and mechanical considerations in restoring volume of the face with use of hyaluronic acid fillers with a novel layered technique

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mohan K.; Dsilva, James A.; Borole, Ateesh J.; Naik, Sudhir M.; Sarkar, Soma G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Facial fillers have revolutionized the field of cosmetic facial rejuvenation as it has become the prime sought – after rejuvenation procedure offering youthful, 3-dimensional look with minimal invasiveness. Fillers are expensive and need to be redone periodically hence a sound understanding of structural basis on which they are laid is important in reducing the quantity of filler required in each sitting as well as increasing the longevity of results. Aim: The aim of the following study is to analyse a novel method of facial filling “The pillars pyramids and tie beams (PPT)” technique and its advantages over the conventional methods. Subjects and Methods: A novel technique of injecting the facial fillers was employed on 67 patients visiting our clinic. These patients were followed-up for a period of 3 years. Results: We observed that the amount of filler material required in initial sitting remains the same, however the frequency of touch up visits is decreased and so is the amount of filler material required for follow-up injections. Conclusion: Facial contour remodelling is being revolutionised by the new filler materials for volume augmentation and no uniform consensus has been reached on the techniques currently used in clinical practice. We advocate this novel PPT technique of facial filling in facial rejuvenation to restore a youthful look as a primary goal. PMID:24987203

  15. Efficacy and safety of a hyaluronic acid filler in subjects treated for correction of midface volume deficiency: a 24 month study.

    PubMed

    Callan, Peter; Goodman, Greg J; Carlisle, Ian; Liew, Steven; Muzikants, Peter; Scamp, Terrence; Halstead, Michael B; Rogers, John D

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are an established intervention for correcting facial volume deficiency. Few studies have evaluated treatment outcomes for longer than 6 months. The purpose of this study was to determine the durability of an HA filler in the correction of midface volume deficiency over 24 months, as independently evaluated by physician investigators and subjects. Subjects received treatment with Juvéderm(™) Voluma(™) to the malar area, based on the investigators' determination of baseline severity and aesthetic goals. The treatment was administered in one or two sessions over an initial 4-week period. Supplementary treatment was permissible at week 78, based on protocol-defined criteria. A clinically meaningful response was predefined as at least a one-point improvement on the MidFace Volume Deficit Scale (MFVDS) and on the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS). Of the 103 subjects enrolled, 84% had moderate or significant volume deficiency at baseline. At the first post-treatment evaluation (week 8), 96% were documented to be MFVDS responders, with 98% and 100% graded as GAIS responders when assessed by the subjects and investigators, respectively. At week 78, 81.7% of subjects were still MFVDS responders, with 73.2% and 78.1% being GAIS responders, respectively. Seventy-two subjects completed the 24-month study, of whom 45 did not receive supplementary Voluma(™) at week 78. Forty-three of the 45 (95.6%) subjects were MFVDS responders, with 82.2% and 91.1% being GAIS responders, respectively. At end of the study, 66/72 subjects were either satisfied or very satisfied with Voluma(™), with 70/72 indicating that they would recommend the product to others. Adverse events were transient and infrequent, with injection site bruising and swelling being the most commonly reported. Voluma(™) is safe and effective in the correction of mild to severe facial volume deficiency, achieving long-term clinically meaningful results. There was a high

  16. Efficacy and durability of hyaluronic acid fillers for malar enhancement: a prospective, randomized, spilt-face clinical controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ki Heon; Gwak, Min Jae; Moon, Sung Kyung; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Min Kyung

    2017-01-31

    Various hyaluronic acid fillers can be used for facial attenuation and rejuvenation. The efficacy and durability of hyaluronic acid fillers are of major concern to dermatologists and patients. This study aimed to evaluate three dimensional morphology, tissue distribution, and changes in volume after injection of two different hyaluronic acid fillers. Ten Korean women were enrolled in this study. Each subject was injected with monophasic hyaluronic acid filler in one malar area and biphasic filler in the other. Clinical outcome was measured before and after injection, and after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, using the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale, photographs and Moire's topography. Facial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed twice over six months. Both products showed good results after injection and demonstrated good durability over time. MRI was a useful modality for assessing tissue distribution and volume changes. The effects and durability after injection of monophasic hyaluronic acid filler and biphasic hyaluronic acid filler are generally comparable.

  17. Labia Majora Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid Filler: Technique and Results.

    PubMed

    Fasola, Elena; Gazzola, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    External female genitalia lose elasticity and volume with age. In the literature several techniques address the redundancy of the labia minora, but only few reports describe the augmentation of labia majora with fat grafting. At present, no studies describe the augmentation of the labia majora with hyaluronic acid. This study aims to present our technique of infiltration of hyaluronic acid filler, analyzing effectiveness, patient satisfaction, and complications. We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients affected by hypotrophy of the labia majora; they were treated with hyaluronic acid filler between November 2010 and December 2014. The Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS) filled out by the doctor and the patients was used to evaluate the results 12 months after the infiltration. Complications were recorded. A total of 31 patients affected by mild to moderate labia majora hypotrophy were treated with 19 mg/mL HA filler; 23 patients affected by severe labia majora hypotrophy were treated with 21 mg/mL HA filler. Among the first group of patients, one underwent a second infiltration 6 months later with 19 mg/mL HA filler (maximum 1 mL). A significant improvement (P < .0001) in GAIS score was observed, both in the scores provided by the patients and by the doctor. A greater relative improvement was observed in patients affected by severe hypotrophy. No complications were recorded. Hyaluronic acid infiltration of the labia majora is able to provide a significant rejuvenation with a simple outpatient procedure. We achieved significant improvements with one infiltration in all cases. The treatment is repeatable, has virtually no complications and it is reversible. 4 Therapeutic. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients.

  19. The efficacy, longevity, and safety of combined radiofrequency treatment and hyaluronic Acid filler for skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuk; Park, Kui Young; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Young; Park, Won-Seok; Bae, Il-Hong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers and radiofrequency (RF) devices have been made in the context of skin rejuvenation and cosmetic surgery. Moreover, combination regimens with both techniques are currently being developed. The present study was designed to examine the clinical and histologic effects of a new needle that incorporates an RF device for HA injections. A new intradermal needle RF device (INNOfill; Pacific Pharma, Korea) was assessed in the present study. In the animal arm, procollagen production was measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the filler volume was quantified by incorporating a dye with filler, and the filler distribution was assessed through the changes in tissue structure. In the human arm, the efficacy of the combination regimen was assessed by using the wrinkle severity rating scale (WSRS). In the animal study, RF treatment increased procollagen production in a time-dependent fashion. The total volume was significantly increased with the RF treatment when compared with the filler injections alone, and lasted for up to 7 weeks after treatment. Additionally, the filler distribution was reduced in animals treated with RF when compared with the untreated group. In the human study, the nasolabial folds of subjects treated with RF before filler injections exhibited a significantly greater change in the WSRS score from baseline when compared with the nasolabial folds treated with filler injections alone. A new device incorporating RF treatment before HA filler injection may represent a biocompatible and long-lasting advance in skin rejuvenation.

  20. The Efficacy, Longevity, and Safety of Combined Radiofrequency Treatment and Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Skin Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuk; Park, Kui Young; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Young; Park, Won-Seok; Bae, Il-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers and radiofrequency (RF) devices have been made in the context of skin rejuvenation and cosmetic surgery. Moreover, combination regimens with both techniques are currently being developed. Objective The present study was designed to examine the clinical and histologic effects of a new needle that incorporates an RF device for HA injections. Methods A new intradermal needle RF device (INNOfill; Pacific Pharma, Korea) was assessed in the present study. In the animal arm, procollagen production was measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the filler volume was quantified by incorporating a dye with filler, and the filler distribution was assessed through the changes in tissue structure. In the human arm, the efficacy of the combination regimen was assessed by using the wrinkle severity rating scale (WSRS). Results In the animal study, RF treatment increased procollagen production in a time-dependent fashion. The total volume was significantly increased with the RF treatment when compared with the filler injections alone, and lasted for up to 7 weeks after treatment. Additionally, the filler distribution was reduced in animals treated with RF when compared with the untreated group. In the human study, the nasolabial folds of subjects treated with RF before filler injections exhibited a significantly greater change in the WSRS score from baseline when compared with the nasolabial folds treated with filler injections alone. Conclusion A new device incorporating RF treatment before HA filler injection may represent a biocompatible and long-lasting advance in skin rejuvenation. PMID:25143672

  1. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  2. Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLain, Leslie; Ingle, Danny

    The American Heritage dictionary defines filler as ‘something added to augment weight or size or fill space'. Historically, commercial papermakers have used a variety of inexpensive, minimally beneficiated minerals as fillers for economic extension of more costly wood fibre. As such, these fillers played a relatively inconsequential role in contributing specific quality characteristics to the final sheet. However, as paper grades have evolved, the role of mineral fillers has dramatically expanded to contribute specific functionality to final paper grades. In general, this has resulted in a broader offering of mineral products to the papermaker delivering a range of optical and physical properties. Additionally, the use of mineral fillers may significantly impact dynamics on the paper machine itself. For example, the type and level of filler can dramatically affect chemical demand, drainage, speed and drying rates. A basic understanding of the fundamental characteristics of fillers and their resulting impact, both within the paper matrix and on the paper machine, is a critical requirement for cost-effective grade optimization.

  3. Biophysical characteristics of hyaluronic acid soft-tissue fillers and their relevance to aesthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Hema; Cassuto, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to present new rheologic data for hyaluronic acid filler products, correlate them with recent tissue integration studies, and provide a scientific rationale for selecting appropriate products for volume replacement within different tissue levels and anatomical zones. A brief overview of the methodology of filler rheology studies and data analysis is provided. Six U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved, cross-linked, nonanimal-derived hyaluronic acid filler products and one hyaluronic acid product approved in Europe and elsewhere were studied: one cohesive polydensifiedmatrix hyaluronic acid (Belotero Balance, also known as Belotero Basic), two Hylacross hyaluronicacids (Juvéderm Ultra and Juvéderm Ultra Plus), one Vycross hyaluronic acid (Juvéderm Voluma), and three nonanimal stabilized hyaluronic acids (Perlane, Restylane and Restylane SubQ) [corrected].The elastic modulus, complex viscosity, and viscous modulus of each filler gel were quantified. Tan delta for each filler gel and also for calcium hydroxylapatite filler (Radiesse) was calculated at 0.7 Hz. Cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid (Belotero Balance) has the lowest elasticity and viscosity and the highest tan delta. This predicts its soft, flowing qualities and correlates with its homogeneous pattern of tissue integration after intradermal implantation. Nonanimal stabilized hyaluronic acid (Perlane and Restylane) has the highest elasticity and viscosity and low tan delta. This predicts its firm, less flowing qualities and correlates with a bolus-like pattern of tissue integration. Hylacross hyaluronic acid (Juvéderm) has intermediate elasticity, viscosity, and tan delta, correlating with its intermediate pattern of tissue integration. Rheologic evaluation reliably predicts tissue integration patterns and appropriate clinical applications of the studied fillers. Paradigms of layered filler placement can be designed to optimally address individual patient

  4. Clinical experience with hyaluronic acid-filler complications.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Hwan; Seo, Sang-Won; Kim, June-Kyu; Chang, Choong-Hyun

    2011-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers have become the material of choice for soft-tissue augmentation. HA fillers are longer lasting, less immunogenic and can be broken down by hyaluronidase. These advantages make HA fillers the most common of the temporary fillers on the market. However, early and delayed complications, ranging from minor to severe, can occur following HA-filler injection. We evaluated and treated 28 cases of HA-filler-related complications that were referred to our hospital over a period of 5 years from July 2004 to October 2009. Twenty-eight patients were included in our study; 82.1% of the patients were female and 17.9% were male. Complications were roughly classified as nodular masses, inflammation, tissue necrosis and dyspigmentation. Affected locations, in descending order of frequency, were the perioral area, forehead, including glabella, nose, nasolabial fold, mentum, including marionette wrinkles, cheek area and periocular wrinkles. The most disastrous complication was alar rim necrosis following injection of the nasolabial fold. We propose two 'danger zones' that are particularly vulnerable to tissue necrosis following filler injection: the glabella and nasal ala. Although there is no definite treatment modality for the correction of HA-filler complications, we have managed them with various available treatment modalities aimed at minimising patient morbidity. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The tower technique: a novel technique for the injection of hyaluronic acid fillers.

    PubMed

    Bartus, Cynthia L; Sattler, Gerhard; Hanke, C William

    2011-11-01

    A number of injection techniques have been described for the placement of hyaluronic acid fillers. Such techniques include, but are not limited to, linear threading, depot, fanning, and layering. The tower technique for hyaluronic acid filler injection is a novel variation of the depot and layering techniques. With this technique, the hyaluronic acid is deposited via a perpendicular approach to the deep tissue plane with a gradual tapering of product deposition as the needle is withdrawn. A series of towers or struts are thus created. These towers serve as support structures for the overlying soft tissue, thereby restoring the face to a more youthful appearance. The anatomic areas most amenable to this technique include the lateral brow, the nasolabial folds, the marionette lines, the prejowl sulcus, and the mental region. A detailed description of the tower technique for facial volume restoration with hyaluronic acid fillers is provided. Further prospective studies are needed to compare the efficacy, safety, and longevity of this technique to other commonly used techniques for the injection of hyaluronic acid fillers.

  6. Factors Affecting the Rheological Measurement of Hyaluronic Acid Gel Fillers.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Öhrlund, Åke; Edsman, Katarina

    2017-09-01

    With the number of available dermal fillers increasing, so is the demand for scientifically based comparisons, often with rheological properties in focus. Since analytical results are always influenced by instrument settings, consensus on settings is essential to make comparison of results from different investigators more useful. Preferred measurement settings for rheological analysis of hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are suggested, and the reasoning behind the choices is presented by demonstrating the effect of different measurement settings on select commercial HA fillers. Rheological properties of 8 HA fillers were measured in a frequency sweep from 10 to 0.01 Hz at 0.1% strain, using an Anton Paar MCR 301, a PP-25 measuring system with a gap of 1 mm at 25°C. A 30-min period was used for relaxation of the sample between loading and measuring. The data presented here, together with previously published data, demonstrate differences in G' from 1.6 to 7.4 times for the same product. A large part of the differences were concluded to be due to differences in rheometry measurement settings. The confusion from the many parameters involved in rheometry can be avoided by simply using the elastic modulus (G') to differentiate products.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(9):876-882.

    .

  7. Clinical Performance of a Dermal Filler Containing Natural Glycolic Acid and a Polylactic Acid Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.1–3 Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  8. Anterior filler displacement following injection of calcium hydroxylapatite gel (Radiesse) for anophthalmic orbital volume augmentation.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Adam G; Holds, John B; Vagefi, M Reza; Bidar, Maziar; McCann, John D; Anderson, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    To describe the complication of anterior filler displacement following injection of calcium hydroxylapatite gel (Radiesse) for anophthalmic enophthalmos correction. Retrospective case series of patients who experienced anterior filler displacement following orbital injection of calcium hydroxylapatite. Data includes patient demographics, indication for injection, route and volume of injection, description of postinjection complications, and final outcome. Four cases of anterior filler displacement and expansion following injection of calcium hydroxylapatite were identified. The patients' ages ranged from 33 to 64 years old. All 4 patients underwent multiple prior orbital surgeries and suffered from anophthalmic enophthalmos. Injectable calcium hydroxylapatite was delivered transcutaneously, to the deep extraconal orbital space, via 27-gauge, 1.25-inch retrobulbar needles. Each patient received an initial 1.3 ml of filler, with 1 patient receiving an additional 0.8 ml. Within 1 week, all patients experienced prominent, edematous lower eyelids. A CT scan of 1 patient radiographically documented anterior migration of the filler material. Two patients required transconjunctival excision of the filler and infiltrated orbital fat. Histopathologic examination of 1 specimen revealed chronic foreign body granulomatous inflammation. Two patients were treated medically, with resolution of clinical findings over 6 to 9 months. Anterior filler displacement is a potential complication of orbital volume augmentation with injectable calcium hydroxylapatite. Patients should be counseled regarding this possibility when considering options for the treatment of anophthalmic enophthalmos. A history of multiple prior orbital surgeries, with associated tissue disruption and scarring, may be a risk factor for filler displacement.

  9. Clinical Application of Earlobe Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid Filler in the Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Kun; Cao, Qian; Hou, Ying; Lv, Wei; Fan, Ju-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Larger earlobes, which are a symbol of "richness" in traditional Chinese culture, are favored by Chinese patients. The objective of this paper is to investigate the application of earlobe augmentation with hyaluronic acid (HA) filler injection and its clinical effects in the Chinese population. A total of 19 patients (38 ears) who received earlobe augmentation with HA filler injections between March 2013 and March 2015 were included. The clinical effects, duration, and complications of these cases were investigated. All patients who received earlobe HA injections showed immediate postoperative effects with obvious morphological improvement of their earlobes. The volume of HA filler injected into each ear was 0.3-0.5 ml. The duration of the effect was 6-9 months. Two of the 19 cases (3 ears) demonstrated mild bruising at the injection site, but the bruising completely disappeared within 7 days after the injection. No vascular embolism, infection, nodule, or granuloma complications were observed in the studied group. The application of earlobe augmentation with HA filler injection is a safe, effective, simple procedure for earlobe shaping. It has an easy clinical application with good clinical prospects. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  10. Filler modification for papermaking with starch/oleic acid complexes with the aid of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiujie; Shen, Jing; Qian, Xueren

    2013-10-15

    To mitigate the negative effect of filler addition on paper strength and improve filler retention, filler modification with hydrogen bonding polymers (e.g., starch) or their composites is an interesting research topic. Differing from previous reports, the concept related to the deposition of starch/oleic acid complexes on precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) with the aid of calcium ions was demonstrated. The introduction of calcium ions resulted in effective starch deposition. As a result of filler modification, filler retention and the tensile strength of the filled paper were simultaneously improved essentially due to the aggregation of PCC particles in filler modification process as well as improved filler bondability. The concept demonstrated in this brief study may provide an alternative approach to filler bondability enhancement for improved papermaking performances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination volume rejuvenation therapy of the face: fat, fillers, and Botox.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Robert F

    2006-01-01

    The author uses combination volume rejuvenation therapy (CVRT) in patients who desire facial rejuvenation with minimal downtime. He describes how the combined use of relatively large doses of multiple injectables-including fat, pharmaceutical soft tissue fillers, and Botox-permits simultaneous volume rejuvenation of most facial areas with or without excisional surgery.

  12. A composite dermal filler comprising cross-linked hyaluronic acid and human collagen for tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Lee, Yongjun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Kim, Hojin; Yun, Chang-Koo; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we developed a composite filler comprising cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) and human collagen (COL) derived from the human umbilical cord with the aim of improving its biocompatibility and longevity compared with commercially available fillers. After HA/ COL composite fillers were made in two different ratios (10:1 and 5:1), the physical properties of the fillers were evaluated. The interior morphologies and in vivo weight change of these hydrogels were also characterized at 1-16 weeks after injection into mice. To evaluate their biocompatibility and durability in vivo, we injected the composite fillers into nude mice subcutaneously. The variations of injected gel weight were measured and compared with the commercial dermal fillers (Restylane and TheraFill). The composites showed improved or similar physical properties (complex viscosity of 19-22 × 10(5) cP, and injection force of 10- 12 N) over the commercial dermal fillers. Sixteen weeks following the injection, the ratio of remaining composite filler weight to initial weight (75.5 ± 16.9%; 10:1) was shown to be greater than that of the commercial fillers (43.2 ± 8.1%, Restylane; 12.3 ± 5.3%, TheraFill). In addition, immunohistochemical analysis with angiogenesis-related markers such as isolectin and vWF revealed newly formed blood vessels and cellular influx into the composite filler, which were not observed in the other fillers. These results clearly suggest that the HA/COL composite filler is a superior candidate for soft tissue reconstruction. The filler we developed may be a suitable candidate as an injectable dermal filler for tissue augmentation in humans.

  13. Aesthetic applications of calcium hydroxylapatite volumizing filler: an evidence-based review and discussion of current concepts: (part 1 of 2).

    PubMed

    Emer, Jason; Sundaram, Hema

    2013-12-01

    Calcium hydroxylapatite filler (CaHA; Radiesse) is a synthetic, non-animal derived product composed of minerals that occur naturally in bone and teeth. Following its development in the US, initial approval by the US FDA for non-aesthetic indications and CE marking in Europe, it was used off FDA-labeling for aesthetic purposes. Its use has grown further since its FDA approval in 2006 for long-lasting correction of moderate to severe wrinkles and folds. It is a popular filler for volume restoration to the face, and also to nonfacial areas such as the dorsum of the hands. The first article of this two-part series provides an evidence-based review of study data pertaining to the mechanism of action and biocompatibility of CaHA filler, and its safety, efficacy and tolerability when used for aesthetic purposes. The review includes data from a number of prospective, controlled comparative studies, from several retrospective studies, and from a meta-analysis of reported complications from alloplastic filler procedures over a 20-year period. The study methodology and number of study subjects are sufficiently robust to provide a high Evidence Level for much of the data. CaHA has good safety, efficacy and tolerability profiles that are comparable to those of hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers. It provides an initial, immediate volume replacement for up to 12 months followed by longer term correction due to biostimulation, resulting in collagenesis. Evidence Level II studies show longevity of 30 months or more after nasolabial fold implantation. Other studies demonstrate the appropriateness of CaHA filler for volume restoration to areas including the mid face, lower face and hands. CaHA is classified as an adjustable filler, whereas HA is fully reversible by hyaluronidase digestion. For this reason, and also because of CaHA's high viscosity and elasticity, evidence-based and experiential consensus suggests its avoidance in highly mobile areas (e.g. lips) or in anatomically

  14. The Kinetics of Reversible Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injection Treated With Hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit L W; Levin, Melissa K; Marmur, Ellen S

    2017-06-01

    Hyaluronidase is an enzyme capable of dissolution of hyaluronic acid (HA). There is a lack of evidence-based research defining time- and concentration-dependent reversal of HA filler using hyaluronidase. To explore the efficacy of different concentrations of hyaluronidase in digesting commercially available HA-based reversible fillers-Belotero Balance (BEL), Juvederm Ultra XC (JUVXC), Juvederm Ultra Plus (JUVX+), Juvederm Voluma XC (JUVV), Restylane-L (RESL), Restylane Silk (RESS), and Perlane/Restylane Lyft (RESLYFT). This was a blinded randomized study involving 15 participants. Participants received HA filler injection into their back, followed by no secondary injection, or injection with normal saline, 20 or 40 units of hyaluronidase. Using a 5-point palpation scale, the degradation of HA filler was monitored over 14 days. In the authors' study, there is a significant decrease in HA filler degradation using 20 and 40 units of hyaluronidase compared with no secondary injection or normal saline. There is no significant difference in HA filler dissolution when comparing 20 to 40 units of hyaluronidase. Lower concentrations of hyaluronidase may be just as effective as higher concentrations to degrade HA filler in situations where the reversal of cutaneous augmentation with HA filler arises.

  15. Hyaluronic acid fillers with cohesive polydensified matrix for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Adri D; Prager, Welf; Rubin, Mark G; Moretti, Ernesto A; Nikolis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cohesive monophasic polydensified fillers show unique viscoelastic properties and variable density of hyaluronic acid, allowing for a homogeneous tissue integration and distribution of the material. Objective The aim of this paper was to review the clinical data regarding the performance, tolerability, and safety of the Belotero® fillers for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation. Methods A literature search was performed up until May 31, 2015 to identify all relevant articles on Belotero® fillers (Basic/Balance, Hydro, Soft, Intense, Volume) and equivalent products (Esthélis®, Mesolis®, Fortélis®, Modélis®). Results This comprehensive review included 26 papers. Findings from three randomized controlled trials showed a greater reduction in nasolabial fold severity with Belotero® Basic/Balance than with collagen (at 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, n=118) and Restylane® (at 4 weeks, n=40), and higher patient satisfaction with Belotero® Intense than with Perlane® (at 2 weeks, n=20). With Belotero® Basic/Balance, an improvement of at least 1 point on the severity scale can be expected in ~80% of patients 1–6 months after injection, with an effect still visible at 8–12 months. Positive findings were also reported with Belotero® Volume (no reduction in hyaluronic acid volume at 12 months, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging), Soft (improvement in the esthetic outcomes when used in a sequential approach), and Hydro (improvement in skin appearance in all patients). The most common adverse effects were mild-to-moderate erythema, edema, and hematoma, most of which were temporary. There were no reports of Tyndall effect, nodules, granulomas, or tissue necrosis. Conclusion Clinical evidence indicates sustainable esthetic effects, good safety profile, and long-term tolerability of the Belotero® fillers, particularly Belotero® Basic/Balance and Intense. PMID:27660479

  16. Hyaluronic acid fillers with cohesive polydensified matrix for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Adri D; Prager, Welf; Rubin, Mark G; Moretti, Ernesto A; Nikolis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Cohesive monophasic polydensified fillers show unique viscoelastic properties and variable density of hyaluronic acid, allowing for a homogeneous tissue integration and distribution of the material. The aim of this paper was to review the clinical data regarding the performance, tolerability, and safety of the Belotero(®) fillers for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation. A literature search was performed up until May 31, 2015 to identify all relevant articles on Belotero(®) fillers (Basic/Balance, Hydro, Soft, Intense, Volume) and equivalent products (Esthélis(®), Mesolis(®), Fortélis(®), Modélis(®)). This comprehensive review included 26 papers. Findings from three randomized controlled trials showed a greater reduction in nasolabial fold severity with Belotero(®) Basic/Balance than with collagen (at 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, n=118) and Restylane(®) (at 4 weeks, n=40), and higher patient satisfaction with Belotero(®) Intense than with Perlane(®) (at 2 weeks, n=20). With Belotero(®) Basic/Balance, an improvement of at least 1 point on the severity scale can be expected in ~80% of patients 1-6 months after injection, with an effect still visible at 8-12 months. Positive findings were also reported with Belotero(®) Volume (no reduction in hyaluronic acid volume at 12 months, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging), Soft (improvement in the esthetic outcomes when used in a sequential approach), and Hydro (improvement in skin appearance in all patients). The most common adverse effects were mild-to-moderate erythema, edema, and hematoma, most of which were temporary. There were no reports of Tyndall effect, nodules, granulomas, or tissue necrosis. Clinical evidence indicates sustainable esthetic effects, good safety profile, and long-term tolerability of the Belotero(®) fillers, particularly Belotero(®) Basic/Balance and Intense.

  17. Biological Evaluation of Flexible Polyurethane/Poly l-Lactic Acid Composite Scaffold as a Potential Filler for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lui, Yuk Fai; Ip, Wing Yuk

    2017-09-13

    Degradable bone graft substitute for large-volume bone defects is a continuously developing field in orthopedics. With the advance in biomaterial in past decades, a wide range of new materials has been investigated for their potential in this application. When compared to common biopolymers within the field such as PLA or PCL, elastomers such as polyurethane offer some unique advantages in terms of flexibility. In cases of bone defect treatments, a flexible soft filler can help to establish an intimate contact with surrounding bones to provide a stable bone-material interface for cell proliferation and ingrowth of tissue. In this study, a porous filler based on segmented polyurethane incorporated with poly l-lactic acid was synthesized by a phase inverse salt leaching method. The filler was put through in vitro and in vivo tests to evaluate its potential in acting as a bone graft substitute for critical-sized bone defects. In vitro results indicated there was a major improvement in biological response, including cell attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase expression for osteoblast-like cells when seeded on the composite material compared to unmodified polyurethane. In vivo evaluation on a critical-sized defect model of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit indicated there was bone ingrowth along the defect area with the introduction of the new filler. A tight interface formed between bone and filler, with osteogenic cells proliferating on the surface. The result suggested polyurethane/poly l-lactic acid composite is a material with the potential to act as a bone graft substitute for orthopedics application.

  18. Applications and Emerging Trends of Hyaluronic Acid in Tissue Engineering, as a Dermal Filler, and in Osteoarthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Amir; Berkland, Cory

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer with a variety of applications in medicine including scaffolding for tissue engineering, dermatological fillers, and viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis treatment. HA is available in most connective tissues in body fluids such as synovial fluid and the vitreous humor of the eye. HA is responsible for several structural properties of tissues as a component of extracellular matrix (ECM) and is involved in cellular signaling. Degradation of HA is a step-wise process that can occur via enzymatic or non-enzymatic reactions. A reduction in HA mass or molecular weight via degradation or slowing of synthesis affects physical and chemical properties such as tissue volume, viscosity, and elasticity. This review addresses the distribution, turnover, and tissue-specific properties of HA. This information is used as context for considering recent products and strategies for modifying the viscoelastic properties of HA in tissue engineering, as a dermal filler, and in osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:23507088

  19. Glans Penis Augmentation Using Hyaluronic Acid Gel as an Injectable Filler

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Tae Il; Kim, Je Jong

    2015-01-01

    Glans penis augmentation (GPA) has received little attention from experts despite the existence of a subset of patients who may be dissatisfied with a small glans or poor tumescence of the glans during erection. Recently, GPA using an injectable filler or implantation of a graft or filler has been developed. Despite a demanding injection technique and inevitable uneven undulation of the glandular surface, GPA using injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is a novel and useful therapy and an effective and safe procedure for soft tissue enhancement. For long-term presence of implants, timed supplementation can be used similar to that for fascial plasty. In complications such as mucosal necrosis of the glans penis, most cases occur from the use of non-HA gel or an unpurified form and misunderstanding of the management protocol for immediate side effects. Currently, GPA using injectable HA gel is not recommended in the International Society for Sexual Medicine guideline due to possible sensory loss. In a 5-year long-term follow-up of GPA by subcutaneous injection of HA gel, the residual volume of implants decreased by 15% of the maximal glandular circumference, but was still effective for alleviating the hypersensitivity of the glans penis in premature ejaculation patients. For efficacy in premature ejaculation, selection of appropriate candidates is the most important factor for success. GPA does not harm erectile function and is less invasive and irreversible compared to dorsal neurectomy. To refine the procedure, more interest and well-designed studies are required for the establishment of the procedure. PMID:26331121

  20. Glans Penis Augmentation Using Hyaluronic Acid Gel as an Injectable Filler.

    PubMed

    Moon, Du Geon; Kwak, Tae Il; Kim, Je Jong

    2015-08-01

    Glans penis augmentation (GPA) has received little attention from experts despite the existence of a subset of patients who may be dissatisfied with a small glans or poor tumescence of the glans during erection. Recently, GPA using an injectable filler or implantation of a graft or filler has been developed. Despite a demanding injection technique and inevitable uneven undulation of the glandular surface, GPA using injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is a novel and useful therapy and an effective and safe procedure for soft tissue enhancement. For long-term presence of implants, timed supplementation can be used similar to that for fascial plasty. In complications such as mucosal necrosis of the glans penis, most cases occur from the use of non-HA gel or an unpurified form and misunderstanding of the management protocol for immediate side effects. Currently, GPA using injectable HA gel is not recommended in the International Society for Sexual Medicine guideline due to possible sensory loss. In a 5-year long-term follow-up of GPA by subcutaneous injection of HA gel, the residual volume of implants decreased by 15% of the maximal glandular circumference, but was still effective for alleviating the hypersensitivity of the glans penis in premature ejaculation patients. For efficacy in premature ejaculation, selection of appropriate candidates is the most important factor for success. GPA does not harm erectile function and is less invasive and irreversible compared to dorsal neurectomy. To refine the procedure, more interest and well-designed studies are required for the establishment of the procedure.

  1. Skin Remodeling Using Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injections in Photo-Aged Faces.

    PubMed

    França Wanick, Fabiana Braga; Almeida Issa, Maria Claudia; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Soares Filho, Porphirio José; Olej, Beni

    2016-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) filler is an important dermatological procedure. Although many studies have reported clinical improvement with this procedure, histology with morphometric evidence is not well documented. To evaluate the clinical and histological results of a HA filler injection and to quantify dermis remodeling at 3 and 9 months after HA injections into aged faces. Twenty patients were enrolled in this study. Hyaluronic acid filler was injected into the nasolabial folds and preauricular regions of the patients. Skin biopsies of the preauricular regions were performed before the procedure and at 3 and 9 months after the procedure. Sixteen women (aged 40-50 years) completed the clinical study and demonstrated improvement for 12 months. Twenty patients completed the histologic studies. Morphologic evaluation showed increases in the epidermal layers. The morphometric study showed a statistically significant increase in collagen fibers at 3 and 9 months after the procedure (34.2% ± 31.5% and 39.5% ± 39.7%, respectively, p < .05). Sustained clinical results for HA filler can be explained not only by the presence of HA gel on the dermis but also by the dermal remodeling induced by HA filler injected into the face.

  2. Tracking and Increasing Viability of Topically Injected Fibroblasts Suspended in Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Namgoong, Sik; Rhee, Sung-Mi; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    A new injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue consisting of a mixture of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler and cultured human fibroblasts have been developed by the authors. To establish this method as a standard treatment, a further study was required to determine whether the injected fibroblasts could stay at the injected place or move to other sites. In addition, effective strategies were needed to increase viability of the injected fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to track the injected fibroblasts and to determine the effect of adding prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) or vitamin C on the viability of fibroblasts.Human fibroblasts labeled with fluorescence dye were suspended in HA filler and injected into 4 sites on the back of nude mice. The injected bioimplants consisted of one of the 4 followings: HA filler without cells (HA group), fibroblasts suspended in HA filler (HA + FB group), PGE1-supplemented fibroblasts in HA filler (HA + FB + PGE1 group), and vitamin C-supplemented fibroblasts in HA filler (HA + FB + VC group). At 4 weeks after injection, locations and intensities of the fluorescence signals were evaluated using a live imaging system.The fluorescence signals of the fibroblast-containing groups were visible only at the injected sites without dispersing to other sites. The HA +FB + PGE1 group showed a significantly higher fluorescence signal than the HA + FB and the HA + FB +VC groups (P < 0.05, each). There was no statistical difference between the HA + FB and HA + FB +VC groups (P = 0.69).The results of the current study collectively suggest that injected fibroblasts suspended in HA filler stay at the injected place without moving to other sites. In addition, PGE1 treatment may increase the remaining rhodamine B isothiocynanate dye at the injected site of the human dermal fibroblasts.

  3. Evaluation of cotton byproducts as fillers for poly(lactic acid) and low density polyethylene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polymeric composites based on cotton burr and cottonseed bull have been prepared by melt blending and extrusion. For poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE), addition of the fillers only slightly changed the composite’s thermal properties and significantly decreased the composite...

  4. Elastomer coated filler and composites thereof comprising at least 60% by weight of a hydrated filler and an elastomer containing an acid substituent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D.; Reilly, W. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The impact resistance of flame retardant composites, especially thermoplastic molding: compounds containing over 60% hydrated mineral filler such as Al(OH)3 or Mg(OH)2 as improved by coating the filler with 1 to 20% of an elastomer. The composite will fail by crazing or shearing rather than by brittle fracture. A well bonded elastomeric interphase resulted by utilizing acidic substituted resins such as ethyl-hexyl acrylate-acrylic acid copolymers which bond to and are cross-linked by the basic filler particles. Further improvement in impact resistance was provided by incorporating 1 to 10% of a resin fiber reinforcement such as polyvinyl alcohol fibers that decompose to yield at least 30% water when heated to decomposition temperature.

  5. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingxun; Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA) may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA) on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline) have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA. PMID:25717339

  6. Assessment of the clinical efficacy of a hyaluronic acid-based deep wrinkle filler using new instrumental methods.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Virginie; Rouquier, Amandine; Black, David; Josse, Gwendal; Auvergnat, Arielle; Briant, Alain; Dahan, Serge; Gassia, Véronique; Saint-Martory, Christine; Zakaria, Wassim; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Grognard-Gourdon, Catherine; Thioly-Bensoussan, Daphné; Degouy, Arnaud; Schmitt, Anne-Marie

    2010-08-01

    The efficacy of numerous hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers has been demonstrated by semi-quantitative and qualitative methods, useful in clinical practice, but poorly reliable. To objectively evaluate the efficacy of a HA gel in treating nasolabial folds (NLFs) over a 9-12-month follow-up period. A total of 47 adult patients with moderate to severe NLFs received one or two injections of HA gel. Efficacy was assessed by measuring NLF depth at time intervals up to 12 months subjectively by blind and open clinical scoring using the Lemperle scale, and objectively using skin replicas and in vivo 3D imaging methods. Tissue characterization and dermal thickness were also assessed using radiofrequency ultrasonography and high-resolution ultrasound imaging, respectively. The filler injection highly significantly decreased the depth of NLFs (p < 0.0001) at all time points, with an improvement of at least 1 grade in the Lemperle score in 77% and 89% of the subjects at 9 and 12 months, respectively. NLF volume measured on replicas and 3D images significantly decreased after injection and this improvement was maintained over 12 months. This HA gel is well tolerated and provides a significant and long-lasting correction of moderate to severe NLFs, as objectively demonstrated by instrumental methods.

  7. Effect of film thickness and filler properties on sulphuric acid permeation in various commercially available epoxy mortar coatings.

    PubMed

    Valix, M; Mineyama, H; Chen, C; Cheung, W H; Shi, J; Bustamante, H

    2011-01-01

    The performance of various commercially available epoxy mortar coatings was compared by measuring their sulphuric acid diffusivity. Apparent diffusivities, which were measured gravimetrically, were found to be dependent on coating tortuosity. In composite materials like epoxy mortars, the tortuosity was determined by filler properties and polymer alignment. Tortuosity was found to depend on the filler size, their dispersion, filler aspect ratio and concentration. The order and greater alignment of polymer aggregates, which characterises thinner coatings effects higher tortuosity and thus lower permeabilities. The result is that sulphuric acid diffusivities were observed to increase with coating thickness, which challenges the notion that greater coating thicknesses provide greater protection or environmental barrier. The effect of film thickness and filler properties observed in this study has significant implications to the current selection of coatings and sewer protection.

  8. Esthetic Reconstruction of Diastema with Adhesive Tooth-Colored Restorations and Hyaluronic Acid Fillers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This report presents a comprehensive esthetic treatment with adhesive tooth-colored restorations in a combination with hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers of diastema in an orthodontic patient with relapse. Case Report. A 36-year-old female patient consulted about 1.5–2 mm midline diastema after an orthodontic relapse of replacing missing central incisors with lateral incisors and dark-colored gingival tissue as a result of a metal post and core with porcelain fused to a metal (PFM) crown at the left lateral incisor. Restorative treatments included replacing the PFM with all-ceramic material and placing a ceramic veneer on the right lateral incisor. To close the space, crown forms of both lateral incisors were altered. A direct resin composite was then used to reform right and left canines to a more ideal lateral incisor shape. An HA fillers injection was used to fill the remaining open gingival embrasure. Eighteen months after treatment, the interdental papilla remained stable and the patient was satisfied with the result. Conclusion. Esthetic reconstruction of diastema and open gingival embrasure in this case can be accomplished without orthodontic retreatment. Tooth-colored restorations and HA filler injection appear as a promising modality to address this patient's esthetic concern. PMID:28386488

  9. Blinded evaluation of the effects of hyaluronic acid filler injections on first impressions.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Steven H; Arkins, John P; Gal, Thomas J

    2010-11-01

    Facial appearance has profound influence on the first impression that is projected to others. To determine the effects that complete correction of the nasolabial folds (NLFs) with hyaluronic acid (HA) filler has on the first impression one makes. Twenty-two subjects received injections of HA filler into the NLFs. Photographs of the face in a relaxed pose were taken at baseline, optimal correction visit, and 4 weeks after optimal correction. Three hundred four blinded evaluators completed a survey rating first impression on various measures of success for each photo. In total, 5,776 first impressions were recorded, totaling 46,208 individual assessments of first impression. Our findings indicate a significant improvement in mean first impression in the categories of dating success, attractiveness, financial success, relationship success, athletic success, and overall first impression at the optimal correction visit. At 4 weeks after the optimal correction visit, significance was observed in all categories measured: social skills, academic performance, dating success, occupational success, attractiveness, financial success, relationship success, athletic success, and overall first impression. Full correction of the NLFs with HA filler significantly and positively influences the first impression an individual projects. © 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  10. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Hyaluronic Acid Fillers and Botulinum Toxin Type A—Recommendations for Combined Treatment and Optimizing Outcomes in Diverse Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Steven; Signorini, Massimo; Vieira Braz, André; Fagien, Steven; Swift, Arthur; De Boulle, Koenraad L.; Raspaldo, Hervé; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Monheit, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination of fillers and botulinum toxin for aesthetic applications is increasingly popular. Patient demographics continue to diversify, and include an expanding population receiving maintenance treatments over decades. Methods: A multinational panel of plastic surgeons and dermatologists convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to develop updated guidelines with a worldwide perspective for hyaluronic acid fillers and botulinum toxin. This publication considers strategies for combined treatments, and how patient diversity influences treatment planning and outcomes. Results: Global Aesthetics Consensus Group recommendations reflect increased use of combined treatments in the lower and upper face, and some midface regions. A fully patient-tailored approach considers physiologic and chronologic age, ethnically associated facial morphotypes, and aesthetic ideals based on sex and culture. Lower toxin dosing, to modulate rather than paralyze muscles, is indicated where volume deficits influence muscular activity. Combination of toxin with fillers is appropriate for several indications addressed previously with toxin alone. New scientific data regarding hyaluronic acid fillers foster an evidence-based approach to selection of products and injection techniques. Focus on aesthetic units, rather than isolated rhytides, optimizes results from toxin and fillers. It also informs longitudinal treatment planning, and analysis of toxin nonresponders. Conclusions: The emerging objective of injectable treatment is facial harmonization rather than rejuvenation. Combined treatment is now a standard of care. Its use will increase further as we refine the concept that aspects of aging are intimately related, and that successful treatment entails identifying and addressing the primary causes of each. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, V. PMID:27119917

  11. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens the life of the patient and can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers is an entity that to the best of our knowledge has never been described in the medical literature. Case Report: We describe a patient who presented with dyspnea and cough after a subcutaneous injection of hyaluronic acid, with radiographic abnormalities including ground glass opacities and consolidation. The patient underwent flexible bronchoscopy and was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Conclusions: This case emphasizes that this life threatening condition may occur with the use of this medication and physicians must be aware of this disorder, as early recognition and management can reduce morbidity. PMID:24826208

  12. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Basora, Jose F; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Male, 25 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: - Unusual clinical course. Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens the life of the patient and can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers is an entity that to the best of our knowledge has never been described in the medical literature. We describe a patient who presented with dyspnea and cough after a subcutaneous injection of hyaluronic acid, with radiographic abnormalities including ground glass opacities and consolidation. The patient underwent flexible bronchoscopy and was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. This case emphasizes that this life threatening condition may occur with the use of this medication and physicians must be aware of this disorder, as early recognition and management can reduce morbidity.

  13. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significant differences between groups of irregular and round shape particles. A hyaluronic acid bioimplant with moderate viscosity is superior to that with low or high viscosity in the viability for human fibroblasts. However, the particle shape does not influence the viability of the fibroblasts.

  14. The effects of penile girth enhancement using injectable hyaluronic acid gel, a filler.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Tae Il; Oh, MiMi; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2011-12-01

    Despites the debates on penile girth enhancement (PGE), demands for enhancement are increasing. Recently, various fillers have been widely used for soft tissue augmentation with proven efficacy and safety. To identify the feasibility and efficacy of PGE by injection of filler. Fifty patients with subjective small penis who visited Korea University Guro outpatient clinic were enrolled and prospectively followed. Restylane Sub-Q (Q-med, Upssala, Sweden) was injected into the fascial layer of penile body via 21G cannula with "Back & Forth Technique" and homogenized with a roller. From April 2006 to February 2008, 50 patients were enrolled and 41 patients were followed until 18 months after PGE. Changes in penile girth at midshaft were measured by tapeline at 1 and 18 months. Patient's visual estimation of residual volume (Gr 0-4), patient's satisfaction (Gr 0-4), and any adverse reactions were also evaluated. Mean injected volume was 20.56 cc (18-22). Compared with basal girth of 7.48 ± 0.35 cm, maximal circumference was significantly increased to 11.41 ± 0.34 cm at 1 month (P < 0.0001) and maintained as 11.26 ± 0.33 cm until 18 months. In patient's visual estimation, two patients complained the decrease as Gr 3 with focal depression at 1 month. At 18 months, all patients answered as Gr 4 without asymmetry. Patient's and partner's satisfaction score was 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.65 ± 0.48 at 1 month and 3.34 ± 0.53 and 3.38 ± 0.49 at 18 months. There were no inflammatory signs or serious adverse reactions in all cases. Considering the property of material, methods, and follow-up results of 18 months, PGE using filler is a very effective and safe technique for penile augmentation. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Clinical performance of a dermal filler containing natural glycolic Acid and a polylactic Acid polymer: results of a clinical trial in human immunodeficiency virus subjects with facial lipoatrophy.

    PubMed

    Tagle, Jorge M; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-02-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.(1-3) Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  16. Consensus Recommendations for Optimal Augmentation of the Asian Face with Hyaluronic Acid and Calcium Hydroxylapatite Fillers.

    PubMed

    Rho, Nark-Kyoung; Chang, Yao-Yuan; Chao, Yates Yen-Yu; Furuyama, Nobutaka; Huang, Peter Y C; Kerscher, Martina; Kim, Hee-Jin; Park, Je-Young; Peng, Hsien Li Peter; Rummaneethorn, Paisal; Rzany, Berthold; Sundaram, Hema; Wong, Chin Ho; Yang, Yuli; Prasetyo, Adri Dwi

    2015-11-01

    Although the use of filling agents for soft-tissue augmentation has increased worldwide, most consensus statements do not distinguish between ethnic populations. There are, however, significant differences between Caucasian and Asian faces, reflecting not only cultural disparities, but also distinctive treatment goals. Unlike aesthetic patients in the West, who usually seek to improve the signs of aging, Asian patients are younger and request a broader range of indications. Members of the Asia-Pacific Consensus group-comprising specialists from the fields of dermatology, plastic surgery, anatomy, and clinical epidemiology-convened to develop consensus recommendations for Asians based on their own experience using cohesive polydensified matrix, hyaluronic acid, and calcium hydroxylapatite fillers. The Asian face demonstrates differences in facial structure and cosmetic ideals. Improving the forward projection of the "T zone" (i.e., forehead, nose, cheeks, and chin) forms the basis of a safe and effective panfacial approach to the Asian face. Successful augmentation may be achieved with both (1) high- and low-viscosity cohesive polydensified matrix/hyaluronic acid and (2) calcium hydroxylapatite for most indications, although some constraints apply. The Asia-Pacific Consensus recommendations are the first developed specifically for the use of fillers in Asian populations. Therapeutic, V.

  17. Use of Ekibastuzsk coal ash as a filler for acid resistant plaster

    SciTech Connect

    Korsakov, F.F.; Isichenko, I.I.; Kabanov, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Acid resistant plasters are used extensively at thermal power plants for protection of gas conduits, ash traps with spouts and hydraulic valves, and the internal surfaces of smoke pump housings. The surface being protected is preliminarily cleaned and a No. 16-20 steel grid attached to the surface by electrial welding. In producing the acid resistant plaster, 14-17 parts by weight of sodium silicofluoride are added to 100 parts by weight of sodium water glass; the remainder consists of andesite or diabase meal to the required consistency. The water glass fulfills the role of a binder; the sodium silicofluoride accelerates solidification of the water glass and the andesite and diabase meal serve as fillers. We found, tested in the laboratory and used successfully (under experimental-industrial conditions) a substitute for andesite and diabase meal. This substitute was ash of Ekibastuzsk coal, which was not only comparable to the meal in regard to quality of the acid resistant plaster, but even exceeded andesite and diabase meal in regard to several qualitative indicators. At the present time, a formula is being developed for an acid resistant plaster produced on the basis of water glass, sodium silicofluoride and ash of Ekibastuzsk coal. In order to verify the possibility of using other ashes instead of andesite and diabase meal, we also tested, under laboratory conditions, acid resistant plasters using ash from thermal power plants (TPP's) also burning Karagandinsk, Kuuchekinsk, Kuznetsk and Kansko-Achinsk coals. In compositions produced with polymer binders, Kansko-Achinsk coal ash was one of the best fillers, providing the most favorable physico-mechanical properties of the composition.

  18. Influence of Filler on the Mechanical Properties and Kinetic Crystallization Behavior of Polylactic Acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuta, Ryo; Inoue, Ryohei; Hara, Ryosuke; Sato, Sadao

    The kinetic crystallization behavior of PLA (polylactic acid) and PLA/MMT nanocomposites containing 3 wt% montmorillonite (MMT) was examined in order to develop a new technique for obtaining the relative crystallization degree of a material from the spherulite occupation area based on images obtained using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. In addition, the relative crystallization degree is discussed in terms of the Ozawa theory. The effect of MMT filler on the mechanical properties of PLA/MMT nanocomposites, the number of spherulites generated in the nanocomposites, and the linear growth rate of these spherulites were also examined experimentally. The relative crystallization curves obtained by CCD and by DSC measurement were found to be approximately the same. Moreover, it was found that the Ozawa theory could be applied not only to PLA but also to PLA/MMT nanocomposites. In these nanocomposites, the number of spherulites decreased and the linear growth rate slightly increased ; moreover, the rate of crystallization also increased. The tensile and flexural modulus of the PLA/MMT nanocomposites containing 3 wt% MMT were 5.2-14.3% greater than those of PLA, and annealing resulted in a further increase of about 4.0-20.7%. However, the Izod impact value decreased due to the increase in rigidity caused by annealing and the addition of filler.

  19. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ip, W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  20. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  1. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  2. Porous poly(L-lactic acid) sheet prepared by stretching with starch particles as filler for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ju, Dandan; Han, Lijing; Li, Zonglin; Chen, Yunjing; Wang, Qingjiang; Bian, Junjia; Dong, Lisong

    2016-05-20

    Porous poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) sheets were prepared by uniaxial stretching PLLA sheets containing starch filler. Here, the starch filler content, stretching ratio, stretching rate and stretching temperature are important factors to influence the structure of the porous PLLA sheets, therefore, they have been investigated in detail. The pore size distribution and tortuosity were characterized by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry. The results revealed that the porosity and pore size enlarged with the increase of the starch filler content and stretching ratio, while shrank with the rise of stretching temperature. On the other hand, the pore structure almost had no changes with the stretching rate ranging between 5 and 40 mm/min. In order to test and verify that the porous PLLA sheet was suitable for the tissue engineering, the starch particles were removed by selective enzymatic degradation and its in vitro biocompatibility to osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells was investigated.

  3. Skin Necrosis with Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Due to a Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Il; Kang, Seok Joo; Sun, Hook

    2017-07-01

    Performing rhinoplasty using filler injections, which improve facial wrinkles or soft tissues, is relatively inexpensive. However, intravascular filler injections can cause severe complications, such as skin necrosis and visual loss. We describe a case of blepharoptosis and skin necrosis caused by augmentation rhinoplasty and we discuss the patient's clinical progress. We describe the case of a 25-year-old female patient who experienced severe pain, blepharoptosis, and decreased visual acuity immediately after receiving a filler injection. Our case suggests that surgeons should be aware of nasal vascularity before performing an operation, and that they should avoid injecting fillers at a high pressure and/or in excessive amounts. Additionally, filler injections should be stopped if the patient complains of severe pain, and appropriate measures should be taken to prevent complications caused by intravascular filler injections.

  4. An Open-Label Uncontrolled, Multicenter Study for the Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of the Dermal Filler Princess VOLUME in the Treatment of Nasolabial Folds

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Daisy; Palatin, Michael; Bartsch, Rolf; Bartsch, Katrin; O'Rourke, Maria; Höller, Sonja; Baumgartner, Renate R.; Prinz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The dermal filler Princess VOLUME is a highly cross-linked, viscoelastic hyaluronic acid injectable gel implant used for aesthetic treatment. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Princess VOLUME in the treatment of nasolabial folds, an open-label uncontrolled, multicenter study was conducted. Forty-eight subjects were recruited who had moderate to deep wrinkles, according to the Modified Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale (MFWS). Subjects received Princess VOLUME in both nasolabial folds at Day 0. Nasolabial fold severity was evaluated at 30, 90, 180, and 270 days after treatment, using the MFWS and the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS). Adverse events and treatment site reactions were recorded. Among the 48 subjects, 93.8% were female with a median age of 52 years. There were significant improvements (P < 0.0001) in the MFWS scores at 30, 180, and 270 days after treatment compared with those at baseline, with a mean decrease of 1.484 (±0.408), 1.309 (±0.373), and 1.223 (±0.401), respectively; hence the primary endpoint was achieved and clinical efficacy demonstrated. Princess VOLUME was well tolerated, and most adverse events were injection site reactions of mild to moderate severity. Subject satisfaction (97.9%), subject recommendation of the treatment (93.6%), and investigators GAIS scores (97.9% improvement) were high. PMID:25821787

  5. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Avoidance and Management of Complications from Hyaluronic Acid Fillers-Evidence- and Opinion-Based Review and Consensus Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Massimo; Liew, Steven; Sundaram, Hema; De Boulle, Koenraad L; Goodman, Greg J; Monheit, Gary; Wu, Yan; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R; Swift, Arthur; Vieira Braz, André

    2016-06-01

    Although the safety profile of hyaluronic acid fillers is favorable, adverse reactions can occur. Clinicians and patients can benefit from ongoing guidance on adverse reactions to hyaluronic acid fillers and their management. A multinational, multidisciplinary group of experts in cosmetic medicine convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to review the properties and clinical uses of Hylacross and Vycross hyaluronic acid products and develop updated consensus recommendations for early and late complications associated with hyaluronic acid fillers. The consensus panel provided specific recommendations focusing on early and late complications of hyaluronic acid fillers and their management. The impact of patient-, product-, and technique-related factors on such reactions was described. Most of these were noted to be mild and transient. Serious adverse events are rare. Early adverse reactions to hyaluronic acid fillers include vascular infarction and compromise; inflammatory reactions; injection-related events; and inappropriate placement of filler material. Among late reactions are nodules, granulomas, and skin discoloration. Most adverse events can be avoided with proper planning and technique. Detailed understanding of facial anatomy, proper patient and product selection, and appropriate technique can further reduce the risks. Should adverse reactions occur, the clinician must be prepared and have tools available for effective treatment. Adverse reactions with hyaluronic acid fillers are uncommon. Clinicians should take steps to further reduce the risk and be prepared to treat any complications that arise.

  6. PIM-1 mixed matrix membranes for gas separations using cost-effective hypercrosslinked nanoparticle fillers.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Bhavsar, Rupesh S; Adams, Dave J; Budd, Peter M; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-04-25

    High-free-volume glassy polymers, such as polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and poly(trimethylsilylpropyne), have attracted attention as membrane materials due to their high permeability. However, loss of free volume over time, or aging, limits their applicability. Introduction of a secondary filler phase can reduce this aging but either cost or instability rules out scale up for many fillers. Here, we report a cheap, acid-tolerant, nanoparticulate hypercrosslinked polymer 'sponge' as an alternative filler. On adding the filler, permeability is enhanced and aging is strongly retarded. This is accompanied by a CO2/N2 selectivity that increases over time, surpassing the Robeson upper bound.

  7. Improving the quality of biopolymer (poly lactic acid) with the addition of bentonite as filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani; Agusnar, Harry; Wirjosentono, Basuki; Rihayat, Teuku; Nurhanifa

    2017-07-01

    PLA (Poly Lactid Acid) - Bentonite polymer nanocomposite which is a combination of natural and nanometer-scale inorganic substances created through three processes, mixing using a melt blending, molding with a hot press using specimens Standard ASTM D 638 Type IV and drying. In this study, PLA combined with two types of natural bentonite obtained from different areas to find differences in the quality of the results of characterization. To optimize the performance of filler, before mixing, bentonite have to furificate first with (NaPO3)6 and also open the interlayer space with CTAB. D-spacing of bentonite imterlayer were analyze by X-Ray difraction (XRD). Characterization bionanocomposite resulting morphologic structure was tested using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Mechanical analysis of PLA-bentonite nanocomposite in the form of tensile strength was tested using a tensile test specimens of standard American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) D 638 Type 4, and thermal resistance using Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  8. Effect of particle size and crystallinity of cellulose filler on the properties of poly(L-lactic acid): Mechanical property and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni'mah, Hikmatun; Ningrum, Eva Oktavia; Sumarno, Rizkiyah, Dwila Nur; Divta, I. G. A. Gede Chandra; Meiliefiana, Subaghio, Mayang Ayudhawara

    2017-05-01

    Two types of cellulose materials were utilized as filler in biodegradable polymer poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) to obtain new biocomposite materials with better properties. The physical properties of those biocomposite materials which include transparency, mechanical property, and thermal stability were investigated by using visual observation, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. In this study, two different particle sizes and crystallinity of cellulose were used to show the effect of particle size and crystallinity of cellulose filler on the properties of PLLA. The cellulose materials used in this research include the following: microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) from Avicel and cellulose fiber from rice straw biomass (CF-RS). The filler content in PLLA matrix was adjusted to be varied: 0 wt%, 2.5 wt%, 5 wt%, 7.5 wt%, and 10 wt%. The crystallinity of MCC and CF-RS measured by x-ray diffraction (XRD) shows the value of 70.25% and 34.9%, respectively. The transparency of PLLA/MCC and PLLA/CF-RS biocomposite films decrease with the increase in cellulose filler content. However, the transparency of PLLA/MCC biocomposite films is better than that of PLLA/CF-RS biocomposite films because the particle size of MCC filler is smaller than that of CF-RS filler so that the dispersion of the MCC filler in PLLA matrix is also better. The mechanical property in term of tensile strength of two types of biocomposite films decrease with the increasing of cellulose content. The decrease in tensile strength after the addition of cellulose filler is due to the agglomeration of the filler since the adhesion between filler and polymer matrix is weaker than that between each of the filler. Because the dispersion of filler MCC in the PLLA matrix is better than that of filler CF-RS in PLLA matrix, the decrease in tensile strength value of PLLA/MCC films is not significant compare to that of PLLA/CF-RS films. Moreover, the high crystallinity of

  9. Long-lasting and bioactive hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite composite hydrogels for injectable dermal fillers: Physical properties and in vivo durability.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seol-Ha; Fan, Ying-Fang; Baek, Jae-Uk; Song, Juha; Choi, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Suk-Wha; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HAc)-hydroxyapatite (HAp) composite hydrogels were developed to improve the biostability and bioactivity of HAc for dermal filler applications. Two kinds of HAc-HAp composite fillers were generated: HAcmicroHAp and HAc-nanoHAp composites. HAc-microHAp was fabricated by mixing HAp microspheres with HAc hydrogels, and HAc-nanoHAp was made by in situ precipitation of nano-sized HAp particles in HAc hydrogels. Emphasis was placed on the effect of HAp on the durability and bioactivity of the fillers. Compared with the pure HAc filler, all of the HAc-HAp composite fillers exhibited significant improvements in volumetric maintenance based on in vivo tests owing to their reduced water content and higher degree of biointegration between the filler and surrounding tissues. HAc-HAp composite fillers also showed noticeable enhancement in dermis recovery, promoting collagen and elastic fiber formation. Based on their long-lasting durability and bioactivity, HAc-HAp composite fillers have great potential for soft tissue augmentation with multifunctionality. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Durability of Three Different Types of Hyaluronic Acid Fillers in Skin: Are There Differences Among Biphasic, Monophasic Monodensified, and Monophasic Polydensified Products?

    PubMed

    da Costa, Adilson; Biccigo, Danilo Guerreiro Zeolo; de Souza Weimann, Ellem Tatiani; Mercadante, Larissa Mondadori; Oliveira, Paulo Roberto Grimaldi; Prebianchi, Stefânia Bazanelli; Abdalla, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib

    2017-05-01

    Hyaluronic acid fillers are used for facial rejuvenation and are classified as non-cross-linked or cross-linked (monophasic mono- or polydensified). To histologically assess the intradermal durability of three types of fillers (biphasic, monophasic monodensified, and monophasic polydensified), to compare the durability of the products over 6 months, and to evaluate the structural changes after application. In all, 25 volunteers received injections of three different fillers in the dermis of the right lumbar region (in one line), and equal amounts of the fillers were injected into three different sites (in the same column), yielding nine points of application in each patient. Each line was biopsied on days 2, 92, and 184; these skin samples were analyzed histologically, and the presence or absence of these fillers was verified by a dermatopathologist. The histological analysis showed that over 182 days, the amount of the injected monophasic polydensified, monophasic monodensified, and biphasic filler products decreased by 62.5%, 25%, and 12.5%, respectively. The biphasic and monophasic monodensified fillers presented greater intradermal durability than did the monophasic polydensified filler at 6 months after intradermal injection.

  11. Granulomatous reaction to hyaluronic acid filler material in oral and perioral region: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Alcântara, Carlos Eduardo P; Noronha, Mariana S; Cunha, Joanna F; Flores, Isadora L; Mesquita, Ricardo A

    2017-07-17

    The use of cosmetic fillers agents in orofacial region has become more often used for esthetic concern. Although adverse effects are rare, some patients may develop foreign body reaction to such fillers. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a biomaterial in the spotlight, because it is normally present in several tissues of human body. The aim of this study was to report a case of a 54-year-old white woman with granulomatous reaction to the HA located in the lips. In addition, a review of the English-language literature of all previously described cases of this condition in oral and perioral region was performed. The location, clinical features, symptoms, time between injection and reaction, type of treatment and treatment outcome of 17 cases were summarized. The clinical and histopathological examination along with a detailed history about this condition is very important to management of patients with nodular lesions in maxillofacial region. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hyaluronic-Acid-Hydroxyapatite Colloidal Gels Combined with Micronized Native ECM as Potential Bone Defect Fillers.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S Connor; Whitlow, Jonathan; Detamore, Michael S; Kieweg, Sarah L; Berkland, Cory J

    2017-01-10

    One of the grand challenges in translational regenerative medicine is the surgical placement of biomaterials. For bone regeneration in particular, malleable and injectable colloidal gelsare frequently designed to exhibit self-assembling and shear-response behavior which facilitates biomaterial placement in tissue defects. The current study demonstrated that by combining native extracellular matrix (ECM) microparticles, i.e., demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and decellularized cartilage (DCC), with hyaluronic acid (HA) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles, a viscoelastic colloidal gel consisting exclusively of natural materials was achieved. Rheological testing of HA-ECM suspensions and HA-HAP-ECM colloidal gels concluded either equivalent or substantially higher storage moduli (G' ≈ 100-10 000 Pa), yield stresses (τy ≈ 100-1000 Pa), and viscoelastic recoveries (G'recovery ≥ 87%) in comparison with controls formulated without ECM, which indicated a previously unexplored synergy in fluid properties between ECM microparticles and HA-HAP colloidal networks. Notable rheological differences were observed between respective DBM and DCC formulations, specifically in HA-HAP-DBM mixtures, which displayed a mean 3-fold increase in G' and a mean 4-fold increase in τy from corresponding DCC mixtures. An initial in vitro assessment of these potential tissue fillers as substrates for cell growth revealed that all formulations of HA-ECM and HA-HAP-ECM showed no signs of cytotoxicity and appeared to promote cell viability. Both DBM and DCC colloidal gels represent promising platforms for future studies in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Overall, the current study identified colloidal gels constructed exclusively of natural materials, with viscoelastic properties that may facilitate surgical placement for a wide variety of therapeutic applications.

  13. Sculptra: the new three-dimensional filler.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Richard N

    2006-10-01

    Sculptra, the synthetic injectable poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA), is a revolutionary three-dimensional filler lasting 18 to 24 months. This unique volumizing agent is best used to globally restore volume to the lower two thirds of the face in patients who have lipoatrophy. Sculptra is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nonimmunogenic derivative of the alpha-hydroxy-acid family. The size and the slow degradation kinetics of PLLA microparticles act as a stimulus for collagen production, providing lasting volume enhancement in lipoatrophy patients.

  14. Shaping Lips with Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    The lips and the eyes enhance facial beauty, and they have been highlighted since time immemorial. Rejuvenating the lips with fillers, frequently hyaluronic acid (HA), is a common procedure but requires expertise. The objective of this text is to describe the procedure in detail and cover the practical aspects of injecting lips with fillers. An analysis of treating lips with needles and cannulae has been made with special emphasis on achieving optimum results. PMID:26644736

  15. Poly(acrylic acid) grafted montmorillonite as novel fillers for dental adhesives: synthesis, characterization and properties of the adhesive.

    PubMed

    Solhi, Laleh; Atai, Mohammad; Nodehi, Azizollah; Imani, Mohammad; Ghaemi, Azadeh; Khosravi, Kazem

    2012-04-01

    This work investigates the graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto nanoclay platelets to be utilized as reinforcing fillers in an experimental dental adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of the adhesive and its shear bond strength to dentin are studied. The effect of the modification on the stability of the nanoparticle dispersion in the dilute adhesive is also investigated. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted onto the pristine Na-MMT nanoclay (Cloisite(®) Na(+)) through the free radical polymerization of acylic acid in an aqueous media. The resulting PAA-g-nanoclay was characterized using FTIR, TGA and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The modified nanoclays were added to an experimental dental adhesive in different concentrations and the morphology of the nanoclay layers in the photocured adhesive matrix was studied using TEM and XRD. Shear bond strength of the adhesives containing different filler contents was tested on the human premolar teeth. The stability of nanoclay dispersion in the dilute adhesive was also studied using a separation analyzer. The results were then statistically analyzed and compared. The results confirmed the grafting reaction and revealed a partially exfoliated structure for the PAA-g-nanoclay. Incorporation of 0.2 wt.% of the modified nanoclay into the experimental adhesive provided higher shear bond strength. The dispersion stability of the modified nanoparticles in the dilute adhesive was also enhanced more than 25 times. Incorporation of the modified particles as reinforcing fillers into the adhesive resulted in higher mechanical properties. The nanofiller containing bonding agent also showed higher shear bond strength due to the probable interaction of the carboxylic acid functional groups on the surface of the modified particles with hydroxyapatite of dentin. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of an acid filler on hydrolysis and biodegradation of poly-lactic acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iozzino, Valentina; Speranza, Vito; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The use of biodegradable polymers is certainly an excellent strategy to solve many of the problems related to the disposal of the traditional polymers, whose accumulation in the environment is harmful and damaging. In order to optimize the use of biodegradable polymers, it is very important to understand and control the transformation processes, the structures and the morphologies resulting from the process conditions used to produce the articles and, not least, the biodegradation. The latter is strictly dependent on the just mentioned variables. The poly-lactic acid, PLA, is a biodegradable polymer. Many studies have been carried out on the degradation process of this polymer. In the course of this work we performed degradation tests on the PLA, with a specific D-isomer content, having amorphous structure, and in particular of biodegradation and hydrolysis. An acid chemical, fumaric acid, was added to PLA with the objective of controlling the rate of hydrolysis and of biodegradation. The hydrolysis process was followed, as function of time, by means of different techniques: pH variation, variation of weight of samples and variation of crystallinity degree and glass transition temperature using DSC analysis. The samples were also analyzed in terms of biodegradability by means of a homemade respirometer apparatus, in controlled composting conditions.

  17. The efficacy and safety of a monophasic hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of nasolabial folds: A randomized, multicenter, single blinded, split-face study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Jung; Ko, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Eun Ja; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Yang Won

    2017-09-14

    The different rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler reflect their specific manufacturing processes and resultant physicochemical characteristics. However, there are few researches about the relationship between product differences and clinical outcome when HA fillers are used for nasolabial folds (NLFs). This study sought to compare the rheological properties, efficacy and safety of a monophasic HA filler, and a well-studied biphasic HA filler, in the treatment of NLFs. A total of 72 Korean subjects with moderate to severe NLFs were randomized to receive injections with monophasic HA or biphasic HA on the left or right side of the face. Efficacy was evaluated by the change in the Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale (WSRS) at 2, 10, 18, 26, and 52 weeks. Safety was assessed on the basis of all abnormal reactions during the clinical test period. To compare the rheological characteristics of two cross-linked HA fillers, viscoelastic analysis was performed. At week 26, the mean WSRS was 2.26±0.56 for the monophasic HA side and 2.24±0.54 for the biphasic HA side. Both treatments were well tolerated. The adverse reactions were mild and transient. Monophasic HA filler had lower elasticity and higher viscosity than biphasic HA filler. Despite a number of different rheological properties, monophasic HA is noninferior to biphasic HA in the treatment of moderate to severe NLFs for 52 weeks. Therefore, monophasic HA provides an alternative option for NLFs correction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Filler frontier: what's new and heading West to the US market.

    PubMed

    Palm, Melanie D

    2014-12-01

    The amount of fillers approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in facial volume augmentation is diminutive in comparison to filler products employed worldwide. In the near future, several new hyaluronic acid filler products will be available to the United States market. Already approved fillers include Belotero Balance for fine lines, Juvéderm Voluma XC for midfacial volume loss replacement, and Restylane Silk for perioral lines and lip augmentation. Volbella, currently under FDA evaluation, will be used for fine-line correction and lip augmentation. The physiochemical properties, best practices, clinical uses, and side effects of these fillers are discussed. Additionally, evolving techniques such as the use of blunt-tipped microcannulas are explained.

  19. Enhancement in electrical conductivity of pastes containing submicron Ag-coated Cu filler with palmitic acid surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2017-09-01

    The fabrication and applied use of submicron Ag-coated Cu (Cu@Ag) particles as a filler material for epoxy-based conductive pastes having the advantages of a lower material cost and antioxidation behavior were studied. Submicron Cu@Ag particles were successfully prepared and surface-modified using palmitic acid. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry results indicated the formation of an organic layer by the chemical interaction between the Cu@Ag surface and palmitic acid and the survival of the organic layer after treatment at 160 °C for 3 h in air. The printed pastes containing both commercial micron Cu@Ag flakes and the fabricated submicron Cu@Ag particles showed a greatly reduced electrical resistivity (4.68 × 10-4 Ω cm) after surface modification compared to an initial value of 1.85 × 10-3 Ω cm when cured.

  20. Pilot Study Examining the Safety and Efficacy of Calcium Hydroxylapatite Filler With Integral Lidocaine Over a 12-Month Period to Correct Temporal Fossa Volume Loss.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit L W; Levin, Melissa K; Marmur, Ellen S

    2017-08-29

    Age-related volume loss in the temporal fossae is due to thinning of the epidermis, loss of subcutaneous structural volume, and change in the bony architecture. Temporal concavities are important areas of 3-dimensional volume restoration. The temporal fossae is becoming an increasingly popular area for patients seeking soft tissue augmentation with injectable fillers such as calcium hydroxylapatite with integral lidocaine [CaHA (+)]. This pilot study aims to define the safety, efficacy, technique, and patient-reported outcomes for injectable CaHA (+) to correct volume loss in the temporal fossae over a 12-month period. This was a single-investigator, nonblinded study involving 20 participants. Participants received filler injection into their temporal fossae, with follow-up evaluations at Day 14, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. CaHA (+) results in statistically significant improvement in temporal fossae appearance lasting up to 12 months. Subjects reported "moderate" global aesthetic improvement over the 12-month period. As the cosmetic field continues to advance, it is important for practitioners to have access to research regarding the efficacy and safety of injectables. These results show that CaHA (+) is an effective and safe option to correct temporal fossae volume loss associated with high patient satisfaction.

  1. Comparison of Intra-arterial and Subcutaneous Testicular Hyaluronidase Injection Treatments and the Vascular Complications of Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    PubMed

    Wang, Muyao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Hang

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronidase is a key preventative treatment against vascular complications of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler injection, but the degradation profile of HA to hyaluronidase is limited, and the comparison between intra-arterial and subcutaneous injections of hyaluronidase has not been studied. To evaluate HA degradation to hyaluronidase and compare different treatments between intra-arterial and subcutaneous testicular hyaluronidase injections. The authors observed HA degradation to hyaluronidase in vitro via microscopic examination and particle analysis. Rabbit ears were used for the in vivo study. There were 2 control groups receiving ligation or HA-induced embolism in the arteries, respectively, and 2 intervention groups receiving hyaluronidase treatments in different regions. The laser Doppler blood perfusion monitoring measurements were made at defined time points, and biopsies were taken on Day 2. Nearly, all of the HAs degraded in vitro at the 1-hour time point. Subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment showed better recovery of blood perfusion. Histology showed severe inflammation in the embolism group and mild inflammation in the intervention groups. A complete enzymatic degradation of HA filler to hyaluronidase needs a certain time, and subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment may be the better option.

  2. Surface functionalization of an osteoconductive filler by plasma polymerization of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(acrylic acid) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petisco-Ferrero, S.; Sánchez-Ilárduya, M. B.; Díez, A.; Martín, L.; Meaurio Arrate, E.; Sarasua, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    One of the major limitations found in the use of nanocomposites based on synthetic hydroxyapatite and polymeric matrix for bone-tissue regeneration lies in the poor interfacial adhesion between the inorganic filler and the polymer matrix. The integrity of the nanocomposite is severely compromised since, on the one hand, high surface fillers tend to form aggregates and on the other, there is no chemical bonding between these two different categories of materials. Thus, customized surface functionalization stands as an effective route to improve the interfacial behaviour between particles and polymeric matrices. Amongst the current state of development of coating technologies, the high film-chemistry controllability offered by plasma polymerization technology enhances the synthesis of polymeric films from virtually any starting organic monomer. In this sense, the work presented here provides strong evidences of surface functionalization achieved by plasma polymerization starting respectively from ε-caprolactone and acrylic acid monomers. The chemistry of the deposited films has been descriptively analysed by XPS demonstrating outstanding retention of monomer functionalities and FTIR spectra of the deposited films revealed a high resemblance to those obtained by conventional synthesis. Results provided thereof are expected to significantly contribute to improve the interfacial behaviour in terms of matrix-reinforcement compatibilization, of crucial importance for bone-tissue engineering applications.

  3. Treatment of Hyaluronic Acid Filler-Induced Impending Necrosis With Hyaluronidase: Consensus Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Biesman, Brian S; Dayan, Steven H; DeLorenzi, Claudio; Lambros, Val S; Nestor, Mark S; Sadick, Neil; Sykes, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Injection-induced necrosis is a rare but dreaded consequence of soft tissue augmentation with filler agents. It usually occurs as a result of injection of filler directly into an artery, but can also result from compression or injury. We provide recommendations on the use of hyaluronidase when vascular compromise is suspected. Consensus recommendations were developed by thorough discussion and debate amongst the authors at a roundtable meeting on Wednesday June 18, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV as well as significant ongoing written and verbal communications amongst the authors in the months prior to journal submission. All authors are experienced tertiary care providers. A prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment with high doses of hyaluronidase (at least 200 U) are critically important. It is not felt necessary to do a skin test in cases of impending necrosis. Some experts recommend dilution with saline to increase dispersion or lidocaine to aid vasodilation. Additional hyaluronidase should be injected if improvement is not seen within 60 minutes. A warm compress also aids vasodilation, and massage has been shown to help. Some experts advocate the use of nitroglycerin paste, although this area is controversial. Introducing an oral aspirin regimen should help prevent further clot formation due to vascular compromise. In our experience, patients who are diagnosed promptly and treated within 24 hours will usually have the best outcomes.

  4. Effect of cross-linking reagents for hyaluronic acid hydrogel dermal fillers on tissue augmentation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Junseok; Bhang, Suk Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo; Seo, Moo Seok; Hwang, Eui Jin; Cho, Il Hwan; Park, Jung Kyu; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2010-02-17

    A novel, biocompatible, and nontoxic dermal filler using hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels was successfully developed for tissue augmentation applications. Instead of using highly reactive cross-linkers such as divinyl sulfone (DVS) for Hylaform, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) for Restylane, and 1,2,7,8-diepoxyoctane (DEO) for Puragen, HA hydrogels were prepared by direct amide bond formation between the carboxyl groups of HA and hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) with an optimized carboxyl group modification for effective tissue augmentation. The HA-HMDA hydrogels could be prepared within 5 min by the addition of HMDA to HA solution activated with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole monohydrate (HOBt). Five kinds of samples, a normal control, a negative control, a positive control of Restylane, adipic acid dihydrazide grafted HA (HA-ADH) hydrogels, and HA-HMDA hydrogels, were subcutaneously injected to wrinkled model mice. According to the image analysis on dorsal skin augmentation, the HA-HMDA hydrogels exhibited the best tissue augmentation effect being stable longer than 3 months. Furthermore, histological analyses after hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome staining revealed the excellent biocompatibility and safety of HA-HMDA hydrogels. The dermal thickness and the dermal collagen density in wrinkled mice after treatment with HA-HMDA hydrogels for 12 weeks were comparable to those of normal mice. Compared with HA-DVS hydrogels and Restylane, the excellent tissue augmentation by HA-HMDA hydrogels might be ascribed to the biocompatible residues of amine groups in the cross-linker of HMDA. The HA-HMDA hydrogels will be investigated further as a novel dermal filler for clinical applications.

  5. Economically enhanced succinic acid fermentation from cassava bagasse hydrolysate using Corynebacterium glutamicum immobilized in porous polyurethane filler.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinchi; Chen, Yong; Ren, Hengfei; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ting; Zhao, Nan; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-12-01

    An immobilized fermentation system, using cassava bagasse hydrolysate (CBH) and mixed alkalis, was developed to achieve economical succinic acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum. The C. glutamicum strains were immobilized in porous polyurethane filler (PPF). CBH was used efficiently as a carbon source instead of more expensive glucose. Moreover, as a novel method for regulating pH, the easily decomposing NaHCO3 was replaced by mixed alkalis (NaOH and Mg(OH)2) for succinic acid production by C. glutamicum. Using CBH and mixed alkalis in the immobilized batch fermentation system, succinic acid productivity of 0.42gL(-1)h(-1) was obtained from 35gL(-1) glucose of CBH, which is similar to that obtained with conventional free-cell fermentation with glucose and NaHCO3. In repeated batch fermentation, an average of 22.5gL(-1) succinic acid could be obtained from each batch, which demonstrated the enhanced stability of the immobilized C. glutamicum cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of the efficacy, safety, and longevity of two different hyaluronic acid dermal fillers in the treatment of severe nasolabial folds: a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind, within-subject study

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Greg J; Bekhor, Phillip; Rich, Michael; Rosen, Robert H; Halstead, Michael B; Rogers, John D

    2011-01-01

    Background Commercially available hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers have distinct physicochemical properties related to their specific manufacturing technology, including HA concentration, cross-linking percentage, and particle size. These factors may determine treatment effectiveness, safety, and longevity; however, this requires confirmation in the clinic. Methods To compare the efficacy, safety, and longevity of two distinct HA-based dermal fillers in the correction of severe nasolabial folds (NLFs), a 24 mg/mL smooth gel (Juvederm ULTRA PLUS™ [JUP]) and a 20 mg/mL particulate gel (Perlane® [PER]) were injected in a total of 80 normal, healthy subjects using a split face design and were followed for 12 months in this prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter study. Results Both fillers achieved a clinically relevant NLF correction (one point or more improvement, based on a validated NLF severity scale). However, JUP displayed greater longevity, with this correction maintained in a significantly larger percentage of NLFs after 6 months (physician’s evaluation) or 9 months (subject’s evaluation) and thereafter for the remainder of the study (70% vs 45%; P = 0.0002 and 62.5% vs 46.3%; P = 0.01 at month 12, based on physician and subject assessments, respectively). At month 12, 71.4% of the subjects nominated a preference for the NLF injected with JUP (P < 0.0001). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion These results suggest that different physicochemical properties of HA-based fillers, associated with distinct manufacturing technologies, may influence treatment longevity in the correction of volume deficits. This may relate to a differential resistance to hyaluronidase and/or free radical degradation as previously documented in vitro. PMID:22253545

  7. A comparison of the efficacy, safety, and longevity of two different hyaluronic acid dermal fillers in the treatment of severe nasolabial folds: a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind, within-subject study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Greg J; Bekhor, Phillip; Rich, Michael; Rosen, Robert H; Halstead, Michael B; Rogers, John D

    2011-01-01

    Commercially available hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers have distinct physicochemical properties related to their specific manufacturing technology, including HA concentration, cross-linking percentage, and particle size. These factors may determine treatment effectiveness, safety, and longevity; however, this requires confirmation in the clinic. To compare the efficacy, safety, and longevity of two distinct HA-based dermal fillers in the correction of severe nasolabial folds (NLFs), a 24 mg/mL smooth gel (Juvederm ULTRA PLUS™ [JUP]) and a 20 mg/mL particulate gel (Perlane(®) [PER]) were injected in a total of 80 normal, healthy subjects using a split face design and were followed for 12 months in this prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter study. Both fillers achieved a clinically relevant NLF correction (one point or more improvement, based on a validated NLF severity scale). However, JUP displayed greater longevity, with this correction maintained in a significantly larger percentage of NLFs after 6 months (physician's evaluation) or 9 months (subject's evaluation) and thereafter for the remainder of the study (70% vs 45%; P = 0.0002 and 62.5% vs 46.3%; P = 0.01 at month 12, based on physician and subject assessments, respectively). At month 12, 71.4% of the subjects nominated a preference for the NLF injected with JUP (P < 0.0001). Both treatments were well tolerated. These results suggest that different physicochemical properties of HA-based fillers, associated with distinct manufacturing technologies, may influence treatment longevity in the correction of volume deficits. This may relate to a differential resistance to hyaluronidase and/or free radical degradation as previously documented in vitro.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of a Hyaluronic Acid Filler to Correct Aesthetically Detracting or Deficient Features of the Asian Nose: A Prospective, Open-Label, Long-Term Study.

    PubMed

    Liew, Steven; Scamp, Terrence; de Maio, Mauricio; Halstead, Michael; Johnston, Nicole; Silberberg, Michael; Rogers, John D

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing interest among patients and plastic surgeons for alternatives to rhinoplasty, a common surgical procedure performed in Asia. To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and longevity of a hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose. Twenty-nine carefully screened Asian patients had their noses corrected with the study filler (Juvéderm VOLUMA [Allergan plc, Dublin, Ireland] with lidocaine injectable gel), reflecting individualized treatment goals and utilizing a standardized injection procedure, and were followed for over 12 months. A clinically meaningful correction (≥1 grade improvement on the Assessment of Aesthetic Improvement Scale) was achieved in 27 (93.1%) patients at the first follow-up visit. This was maintained in 28 (96.6%) patients at the final visit, based on the independent assessments of a central non-injecting physician and the patients. At this final visit, 23 (79.3%) patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the study filler and 25 (86.2%) would recommend it to others. In this small series of patients, there were no serious adverse events (AEs), with all treatment-related AEs being mild to moderate, transient injection site reactions, unrelated to the study filler. Using specific eligibility criteria, individualized treatment goals, and a standardized injection procedure, the study filler corrected aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose, with the therapeutic effects lasting for over 12 months, consistent with a high degree of patient satisfaction. This study supports the safety and efficacy of this HA filler for specific nose augmentation procedures in selected Asian patients. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3: Therapeutic. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of a Hyaluronic Acid Filler to Correct Aesthetically Detracting or Deficient Features of the Asian Nose: A Prospective, Open-Label, Long-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Steven; Scamp, Terrence; de Maio, Mauricio; Halstead, Michael; Johnston, Nicole; Silberberg, Michael; Rogers, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest among patients and plastic surgeons for alternatives to rhinoplasty, a common surgical procedure performed in Asia. Objectives To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and longevity of a hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose. Methods Twenty-nine carefully screened Asian patients had their noses corrected with the study filler (Juvéderm VOLUMA [Allergan plc, Dublin, Ireland] with lidocaine injectable gel), reflecting individualized treatment goals and utilizing a standardized injection procedure, and were followed for over 12 months. Results A clinically meaningful correction (≥1 grade improvement on the Assessment of Aesthetic Improvement Scale) was achieved in 27 (93.1%) patients at the first follow-up visit. This was maintained in 28 (96.6%) patients at the final visit, based on the independent assessments of a central non-injecting physician and the patients. At this final visit, 23 (79.3%) patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the study filler and 25 (86.2%) would recommend it to others. In this small series of patients, there were no serious adverse events (AEs), with all treatment-related AEs being mild to moderate, transient injection site reactions, unrelated to the study filler. Conclusions Using specific eligibility criteria, individualized treatment goals, and a standardized injection procedure, the study filler corrected aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose, with the therapeutic effects lasting for over 12 months, consistent with a high degree of patient satisfaction. This study supports the safety and efficacy of this HA filler for specific nose augmentation procedures in selected Asian patients. Level of Evidence: 3 Therapeutic PMID:27301371

  10. Synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement fillers increased the fluoride recharge and lactic acid neutralizing ability of a resin-based pit and fissure sealant.

    PubMed

    Surintanasarn, Atikom; Siralertmukul, Krisana; Thamrongananskul, Niyom

    2017-07-12

    This study evaluated the effect of different types of filler in a resin-based pit and fissure sealant on fluoride release, recharge, and lactic acid neutralization. Resin-based sealant was incorporated with 5% w/w of the following fillers: calcium aluminate cement (CAC), synthesized mesoporous silica (SI), a CAC and SI mixture (CAC+SI), glass-ionomer powder (GIC), and acetic acid-treated GIC (GICA). Sealant without filler served as control. The samples were immersed in deionized water or a lactic acid solution and the concentration of fluoride in the water, before and after fluoride recharge, and the lactic acid pH change, respectively, were determined. The CAC+SI group demonstrated the highest fluoride release after being recharged with fluoride gel. The CAC+SI group also demonstrated increased lactic acid pH. These findings suggest that a resin-based sealant containing synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement may enhance remineralization due to fluoride release and higher pH.

  11. Safety and performance of cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting – an open-label, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Kühne, Ulrich; Esmann, Jørgen; von Heimburg, Dennis; Imhof, Matthias; Weissenberger, Petra; Sattler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM®) hyaluronic acid fillers are now available with or without lidocaine. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and performance of CPM® fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting. In an open-label, prospective, postmarketing study, 108 patients from seven sites in Germany and Denmark were treated with one or more lidocaine-containing CPM® fillers. Performance was assessed using the Merz Aesthetics Scales® (MAS). Pain was rated on an 11-point visual analog scale. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction as well as adverse events were recorded. Improvements of ≥1-point on MAS immediately after and 17 days posttreatment were observed in ~90% of patients compared with baseline. All investigators assessed ejection force, product positioning, and performance as similar or superior to the respective nonlidocaine products. Overall, 94% of investigators were satisfied with the esthetic outcomes and were willing to continue using the products. All patients except one were satisfied with the results, and all were willing to repeat the treatment. Mean pain scores were low during (<3.0) and after injection (<0.6). Except for one case of bruising, all adverse events were mild to moderate. CPM® fillers with lidocaine are safe and effective for a wide range of esthetic facial indications. PMID:27799807

  12. Graphene Nanoplatelets as Novel Reinforcement Filler in Poly(lactic acid)/Epoxidized Palm Oil Green Nanocomposites: Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chieng, Buong Woei; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Giita Silverajah, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP) was investigated as a novel reinforcement filler in mechanical properties for poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/epoxidized palm oil (EPO) blend. PLA/EPO/xGnP green nanocomposites were successfully prepared by melt blending method. PLA/EPO reinforced with xGnP resulted in an increase of up to 26.5% and 60.6% in the tensile strength and elongation at break of the nanocomposites respectively, compared to PLA/EPO blend. XRD pattern showed the presence of peak around 26.5° in PLA/EPO nanocomposites which corresponds to characteristic peak of graphene nanoplatelets. However, incorporation of xGnP has no effect on the flexural strength and modulus. Impact strength of PLA/5 wt% EPO improved by 73.6% with the presence of 0.5 wt% xGnP loading. Mechanical properties of PLA were greatly improved by the addition of a small amount of graphene nanoplatelets (<1 wt%). PMID:23109829

  13. Graphene nanoplatelets as novel reinforcement filler in poly(lactic acid)/epoxidized palm oil green nanocomposites: mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Buong Woei; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Giita Silverajah, V S

    2012-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP) was investigated as a novel reinforcement filler in mechanical properties for poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/epoxidized palm oil (EPO) blend. PLA/EPO/xGnP green nanocomposites were successfully prepared by melt blending method. PLA/EPO reinforced with xGnP resulted in an increase of up to 26.5% and 60.6% in the tensile strength and elongation at break of the nanocomposites respectively, compared to PLA/EPO blend. XRD pattern showed the presence of peak around 26.5° in PLA/EPO nanocomposites which corresponds to characteristic peak of graphene nanoplatelets. However, incorporation of xGnP has no effect on the flexural strength and modulus. Impact strength of PLA/5 wt% EPO improved by 73.6% with the presence of 0.5 wt% xGnP loading. Mechanical properties of PLA were greatly improved by the addition of a small amount of graphene nanoplatelets (<1 wt%).

  14. Application of novel catalytic-ceramic-filler in a coupled system for long-chain dicarboxylic acids manufacturing wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Fan, Chunzhen; He, Shengbing; Dai, Bibo; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili; Gao, Lei

    2016-02-01

    To gain systematic technology for long-chain dicarboxylic acids (LDCA) manufacturing wastewater treatment, catalytic micro-electrolysis (CME) coupling with adsorption-biodegradation sludge (AB) process was studied. Firstly, novel catalytic-ceramic-filler was prepared from scrap iron, clay and copper sulfate solution and packed in the CME reactor. To remove residual n-alkane and LDCA, the CME reactor was utilized for LDCA wastewater pretreatment. The results revealed that about 94% of n-alkane, 98% of LDCA and 84% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed by the aerated CME reactor at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.0 h. In this process, catalysis from Cu and montmorillonites played an important role in improving the contaminants removal. Secondly, to remove residual COD in the wastewater, AB process was designed for the secondary biological treatment, about 90% of the influent COD could be removed by biosorption, bio-flocculation and biodegradation effects. Finally, the effluent COD (about 150 mg L(-1)) discharged from the coupled CME-AB system met the requirement of the national discharged standard (COD ≤ 300 mg L(-1)). All of these results suggest that the coupled CME-AB system is a promising technology due to its high-efficient performance, and has the potential to be applied for the real LDCA wastewater treatment.

  15. Digital and interdigital corns: a report of two cases with use of hyaluronic acid gel filler.

    PubMed

    Brousseau-Foley, Magali; Cantin, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Digital and interdigital corns are common painful foot conditions encountered by podiatrists during the course of their practice. These corns can often be treated with conservative techniques, although they tend to eventually recur. Currently, no single treatment exists that is efficient, long-lasting, minimally invasive, and easy to administer. This article describes two cases where hyaluronic acid gel injections were used to improve symptoms associated with digital and interdigital corns located in a nonweightbearing area. Both patients tolerated the intervention well and showed considerable improvement of their condition for a substantial period of time after the intervention without developing adverse reactions. Hyaluronic acid gel injections could very well represent an interesting therapeutic alternative for digital and interdigital corns located in nonweightbearing areas.

  16. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  17. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  18. The filler revolution: a six-year retrospective.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Naissan O; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-01

    There are currently more than 20 FDA-approved fillers in the United States (U.S.), noteworthy considering that it was only six years ago that the first hyaluronic acid filler was approved. The pace of development of filler substances in the last few years has been extremely rapid. The authors review the development, advantages, and disadvantages of fillers currently available in the U.S.

  19. Dermal fillers. The next generation.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Tracey

    2004-01-01

    In today's busy and demanding world, we no longer have the luxury of taking weeks to recover from a surgical procedure and are more frequently seeking quicker alternatives. The use of dermal fillers meets this need but in no way replaces a surgical intervention. Previously, bovine collagen was the only approved dermal filler. However, today there are several options available including a human collagen, a variety of hyaluronic acids, and a permanent injectable product. Each of the products has different uses, indications, and adverse reactions. The experienced injector now has a wider selection of products from which to choose to ensure that the patient receives what is best suited for his or her particular situation. These new products are becoming increasingly popular, due to acceptability and affordability, but are not without potential complications and adverse reactions. This article discusses the use of Cosmoderm/Cosmoplast, Hylaform, Restylane/Perlane, and Artecoll dermal fillers.

  20. Thermal Analysis of Filler Reinforced Polymeric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Mahesh Devidas

    Improving heat dissipating property of composite materials is becoming increasingly important in domains ranging from the automotive industry, electronic devices to aeronautical industry. Effective heat dissipation is required especially in aircraft and racing tires to guarantee high performance and good service life [1]. The present study is focused on improving the thermal conductivity of Emulsion-styrene butadiene rubber (ESBR) which is a cheap alternative to other rubber composites. The disadvantages of ESBR are low thermal conductivity and high heat generation. Adding fillers with high thermal conductivity to ESBR is proposed as a technique for improving the thermal conductivity of ESBR. The purpose of the research is to predict the thermal conductivity of ESBR when filled with fillers of much higher thermal conductivity and also to find out to what extent the filler properties affect the heat transfer capabilities of the composite matrix. The influence of different filler shapes i.e. spherical, cylindrical and platelets on the overall thermal capability of composite matrix is studied, the finite element modelings are conducted using Abaqus. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional models are created in Abaqus to simulate the microstructure of the composite matrix filled with fillers. Results indicate that the overall thermal conductivity increases with increasing filler loading i.e. for a filler volume fraction of 0.27, the conductivity increased by around 50%. Filler shapes, orientation angle, and aspect ratio of the fillers significantly influences the thermal conductivity. Conductivity increases with increasing aspect ratio (length/diameter) of the cylindrical fillers since longer conductive chains are able to form at the same volume percentage as compared to spherical fillers. The composite matrix reaches maximum thermal conductivity when the cylindrical fillers are oriented in the direction of heat flow. The heat conductivity predicted by FEM for ESBR is

  1. Market opportunities for fly ash fillers in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.; Harris, T.; Gledhill, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Direct Acid Leaching (DAL) processed fly ash is derived from treating raw and beneficiated coal fly ash with hydrochloric acid. The DAL process allows for the production of fly ash with greater chemical purity and consistency than raw fly ash alone. In addition, DAL fly ash is similar to various minerals used in a wide range of applications that require filler minerals. This project investigates the feasibility of using three grades of DAL fly ash ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns in diameter as an alternative filler material to mineral fillers. Six major applications in North America, requiring large volumes of filler minerals were investigated by region including: (1) asphalt roofing shingles (2) carpet backing (3) joint compound and wallboard (4) industrial coatings (5) plastics (6) vinyl flooring. It is determined that calcium carbonate was the primary mineral filler DAL fly ash would be competing with in the applications investigated. Calcium carbonate is used in all applications investigated. The application which demonstrated the greatest potential for using DAL fly ash is asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles were the largest calcium carbonate consuming application identified, consuming 4.8 million tons in 1988, and is the least sensitive to the dark color of the DAL fly ash. Although the DAL fly ash typically has a smaller particle size, in comparison to calcium carbonate, the asphalt shingle manufacturers felt it would be a good substitute. Other promising applications for DAL fly ash were industrial coatings and plastics where the calcium carbonate particle size requirements of 3 to 6 microns very closely matches the particle size of the DAL fly ash considered in this project. 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  2. Facial volume restoration of the aging face with poly-l-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Vleggaar, Danny

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss current techniques used with poly-l-lactic acid to safely and effectively address changes observed in the aging face. Several important points deserve mention. First, this unique agent is not a filler but a stimulator of the host's own collagen, which then acts to volumize tissue in a gradual, progressive, and predictable manner. The technical differences between the use of biostimulatory agents and replacement fillers are simple and straightforward, but are critically important to the safe and successful use of these products and will be reviewed in detail. Second, in addition to gains in technical insights that have improved our understanding of how to use the product to best advantage, where to use the product to best advantage in facial filling has also improved with ever-evolving insights into the changes observed in the aging face. Finally, it is important to recognize that a patient's final outcome, and the amount of product and work it will take to get there, is a reflection of the quality of tissues with which they start. This is, of course, an issue of patient selection and not product selection.

  3. Facial Assessment and Injection Guide for Botulinum Toxin and Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Focus on the Lower Face.

    PubMed

    de Maio, Maurício; Wu, Woffles T L; Goodman, Greg J; Monheit, Gary

    2017-09-01

    This third article of a three-part series addresses techniques and recommendations for aesthetic treatment of the lower face. The lower face is considered an advanced area for facial aesthetic treatment. In this region, soft-tissue fillers play a more important role than neuromodulators and should be used first to provide structure and support before neuromodulators are considered for treatment of dynamic lines. Treatment of the lip, perioral region, and chin, in addition to maintaining balance of the lower face with the face overall, is challenging. Procedures on the lip should avoid overcorrection while respecting the projection of the lips on the profile view and the ratio of lip size to chin. The chin is often neglected, but reshaping the jawline can provide dramatic improvement in facial aesthetics. Both profile and anterior views are critical in assessment and treatment of the lower face. Finally, rejuvenation of the neck region requires fillers for structural support of the chin and jawline and neuromodulators for treatment of the masseter and platysma.

  4. A systematic review of filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV facial lipoatrophy (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jagdeo, Jared; Ho, Derek; Lo, Alex; Carruthers, Alastair

    2015-12-01

    HIV facial lipoatrophy (FLA) is characterized by facial volume loss. HIV FLA affects the facial contours of the cheeks, temples, and orbits, and is associated with social stigma. Although new highly active antiretroviral therapy medications are associated with less severe FLA, the prevalence of HIV FLA among treated individuals exceeds 50%. The goal of our systematic review is to examine published clinical studies involving the use of filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV FLA and to provide evidence-based recommendations based on published efficacy and safety data. A systematic review of the published literature was performed on July 1, 2015, on filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV FLA. Based on published studies, poly-L-lactic acid is the only filler agent with grade of recommendation: B. Other reviewed filler agents received grade of recommendation: C or D. Poly-L-lactic acid may be best for treatment over temples and cheeks, whereas calcium hydroxylapatite, with a Food and Drug Administration indication of subdermal implantation, may be best used deeply over bone for focal enhancement. Additional long-term randomized controlled trials are necessary to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of fillers that have different biophysical properties, in conjunction with cost-effectiveness analysis, for treatment of HIV FLA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A Randomized, Evaluator-Blinded, Split-Face Comparison Study of the Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Mannitol Containing Monophasic Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler for the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Nasolabial Folds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook; Moon, Ik Jun; Yun, Woo Jin; Chung, Bo Young; Kim, Sang Duck; Lee, Ga-Young; Chang, Sung Eun

    2016-06-01

    Mannitol containing monophasic filler with higher crosslinking has not been well studied for moderate and severe nasolabial fold (NLF) correction. To compare the efficacy and safety of a novel mannitol containing hyaluronic acid (HA) filler (HA-G) with biphasic HA filler (HA-P) for moderate and severe NLF correction. Thirteen subjects with symmetric moderate to severe NLF received HA-G (in one NLF) and HA-P (in other NLF) and were evaluated for 24 weeks. At both 12 and 24 weeks, the mean improvement in Genzyme 6-point grading scale from baseline was significantly greater in the side of face that was treated with HA-G than HA-P (1.96±0.91 vs. 1.54±0.73 at week 12; p=0.044, 1.88±0.78 vs. 1.3±0.79 at week 24; p=0.027, respectively). At 12 weeks, the mean Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale score was 2.92±0.93 for HA-G and 2.31±0.95 for HA-P (p=0.008). Both fillers were well tolerated. The HA filler HA-G provides better efficacy and similar local tolerability compared with HA-P in 6 months following treatment for moderate and severe NLF.

  6. Facial Rejuvenation with Fillers: The Dual Plane Technique

    PubMed Central

    Salti, Giovanni; Rauso, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial aging is characterized by skin changes, sagging and volume loss. Volume is frequently addressed with reabsorbable fillers like hyaluronic acid gels. Materials and Methods: From an anatomical point of view, the deep and superficial fat compartments evolve differently with aging in a rather predictable manner. Volume can therefore be restored following a technique based on restoring first the deep volumes and there after the superficial volumes. We called this strategy “dual plane”. A series of 147 consecutive patients have been treated with fillers using the dual plane technique in the last five years. Results: An average of 4.25 session per patient has been carried out for a total of 625 treatment sessions. The average total amount of products used has been 12 ml per patient with an average amount per session of 3.75 ml. We had few and limited adverse events with this technique. Conclusion: The dual plane technique is an injection technique based on anatomical logics. Different types of products can be used according to the plane of injection and their rheology in order to obtain a natural result and few side effects. PMID:26644734

  7. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  8. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  9. Xanthelasma-Like Reaction to Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Or, Lior; Eviatar, Joseph A; Massry, Guy G; Bernardini, Francesco P; Hartstein, Morris E

    The purpose of this study is to describe a new complication of a xanthelasma-like reaction which appeared after dermal filler injection in the lower eyelid region. A retrospective case analysis was performed on 7 patients presenting with xanthelasma-like reaction after filler injection to the lower eyelids. Seven female subjects with no history of xanthelasma presented with xanthelasma-like reaction in the lower eyelids post filler injection. Fillers included hyaluronic acid (2 patients), synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (4 patients), and polycaprolactone microspheres (one patient). Average time interval between filler injection and development of xanthelasma-like reaction was 12 months (range: 6-18 months). Treatment included steroid injections, 5FU injections, ablative or fractionated CO2 laser, and direct excision. Pathology confirmed the lesion was a true xanthelasma in one patient. In treated patients, there was subtotal resolution after laser. Xanthelasma-like reaction resolved completely after direct excision. Three patients elected to have no treatment. Previously there has been one reported case of xanthelasma after filler injection. This case series is the largest to date. Furthermore, this series is notable because xanthelasma-like reactions appeared after injection with 3 different types of fillers. None of the patients had evidence of xanthelasma prefiller injection. The precise mechanism by which filler injection can lead to the formation of xanthelasma-like reaction is unclear. A possible mechanism may be related to binding of low-density lipoprotein and internalization by macrophages. Further investigation is required. Nevertheless, physicians performing filler injections should be aware of this new complication and treatment options.

  10. Fillers used in papermaking. (Latest citations from the Paper and Board, Printing, and Packaging Industries Research Associations database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning organic and inorganic fillers used in paper products and their effect on the properties and manufacture of paper. The citations examine a variety of fillers, including natural calcium carbonate, bentonite, polymeric fillers, titanium dioxide, calcium carbonate, calcium silicate, barium sulphate, agalite, talc, clay, kaolin, limestone, mica, and ash. Filler effects on thermal strength, coloring, acidity, surface coatings, porosity, production efficiency, absorption, opacity, printability, and deposit control are presented. Also discussed are the microanalysis of fillers, recovery of fillers from wastes, availability of filler and pigment raw materials, and the determination of filler content in paper products. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Clinical comparison between two hyaluronic acid-derived fillers in the treatment of nasolabial folds in Chinese subjects: BioHyalux versus Restylane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Sun, Nan; Xu, Yue; Liu, Huixian; Zhong, Shaomin; Chen, Liyang; Li, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid fillers are used to improve the appearance of nasolabial folds (NLF). This study aimed to compare the efficacy, safety, and durability of a new hyaluronic acid gel (BioHyalux) versus Restylane for the correction of NLF. This was a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority clinical trial involving 88 subjects with moderate to severe NLF. Subjects were randomized to BioHyalux and Restylane on either sides of the NLF. NLF was assessed before and right after injection, and at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months. Patients were followed up for 13-15 months to evaluate the durability and long-term safety. A clinically meaningful response was predefined as at least one-point improvement on the Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale, which is a five-point scale. At 6 months, the response rate of BioHyalux was not inferior to that of Restylane (P < 0.05). At the 13-15 months follow-up, the response rate by investigators was 58.0 % on the BioHyalux side versus 63.8 % on the Restylane side. The response rate by subjects showed similar results, which was 56.5 % on the BioHyalux side versus 60.9 % on the Restylane side at 13-15 months. The subjects' Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS) showed that most subjects felt improvements on both sides of NLF (P > 0.05) at all time points. At 6 months, 100 % reported improvements on both side; at 13-15 months, 60 % of subjects reported improvements with BioHyalux versus 64 % with Restylane. Adverse events were transient and predominantly mild or moderate in severity including injection site swelling, pain, itching, bruising, and tenderness. BioHyalux had reliable safety and tolerance, and could be an effective injectable filler for correcting NLF.

  12. Late-Onset Complication of Fillers: Paraffinoma of the Lower Eyelids Clinically Mimicking Xanthelasma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Woo; Park, Hyun-sun; Yoon, Hyun-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Injectable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is world-famous filler used in lipoatrophy and facial rejuvenation because of its collagen neogenesis effect which leads to gradual volume restoration. Until recently, quite a number of unwanted adverse events of PLLA have been reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, paraffinoma as a complication of PLLA has never been reported. We herein describe the first case of paraffinoma after Sculptra® injection and propose its possible mechanism. PMID:27904276

  13. Gap filler material

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-04

    S114-E-6674 (4 August 2005) --- On Discovery's middeck, one of the STS-114 crew members holds a piece of the gap filler material that had been protruding from between TPS tiles and retrieved the day before by Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, during the third spacewalk of the flight. Robinson used his gloved fingers to pull out this gap filler and another one from Discovery's belly while carefully supported and maneuvered by the Canadian-built remote manipulator system, operated inside Discovery's cabin by astronauts Wendy B. Lawrence and James M. Kelly. Gap fillers like those Robinson removed are thin, coated Nextel fabric. The protruding gap fillers were identified in photos taken by Station crewmembers using telephoto lenses as Discovery did a slow back flip about 600 feet below before docking.

  14. The Efficacy and Safety of Lidocaine-Containing Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler for Treatment of Nasolabial Folds: A Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Joon; Han, Seung Won; Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Hye Won; Kim, Moon Beom; Kang, Hoon

    2015-12-01

    The use of injectable hyaluronic acid-based gel is well established in aesthetic facial procedures especially on the nasolabial fold (NLF). To compare the efficacy and safety of PP-501-A-Lidocaine dermal filler with RestylaneLidocaine(®) when administered to the NLF. Sixty-six subjects seeking correction of NLFs, with moderate or severe wrinkle severity, were recruited for this multicenter, randomized, patient and evaluator-blind, matched pairs, and active-controlled design clinical study. PP-501-A-Lidocaine and RestylaneLidocaine(®) were injected into the deep layer of the dermis and/or subcutis of the NLF. The first validity evaluation variable was the average wrinkle severity rating scale (WSRS), as scored by independent blinded evaluators at week 24. The second validity evaluation variable including the global aesthetic improvement scale (GAIS), the WSRS, and adverse event reporting at weeks 8, 16, and 24 were also performed. The mean improvement in the WSRS from baseline was 1.58 ± 0.68 for the PP-501-A-Lidocaine and 1.51 ± 0.66 for the RestylaneLidocaine(®) at week 24. The average value at week 8 after the final application was 1.62 ± 0.78 and 1.60 ± 0.75 in parts subject to PP-501-A-Lidocaine and RestylaneLidocaine(®), respectively, and 1.58 ± 0.70 and 1.57 ± 0.68 at week 16, respectively. Both improvement and duration of the treatment effect were similar between the two groups. GAIS data rated by the treating investigator and participants showed no statistically significant differences. Both fillers were well tolerated and adverse reactions were mild and transient in most cases. PP-501-A-Lidocaine showed an equivalent efficacy and safety observed after 6 months of follow-up compared to RestylaneLidocaine(®). This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  15. Filler Migration: A Number of Mechanisms to Consider.

    PubMed

    Jordan, David R; Stoica, Bazil

    2015-01-01

    To report 3 representative cases of soft tissue filler identified in locations other than their intended injected sites (possible migration) and review the literature on pathogenesis of filler migration. Soft tissue fillers are continuing to increase in popularity throughout North America and worldwide as a means of volume restoration and contour enhancement. With increasing recognition of their value in restoring a more youthful appearance and the ease of office injection, soft tissue fillers have become one of the most commonly performed nonsurgical cosmetic procedures. Soft tissue fillers are also foreign bodies in our system and therefore have the potential for a myriad of complications both immediately after the injection and potentially months or years later. Filler migration is one such complication and has a number of potential mechanisms. The authors reviewed the medical records of 3 patients with filler located in areas other than their intended injected sites possibly as a result of migration. All patients were from the practice of 1 individual (DRJ). A MEDLINE search of the English-language literature on filler migration was conducted to investigate the various causes responsible for migration of filler. Clinical manifestations of the possible filler migration in the 3 cases included eyelid swelling in 2 patients and a noninflammatory mass adjacent to the area of filler injection in the third patient. Surgery was performed on 1 patient, and filler was visualized in the tissue and dissolved with hyaluronidase. Hyaluronidase was also used to dissolve the suspected filler in a second patient, and the third patient has elected to continue with observation. Filler migration is one of the potential complications associated with the injection of soft tissue fillers. It is important all physicians assessing nodules/masses/swelling in the facial area be aware that soft tissue fillers may migrate to a location away from their intended site of injection by several

  16. Dermal fillers: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Dermal fillers have been used for decades in soft tissue augmentation. Currently, filler implementation is among the most common minimally invasive procedures for rejuvenation and body sculpturing. There is a broad variety of filler materials and products. Despite immense experience, a number of controversies in this topic exist. Some of these controversies are addressed in this review, for example, who should perform filler injections, the difference between permanent and nonpermanent fillers, the off-label use of liquid silicone, and the role of pain reduction. Implementation of guidelines and restriction of filler use by trained physicians can improve safety for patients. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay in low volume.

    PubMed

    Bainor, Anthony; Chang, Lyra; McQuade, Thomas J; Webb, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2011-03-15

    The BCA assay is a colorimetric method for estimating protein concentration. In 96-well plates, the relationship between protein content and absorbance is nearly linear over a wide range; however, performance is reduced in lower volume. To overcome this limitation, we performed the BCA assays in opaque, white 384-well plates. These plates emit fluorescence between 450-600 nm when excited at 430 nm; thus, their fluorescence is quenched by the BCA chromophore (λ(max) 562 nm). This arrangement allowed accurate determination of protein content using only 2 μL of sample. Moreover, soluble flourescein could replace the white plates, creating a homogenous format.

  18. Temporary blindness after an anterior chamber cosmetic filler injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Eom, Jin-Sup; Kim, Jae Yong

    2015-06-01

    Blindness is a rare but devastating complication of cosmetic filler injection. A primary cause of blindness following hyaluronic acid filler injection is retrograde intravascular embolization into the small ocular arteries. We here report a case of temporary blindness associated with the injection of hyaluronic acid filler into the anterior chamber of eye. This is the first report of temporary blindness after cosmetic filler injection into the anterior chamber, and the first described case that recovered completely after the filler was removed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  19. Effect of processing parameter and filler content on tensile properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Adilah Mat; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.

    2013-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer were prepared via melt blending method using the Haake Rheomix internal mixer. In order to obtain the optimal processing parameter, the nanocomposite with 89 wt % of PLA was blended with 10 wt % of LNR and 1 wt % of MWCNTs were mixed with various mixing parameter condition; mixing temperature, mixing speed and mixing time. The optimum processing parameter of the composites was obtained at temperature of 190°C, rotation speed of 90 rpm and mixing time of 14 min. Next, the effect of MWCNTs loading on the tensile properties of nanocomposites was investigated. The nanocomposites were melt blended using the optimal processing parameter with MWCNTs loading of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4 wt %. The result showed that the sample with 3.5 wt % of MWCNTs gave higher tensile strength and Young's modulus. The SEM micrographs confirmed the effect of good dispersion of MWCNTs and their interfacial bonding in PLA nanocomposites. However, the elongation at break decreased with increasing the percentage of MWCNTs.

  20. Heat-Shield Gap Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, D. B.; Stewart, D. A.; Smith, M.; Estrella, C.; Goldstein, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic cloth strips provide flexible, easily replaceable insulating filler. Filler prevents hot gas from flowing between heat-shield tiles while allowing space for thermal expansion and contraction. Strips easily replaced when necessary.

  1. A comparative study of nano-SiO2 and nano-TiO2 fillers on proton conductivity and dielectric response of a silicotungstic acid-H3PO4-poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Gao, Han; Lian, Keryn

    2014-01-08

    The effects of nano-SiO2 and nano-TiO2 fillers on a thin film silicotungstic acid (SiWA)-H3PO4-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) proton conducting polymer electrolyte were studied and compared with respect to their proton conductivity, environmental stability, and dielectric properties, across a temperature range from 243 to 323 K. Three major effects of these fillers have been identified: (a) barrier effect; (b) intrinsic dielectric constant effect; and (c) water retention effect. Dielectric analyses were used to differentiate these effects on polymer electrolyte-enabled capacitors. Capacitor performance was correlated to electrolyte properties through dielectric constant and dielectric loss spectra. Using a single-ion approach, proton density and proton mobility of each polymer electrolyte were derived as a function of temperature. The results allow us to deconvolute the different contributions to proton conductivity in SiWA-H3PO4-PVA-based electrolytes, especially in terms of the effects of fillers on the dynamic equilibrium of free protons and protonated water in the electrolytes.

  2. Platable Filler And Sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heerman, Todd R.; Volkenant, Jerome G.

    1992-01-01

    Mixture of facsimile compound and silver powder forms positive seal in small hole in metal sheet. Filled hole plated over by standard electrodeposition. Compound does not deteriorate in high plating-bath temperatures, unlike wax and other fillers. Provides surface to which plated metals readily adhere.

  3. Platable Filler And Sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heerman, Todd R.; Volkenant, Jerome G.

    1992-01-01

    Mixture of facsimile compound and silver powder forms positive seal in small hole in metal sheet. Filled hole plated over by standard electrodeposition. Compound does not deteriorate in high plating-bath temperatures, unlike wax and other fillers. Provides surface to which plated metals readily adhere.

  4. Microvascular complications associated with injection of cosmetic facelift dermal fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Prendes, Mark; Chang, Shu-Hong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Minimally-invasive cosmetic surgeries such as injection of subdermal fillers have become very popular in the past decade. Although rare, some complications may follow injections such as tissue necrosis and even blindness. There exist two hypothesis regarding source of these complications both of which include microvasculature. The first hypothesis is that fillers in between the tissue structures and compress microvasculature that causes blockage of tissue neutrition and oxygen exchange in the tissue. In another theory, it is hypothesized that fillers move inside major arteries and block the arteries/veins. In this paper, we study these hypotheses using optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography technologies with different hyaluronic-acid fillers in a mouse ear model. Based on our observations, the fillers eventually block arteries/veins if injected directly into them that eventually causes tissue necrosis.

  5. Dermal Fillers: Do's and Dont's

    PubMed Central

    Vedamurthy, Maya; Vedamurthy, Amar; Nischal, KC

    2010-01-01

    Dermal fillers are an important tool in the armamentarium of an aesthetic dermatologist in the management of ageing skin. A surge in the use of fillers has been witnessed due to increasing awareness among people, easy availability of fillers and increased enthusiasm amongst the dermatologists and plastic surgeons to use this modality. In this era of evidence-based medicine and litigations against doctors, Dermatologists should be vigilant about different acts of omission and commission in the use of fillers. This article briefly discusses the dos and don'ts with respect to dermal fillers. PMID:20606986

  6. [Cutaneous ultrasound and dermal fillers].

    PubMed

    Villegas Fernández, C; Burón Álvarez, I; Fernández-Tresguerres Centeno, A; Alfageme Roldán, F; de Cabo Francés, F

    2015-11-01

    Requests for fillers or dermatological implants have dramatically increased in dermatology consultations in the last few years, either for the correction of superficial age-related wrinkles and cutaneous creases or to increase the volume of specific areas (cheeks, lips...). Dermatologists are often the first professionals to provide these treatments. Nevertheless, in other situations, the patients have already been treated, and many of them do not know the type of material that has been implanted or may even deny previous treatment, even when evident on clinical examination. In these occasions, cutaneous ultrasound is an effective and reliable tool for the real-time diagnosis of the kind of implant that has been used, its location, and the study of its possible complications.

  7. What's new in fillers?

    PubMed

    Brown, Lance H; Frank, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    This article is an in-depth review of various materials and products that have been used for the augmentation of soft tissue in the past, and covers several new products, methods, and techniques that may provide new options for dermatologists who use fillers in their practice. Pros and cons of each are discussed, along with mechanisms of action, dosages, approved and off-label uses, as well as a look ahead at some prospective technology.

  8. Thermal analysis of resin composites with ellipsoidal filler considering thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of composites with ellipsoidal fillers is analyzed by using a homogenization method that is able to represent the microstructure precisely. In this study, various parameters such as the volume fraction, shape, and distribution of the filler are quantitatively estimated to understand the mechanisms of heat transfer in the composite. First, thermal boundary resistance between resin and filler is important for obtaining composites with higher thermal conductivity. Second, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity arises from contact between filler in the case of ellipsoidal filler and produces lower thermal resistance. Finally, the filler network and thermal resistance are essential for the heat transfer in composites because the path of thermal conduction is improved by contact between neighboring filler particles.

  9. Ultrasound detection and identification of cosmetic fillers in the skin.

    PubMed

    Wortsman, X; Wortsman, J; Orlandi, C; Cardenas, G; Sazunic, I; Jemec, G B E

    2012-03-01

    While the incidence of cosmetic filler injections is rising world-wide, neither exact details of the procedure nor the agent used are always reported or remembered by the patients. Thus, although complications are reportedly rare, availability of a precise diagnostic tool to detect cutaneous filler deposits could help clarify the association between the procedure and the underlying pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate cutaneous sonography in the detection and identification of cosmetic fillers deposits and, describe dermatological abnormalities found associated with the presence of those agents. We used ultrasound in a porcine skin model to determine the sonographic characteristics of commonly available filler agents, and subsequently applied the analysis to detect and identify cosmetic fillers among patients referred for skin disorders. Fillers are recognizable on ultrasound and generate different patterns of echogenicity and posterior acoustic artefacts. Cosmetic fillers were identified in 118 dermatological patients; most commonly hyaluronic acid among degradable agents and silicone oil among non-degradable. Fillers deposits were loosely scattered throughout the subcutaneous tissue, with occasional infiltration of local muscles and loco-regional lymph nodes. Accompanying dermatopathies were represented by highly localized inflammatory processes unresponsive to conventional treatment, morphea-like reactions, necrosis of fatty tissue and epidermal cysts; in the case of non-degradable agents, the associated dermatopathies were transient, resolving upon disappearance of the filler. Cosmetic filler agents may be detected and identified during routine ultrasound of dermatological lesions; the latter appear to be pathologically related to the cosmetic procedure. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture... Cigar filler. The tobacco that forms the core or inner part of a cigar. Cigar-filler tobacco is tobacco of the kind and quality commonly used for cigar fillers. Cigar-filler types are those which produce...

  11. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture... Cigar filler. The tobacco that forms the core or inner part of a cigar. Cigar-filler tobacco is tobacco of the kind and quality commonly used for cigar fillers. Cigar-filler types are those which produce...

  12. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture... Cigar filler. The tobacco that forms the core or inner part of a cigar. Cigar-filler tobacco is tobacco of the kind and quality commonly used for cigar fillers. Cigar-filler types are those which produce...

  13. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture... Cigar filler. The tobacco that forms the core or inner part of a cigar. Cigar-filler tobacco is tobacco of the kind and quality commonly used for cigar fillers. Cigar-filler types are those which produce...

  14. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture... Cigar filler. The tobacco that forms the core or inner part of a cigar. Cigar-filler tobacco is tobacco of the kind and quality commonly used for cigar fillers. Cigar-filler types are those which produce...

  15. A prospective, split-face, randomized, comparative study of safety and 12-month longevity of three formulations of hyaluronic acid dermal filler for treatment of nasolabial folds.

    PubMed

    Prager, Welf; Wissmueller, Esther; Havermann, Isabel; Bee, Eva K; Howell, David J; Zschocke, Ina; Simon, Jeannette

    2012-07-01

    Data regarding several hyaluronic acids (HAs) used identically for facial tissue augmentation have heretofore been unavailable. This prospective, split-face, randomized, two-armed study sought to determine the long-term safety and effectiveness of three HAs (HA-1 (Belotero Basic/Balance), HA-2 (Restylane), and HA-3 (Juvéderm Ultra 3/Juvéderm Ultra Plus XC) in the treatment of nasolabial folds (NLFs). Twenty participants in Arm A received HA-1 in one NLF and HA-2 in the other. In Arm B, 20 participants received HA-1 in one NLF and HA-3 in the other. Injection was at visit 2, with follow-up visits at 1, 6, 9, and 12 months. Mean volume of HA was slightly <1.5 mL/NLF. Adverse events were unremarkable across all HAs, with injection site erythema being the most frequent adverse event. Mean pretreatment NLF severity rating for both arms was 2.3; at 12 months, mean posttreatment severity rating was 1.5 for HA-1/HA-2 and 1.6 for HA-1/HA-3. Although not statistically significant, participants tended to show a preference for HA-1. All three HAs provided essentially equivalent results, except for 4-week evenness results, which favored HA-1. Injection volumes of the three HAs were also similar. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Clinical and instrumental evaluation of a cross-linked hyaluronic acid filler dermal injection: effects on nasolabial folds skin biophysical parameters and augmentation from a single-dose, monocentric, open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Cameli, Norma; Mariano, Maria; Serio, Mirko; Berardesca, Enzo

    2016-10-01

    When a hyaluronic acid dermal device to fill soft tissues is chosen, efficacy, safety and durability are key concerns. This is an open-label prospective study to instrumentally evaluate the effects of HA filler dermal injection on nasolabial folds skin biophysical parameters and augmentation. A single Italian site treated female subjects aged 40-55, for nasolabial folds, with a single standardized injection. The outcome was evaluated with objective quantitative measurements after 90 (T1) and 180 days (T2) from the injection comparing to baseline (T0) by means of Corneometer (skin hydration measurement), Cutometer (skin elasticity measurement), and Visioface devices for digital and UV computerized image analysis. Secondary endpoints were safety assessment, subject investigator satisfaction with the intervention. Assessment of aesthetic results included photographic documentation. The computerized image analysis confirmed the clinical assessment showing statistically significant reduction in nasolabial folds both at T1 and T2. Visioface® indexes showed a marked and statistical significant response. An excellent profile of satisfaction of the product at T2 from investigators and patients was recorded. Skin hydration and elasticity did not show significant changes. In our study, a standardized HA filler dermal injection on nasolabial folds did not influence skin biophysical parameters such as skin hydration and elasticity. Nasolabial folds showed a persistent and significative response at T2 confirmed by instrumental evaluation. The tolerability and safety profile of the product was excellent.

  17. Filler-polymer bonding and its role in elastomer reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping, Mark, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    Iron oxide particles were blended into samples of cis-1,4-polybutadiene and polyisobutylene, and both the unfilled polymers and the resulting polymer-filler mixture were cured with benzoyl peroxide. The filled networks were cloudy, but strips extracted using a toluene-hydrochloric acid mixture became as clear as the unfilled networks, suggesting removal of the filler particles. Equilibrium swelling and stress-strain measurements in elongation were carried out the unfilled elastomer and on the filled ones, both before and after extraction. There were no significant differences between the stress-strain isotherms and degrees of equilibrium swelling of the unfilled networks and the corresponding properties of the previously-filled networks after the filler particles were removed. This suggests that for these systems, the bonding between the filler particles and the polymer chains is physical rather than chemical.

  18. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films.

  19. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anthony J.; Chang, Brian L.; Percec, Ivona

    2016-01-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005–2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration–approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that “product customization” is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes. PMID:28018778

  20. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements.

    PubMed

    Montes, José Raúl; Wilson, Anthony J; Chang, Brian L; Percec, Ivona

    2016-12-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005-2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration-approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that "product customization" is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes.

  1. Numerical Investigation of T-joints with 3D Four Directional Braided Composite Fillers Under Tensile Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-kang; Liu, Zhen-guo; Hu, Long; Wang, Yi-bo; Lei, Bing; Huang, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Numerical studied on T-joints with three-dimensional four directional (3D4D) braided composite fillers was presented in this article. Compared with conventional unidirectional prepreg fillers, the 3D braided composite fillers have excellent ability to prevent crack from penetrating trigone fillers, which constantly occurred in the conventional fillers. Meanwhile, the 3D braided composite fillers had higher fiber volume fraction and eliminated the fiber folding problem in unidirectional prepreg fillers. The braiding technology and mechanical performance of 3D4D braided fillers were studied. The numerical model of carbon fiber T-joints with 3D4D braided composite fillers was built by finite element analysis software. The damage formation, extension and failing process of T-joints with 3D4D braided fillers under tensile load were investigated. Further investigation was extended to the effect of 3D4D braided fillers with different braiding angles on mechanical behavior of the T-joints. The study results revealed that the filling area was the weakest part of the T-joints where the damage first appeared and the crack then rapidly spread to the glue film around the filling area and the interface between over-laminate and soleplate. The 3D4D braided fillers were undamaged and the braiding angle change induced a little effect on the bearing capacity of T-joints.

  2. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Kyu; Jung, Cheolkyu; Woo, Se Joon; Park, Kyu Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions.

  3. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions. PMID:26713062

  4. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    SciTech Connect

    G. G. Loomis; A. P. Zdinak; M. A. Ewanic; J. J. Jessmore

    1998-01-01

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity characteristic leach ing

  5. Injectable facial fillers: imaging features, complications, and diagnostic pitfalls at MRI and PET CT.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Pravin; Kohler, Romain; Boudabbous, Sana; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva

    2017-10-04

    Injectable fillers are widely used for facial rejuvenation, correction of disabling volumetric fat loss in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, Romberg disease, and post-traumatic facial disfiguring. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the anatomy of facial fat compartments, as well as with the properties and key imaging features of commonly used facial fillers, filler-related complications, interpretation pitfalls, and dermatologic conditions mimicking filler-related complications. The distribution of facial fillers is characteristic and depends on the anatomy of the superficial fat compartments. Silicone has signature MRI features, calcium hydroxyapatite has characteristic calcifications, whereas other injectable fillers have overlapping imaging features. Most fillers (hyaluronic acid, collagen, and polyalkylimide-polyacrylamide hydrogels) have signal intensity patterns compatible with high water content. On PET-CT, most fillers show physiologic high FDG uptake, which should not be confounded with pathology. Abscess, cellulitis, non-inflammatory nodules, and foreign body granulomas are the most common filler-related complications, and imaging can help in the differential diagnosis. Diffusion weighted imaging helps in detecting a malignant lesion masked by injected facial fillers. Awareness of imaging features of facial fillers and their complications helps to avoid misinterpretation of MRI, and PET-CT scans and facilitates therapeutic decisions in unclear clinical cases. • Facial fillers are common incidental findings on MRI and PET-CT scans. • They have a characteristic appearance and typical anatomic distribution • Although considered as safe, facial filler injections are associated with several complications • As they may mask malignancy, knowledge of typical imaging features is mandatory. • MRI is a problem-solving tool for unclear cases.

  6. Filler migration to the forehead due to multiple filler injections in a patient addicted to cosmetic fillers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hua; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Wu, Bai-Yao; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Filler migration is a potential complication following the injection of multiple fillers. With the increasing popularity of multiple filler injections, migrated granulomas should be an essential differential diagnosis for newly growing facial lumps. It is important for all physicians to be aware that complication induced by dermal fillers can occur in locations other than the planned injected sites. We described a case of filler migration to the forehead in a patient addicted to cosmetic fillers. To our knowledge, it has never been published in dermatology literature so far. A detailed history of cosmetic procedures from the patient addicted to filler injections is necessary for accurate diagnosis. Because account of previous cosmetic filler injections is not always reliable, an early skin biopsy with pathological examination is the gold standard for determining whether multiple filler injections have been performed.

  7. Effect of filler size and shape on local nanoindentation modulus of resin-composites.

    PubMed

    Masouras, Konstantinos; Akhtar, Riaz; Watts, David C; Silikas, Nick

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the Young's moduli (E) of a series of model dental resin-composites using nanoindentation, and to examine how E was influenced by differences in filler-size and shape. Materials with different filler-sizes and shapes but constant filler volume-fraction were investigated. Disc specimens, mounted in polystyrene resin were mechanically polished and tested with a nanoindenter. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test were used for the statistical analysis. Regression analysis was used to investigate the correlation between E and filler-size. E ranged from 9.31 to 12.54 GPa for spherical fillers and from 14.09 to 17.03 GPa for irregular fillers. Statistically significant differences were found among the groups. Strong quadratic correlations were observed between E and filler-size for unimodal materials with spherical and irregular fillers, but were not statistically significant. Filler-size and shape seemed to be fine-tuning factors for E.

  8. Fibre reinforced CMC with polymer/filler derived matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Suttor, D.; Erny, T.; Greil, P.

    1995-09-01

    A ceramic matrix for carbon fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) has been developed from polysiloxane/boron mixtures. Complex geometries can be realized by using processing technologies of fibre reinforced polymer composites. Upon pyrolysis the polymer/filler mixture is converted into a ceramic matrix consisting of SiC, B{sub 4}C, BN and a Si-O-C-(N) glass, without reacting with the carbon fibre. Due to the large volume increase of the reactive boron filler upon nitridation (+142 vol%) no multiple reinfiltration of the structure is necessary in order to achieve a dense matrix. Thermodynamic modelling of the pyrolysis is a useful tool to estimate the qualitative and quantitative phase composition as a function of polymer, filler and gas atmospheres.

  9. Investigation of physical properties of a polycaprolactone dermal filler when mixed with lidocaine and lidocaine/epinephrine.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Francisco; Marijnissen-Hofsté, Joanna

    2012-12-01

    In esthetic treatments with dermal fillers, increasing numbers of physicians are using the technique of mixing an anesthetic agent into the dermal filler before treatment to increase the comfort of the patients. This study aimed at evaluating the effects on the physical properties of a polycaprolactone (PCL)-based dermal filler after mixing with lidocaine. A range of 2.0% lidocaine and 2.0% lidocaine/epinephrine concentrations was mixed with the PCL dermal filler to evaluate the changes in dynamic viscosity and elasticity, extrusion force, pH, and needle jam rates. The number of passes back to forth for optimal homogeneity of lidocaine and PCL dermal filler was determined. With 15 mixing strokes the lidocaine solution can effectively be mixed into dermal filler resulting in a homogenous blend. The viscosity, elasticity, and the extrusion force decrease with increasing lidocaine volume. The viscosity and elasticity of the dermal filler is sufficient to keep the PCL microspheres in suspension. There were no needle jams. The pH of the PCL dermal filler mixed with lidocaine solution is equivalent to that of the original dermal filler. It is concluded that mixing of lidocaine into the PCL-based dermal filler can safely be performed without harmful changes in the physical properties of the original dermal filler.

  10. [Benefits of volumetric to facial rejuvenation. Part 2: Dermal fillers].

    PubMed

    Bui, P; Pons Guiraud, A; Lepage, C

    2017-09-11

    Injectable substances known as fillers are used to palliate age-related atrophy and ptosis, and for their so-called "pseudo-lifting" action. They do not replace face and neck lift, but allow it to be postponed or, when injected after surgical lifting, make the result durable. Hyaluronic acid has a predominant and unchallenged place among fillers, well ahead of poly-L-lactic acid or calcium hydroxyapatite. Approaches and injection methods are the same for all fillers, corresponding to those for autologous fat injection, the reference substance, with a few particularities. The substance used, the level of hyaluronic acid reticulation, and the depth of the injection depend on the injection site and intended effect. Effects range from smoothing superficial wrinkles to remodeling whole parts of the face. Complications related to such fillers are well known, especially in the case of hyaluronic acid, where overcorrection is the most frequent. To limit the risk of complications and also to offer each patient the most individually adapted corrections, before any procedure, the plastic surgeon needs to question the patient and perform precise medical examination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  12. Fluoride release from aged resin composites containing fluoridated glass filler.

    PubMed

    Itota, Toshiyuki; Al-Naimi, Omar T; Carrick, Thomas E; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; McCabe, John F

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release from aged resin composites containing different types of fluoridated glass filler into both deionized distilled water and lactic acid solution. Three resin composites, UniFil S (containing fluoro-alumino-silicate glass filler), Reactmer (containing pre-reacted glass-ionomer filler) and Beautifil (containing both types of fillers) were used. A conventional glass-ionomer cement, Ketac-Fil, was used as a control. Five disk specimens of each material were prepared and aged in water for 10 weeks. After aging, specimens were immersed in deionized distilled water for a further 6 days and then in aqueous lactic acid (pH 4.0) for 2 days. This process was repeated twice more and the specimens were subsequently immersed in water for a further 12 days. Fluoride release was measured every 2 days throughout the post-aging period. The amount of fluoride release for aged UniFil S and Beautifil markedly increased in acid solution compared with water storage. The difference was not so great for aged Reactmer and Ketac-Fil. UniFil S and Beautifil gave significantly greater fluoride release in water following immersion in acid solution (p<0.05, two-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test), but Reactmer and Ketac-Fil showed no such increase in fluoride release after acid immersion. These results suggested that the nature of the fluoridated glass filler within a resin composite and the way in which the material interacts with an acidic environment affected the amount of fluoride released.

  13. Use of Fillers in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyoung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Surgical rhinoplasty is the one of the most common cosmetic procedures in Asians. But there are limitations, such as down time, high cost, and a steep learning curve. Most complications are implant related. A safer and less invasive procedure is rhinoplasty using fillers. Good knowledge of the nasal anatomy is essential for rhinoplasty using fillers. Knowledge of nerves, blood supply, and injection plane allows avoiding complications. There are several planes in the nose. The deep fatty layer is recommended for injection, because it is wide and loose and there are less important neurovascular structures. Botulinum toxin also can be used for noninvasive rhinoplasty.

  14. Formation of a transition layer on the fillers of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukosiute, I.; Levinskas, R.; Kviklys, A.

    2006-09-01

    Based on a plane model of composites, the effect of a transition layer on the elastic modulus Ec of the composites is analyzed in the case where, under the action of a load, the transition layer is formed both on the side of matrix and filler. In evaluating Ec, it is assumed that the elastic modulus in the layer grows linearly from the elastic modulus of matrix to that of filler, but pores in the filler are impermeable to matrix macromolecules. Analytic relation ships are found which allow one to determine the volume fractions of the transition layer on the side of matrix and filler if the experimental elastic modulus of the composite is known. These relationships are used to find the magnitude of the layer in epoxy composites with various fillers and to evaluate its effect on the compressive elastic modulus of the composites.

  15. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.914 Fillers. Both gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if metal...

  16. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.710 Fillers. A strainer should be installed between the cooker and the filler. The hoppers of all filters shall be covered...

  17. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.710 Fillers. A strainer should be installed between the cooker and the filler. The hoppers of all filters shall be covered...

  18. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.710 Fillers. A strainer should be installed between the cooker and the filler. The hoppers of all filters shall be covered...

  19. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.710 Fillers. A strainer should be installed between the cooker and the filler. The hoppers of all filters shall be covered...

  20. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.914 Fillers. Both gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if metal...

  1. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fillers. 58.710 Section 58.710 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.710 Fillers. A strainer should be installed between the cooker and the filler. The hoppers of all filters shall be covered...

  2. Dry bin filler for apples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A unique dry bin filler for apples using a sequenced tray was developed to reduce bruising in packing operations. Research and commercial trials in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington State demonstrated the ability to fill bins evenly and with low damage. Cultivars with different bruising su...

  3. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2012-09-10

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  4. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2009-08-26

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  5. Orbitofacial rejuvenation of temple hollowing with Perlane injectable filler.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan J; Malhotra, Raman

    2010-01-01

    Temple hollowing with soft tissue volume loss is well recognized in HIV lipoatrophy. Similar changes occur as part of aging, with skeletalization of the orbital rim and clipping of the eyebrow tail. The authors report their initial experience treating temple volume loss and orbitofacial asymmetry with nonanimal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA). This study was a retrospective, interventional case series with a patient satisfaction questionnaire and independent physician grading of results. Patients initially received approximately 1 mL of Perlane (Q-Med, Uppsala, Sweden; Medicis, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona) injected into the superficial fascia of each temple. The filler was placed behind the frontozygomatic process to soften the bony contour of the lateral orbital rim. Outcome measures included satisfaction with injection procedure, fulfillment of expectations, satisfaction with appearance, change in self-confidence, the need for retreatment, and complications. Twenty patients were treated, for a total of 39 temples. Mean follow-up was nine months (range, four to 14 months). Patients were primarily female (90%), all were Caucasian, and their ages ranged from 20 to 60 years. Eighteen patients had age-related temple hollowing, one had dysthyroid volume loss, and one had hollowing due to orbitotemporal neurofibromatosis. The majority had 1-mL injections to each side (range, 0.3-3 mL). One patient received 3 mL to correct asymmetry. The procedure was well tolerated with ice pack cooling and no local anesthesia. Of 16 patients who replied to the questionnaire, 13 were very or moderately satisfied and requested repeat treatment, whereas three were only mildly satisfied or ambivalent. Side effects included transient mild or moderate discomfort, superficial vein prominence, and localized bruising. This series suggests the effective and safe application of Perlane in temple hollow rejuvenation and correction of asymmetry. It offers tolerability, high patient satisfaction

  6. Filler/ Polycarbosilane Systems as CMC Matrix Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrolytic conversion of polymeric precursors to ceramics is accompanied by loss of volatiles and large volume changes. Infiltration of a low viscosity polymer into a fiber preform will fill small spaces within fiber tows by capillary forces, but create large matrix cracks within large, intertow areas. One approach to minimizing shrinkage and reducing the number of required infiltration cycles is to use particulate fillers. In this study, Starfire allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) was blended with a silicon carbide powder, with and without dispersant, using shear mixing. The polymer and polymer/particle interactions were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and rheometry. Polymer/particulate slurries and suspensions were used to infiltrate a figidized preform of an eight ply five harness satin CG Nicalon fiber having a dual layer BN/SiC interface coating, and the resulting composites characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Hyaluronic acid gel ( Juvéderm™) preparations in the treatment of facial wrinkles and folds

    PubMed Central

    Allemann, Inja Bogdan; Baumann, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Soft tissue augmentation with temporary dermal fillers is a continuously growing field, supported by the ongoing development and advances in technology and biocompatibility of the products marketed. The longer lasting, less immunogenic and thus more convenient hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are encompassing by far the biggest share of the temporary dermal filler market. Since the approval of the first HA filler, Restylane®, there are at least 10 HA fillers that have been approved by the FDA. Not all of the approved HA fillers are available on the market, and many more are coming. The Juvéderm™ product line (Allergan, Irvine, CA), consisting of Juvéderm™ Plus and Juvéderm™ Ultra Plus, was approved by the FDA in 2006. Juvéderm™ is a bacterium-derived nonanimal stabilized HA. Juvéderm™ Ultra and Ultra Plus are smooth, malleable gels with a homologous consistency that use a new technology called “Hylacross™ technology”. They have a high concentration of cross-linked HAs, which accounts for its longevity. Juvéderm™ Ultra Plus is used for volumizing and correcting deeper folds, whereas Juvéderm™ Ultra is best for contouring and volumizing medium depth facial wrinkles and lip augmentation. Various studies have shown the superiority of the HA filler products compared with collagen fillers for duration, volume needed, and patient satisfaction. Restylane®, Perlane®, and Juvéderm™ are currently the most popular dermal fillers used in the United States. PMID:19281055

  8. Effect of elastic filler on the fatigue failure of thermoplastic polyurethane film at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishetskii, I. V.; Parfeev, V. M.; Erykalova, T. A.; Borisova, E. Yu.

    1989-11-01

    It was established by mathematical modeling of the curves of spectral transmissivity and by comparing them with experiments that in the mixture of polyurethane with caoutchouc an increase of the volume fraction of filler entails changes of the characteristic dimensions of its particles. With small volume fractions of filler (less than 10%), in consequence of the predominantly small size of the impurities, the mechanism of quasibrittle failure is realized without development of bulk damage to the mixture. When the mixture contains 20-30% filler, satisfactory static elastic and strength properties are retained, and in case of fatigue a considerable amount of damage accumulates and the mechanism of inhibiting macrocracks on the boundaries of impurities begins to act. When the proportion of filler increases further, the elastic and strength properties of the mixture are rapidly impaired, and as a consequence the material becomes practically unusable in operation.

  9. Effect of resin-composite filler particle size and shape on shrinkage-stress.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, Julian D; Maisuria, Amit; Vogel, Karin; Watts, David C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of variations in filler particle size and shape on the polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics of resin-composites. A model series of 12 VLC resin-composites were studied. The particulate dispersed phase volume fraction was 56.7%: these filler particles were systematically graded in size, and further were either spherical or irregular. A Bioman instrument (cantilever beam method) was employed to determine the shrinkage-stress kinetics following 40s irradiation (600 mW/cm(2)) at 23°C (n=3). All data were captured for 60 min and the final shrinkage-stress calculated. Shrinkage-stress varied between 3.86 MPa (SD 0.14) for S3 (spherical filler particles of 500 nm) and 8.44 MPa (SD 0.41) for I1 (irregular filler particles of 450 nm). The shrinkage-stress values were generally lower for those composites with spherical filler particles than those with irregular filler particles. The differences in shrinkage-stress with filler particle size and shape were statistically significant (p<0.001). Composites with spherical filler particles exhibit lower shrinkage-stress values compared to those with irregular filler particles. Shrinkage-stress and shrinkage-stress rate vary in a complex manner with variations in the size of the dispersed phase particles: a hypothesized explanation for the effect of filler particle size and shape is presented. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduction of Candida biofilm adhesion by incorporation of prereacted glass ionomer filler in denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Chiaki; Takakuda, Kazuo; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of surface reaction-type prereacted glass ionomer (S-PRG) fillers on Candida albicans adhesion on denture base resin. Discs were prepared by incorporating the S-PRG filler into the polymer powder of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based, heat-polymerizing resin at 0 (control), 5%, 10%, and 20% (w/w). The surface roughness of all disc surfaces was measured. Elemental analysis of released Na(+), Sr(2+), SiO3(2-), Al(3-), BO3(3-), and F(-) was performed after water immersion. Each disc was placed in a well with artificial saliva to form acquired pellicle, incubated, washed with phosphate-buffered saline, and immersed in a C. albicans (JCM2085) cell suspension standardized at 10(4) cells/ml. After aerobic incubation at 37 °C for 24 h, the metabolic mitochondrial activity, total biofilm biomass, and biofilm thickness were evaluated. The morphogenetic transition of C. albicans in the early culture stage (1 and 3 h) was observed. There was a slight but significant increase in the surface roughness with an increase in the filler content. The metabolic activity and total biomass volume were significantly lower in all filler groups than in the control group, although there were no significant differences among the filler groups. Groups with at least 5% filler content exhibited a thinner biofilm compared with the control group. All filler groups showed hyphal forms at 3 h, with the length of the hyphae being lesser than those in the control group. Although the incorporation of S-PRG filler slightly increases the surface roughness of denture base resin, it reduces the adhesion of C. albicans. The S-PRG filler has the potential to reduce Candida albicans adhesion on denture base resin and may lower the risk of denture stomatitis. However, filler incorporation can increase the surface roughness of heat-polymerizing denture base resin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Solid Midfacial Implants: When Fillers Are Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Karan; Binder, William

    2016-10-01

    The aging process results in volumetric changes on multiple levels of the face including the skin, soft tissue, and underlying facial skeleton. Malar and mandibular augmentation with facial fillers and alloplastic implants are two treatment options used to achieve the goal of volume enhancement. Noninvasive modalities have become increasingly popular due to the availability of office-based options that require a limited understanding of facial aesthetics, a basic grasp of the mechanisms behind the aging process, and no level of surgical expertise or training. It is important, however, to understand the limitations and appropriate use of each technique, surgical and nonsurgical, either as a sole modality or in conjunction with each other to attain optimal aesthetic results. Although minimally invasive soft-tissue augmentation procedures such as fillers offer midface treatment options, alloplastic implants provide a stable support platform or scaffolding for skeletal and soft-tissue augmentation that fillers alone cannot often provide. A multilevel understanding of facial aesthetics must include the facial skeletal architecture and foundation that it provides for proper soft-tissue draping and contour. Alloplastic implants remain the standard for skeletal augmentation and remain the mainstay when fillers are not sufficient for midface augmentation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Fatty acid intake in relation to reproductive hormones and testicular volume among young healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Chavarro, Jorge E; Mendiola, Jaime; Roca, Manuela; Tanrikut, Cigdem; Vioque, Jesús; Jørgensen, Niels; Torres-Cantero, Alberto M

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dietary fats may influence testicular function. However, most of the published literature on this field has used semen quality parameters as the only proxy for testicular function. We examined the association of fat intake with circulating reproductive hormone levels and testicular volume among healthy young Spanish men. This is a cross-sectional study among 209 healthy male volunteers conducted between October 2010 and November 2011 in Murcia Region of Spain. Participants completed questionnaires on lifestyle, diet, and smoking, and each underwent a physical examination, and provided a blood sample. Linear regression was used to examine the association between each fatty acid type and reproductive hormone levels and testicular volumes. Monounsaturated fatty acids intake was inversely associated with serum blood levels of calculated free testosterone, total testosterone, and inhibin B. A positive association was observed between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and luteinizing hormone concentrations. In addition, the intake of trans fatty acids was associated with lower total testosterone and calculated free testosterone concentrations (Ptrend = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was positively related to testicular volume while the intake of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids was inversely related to testicular volume. These data suggest that fat intake, and particularly intake of omega 3, omega 6, and trans fatty acids, may influence testicular function. PMID:27834316

  13. Prolonging the Life of Refractory Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schomburg, C.; Dotts, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Useful life of refractory glass-cloth gap filler is increased by coating it with a suspension of silicon carbide in butanol and polyethylene. Coating is applied to refractory-fiber cloth filler that seals gaps between insulating tiles on Space Shuttle orbiter. Tests showed that cloth fibers would be embrittled by extreme temperatures encountered on reentry into Earth's atmosphere and that only 25 percent of the thousands of fillers would be reusable after a mission. With coating, 85 percent of fillers would be reusable.

  14. [Determination of Ag, Cu, Zn and Cd in silver brazing filler metals by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Yang, X

    1997-06-01

    A method of simultaneous and direct determination for Ag, Cu, Zn and Cd in silver brazing filler metals by ICP-AES is reported. The spectral interferences and effect of acidity have been investigated. Working conditions were optimized. The method has been applied to the analysis of silver brazing filler metals with RSD of 4-7% and recovery of 94-105%. This method was accurate, simple and rapid.

  15. Foreign Body Granulomas after the Use of Dermal Fillers: Pathophysiology, Clinical Appearance, Histologic Features, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Min

    2015-01-01

    A foreign body granuloma is a non-allergic chronic inflammatory reaction that is mainly composed of multinucleated giant cells. Foreign body granulomas may occur after the administration of any dermal filler. Factors such as the volume of the injection, impurities present in the fillers, and the physical properties of fillers affect granuloma formation. The formation of granulomas involves five phases: protein adsorption, macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion, and crosstalk. The clinical and pathologic features of granulomas vary depending on the type of filler that causes them. Foreign body granulomas can be treated effectively with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Surgical excisions of granulomas tend to be incomplete because granulomas have ill-defined borders and moreover, surgical excisions may leave scars and deformities. PMID:25798398

  16. Current Concepts in Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Amir; Watson, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    When evaluating the face in thirds, the upper face, midface, and lower face, one may assume the lateral the temple, midface, and lateral mandible as the pillars of these subdivisions. Many of our facial aesthetic procedures address these regions, including the lateral brow lift, midface lift, and lateral face lift. As the use of facial fillers has advanced, more emphasis is placed on the correction of the temples, midlateral face, and lateral jaw line. This article is dedicated to these facial aesthetic pillars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p < 0.05) greater levels of fluoride release compared with the control and 1% glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  18. The role of fillers in aesthetic medicine: medico-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, E; Montanari Vergallo, G; Reale, G; di Luca, A; Catarinozzi, I; Napoletano, S; Zaami, S

    2016-11-01

    In recent years there has been an exponential increase of fillers use in aesthetic medicine. The popularity of this anti-wrinkle product is based on their capacity to offer significant improvement in the aesthetic field, particularly to skin rejuvenating processes with non-invasive and less expensive techniques, if compared to the surgical methods (i.e. surgical lifting). The great number of fillers on the market is composed of a large heterogenic number of biomaterials. The aim of this review was to provide an overview and a classification of the filling materials that are most commonly used. A synthesis of the literature concerning fillers and related side effects was also reported. The law decree no. 23 of 1998, converted in the law no. 94 of 1998 and the principal judgments of the Italian Court of Cassation have been examined with the medico-legal issues related to fillers use in medicine. With respect to their degradation, filler materials may be classified as temporary (degradable), semi-permanent and permanent (not degradable). The temporary fillers such as hyaluronic acid and collagen are completely degraded by the surrounding tissue in a few months. The permanent fillers, such as the ones derived from silicon oil and minerals are not biodegradable and may cause serious and irreversible side effects. Their use requires a physician with a high level of specialization to perform the treatment, a deep knowledge of face anatomy and a great degree of experience.

  19. Effect of Geopolymer filler in Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) Pipe for Piping Application: Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus Abu Hashim, Mohammad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali, Che; Hussin, Kamarudin; Binhussain, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The present work is aimed to carry out the effect of geopolymer material which is fly ash as filler in the glass reinforced epoxy pipe on the micro structure of fly ash geopolymer, compression properties, and bulk density using the filament winding method. Conventional glass reinforced epoxy pipes has its own disadvantages such as high corrosion resistance at acidic environment and low strength which can be replaced by the composite pipes. Geopolymer is a type of amorphous alumino-silicate and can be synthesized by geopolymerization process. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 - 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is fly ash with 4 Molarity were prepared. Morphology of the raw material fly ash and fly ash based-geopolymer surface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the additions of fly ash at the beginning with 10 wt% are showing higher compressive strength than glass reinforced epoxy pipe without fly ash geopolymer filler. The compressive test of these series of samples was determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples fly ash based-geopolymer filler are higher as compared to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with fly ash geopolymer filler continues to decline when added to 20 wt% - 40 wt% of geopolymer filler loading. The results showed that the mixing of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  20. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 3: Aquatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, D.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report is an assessment of information on the aquatic effects of acid rain, produced to act as technical support for development of an acid rain strategy. It first reviews the previous aquatic effects assessment of 1990 and aquatic effects monitoring and research conducted post-1990. It then presents and discusses results of research that proceeds from the knowledge base and status presented in the 1990 assessment. First, the chemical and biological changes observed in aquatic ecosystems since the early 1980s are assessed, including an analysis of the factors (such as declining acidic deposition) that influence the changes. Regional differences and hysteresis between acidification and recovery responses are also discussed. Second, interactions between the acidity stressor and other atmospherically based stressors such as climate change and contaminant deposition are considered. Third, the effectiveness of existing critical and target loads in protecting aquatic ecosystems is re-evaluated. Finally, the likely effect of full implementation of the planned sulphur dioxide controls in Canada and the United States on aquatic chemistry and biology is predicted using up-to-date modelling tools. Knowledge gaps are identified along with recommended actions to be implemented.

  1. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen...

  2. Fillers as Signs of Distributional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taelman, Helena; Durieux, Gert; Gillis, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal analysis is presented of the fillers of a Dutch-speaking child between 1;10 and 2;7. Our analysis corroborates familiar regularities reported in the literature: most fillers resemble articles in shape and distribution, and are affected by rhythmic and positional constraints. A novel finding is the impact of the lexical environment:…

  3. Filler functionality in edible solid foams.

    PubMed

    van der Sman, R G M

    2016-05-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains. But, we show that much can be learned about that from the field of synthetic polymeric foams with (nano)fillers. For edible brittle foams the enhancement of mechanical strength by filler ingredients is less relevant compared to the additional functionalities such as 1) the promotion of bubble nucleation and 2) cell opening-which are much more relevant for the snack texture. The survey of particulate ingredients added to snack formulations shows that they cannot be viewed as inert fillers, because of their strong hygroscopic properties. Hence, these fillers will compete with starch for water, and that will modify the glass transition and boiling point, which are important factors for snack expansion. Filler properties can be modified via extrusion, but it is better if that processing step is decoupled from the subsequent processing steps as mixing and expansion. Several filler ingredients are also added because of their nutritional value, but can have adverse effect on snack expansion. These adverse effects can be reduced if the increase of nutritional value is decoupled from other filler functionality via compartmentalization using micropellets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prolonging the Life of Refractory Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schomburg, C.; Dotts, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Useful life of a refractory glass cloth gap filler is increased by coating it with a suspension of silicon carbide in butanol and polyethylene. Coating is applied to the refractory filler that seals gaps between insulating tiles on the Space Shuttle orbiter. Silicon carbide coating prevents embrittlement at high temperatures such as those encountered on reentry into Earth's atmosphere.

  5. Wind-Resistant Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellavia, J.; Quigley, I. A.; Callahan, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Filler developed for gaps between insulating tiles on Space Shuttle finds application in industries that use tiles for thermal or environmental protection. Filler consists of tight-fitting ceramic tubes and fibrous alumina. Combination resists high wind loads while providing requisite heat protection. Quartz-thread stitching holds envelope together.

  6. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen...

  7. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen...

  8. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen...

  9. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen...

  10. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections... gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if...

  11. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections... gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if...

  12. Void Filler Foam Accelerated Load Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    filler foam for use in military aircraft. Phases 1, I1, and III of this task also are summarized in this report to show the evolution of the void filler...this program, MCAIR evaluated four types of foam material. i. Scott LAS-103ZF ( reticulated foam) 2. Goodyear DZ-70D461 (flexible foam) 3. NOPCO BX-249

  13. Electro-mechanical properties of hydrogel composites with micro- and nano-cellulose fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Mohamed Shahid U.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Lakshmana Rao, C.

    2015-09-01

    Stimuli responsive cross-linked hydrogels are of great interest for applications in diverse fields such as sensors and biomaterials. In this study, we investigate polymer composites filled with cellulose fillers. The celluloses used in making the composites were a microcrystalline cellulose of commercial grade and cellulose nano-whiskers obtained through acid hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose. The filler concentration was varied and corresponding physical, mechanical and electro-mechanical characterization was carried out. The electro-mechanical properties were determined using a quasi-static method. The fillers not only enhance the mechanical properties of the composite by providing better reinforcement but also provide a quantitative electric potential in the composite. The measurements reveal that the polymer composites prepared from two different cellulose fillers possess a quantitative electric potential which can be utilized in biomedical applications. It is argued that the mechanism behind the quantitative electric potential in the composites is due to streaming potentials arising due to electrical double layer formation.

  14. Complications of injectable fillers, part 2: vascular complications.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Accidental intra-arterial filler injection may cause significant tissue injury and necrosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, currently the most popular, are the focus of this article, which highlights complications and their symptoms, risk factors, and possible treatment strategies. Although ischemic events do happen and are therefore important to discuss, they seem to be exceptionally rare and represent a small percentage of complications in individual clinical practices. However, the true incidence of this complication is unknown because of underreporting by clinicians. Typical clinical findings include skin blanching, livedo reticularis, slow capillary refill, and dusky blue-red discoloration, followed a few days later by blister formation and finally tissue slough. Mainstays of treatment (apart from avoidance by meticulous technique) are prompt recognition, immediate treatment with hyaluronidase, topical nitropaste under occlusion, oral acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), warm compresses, and vigorous massage. Secondary lines of treatment may involve intra-arterial hyaluronidase, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and ancillary vasodilating agents such as prostaglandin E1. Emergency preparedness (a "filler crash cart") is emphasized, since early intervention is likely to significantly reduce morbidity. A clinical summary chart is provided, organized by complication presentation.

  15. Effects of copper filler sizes on the dielectric properties and the energy harvesting capability of nonpercolated polyurethane composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putson, C.; Lebrun, L.; Guyomar, D.; Muensit, N.; Cottinet, P.-J.; Seveyrat, L.; Guiffard, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonpercolated composites based on polyurethane (PU) filled with low concentrations copper (Cu) powders of varying sizes were studied as electrostrictive materials for mechanical energy harvesting. The dispersion of the fillers within the polymeric matrix was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and results showed a relatively homogeneous dispersion for the microsized fillers and the existence of agglomerates for their nanosized counterparts. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements displayed that there occurred no interaction between the polymeric matrix and the microsized fillers whereas the nanosized fillers slightly enhanced the glass transition of the soft segments of PU and significantly affected the recrystallization temperature. The dependence of the dielectric properties of the composites as a function of the filler volume fraction and filler size was investigated over a broad range of frequencies, showing an increase in the permittivity when fillers were used. This increase was more pronounced for the composites containing nanosized fillers. The measurement of the harvested current and of the harvested power also demonstrated an enhancement of the energy harvesting capability when nanofillers were employed. From the experimental data, it appeared that the electrostrictive coefficient Q was not proportional to the inverse ratio of the permittivity and the Young modulus for the studied composites. Finally, analytical modeling of the harvested current and of the harvested energy offered an accurate description of the experimental data.

  16. Injectable carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels for soft tissue filler applications.

    PubMed

    Varma, Devika M; Gold, Gittel T; Taub, Peter J; Nicoll, Steven B

    2014-12-01

    Disease, trauma and aging all lead to deficits in soft tissue. As a result, there is a need to develop materials that safely and effectively restore areas of deficiency. While autogenous fat is the current gold standard, hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are commonly used. However, the animal and bacterial origin of HA-based materials can induce adverse reactions in patients. With the aim of developing a safer and more affordable alternative, this study characterized the properties of a plant-derived, injectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soft tissue filler. Specifically, methacrylated CMC was synthesized and crosslinked to form stable hydrogels at varying macromer concentrations (2-4% w/v) using an ammonium persulfate and ascorbic acid redox initiation system. The equilibrium Young's modulus was shown to vary with macromer concentration (ranging from ∼2 to 9.25kPa), comparable to values of native soft tissue and current surgical fillers. The swelling properties were similarly affected by macromer concentration, with 4% gels exhibiting the lowest swelling ratio and mesh size, and highest crosslinking density. Rheological analysis was performed to determine gelation onset and completion, and was measured to be within the ISO standard for injectable materials. In addition, hydrolytic degradation of these gels was sensitive to macromer concentration, while selective removal using enzymatic treatment was also demonstrated. Moreover, favorable cytocompatibility of the CMC hydrogels was exhibited by co-culture with human dermal fibroblasts. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the tunability of redox-crosslinked CMC hydrogels by varying fabrication parameters, making them a versatile platform for soft tissue filler applications.

  17. Dermal fillers in aesthetics: an overview of adverse events and treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Funt, David; Pavicic, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Background The ever-expanding range of dermal filler products for aesthetic soft tissue augmentation is of benefit for patients and physicians, but as indications and the number of procedures performed increase, the number of complications will likely also increase. Objective To describe potential adverse events associated with dermal fillers and to provide structured and clear guidance on their treatment and avoidance. Methods Reports of dermal filler complications in the medical literature were reviewed and, based on the publications retrieved and the authors’ extensive experience, recommendations for avoiding and managing complications are provided. Results Different dermal fillers have widely varying properties, associated risks, and injection requirements. All dermal fillers have the potential to cause complications. Most are related to volume and technique, though some are associated with the material itself. The majority of adverse reactions are mild and transient, such as bruising and trauma-related edema. Serious adverse events are rare, and most are avoidable with proper planning and technique. Conclusion For optimum outcomes, aesthetic physicians should have a detailed understanding of facial anatomy; the individual characteristics of available fillers; their indications, contraindications, benefits, and drawbacks; and ways to prevent and avoid potential complications. PMID:24363560

  18. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon from most natural waters ranges from 1 to 20 milligrams carbon per liter, of which approximately 75 percent are organic acids. These acids can be chromatographically fractionated into hydrophobic organic acids, such as humic substances, and hydrophilic organic acids. To effectively study any of these organic acids, they must be isolated from other organic and inorganic species, and concentrated. Usually, large volumes of water must be processed to obtain sufficient quantities of material, and adsorption chromatography on synthetic, macroporous resins has proven to be a particularly effective method for this purpose. The use of the nonionic Amberlite XAD-8 and Amberlite XAD-4 resins and the anion exchange resin Duolite A-7 for isolating and concentrating organic acids from water is presented.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of N-Halamine-based Antimicrobial Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhuni, Revathi V.; Luo, Jie; Cao, Zhengbing; Sun, Yuyu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the surface of CaCO3 fillers could be coated with an N-halamine based fatty acid to make the filler surface organophilic and accomplish antibacterial activity simultaneously, rendering the resulting polymer-filler composites antimicrobial. Thus, a new bi-functional compound, 4, 4 -Dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid (DMH-UA), was synthesized by treating the potassium salt of dimethyl hydantoin (DMH) with 11-bromoundecanoic acid (BUA). Upon chlorination treatment with diluted bleach, DMH-UA was transformed into 3-chloro-4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin- undecanoic acid (Cl-DMH-UA). Alternatively, DMH-UA could be coated onto the surface of CaCO3 to obtain the corresponding calcium salt, 4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid-calcium carbonate (DMH-UA-CaCO3). In the presence of diluted chlorine bleach, the coated DMH-UA on the surface of CaCO3 was transformed into Cl-DMH-UA, leading to the formation of Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3. The reactions were characterized with FT-IR, NMR, UV, DSC and SEM analyses. Both Cl-DMH-UA and Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 were used as antimicrobial additives for cellulose acetate (CA). The antimicrobial efficacy of the resulting samples was evaluated against both Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria). It was found that with the same additive content, CA samples with Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 and Cl-DMH-UA had very similar antimicrobial and biofilm-controlling activity, but the former released less active chlorine into the surrounding environment than the latter. PMID:22942559

  20. Cosmetic Fillers: Perspectives on the Industry.

    PubMed

    Basta, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The cosmetic filler industry has evolved substantially over the last 30 years. The market is characterized by multiple fillers and a competitive dynamic among major aesthetics companies. Marketing in the United States and Europe has been different owing to regulatory constraints. Differences have led to more rapid growth in the European market. The US market has evolved owing to growth of major companies with multiple product portfolios and leverage in consumer promotion and aesthetics office marketing owing to scale. The evolution of the filler market will include new materials, injection techniques, and facilitation devices, and new areas of injection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of electromagnetic Stirring on the Element Distribution in Laser Beam Welding of Aluminium with Filler Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, M.; Tang, Z.; Vollertsen, F.

    Additional external electromagnetic fields are used in laser beam welding of aluminium with silicon containing filler wire to manipulate the flow of the liquid metal due to induced volume forces and hence to modify the element distribution. Aiming for a better understanding of the fluid-dynamic processes inside the meld pool, a CFD model has been implemented to simulate the melt flow. In this paper, simulation results on the resulting element distribution of filler wire material under a coaxial magnetic field with different frequencies is compared to experimental results for the same parameters. It is shown that in both cases the concentration of alloying elements of the filler material has a spatial periodicity. From the CFD model it can be concluded that the change of the distribution of the filler material results from a modulation of the melt flow due to the periodic induced electromagnetic volume forces.

  2. Relative acidic compartment volume as a lysosomal storage disorder–associated biomarker

    PubMed Central

    te Vruchte, Danielle; Speak, Anneliese O.; Wallom, Kerri L.; Al Eisa, Nada; Smith, David A.; Hendriksz, Christian J.; Simmons, Louise; Lachmann, Robin H.; Cousins, Alison; Hartung, Ralf; Mengel, Eugen; Runz, Heiko; Beck, Michael; Amraoui, Yasmina; Imrie, Jackie; Jacklin, Elizabeth; Riddick, Kate; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Wassif, Christopher A.; Rolfs, Arndt; Rimmele, Florian; Wright, Naomi; Taylor, Clare; Ramaswami, Uma; Cox, Timothy M.; Hastings, Caroline; Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Ory, Daniel S.; Arias, Begona; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Sillence, Daniel J.; Wraith, James E.; Porter, Forbes D.; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Platt, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) occur at a frequency of 1 in every 5,000 live births and are a common cause of pediatric neurodegenerative disease. The relatively small number of patients with LSDs and lack of validated biomarkers are substantial challenges for clinical trial design. Here, we evaluated the use of a commercially available fluorescent probe, Lysotracker, that can be used to measure the relative acidic compartment volume of circulating B cells as a potentially universal biomarker for LSDs. We validated this metric in a mouse model of the LSD Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) and in a prospective 5-year international study of NPC patients. Pediatric NPC subjects had elevated acidic compartment volume that correlated with age-adjusted clinical severity and was reduced in response to therapy with miglustat, a European Medicines Agency–approved drug that has been shown to reduce NPC1-associated neuropathology. Measurement of relative acidic compartment volume was also useful for monitoring therapeutic responses of an NPC2 patient after bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, this metric identified a potential adverse event in NPC1 patients receiving i.v. cyclodextrin therapy. Our data indicate that relative acidic compartment volume may be a useful biomarker to aid diagnosis, clinical monitoring, and evaluation of therapeutic responses in patients with lysosomal disorders. PMID:24487591

  3. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section....973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed in... the airplane other than the tank itself. (c) Each filler cap must provide a fuel-tight seal for the...

  4. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section....973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed in... the airplane other than the tank itself. (c) Each filler cap must provide a fuel-tight seal for the...

  5. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section....973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed in... the airplane other than the tank itself. (c) Each filler cap must provide a fuel-tight seal for the...

  6. Avoiding and Treating Blindness From Fillers: A Review of the World Literature.

    PubMed

    Beleznay, Katie; Carruthers, Jean D A; Humphrey, Shannon; Jones, Derek

    2015-10-01

    As the popularity of soft tissue fillers increases, so do the reports of adverse events. The most serious complications are vascular in nature and include blindness. To review the cases of blindness after filler injection, to highlight key aspects of the vascular anatomy, and to discuss prevention and management strategies. A literature review was performed to identify all the cases of vision changes from filler in the world literature. Ninety-eight cases of vision changes from filler were identified. The sites that were high risk for complications were the glabella (38.8%), nasal region (25.5%), nasolabial fold (13.3%), and forehead (12.2%). Autologous fat (47.9%) was the most common filler type to cause this complication, followed by hyaluronic acid (23.5%). The most common symptoms were immediate vision loss and pain. Most cases of vision loss did not recover. Central nervous system complications were seen in 23.5% of the cases. No treatments were found to be consistently successful in treating blindness. Although the risk of blindness from fillers is rare, it is critical for injecting physicians to have a firm knowledge of the vascular anatomy and to understand key prevention and management strategies.

  7. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  8. Mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) - lignocellulosic fillers biocomposites in dependence to filler content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, Anna; Pantyukhov, Petr; Popov, Anatoly

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical properties of biocomposites based on ethylene-octene copolymer were studied. The aim of present work was to investigate the mechanical properties of composites based on ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) in dependence to type of the filler, filler content and trade mark of EOC. Addition of fillers (wood flour or seed flax straw) decreases elongation at break and decreases unsignificantly tensile strenght of examined copolymers. Particles of filler increase the toughness of polymer chain, which leads to decline of elongation at break. Biocomposites with wood flour had higher tensile strength and elongation at break than the composites with flax straw.

  9. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1997-12-01

    Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

  10. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., shall be made of stainless steel or equally corrosion-resistant material; except that, certain... Standards for Plastic, and Rubber and Rubber-Like Materials. Fillers shall be designed so that they in no...

  11. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Fillers: from the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Glogau, Richard G

    2012-06-01

    Modern medical use of injectable soft-tissue augmentation fillers has evolved from the introduction of bovine collage implants to an array of synthesized materials in the current domestic and foreign markets. The concept of augmentation has moved from simple lines, scars, and wrinkles to revolumizing the aging face. A brief overview of the past, present, and future injectable fillers is presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  14. Initial investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel model filler materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.; Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Various filler materials are being investigated for applicability to cryogenic wind tunnel models. The filler materials will be used to fill surface grooves, holes and flaws. The severe test environment of cryogenic models precludes usage of filler materials used on conventional wind tunnel models. Coefficients of thermal expansion, finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability of several candidate filler materials were examined. Promising filler materials are identified.

  15. PALS and DSC measurements in 8 MeV electron irradiated natural rubber filled with different fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Arunava; Pan, Sandip; Roychowdhury, Anirban; Sengupta, Asmita

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high energy electron irradiation on the microstructure and thermal properties of natural rubber (NR) filled with different fillers at different concentrations are studied. The samples are irradiated with 8 MeV electron beam to a total dose of 100 KGy. The change in free volume size and specific heat due to addition of fillers and irradiation are studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) respectively. The Positron lifetime spectra are de-convoluted into two components. The longer lived component (τo-Ps) signifies the pick-off annihilation of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) at free volume site which may be related to the radius of the free volume holes. It is observed that the specific heat (Cp) and free volume size are all affected by both irradiation and addition of fillers.

  16. Simultaneous determination of equivalence volumes and acid dissociation constants from potentiometric titration data.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, G; Ziogas, I

    1995-06-01

    New iterative methods for analysis of potentiometric titration data of (a) mixtures of weak monoprotic acids with their conjugate bases, (b) solutions of polyprotic (di- and triprotic) acids, and (c) mixtures of two diprotic acids are presented. These methods, using data exclusively resulting from the acidic region of the titration curve permits the accurate determination of the analytical concentration of one or more acids even if the titration is stopped well before the end point of the titration. For the titration of a solution containing a conjugate acid/base pair, the proposed procedure enables the extraction of the initial composition of the mixture, as well as the dissociation constant of the concerned acid. Thus, it is possible by this type of analysis to distinguish whether a weak acid has been contaminated by a strong base and define the extent of the contamination. On the other hand, for the titration of polyprotic acids, the proposed approach enables the extraction of the accurate values of the equivalence volume and the dissociation constants K(i) even when the ionization stages overlap. Finally, for the titration of a mixture of two diprotic acids the proposed procedure enables the determination of the composition of the mixture even if the sum of the concentrations of the acids is not known. This method can be used in the analysis of solutions containing two diastereoisomeric forms of a weak diprotic acid. The test of the proposed procedures by means of ideal and Monte Carlo simulated data revealed that these methods are fairly applicable even when the titration data are considerably obscured by 'noise' or contain an important systematic error. The proposed procedures were also successfully applied to experimental titration data.

  17. Effect of filler porosity on the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica gel/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Lannutti, J J; Seghi, R R

    1998-01-01

    This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effect of controlled nanoporosity on the wear resistance of polymeric composites reinforced with silica gel powders and to determine the mechanisms controlling the abrasive wear properties of these unique nanostructured materials. Silica gels were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) using four different catalysts to modify the porous structure of the resulting polysilicate silanation, an organic monomer (TEGDMA) containing various initiators was introduced into the gel powders to form a paste. The various pastes were then polymerized inside a glass mold. A pin-on-disk apparatus was then used to record the specimen length and number of revolutions. Abrasive wear rates were determined by regression analysis and statistical differences were determined by analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. BET was used to characterize the filler pore structure and scanning electron microscopy was used used to visually examine the abraded surfaces. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the wear rates of the experimental composites were noted. Within the range of filler porosities examined, wear resistance was found to be linearly dependent (R2 = 0.983) on filler pore volume. The wear rates decreased with increasing filler porosity. HCl-catalyzed gels having low porosity produced composites having relatively limited abrasion resistance. In contrast, high porosity HF-catalyzed gels produced more wear-resistant composites. The abrasive wear resistance of these nanocomposites was not significantly affected by the level of silane coupling used in these experiments. SEM evaluation suggested that better wear resistance was associated with fine-scale plastic deformation of the wear surface and the absence of filler particle pullout. Porous particles prepared via sol-gel show some promise as fillers that improve the wear resistance of photopolymerized resins. The wear resistance of the fillers

  18. Passive Cooling Enabled by Polymer Composite Coating: Dependence on Filler, Filler Size and Coating Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yue; Shi, Frank G.

    2017-07-01

    The effective passive radiation cooling that is enabled by silicone-based composites is investigated for its dependence on coating thickness and filler size in the range of nanometers to micrometers. It is established, contrary to prior reports, that the effective passive radiation cooling does not exhibit a filler size dependence, i.e., there is no optimal size at which a maximum cooling would be reached. However, the apparent cooling effect is filler type dependent and among the fillers investigated, Al2O3 exhibits the best apparent cooling effect. In addition, the apparent cooling effect is dependent on coating thickness: the thickness dependence is non-monotonic, and the maximum cooling occurs at an optimal thickness of 70 μm, regardless of filler type. Potential significant implications of the findings are also discussed.

  19. Passive Cooling Enabled by Polymer Composite Coating: Dependence on Filler, Filler Size and Coating Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yue; Shi, Frank G.

    2017-02-01

    The effective passive radiation cooling that is enabled by silicone-based composites is investigated for its dependence on coating thickness and filler size in the range of nanometers to micrometers. It is established, contrary to prior reports, that the effective passive radiation cooling does not exhibit a filler size dependence, i.e., there is no optimal size at which a maximum cooling would be reached. However, the apparent cooling effect is filler type dependent and among the fillers investigated, Al2O3 exhibits the best apparent cooling effect. In addition, the apparent cooling effect is dependent on coating thickness: the thickness dependence is non-monotonic, and the maximum cooling occurs at an optimal thickness of 70 μm, regardless of filler type. Potential significant implications of the findings are also discussed.

  20. Positron annihilation study on free volume of amino acid modified, starch-grafted acrylamide copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, K. R.; Al-Sigeny, S.; Sharshar, T.; El-Hamshary, H.

    2006-05-01

    Free volume measurements using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed for uncrosslinked and crosslinked starch-grafted polyacrylamide, and their modified amino acid samples including some of their iron(III) complexes. The measurements were performed at room temperature. The analysis of lifetime spectra yielded mostly three lifetime components. It was observed that the values of the short lifetime component τ1 are slightly higher than the lifetime associated with the self-decay of para-positronium atoms in polymers. The free volume was probed using ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation lifetime parameters. The mean free volume has also been calculated from the lifetime data. The avrage value of this parameter of the crosslinked polymer were found to be higher than those of the uncrosslinked polymer.

  1. Influence of loading volume of mefenamic acid on granules and tablet characteristics using a compaction simulator.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Go; Betz, Gabriele; Leuenberger, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Mefenamic acid (MA), a poorly water-soluble drug, was used as a model substance to investigate granules and tablet characteristics to be optimized for the loading volume of MA (0-74.1% v/v) in the formulation including lactose monohydrate/maize starch (7/3) as excipients. The compactibility of granules increased with loading volume of MA. This was related to the brittle behavior of MA during compression and the increase of intragranular pore volume of granules. The minimum disintegration time (266 +/- 8.3 s) was found in the tablet that was composed of 55.1% v/v MA and 13.6% v/v maize starch. The determination of the critical concentration of disintegrant (% v/v) required for a minimum disintegration time may be useful for solid dosage form design.

  2. The "skinny"on Sculptra: a practical primer to volumization with poly-L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Palm, Melanie; Chayavichitsilp, Pamela

    2012-09-01

    Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is a biostimulatory agent that can correct bony and soft tissue facial deficiencies by producing gradual volume restoration. Proper patient selection and clear expectations are important to treatment success. Correct product preparation, injection technique, and patient follow-up correlates with increased patient safety, outcomes, and satisfaction. Alone, or in combination with other rejuvenative procedures, Sculptra® provides longer-lasting improvement to signs of facial aging.

  3. Revealing nanocomposite filler structures by swelling and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Guilhem P; Genix, Anne-Caroline; Paupy-Peyronnet, Nathalie; Degrandcourt, Christophe; Couty, Marc; Oberdisse, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are used widely, mainly for the industrial application of car tyres. The rheological behavior of such nanocomposites depends in a crucial way on the dispersion of the hard filler particles - typically silica nanoparticles embedded in a soft polymer matrix. It is thus important to assess the filler structure, which may be quite difficult for aggregates of nanoparticles of high polydispersity, and with strong interactions at high loading. This has been achieved recently using a coupled TEM/SAXS structural model describing the filler microstructure of simplified industrial nanocomposites with grafted or ungrafted silica of high structural disorder. Here, we present an original method capable of reducing inter-aggregate interactions by swelling of nanocomposites, diluting the filler to low-volume fractions. Note that this is impossible to reach by solid mixing due to the large differences in viscoelasticity between the composite and the pure polymer. By combining matrix crosslinking, swelling in a good monomer solvent, and post-polymerization of these monomers, it is shown that it is possible to separate the filler into small aggregates. The latter have then been characterized by electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, confirming the conclusions of the above mentioned TEM-SAXS structural model applied directly to the highly loaded cases.

  4. Endocrine and performance responses to high volume training and amino acid supplementation in elite junior weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Fry, A C; Kraemer, W J; Stone, M H; Warren, B J; Kearney, J T; Maresh, C M; Weseman, C A; Fleck, S J

    1993-09-01

    To examine the effects of 1 week of high volume weightlifting and amino acid supplementation, 28 elite junior male weightlifters received either amino acid (protein) or lactose (placebo) capsules using double-blind procedures. Weightlifting test sessions were performed before and after 7 days of high volume training sessions. Serum concentrations of testosterone (Tes), cortisol (Cort), and growth hormone (GH) as well as whole blood lactate (HLa) were determined from blood draws. Lifting performance was not altered for either group after training, although vertical jump performance was not altered for either group after training, although vertical jump performance decreased for both groups. Both tests elicited significantly elevated exercise-induced hormonal and HLa concentrations. Significant decreases in postexercise hormonal and HLa concentrations from Test 1 to Test 2 were observed for both groups. Tes concentrations at 7 a.m. and preexercise decreased for both groups from Test 1 to Test 2, while the placebo group exhibited a decreased 7 a.m. Tes/Cort. These data suggest that amino acid supplementation does not influence resting or exercise-induced hormonal responses to 1 week of high volume weight training, but endocrine responses did suggest an impending over-training syndrome.

  5. Effects of silane-modified fillers on properties of dental composite resin.

    PubMed

    Aydınoğlu, Aysu; Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silanization on the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of dental composites was investigated. Silica fillers were obtained from colloidal silica solution, Ludox® HS-40 and they were silanized by using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in an acidic media. Mineralogical and chemical structures of unsilanized and silanized fillers were determined by using XRD and FT-IR analyses. The modification of unsilanized/silanized fillers were investigated by performing XPS and TGA analyses. The morphological evaluations, surface area, and particle size measurements were performed by using SEM, BET, and Zeta-Sizer, respectively. Eventually, pure and amorphous silica fillers were obtained. Furthermore, the weight percentage of the silane in silica/silane structure was compatible with theoretical values. SEM images, surface area, and particle size measurements showed that agglomeration tendencies of silanized fillers were lower compared to silanized fillers because of the MPTMS addition. Experimental composites (5/10/10/5BisGMA/HEMA/UDMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 70wt% silanized/unsilanized SiO2) were fabricated into 4mm diameter×6mm thick discs for compressive strength (CS), angular flexural strength (AFS), curing depth (CD), and polymerization shrinkage (PS) on a 25×2×2mm rectangular Teflon mold for flexural strength (FS) and modulus of elasticity (E) tests. The curing depth (CD) and degree of polymerization percentage (DP) of composites were determined. Consequently, results showed that mechanical properties and DP of composite resins can be greatly influenced by silanization as a result of the organic matrix-inorganic filler interface bonding formed by silane structures. Despite of these findings, silanization of the SiO2 was not effected DC and PS values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanical, thermal, and moisture properties of plastics with bean as filler

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experiments on polymers using beans as fillers are reported herein. We are looking for desirable mechanical, thermal and moisture properties at economical costs. Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is studied as the polymeric matrix because it is available and biodegradable. Although the physical properties are...

  7. High-Temperature Insulating Gap Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toombs, Gordon R.; Oyoung, Kevin K.; Stevens, Everett G.

    1991-01-01

    New inorganic, ceramic filler for gaps between refractory ceramic tiles offers high resistance to heat and erosion. Consists of ceramic-fiber fabric precoated with silica and further coated with silica containing small amount of silicon carbide powder to increase thermal emittance. Developed as replacement for organic filler used on thermal-protection system of Space Shuttle. Promises to serve for many missions and to reduce cost and delay of refurbishing aerospace craft. Used as sealing material in furnaces or as heat shield for sensitive components in automobiles, aircraft, and home appliances.

  8. Thermal pretreatment of silica composite filler materials

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Quan; Ramsey, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Three different silica filler materials were thermally treated in order to effect dehydration, dehydroxylation, and rehydroxylation. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), pycnometry, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For all fillers, our results indicate incremental removal of silanol groups at higher heating temperatures and irreversible dehydroxylation at over 673 K. To remove the organic content and maintain adequate silanol density for subsequent silanization on Stöber-type silica, we suggest heating at 673 K followed by overnight boiling in water. PMID:20445821

  9. Blindness caused by cosmetic filler injection: a review of cause and therapy.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Jean D A; Fagien, Steve; Rohrich, Rod J; Weinkle, Susan; Carruthers, Alastair

    2014-12-01

    Vascular occlusion causing blindness is a rare yet greatly feared complication of the use of facial aesthetic fillers. The authors performed a review of the aesthetic literature to ascertain the reported cases of blindness and the literature reporting variations in the vascular anatomy of the human face. The authors suggest a small but potentially helpful addition to the accepted management of the acute case. Cases of blindness, mostly irreversible, from aesthetic filler injections have been reported from Asia, Europe, and North America. Autologous fat appears to be the most frequent filler causing blindness. Some cases of partial visual recovery have been reported with hyaluronic acid and calcium hydroxylapatite fillers. The sudden profusion of new medical and nonmedical aesthetic filler injectors raises a new cause for alarm about patient safety. The published reports in the medical literature are made by experienced aesthetic surgeons and thus the actual incidence may be even higher. Also, newer injectors may not be aware of the variations in the pattern of facial vascular arborization. The authors present a summary of the relevant literature to date and a suggested helpful addition to the protocols for urgent management.

  10. Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.S.K.

    2008-09-15

    This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

  11. Filling effects, persistence, and safety of dermal fillers formulated with stem cells in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Maciej; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Rasmus, Marta; Warda, Karolina; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Alina; Bodnar, Magdalena; Marszałek, Andrzej; Drewa, Tomasz; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2014-11-01

    Research is scarce regarding the effectiveness of dermal fillers containing autologous stem cells. The authors sought to determine the local and systemic effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as a component of dermal fillers in an animal model. Wistar rats were injected with 1 of the following dermal fillers: ADSCs combined with hyaluronic acid (ADSC-HA), ADSCs combined with fish collagen (ADSC-COL), HA alone (CONTROL-HA), or COL alone (CONTROL-COL). Fillers were injected into the glabella, dorsum, and chest of each animal. The ADSCs were labeled with PKH26 to assess cell migration. Filling effects (FEs) were measured immediately after injection and at 1.5 months and 3 months after injection. Skin specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to assess localization and persistence of ADSCs. Mean FEs in animals implanted with ADSCs were greater and persisted longer than those of controls. No inflammatory responses were observed in any group. Three months after injection, PKH26-positive cells comprised nearly 70% of cells at the injection site in animals treated with ADSC-HA. PKH26 fluorescence also was detected in the spleen but not in the brain, kidney, or lung. Stem cells have the potential to improve the aesthetic effects and longevity of dermal fillers. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  12. The Classification and Prognosis of Periocular Complications Related to Blindness following Cosmetic Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Myung, Yujin; Yim, Sangjun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Baek-Kyu; Heo, Chan-Yeong; Baek, Rong-Min; Pak, Chang-Sik

    2017-07-01

    Common side effects during hyaluronic acid filler injections are typically mild and reversible, but several reports of blindness have received attention. The present study focused on orbital symptoms combined with blindness, aiming to classify affected patients and predict their disease course and prognosis. From September of 2012 to August of 2015, nine patients with vision loss after filler injection were retrospectively reviewed. Ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and enophthalmos were recorded over a 6-month follow-up, and patients were classified into four types according to periocular symptom manifestation. Two patients were categorized as type I (blindness without ptosis or ophthalmoplegia), two patients as type II (blindness and ptosis without ophthalmoplegia), two patients as type III (blindness and ophthalmoplegia without ptosis), and three patients as type IV (blindness with ptosis and ophthalmoplegia). The present study includes previously unpublished information about orbital symptom manifestations and prognosis combined with blindness caused by retinal artery occlusion after cosmetic filler injection. Therapeutic, V.

  13. Potential of using multiscale kenaf fibers as reinforcing filler in cassava starch-kenaf biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zainuddin, Siti Yasmine Zanariah; Ahmad, Ishak; Kargarzadeh, Hanieh; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Dufresne, Alain

    2013-02-15

    Biodegradable materials made from cassava starch and kenaf fibers were prepared using a solution casting method. Kenaf fibers were treated with NaOH, bleached with sodium chlorite and acetic buffer solution, and subsequently acid hydrolyzed to obtain cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). Biocomposites in the form of films were prepared by mixing starch and glycerol/sorbitol with various filler compositions (0-10 wt%). X-ray diffraction revealed that fiber crystallinity increased after each stage of treatment. Morphological observations and size reductions of the extracted cellulose and CNCs were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of different treatments and filler contents of the biocomposites were evaluated through mechanical tests. Results showed that the tensile strengths and moduli of the biocomposites increased after each treatment and the optimum filler content was 6%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Two Cases of Adverse Reactions of Hyaluronic Acid–based Filler Injections

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Dong, Ming; Li, Tong; Ma, Qiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the natural components of the human body with high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and nonimmunogenicity, which makes it the ideal biomedical filling agent currently available. However, for many medical practitioners, HA filler injections remain a relatively new item to carry out. Learning while practicing, it is inevitable to encounter some difficulties and adverse reactions in its application. Here we report two cases of adverse reactions to HA-based filler injections, including anaphylactic reaction on the face and vascular thrombosis after augmentation rhinoplasty with HA filler. In this report, we highlight the management and prevention of the adverse reactions, especially in case 2, because vascular thrombosis is one of the severe complications and injectors should know how to avoid it and how to deal with it, thereby increasing the safety of HA-based procedures. PMID:28293495

  15. Synthesis of Superabsorbent Polymer via Inverse Suspension Method: Effect of Carbon Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Munirah Ezzah Tuan; Shima Jamari, Saidatul; Ling, Yeong Yi; Ghazali, Suriati

    2017-05-01

    This paper studies on the effect of the addition of carbon filler towards the performance of superabsorbent polymer composite (SAPc). In this work, the SAPc was synthesized using inverse suspension polymerization method. The process involved two different solutions; dispersed phase which contains partially neutralized acrylic acid, acrylamide, APS and NN-Methylenebisacrylamide, and continuous phase which contains cyclohexane, span-80 and carbon filler (at different weight percent). The optimum SAPs and filler ratio was measured in terms of water retention in soil and characterized by Mastersizer, FTIR and SEM. Biodegradability of the polymer was determined by soil burial test and SAPc with 0.02% carbon has highest biodegradability rate. SAPc with 0.04wt% carbon showed the optimal water retention percentage among all the samples. The synthesized SAPc producing spherical shapes with parallel alignment due to the addition of carbon fiber. It can be concluded that the addition of carbon fiber able to enhance the performance of the SAP composite (SAPc).

  16. Wear behavior of light-cured resin composites with bimodal silica nanostructures as fillers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruili; Bao, Shuang; Liu, Fengwei; Jiang, Xiaoze; Zhang, Qinghong; Sun, Bin; Zhu, Meifang

    2013-12-01

    To enhance wear behavior of resin composites, bimodal silica nanostructures including silica nanoparticles and silica nanoclusters were prepared and proposed as fillers. The silica nanoclusters, a combination of individually dispersed silica nanoparticles and their agglomerations, with size distribution of 0.07-2.70 μm, were fabricated by the coupling reaction between amino and epoxy functionalized silica nanoparticles, which were obtained by the surface modification of silica nanoparticles (~70 nm) using 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane (GPS) as coupling agents, respectively. Silica nanoparticles and nanoclusters were then silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) to prepare composites by mixing with bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA) and tri (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). Experimental composites with various filler compositions were prepared and their wear behaviors were assessed in this work. The results suggested that composites with increasing addition of silica nanoparticles in co-fillers possessed lower wear volume and smoother worn surface. Particularly, the composite 53:17 with the optimum weight ratio of silica nanoparticles and silica nanoclusters presented the excellent wear behavior with respect to that of the commercial Esthet-X, although the smallest wear volume was achieved by Z350 XT. The introduction of bimodal silica nanostructures as fillers might provide a new sight for the design of resin composites with significantly improved wear resistance.

  17. Application of Image And X-Ray Microtomography Technique To Quantify Filler Distribution In Thermoplastic-Natural Rubber Blend Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Sahrim; Rasid, Rozaidi; Mouad, A. T.; Aziz Mohamed, A.; Abdullah, Jaafar; Dahlan, M.; Mohamad, Mahathir; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Hamzah Harun, M.; Yazid, Hafizal; Abdullah, W. Saffiey W.

    2010-01-05

    X-ray microtomography and ImageJ 1.39 u is used as a tool to quantify volume percentage of B{sub 4}C as fillers in thermoplastic-natural rubber blend composites. The use of percentage of area occupied by fillers as obtain from ImageJ from the microtomography sliced images enables the proposed technique to easily obtain the amount volume percentage of B{sub 4}C in the composite non-destructively. Comparison with other technique such as density measurement and chemical analysis proves the proposed technique as one of the promising approach.

  18. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  19. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  20. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  1. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  2. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  3. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  4. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed...

  5. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  6. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  7. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary construction and all parts, including valves and filler heads accessible for cleaning. New or replacement...

  8. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the airplane...

  9. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary construction and all parts, including valves and filler heads accessible for cleaning. New or replacement...

  10. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  11. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  12. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  13. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the airplane...

  14. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  15. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the airplane...

  16. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  17. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  18. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  19. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the airplane...

  1. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary construction and all parts, including valves and filler heads accessible for cleaning. New or replacement...

  2. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  3. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed in...

  4. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  5. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  6. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  7. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  8. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  9. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  10. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  11. Process for recovering filler from polymer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Maurice L.; Smith, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a process for recovering filler material from a polymeric matrix by reacting the matrix at an elevated temperature in a gas atmosphere with a controlled oxidizing potential and thereafter separating and cleaning the residue from the reaction mixture.

  12. Waste-wood-derived fillers for plastics

    Treesearch

    Brent English; Craig M. Clemons; Nicole Stark; James P. Schneider

    1996-01-01

    Filled thermoplastic composites are stiffer, stronger, and more dimensionally stable than their unfilled counterparts. Such thermoplastics are usually provided to the end-user as a precompounded, pelletized feedstock. Typical reinforcing fillers are inorganic materials like talc or fiberglass, but materials derived from waste wood, such as wood flour and recycled paper...

  13. The Role of Bacterial Biofilm in Adverse Soft-Tissue Filler Reactions: A Combined Laboratory and Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Saththianathan, Mayuran; Johani, Khalid; Taylor, Alaina; Hu, Hongua; Vickery, Karen; Callan, Peter; Deva, Anand K

    2017-03-01

    The development of chronic nodules and granulomatous inflammation after filler injections has been attributed to bacterial biofilm infection. The authors aimed to investigate the relationship between filler and bacterial biofilm using a combined in vitro and in vivo study. In vitro assays to investigate the ability of filler materials to support the growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm and the effect of multiple needle passes through a biofilm-contaminated surface were designed. Analysis of clinical biopsy specimens from patients presenting with chronic granulomas following filler administration using a number of laboratory tests for biofilm was performed. All fillers (i.e., hyaluronic acid, polyacrylamide gel, and poly-L-lactic acid) supported the growth of S. epidermidis biofilm in vitro. Multiple needle passes through a biofilm-contaminated surface resulted in significantly increased contamination of filler material by a factor of 10,000 (p < 0.001). Six clinical samples from five patients all demonstrated bacterial biofilm. The mean number of bacteria was found to be 2.2 × 10 bacteria/mg tissue (range, 5.6 × 10 to 3.7 × 10 bacteria/mg tissue). Microbiome analysis detected a predominance of Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, and Propionibacterium as present in these samples. Filler material can support the growth of bacterial biofilm in vitro. Multiple needle passes can significantly increase the risk of filler contamination. Biofilm appears to be associated with high numbers in clinical samples of patients presenting with chronic granulomatous inflammation. Strategies to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination need to be further studied and translated into clinical practice. Therapeutic, V.

  14. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  15. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O Hwan; Oh, Yu Gyeong; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Kim, Byoung Gak; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K)−1, which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis–Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally. PMID:27877843

  16. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O Hwan; Oh, Yu Gyeong; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Kim, Byoung Gak; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-12-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K)(-1), which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis-Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally.

  17. Bioactive glass particulate filler composite: Effect of coupling of fillers and filler loading on some physical properties.

    PubMed

    Oral, Onur; Lassila, Lippo V; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silanization of biostable and bioactive glass fillers in a polymer matrix on some of the physical properties of the composite. The water absorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness of different particulate filler composite resins were studied in vitro. Five different specimen groups were analyzed: A glass-free control, a non-silanized bioactive glass, a silanized bioactive glass, a non-silanized biostable glass and a silanized biostable glass groups. All of these five groups were further divided into sub-groups of dry and water-stored materials, both of them containing groups with 3wt%, 6wt%, 9wt% or 12wt% of glass particles (n=8 per group). The silanization of the glass particles was carried out with 2% of gamma-3-methacryloxyproyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). For the water absorption and solubility tests, the test specimens were stored in water for 60 days, and the percentages of weight change were statistically analyzed. Flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness values were tested with a three-point bending test and statistically analyzed. Higher solubility values were observed in non-silanized glass in proportion to the percentage of glass particles. Silanization, on the other hand, decreased the solubility values of both types of glass particles and polymer. While 12wt% non-silanized bioactive glass specimens showed -0.98wt% solubility, 12wt% silanized biostable glass specimens were observed to have only -0.34wt% solubility. The three-point bending results of the dry specimens showed that flexural strength, toughness and flexural modulus decreased in proportion to the increase of glass fillers. The control group presented the highest results (106.6MPa for flexural strength, 335.7kPA for toughness, 3.23GPa for flexural modulus), whereas for flexural strength and toughness, 12wt% of non-silanized biostable glass filler groups presented the lowest (70.3MPa for flexural strength

  18. Chemical interaction of polyethylene matrix with vegetable fillers in biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantyukhov, Petr; Monakhova, Tatiana; Popov, Anatoly; Zykova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the diffusion of low molecular weight components from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites. In order to identify the diffusible substances a model experiment used where the hexadecane acted as a model of polyethylene. It was determined that polyphenolic compounds and chlorophyll penetrate from vegetable fillers to hexadecane to the maximum extent. There was found a correlation between the amount of polyphenolic compounds diffusible from the fillers to hexadecane and thermal oxidation kinetics of real biocomposites based on polyethylene and vegetable fillers. Thus, it has been assumed the diffusion of polyphenols and chlorophyll from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites.

  19. External Compression Versus Intravascular Injection: A Mechanistic Animal Model of Filler-Induced Tissue Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Hong; Yousefi, Sivash; Qin, Jia; Tarbet, Kristin; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang; Chappell, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue ischemia is a devastating and unpredictable complication following dermal filler injection. Multiple mechanisms to explain this complication have been proposed, including vascular compression, vessel damage, and intraarterial filler emboli. To elucidate the mechanism of injury, the authors introduce a mouse model, imaged with optical microangiography and laser speckle contrast imaging technologies, to demonstrate in vivo microvascular response to soft tissue and intravascular filler injection. To determine the effect of external vascular compression on distal perfusion, the authors attempted to occlude vessels with subcutaneous hyaluronic acid gel (HAG) bolus injections into the pinna of hairless mice. The authors also performed suture ligation of a major vascular bundle. Following these interventions, laser speckle and optical microangiography were performed serially over 1 week follow up. To determine the effect of intravascular HAG injection, the authors devised and validated a novel method of cannulating the mouse external carotid artery for intraarterial access to the pinna vasculature. Using this model, the authors performed intraarterial HAG injections and completed optical microangiography and laser speckle contrast imaging. Despite large HAG bolus injections directly adjacent to vascular bundles, the authors were unable to induce compressive occlusion of the mouse pinna vessels. Vascular occlusion was successfully performed with suture ligation, but optical microangiography and laser speckle contrast imaging confirmed undisturbed distal capillary bed perfusion. With intravascular HAG injection, large segments of pinna showed distinct perfusion reduction along a vascular distribution when compared with preinjection images, most noticeably at the capillary level. The novel mouse pinna model combining intravascular access and in vivo microvascular perfusion imaging has furthered the understanding of the mechanism of filler-induced tissue ischemia

  20. Effects of PMMA and Cross-Linked Dextran Filler for Soft Tissue Augmentation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Soyun; Lee, So-Hyoun; Shim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Se Eun; Kang, Seong Soo; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted for evaluation of the ability to maintain efficacy and biocompatibility of cross-linked dextran in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (DiHM) and cross-linked dextran mixed with PMMA in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (PDiHM), compared with hyaluronic acid (HA) filler. Saline and HA solution was administered in the negative and positive control groups, and DiHM and PDiHM were administered in the test groups (n = 10 in each group). The site of cranial subcutaneous injection was the mid-point of the interpupillary line, and the site of intraoral submucosal injection was the ridge crest 2 mm below the cervical line of the mandibular left incisor. Before and immediately after filler injection, intraoral photos and lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken for analysis and comparison of the effect of the filler on the injection sites. The filler injected areas were converted into sequential size changes (%) of the baseline. Histomorphologic examination was performed after 12 weeks. The smallest value in the filler injected area was observed during the experimental period in the normal saline group (p < 0.001), which was almost absorbed at 4 weeks (7.19% ± 12.72%). The HA group exhibited a steady decrease in sequential size and showed a lower value than the DiHM and PDiHM groups (saline < HA < DHiM, PDHiM, p < 0.001). DiHM and PDiHM tended to increase for the first 4 weeks and later decreased until 12 weeks. In this study on DiHM and PDiHM, there was no histological abnormality in cranial skin and oral mucosa. DiHM and PDiHM filler materials with injection system provide an excellent alternative surgical method for use in oral and craniofacial fields.

  1. Effects of PMMA and Cross-Linked Dextran Filler for Soft Tissue Augmentation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Soyun; Lee, So-Hyoun; Shim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Se Eun; Kang, Seong Soo; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted for evaluation of the ability to maintain efficacy and biocompatibility of cross-linked dextran in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (DiHM) and cross-linked dextran mixed with PMMA in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (PDiHM), compared with hyaluronic acid (HA) filler. Saline and HA solution was administered in the negative and positive control groups, and DiHM and PDiHM were administered in the test groups (n = 10 in each group). The site of cranial subcutaneous injection was the mid-point of the interpupillary line, and the site of intraoral submucosal injection was the ridge crest 2 mm below the cervical line of the mandibular left incisor. Before and immediately after filler injection, intraoral photos and lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken for analysis and comparison of the effect of the filler on the injection sites. The filler injected areas were converted into sequential size changes (%) of the baseline. Histomorphologic examination was performed after 12 weeks. The smallest value in the filler injected area was observed during the experimental period in the normal saline group (p < 0.001), which was almost absorbed at 4 weeks (7.19% ± 12.72%). The HA group exhibited a steady decrease in sequential size and showed a lower value than the DiHM and PDiHM groups (saline < HA < DHiM, PDHiM, p < 0.001). DiHM and PDiHM tended to increase for the first 4 weeks and later decreased until 12 weeks. In this study on DiHM and PDiHM, there was no histological abnormality in cranial skin and oral mucosa. DiHM and PDiHM filler materials with injection system provide an excellent alternative surgical method for use in oral and craniofacial fields. PMID:26633376

  2. Iatrogenic occlusion of the ophthalmic artery after cosmetic facial filler injections: a national survey by the Korean Retina Society.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu Hyung; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Woo, Se Joon; Kang, Se Woong; Lee, Won Ki; Choi, Kyung Seek; Kwak, Hyung Woo; Yoon, Ill Han; Huh, Kuhl; Kim, Jong Woo

    2014-06-01

    Iatrogenic occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and its branches is a rare but devastating complication of cosmetic facial filler injections. To investigate clinical and angiographic features of iatrogenic occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and its branches caused by cosmetic facial filler injections. Data from 44 patients with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and its branches after cosmetic facial filler injections were obtained retrospectively from a national survey completed by members of the Korean Retina Society from 27 retinal centers. Clinical features were compared between patients grouped by angiographic findings and injected filler material. Visual prognosis and its relationship to angiographic findings and injected filler material. Ophthalmic artery occlusion was classified into 6 types according to angiographic findings. Twenty-eight patients had diffuse retinal and choroidal artery occlusions (ophthalmic artery occlusion, generalized posterior ciliary artery occlusion, and central retinal artery occlusion). Sixteen patients had localized occlusions (localized posterior ciliary artery occlusion, branch retinal artery occlusion, and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy). Patients with diffuse occlusions showed worse initial and final visual acuity and less visual gain compared with those having localized occlusions. Patients receiving autologous fat injections (n = 22) had diffuse ophthalmic artery occlusions, worse visual prognosis, and a higher incidence of combined brain infarction compared with patients having hyaluronic acid injections (n = 13). Clinical features of iatrogenic occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and its branches following cosmetic facial filler injections were diverse according to the location and extent of obstruction and the injected filler material. Autologous fat injections were associated with a worse visual prognosis and a higher incidence of combined cerebral infarction. Extreme caution and care should be taken during

  3. Rapid Polymer Concrete Repairs Using Available Fillers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    report was reviewed and cleared for public release by the Air Force Research Laboratory Tyndall Site (AFRL/MLQ) Public Affairs Office (PAO) and is...AFRL-ML-TY-TP-2005-4544 RAPID POLYMER CONCRETE REPAIRS USING AVAILABLE FILLERS David W. Fowler, Ph. D, P.E., Chul Suh, P.E., and...February 2006 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and

  4. Salt Filler For Making Covered Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Holmes, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    In simple fabrication technique, metal salts used to create such subsurface channels as those for coolant in metallic heat exchanger. Layer of metal deposited on structure by vacuum plasma spraying, sealing channels. Metal salt or salt mixture has melting temperature higher than those of waxes and aluminum and withstands high temperature of plasma spraying. After plasma spraying, salt filler dissolved quickly and easily and flushed away with water or other appropriate solvent, leaving behind covered channels.

  5. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  6. Stable, Thermally Conductive Fillers for Bolted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVesque, Raymond J., II; Jones, Cherie A.; Babel, Henry W.

    2003-01-01

    A commercial structural epoxy [Super Koropon (or equivalent)] has been found to be a suitable filler material for bolted joints that are required to have large thermal conductances. The contact area of such a joint can be less than 1 percent of the apparent joint area, the exact value depending on the roughnesses of the mating surfaces. By occupying the valleys between contact peaks, the filler widens the effective cross section for thermal conduction. In comparison with prior thermal joint-filler materials, the present epoxy offers advantages of stability, ease of application, and -- as a byproduct of its stability -- lasting protection against corrosion. Moreover, unlike silicone greases that have been used previously, this epoxy does not migrate to contaminate adjacent surfaces. Because this epoxy in its uncured state wets metal joint surfaces and has low viscosity, it readily flows to fill the gaps between the mating surfaces: these characteristics affect the overall thermal conductance of the joint more than does the bulk thermal conductivity of the epoxy, which is not exceptional. The thermal conductances of metal-to-metal joints containing this epoxy were found to range between 5 and 8 times those of unfilled joints.

  7. Evaluation of dermal fillers with noncontact optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Over 2 million dermal filler procedures are performed each year in the USA alone, and this figure is only expected to increase as the aging population continues to grow. Dermal filler treatments can last from a few months to years depending on the type of filler and its placement. Although adverse reactions are rare, they can be quite severe due to ischemic events and filler migration. Previously, techniques such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging have been used to evaluate the filler injections. However, these techniques are not practical for real-time filler injection guidance due to limitations such as the physical presence of the transducer. In this work, we propose the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for image-guided dermal filler injections due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of OCT. In addition, we utilize a noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) technique, to evaluate the efficacy of the dermal filler injection. A grid of air-pulse OCE measurements was taken, and the dynamic response of the skin to the air-pulse was translated to the Young's modulus and shear viscosity. Our results show that OCT was able to visualize the dermal filler injection process, and that OCE was able to localize the dermal filler injection sites. Combined with functional techniques such as optical microangiography, and recent advanced in OCT hardware, OCT may be able to provide real-time injection guidance in 3D by visualizing blood vessels to prevent ischemic events.

  8. A review of chemical-approach and ultramorphological studies on the development of fluoride-releasing dental adhesives comprising new pre-reacted glass ionomer (PRG) fillers.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tay, Franklin R; Endo, Takeshi; Pashley, David H

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on fluoride-releasing adhesives and the related studies in this field based on information from original research papers, reviews, and patent literatures. A revolutionary PRG (pre-reacted glass ionomer) filler technology--where fillers were prepared by the acid-base reaction of a fluoroaluminosilicate glass with polyalkenoic acid in water, was newly developed, and a new category as "Giomer" was introduced into the market. On fluoride release capability, SIMS examination revealed in vitro fluoride ion uptake by dentin substrate from the PRG fillers in dental adhesive. On bonding durability, it was found that the improved durability of resin-dentin bonds might be achieved not only via the strengthened dentin due to fluoride ion uptake from the PRG-Ca fillers, but also due to retention of relatively insoluble 4-AETCa formed around remnant apatite crystallites within the hybrid layer in 4-AET-containing self-etching adhesives. On ultramorphological study of the resin-dentin interface, TEM images of the PRG-Ca fillers revealed that the dehydrated hydrogel was barely distinguishable from normal glass fillers, if not for the concurrent presence of remnant, incompletely reacted glass cores. In conclusion, it was expected that uptake of fluoride ions with cariostatic effect from PRG-Ca fillers would endow dentin substrates with the benefit of secondary caries prevention, together with an effective and durable adhesion to dentin.

  9. Partial molar volumes of some alpha-amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions at 308.15 K.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yan, Z; Zhuo, K; Lu, J

    1999-08-30

    The apparent molar volumes V(2,phi) have been determined for glycine, DL-alpha-alanine, DL-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, DL-valine and DL-leucine in aqueous solutions of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol kg(-1) sodium acetate by density measurements at 308.15 K. These data have been used to derive the infinite dilution apparent molar volumes V(0)(2,phi) for the amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions and the standard volumes of transfer, Delta(t)V(0), of the amino acids from water to aqueous sodium acetate solutions. It has been observed that both V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0) vary linearly with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of the amino acids. These linear correlations have been utilized to estimate the contributions of the charged end groups (NH(3)(+), COO(-)), CH(2) group and other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0). The results show that V(0)(2,phi) values for (NH(3)(+), COO(-)) groups increase with sodium acetate concentration, and those for CH(2) are almost constant over the studied sodium acetate concentration range. The transfer volume increases and the hydration number of the amino acids decreases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. These facts indicate that strong interactions occur between the ions of sodium acetate and the charged centers of the amino acids. The volumetric interaction parameters of the amino acids with sodium acetate were calculated in water. The pair interaction parameters are found to be positive and decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the amino acids, suggesting that sodium acetate has a stronger dehydration effect on amino acids which have longer hydrophobic alkyl chains. These phenomena are discussed by means of the co-sphere overlap model.

  10. Methylmalonic acid quantification in low serum volumes by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Theresa L; Keyes, William R; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Allen, Lindsay H; Newman, John W

    2011-06-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a metabolic intermediate transformed to succinic acid (SA) by a vitamin B(12)-dependent catalytic step, and is broadly used as a clinical biomarker of functional vitamin B12 status. However, reported methods use between 100 and 1000 μL of serum or plasma making them sub-optimal for sample-limited studies, including those with neonates and infants. LC-MS/MS based protocols to measure MMA as n-butyl esters in the presence of tri-deuterated MMA (MMA-d(3)) were modified for use with 25 μL of human serum by scaling down sample processing volumes and analysis by UPLC-MS/MS. Plasma-based calibration solutions were found to be unnecessary, and chromatographic resolution and peak shape of SA and MMA was optimized in <4 min with isocratic 53:47 methanol/1.67 mM (pH 6.5) ammonium formate. Additionally, 1-cyclohexyl-urido-3-dodecanoic acid (CUDA) was included as internal standard allowing direct assessment of MMA recovery. Sample concentrations in the low normal range produced a signal:noise of >100:1. MMA intra- and inter-assay variability was under 10%. MMA-d(3) surrogate recovery averaged 93±14%. MMA stability exceeded three years in frozen samples and was unaffected by up to five freeze/thaw cycles. In conclusion, we report that methylmalonic acid can be measured with 25 μL of serum using water based standards. The assay signal:noise per concentration indicates that the method could perform as implemented with as little as 5 μL of serum. The reported method is applicable for studies of functional B12 status in sample limited experiments including investigations of nutritional status in neonates and in studies where low normal MMA levels are expected.

  11. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids mediate insulin-mediated augmentation in skeletal muscle perfusion and blood volume

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Sajeevani; Chadderdon, Scott; Wu, Melinda; Qi, Yue; Xie, Aris; Alkayed, Nabil J.; Davidson, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow (MBF) increases in response to physiological hyperinsulinemia. This vascular action of insulin may facilitate glucose uptake. We hypothesized that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), a family of arachadonic, acid-derived, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, are mediators of insulin's microvascular effects. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) was performed to quantify skeletal muscle capillary blood volume (CBV) and MBF in wild-type and obese insulin-resistant (db/db) mice after administration of vehicle or trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid (t-AUCB), an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase that converts EETs to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Similar studies were performed in rats pretreated with l-NAME. CEU was also performed in rats undergoing a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, half of which were pretreated with the epoxygenase inhibitor MS-PPOH to inhibit EET synthesis. In both wild-type and db/db mice, intravenous t-AUCB produced an increase in CBV (65–100% increase at 30 min, P < 0.05) and in MBF. In db/db mice, t-AUCB also reduced plasma glucose by ∼15%. In rats pretreated with l-NAME, t-AUCB after produced a significant ≈20% increase in CBV, indicating a component of vascular response independent of nitric oxide (NO) production. Hyperinsulinemic clamp produced a time-dependent increase in MBF (19 ± 36 and 76 ± 49% at 90 min, P = 0.026) that was mediated in part by an increase in CBV. Insulin-mediated changes in both CBV and MBF during the clamp were blocked entirely by MS-PPOH. We conclude that EETs are a mediator of insulin-mediated augmentation in skeletal muscle perfusion and are involved in regulating changes in CBV during hyperinsulinemia. PMID:25336524

  12. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption on macroporous resins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.; Suffet, I.H.; Malaiyandi, Murugan

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption on synthetic macroporous resins, such as the Amberlite XAD series and Duolite A-7, is routinely used to isolate and concentrate organic acids from forge volumes of water. Samples as large as 24,500 L have been processed on site by using these resins. Two established extraction schemes using XAD-8 and Duolite A-7 resins are described. The choice of the appropriate resin and extraction scheme is dependent on the organic solutes of interest. The factors that affect resin performance, selectivity, and capacity for a particular solute are solution pH, resin surface area and pore size, and resin composition. The logistical problems of sample handling, filtration, and preservation are also discussed.

  13. AB65. Experience in the use of synthetic fillers in phalloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Yul

    2014-01-01

    Penis size has been a source of anxiety for men throughout history, and men often feel the need to enlarge their penises in order either to improve their self-esteem or to satisfy and impress their partners. Many different types of penile enhancement surgery are performed all over the world, although there are medico-legal issues and paucity of scientific data. An ideal procedure for phalloplasty should rely on two principles: minimal incision with limited scarring and no interference with the erectile function. Several techniques have been described to increase penile length, including cutting the suspensory ligament with or without V-Y plasty of the lower abdominal skin, possibly with fat, dermis, autologous rib cartilage, or synthetic material graft to prevent reattachment of the suspensory ligament. Liposuction or lipectomy has been used for patients with a large infrapubic pad of fat. Surgery to enhance the penile girth includes lipoinjection, dermal free or pedicle grafts, and venous grafting for the corpora cavernosa, injection of synthetic dermal filler. Currently, as the need for safer, effective and less-invasive procedures is increasing, enhancement procedures using injectable products are in high demand. Injectable soft-tissue substitutes provide an affordable, nonsurgical alternative for correcting contour defects and soft tissue augmentation with autologous fat, silicone, collagen, and hyaluronic acid, dextran filler, polylactic acid. We have developed two synthetic fillers; Cross-linked dextran and polymethylmethacrylate mixture (Lipen-10), Polylactic acid (PLA) filler. Penile lnjection of; Cross-linked dextran and polymethylmethacrylate mixture (Lipen-10) and Polylactic acid filler led to significant increase in penile size, showed a good durability and was well-tolerated, without serious adverse events. Glans penis augmentation has been performed in real practice, although it is not an established procedure. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of

  14. Evaluation of microwave acid digestion for determination of fiber-volume contents in carbon-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.C.; McLaughlin, V.N.; El-Amin, L.; Ilias, S.

    1995-06-01

    The analysis of carbon-epoxy composites for fiber-volume contents is significant in determining the quality and strength of a given composite. The method commonly being used is acid digestion in a hot water bath, which takes about 2.5 hours for digestion alone. A study has been done using a new technique, what is known as Microwave Acid Digestion (MAD) for quick determination of fiber-volume contents of carbon-epoxy composites. This technique uses a specially designed teflon bomb for digestion. The bomb allows for temperatures up to 250 C and pressures up to 1,200 psi. Under such operating conditions, the MAD technique reduces digestion time to about 70 seconds. The study demonstrated that the microwave acid digestion (MAD) is an efficient means for determination of fiber-volume contents of carbon-epoxy composites.

  15. Injection volumes of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid are increasing in the endoscopic management of vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Mathew D; Koyle, Martin A; Cowan, Charles A; Zamilpa, Ismael; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2010-05-01

    Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Deflux) has been increasingly used for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Experience has shown that injecting more volume of material is necessary to achieve greater success. We evaluate trends in the number of vials being used to treat VUR using a multi-institutional database and data from patients treated at our own institution. Children of age 0-19 years in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database from 2003 to 2008 were extracted with a VUR diagnosis (ICD-9 593.7x) and subureteric injection procedure code (CPT 52327). We identified children with reflux treated with endoscopic injection at Seattle Children's Hospital from 2005 to 2008. Hospital trends of the number of vials used were evaluated using multivariate linear regression. From 2003 to 2008, we identified 4,078 endoscopic injection procedures in PHIS. There was a 33% increase in the average number of vials used per patient (p < 0.0001) with more than a threefold increase in the number of patients receiving three or more vials per procedure. All institutions increased the average vials used per patient with the most pronounced increase at the highest-volume centers. These trends were also present in the 186 children treated at our own institution. Over the study period there was an increase in the number of vials of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid being used per patient to treat children with VUR. This practice may improve success rates but will increase the cost of treatment due to the inherent expense of the material.

  16. Prediction of solute kinetics, acid-base status, and blood volume changes during profiled hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Colí, L; Brighenti, C; Chiari, L; de Pascalis, A; Avanzolini, G

    2000-02-01

    A mathematical model of solute kinetics oriented to the simulation of hemodialysis is presented. It includes a three-compartment model of body fluids (plasma, interstitial and intracellular), a two-compartment description of the main solutes (K+, Na+, Cl-, urea, HCO3-, H+), and acid-base equilibrium through two buffer systems (bicarbonate and noncarbonic buffers). Tentative values for the main model parameters can be given a priori, on the basis of body weight and plasma concentration values measured before beginning the session. The model allows computation of the amount of sodium removed during hemodialysis, and may enable the prediction of plasma volume and osmolarity changes induced by a given sodium concentration profile in the dialysate and by a given ultrafiltration profile. Model predictions are compared with clinical data obtained during 11 different profiled hemodialysis sessions, both with all parameters assigned a priori, and after individual estimation of dialysances and mass-transfer coefficients. In most cases, the agreement between the time pattern of model solute concentrations in plasma and clinical data was satisfactory. In two sessions, blood volume changes were directly measured in the patient, and in both cases the agreement with model predictions was acceptable. The present model can be used to improve the dialysis session taking some characteristics of individual patients into account, in order to minimize intradialytic unbalances (such as hypotension or disequilibrium syndrome).

  17. Effect of filler loading of nickel zinc ferrite on the tensile properties of PLA nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical strength of magnetic polymer nanocomposite (MPNC) of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer is reported. The matrix was prepared from PLA and LNR in the ratio of 90:10. The MPNC were prepared at constant mixing temperature at 180°C, mixing time of 15 min. and mixing speed of 100 rpm. In order to achieve a good dispersion of NiZn ferrite in the matrix, firstly an ultrasonic treatment had been employed to mix the LNR and NiZn ferrite for 1 hour. The MPNC of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite then were prepared via Thermo Haake internal mixer using melt-blending method from different filler loading from 1-5 wt% NiZn ferrite. The result of tensile tests showed that as the filler loading increases the tensile strength also increases until an optimum value of filler loading was reached. The Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break have also increased. The study proves that NiZn ferrite is excellent reinforcement filler in PLA matrix. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were meant to show the homogeneity dispersion of nanoparticles within the matrix and to confirm the elemental composition of NiZn ferrites-PLA/LNR nanocomposites respectively.

  18. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Copper Nanofluids: The Effect of Filler Geometry.

    PubMed

    Bhanushali, Sushrut; Jason, Naveen Noah; Ghosh, Prakash; Ganesh, Anuradda; Simon, George P; Cheng, Wenlong

    2017-06-07

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions that exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity at low filler loadings and thus have been proposed for heat transfer applications. Here, we systematically investigate how particle shape determines the thermal conductivity of low-cost copper nanofluids using a range of distinct filler particle shapes: nanospheres, nanocubes, short nanowires, and long nanowires. To exclude the potential effects of surface capping ligands, all the filler particles are kept with uniform surface chemistry. We find that copper nanowires enhanced the thermal conductivity up to 40% at 0.25 vol % loadings; while the thermal conductivity was only 9.3% and 4.2% for the nanosphere- and nanocube-based nanofluids, respectively, at the same filler loading. This is consistent with a percolation mechanism in which a higher aspect ratio is beneficial for thermal conductivity enhancement. To overcome the surface oxidation of the copper nanomaterials and maintain the dispersion stability, we employed polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a dispersant and ascorbic acid as an antioxidant in the nanofluid formulations. The thermal performance of the optimized fluid formulations could be sustained for multiple heating-cooling cycles while retaining stability over 1000 h.

  19. Fillers for improved graphite fiber retention by polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, C. H.; Simpson, F. H.; House, E. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This program was designed to develop technology for fabrication of graphite/epoxy composites containing selected boron and boron-containing fillers, determine the effects of the fillers on physical and mechanical properties of composites, and evaluate the effectiveness of the boron fillers for fiber retention when the composites are exposed to fire conditions followed by impact. Fillers evaluated were crystalline and amorphous boron, boron carbide, and aluminum boride. The fillers were evaluated by mixing with Narmco 5208 resin matrix at quantities up to 5%. Graphite composites were fabricated and evaluated with respect to their mechanical properties, resistance to humidity, and burning characteristics. Also, the mechanism by which the fillers prevented fiber release was studied.

  20. Initial Investigation of Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Model Filler Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Filler materials are used for surface flaws, instrumentation grooves, and fastener holes in wind tunnel models. More stringent surface quality requirements and the more demanding test environment encountered by cryogenic wind tunnels eliminate filler materials such as polyester resins, plaster, and waxes used on conventional wind tunnel models. To provide a material data base for cryogenic models, various filler materials are investigated. Surface quality requirements and test temperature extremes require matching of coefficients of thermal expansion or interfacing materials. Microstrain versus temperature curves are generated for several candidate filler materials for comparison with cryogenically acceptable materials. Matches have been achieved for aluminum alloys and austenitic steels. Simulated model surfaces are filled with candidate filler materials to determine finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability when subjected to cryogenic cycling. Filler material systems are identified which meet requirements for usage with aluminum model components.

  1. Adverse reactions to dermal fillers: a review of European experiences.

    PubMed

    Andre, P; Lowe, N J; Parc, A; Clerici, T H; Zimmermann, U

    2005-12-01

    In Europe, numerous dermal fillers have been utilized for the past decade. A lot of drawbacks have been reported and sometimes, severe complications occurred. Our purpose is to report the clinical aspects of the adverse reactions following injections of some of the dermal fillers. Histological aspects of complications are also described. Adverse reactions secondary to biodegradable products are usually time limited, but with the non-biodegradable products, we have observed severe, persistent, and recurrent complications. Histological examinations, in cases of non-biodegradable products, may show the presence and persistence of the filler. For the moment, there is no ideal dermal filler. All fillers can lead to adverse events and we need to inform patients fully before injecting. Clinical studies with long-term follow-up before launching a new product on the market are recommended. We believe that in Europe, at present, the CE mark is not a guarantee of safety of dermal fillers.

  2. Penile Girth Enhancement With Polymethylmethacrylate-Based Soft Tissue Fillers.

    PubMed

    Casavantes, Luis; Lemperle, Gottfried; Morales, Palmira

    2016-09-01

    An unknown percentage of men will take every risk to develop a larger penis. Thus far, most injectables have caused serious problems. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microspheres have been injected as a wrinkle filler and volumizer with increasing safety since 1989. To report on a safe and permanently effective method to enhance penile girth and length with an approved dermal filler (ie, PMMA). Since 2007, the senior author has performed penile augmentation in 752 men mainly with Metacrill, a suspension of PMMA microspheres in carboxymethyl-cellulose. The data of 729 patients and 203 completed questionnaires were evaluated statistically. The overall satisfaction rate was 8.7 on a scale of 1 to 10. After one to three injection sessions, average girth increased by 3.5 cm, or 134% (10.2 to 13.7 cm = 134.31%). Penile length also increased by weight and stretching force of the implant from an average of 9.8 to 10.5 cm. Approximately half the patients perceived some irregularities of the implant, which caused no problems. Complications occurred in 0.4%, when PMMA nodules had to be surgically removed in three of the 24% of patients who had a non-circumcised penis. After 5 years of development, penile augmentation with PMMA microspheres appears to be a natural, safe, and permanently effective method. The only complication of nodule formation and other irregularities can be overcome by an improved injection technique and better postimplantation care. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  4. Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfonic Acids). PEMs with frozen-in free volume

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, Morton

    2016-01-21

    Early work with rigid rod aromatic polyelectrolytes implied that steric hindrance in packing of the rigid rods left unoccupied volumes that could absorb and hold water molecules strongly. We called this “frozen in free volume). It is illustrated and contrasted with the packing of flexible backbone polyelectrolytes (Reference 5 of this report). This was quantified for poly(biphenylene disulfonic acid) (PBDSA) and poly(phenylene disulfonic acid) (PPDSA). We found that PPDSA held three water molecules per acid group down to 11% relative humidity (RH) and had very high conductivity even at these low RHs. (Reference 1 of report.) The frozen-in free volume was calculated to be equivalent to a λ of 3.5. The work reported below concentrated on studying these polymers and their copolymers with biphenylene disulfonic acid. As expected, the polyelectrolytes are water soluble. Several approaches towards making water stable films were studied. Grafting alkyl benzene substituents on sulfonic acid groups had worked for PBPDSA (1) so it was tried with PPDSA and a 20%/80% copolymer of BPDSA and PDSA (B20P80). T-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl benzene were grafted. Good films could be made. Water absorption and conductivity were studied as a function of RH and temperature (Reference 2). When less than 20% of the sulfonic acid groups were grafted, conductivity was much higher than that of Nafion NR212 at all RHs. At low graft levels, conductivity was ten times higher. Mechanical properties and swelling were acceptable below 90% RH. However, all the films were unstable in water and slowly disintegrated. The proposed explanation was that the molecules formed nano-aggregates in solution held together by hydrophobic bonding. Their cast films disintegrated when placed in water since hydrophobic bonding between the nano-aggregates was poor. We then shifted to crosslinking as a method to produce water stable films (References 3 and 4). Biphenyl could easily be reacted with the polymer

  5. Renal effects of essential fatty acid deficiency in hydropenic and volume-expanded rats.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Ana D O; Nunes, Flávia A; Léger, Claude; Aléssio, Maria L M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effects of essential fatty acid (EFA) on fractional sodium excretion (FE(Na(+))) and renal hemodynamics in rats during hydropenia (H) and acute volume expansion (VE), successively. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF) were measured using a blood pressure transducer and a flow probe, respectively, both connected to a flowmeter. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated by inulin clearance. The rats receiving coconut oil as only source of dietary lipids (the EFA-deficient group) presented lower levels of linoleic acid in cortex and medulla and lower body weight than the rats receiving soy oil in place of coconut oil (the control non-EFA-deficient group). During H, the EFA-deficient rats exhibited a lower level of renal vascular resistance resulting in a higher level of RBF and a higher urinary flow (V') and FE(Na(+)), although GFR was lower than in the control group. During VE, the rats of the control group responded with increased MAP, RBF, V' and FE(Na(+)), which were not found in the EFA-deficient group, suggesting an impaired hemodynamic adjustment in EFA deficiency. In conclusion, both experimental conditions revealed that EFA deficiency affects the renal hemodynamics.

  6. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  9. Investigating Filler Reinforcement and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior in Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shi-Qing; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    Solid fillers have been known to enhance the linear viscoelastic responses of polymer melts and elastomers. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of such systems is closely related to the reinforcement of the linear viscoelascity. Understanding such phenomena as the Payne effect (where the storage modulus is measured to decrease in oscillatory shear with the amplitude of the oscillation and with time for a fixed amplitude) requires a better understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism. Recent publications, from two different groups (a) (b) prompted our present study. Using monodisperse 1,4-polybutadiene melts as the matrix and nano-silicon oxide particles of 15 nm diameter as the fillers, we carried out a variety of viscoelastic and NMR-spin-echo diffusion measurements to elucidate the important role of the filler-filler networking in controlling the observed linear and nonlinear behavior at temperatures over 100 degrees above the glass transition temperature of PBD. (a)S.S. Sternstein and A. Zhu, Macromolecules 35, 7262 (2002); Composites Sci. and Techn. 63, 1113 (2003). This work claims that the reinforcement arises primarily from the entrapped chain entanglement due to chain adsorption on filler surfaces instead of the filler-filler networking. (b) H. Montes, F. Lequeux and J. Berriot, Macromolecules, 36, 8107 (2003). This work advocates that a glassy layer formed around each filler is responsible for the enhanced linear viscoelascity and for the observed nonlinear viscoelastic behavior such as the Payne effect.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation enhances stroke volume and cardiac output during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Walser, Buddy; Stebbins, Charles L

    2008-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypotheses that dietary supplementation with DHA (2 g/day) + EPA (3 g/day) enhances increases in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) and decreases in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) during dynamic exercise. Healthy subjects received DHA + EPA (eight men, four women) or safflower oil (six men, three women) for 6 weeks. Both groups performed 20 min of bicycle exercise (10 min each at a low and moderate work intensity) before and after DHA + EPA or safflower oil treatment. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), SV, CO, and SVR were assessed before exercise and during both workloads. HR was unaffected by DHA + EPA and MAP was reduced, but only at rest (88 +/- 5 vs. 83 +/- 4 mm Hg). DHA + EPA augmented increases in SV (14.1 +/- 6.3 vs. 32.3 +/- 8.7 ml) and CO (8.5 +/- 1.0 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.2 L/min) and tended to attenuate decreases in SVR (-7.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -10.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg L(-1) min(-1)) during the moderate workload. Safflower oil treatment had no effects on MAP, HR, SV, CO or SVR at rest or during exercise. DHA + EPA-induced increases in SV and CO imply that dietary supplementation with these fatty acids can increase oxygen delivery during exercise, which may have beneficial clinical implications for individuals with cardiovascular disease and reduced exercise tolerance.

  11. Increased cartilage volume after injection of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis knee patients who underwent high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Chareancholvanich, Keerati; Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat

    2014-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical procedure used to correct abnormal mechanical loading of the knee joint; additionally, intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections have been shown to restore the viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid and balance abnormal biochemical processes. It was hypothesized that combining HTO with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections would have benefit to improve the cartilage volume of knee joints. Forty patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) were randomly placed into 1 of 2 groups. The study group (n = 20) received 2 cycles (at 6-month intervals) of 5 weekly intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections after HTO operation. The control group (n = 20) did not receive any intra-articular injections after HTO surgery. Cartilage volume (primary outcome) was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pre-operatively and 1 year post-operatively. Treatment efficacy (secondary outcomes) was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index (WOMAC) and by the comparison of the total rescue medication (paracetamol/diclofenac) used (weeks 6, 12, 24, 48). MRI studies showed a significant increase in total cartilage volume (p = 0.033), lateral femoral cartilage volume (p = 0.044) and lateral tibial cartilage volume (p = 0.027) in the study group. Cartilage volume loss was detected at the lateral tibial plateau in the control group. There were significant improvements after surgery in both groups for all subscales of WOMAC scores (p < 0.001) compared to the baseline. However, no difference was found between the two groups. The study group had significantly lower amounts of diclofenac consumption (p = 0.017). Based on the findings of the present study, intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections may be beneficial for increasing total cartilage volume and preventing the loss of lateral tibiofemoral joint cartilage after HTO. Therapeutic study, Level I.

  12. Dataset for acrylate/silica nanoparticles formulations and photocured composites: Viscosity, filler dispersion and bulk Poisson׳s ratio.

    PubMed

    Gojzewski, Hubert; Sadej, Mariola; Andrzejewska, Ewa; Kokowska, Martyna

    2017-06-01

    UV-curable polymer composites are of importance in industry, biomedical applications, scientific fields, and daily life. Outstanding physical properties of polymer composites were achieved with nanoparticles as filler, primarily in enhancing mechanical strength or barrier properties. Structure-property relationships of the resulting nanocomposites are dictated by the polymer-filler molecular architecture, i.e. interactions between polymer matrix and filler, and high surface area to volume ratio of the filler particles. Among monomers, acrylates and methacrylates attracted wide attention due to their ease of polymerization and excellent physicochemical and mechanical properties of the derived polymers. We prepared and photopolymerized two series of formulations containing hydrophobized silica nanofiller (Aerosil R7200) dispersed in 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) or polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) monomers. We compared selected physical properties of the formulations, both before and after photocuring; specifically the viscosity of formulations and dispersion of the filler in the polymer matrices. Additionally, we estimated the bulk Poisson׳s ratio of the investigated nanocomposites. This article contains data related to the research article entitled "Nanoscale Young׳s modulus and surface morphology in photocurable polyacrylate/nanosilica composites" (Gojzewski et al., 2017) [1].

  13. Hyaluron Filler Containing Lidocaine on a CPM Basis for Lip Augmentation: Reports from Practical Experience.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tanja C; Sattler, Gerhard; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-06-01

    Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers is established. As monophasic polydensified hyaluronic acid products with variable density, CPM-HAL1 (Belotero Balance Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) and CPM-HAL2 (Belotero Intense Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) are qualified for beautification and particularly natural-looking rejuvenation, respectively. The aim of this article was to assess the handling and outcome of lip augmentation using the lidocaine-containing hyaluronic acid fillers, CPM-HAL1 and CPM-HAL2. Data were documented from patients who received lip augmentation by means of beautification and/or rejuvenation using CPM-HAL1 and/or CPM-HAL2. Observation period was 4 months, with assessment of natural outcome, evenness, distribution, fluidity, handling, malleability, tolerability, as well as patient satisfaction and pain. A total of 146 patients from 21 German centers participated. Physicians rated natural outcome and evenness as good or very good for more than 95% of patients. Distribution, fluidity, handling, and malleability were assessed for both fillers as good or very good in more than 91% of patients. At every evaluation point, more than 93% of patients were very or very much satisfied with the product. A total of 125 patients (85.6%) experienced transient injection-related side effects. Pain intensity during the procedure was mild (2.72 ± 1.72 on the 0-10 pain assessment scale) and abated markedly within 30 minutes (0.42 ± 0.57). Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers produced a long-term cosmetic result. Due to the lidocaine content, procedural pain was low and transient. Accordingly, a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved that was maintained throughout the observation period.

  14. Characterization of Morphology and Composition of Inorganic Fillers in Dental Alginates

    PubMed Central

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Meneghel, Luciana Lira; da Silva, Fabiane Borges; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Archimedes' Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C), Hydrogum 5 (H5), Hydrogum (H), Orthoprint (O), and Jeltrate Plus (JP). The different alginate powders (0.5 mg) were fixed on plastic stubs (n = 5) and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450°C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si) by weight (C—81.59%, H—79.89%, O—78.87%, H5—77.95%, JP—66.88%, wt). The filler fractions in volume (vt) were as follows: H5—84.85%, JP—74.76%, H—70.03%, O—68.31%, and C—56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology. PMID:25165690

  15. Structure, scattering patterns and phase behavior of polymer nanocomposites with nonspherical fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lisa M; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites made with carbon nanotubes, clay platelets, laponite disks and other novel nonspherical fillers have been the focus of many recent experiments. However, the effects of nanoparticle shape on statistical structure, polymer-mediated effective interactions, scattering patterns, and phase diagrams are not well understood. We extend and apply the polymer reference interaction site model liquid state theory to study the equilibrium properties of pseudo one-, two- and threedimensional particles (rod, disk, cube) of modest steric anisotropy and fixed space-filling volume in a dense adsorbing homopolymer melt up to relatively high volume fractions. The second virial coefficient, nanoparticle potential-of-mean force, osmotic compressibilities, and isotropic spinodal demixing boundaries have been determined. The entropic depletion attraction between nanoparticles is dominant for weakly adsorbing polymer, while strongly adsorbing chains induce a bridging attraction. Intermediate interfacial cohesion results in the formation of a steric stabilizing adsorbed polymer layer around each nanoparticle, which can partially damp inter-filler collective order on various length scales and increase order on an averaged length scale. The details of depletion, stabilization, or bridging behavior are shape-dependent and often, but not always, trends are monotonic with increasing filler dimensionality. Distinctive nanoparticle shape-dependent low angle features are predicted for the collective polymer structure factor associated with competing macrophase fluctuations and microphase-like ordering. The influence of nonzero mixture compressibility on the scattering profiles is established.

  16. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways.

  17. Characterization of morphology and composition of inorganic fillers in dental alginates.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Meneghel, Luciana Lira; da Silva, Fabiane Borges; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Archimedes' Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C), Hydrogum 5 (H5), Hydrogum (H), Orthoprint (O), and Jeltrate Plus (JP). The different alginate powders (0.5 mg) were fixed on plastic stubs (n = 5) and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450(°)C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si) by weight (C-81.59%, H-79.89%, O-78.87%, H5-77.95%, JP-66.88%, wt). The filler fractions in volume (vt) were as follows: H5-84.85%, JP-74.76%, H-70.03%, O-68.31%, and C-56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology.

  18. Lip augmentation with a new filler (agarose gel): a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Carinci, Francesco; Piattelli, Adriano

    2009-08-01

    Many fillers have been used to augment lips. Agarose gel is a new and absorbable filler indicated for the correction of soft tissues and lip. This article reviews the results of 68 cases that have undergone lip augmentation with this new filler in the last 3 years. A total of 68 patients received agarose gel for treatment for lip augmentation in a 3-year period from 2005 to 2008. Each of the patients signed an informed consent form. The patients were between 35 and 70 years of age. Three patients were male, and 65 were female. A volume of 0.5-1.0 mL of agarose gel was sufficient for each lip. A bigger volume may result in a dense mass and pain. All patients were successfully treated with injections of agarose gel. Clinical improvement was noted immediately, and only mild bruising was recorded. All of the the patients returned to the clinic 10 days after treatment for follow-up, and all felt that an excellent cosmetic result was obtained. The patients were told to return after an additional month for follow-up and possible reinjection. The results lasted approximately 5 months with a gradual decline to baseline. The agarose gel was very well tolerated with only a few mild adverse reactions that resolved spontaneously. During 3 years of clinical use, agarose gel proved to be a reliable and predictable treatment for lip augmentation.

  19. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  20. Interspecies differences in reaction to a biodegradable subcutaneous tissue filler: severe inflammatory granulomatous reaction in the Sinclair minipig.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Touitou, Dan; Levin, Galit; Ickowicz, Diana E; Zada, Moran Haim; Abbas, Randa; Yankelson, Lior; Domb, Abraham J; Nyska, Abraham

    2015-02-01

    Soft tissue filler products have become very popular in recent years, with ever-increasing medical and aesthetic indications. While generally considered safe, the number of reported complications with tissue fillers is growing. Nevertheless, there is no specific animal model that is considered as the gold standard for assessing safety or efficacy of tissue fillers, and there are very little data on interspecies differences in reaction to these products. Here, we report on interspecies differences in reaction to a subcutaneous injectable co-polyester, composed of castor oil and citric acid. Comparison of the histopathological local tissue changes following 1-month postimplantation, indicated that in rats the reaction consisted of cavities, surrounded by relatively thin fibrotic enveloping capsule. In contrast, an unexpected severe inflammatory granulomatous reaction was noticed in Sinclair minipigs. To our knowledge, this is the first report on significant interspecies differences in sensitivity to tissue fillers. It emphasizes the importance of using the appropriate animal model for performing preclinical biocompatibility assays for biodegradable polymers, tissue fillers, and implanted medical devices in general. It also makes the Sinclair minipig subject for scrutiny as an animal model in future biocompatibility studies.

  1. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  2. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  3. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  4. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  5. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  6. Filler Wire Development for 2195 Aluminum-Lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cho, Alex; Russell, Carolyn; Zimmerman, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The presentation outline summarizes activities supporting the development of filler wire for 215 aluminum-lithium. The specific objective of the research was to identify an Al-Cu based filler wire chemistry which reduces weld susceptibility in 2195 Aluminum-Lithium welds and repairs welds along with providing adequate mechanical properties. This report is in viewgraph form.

  7. Use of nut shells as fillers in polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The three nutshell fillers including walnut, almond and pistachio nutshell were added to PLA. All the physical properties of samples deteriorated relative to PLA. When subjected to heat pre-treatment, although the physical properties of PLA-filler samples still deteriorated, the extent of deteriorat...

  8. Filler-wire positioner for electron beam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaupre, W. M.; Fueg, L. B.; Phillips, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    Miniaturized positioner is installed in any electron beam vacuum chamber for use with wire feed applications requiring filler wire. Horizontal and vertical control of the positioner is maintained from a console while chamber is under vacuum. Device permits more positive positioning of welding filler wire.

  9. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  10. Selecting fillers on emotional appearance improves lineup identification accuracy.

    PubMed

    Flowe, Heather D; Klatt, Thimna; Colloff, Melissa F

    2014-12-01

    Mock witnesses sometimes report using criminal stereotypes to identify a face from a lineup, a tendency known as criminal face bias. Faces are perceived as criminal-looking if they appear angry. We tested whether matching the emotional appearance of the fillers to an angry suspect can reduce criminal face bias. In Study 1, mock witnesses (n = 226) viewed lineups in which the suspect had an angry, happy, or neutral expression, and we varied whether the fillers matched the expression. An additional group of participants (n = 59) rated the faces on criminal and emotional appearance. As predicted, mock witnesses tended to identify suspects who appeared angrier and more criminal-looking than the fillers. This tendency was reduced when the lineup fillers matched the emotional appearance of the suspect. Study 2 extended the results, testing whether the emotional appearance of the suspect and fillers affects recognition memory. Participants (n = 1,983) studied faces and took a lineup test in which the emotional appearance of the target and fillers was varied between subjects. Discrimination accuracy was enhanced when the fillers matched an angry target's emotional appearance. We conclude that lineup member emotional appearance plays a critical role in the psychology of lineup identification. The fillers should match an angry suspect's emotional appearance to improve lineup identification accuracy.

  11. Aluminum oxide filler prevents obstructions in tubing during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1966-01-01

    Granular aluminum oxide is used as filler in serpentine tubing while welding the tubing to a flat surface. The filler eliminates obstructions in the tubes formed by molten weld nuggets and is porous enough to allow gases to escape from the welding area.

  12. Fillers as Signals: Evidence from a Question-Answering Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Esther J.; Risko, Evan F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of a human or computer "partner" on the production of fillers ("um" and "uh") during a question and answer task. Experiment 1 investigated whether or not responding to a human partner as opposed to a computer partner results in a higher rate of filler production. Participants…

  13. Fillers as Signals: Evidence from a Question-Answering Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Esther J.; Risko, Evan F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of a human or computer "partner" on the production of fillers ("um" and "uh") during a question and answer task. Experiment 1 investigated whether or not responding to a human partner as opposed to a computer partner results in a higher rate of filler production. Participants…

  14. Filler syllables: what is their status in emerging grammar?

    PubMed

    Peters, A M

    2001-02-01

    Although it has long been observed that some children incorporate unglossable syllables into their early utterances, it has been difficult to integrate these 'fillers' into theories of language acquisition. Because they straddle boundaries between phonology and morphosyntax, and between pragmatics and lexicon, they do not fit neatly into linguists' notions about 'modules' of language. Fillers have been reported in quite an array of languages, and yet they seem to be more common among learners of some languages than others. Even when language is held constant, children seem to vary immensely as to whether they produce fillers at all. With more researchers reporting fillers in more languages, it seems time to (1) review what we now know about fillers; (2) propose a reasonably unified set of criteria for identifying them; and (3) suggest an approach that will promote their further study.

  15. Simulation of Polymer Physical Gel With Platelet Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Di; Gerssape, Dilip

    Platelet filler such as clays have superior effects on the properties of polymer gels. We used molecular dynamic simulations to study platelet filled composite gels system, in which small hexagonal disks simulate the platelets and gelation is due to short-range attraction between end-monomers and platelets. The properties of platelet filled composites are studied as a function of filler concentration. The mechanism of gelation was found similar to those of pure polymer gels; the polymers and platelets formed organic-inorganic networks, which percolate at high enough filler concentration. It was observed platelets aggregated into local intercalation structure, which significantly differs from typical spherical fillers. This unique intercalation structure is examined by radial distribution function and ordering parameters. We discussed how intercalation would affect the properties of the platelet composites by comparing them with spherical fillers.

  16. Managing Complications of Fillers: Rare and Not-So-Rare

    PubMed Central

    Haneke, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted. PMID:26865784

  17. Inorganic and prepolymerized filler analysis of four resin composites.

    PubMed

    Salazar, D C; Dennison, J; Yaman, P

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the filler content by weight percentage of four resin composites and examined the morphology, size, and elemental distribution of the filler particles. Four commercially available light-cured resin composites were evaluated for filler content by weight using ashing in air and acetone dissolution techniques. Ten specimens were analyzed for each material and technique. Specimens for ashing were heated to 650°C for 30 minutes. For the acetone dilution, the uncured specimens were dissolved, centrifuged, and decanted. In addition, scanning electron microscopy evaluation and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis were performed to determine morphologic characteristics and elemental distribution, respectively. Filler percentages by weight for Aelite LS, Filtek LS, IPS Empress Direct, and Kalore from ashed in air were 86.44%, 77.86%, 72.17%, and 70.62%, and from acetone dissolution percentages were 85.05%, 75.56%, 78.88%, and 77.73%, respectively. Aelite LS had significantly higher filler content for both techniques. Kalore had significantly lower filler content for the ashing technique (70.62%), and Filtek LS had significantly lower filler content for the acetone dissolution technique (75.55%). Manufacturer reported filler content for Aelite LS (88%) and Filtek LS (76%) approximated the study results for both techniques, while Kalore (82%) and IPS Empress Direct (79%) were only similar for acetone dissolution, indicating higher content of prepolymerized particles. Morphologic examination showed spherical shaped particles for Aelite LS and splintered and irregular shaped particles for all other materials. Aelite LS had the highest filler content for both techniques. Values for filler content by weight using the acetone dissolution were closer to manufacturer reported values.

  18. Intracellular pH modulates taste receptor cell volume and the phasic part of the chorda tympani response to acids.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Vijay; Pasley, Hampton; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Heck, Gerard L; Vinnikova, Anna K; DeSimone, John A

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between cell volume and the neural response to acidic stimuli was investigated by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell volume in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) in vitro and by rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve recordings in vivo. CT responses to HCl and CO2 were recorded in the presence of 1 M mannitol and specific probes for filamentous (F) actin (phalloidin) and monomeric (G) actin (cytochalasin B) under lingual voltage clamp. Acidic stimuli reversibly decrease TRC pHi and cell volume. In isolated TRCs F-actin and G-actin were labeled with rhodamine phalloidin and bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease-1 conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488, respectively. A decrease in pHi shifted the equilibrium from F-actin to G-actin. Treatment with phalloidin or cytochalasin B attenuated the magnitude of the pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume. The phasic part of the CT response to HCl or CO2 was significantly decreased by preshrinking TRCs with hypertonic mannitol and lingual application of 1.2 mM phalloidin or 20 microM cytochalasin B with no effect on the tonic part of the CT response. In TRCs first treated with cytochalasin B, the decrease in the magnitude of the phasic response to acidic stimuli was reversed by phalloidin treatment. The pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume induced a flufenamic acid-sensitive nonselective basolateral cation conductance. Channel activity was enhanced at positive lingual clamp voltages. Lingual application of flufenamic acid decreased the magnitude of the phasic part of the CT response to HCl and CO2. Flufenamic acid and hypertonic mannitol were additive in inhibiting the phasic response. We conclude that a decrease in pHi induces TRC shrinkage through its effect on the actin cytoskeleton and activates a flufenamic acid-sensitive basolateral cation conductance that is involved in eliciting the phasic part of the CT response to

  19. Hybrid Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle Colloidal Gels are Injectable Fillers for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhen; Jamal, Syed; Detamore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Injectable bone fillers have emerged as an alternative to the invasive surgery often required to treat bone defects. Current bone fillers may benefit from improvements in dynamic properties such as shear thinning during injection and recovery of material stiffness after placement. Negatively charged inorganic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled with positively charged organic poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs to create a cohesive colloidal gel. This material is held together by electrostatic forces that may be disrupted by shear to facilitate extrusion, molding, or injection. Scanning electron micrographs of the dried colloidal gels showed a well-organized, three-dimensional porous structure. Rheology tests revealed that certain colloidal gels could recover after being sheared. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were also highly viable when seeded on the colloidal gels. HAp/PLGA NP colloidal gels offer an attractive scheme for injectable filling and regeneration of bone tissue. PMID:23815275

  20. [What's new in aesthetic dermatology: filler and laser treatments].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C

    2009-05-01

    In esthetic dermatology, filling and laser treatments are two essential techniques. Several recent studies on calcium hydroxyapatite in filling treatments and facial volumetry, in esthetics, but also in HIV patients, have been published. It was also tested in accentuated melomental folds where it is superior to hyaluronic acid. In aging of the skin of the dorsal aspect of the hands, hyaluronic acid provides slightly better results than collagen. Filler rhinoplasty can correct minor deformations of the nose. Lipofilling is advantageous for linear scleroderma of the face, at least in the forehead region, and adipocyte stem cells may be a future solution for facial aging or lipoatrophy. The risk of local and/or general sarcoid reactions related to interferon in patients having undergone filling injections has been reported. In the field of laser treatment, fractionated photothermolysis has motivated much more research and seem particularly valuable in treating acne scars, aging of the dorsal aspect of the hands, and, more anecdotally, in colloid milium and pearly penile papules. Laser is also useful in preventing surgical scars where a mini-diode can also be used. For axillary hyperhidrosis, subdermic Nd-YAG laser competes with botulinum toxin, with longer-lasting results. Solutions are appearing for treatment of red or white striae cutis distensae. Intense pulsed light is the reference technique for poikiloderma of Civatte, and seems effective, with new devices, for melasma. However, inappropriately used by nonphysicians, IPL can cause serious ocular accidents; one case of uveitis has been reported.

  1. Effect of continuous longitudinal glass fiber reinforcement on the cantilever beam strength of particulate filler composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Christopher Watts, David

    2006-11-01

    weight fraction of filler increased, but a higher fiber volume fraction did not lead to a significantly higher cantilever beam strength.

  2. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in (1) H MRS volumes composed heterogeneously of grey and white matter.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Brealy, Jennifer A; Linden, David E J; Evans, C John

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration using localised MRS suffers from partial volume effects related to differences in the intrinsic concentration of GABA in grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. These differences can be represented as a ratio between intrinsic GABA in GM and WM: rM . Individual differences in GM tissue volume can therefore potentially drive apparent concentration differences. Here, a quantification method that corrects for these effects is formulated and empirically validated. Quantification using tissue water as an internal concentration reference has been described previously. Partial volume effects attributed to rM can be accounted for by incorporating into this established method an additional multiplicative correction factor based on measured or literature values of rM weighted by the proportion of GM and WM within tissue-segmented MRS volumes. Simulations were performed to test the sensitivity of this correction using different assumptions of rM taken from previous studies. The tissue correction method was then validated by applying it to an independent dataset of in vivo GABA measurements using an empirically measured value of rM . It was shown that incorrect assumptions of rM can lead to overcorrection and inflation of GABA concentration measurements quantified in volumes composed predominantly of WM. For the independent dataset, GABA concentration was linearly related to GM tissue volume when only the water signal was corrected for partial volume effects. Performing a full correction that additionally accounts for partial volume effects ascribed to rM successfully removed this dependence. With an appropriate assumption of the ratio of intrinsic GABA concentration in GM and WM, GABA measurements can be corrected for partial volume effects, potentially leading to a reduction in between-participant variance, increased power in statistical tests and better discriminability of true effects.

  3. Alignment of 700 globin sequences: extent of amino acid substitution and its correlation with variation in volume.

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, O. H.; Moens, L.; Vanfleteren, J.; Trotman, C. N.; Suzuki, T.; Vinogradov, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Seven-hundred globin sequences, including 146 nonvertebrate sequences, were aligned on the basis of conservation of secondary structure and the avoidance of gap penalties. Of the 182 positions needed to accommodate all the globin sequences, only 84 are common to all, including the absolutely conserved PheCD1 and HisF8. The mean number of amino acid substitutions per position ranges from 8 to 13 for all globins and 5 to 9 for internal positions. Although the total sequence volumes have a variation approximately 2-3%, the variation in volume per position ranges from approximately 13% for the internal to approximately 21% for the surface positions. Plausible correlations exist between amino acid substitution and the variation in volume per position for the 84 common and the internal but not the surface positions. The amino acid substitution matrix derived from the 84 common positions was used to evaluate sequence similarity within the globins and between the globins and phycocyanins C and colicins A, via calculation of pairwise similarity scores. The scores for globin-globin comparisons over the 84 common positions overlap the globin-phycocyanin and globin-colicin scores, with the former being intermediate. For the subset of internal positions, overlap is minimal between the three groups of scores. These results imply a continuum of amino acid sequences able to assume the common three-on-three alpha-helical structure and suggest that the determinants of the latter include sites other than those inaccessible to solvent. PMID:8535255

  4. Effects of Ammi visnaga (Bisnaga) extract on the volume and acidity of stimulated gastric secretion in fasting rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jan, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of extract of Ammi visnaga on volume and acidity of stimulated gastric secretion in rabbits and also its safety on liver and kidney function. Quasi experimental study. Pharmacology Department, Saidu Medical College, Swat, in the years 2008-9. Thirty rabbits weighing 1 - 1.5 kg were divided into groups A, B and C each having 10 animals. After fasting for 48 hours, pylorus of animals of group A and B was ligated. Group A was administered Carbachol and group B was given extracts of Ammi visnaga followed by Carbachol after 15 minutes intraperitoneally. After 4 hours, stomach contents were measured for volume and then centrifuged and estimated for acidity. The extract was also administered to group C animals for 45 days to observe its effects on liver and kidney function. In group B, reduction in volume, free and total acidity of gastric juice was highly significant when the mean values were compared with group A. In group C, mean values of liver and kidney function test compared with pre-treated values, were found statistically non-significant. Ammi visnaga extract can be used effectively and safely in the treatment of hyper acidity conditions and peptic ulcer after evaluation of its effects in human being.

  5. Inhibition of enamel demineralization by buffering effect of S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Masayuki; Kakuda, Shinichi; Ida, Yusuke; Toshima, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Masanori; Endo, Kazuhiko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2014-02-01

    The buffering capacity and inhibitory effects on enamel demineralization of two commercially available dental sealants were evaluated in this study. The effects of filler particles were also examined. Disks of enamel and cured sealant materials of BeautiSealant (silica or S-PRG filler) or Teethmate F-1 were incubated in lactic acid solutions (pH 4.0) for 1-6 d. The pH changes and amounts of ions released in the solutions were assessed, and enamel surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The pH of the solution with BeautiSealant (S-PRG filler) was neutralized from pH 4.0 to pH 6.1 (after incubation for 1 d) and from pH 4.0 to pH 6.7 (after incubation for 6 d). In addition, no release of calcium ions was detected and the enamel surface was morphologically intact in scanning electron microscopy images. However, the pH of the solution with Teethmate F-1 remained below pH 4.0 during incubation from days 1 to 6. Calcium release was increased in solutions up to and after 6 d of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the structures of hydroxyapatite rods were exposed at the specimen surfaces as a result of demineralization. Ions released from S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant rapidly buffered the lactic acid solution and inhibited enamel demineralization.

  6. Filler Materials for Polyphenylenesulphide Composite Coatings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Gawlik, K.

    2001-07-17

    Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have tested polymer-based coating systems to reduce the capital equipment and maintenance costs of heat exchangers in corrosive and fouling geothermal environments. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect low-cost carbon steel tubing; they are formulated to resist wear from hydroblasting and to have high thermal conductivity. Recently, new filler materials have been developed for coating systems that use polyphenylenesulphide as a matrix. These materials include boehmite crystals (orthorhombic aluminum hydroxide, which is grown in situ as a product of reaction with the geothermal fluid), which enhance wear and corrosion resistance, and carbon fibers, which improve mechanical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties of the composite.

  7. Recent developments in annual growth lignocellulosics as reinforcing fillers in thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R.E.; Caulfield, D.F.; Rowell, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    Recent interest in reducing the environmental impact of materials is leading to the development of newer agricultural based materials that can reduce the stress to the environment. Several billion pounds of fillers and reinforcements are used annually in the plastics industry and their use is likely to increase, to reduce the amount of plastics used in a product, with improved compounding technology and new coupling agents. The use of lignocellulosic fibers (eg. kenaf, jute, etc.) as reinforcing fillers in plastics has generated significant interest in recent years. The use of lignocellosic fibers permit the use of high volume fillings due to their lower densities and non-abrasive properties, and therefore reduces the use of plastics in a product. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50% weight of glass fiber-PP injection molded composite and are superior to typical calcium carbonate or talc based PP composites. Results indicate that annual growth lignocellulosic wastes and fibers are viable reinforcing fillers as long as the right processing conditions and aids are used, and for applications where the higher water absorption of the agro-base fiber composite is not critical.

  8. Tensile Residual Stress Mitigation Using Low Temperature Phase Transformation Filler Wire in Welded Armor Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Tzelepis, Demetrios A; Payzant, E Andrew; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) has been a persistent issue in welding of high-strength steels. Mitigating residual stresses is one of the most efficient ways to control HIC. The current study develops a proactive in-process weld residual stress mitigation technique, which manipulates the thermal expansion and contraction sequence in the weldments during welding process. When the steel weld is cooled after welding, martensitic transformation will occur at a temperature below 400 C. Volume expansion in the weld due to the martensitic transformation will reduce tensile stresses in the weld and heat affected zone and in some cases produce compressive residual stresses in the weld. Based on this concept, a customized filler wire which undergoes a martensitic phase transformation during cooling was developed. The new filler wire shows significant improvement in terms of reducing the tendency of HIC in high strength steels. Bulk residual stress mapping using neutron diffraction revealed reduced tensile and compressive residual stresses in the welds made by the new filler wire.

  9. Does the amount of filler content in sealants used to prevent decalcification on smooth enamel surfaces really matter?

    PubMed

    Van Bebber, Lauren; Campbell, Phillip M; Honeyman, Allen L; Spears, Robert; Buschang, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    To determine how filler content and an acidic environment affect the retention of sealants placed on smooth enamel surfaces. A sample of 120 teeth was randomly divided into six subsamples. Three experimental sealants with identical formulas, with the exception of the amount of filler content (18%, 30%, 50%), were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations. Half of the subsamples were exposed to an acid environment (pH of 2.5) for 96 hours. With the use of a tooth-brushing simulator, each tooth was exposed to 15,000 brushing strokes, while a slurry of 1 : 3 toothpaste/neutral sodium bicarbonate cycled through the machine. Initial and final photographs were analyzed subjectively and objectively. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs were used to evaluate the tooth surface. Subjective analyses showed significant (P < .05) filler effects, with the 18% filled sealant showing the least change, followed by the 30% sealant, then the 50% filled sealant, which showed the greatest loss. Objective analyses showed the same pattern of loss, but the differences between sealants were not statistically significant. Exposure to an acidic environment had no significant effect on sealant retention. SEMS showed a layer of sealant remaining on all of the sealed teeth evaluated. Filler content of resin sealant material affects the retention of sealants on smooth enamel surfaces; exposure to an acid environment has no effect on sealant retention. Within the limits of this study, highly filled resin sealants once saturated have the ability to endure the oral environment and remain on a smooth enamel surface, regardless of the amount of filler content.

  10. Microstructural and rheological analysis of fillers and asphalt mastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, R.; Simon, A.; Kocserha, I.; Buzimov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pavements are made of different grades of mineral aggregates and organic binder. The aggregates are sorted in different sizes and different amount which are mixed together with bitumen. The finest mineral fraction (d<0.063 mm) is called filler. This component has an important role in asphalt mixture - it fills the gaps between the aggregates and if mixed with bitumen (which is called asphalt mastics) it sticks the larger particles together. Particle size, microstructure and surface properties of fillers highly affect the cohesion with bitumen, therefore the aim of our research was to investigate the microstructure of mineral fillers (limestone, dolomite) which are used in Hungarian road constructions with the use of different techniques (particle size distribution, scanning electronmicroscopy tests, mercury intrusion porosimetry, BET specific surface tests, determination of hydrophobicity). After the tests of fillers, asphalt mastics were prepared and rheological examinations were obtained. These examinations served to observe the interaction and the effect of fillers. The stiffening effect of fillers and the causes of rutting were also investigated. Based on our results, it can be stated that particle size, hydrophobic properties and the amount of fillers highly affect the rheological properties of mastics.

  11. Orbiter Gap Filler Bending Model for Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure loads on a protruding gap filler during an Orbiter reentry are investigated to evaluate the likelihood of extraction due to pressure loads, and to ascertain how much bending will be induced by re-entry pressure loads. Oblique shock wave theory is utilized to develop a representation of the pressure loads induced on a gap filler for the ISSHVFW trajectory, representative of a heavy weight ISS return. A free body diagram is utilized to react the forces induced by the pressure forces. Preliminary results developed using these methods demonstrate that pressure loads, alone, are not likely causes of gap filler extraction during reentry. Assessment of the amount a gap filler will bend over is presented. Implications of gap filler bending during re-entry include possible mitigation of early boundary layer transition concerns, uncertainty in ground based measurement of protruding gap fillers from historical Orbiter flight history, and uncertainty in the use of Orbiter gap fillers for boundary layer prediction calibration. Authors will be added to the author list as appropriate.

  12. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  13. Rapid determination of the equivalence volume in potentiometric acid-base titrations to a preset pH-II Standardizing a solution of a strong base, graphic location of equivalence volume, determination of stability constants of acids and titration of a mixture of two weak acids.

    PubMed

    Ivaska, A

    1974-06-01

    A newly proposed method of titrating weak acids with strong bases is applied to standardize a solution of a strong base, to graphic determination of equivalence volume of acetic acid with an error of 0.2%, to calculate the stability constants of hydroxylammonium ion, boric acid and hydrogen ascorbate ion and to analyse a mixture of acetic acid and ammonium ion with an error of 0.2-0.7%.

  14. Modulation of the enzymatic efficiency of ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase by the amino acid volume around the catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Matías A; Arakaki, Adrián K; Rial, Daniela V; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2008-03-01

    Ferredoxin (flavodoxin)-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are ubiquitous flavoenzymes that deliver NADPH or low-potential one-electron donors (ferredoxin, flavodoxin, adrenodoxin) to redox-based metabolic reactions in plastids, mitochondria and bacteria. Plastidic FNRs are quite efficient reductases. In contrast, FNRs from organisms possessing a heterotrophic metabolism or anoxygenic photosynthesis display turnover numbers 20- to 100-fold lower than those of their plastidic and cyanobacterial counterparts. Several structural features of these enzymes have yet to be explained. The residue Y308 in pea FNR is stacked nearly parallel to the re-face of the flavin and is highly conserved amongst members of the family. By computing the relative free energy for the lumiflavin-phenol pair at different angles with the relative position found for Y308 in pea FNR, it can be concluded that this amino acid is constrained against the isoalloxazine. This effect is probably caused by amino acids C266 and L268, which face the other side of this tyrosine. Simple and double FNR mutants of these amino acids were obtained and characterized. It was observed that a decrease or increase in the amino acid volume resulted in a decrease in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme without altering the protein structure. Our results provide experimental evidence that the volume of these amino acids participates in the fine-tuning of the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme.

  15. Do you know where your fillers go? An ultrastructural investigation of the lips

    PubMed Central

    Vent, Julia; Lefarth, Florian; Massing, Thomas; Angerstein, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the exact location and position of hyaluronic acid fillers in the perioral region by ultrasound and optical coherence tomography. Introduction To date, there are few in vivo investigations in humans on the exact positioning of injectable hyaluronic acid fillers, and severe complications such as hematoma and thromboembolism are rarely addressed. Materials and methods There were nine female patients investigated in this pilot study. All of them were periorally injected with hyaluronic acid. The exact product, amount, and locations, as well as the injection techniques, were recorded and compared. Before, immediately after, and 18 days after injection, photo documentation as well as high-resolution ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography of the lip surface were performed. Results Minor bruising occurred, which resolved within 7 to 9 days. On day 18, no more hemorrhage could be detected. Injected material distributed well in the tissue, and no embolism or thrombosis occurred. However, the injected material came close (up to 1 mm) to important structures such as blood vessels. Lip wrinkles improved, and the lip surface was smoother and more even. Conclusion Hyaluronic acid injections can improve aesthetics and reduce fine wrinkles of the lips. In the patients investigated in this study, compression of structures such as vessels and nerve fibers did not occur, nor did any severe complications result from injection. However, one must be aware of serious complications (eg, hematoma, thromboembolism) and the important anatomic structures (eg, orbicularis oris muscle, vessels, and nerves), and injecting physicians should always have hyaluronidase as a rescue medication at hand. Summary Hyaluronic acid is a suitable tool for lip augmentation and reduction of fine lines; however, one must be aware of anatomic structures when injecting filler material into the lips and perioral area, and be familiar with the injection techniques. PMID:25018646

  16. Intracellular pH Modulates Taste Receptor Cell Volume and the Phasic Part of the Chorda Tympani Response to Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lyall, Vijay; Pasley, Hampton; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Heck, Gerard L.; Vinnikova, Anna K.; DeSimone, John A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between cell volume and the neural response to acidic stimuli was investigated by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell volume in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) in vitro and by rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve recordings in vivo. CT responses to HCl and CO2 were recorded in the presence of 1 M mannitol and specific probes for filamentous (F) actin (phalloidin) and monomeric (G) actin (cytochalasin B) under lingual voltage clamp. Acidic stimuli reversibly decrease TRC pHi and cell volume. In isolated TRCs F-actin and G-actin were labeled with rhodamine phalloidin and bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease-1 conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488, respectively. A decrease in pHi shifted the equilibrium from F-actin to G-actin. Treatment with phalloidin or cytochalasin B attenuated the magnitude of the pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume. The phasic part of the CT response to HCl or CO2 was significantly decreased by preshrinking TRCs with hypertonic mannitol and lingual application of 1.2 mM phalloidin or 20 μM cytochalasin B with no effect on the tonic part of the CT response. In TRCs first treated with cytochalasin B, the decrease in the magnitude of the phasic response to acidic stimuli was reversed by phalloidin treatment. The pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume induced a flufenamic acid–sensitive nonselective basolateral cation conductance. Channel activity was enhanced at positive lingual clamp voltages. Lingual application of flufenamic acid decreased the magnitude of the phasic part of the CT response to HCl and CO2. Flufenamic acid and hypertonic mannitol were additive in inhibiting the phasic response. We conclude that a decrease in pHi induces TRC shrinkage through its effect on the actin cytoskeleton and activates a flufenamic acid–sensitive basolateral cation conductance that is involved in eliciting the phasic part of the CT response to

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polymer matrix composite material with combination of ZnO filler and nata de coco fiber as a candidate of semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Asep Handaya; Anindita, Hana Nabila

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of semiconductor composite using acrylic matrix filled with ZnO and nata de coco fiber has been conducted in this research. The purpose of this research is to obtain semiconductor composite material that has a good mechanical strength and thermal resistance. In situ polymerization method is used in this research and the composites are ready to be characterized after 12 hours. The main parameter that is characterized is the electric conductivity of the composite. Additional parameters are also characterized such as composite's elastic modulus and glass transition temperature. The composites that has been made in this research can be classified as semiconductor material because the conductivity is in the range of 10-8-103 S/cm. In general the addition of ZnO and nata de coco filler can increase the conductivity of the composite. The highest semiconductor characteristic in acrylic/ZnO composite is obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 3.4 x 10-7 S/cm. Similar with acrylic/ZnO composite, in acrylic/nata de coco fiber composite the highest semiconductor characteristic is also obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 1.15 x 10-7 S/cm. Combination of 20% volume of ZnO, 10% volume of nata de coco, and 70% volume of acrylic resulting in composite with electric conductivity of 1.92 x 10-7 S/cm. In addition, combination of ZnO and nata de coco fiber as filler in composite can also improve the characteristic of composite where composite with 20% volume of ZnO filler and 10% volume of nata de coco fiber resulting in composite with elastic modulus of 1.79 GPa and glass transition temperature of 175.73°C which is higher than those in acrylic/ZnO composite.

  18. Remedial methods for intergranular attack of alloy 600 tubing. Volume 3. Boric acid and acetic acid remedial methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubright, M.M.

    1986-06-01

    An important cause of recent tube degradation in recirculating pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators with open tube/tubesheet crevices is intergranular attack (IGA) of alloy 600 tubing in the crevice region. The attack appears to occur on the hot leg tubing because of high concentrations of caustic species formed from remnants of past phosphate water treatment, combined with materials from inleakage from freshwater-cooled condensers. The concept of using neutralizers to modify the aggressiveness of the crevice environment was examined. It appears that this can be accomplished by neutralizing the caustic species with an acid. Two ways to apply the acid are by off-line flushing during plant shutdown and by on-line treatment during operation. The substance that appears to be most suitable for off-line flushing is acetic acid, with boric acid as a second choice. Concentrations should be in the range of from 1000 to 5000 ppM. The addition of 1000 to 5000 ppM of a non-ionic detergent in the flush solution should improve penetration of the crevice. Use of preflush lancing to remove sludge on the tubesheet will also help by reducing acid consumption. The requirements for materials to be used in on-line treatment are more stringent because of possible interaction with other components in the secondry system. Boric acid is the only substance that has operational experience. A series of tests are proposed to investigate the behavior of acetic acid and boric acid on tubesheet sludge, on tubesheet/support plate material, and on alloy 600/tubesheet couples. Similarly, areas of uncertainty of on-line treatment with boric acid are its effect on tubesheet/support plate materials and on the rest of the secondary system. 23 refs.

  19. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic organic separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity is predictable from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach is applied to two polymer- plasticizer -filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10-mil) fuel cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  20. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.

  1. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance for...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance for...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance for...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance for...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance for...

  6. Prevention and management of vision loss relating to facial filler injections

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kwok Thye David; Chua, Jun Jin; Lee, Hung Ming; Lim, Joyce Teng-Ee; Chuah, Gerard; Yim, Benjamin; Puah, Boon Kwang

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION With the increased use of filler and fat injections for aesthetic purposes, there has been a corresponding increase in the incidence of complications. Vision loss as an uncommon but devastating vascular side effect of filler injections was the focus of this paper. METHODS A review committee, consisting of plastic surgeons, aesthetic medical practitioners, ophthalmologists and dermatologists from Singapore, was convened by the Society of Aesthetic Medicine (Singapore) to review and recommend methods for the prevention and management of vision loss secondary to filler injections. RESULTS The committee agreed that prevention through proper understanding of facial anatomy and good injection techniques was of foremost importance. The committee acknowledged that there is currently no standard management for these cases. Based on existing knowledge, injectors may follow a proposed course of action, which can be divided into immediate, definitive and supportive. The goals were to reduce intraocular pressure, dislodge the embolus to a more peripheral location, remove or reverse central ischaemia, preserve residual retinal function, and prevent the deterioration of vision. Dissolving a hyaluronic acid embolus remains a controversial option. It is proposed that injectors must be trained to recognise symptoms, institute immediate actions and refer patients without delay to dedicated specialists for definitive and supportive management. CONCLUSIONS Steps to prevent and manage vision loss based on current evidence and best clinical practices are outlined in this paper. Empirical referral to any emergency department or untrained doctors may lead to inordinate delays and poor outcomes for the affected eye. PMID:27549227

  7. Prevention and management of vision loss relating to facial filler injections.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kwok Thye David; Chua, Jun Jin; Lee, Hung Ming; Lim, Joyce Teng-Ee; Chuah, Gerard; Yim, Benjamin; Puah, Boon Kwang

    2016-08-01

    With the increased use of filler and fat injections for aesthetic purposes, there has been a corresponding increase in the incidence of complications. Vision loss as an uncommon but devastating vascular side effect of filler injections was the focus of this paper. A review committee, consisting of plastic surgeons, aesthetic medical practitioners, ophthalmologists and dermatologists from Singapore, was convened by the Society of Aesthetic Medicine (Singapore) to review and recommend methods for the prevention and management of vision loss secondary to filler injections. The committee agreed that prevention through proper understanding of facial anatomy and good injection techniques was of foremost importance. The committee acknowledged that there is currently no standard management for these cases. Based on existing knowledge, injectors may follow a proposed course of action, which can be divided into immediate, definitive and supportive. The goals were to reduce intraocular pressure, dislodge the embolus to a more peripheral location, remove or reverse central ischaemia, preserve residual retinal function, and prevent the deterioration of vision. Dissolving a hyaluronic acid embolus remains a controversial option. It is proposed that injectors must be trained to recognise symptoms, institute immediate actions and refer patients without delay to dedicated specialists for definitive and supportive management. Steps to prevent and manage vision loss based on current evidence and best clinical practices are outlined in this paper. Empirical referral to any emergency department or untrained doctors may lead to inordinate delays and poor outcomes for the affected eye. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  8. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    PubMed

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P < 0.05). This novel resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  9. Comparison of pirenzepine, ranitidine, and pirenzepine-ranitidine combination for reducing preoperative gastric fluid acidity and volume in children.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, N; Nishina, K; Mikawa, K; Shiga, M; Obara, H

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a two-part controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative oral pirenzepine (muscarinic receptor antagonist known to inhibit gastric secretion), ranitidine, and the combination pirenzepine-ranitidine in controlling gastric fluid pH and volume in 210 ASA I children, aged 2-14 yr, undergoing elective surgery. In the first part of the study (n = 90), the proportion of children considered at risk for aspiration pneumonitis was reduced with pirenzepine 25 mg (P < 0.05) but not with 12.5 mg. In the second part of the study, the other 120 children were allocated randomly to one of four groups: pirenzepine 25 mg with placebo; ranitidine 75 mg with placebo; pirenzepine 25 mg with ranitidine 75 mg; and placebo and placebo. These medications were administered 1 h before anaesthesia. After tracheal intubation, volume and pH of the gastric fluid aspiration via a multiorifice orogastric tube were measured. Pirenzepine 25 mg decreased gastric fluid volume (P < 0.05) but failed to increase gastric pH. Ranitidine 75 mg increased gastric pH (P < 0.05) but failed to decrease fluid volume. The pirenzepine-ranitidine combination reduced gastric fluid acidity and volume (P < 0.05).

  10. Dermal filler complications: a clinicopathologic study with a spectrum of histologic reaction patterns.

    PubMed

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed; Fawzy, Sameh; Saied, Asmaa; Al Said, Mohammed; Amer, Ahmed; Eassa, Bayoumi

    2015-02-01

    Although dermal fillers are generally accepted as safe and well-tolerable cosmetic tools, adverse reaction still forms a prognostic problem. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinicopathologic patterns of dermal filler complications in our center. A 5-year single-center study that included patients complained from filler complications and referred to the dermatopathology unit in Al-Azhar University for histologic assessment. The study included 38 female patients with an average age of 47 years. The mean onset of complications was 14.6 ± 5.27 months after injection. The injected material included hyaluronic acid (18.4%), silicone (52.6%), bovine collagen (15.8%) and polyacrylamide hydrogel (13.2%). Most lesions were located on the face (55.3%), less commonly on the hands (18.4%), buttocks (21%), and rarely on the vulva (5.3%). The clinical spectrum included indurated plaque (23.7%), nodular lesion (31.6%), inflammatory mass (15.8%), atrophic lesion (10.5%), skin discoloration (13.1%) and ulceration (5.3%). Histologically, granulomatous reaction was the major finding, either a foreign body granuloma (34.2%) or infectious granuloma (13.2%). Other histologic reactions included dermal pseudocysts with chronic inflammation (26.3%), dermal fibrosis (15.8%), and eosinophilic panniculitis (10.5%). Our results confirmed that dermal fillers could be manifested with variable clinical presentations and show different histologic reactions. Because of long-standing duration until complications occur, history taking is crucial and should be emphasized in every suspected patient. It is hoped that this article will increase awareness for recognition of these variable complications and help select the appropriate therapy.

  11. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Norshamira, A. Mariatti, M.

    2015-07-22

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  12. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norshamira, A.; Mariatti, M.

    2015-07-01

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe2O3) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  13. Amino Acid Correction of Regulatory Volume Decrease Evoked by Hypotonic Stress in Mouse Oocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, M A; Golichenkov, V A; Pogorelova, V N; Panait, A I; Smirnov, A A; Pogorelov, A G

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory volume decrease in response to hypotonic stress is typical of the oocytes and early mouse embryos. Changes in the kinetics of osmotic reaction can be used as a marker of the modulating effect of the incubation medium on transmembrane transport in embryonic cells. Quantitative laser scanning microtomography (QLSM) was used to measure oocyte volume. In this paper, it is shown that addition of 5 μM glycine, taurine, or GABA, as well as ATP to Dulbecco's medium abolished the regulatory volume decrease in mature mouse oocytes.

  14. Acoustic Identification of Filler Materials in Unexploded Ordnance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    amplitude Calculate filler velocity and attenuation Match measured properties with database Sender Receiver Top view ordnance case Filler Acoustic...time of this signal peak is at the middle of the rise of the leading signal, not at the time where the signal rises from zero amplitude which is the...differentiate it from the case noise that will always be present. First, the time signal must 10 rapidly increase in amplitude from the baseline noise level

  15. Influence of silanization and filler fraction on aged dental composites.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Lee, S Y; Keh, E S; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-11-01

    The effect of silanization and filler fraction on the mechanical properties of aged dental composites was investigated. Experimental composites (75/25 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% 8 microm silanized/unsilanized BaSiO6) were fabricated into 4.7 mm diameter x 2.2 mm thick discs and 3.5 mm diameter x 7.3 mm thick discs for diametral tensile and compressive tests, respectively. The effect of immersion in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for 0-30 days on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and compressive strength (CS) of the samples was evaluated and analysed by ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The fracture interface between filler and resin matrix was then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results and subsequent statistical evidence from DTS (18.6+/-7.6 MPa, silanized versus 11.7+/-2.6 MPa, unsilanized) and CS (85.1+/-29.7 MPa, silanized versus 56.0+/-11.3 MPa, unsilanized) strongly implies that silanization may greatly enhance the mechanical properties of the resin composites. Furthermore, it also shows that both DTS and CS increased proportionally as the filler fraction of the composites increased. However, in the unsilanized groups, DTS decreased (up to 40%) as the filler fraction increased, and CS showed no relevance to the filler fraction at all. As for the influence of aging, it was found that both DTS and CS showed a significant decrease after immersion in 75% ethanol, and silanization heavily correlated with the filler fraction of aged-resin composites. Microscopic examination of the fractured samples showed that failure primarily occurred within the resin matrix per se for silanized composites and adjacent to the filler particles for unsilanized composites. All the evidence points to the conclusion that mechanical properties of aged-resin composites can be greatly influenced by silanization and the filler fraction.

  16. Global Updates on the Future Directions of Neurotoxins and Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Heningburg, Jade

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Neurotoxins and fillers continue to remain in high demand, comprising a large part of the growing business of cosmetic minimally invasive procedures. Multiple Food and Drug Administration–approved safe yet different products exist within each category, and the role of each product continues to expand. The authors review the literature to provide an overview of the use of neurotoxins and fillers and their future directions. PMID:28018777

  17. High-volume extraction of nucleic acids by magnetic bead technology for ultrasensitive detection of bacteria in blood components.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Melanie; Kleesiek, Knut; Dreier, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid isolation, the most technically demanding and laborious procedure performed in molecular diagnostics, harbors the potential for improvements in automation. A recent development is the use of magnetic beads covered with nucleic acid-binding matrices. We adapted this technology with a broad-range 23S rRNA real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay for fast and sensitive detection of bacterial contamination of blood products. We investigated different protocols for an automated high-volume extraction method based on magnetic-separation technology for the extraction of bacterial nucleic acids from platelet concentrates (PCs). We added 2 model bacteria, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli, to a single pool of apheresis-derived, single-donor platelets and assayed the PCs by real-time RT-PCR analysis with an improved primer-probe system and locked nucleic acid technology. Co-amplification of human beta(2)-microglobulin mRNA served as an internal control (IC). We used probit analysis to calculate the minimum concentration of bacteria that would be detected with 95% confidence. For automated magnetic bead-based extraction technology with the real-time RT-PCR, the 95% detection limit was 29 x 10(3) colony-forming units (CFU)/L for S. epidermidis and 22 x 10(3) CFU/L for E. coli. No false-positive results occurred, either due to nucleic acid contamination of reagents or externally during testing of 1030 PCs. High-volume nucleic acid extraction improved the detection limit of the assay. The improvement of the primer-probe system and the integration of an IC make the RT-PCR assay appropriate for bacteria screening of platelets.

  18. Fillers for improved graphite fiber retention by polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a program designed to determine the extent to which elemental boron and boron containing fillers added to the matrix resin of graphite/epoxy composites prevent the release of graphite fibers when the composites are exposed to fire and impact conditions are described. The fillers evaluated were boron, boron carbide and aluminum boride. The conditions evaluated were laboratory simulations of those that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation. The baseline (i.e., unfilled) laminates evaluated were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy. The baseline and filled laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, also were compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the baseline graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that the addition of boron and boron containing fillers to the resin matrix eliminated this fiber release. Mechanical properties of laminates containing the boron and boron containing fillers were lower than those of the baseline laminates. These property degradations for two systems: boron (5 micron) at 2.5 percent filler loading, and boron (5 micron) at 5.0 percent filler loading do not appear severe enough to preclude their use in structural composite applications.

  19. Coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules as a basis for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper production.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Fan, Jun; Chen, Wensen; Shu, Jiayan; Qian, Xueren; Wei, Haifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Shen, Jing

    2016-09-20

    The sustainable, efficient use of renewable bio-based additives in the production of various materials fits well into the concept of sustainability. Here, the concept of coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper-based cellulosic networks is presented. Coaggregation of precipitated calcium carbonate filler particles and uncooked, unmodified corn starch granules by cationic polyacrylamide (a cationic high molecular weight polymer flocculant) in combination with bentonite (an anionic microparticle) prior to addition to cellulosic fiber slurry delivered enhanced filler bondability with cellulosic fibers. For instance, under the conditions studied, preaggregation resulted in an increase in filler bondability factor from 9.24 to 15.21 at starch dosage of 1% (on the basis of the dry weight of papermaking stock). The swelling and gelatinization of the starch granules in starch-filler preaggregates or hybrids enabled the "bridging" of the gaps in cellulosic networks, leading to structural consolidation and strength enhancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Solvent accessibility, residue charge and residue volume, the three ingredients of a robust amino acid substitution matrix.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Hani; Katanforoush, Ali; Torabi, Noorossadat; Najafabadi, Hamed Shateri

    2007-04-21

    Cost measure matrices or different amino acid indices have been widely used for studies in many fields of biology. One major criticism of these studies might be based on the unavailability of an unbiased and yet effective amino acid substitution matrix. Throughout this study we have devised a cost measure matrix based on the solvent accessibility, residue charge, and residue volume indices. Performed analyses on this novel substitution matrix (i.e. solvent accessibility charge volume (SCV) matrix) support the uncontaminated nature of this matrix regarding the genetic code. Although highly similar to a number of previously available cost measure matrices, the SCV matrix results in a more significant optimality in the error-buffering capacity of the genetic code when compared to many other amino acid substitution matrices. Besides, a method to compare an SCV-based scoring matrix with a number of widely used matrices has been devised, the results of which highlights the robustness of this matrix in protein family discrimination.

  1. Prediction of steady-state volume of distribution of acidic drugs by quantitative structure-pharmacokinetics relationships.

    PubMed

    Zhivkova, Zvetanka; Doytchinova, Irini

    2012-03-01

    The volume of distribution (VD) is one of the most important pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs. The present study employs quantitative structure-pharmacokinetics relationships (QSPkR) to derive models for VD prediction of acidic drugs. The steady-state volume of distribution (VD(ss)) values of 132 acidic drugs were collected, the chemical structures were described by 178 molecular descriptors, and QSPkR models were derived after variable selection by genetic algorithm and stepwise regression. Models were validated by cross-validation procedures and external test set. According to the molecular descriptors selected as the most predictive for VD(ss), the presence of seven- and nine-member cycles, atom type P(5+), SH groups, and large nonionized substituents increase the VD(ss), whereas atom types S(2+) and S(4+) and polar ionized substituents decrease it. Cross-validation and external validation studies on the QSPkR models derived in the present study showed good predictive ability with mean fold error values ranging from 1.58 (cross-validation) to 2.25 (external validation). The model performance is comparable to more complicated methods requiring in vitro or in vivo experiments and superior to the existing QSPkR models concerning acidic drugs. Apart from the prediction of VD in human, present models are also useful as a curator of available pharmacokinetic databases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Concentration determination of nucleic acids and proteins using the micro-volume BioSpec-nano-spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Suja

    2011-02-17

    Nucleic acid quantitation procedures have advanced significantly in the last three decades. More and more, molecular biologists require consistent small-volume analysis of nucleic acid samples for their experiments. The BioSpec-nano provides a potential solution to the problems of inaccurate, non-reproducible results, inherent in current DNA quantitation methods, via specialized optics and a sensitive PDA detector. The BioSpec-nano also has automated functionality such that mounting, measurement, and cleaning are done by the instrument, thereby eliminating tedious, repetitive, and inconsistent placement of the fiber optic element and manual cleaning. In this study, data is presented on the quantification of DNA and protein, as well as on measurement reproducibility and accuracy. Automated sample contact and rapid scanning allows measurement in three seconds, resulting in excellent throughput. Data analysis is carried out using the built-in features of the software. The formula used for calculating DNA concentration is: Sample Concentration = DF · (OD260-OD320)· NACF (1) Where DF = sample dilution factor and NACF = nucleic acid concentration factor. The Nucleic Acid concentration factor is set in accordance with the analyte selected. Protein concentration results can be expressed as μg/mL or as moles/L by entering e280 and molecular weight values respectively. When residue values for Tyr, Trp and Cysteine (S-S bond) are entered in the e280Calc tab, the extinction coefficient values are calculated as e280 = 5500 x (Trp residues) + 1490 x (Tyr residues) + 125 x (cysteine S-S bond). The e280 value is used by the software for concentration calculation. In addition to concentration determination of nucleic acids and protein, the BioSpec-nano can be used as an ultra micro-volume spectrophotometer for many other analytes or as a standard spectrophotometer using 5 mm pathlength cells.

  3. Concentration Determination of Nucleic Acids and Proteins Using the Micro-volume Bio-spec Nano Spectrophotometer

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Suja

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic Acid quantitation procedures have advanced significantly in the last three decades. More and more, molecular biologists require consistent small-volume analysis of nucleic acid samples for their experiments. The BioSpec-nano provides a potential solution to the problems of inaccurate, non-reproducible results, inherent in current DNA quantitation methods, via specialized optics and a sensitive PDA detector. The BioSpec-nano also has automated functionality such that mounting, measurement, and cleaning are done by the instrument, thereby eliminating tedious, repetitive, and inconsistent placement of the fiber optic element and manual cleaning. In this study, data is presented on the quantification of DNA and protein, as well as on measurement reproducibility and accuracy. Automated sample contact and rapid scanning allows measurement in three seconds, resulting in excellent throughput. Data analysis is carried out using the built-in features of the software. The formula used for calculating DNA concentration is: Sample Concentration = DF · (OD260-OD320)· NACF (1) Where DF = sample dilution factor and NACF = nucleic acid concentration factor. The Nucleic Acid concentration factor is set in accordance with the analyte selected1. Protein concentration results can be expressed as μg/ mL or as moles/L by entering e280 and molecular weight values respectively. When residue values for Tyr, Trp and Cysteine (S-S bond) are entered in the e280Calc tab, the extinction coefficient values are calculated as e280 = 5500 x (Trp residues) + 1490 x (Tyr residues) + 125 x (cysteine S-S bond). The e280 value is used by the software for concentration calculation. In addition to concentration determination of nucleic acids and protein, the BioSpec-nano can be used as an ultra micro-volume spectrophotometer for many other analytes or as a standard spectrophotometer using 5 mm pathlength cells. PMID:21372788

  4. Carbonated calcium phosphates are suitable pH-stabilising fillers for biodegradable polyesters.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Carsten; Epple, Matthias

    2003-05-01

    Carbonated amorphous calcium phosphates were prepared with different carbonate content. Their ability to neutralise acidity was probed by time-resolved titration experiments with lactic acid, the monomer that results from degradation of polylactide. The results show that although calcium phosphate as such can reduce acidity, their buffering range lies at a pH of about 4, i.e. outside the physiological range. This is not related to the rate of dissolution. Carbonated calcium phosphates as well as calcium carbonate (calcite) alone are able to keep the pH around 7.4. Consequently, carbonated calcium phosphates are suitable basic filler materials as they are able to compensate acidity, and to buffer within the physiological pH-range.

  5. Injectable Cartilage Shaving: An Autologous and Long Lasting Filler Material for Correction of Minor Contour Deformities in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Ali; Hamedi, Zahra Sadat; Manafi, Amir; Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Rajaee, Ahmadreza; Manafi, Farzad

    2015-07-01

    Filler materials are gaining popularity in nonsurgical rhinoplasty the major advantages are the ability to camouflage the surface deformities, and also the soft and malleable consistency; while the major drawback of the safe fillers such as hyaluronic acid is short durability. In this study, we evaluated the injectable cartilage shaving as an autologous filler material for correction of minor contour deformities in rhinoplasty. Injectable cartilage shaving was used for correction of surface irregularities in primary or secondary rhinoplasty, and long term results of 128 patients were evaluated. The source of cartilage was autologous septum, rib or less frequently, the ear concha. The material was injected with 14 to 18 gauge needles or blunted tip lipofilling cannulas with 1.3-1.7 mm internal diameters. It was performed whether during the septorhinoplasty or as a separate single procedure without elevation of the flap. Success was defined as the long term survival of the graft in the desired site and absence of recurrent deformity or complications such as extrusion, infection or displacement. Twenty seven males and 101 females underwent the procedure from May 2008 to January 2014. Mean follow up period was 31 (13-58) months. Ninety five percent of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the results at the last follow up visits and touch up procedure was performed for the unsatisfied patients. Injectable cartilage shaving is a reliable filler to correct and camouflage the surface irregularities, and it is durable and predictable in long term follow ups.

  6. Injectable Cartilage Shaving: An Autologous and Long Lasting Filler Material for Correction of Minor Contour Deformities in Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Manafi, Ali; Hamedi, Zahra Sadat; Manafi, Amir; Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Rajaee, Ahmadreza; Manafi, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Filler materials are gaining popularity in nonsurgical rhinoplasty the major advantages are the ability to camouflage the surface deformities, and also the soft and malleable consistency; while the major drawback of the safe fillers such as hyaluronic acid is short durability. In this study, we evaluated the injectable cartilage shaving as an autologous filler material for correction of minor contour deformities in rhinoplasty. METHODS Injectable cartilage shaving was used for correction of surface irregularities in primary or secondary rhinoplasty, and long term results of 128 patients were evaluated. The source of cartilage was autologous septum, rib or less frequently, the ear concha. The material was injected with 14 to 18 gauge needles or blunted tip lipofilling cannulas with 1.3-1.7 mm internal diameters. It was performed whether during the septorhinoplasty or as a separate single procedure without elevation of the flap. Success was defined as the long term survival of the graft in the desired site and absence of recurrent deformity or complications such as extrusion, infection or displacement. RESULTS Twenty seven males and 101 females underwent the procedure from May 2008 to January 2014. Mean follow up period was 31 (13-58) months. Ninety five percent of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the results at the last follow up visits and touch up procedure was performed for the unsatisfied patients. CONCLUSION Injectable cartilage shaving is a reliable filler to correct and camouflage the surface irregularities, and it is durable and predictable in long term follow ups. PMID:26284177

  7. Reinforced Positive Filler Paste For Lead/Acid Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dean B.; Rippel, Wally E.

    1991-01-01

    Lead-coated glass fibers extend battery life. Mixture of lead-coated glass fibers and positive paste form pellets of active material between grid wires of positive battery electrode. Fibers contribute to charge capacity, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stability of electrode.

  8. Use of ( sup 11 C)aminocyclohexanecarboxylate for the measurement of amino acid uptake and distribution volume in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppe, R.A.; Mangner, T.; Betz, A.L.; Shulkin, B.L.; Allen, R.; Kollros, P.; Kuhl, D.E.; Agranoff, B.W. )

    1990-09-01

    A quantitative positron emission tomographic (PET) method to measure amino acid blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport rate and tissue distribution volume (DV) has been developed using {sup 11}C-labeled aminocyclohexanecarboxylate (ACHC), a nonmetabolized amino acid analogue. Dynamic PET data were acquired as a series of 15 scans covering a total of 60 min and analyzed by means of a two-compartment, two-parameter model. Functional images were calculated for the amino acid transport rate constants across the BBB and the amino acid DV in the brain. Results show ({sup 11}C)ACHC to have an influx rate constant in gray matter of approximately 0.03-0.04 ml g-1 min-1, indicating a single-pass extraction fraction of approximately 5-7%. The intersubject coefficient of variation was approximately 15% while intrasubject variability of repeat scans was only slightly greater than 5%. Studies were performed in 15 young normal volunteer control subjects, 5 elderly controls, 7 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, and one patient with phenylketonuria. Results indicate that ({sup 11}C)-ACHC will serve as the basis of a method for measuring amino acid transport rate and DV in the normal and pathological human brain.

  9. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 4: The effects on Canada`s forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.

    1997-12-31

    This report reviews the state of acid rain assessment related to Canadian forests as it has progressed since the last assessment carried out in 1990. The assessment also highlights key policy issues and the uncertainties associated with addressing them. Sections of the report cover the following: Acid rain and current forest decline in coastal birch, sugar maple, and high elevation forests; the effects of acid rain on tree physiology and soil chemistry; results of forest health monitoring in national, North American, Ontario, and Quebec networks; the critical loads or levels of acid deposition, with reference to case studies; and international involvement in acid rain research and abatement. Finally, research and information needs are identified.

  10. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  11. Effects of PCC fillers on plain paper ink-jet print quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Alan J.; Donigian, Douglas W.; Gill, Robert A.

    1997-08-01

    Ink jet printability is rapidly becoming a requirement for all multipurpose office papers. These papers must have an optimized balance of properties so they can perform equally well under various printing methods such as xerography, ink jet, and thermal imaging. The office paper of today truly must be a multipurpose copy paper capable of providing good toner adhesion as well as controlled absorption of aqueous ink jet solutions. The demand for ink jet paper is increasing rapidly. The global market for cut-size ink jet papers will expand to nearly 1.4 million tons by the year 2000. By that time the global market for all cut-size multipurpose plain printing papers will grow to nearly twenty million tons. The ink jet printing process places a large volume of aqueous ink on the surface of a substrate. The manner in which the substrate handles that volume of ink determines in large part the quality of the print. Multipurpose office papers are composed chiefly of cellulose fibers, inorganic fillers, and chemical additives. All of these components affect the quality of the sheet as an ink jet substrate. The particle morphology, surface area, and surface treatment of PCC fillers affect the ink jet printability of multipurpose office papers. This paper focuses on results from pilot paper machine and commercial trials performed in an effort to turn 'plain' office papers into high quality multipurpose papers capable of meeting or exceeding ink jet print quality specifications.

  12. Adipic acid enhanced flue gas desulfurization process for industrial boilers. Volume 2. Technical assessment. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, G.P.; Hargrove, O.W.

    1983-03-01

    The SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency with the adipic acid averaged 94.3% over a 30-day period, representing a significant improvement in the performance of the system using only limestone. Economic calculations for an industrial boiler adipic-acid-enhanced limestone FGD system indicate a slight reduction in both capital and operating expenses relative to a limestone-only system designed for 90% SO/sub 2/ control of 3.5% sulfur coal. The costs are competitive with the dual alkali system. The successful demonstration of the adipic-acid-enhanced limestone system increases the number of demonstrated technologies available to a potential user.

  13. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of percolates and its evaporates from Technosols before and after limestone filler stabilisation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The chemistry of waters is recognized as a relevant monitoring tool when assessing the adverse effects of acid mine drainage. The weathering of sulphide minerals produces a great variety of efflorescences of soluble sulphate salts. These minerals play an important role for environmental pollution, since they can be either a sink or a source for acidity and trace elements. This communication deals with the leachability of potentially toxic elements (PTE) eluting from technosols formed from soils affected by mining activities and limestone filler. A total of three contaminated soils affected by opencast mining were selected and mixed with limestone filler at three percentages: 10 %, 20 % and 30 %, providing nine stabilised samples. These samples were stored in containers and moistened simulating rainfall. The percolates obtained were collected, and the PTEs content (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn) was determined. Evaporation-precipitation experiments were carried out in these waters, and the mineralogical composition of efflorescences was evaluated. The study area is heavily polluted as a result of historical mining and processing activities, producing large amount of wastes, characterised by high trace elements content and acidic pH. The results obtained for the percolates after the rain episode showed that, before the stabilization approach, waters had an acidic pH, high electrical conductivity and high PTEs content. When these soils were mixed with 10, 20 and 30 % of limestone filler, the pH was neutral and the soluble trace element content strongly decreased, being under the detection limit when limestone percentage was 20 % and 30 %. The mineralogical composition of efflorescences before the stabilisation approach showed that predominant minerals were copiapite, followed by gypsum and bilinite. Other soluble sulphates were determined in lower percentage, such as hexahydrite, halotriquite or pickeringite. After the mixing with 10 % of limestone filler, the evaporates

  14. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 2: Atmospheric science assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The introduction to this report summarizes the approach and conclusions of a 1990 assessment of long-range transport and acid deposition in Canada from the perspective of the atmospheric sciences. It then presents the results of research activities conducted since the previous assessment. Chapter 2 examines the impact to date of the emission control programs in reducing wet and dry sulfate deposition, effects on acid aerosols and visibility, and regional-scale model development, evaluation, and application. Section 3 describes the application of two regional-scale acid deposition models, the Atmospheric Environment Service Lagrangian long-range transport model and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model, to develop projections of the efficacy of currently legislated sulfur dioxide emission control programs in reducing sulfate deposition. The focus is on eastern Canada from 1986--1990 to 2010, when controls will have been fully implemented. The final chapter summarizes key findings of the atmospheric science component of the acid deposition program with a view to identifying requirements for additional scientific work to support policy development on the acid rain and other air issues.

  15. Waste oyster shell as a kind of active filler to treat the combined wastewater at an estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongbing; Huang, Gu; Fu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Daocai; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Bo; Fan, Liangqian; Chen, Fenghui; Sun, Xiubo

    2013-10-01

    Estuaries have been described as one of the most difficult environments on Earth. It is difficult to know how to treat the combined wastewater in tidal rivers at the estuary, where the situation is very different from ordinary fresh water rivers. Waste oyster shell was used as the active filler in this study in a bio-contact oxidation tank to treat the combined wastewater at the Fengtang Tidal River. With a middle-experimental scale of 360 m3/day, the average removal efficiency of COD, BOD, NH3-N, TP and TSS was 80.05%, 85.02%, 86.59%, 50.58% and 85.32%, respectively, in this bio-contact oxidation process. The living microbes in the biofilms on the waste oyster shell in this bio-contact oxidation tank, which were mainly composed of zoogloea, protozoa and micro-metazoa species, revealed that waste oyster shell as the filler was suitable material for combined wastewater degradation. This treatment method using waste oyster shell as active filler was then applied in a mangrove demonstration area for water quality improvement near the experiment area, with a treatment volume of 5 x 10(3) m3/day. Another project was also successfully applied in a constructed wetland, with a wastewater treatment volume of 1 x 10(3) m3/day. This technology is therefore feasible and can easily be applied on a larger scale.

  16. Tuning filler shape, surface chemistry and ion content in nanofilled polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha V. N. R.

    We investigate how nanofiller surface chemistry and aspect ratio affect the performance of nanofilled solid polymer electrolytes. Polymer-based electrolytes are an attractive alternative to the organic electrolytes currently used in lithium ion batteries. We characterize acidic nanoparticle filled electrolytes and compare them to neutral particle-filled electrolytes previously measured in our lab. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements indicate that the highest increase in conductivity occurs at the eutectic composition (EO/Li=10) and is independent of filler surface chemistry. We measure PEO dynamics using quasi-elastic neutron scattering and do not observe any change in polymer dynamics with particle surface chemistry. When we examine the elastic incoherent structure factor associated with the rotational process, fillers are found to restrict the rotation of the highly conducting PEO6:LiClO4 tunnels. At the eutectic composition, these tunnels are stabilized at the filler surface even above PEO melting temperature. Marginal stability theory predicts formation of alternating layers of coexisting phases at the eutectic composition. We propose a new mechanism, via stabilization of alternating layers of PEO and highly conducting PEO 6:LiClO4 tunnels at the filler surface. When compared to spherical particles, more such structures would be stabilized at a filler surface with high aspect ratio. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutral gamma-Al2O3 nanowhiskers (2-4 nm in diameter and 200-400 nm in length) intensify the effect of neutral gamma-Al 2O3 nanoparticles. The diameters of the two fillers are similar, but the change in aspect ratio (1 to 100) improves conductivity by a factor of 5. This enhancement occurs at battery operation temperatures! Although the change in aspect ratio does not affect thermal transitions and segmental dynamics at optimal whisker loading, the rotation of PEO6 remnants is distinct at the eutectic composition. Because the mechanism by which

  17. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of Kenaf fiber-polpyropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In our experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the non-polar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50 % by volume (39 % by volume) of kenaf-PP composites compares favorably with a 40 % by weight of glass fiber-PP injection molded composites, These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and for applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  18. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  19. A study of retentive filler and its use in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Xu, H C; Wang, T; Heindl, D; Zheng, G; Liu, W Y; Nagel, J R

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a fine compound inorganic filler with special surface microstructure (called retentive filler or RF) and to investigate its use in composite resin and synthetic resin teeth. Barium silicate glass and fine silicon dioxide or barium silicate glass were mixed and sintered, then dispersed and classified by sedimentation. The surface microstructure and the particle size distribution of retentive filler were surveyed, and the mechanical properties of the composite resin and the resin tooth material reinforced with RF were tested. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the surface of RF particles is distinguished for its retentive contour microstructure. The particle size of RF is smaller than 3 microns. The mechanical properties of composite resin reinforced with RF are better than that of composites containing normal fillers, and the wear resistance of the resin tooth material containing RF is better than that of normal synthetic resin. The RF can be successfully prepared by the technological process in this study. Because of the special surface microstructure, RF has a good bonding to the resin matrix. The testing results suggest that it is feasible to improve the mechanical properties, especially the wear resistance of the composite resin and resin teeth, by using retentive filler.

  20. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 5: The effects on human health

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this report is to provide a broad framework from the latest available data, mostly since 1990, in an attempt to estimate the specific agents within the air pollution mixture of acid rain that are related to adverse effects on human health. Direct and indirect health effects of sulphur dioxide and its derivatives, sulfate, particulate matter, and acid aerosols are reviewed separately. Information is included on the distribution of sulphur oxides across Canada and on epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological studies related to the direct health effects. In addition, indirect health effects such as changes in visibility and climate, and leaching of metals into water supplies, are also reviewed.

  1. Volume-activated amino acid efflux from term human placental tissue: stimulation of efflux via a pathway sensitive to anion transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; McNeillie, S A

    1995-04-01

    The effect of a hyposmotic challenge and hence cell-swelling upon the efflux of a variety of solutes from isolated human placental tissue has been examined. A hyposmotic shock increased the fractional release of taurine, the most abundant free amino acid in placental tissue, via a pathway sensitive to niflumic acid, DIDS (4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2',2'-disulphonic acid,) NPPB (5-Nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) and DIOA (R(+)[2-n-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-2,3-dihydro-1-oxo-1H-inden -5-y) oxy] acetic acid). In contrast, tamoxifen was without effect. The cell-swelling induced efflux of taurine was attenuated (40 per cent) by replacing external Cl- with NO3-. The efflux of glutamic acid was also markedly increased by a hyposmotic challenge. Niflumic acid inhibited both basal and volume-activated glutamic acid efflux. A hyposmotic shock also increased alpha-aminoisobutyric acid efflux but not that of 3-O-methylglucose and SO4(2)-. The results suggest that the human placenta can respond to cell-swelling by releasing organic osmolytes such as amino acids via a pathway which is sensitive to anion transport inhibitors. However, it appears that the volume-activated amino acid transport system is independent from the placental anion-exchange pathways. The efflux of these compounds may act with K+ and Cl- efflux to effect a regulatory volume decrease in placental tissue. In addition, volume-activated transport may play a role in transplacental amino acid transfer.

  2. Properties of polymer blends filled with mixtures of conductive fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongruang, Wiriya

    2001-11-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE), ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and blends thereof are used to produce ternary and quaternary conductive polymer composites (CPCs) containing carbon black (CB), carbon graphite (G), carbon fiber (CF) and selected mixtures thereof to discern if polymer blends and mixed fillers yield appreciable advantages over CPCs composed of single polymers and/or single fillers. The effects of polymer blend composition and filler type, concentration and composition on electrical conductivity, composite morphology, mechanical properties and thermal behavior have been examined and correlated to establish meaningful structure-property relationships that can facilitate the rational design of efficient CPCs. Enhanced conductivity due to double-percolation is observed in ternary CPCs containing CB or G, whereas the concept of bridged double percolation is proposed to explain substantial conductivity increases in quaternary composites.

  3. Upper Face: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jonathan M; Cotofana, Sebastian; Trevidic, Patrick; Solish, Nowell; Carruthers, Jean; Carruthers, Alastair; Moradi, Amir; Swift, Arthur; Massry, Guy G; Lambros, Val; Remington, B Kent

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has been rapidly increased as the range of injectable products and indications continues to expand. Complications may arise from improper placement or technique. This article highlights the importance of anatomic knowledge when using injectable fillers in the face. A detailed review of the clinical anatomy of the upper face is performed. Regional approaches are described using the applied anatomy to efficiently and safely augment the different subunits of the upper face. Key aspects of safe and successful injection of fillers in the upper face include a thorough knowledge of the location of fat compartments and neurovascular structures. Awareness of these structures enables the practitioner to maximize injections, while avoiding damage to important nerves and vessels. A detailed knowledge of the anatomy and properties of the product is paramount to maximize the efficacy while minimizing the risk of complications.

  4. Numbers or apologies? Customer reactions to telephone waiting time fillers.

    PubMed

    Munichor, Nira; Rafaeli, Anat

    2007-03-01

    The authors examined the effect of time perception and sense of progress in telephone queues on caller reactions to 3 telephone waiting time fillers: music, apologies, and information about location in the queue. In Study 1, conducted on 123 real calls, call abandonment was lowest, and call evaluations were most positive with information about location in the queue as the time filler. In Study 2, conducted with 83 participants who experienced a simulated telephone wait experience, sense of progress in the queue rather than perceived waiting time mediated the relationship between telephone waiting time filler and caller reactions. The findings provide insight for the management and design of telephone queues, as well as theoretical insight into critical cognitive processes that underlie telephone waiting, opening up an important new research agenda.

  5. Effects of filler composition on flexibility of microfilled resin composite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Ori, T; Saimi, Y

    2005-07-01

    The effects of the filler composition on physical and mechanical properties of microfilled composites was investigated by measuring water absorption, solubility, compressive, flexural, and impact strength. A series of experimental composites, consisting of UDMA/TEGDMA comonomer matrix and prepolymerized fillers, was fabricated. The prepolymerized fillers were composed of hydrophobic colloidal silica and two monomers in varying ratios, trimethylolpropanetrimethacrylate (TMPT), and polyesterdiacrylate (PEDA). TMPT/PEDA ratios were 100:0, 64:36, 46:54, 18:82, and 0:100%. There were no significant differences in water sorption and solubility, regardless of the amount of PEDA monomer. Young's modulus and modulus of resilience increased with decreasing PEDA ratio. Fracture energy exhibited drastic changes (30.1 x 10(-5) J to 93.4 x 10(-5) J). The highest value of flexural strength (96.0 +/- 3.5 MPa) was obtained when the TMPT-PEDA filler was 46:54. The impact strengths of composites fabricated with TMPT-PEDA filler of 46:54 (11.2 +/- 1.4 kJ/m(2)), 18:82 (10.6 +/- 3.2 kJ/m(2)), and 0:100 (13.1 +/- 3.8 kJ/m(2)) were significantly higher than those with 100:0 (6.0 +/- 1.8 kJ/m(2)) or 64:36 (7.1 +/- 2.4 kJ/m(2)). Based upon the results, it was concluded that the mechanical properties of microfilled composites were improved by the modification of prepolymerized filler composition.

  6. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M. Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  7. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-01

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  8. iPP Crystallization: Micro and Nano Fillers Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioffredi, Emilia; Cassulo, Gabriele; Frache, Alberto; Luca Maffettone, Pier

    2010-06-01

    Since the properties of semicrystalline polymers depend on the morphology, studies on effect of fillers on the composites crystallization are of great interest. In this work, a micrometric talc and a nanoclay are dispersed in a polypropylene matrix and the influence of two different fillers and temperature on the polymer crystallization behavior in quiescent conditions is assessed by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and rheological characterization through linear viscoelasticity (SAOS) [1]. The DSC tests lead to the half crystallization time, depending on overall crystallization rate (i.e. nucleation and growth) whereas by rheological measurement one can deduce also the induction time, depending only on nucleation [2].

  9. Effects of immersion in solution of an experimental toothpaste containing S-PRG filler on like-remineralizing ability of etched enamel.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Ito, Shuichi; Nakagaki, Susumu; Kohda, Naohisa; Muguruma, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the like-remineralizing ability of experimental toothpaste containing surface reaction-type pre-reacted glassionomer (S-PRG) filler on etched enamel. Human enamel blocks were etched with 35% phosphoric acid and immersed in 5-mL distilled water, fourfold diluted solution of NaF-containing toothpaste, or S-PRG filler-containing experimental toothpaste. Nanoindentation testing was carried out during immersion and the enamel surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Elemental analysis of the ions in each solution was performed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluoride electrode. After 1 month of immersion, the hardness and elastic modulus of the specimen immersed in S-PRG filler-containing toothpaste showed significantly greater values than those of the specimen immersed in NaF-containing toothpaste. Considerable amounts of Al, B, Na, Si, Sr, F ions were detected in the solution of S-PRG filler-containing toothpaste. Experimental S-PRG filler-containing toothpaste may enhance the like-remineralizing ability of etched enamel surfaces due to its ion-releasing ability.

  10. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    PubMed

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influences of filler content and size on the color adjustment potential of nonlayered resin composites.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yong-Rok; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Ju, Sung-Won; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2017-01-31

    The blending effect (BE) plays an important role in esthetics of the composite resin. The objective of this study was to determine the extents to which filler size and content affect the BE. Three types of fillers (0.7, 1.0, and 1.5 µm) were mixed at weight contents of 60, 70, 75, and 80%. This study simulated clinical class 3 or 4 cavities and quantitatively measured the color diffusion of the objects next to the cavities based on the CIELab color space. For each filler size, there was a trend of increasing BE as the filler content was increased. The translucency parameter (TP) exhibited the opposite trend of decreasing (p<0.05) with increases in filler content. The filler size did not affect the BE, and the different filler sizes produced statistically non-significant results in this study. Increases in filler content elevated the opacity of the composite resin and significantly influenced the BE.

  12. Effect of biobased fillers nature on biodeterioration of hybrid polyethylene composites by mold fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastalygina, E. E.; Popov, A. A.; Pantyukhov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deterioration of natural fillers and polyethylene composites on their basis (polyethylene/filler=70/30) due to the action of mold fungi. The fillers chemical composition, dimensional parameters and biodegradability have been analyzed as factors exert a considerable impact on composite materials biodeterioration. It has been found that the principal factor determining the biodeterioration of polyethylene/filler composites by mold fungi is chemical composition of a filler and, in turn, its biodegradability. The excess of holocellulose content over lignin content and high protein content in a filler are able to induce biofouling of the polymeric composite materials. The presence of soluble and easy hydrolysed fraction in a filler increases its availability in a polymeric matrix. According to the study results, most effective natural fillers as additives stimulating polyethylene composites biodegradability are milled straw of seed flax and hydrolyzed keratin of bird’s feather.

  13. Improved fiber retention by the use of fillers in graphite fiber/resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, R. E.; Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of matrix fillers were tested for their ability to prevent loss of fiber from graphite fiber/PMR polyimide and graphite fiber/epoxy composites in a fire. The fillers tested included powders of boron, boron carbide lime glass, lead glass, and aluminum. Boron was the most effective and prevented any loss of graphite fiber during burning. Mechanical properties of composites containing boron filler were measured and compared to those of composites containing no filler.

  14. Space charge suppression effect of nano-size fillers added to polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, T.; Murata, Y.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Reddy, C. C.

    2009-08-01

    Space charge suppression mechanism in nano-composite polymer material is studied using experimental results and numerical simulation. Recently, many kinds of nano-composite polymeric materials have been reported to have improved their characteristics under high electric field. For example, LDPE/MgO nano-composite, which is made up of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and nano size filler of magnesium oxide (MgO), exhibits high volume resistivity and high dielectric strength under dc electric field. Authors have investigated the space charge behaviour in LDPE/MgO nano-composite under high electric field using pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. It has been found that, compared to LDPE, the space charge formation is also suppressed in the nano-composite material. As a reason for the suppression, we have suggested that the induced dipole polarization around MgO filler formed by dc stress application might play a role of carrier trap sites. From the numerical calculation, distortion of electric potential around MgO is seen to be much larger than that around naturally included dipole. It means that the MgO acts as a deep trap site as different from some defect or ions included in LDPE. Using the numerical calculation based on such electric potential distortion, we have tried to simulate the space charge distribution in LDPE/MgO under high dc electric field. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Effect of Conductive Inorganic Fillers on Space Charge Accumulation Characteristics in Cross-linked Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Maeno, Takashi; Mizuno, Takehiko; Takahashi, Tohru

    We have observed space charge profiles in cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) under dc high electric field using the PEA (pulsed electro-acoustic) system to study the relationship between space charge behavior and dielectric breakdown. In our previous research work, we have found that a large amount of, so called, packet-like charge generates in low density polyethylene (LDPE) under high dc electric field of more than 100 kV/mm. The packet-like charge enhances the electric field locally in bulk of the sample, and then finally it leads a breakdown. On the other hand, a new type of XLPE which was made through adding conductive inorganic fillers, shows a good dc dielectric breakdown characteristic and high volume resistivity under dc stress. In this report, we tried to observe the space charge behavior under high dc electric field in this material. From the results, it is found that the charge injection is effectively suppressed by adding only a small amount of conductive inorganic fillers to XLPE.

  16. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  17. Nonmedical-grade Injections of Permanent Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Bayers, Stephanie; Beer, Michael; Beer, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Silicone injections may result in complications that bring patients to a dermatologist or plastic surgeon. These complications may be due to the use of nonmedical grade products, large volume injections, incorrect placement of the product, or a combination of the above. Frequently, complications result when injections are performed by unlicensed practitioners. Individuals who undergo large volume procedures may develop a variety of life-threatening problems ranging from infections to pulmonary emboli. Once they develop problems, these patients often present to licensed and board-certified physicians for treatment. Based on a review of the literature, this article provides a management algorithm for various complications. In addition, a medicolegal perspective is presented. Finally, the transgender experience as it relates to silicone injections is also reviewed. PMID:23630638

  18. Effectiveness of Juvéderm Ultra Plus dermal filler in the treatment of severe nasolabial folds.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Mary P; Smith, Stacy R; Thomas, Jane A; Murphy, Diane K; Beddingfield, Frederick C

    2008-01-01

    With the baby boomer generation firmly ensconced in middle age and the ubiquity of botulinum toxin type A, nonsurgical facial rejuvenation is becoming increasingly prevalent. As this generation continues to age, products with greater therapeutic power to correct aging changes will be in growing demand. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, within-subject, controlled study was conducted comparing Juvéderm Ultra Plus hyaluronic acid filler with bovine collagen. A subset of subjects classified as having treatment for severe nasolabial folds is presented in this article. Subjects received Juvéderm Ultra Plus in one severe nasolabial fold and Zyplast collagen in the other nasolabial fold; up to two touch-up treatments were allowed at 2-week intervals. Nasolabial fold severity was evaluated every 4 weeks for 24 weeks using a five-point scale. Treatment site reactions and adverse events were also recorded. A complimentary treatment was offered at the end of the trial, with effectiveness evaluations just before retreatment and up to 48 weeks after repeated treatment for a subset of subjects. Of the 87 subjects, most were female Caucasians, but all Fitzpatrick skin types were represented (36 percent types IV through VI). At 24 weeks, 96 percent of nasolabial folds treated with Juvéderm had maintained clinically significant correction, and 81 percent maintained the correction for 1 year or more. Results were similar for those subjects with follow-up through 48 weeks after repeated treatment. The median volume required for repeated treatment with Juvéderm was significantly less than that for initial treatment (0.7 ml versus 1.6 ml). Juvéderm Ultra Plus provides correction of severe nasolabial folds through 1 year or more.

  19. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  20. Evaluation of intergranular attack on Alloy 600: Volume 2, Effectiveness of boric acid: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hermer, R.E.; Wolfe, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of boric acid applied on-line and via crevice flushing was evaluated in this program as a remedial action for intergranular attack on mill annealed Alloy 600 steam generator tubing in tubesheet and support plate crevices. Single tube model boilers were used to simulate the full length of a steam generator tubesheet crevice and the support plate crevices at hot leg conditions. The tubesheet crevices had preloaded inventories of 10% sodium hydroxide/2.5% sodium sulfate solution. All of the crevices were exposed to on-line additions of 0.1 ppM hydroxide and 0.04 ppM sulfate as the sodium salts. These baseline conditions caused pre-existing IGA beneath eccentrically mounted support plates to increase in depth at a rate of 2.40 ..mu..m/day. In the tubesheet crevices the pre-existing IGA increased in depth at a rate of 1.6 ..mu..m/day. The virgin mill annealed tubing in the tubesheet crevice developed IGA at a rate of 0.73 ..mu..m/day during the final 60 days of the 90 day test. The first 30 days were an incubation period during which no IGA occurred. The results of this work suggest that boric acid can inhibit IGA on unattacked tubing when applied continuously at the field specifiation of 5 to 10 ppM in the blowdown. It can also slow down propagation of pre-existing IGA if present in the proper ratio (which requires adequate treatment levels) and if it can access the corrosion sites. Corrosion may progress in areas where boric acid is not able to penetrate in sufficient excess to the corrodent present. 10 refs., 85 figs., 39 tabs.

  1. Fast quantitative PCR, locked nucleic acid probes and reduced volume reactions are effective tools for detecting Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis DNA.

    PubMed

    Ruthig, Gregory R; Deridder, Benjamin P

    2012-01-24

    The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis threatens amphibian populations around the world. The ability to detect this pathogen on infected animals and in the environment is critical for understanding and controlling this pandemic. We tested several advances in quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques to detect B. dendrobatidis DNA. We used a fast PCR thermocycler and enzymes that reduced the volume and the duration of the reaction. We also compared a conventional TaqMan minor groove binding (MGB) probe to an identical locked nucleic acid (LNA) counterpart. The fast qPCR reaction had a high degree of sensitivity to B. dendrobatidis DNA. The LNA probe was effective for detecting B. dendrobatidis DNA and produced results -similar to those of the MGB probe. The modifications that we tested can improve the cost, time efficiency and specificity of quantitative PCR as a tool for detecting pathogen DNA.

  2. Amorphous Ti-Zr; Base Metglas brazing filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinkin, A.; Liebermann, H.; Pounds, S.; Taylor, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is the first report on processing, properties and potential application of amorphous titanium/zirconium-base alloys produced in the form of a good quality continuous and ductile ribbon having up to 12.5 mm width. To date, the majority of titanium brazing is accomplished using cooper and aluminum-base brazing filler metals. The brazements produced with these filler metals have rather low ({approximately}300{degrees} C) service temperature, thus impeding progress in aircraft and other technologies and industries. The attempt to develop a generation of high temperature brazing filler metals was made in the late sixties-early seventies studies in detail were a large number of Ti-, Zr-Ti-Zr, Ti-V and Zr-V-Ti based alloys. The majority of these alloys has copper and nickel as melting temperature depressants. The presence of nickel and copper converts them into eutectic alloys having (Ti(Zr)) (Cu(Ni)), intermetallic phases as major structural constituents. This, in turn, results in high alloy brittleness and poor, if any, processability by means of conventional, i.e. melting-ingot casting-deformation technology. In spite of good wettability and high joint strength achieved in dozens of promising alloys, only Ti-15Cu-15Ni is now widely used as a brazing filler metal for high service temperature. Up until now this material could not be produced as a homogeneous foil and is instead applied as a clad strip consisting of three separate metallic layers.

  3. Review of 3-dimensional Facial Anatomy: Injecting Fillers and Neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, David A.; Scheuer, Jack F.; Villanueva, Nathaniel L.; Pezeshk, Ronnie A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: To achieve consistent results utilizing facial injectables, practitioners must understand the pertinent anatomy of the forehead, temple, cheek, nose, and perioral areas. A detailed understanding of facial blood vessels, nerves, and musculature is essential for safe and effective placement of fillers and neuromodulators. PMID:28018775

  4. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  5. Internal Filler-Wire Feed For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding contains lengthwise channel for feeding filler wire to weld joint. Channel makes it unnecessary to feed wire through guides outside electrode, conserving valuable space near weld and protects wire from deformation by contact with other parts in vicinity of weld. Helpful in robotic or automatic welding.

  6. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  7. Sensor Monitors Force On Filler Wire During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Tim; Milly, Pete, Sr.; White, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    Sensor measures lateral contact force between filler wire and weldment. Output of sensor fed as input to motorized wire-position controller, which strives to maintain desired contact force. Sensor built into wire-feed assembly. Pivoting arm transmits lateral force on tip of wire to load cell. Setscrews prevent underload and overload on load cell.

  8. Internal Filler-Wire Feed For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding contains lengthwise channel for feeding filler wire to weld joint. Channel makes it unnecessary to feed wire through guides outside electrode, conserving valuable space near weld and protects wire from deformation by contact with other parts in vicinity of weld. Helpful in robotic or automatic welding.

  9. Composite materials with metallic matrix and ceramic porous filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakarinova, V. I.; Portnoi, V. K.

    1995-08-01

    Composite materials with a reduced density reinforced with hollow corundum particles can be of interest as damping and abrasive materials for decreasing the mass of a structure. Methods for mixing powders and their hot pressing are suggested in order to produce such composite materials without fracture of the brittle hollow particles of the filler.

  10. Gap Filler Induced Transition on the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Barnhardt, Michael D.; Tang, Chun Y.; Sozer, Emre; Candler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Detached Eddy Simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of high-fidelity turbulence modeling on roughness-induced transition to turbulence during Mars entry. Chemically reacting flow solutions will be obtained for a gap filler of Mars Science Laboratory at the peak heating condition.

  11. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  12. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General... construction and all parts, including valves and filler heads accessible for cleaning. New or...

  13. Multi-scale analysis of the effect of nano-filler particle diameter on the physical properties of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Inoue, Sayuri; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of silica nano-filler particle diameters in a computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin (CR) block on physical properties at the multi-scale in silico. CAD/CAM CR blocks were modeled, consisting of silica nano-filler particles (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 nm) and matrix (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA), with filler volume contents of 55.161%. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios for the block at macro-scale were analyzed by homogenization. Macro-scale CAD/CAM CR blocks (3 × 3 × 3 mm) were modeled and compressive strengths were defined when the fracture loads exceeded 6075 N. MPS values of the nano-scale models were compared by localization analysis. As the filler size decreased, Young's moduli and compressive strength increased, while Poisson's ratios and MPS decreased. All parameters were significantly correlated with the diameters of the filler particles (Pearson's correlation test, r = -0.949, 0.943, -0.951, 0.976, p < 0.05). The in silico multi-scale model established in this study demonstrates that the Young's moduli, Poisson's ratios, and compressive strengths of CAD/CAM CR blocks can be enhanced by loading silica nanofiller particles of smaller diameter. CAD/CAM CR blocks by using smaller silica nano-filler particles have a potential to increase fracture resistance.

  14. Common Loon (Gavia immer) eggshell thickness and egg volume vary with acidity of nest lake in northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollentier, C.D.; Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental acidification has been associated with factors that may negatively affect reproduction in many waterbirds. Declines in lake pH can lead to reductions in food availability and quality, or result in the altered availability of toxic metals, such as mercury. A recent laboratory study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources indicated that Common Loon (Gavia immer) chicks hatched from eggs collected on acidic lakes in northern Wisconsin may be less responsive to stimuli and exhibit reduced growth compared to chicks from neutral-pH lakes. Here we report on the relation between Common Loon egg characteristics (eggshell thickness and egg volume) and lake pH, as well as eggshell methylmercury content. Eggs (N = 84) and lake pH measurements were obtained from a four county region of northern Wisconsin. Egg-shells were 3-4% thinner on lakes with pH ??? 6.3 than on neutral-pH lakes and this relation was linear across the pH range investigated (P 0.05, n.s.) or lake pH. Results suggest that low lake pH may be associated with thinner eggshells and reduced egg volume in Common Loons. We speculate on the mechanisms that may lead to this phenomeno.

  15. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  16. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-06-26

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections and it is important to understand the effect that different types of calcium carbonates have on the paper properties made of 100% eucalyptus pulp. The current study is focused on selecting the most suitable market available calcium carbonate for the production of uncoated Eucalyptus digital printing paper, targeting a potential filler increase of 5% above the currently used filler content. We made hand sheets using 13 different varieties of widely used calcium carbonates [Nine samples of PCC (two rhombic and seven scalenohedral, covering a wide particle size range from 1.2 {micro}m to 2.9 {micro}m), and four samples of GCC (three anionic and one cationic, with a particle size range from 0.7 {micro}m to 1.5 {micro}m)] available in the market followed by a 12” pilot plant paper machine run. The detailed analysis on the main structural, optical and strength properties of the hand sheets found that the most suitable calcium carbonate for uncoated Eucalyptus digital printing paper production is scalenohedral PCC, with a particle size of 1.9 {micro}m for its positive effects on thickness, stiffness, brightness and opacity of paper.

  17. Mechanical properties of HDPE/UHMWPE blends: effect of filler loading and filler treatment.

    PubMed

    Lai, K L K; Roziyanna, A; Ogunniyi, D S; Zainal, Arifin M I; Azlan, Ariffin A

    2004-05-01

    Various blend ratios of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were prepared with the objective of determining their suitability as biomaterials. In the unfilled state, a blend of 50/50 (HDPE/UHMWPE) ratio by weight was found to yield optimum properties in terms of processability and mechanical properties. Hydroxyapatite (HA) was compounded with the optimum blend ratio. The effects of HA loading, varied from 0 to 50wt% for both filled and unfilled blends were tested for mechanical properties. It was found that the inclusion of HA in the blend led to a remarkable improvement of mechanical properties compared to the unfilled blend. In order to improve the bonding between the polymer blend and the filler, the HA used was chemically treated with a coupling agent known as 3-(trimethoxysiyl) propyl methacrylate and the treated HA was mixed into the blend. The effect of mixing the blend with silane-treated HA also led to an overall improvement of mechanical properties.

  18. Application of geophysics to acid mine drainage investigations. Volume 2. Site investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Custis, K.

    1994-09-01

    The report describes geophysical field investigations undertaken to evaluate the utility of surface geophysical techniques in detecting and monitoring groundwater pollution from mine waste in the Western United States. The document addresses results of investigations at Spenceville Copper Mine, Leviathan Sulfur Mine, Iron Mountain Copper Mine, and Walker Copper Mine. Methods used in the field investigations included conventional D.C. resistivity, electromagnetic, self potential, and magnetic. It was found that the source and extent of acid mine drainage can be identified, known groundwater flow paths correlate well with geophysical anomalies, subsurface layering of mine waste piles can be mapped with some geophysical methods, and leakage from waste impoundments is detectable by some surface geophysical methods. The document includes maps, charts, and tables.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging quality and volumes of brain structures from live and postmortem imaging of California sea lions with clinical signs of domoic acid toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Montie, Eric W; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Pussini, Nicola; Battey, Thomas W K; Barakos, Jerome; Dennison, Sophie; Colegrove, Kathleen; Gulland, Frances

    2010-09-17

    Our goal in this study was to compare magnetic resonance images and volumes of brain structures obtained alive versus postmortem of California sea lions Zalophus californianus exhibiting clinical signs of domoic acid (DA) toxicosis and those exhibiting normal behavior. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images of postmortem-intact brains, up to 48 h after death, provided similar quality to images acquired from live sea lions. Volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the cerebral hemispheres were similar to volumes calculated from images acquired when the sea lions were alive. However, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes decreased due to leakage. Hippocampal volumes from postmortem-intact images were useful for diagnosing unilateral and bilateral atrophy, consequences of DA toxicosis. These volumes were similar to the volumes in the live sea lion studies, up to 48 h postmortem. Imaging formalin-fixed brains provided some information on brain structure; however, images of the hippocampus and surrounding structures were of poorer quality compared to the images acquired alive and postmortem-intact. Despite these issues, volumes of cerebral GM and WM, as well as the hippocampus, were similar to volumes calculated from images of live sea lions and sufficient to diagnose hippocampal atrophy. Thus, postmortem MRI scanning (either intact or formalin-fixed) with volumetric analysis can be used to investigate the acute, chronic and possible developmental effects of DA on the brain of California sea lions.

  20. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  1. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  2. Influence of anodization parameters on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide formed in mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Tzung-Ta; Chang, Yao-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The growth of anodic alumina oxide was conducted in the mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids. The influence of anodizing voltage, electrolyte temperature, and concentration of phosphoric and oxalic acids on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide has been investigated. Either anodizing parameter is chosen to its full extent of range that allows the anodization process to be conducted without electric breakdown and to explore the highest possible volume expansion factor. The volume expansion factors were found to vary between 1.25 and 1.9 depending on the anodizing parameters. The variation is explained in connection with electric field, ion transport number, temperature effect, concentration, and activity of acids. The formation of anodic porous alumina at anodizing voltage 160 V in 1.1 M phosphoric acid mixed with 0.14 M oxalic acid at 2 °C showed the peak volume expansion factor of 1.9 and the corresponding moderate growth rate of 168 nm/min.

  3. Rumen morphometrics and the effect of digesta pH and volume on volatile fatty acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Melo, L Q; Costa, S F; Lopes, F; Guerreiro, M C; Armentano, L E; Pereira, M N

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rumen digesta volume and pH on VFA absorption and its relation to rumen wall morphology were evaluated. Nine rumen cannulated cows formed 3 groups based on desired variation in rumen morphology: The High group was formed by Holsteins yielding 25.9 kg milk/d and fed on a high-grain total mixed ration (TMR); the Medium group by Holstein-Zebu crossbreds yielding 12.3 kg milk/d and fed on corn silage, tropical pasture, and a commercial concentrate; and the Dry group by nonlactating grazing Jerseys fed exclusively on tropical pasture. Within each group, a sequence of 3 ruminal conditions was induced on each cow in 3 × 3 Latin Squares, with 7-d periods: high digesta volume and high pH (HVHP), low volume and high pH (LVHP), and low volume and low pH (LVLP). Rumen mucosa was biopsied on the first day of Period 1. Ruminal morphometric variables evaluated were mitotic index, absorptive surface and papillae number per square centimeter of wall, area per papillae, papillae area as a percentage of absorptive surface, and epithelium, keratinized layer, and nonkeratinized layer thickness. There was marked variation in rumen morphology among the groups of cows. Grazing Jerseys had decreased rumen wall absorptive surface area and basal cells mitotic index, and increased thickness of the epithelium and of the keratin layer compared with cows receiving concentrates. Mean rumen pH throughout the 4 h sampling period was: 6.78 for HVHP, 7.08 for LVHP, and 5.90 for LVLP (P < 0.01). The capacity of the rumen wall to absorb VFA was estimated by the Valerate/CrEDTA technique. The fractional exponential decay rate for the ratio of valeric acid to Cr (k Val/Cr) was determined by rumen digesta sampling at 20-min intervals during 4 h, after the mixing of markers and the return of the evacuated ruminal content. The k Val/Cr values for treatments HVHP, LVHP, and LVLP were, respectively: 19.6, 23.9, and 35.0 %/h (SEM = 2.01; P = 0.21 for contrast HVHP vs. LVHP and P < 0.01 for

  4. Effect of Montmorillonite Nanogel Composite Fillers on the Protection Performance of Epoxy Coatings on Steel Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Saeed, Ashraf M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Wahby, Mohamed

    2017-06-02

    Montmorillonite (MMT) clay mineral is widely used as filler for several organic coatings. Its activity is increased by exfoliation via chemical modification to produce nanomaterials. In the present work, the modification of MMT to form nanogel composites is proposed to increase the dispersion of MMT into epoxy matrices used to fill cracks and holes produced by the curing exotherms of epoxy resins. The dispersion of MMT in epoxy improved both the mechanical and anti-corrosion performance of epoxy coatings in aggressive marine environments. In this respect, the MMT surfaces were chemically modified with different types of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl propane sulfonic acid (AMPS) nanogels using a surfactant-free dispersion polymerization technique. The effect of the chemical structure, nanogel content and the interaction with MMT surfaces on the surface morphology, surface charges and dispersion in the epoxy matrix were investigated for use as nano-filler for epoxy coatings. The modified MMT nanogel epoxy composites showed excellent resistance to mechanical damage and salt spray resistance up to 1000 h. The interaction of MMT nanogel composites with the epoxy matrix and good response of AMPS nanogel to sea water improve their ability to act as self-healing materials for epoxy coatings for steel.

  5. Carbon nanotube growth from films of Langmuir-Blodgett deposited Fe nanoparticles with filler molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, Naoki; Takezawa, Akihiro; Kanasugi, Osamu; Nara, Ryuta; Kushida, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Independently controlling the number density and diameter of Fe nanoparticles (FeNPs) used as a catalyst for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) growth is difficult by conventional methods. In this study, mixed solutions of FeNPs and palmitic acid (C16) used as filler molecules were prepared to prevent the thermal aggregation of FeNPs and control the number density of VA-CNTs. FeNPs mixed with C16 monolayer films were prepared on the water surface and deposited on SiO2/Si substrates by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. VA-CNTs were synthesized by a thermal chemical vapor deposition method using acetylene gas. Furthermore, we studied the optimum hydrogen reduction temperature and time of FeNPs used as a catalyst to encourage VA-CNT growth. By controlling the ratio of FeNP catalyst to C16 as a filler molecule in the LB film and optimizing hydrogen reduction condition, we were able to control the number density and diameter of FeNPs independently.

  6. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of kenaf fiber-polypropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M. |

    1995-05-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In these experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the nonpolar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50% by weight (39% by volume) of kenaf-PP composite compare favorably with a 40% by weight of glass fiber-PP injection-molded composite. These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral-based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and they are used in applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  7. The interaction between the permanent magnet and ceramic superconductor with organic filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźny, L.; Kisiel, A.; Garbera, A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the phenomenon of magnetic levitation for YBaCuO superconducting samples in pure form and with epoxy resin content of 40%. Samples of superconductors were prepared by the standard reaction in the solid state. The forces of interaction between the superconductor and neodymium permanent magnet were measured. Samples with epoxy resin fillers had significantly smaller levitation force than the sample of the sintered superconductors. This is due to a much lower content of pure superconducting material in the sample volume (about 60% of the YBaCuO). However, the obvious advantage of such samples is the possibility of preparation superconductors with complicated shapes, eg. for use in a superconducting bearings or other devices.

  8. Proceedings of the international land reclamation and mine drainage conference and third international conference on the abatement of acidic drainage. Volume 1: Mine drainage -- SP 06A-94

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Volume 1 of these proceedings is divided into the following sections: Modeling mine water quality; Water treatment with wetlands; Predicting mine water quality; Water treatment--Chemical; Control of acid mine drainage--Wet covers; Site characterization monitoring; Control of acid mine drainage--Alkaline addition; and Mine water geochemistry. Papers dealing with or applicable to coal or uranium mining have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Midface and perioral volume restoration: a conversation between the US and Italy.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Erin; Calvisi, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous dermal fillers available to injectors in the US and Europe for the correction of age-related volume loss in the midface and perioral regions. Product availability differs between these two aesthetic markets due to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements. The purpose of this study is to discuss differences in filler selection by two practitioners in the US and Europe based upon both stylistic approach and filler availability in each market. To analyse and discuss the approach to midface as well as lip and perioral volume restoration by two independent dermatologists working in the US and Italy. Seven patients were selected for discussion and divided into two groups: 1) those requiring midface volumization and 2) those undergoing perioral or lip volume replacement. Patients in the midface group were injected with Juvéderm Voluma® XC, Juvéderm® Volift® with lidocaine, Restylane- L®, Perlane-L® or Radiesse®. Patients in the perioral and/or lip group were injected with Juvéderm® Volbella™, with lidocaine, or Belotero Balance™. Patients were photographed before and immediately after injection to evaluate aesthetic outcomes. In each case, filler selection was based upon patient characteristics, anatomical considerations and inherent filler properties. All patients were extremely satisfied with their treatments. There were no significant immediate or delayed complications following treatment with any of the dermal fillers used. Volume restoration in the midface and perioral or lip region can be effectively achieved using a variety of dermal fillers. The dermal filler portfolio available in Europe is exponentially larger than that in the US. Product selection in either market is ultimately the result of the physician's experience injecting each dermal filler, as well as his or her personal preferences.

  10. Optical coherence tomography for image-guided dermal filler injection and biomechanical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Dermal fillers are a very popular anti-ag ing treatment with estimated sales in the billions of dollars and millions of procedures performed. As the aging population continues to grow, these figures are only e xpected to increase. Dermal fillers have various compositions depending on their intended applicati on. Reactions to dermal fillers can be severe, such as ischemic events and filler migration to the eyes. Howe ver, these adverse reactions are rare. Nevertheless, the capability to perform imag e-guided filler injections would minimize th e risk of such reacti ons. In addition, the biomechanical properties of various fillers have been evalua ted, but there has been no investigation on the effects of filler on the biomechanical properties of skin. In this work, we utilize optical cohe rence tomography (OCT) for visualizing dermal filler injections with micrometer-scale sp atial resolution. In addition, we utilize noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify the changes in the biomechan ical properties of pig skin after the dermal filler injections. OCT was successfully able to visualize the dermal filler injecti on process, and OCE showed that the viscoelasticity of the pig skin was increased locally at the filler injection sites. OCT may be able to provide real-time image guidance in 3D, and when combined with functional OCT techniques such as optical microangiography, could be used to avoid blood vessels during the injection.

  11. Vacuum Brazing Diamond Grits with Cu-based or Ni-based Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenchun; Lu, Jinbin; Li, Yang; Xu, Shuai; Zhong, Sujuan; Wang, Bangfu; Qiu, Xinkai

    2017-08-01

    Diamond grits were brazed using Cu-Sn-Cr and Ni-Cr-B-Si filler metals, and the brazed grits were examined for microstructure (SEM, EDS, XRD), microhardness, and compression strength. Results showed that the microstructure of the Cu-based filler metal was uniform and consisted of α-Cu + (α-Cu + δ). Its wettability to the diamond was better than Ni-based filler due to the formation of a thin carbide reaction layer that improved the bond strength between the diamond and steel. The Cu-based filler led to reduced thermal damage to the diamond. The Cr in the filler metal diffused to the steel substrate to form a reaction layer at the filler/steel substrate interface. The microhardness of the Ni filler metal (810-830 HV0.3) was significantly higher than that of Cu filler metal (170-230 HV0.3). The compressive load values of the diamond grits brazed with Cu-based or Ni-based filler metal were 93.7 and 49.2% of the original diamond, and the TI values were 83.7 and 59.8% of the original diamond. Grinding experiments for failure mode in monolayer tools revealed that the tools brazed with Cu-based filler metal had a lower macro-fracture ratio than those brazed using the Ni-based filler.

  12. Vacuum Brazing Diamond Grits with Cu-based or Ni-based Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenchun; Lu, Jinbin; Li, Yang; Xu, Shuai; Zhong, Sujuan; Wang, Bangfu; Qiu, Xinkai

    2017-06-01

    Diamond grits were brazed using Cu-Sn-Cr and Ni-Cr-B-Si filler metals, and the brazed grits were examined for microstructure (SEM, EDS, XRD), microhardness, and compression strength. Results showed that the microstructure of the Cu-based filler metal was uniform and consisted of α-Cu + (α-Cu + δ). Its wettability to the diamond was better than Ni-based filler due to the formation of a thin carbide reaction layer that improved the bond strength between the diamond and steel. The Cu-based filler led to reduced thermal damage to the diamond. The Cr in the filler metal diffused to the steel substrate to form a reaction layer at the filler/steel substrate interface. The microhardness of the Ni filler metal (810-830 HV0.3) was significantly higher than that of Cu filler metal (170-230 HV0.3). The compressive load values of the diamond grits brazed with Cu-based or Ni-based filler metal were 93.7 and 49.2% of the original diamond, and the TI values were 83.7 and 59.8% of the original diamond. Grinding experiments for failure mode in monolayer tools revealed that the tools brazed with Cu-based filler metal had a lower macro-fracture ratio than those brazed using the Ni-based filler.

  13. Study on a novel Sn-electroplated silver brazing filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2017-08-01

    Novel Sn-electroplated Ag brazing filler metal with a high tin content was prepared by combining the plating and thermal diffusion method. The BAg45CuZn alloy was used as a base filler metal, and a Sn layer was electroplated on it. Then the H62 brass was brazed with the Sn-plated brazing filler metal containing 6.2 wt% of Sn. The results showed that the microstructure of the brazed joints with the Sn-plated filler mainly consisted of the Ag phase, Cu phase, CuZn phase and Cu5Zn8 phase. The tensile strength of the joints brazed with the Sn-plated filler metal was 326 MPa, which was higher than that of the joints with the base filler metal. Fracture analysis showed that the fractures of the joints brazed by the Sn-plated filler metal was mainly ductile fracture mixed with a small quantity of brittle fracture.

  14. Autonomous Slat-Cove-Filler Device for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated with Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor); Lockard, David P (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Weber, Douglas Leo (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A slat cove filler is utilized to reduce airframe noise resulting from deployment of a leading edge slat of an aircraft wing. The slat cove filler is preferably made of a super elastic shape memory alloy, and the slat cove filler shifts between stowed and deployed shapes as the slat is deployed. The slat cove filler may be configured such that a separate powered actuator is not required to change the shape of the slat cove filler from its deployed shape to its stowed shape and vice-versa. The outer contour of the slat cove filler preferably follows a profile designed to maintain accelerating flow in the gap between the slat cove filler and wing leading edge to provide for noise reduction.

  15. Ductility dip cracking susceptibility of Inconel Filler Metal 52 and Inconel Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Kikel, J.M.; Parker, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 have become the materials of choice for commercial nuclear steam generator applications in recent years. Filler Metal 52 exhibits improved resistance to weld solidification and weld-metal liquation cracking as compared to other nickel-based filler metals. However, recently published work indicates that Filler Metal 52 is susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC) in highly restrained applications. Susceptibility to fusion zone DDC was evaluated using the transverse varestraint test method, while heat affected zone (HAZ) DDC susceptibility was evaluated using a newly developed spot-on-spot varestraint test method. Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 cracking susceptibility was compared to the DDC susceptibility of Alloy 600, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625. In addition, the effect of grain size and orientation on cracking susceptibility was also included in this study. Alloy 690, Filler Metal 82, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625 were found more susceptible to fusion zone DDC than Alloy 600. Filler Metal 52 and Alloy 690 were found more susceptible to HAZ DDC when compared to wrought Alloy 600, Filler Metal 82 and Filler Metal 625. Filler Metal 52 exhibited the greatest susceptibility to HAZ DDC of all the weld metals evaluated. The base materials were found much more resistant to HAZ DDC in the wrought condition than when autogenously welded. A smaller grain size was found to offer greater resistance to DDC. For weld metal where grain size is difficult to control, a change in grain orientation was found to improve resistance to DDC.

  16. Preparation of EPR/silica filler by a co-irradiation method forming PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Dang, Shuaiying; Huang, Zhijuan; Xu, Yongshen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to prepare ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR)/silica filler by co-irradiation method forming polypropylene (PP)/EPR/silica nanocomposites. The grafting of maleic anhydride (MAH) on EPR was first studied by co-irradiation in the micro-suspension without any chemical initiator, and the effects of MAH concentration and the total co-irradiation dose on the graft degree of MAH were investigated. Then PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites were successfully prepared by blending of PP matrix and EPR/silica filler, which was obtained by co-irradiation using a mixture of EPR/MAH microsuspension in xylene and tetraethoxysilane/KH560 sol in formic acid. FTIR and SEM results showed that the reactions between MAH on EPR chains and KH560 surrounding silica particles were adopted to form the EPR/silica filler with strong bonding and well silica dispersion. Mechanical properties of PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with different silica contents and the comparisons with PP, PP/EPR and PP/silica films were studied. The rigid silica particles were trapped in EPR shell and well dispersed in PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with good compatibility and strong interfacial adhesion, achieving overall improvements in stiffness, strength and toughness compared with pure PP.

  17. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F; Paiva, Maria C; Alves, Natália M

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications.

  18. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F.; Paiva, Maria C.; Alves, Natália M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications. PMID:27877909

  19. Properties of hybrid resin composite systems containing prepolymerized filler particles.

    PubMed

    Blackham, Jason T; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Lien, Wen

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the properties of newer hybrid resin composites with prepolymerized-filler particles to traditional hybrids and a microfill composite. The following properties were examined per composite: diametral tensile strength, flexural strength/modulus, Knoop microhardness and polymerization shrinkage. Physical properties were determined for each Jason T Blackham, DMD, USAF, General Dentistry, Tyndall composite group (n = 8), showing significant differences between groups per property (p < 0.001). In general, the traditional hybrid composites (Z250, Esthet-X) had higher strength, composites containing pre-polymerized fillers (Gradia Direct Posterior, Premise) performed more moderately and the microfill composite (Durafill VS) had lower strength. Premise and Durafill VS had the lowest polymerization shrinkage.

  20. Filler segmentation of SEM paper images based on mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Ait Kbir, M; Benslimane, Rachid; Princi, Elisabetta; Vicini, Silvia; Pedemonte, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Recent developments in microscopy and image processing have made digital measurements on high-resolution images of fibrous materials possible. This helps to gain a better understanding of the structure and other properties of the material at micro level. In this paper SEM image segmentation based on mathematical morphology is proposed. In fact, paper models images (Whatman, Murillo, Watercolor, Newsprint paper) selected in the context of the Euro Mediterranean PaperTech Project have different distributions of fibers and fillers, caused by the presence of SiAl and CaCO3 particles. It is a microscopy challenge to make filler particles in the sheet distinguishable from the other components of the paper surface. This objectif is reached here by using switable strutural elements and mathematical morphology operators.

  1. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Oleksy, Mariusz; Szwarc-Rzepka, Karolina; Heneczkowski, Maciej; Oliwa, Rafał; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM. PMID:28788177

  2. Neutron Spectrometry for Identification of Filler Material in UXO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    whether ordnance is filled with explosives or inert material (e.g., concrete, Plaster of Paris, wax , etc.) or whether it is empty. Without verification...Plaster of Paris, wax , etc.) or whether it is empty. Without verification of the filler material, handling procedures often necessitate that the...S. Chmelik, R. J. Rasmussen, R. M. S. Schofield, G. E. Sieger, and J. C. Overley, Using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) to Candle

  3. A concept for improved fire-safety through coated fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1977-01-01

    A possible method is examined for obtaining a high value of thermal conductivity before ignition and a low value after ignition in standard composite materials. The idea is to coat fiberglass, alumina trihydrate, and similar fillers with specially selected chemicals prior to using polymer resins. The amount of the coat constitutes typically less than 5% of the material's total weight. The experimental results obtained are consistent with the basic concept.

  4. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  5. Using hyperbranched oligomer functionalized glass fillers to reduce shrinkage stress

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Sheng; Azarnoush, Setareh; Smith, Ian R.; Cramer, Neil B.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N

    2012-01-01

    Objective Fillers are widely utilized to enhance the mechanical properties of polymer resins. However, polymerization stress has the potential to increase due to the higher elastic modulus achieved upon filler addition. Here, we demonstrate a hyperbranched oligomer functionalized glass filler UV curable resin composite which is able to reduce the shrinkage stress without sacrificing mechanical properties. Methods A 16-functional alkene-terminated hyperbranched oligomer is synthesized by thiol-acrylate and thiol-yne reactions and the product structure is analyzed by 1H-NMR, mass spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Surface functionalization of the glass filler is measured by thermogravimetric analysis. Reaction kinetics, mechanical properties and shrinkage stress are studied via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis and a tensometer, respectively. Results Silica nanoparticles are functionalized with a flexible 16-functional alkene-terminated hyperbranched oligomer which is synthesized by multistage thiol-ene/yne reactions. 93% of the particle surface was covered by this oligomer and an interfacial layer ranging from 0.7 – 4.5 nm thickness is generated. A composite system with these functionalized silica nanoparticles incorporated into the thiol-yne-methacrylate resin demonstrates 30% reduction of shrinkage stress (from 0.9 MPa to 0.6 MPa) without sacrificing the modulus (3100 ± 300 MPa) or glass transition temperature (62 ± 3 °C). Moreover, the shrinkage stress of the composite system builds up at much later stages of the polymerization as compared to the control system. Significance Due to the capability of reducing shrinkage stress without sacrificing mechanical properties, this composite system will be a great candidate for dental composite applications. PMID:22717296

  6. Resorbable fillers reduce stress risers from empty screw holes.

    PubMed

    Alford, J Winslow; Bradley, Michael P; Fadale, Paul D; Crisco, Joseph J; Moore, Douglas C; Ehrlich, Michael G

    2007-09-01

    Empty screw holes after hardware removal are stress risers that weaken bone and can lead to refracture in an active individual. We sought to reduce these stress risers. We hypothesize that resorbable screws used as hole fillers would (1) provide immediate strength and (2) maintain this strength during resorption. Randomized, prospective controlled animal laboratory study with 75 live New Zealand white rabbits' paired femurs. Single mid-diaphyseal holes were filled with a metal or resorbable screw; contralateral femurs were paired empty hole controls. Main outcome measurements included histologic analysis, torsion to failure, peak torque, energy to failure, and stiffness at baseline, 1 week, and 13 weeks postimplantation. At time baseline, resorbable fillers produced an immediate 30% increase in the peak torque (p = 0.01) and 73% increase in peak energy (p = 0.006). Metal screws produced a 17% increase in peak torque (p = 0.038), and a 58% increase in the amount of energy to failure (p = 0.009). At 1 week, although the resorbable (p = 0.01) but not the metal (p = 0.82) screws increased the peak torque, both metal (p = 0.003) and resorbable (p = 0.050) screws increased the peak energy compared with contralateral empty controls. At 13 weeks, metal and resorbable screw-filled bones were as strong as the healed contralateral femurs. Partial screw resorption and new bone formation without lysis was demonstrated histologically. Resorbable screw hole fillers immediately increase the strength of bones without weakening during early resorption. Placing resorbable fillers in bone defects after hardware removal could reduce the likelihood of refracture.

  7. Verification of Embolic Channel Causing Blindness Following Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Moon, Hyoung Jin; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn

    2015-02-01

    Ocular complications following cosmetic filler injections are serious situations. This study provided scientific evidence that filler in the facial and the superficial temporal arteries could enter into the orbits and the globes on both sides. We demonstrated the existence of an embolic channel connecting the arterial system of the face to the ophthalmic artery. After the removal of the ocular contents from both eyes, liquid dye was injected into the cannulated channel of the superficial temporal artery in six soft embalmed cadavers and different color dye was injected into the facial artery on both sides successively. The interior sclera was monitored for dye oozing from retrograde ophthalmic perfusion. Among all 12 globes, dye injections from the 12 superficial temporal arteries entered ipsilateral globes in three and the contralateral globe in two arteries. Dye from the facial artery was infused into five ipsilateral globes and in three contralateral globes. Dye injections of two facial arteries in the same cadaver resulted in bilateral globe staining but those of the superficial temporal arteries did not. Direct communications between the same and different arteries of the four cannulated arteries were evidenced by dye dripping from the cannulating needle hubs in 14 of 24 injected arteries. Compression of the orbital rim at the superior nasal corner retarded ocular infusion in 11 of 14 arterial injections. Under some specific conditions favoring embolism, persistent interarterial anastomoses between the face and the eye allowed filler emboli to flow into the globe causing ocular complications.

  8. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  9. Weldability testing of Inconel{trademark} filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, B.B.; Lin, W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the findings of a research program aimed at quantifying the weld solidification cracking susceptibility and weld metal liquation cracking susceptibility of Inconel{trademark} filler materials 52, 82, 152 and 182 deposited on a variety of materials intended for pressurized water reactor applications. A cursory investigation on the repair weldability of Filler Metal 52 using the Gleeble{trademark} thermo-mechanical simulation technique is also included. The brittle temperature range (BTR) in the fusion zone and HAZ was determined using the longitudinal-Varestraint test and spot-Varestraint test, respectively, and used as a weldability index for quantification of susceptibility to weld solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking. Results from this study showed that Filler Metals 52 exhibited the best resistance to both weld solidification cracking and weld metal liquation cracking followed by 82, 152 and 182 for the base metal combinations tested in this study. Repair weldability study suggested that the resistance to weld metal liquation cracking of 52 all weld metal would not be significantly reduced after ten times of weld simulation at peak temperatures of 900 C and 1,300 C.

  10. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy to Avoid Blindness From Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2016-11-01

    The most serious complication of filler or fat injection is blindness. According to a recent systematic review of 98 patients of blindness provoked by filler or fat injection, only 2 patients had the outcome of a complete recovery of vision.In the literature, only 2 papers were found in which hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was used in ophthalmic artery obstruction. However, no improvement of vision was obtained in either patient. Recently, the authors treated a patient who had central retinal vein occlusion and cilioretinal artery occlusion with HBOT (daily 2-hour sessions at 253 kPa for 14 days), and his visual acuity returned to normal.In central retinal artery obstruction, if the cilioretinal artery is present, it will maintain the thickness of the retina to a variable extent. Though the size of the cilioretinal artery and the area it supplies varies, 36.2% (32.1-40.2%) of people have a cilioretinal artery.Thereafter, HBOT might be applied to patients with central retinal artery occlusion following filler injection.

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy to Avoid Blindness From Filler Injection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2016-09-09

    The most serious complication of filler or fat injection is blindness. According to a recent systematic review of 98 patients of blindness provoked by filler or fat injection, only 2 patients had the outcome of a complete recovery of vision.In the literature, only 2 papers were found in which hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was used in ophthalmic artery obstruction. However, no improvement of vision was obtained in either patient. Recently, the authors treated a patient who had central retinal vein occlusion and cilioretinal artery occlusion with HBOT (daily 2-hour sessions at 253 kPa for 14 days), and his visual acuity returned to normal.In central retinal artery obstruction, if the cilioretinal artery is present, it will maintain the thickness of the retina to a variable extent. Though the size of the cilioretinal artery and the area it supplies varies, 36.2% (32.1-40.2%) of people have a cilioretinal artery.Thereafter, HBOT might be applied to patients with central retinal artery occlusion following filler injection.

  12. Electrically insulating thermal nano-oils using 2D fillers.

    PubMed

    Taha-Tijerina, Jaime; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Gao, Guanhui; Rohde, Matthew; Tsentalovich, Dmitri A; Pasquali, Matteo; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-02-28

    Different nanoscale fillers have been used to create composite fluids for applications such as thermal management. The ever increasing thermal loads in applications now require advanced operational fluids, for example, high thermal conductivity dielectric oils in transformers. These oils require excellent filler dispersion, high thermal conduction, but also electrical insulation. Such thermal oils that conform to this thermal/electrical requirement, and yet remain in highly suspended stable state, have not yet been synthesized. We report here the synthesis and characterization of stable high thermal conductivity Newtonian nanofluids using exfoliated layers of hexagonal boron nitride in oil without compromising its electrically insulating property. Two-dimensional nanosheets of hexagonal boron nitride are liquid exfoliated in isopropyl alcohol and redispersed in mineral oil, used as standard transformer oil, forming stable nanosuspensions with high shelf life. A high electrical resistivity, even higher than that of the base oil, is maintained for the nano-oil containing small weight fraction of the filler (0.01 wt %), whereas the thermal conductivity was enhanced. The low dissipation factor and high pour point for this nano-oil suggests several applications in thermal management.

  13. Fatigue strengths of particulate filler composites reinforced with fibers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Myung; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Hattori, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Koji; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic fatigue strengths at 10(5) cycles and the strains of particulate filler composite resins with and without reinforcing fibers. An UHMWPE (Ribbond), a polyaromatic polyamide fiber (Fibreflex), and three glass fibers (GlasSpan, FibreKor, Vectris Frame) were used to reinforce the particulate filler composite resins. The fatigue properties were measured in three-point bending mode using a servohydraulic universal testing machine at a frequency of 5 Hz, until failure occurred or 10(5) cycles had been completed. The fatigue strengths at 10(5) cycles were determined by the staircase method. The fractured aspects of specimens were evaluated by an optical and scanning electron microscope. The fatigue strengths of particulate filler composite resins were 49-57 MPa, and those of fiber-reinforced were 90-209 MPa. Unidirectional glass fibers showed higher reinforcing effects on the fatigue strengths of composite resins. The strain of UHMWPE-reinforced composite was largest.

  14. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, M. R. S.; Furtado, C. R. G. E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

  15. Thermal Degradation of Filler/PP Composite and Its Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Hiroshi; Funami, Fumiyasu; Yasuda, Naoki; Nomura, Manabu; Yui, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Nobuo

    To examine thermal degradation accelerated by filling inorganic particles in polypropylene (PP), the composites were made with three types of inorganic powders : talc, magnesium hydroxide, and mica. They were easily degraded with the fillers in this order in the thermal aging test. A commercial heat resistance agent, ‘Plenlizer MK-400’, was added while making the composites. The degradation resistance of the agent remarkably appeared in the reverse order. That is, thermal degradation was most depressed in talc-filled composite with the agent. In another experience, soxhlet extraction was carried out to the filler with an organic solvent, o-xylene, that was able to dissolve PP. A lot of inorganic ions were detected in the extractant. In particular, the detected amount of aluminum ion increased in the order of talc, magnesium hydroxide, and mica. This order was the same as the fillers indicated by the degree of degradation. Infrared analysis of the agent with inorganic ions in chloroform showed that the peaks due to the agent were much stronger with aluminum ion than those with iron ion. These results suggested that a cause of degradation was aluminum ion dispersed from particles to PP matrix during the molding.

  16. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  17. Sulphonic acid derivatives as probes of pore properties of volume-regulated anion channels in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Droogmans, G; Maertens, C; Prenen, J; Nilius, B

    1999-09-01

    1. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the effects of 4-sulphonic-calixarenes and some other poly-sulphonic acid agents, such as suramin and basilen blue, on volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) currents in cultured endothelial cells (CPAE cells). 2. The 4-sulphonic-calixarenes induced a fast inhibition at positive potentials but were ineffective at negative potentials. At small positive potentials, 4-sulphonic-calix[4]arene was a more effective inhibitor than 4-sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene, which became more effective at more positive potentials. 3. Also suramin and basilen blue induced a voltage dependent current inhibition, reaching a maximum around +40 mV and declining at more positive potentials. 4. The voltage dependence of inhibition was modelled by assuming that these negatively charged molecules bind to a site inside VRAC that senses a fraction delta of the applied electrical field, ranging beween 0.16 to 0.32. 4-Sulphonic-calix[4]arene, suramin and basilen blue bind and occlude VRAC at moderate potentials, but permeate the channel at more positive potentials. 4-Sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene however do not permeate the channel. From the structural information of the calixarenes, we estimate a lower and upper limit of 11*12 and 17*12 A2 respectively for the cross-sectional area of the pore.

  18. 5-year study of a polyacrylamide hydrogel-based filler for rehabilitation of HIV-related facial lipoatrophy.

    PubMed

    Rauso, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    Lipoatrophy of the face negatively impacts the quality of life and body image of individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Facial fillers can minimize the stigma associated with the human immonodeficiency virus (HIV). In this 5-year follow-up study, the author assessed the safety and efficacy of a permanent, non-biodegradable, polyacrylamide hydrogel for facial volume restoration, and compared the results with those of a previous 18-month follow-up study. Thirty-one HIV-positive individuals, initially enrolled in the study between January 2008 and January 2009, received treatment of facial wasting by injection of the polyacrylamide gel until complete volume restoration was achieved. Asepsis rules were strictly observed before and during each injection session. Patients evaluated their aesthetic outcomes on a visual analog scale. Patient satisfaction was high. There was no occurrence of local infection, foreign-body reaction, or product during the 5 years of follow-up. Small, palpable, nonvisible nodules were recorded in nine cases. It appears that these same nodules were present in the 18-month study. It is believed that the nodules were caused by overfilling in the same site. As supported by the initial 18-month study, polyacrylamide hydrogel filler appears safe and effective for the treatment of HIV-related lipoatrophy. With strict observation of asepsis rules and patient adherence to posttreatment instructions, this filler can be ideal for treating facial wasting in patients with HIV. 3 Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Silver migration from nanosilver and a commercially available zeolite filler polyethylene composites to food simulants.

    PubMed

    Cushen, M; Kerry, J; Morris, M; Cruz-Romero, M; Cummins, E

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene composites containing Agion(TM) commercial silver ion filler at three different percentage fill rates (0.5, 1.0 and 2% w/w) and polyethylene composites containing laboratory produced silver nanoparticles (Agnps) at two different percentage fill rates (0.1 and 0.5% w/w) underwent migration tests according to Commission Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011. Migrated silver in the two simulants (acidified water with 3% acetic acid and distilled water) was quantified using two techniques: inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Hach Lange spectroscopy. The former had higher sensitivity with mean silver migration from Agion composites (n = 12) ranging from < 0.001 to 1.50 × 10(-2) mg l(-1). Mean silver migration from Agnps composites ranged from 4.65 × 10(-2) to 0.38 mg l(-1) and 8.92 × 10(-2) and 5.15 × 10(-2) mg l(-1) for Hach Lange spectrophotometry and ICPAES, respectively. Both percentage fill rate in the composite and the simulant type, as factors, were found to be significant in both silver migration from Agion (p < 0.0001 and < 0.01, respectively) and Agnps (p < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imagery showed differences in size distributions and morphology of particles (shape and degree of agglomeration) before and after migration. PE composites containing 0.5% Agion, simulating contact with non-acidic foods, was the only scenario that did not exceed the permitted migration level of non-authorised substances given in EU 10/2011. This study illustrates the need for careful engineering of the composite filler system to conform to limits with cognisance of food pH and percentage fill rate.

  20. Influence of Erosion Phenomenon on Flow Behavior of Liquid Al-Si Filler Between Brazed Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takahiro; Ueda, Toshiki

    Automotive heat exchangers are predominantly composed of plates, tubes and fins. Each component is brazed by using Al-Si filler. In the plate/tube/fin brazed-structures, the flow of the liquid filler between the components affects the fillet size at each joint. In this study, the influence of the erosion phenomenon, i.e., silicon diffusion from the braze cladding into the core alloy, in the tube on the flow behavior of the liquid filler flowing on the tube from the plate to the fin has been investigated. As a result, the area of the liquid filler not flowing but existing around α phases on the tube during brazing, which is defined as filler flow channel, can change depending on the erosion degree. The flow ability of the liquid filler flowing from the plate to the fin increases as the area increases.

  1. New fillers under consideration: what is the future of injectable aesthetics?

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    The past 5 years in the United States have seen an explosion in the popularity of noninvasive aesthetic procedures. Not only have fillers and Botox turned out to be fantastically reliable and effective aesthetic tools, but also they have vastly expanded the accessibility of cosmetic procedures. Our cosmetic filler options are growing quickly as more and more fillers are coming before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), seeking entry into the lucrative U.S. market. This article outlines the approval process that foreign fillers go through in their home countries and gives an idea of the fillers that are currently under consideration by the FDA. As our armamentarium of injectable fillers grows, it will be essential to know each product's strengths and weaknesses so that we can provide our patients with the best possible aesthetic results.

  2. Filler Nodules: Inflammatory or Infectious? A Review of Biofilms and Their Implications on Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Omer; Overman, Joseph; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2017-05-22

    The numbers of minimally invasive cosmetic procedures performed in the United States have steadily increased each year. Concurrently, the rates of filler complications have also increased. Delayed filler reactions and granulomas have recently been attributed to biofilm infections. The biology and pathogenesis of biofilms, and their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention will be discussed. The relevant and recent literature on delayed filler reactions and biofilms was reviewed. Increasing evidence implicates biofilm infections in the pathogenesis of delayed filler reactions. Therapeutic and preventative measures can be taken to minimize the occurrence of these potentially devastating consequences of dermal fillers. Awareness of biofilm infections is key in the assessment of filler reactions in order to ensure timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Treatment algorithm of complications after filler injection: based on wound healing process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Duk Kyun; Jeong, Hii Sun; Suh, In Suck

    2014-11-01

    Soft tissue filler injection has been a very common procedure worldwide since filler injection was first introduced for soft tissue augmentation. Currently, filler is used in various medical fields with satisfactory results, but the number of complications is increasing due to the increased use of filler. The complications after filler injection can occur at any time after the procedure, early and delayed, and they range from minor to severe. In this review, based on our experience and previously published other articles, we suggest a treatment algorithm to help wound healing and tissue regeneration and generate good aesthetic results with early treatment in response to the side effects of filler. Familiarity with the treatment of these rare complications is essential for achieving the best possible outcome.

  4. Microscopic and ultrastructural evidences in human skin following calcium hydroxylapatite filler treatment.

    PubMed

    Zerbinati, Nicola; D'Este, Edoardo; Parodi, Pier Camillo; Calligaro, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    This study uses light and electron microscopes to gain a better knowledge of the interactions of calcium hydroxylapatite filler with the connective tissue of the skin and the modifications of the human deep dermis, after 2 months of treatment. Some morphological evidences of this observational study of filler treated tissue support-specific mechanism involved in the structural modifications of both filler microspherules and cells of the connective tissue. They demonstrate the absence of any immunological reaction and show that the used filler is modified very slowly over time by the action of cells of the connective tissue closely related to the filler without any activity of phagocytosis. Furthermore, associated with the modifications of the filler, evidences of stimulatory effects on dermal fibroblasts are reported.

  5. Brazing of copper to stainless steel with a low-silver-content brazing filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukikoshi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yūki; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Kanasaki, Fumio

    2014-08-01

    The brazing of copper to stainless steel (SUS304 JIS) was performed using a low- silver-content brazing filler metal, Ag-50Cu, under an Ar gas atmosphere with a conventional furnace, owing to the potential economic benefits of using low-silver-content filler metals. The brazeability of the low-silver-content brazing filler metal to copper and SUS304 was investigated. A good joint was obtained, and a drastic dissolution reaction occurred at the copper side. Molten BAg8 penetrated along the crystal grain boundary of the copper base metal when BAg8 was used as the filler metal. This was caused by the dissolution of Ni from the stainless steel into the molten filler metal. Ag-50Cu, which was investigated in this work, can be used instead of BAg8 filler metal.

  6. Effect of presilanization filler decontamination on aesthetics and degradation resistance of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Kenichi; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2002-12-01

    Filler-matrix coupling determines, to a large extent, the mechanical strength and clinical longevity of dental composites. The aim of this study was to examine how far a methodology to decontaminate filler prior to silanization may improve aesthetic performance in addition to physico-mechanical properties such as degradation resistance. It was reported that filler particles are surrounded and wrapped by a film that consists of multiple layers of silane molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, however, revealed that silanization of filler particles largely depended upon siloxane bridge (Si-O-Si) formation between the silica surface and the silane molecule rather than on intermolecular bonding between adjacent silane molecules. In this study, we showed that filler decontamination resulted in a higher translucency, thereby providing a better aesthetic potential. In addition, experimental composites produced following presilanization decontamination of filler revealed a higher Vickers hardness value and a diametral tensile strength that was resistant to degradation by thermo-cycling.

  7. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  8. Effect of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Hayakawa, Iwao; Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth were examined. Four types of experimental resins were prepared: one was a matrix resin, while the others were composite resins containing three different types of fillers (nano-sized silica filler with or without silanization, and prepolymerized filler). Specimens were immersed in distilled water, coffee, red wine, or curry. Color change after immersion was measured using a colorimeter. Color difference values (delta E) and changes in translucency parameter (delta TP) were statistically analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's comparison. On the influence of the polishing factor, statistically significant differences were neither observed in delta E nor delta TP between polished and non-polished tooth surfaces. On the contrary, the influences of filler type and discoloration medium, and their interaction thereof, were significant. With unsilanized filler, the delta E value of composite resin artificial teeth was significantly increased.

  9. Management of Complications Caused by Permanent Fillers in the Face: A Treatment Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cassuto, Daniel; Pignatti, Marco; Pacchioni, Lucrezia; Boscaini, Giulia; Spaggiari, Antonio; De Santis, Giorgio

    2016-08-01

    Nonresorbable substances are still injected to enhance soft-tissue volumes and fill subcutaneous defects. Inflammatory reactions (often termed granulomas) to these materials can be functionally and socially disabling. Most therapeutic options used until now are nonspecific antiinflammatory treatments, targeting an ill-defined immune reaction of undefined cause. The minimally invasive intralesional laser treatment can remove the foreign substance and the inflammatory reaction with an 808-nm diode laser. Two hundred nineteen consecutive patients referred from September of 2006 until June of 2013 for inflammatory reactions to permanent facial fillers and treated with this technique at the authors' institution with a minimum 6-month follow-up were studied. All patients were screened with an ultrasound soft-tissue examination and the lesions were classified as either cystic (implants inserted by bolus injections) or infiltrating (as in microdeposit injection). The authors' therapeutic approach is summarized in an algorithm: infiltrating patterns were treated with intralesional laser treatment alone, whereas cystic distribution cases were also drained through stab wound incisions. The mean patient age was 49 years (range, 23 to 72 years); 204 patients were women. Partial improvement was obtained in 30 percent of patients, whereas 8 percent discontinued the treatment because of a lack of satisfaction. Lesions disappeared completely in 62 percent. Complications included transient swelling in all cases, hematoma in 2 percent, secondary sterile abscess in 9.5 percent, and minimal scarring in 10 percent. A problem-oriented systematic approach to inflammatory complications from permanent fillers is proposed, based on the comprehensive work from the past 7 years, with an overall improvement rate of 92 percent. Therapeutic, IV.

  10. A Langevin dynamics study of mobile filler particles in phase-separating binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laradji, Mohamed

    2004-05-01

    The dynamics of phase separation in a simple binary mixture containing mobile filler particles that are preferentially wet by one of the two components is investigated systematically via Langevin simulations in two dimensions. We found that while the filler particles reduce the growth rate of spinodal decomposition, the domain growth remains essentially identical to that of the pure binary mixture. The growth rate diminishes as either the filler particles concentration is increased or their diffusivity is decreased.

  11. Kinetics of pH and colour of meat emulsions containing various fillers during smokehouse cooking.

    PubMed

    Correia, L R; Mittal, G S

    1991-01-01

    The cooking kinetics of meat emulsions containing various fillers was determined by monitoring changes in pH and colour during smokehouse cooking. The fillers used were buttermilk powder, corn starch, microcrystallline cellulose, modified corn starch, modified wheat flour, soy-protein concentrate and whey-protein concentrate. The cooking process was modelled using reaction kinetics and Eyring's absolute reaction rate theory. Enthalpy and entropy changes of activation were calculated for various properties and fillers.

  12. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R.; Suan, T. Nguen

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  13. The use of agar as a novel filler for monolithic matrices produced using hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John G; Devine, Declan M; Kennedy, James E; Geever, Luke M; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2006-08-01

    The use of filler materials in an extended release monolithic polymer matrix can lead to a vastly altered release profile for the active pharmaceutical ingredient. A range of excipients for use in monolithic matrices have been discussed in the literature. The body of work described in this research paper outlines the use of agar as a novel filler material in a hot melt extruded polymer matrix. Several batches of matrix material were prepared with Diclofenac sodium used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Agar and microcrystalline cellulose were used as the filler materials in varying ratios, to examine the effect of % filler content as well as filler type on the properties of the hot melt extruded matrix. The resultant extrudates were characterised using steady state parallel plate rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution testing. The rheometry analysis concluded that the fillers used resulted in an increase in the matrix viscosity. The DSC scans obtained showed negligible effects on the melting behavior of the matrix as a result of the filler inclusion. Dissolution analysis showed that the presence of the fillers resulted in a slower release rate of API than for the matrix alone. The results detailed within this paper indicate that agar is a viable filler for extended release hot melt produced dosage forms.

  14. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers

    PubMed Central

    Brostow, Witold; Lobland, Haley E. Hagg; Hnatchuk, Nathalie; Perez, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs). We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic—with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention. PMID:28336900

  15. B218 Weld Filler Wire Characterization for Al-Li Alloy 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems- Michoud Operations, and McCook Metals have developed an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, a McCook Metals designation. B218 is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties over the 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire, which is currently used to weld 2195 on the Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program. An initial characterization was performed consisting of a repair weld evaluation using B218 and 4043 weld filler wires. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic repair weld tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. From the testing, B218 weld filler wire produce enhanced repair weld tensile strength, ductility, and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195 over 4043.

  16. The Microstructural Evolution of Vacuum Brazed 1Cr18Ni9Ti Using Various Filler Metals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunxia; Cui, Haichao; Lu, Binfeng; Lu, Fenggui

    2017-04-05

    The microstructures and weldability of a brazed joint of 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel with BNi-2, BNi82CrSiBFe and BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metals in vacuum were investigated. It can be observed that an interdiffusion region existed between the filler metal and the base metal for the brazed joint of Ni-based filler metals. The width of the interdiffusion region was about 10 μm, and the microstructure of the brazed joint of BNi-2 filler metal was dense and free of obvious defects. In the case of the brazed joint of BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metal, there were pits, pores and crack defects in the brazing joint due to insufficient wettability of the filler metal. Crack defects can also be observed in the brazed joint of BNi82CrSiBFe filler metal. Compared with BMn50NiCuCrCo and BNi82CrSiBFe filler metals, BNi-2 filler metal is the best material for 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel vacuum brazing because of its distinct weldability.

  17. The utility of high-frequency ultrasound in dermal filler evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grippaudo, Francesca Romana; Mattei, Mauro

    2011-11-01

    Aim of this study is to describe the use of high-frequency ultrasound to ascertain the site, quantity, and type of filler injected in the soft tissue of the face, with respect to reliability of the procedure and the analysis costs. Between December 2006 and August 2010, 80 subjects aged 25 to 65 years, who underwent facial filler augmentation, were submitted to high-frequency sonography. Of total, 42 patients (22 after temporary filler and 20 after permanent filler) were healthy and satisfied of the treatment, and 38 patients sought consultation for filler-related problems. The nature of the injected filler was known in 86.25% of the patients, whereas it was unknown in 13.75% of the patients. Besides 4 patients, previously treated with temporary products, in which no foreign material was detected, high-frequency sonography was able to identify and quantify the presence of filler in the soft tissue of 97% of patients. Moreover, it was possible to detect inflammatory reaction (that were often silent), granulomas, and recognize the presence of diverse fillers in the same area. Ultrasonography has proved to be a useful, inexpensive, noninvasive tool for the identification of the site, quantity, and often even nature of the filler injected.

  18. Streptococcus sanguinis isolated from filler granuloma: Successful treatment with incision and drainage.

    PubMed

    Seok, Joon; Jang, Yu-Jin; Li, Kapsok; Mun, Seog Kyun; Kim, Beom Joon

    2016-11-01

    Filler granuloma is considered to be the result of delayed immune responses; growing evidence suggests that they may be secondary to biofilm formation. Dermal filler is technically a foreign body, and as the development of newer generations of dermal fillers lengthens their duration, it is possible that there is also an increased risk of biofilm formation. Here, we present a case report of a patient with Streptococcus sanguinis isolated from a filler granuloma, suggestive of biofilm formation. This case demonstrates the effective use of antibiotics after incision and drainage on antibiotic resistant biofilm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Bjorkman, Gerry; McCool, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems, and McCook Metals' development an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding 2195 aluminum lithium. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, which is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program consists of 2195 welded with 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire. The B218 filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties. An initial characterization of the B218 weld filler wire was performed consisting of initial weld and repair weld evaluation comparing B218 and 4043. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. B218 weld filler wire proved to produce enhanced initial and repair weld tensile and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding 2195 and other aluminum lithium alloys over 4043.

  20. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers.

    PubMed

    Brostow, Witold; Lobland, Haley E Hagg; Hnatchuk, Nathalie; Perez, Jose M

    2017-03-16

    Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs). We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic-with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention.