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Sample records for acid washing perma-pressing

  1. Reactivation of a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst by acid washing.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Francisco Cabello; Mariscal, Rafael; Granados, Manuel López; Fierro, José Luis García; Brettes, Pilar; Salas, Oscar

    2005-05-15

    The catalytic activity of samples taken from an oxidation catalyst mounted on diesel-driven automobiles and aged under road conditions was recovered to a significant extent by washing with a dilute solution of citric acid. The characterization of samples arising from a fresh, a vehicle-aged, and a regenerated catalyst was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively high levels of S and P, in the form of aluminum sulfate and phosphate, respectively, together with contaminant Si were detected in the used catalyst. Washing of the vehicle-aged catalytic oxidation converter revealed high efficiency in the extraction of the main contaminants detected (S and P) by this nondestructive methodology. The results of the experiments reported here should encourage the development of a technology based on this reactivation procedure for the rejuvenation of the catalytic device mounted on diesel exhaust pipes. PMID:15952394

  2. Occupational Hydrofluoric Acid Injury from Car and Truck Washing--Washington State, 2001-2013.

    PubMed

    Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K; Eckert, Carly M; Anderson, Naomi J; Bonauto, David K

    2015-08-21

    Exposure to hydrofluoric acid (HF) causes corrosive chemical burns and potentially fatal systemic toxicity. Car and truck wash cleaning products, rust removers, and aluminum brighteners often contain HF because it is efficient in breaking down roadway matter. The death of a truck wash worker from ingestion of an HF-based wash product and 48 occupational HF burn cases associated with car and truck washing in Washington State during 2001-2013 are summarized in this report. Among seven hospitalized workers, two required surgery, and all but one worker returned to the job. Among 48 injured workers, job titles were primarily auto detailer, car wash worker, truck wash worker, and truck driver. Because HF exposure can result in potentially severe health outcomes, efforts to identify less hazardous alternatives to HF-based industrial wash products are warranted. PMID:26292206

  3. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broilers after multiple washing in potassium hydroxide and lauric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number of various types of bacteria on skin of processed broilers was determined after each of five consecutive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA). Breast skin was taken from carcasses obtained from a commercial processing facility. Portions of skin were washe...

  4. Using acid-washed waste tire rubber in soilless media for tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Cerasiforne’ tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was grown in soilless potting media contained different substrate formulas including 25:25:50 volume ratio of acid-washed (AWR) or non-washed shredded rubber (NAWR): vermiculite or zeolite: perlite. Additionally, plants were grown in a peat: perli...

  5. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems. PMID:25151072

  6. Effects of surfactants on low-molecular-weight organic acids to wash soil zinc.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Yao, Ping; Li, Ting; Wang, Guiyin; Gong, Guoshu; Li, Yun; Deng, Ouping

    2016-03-01

    Soil washing is an effective approach to the removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil. In this study, the effects of the surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, Triton X-100, and non-ionic polyacrylamide (NPAM) on oxalic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid used to remove zinc from contaminated soils were investigated. The Zn removal efficiencies of all washing solutions showed a logarithmic increase with acid concentrations from 0.5 to 10.0 g/L, while they decreased as pH increased from 4 to 9. Increasing the reaction time enhanced the effects of surfactants on Zn removal efficiencies by the acids during washing and significantly (P < 0.05) improved the removal under some mixed cases. Oxalic acid suffered antagonistic effects from the three surfactants and seriously damaged soil nutrients during the removal of soil Zn. Notably, the three surfactants caused synergistic effects on tartaric and citric acid during washing, with NPAM leading to an increase in Zn removal by 5.0 g/L citric acid of 10.60 % (P < 0.05) within 2 h. NPAM also alleviated the loss of cation exchange capacity of washed soils and obviously improved soil nitrogen concentrations. Overall, combining citric acid with NPAM offers a promising approach to the removal of zinc from contaminated soil. PMID:26527338

  7. Application of edible coating and acidic washing for extending the storage life of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Naser; Zahedi, Younes

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocolloid-based materials have been extensively used to coat fruit and vegetables to prolong shelf-life. The effects of different concentrations of acidic washing (acetic, ascorbic, citric and malic acids) followed by coating with gum arabic (GA), carboxymethyl cellulose and emulsified gum arabic (EGA) were evaluated on the weight loss (WL), firmness and color of mushroom. The WL of the uncoated mushrooms was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that of the coated ones, and the minimum WL was obtained with EGA coating. The mushrooms washed with malic and ascorbic acids showed minimum and maximum of WL, respectively. Loss in firmness of the EGA-coated mushrooms was by 21% (the minimum of loss), while loss value of the uncoated ones was by 39% (the maximum of loss). Firmness of mushrooms was not influenced by the acid type. Concentration of the acid significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the firmness of mushrooms, and at the lowest concentration of acid (1%), the mushrooms tissue was firmest. The L* value of the mushrooms coated with GA was higher than that of others. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in L* value and a significant (p < 0.05) increase in a* and b* values occurred in the mushrooms washed with acetic acid. Overall, washing with 1% citric or malic acid followed by coating with EGA resulted in minimum decrease in WL and firmness of the mushrooms. PMID:23175781

  8. Nitric acid flowsheet with late wash PHA testing. Task Technical Plan, Integrated DWPF Melter System

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1993-10-28

    This Task Technical Plan outlines the activities to be conducted in the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) in ongoing support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) utilizing the Nitric Acid Flowsheet in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produced by the Late Wash Flowsheet. The IDMS facility is to be operated over a series of runs (2 to 4) using the Nitric Acid Flowsheet. The PHA will be produced with the Late Wash Flowsheet in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). All operating conditions shall simulate the expected DWPF operating conditions as closely as possible. The task objectives are to perform at least two IDMS runs with as many operating conditions as possible at nominal DWPF conditions. The major purposes of these runs are twofold: verify that the combined Late Wash and Nitric Acid flowsheets produce glass of acceptable quality without additional changes to process equipment, and determine the reproducibility of data from run to run. These runs at nominal conditions will be compared to previous runs made with PHA produced from the Late Wash flowsheet and with the Nitric Acid flowsheet in the SRAT (Purex 4 and Purex 5).

  9. Effect of washing broiler carcasses in potassium hydroxide and lauric acid on native bacterial flora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the bactericidal effect of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA) on the native bacterial flora of broiler carcasses. Carcasses were placed in solutions of 1.0% KOH and 2.0 % LA or in distilled water (control) and washed by shaking for 1 min on a mechani...

  10. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution (w/v). Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing li...

  11. Spray washing carcasses with alkaline solutions of lauric acid to reduce bacterial contamination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of spray washing carcasses with lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) on bacteria recovered from whole-carcass-rinsates (WCR) was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Camp...

  12. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) (w/v) solution. Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing l...

  13. Role of lauric acid-potassium hydroxide concentration on bacterial contamination of spray washed broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with various concentrations of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions. Fifty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing line of...

  14. Acid wash of second cycle solvent in the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock

    SciTech Connect

    York, W.R.

    1984-02-07

    Entrainment of contaminated water in the organic phase and poor phase disengagement is prevented in the second cycle scrubber, in a two cycle-uranium recovery process, by washing the organic solvent stream containing entrained H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ from the second cycle extractor, with a dilute aqueous sulfuric or nitric acid solution in an acid scrubber, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle stripper.

  15. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound. PMID:27223116

  16. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound. PMID:27223116

  17. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid < 0.1 M EDTA<0.3 M HCl, thus hydrochloric acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples. PMID:26599728

  18. Hydrothermal hexagonal SrFe12O19 ferrite powders: Phase composition, microstructure and acid washing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ailin; Hu, Xuzhao; Li, Diankai; Chen, Lu; Jin, Chuangui; Zuo, Conghua; Su, Shubing

    2014-03-01

    A series of hexagonal m-type SrFe12O19 ferrite powders were hydrothermally synthesized, and their phase composition, microstructure and magnetic properties before/after acid washing were studied. In the synthesis of these specimens, the atomic ratio of Fe/Sr ( R F/S ) in starting materials was set to 4, 5 and 12, respectively. When R F/S = 12, the specimen has morphology of round flat cakes, not typical hexagonal plate-like structure. The results of SEM images and XRD patterns indicate that the specimen with R F/S = 12 was mostly composed of Fe2O3. When R F/S = 4 or 5, the hexagonal plate-like SrFe12O19 ferrite powders were successfully synthesized with only a small quantity of Fe2O3 and SrCO3 impurities. It is also found that acid washing can eliminate the impurities in as-synthesized specimens effectively, and also change their topography, which enhances the saturation magnetization. However, the coercivity changed irregularly after acid washing, which is ascribed to the combination of the changed morphology, introduced stress and lattice defects.

  19. Changes in the bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler chickens washed in solutions of salicylic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the number of bacteria recovered from the skin of processed broilers after each of five consecutive washings in salicylic acid (SA) solutions was examined. Skin samples from commercially processed broiler carcasses were divided into 3 groups and washed in distilled water (control), 10% S...

  20. Effect of multiple washing in salicylic acid on the bacterial flora of the skin of processed broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine changes in the bacterial flora of the skin of processed broilers after each of five consecutive washings in solutions of the keratolytic agent, salicylic acid. Skin samples from commercially processed broiler carcasses were divided into 3 groups and washed in ...

  1. Hydrogen generation during IDMS demonstrations of the Late Washing and Nitric Acid flowsheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.A.

    1992-10-19

    Recently, Late Washing (LW) and Nitric Acid (NA) flowsheets, developed respectively for the DWPF at Savannah River Technology Center SPC and CPC, were demonstrated in the one-fifth scale DWPF pilot facilities, PHEF and IDMS. Using the LW flowsheet, four runs in the PHEF produced enough PHA for two runs in the IDMS (denoted by PX4 and PX5). One of the objectives of these IDMS runs was to obtain peak hydrogen generation rates and compare them to the peak hydrogen generation rate design basis obtained from a previous IDMS run, based on the HAN and Formic Acid (HAN-FA) flowsheets.

  2. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  3. Hydrogen generation in SRAT with nitric acid and late washing flowsheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.

    1992-10-26

    Recently, SRTC recommended two process changes: (1) a final wash of the tetraphenylborate precipitate feed slurry and (2) the use of nitric acid to neutralize the sludge in the SRAT. The first change produced an aqueous hydrolysis product (PHA) with higher formic acid/formate and copper concentration, and reduced the nitrate content in the PHA by an order of magnitude. The second change is to substitute part of formic acid added to the SRAT with nitric acid, and therefore may reduce the hydrogen generated in the SRAT as well as provide nitrate as an oxidant to balance the redox state of the melter feed. The purpose of this report is to determine the pertinent variables that could affect the hydrogen generation rate with these process changes.

  4. Reactivation of an aged commercial three-way catalyst by oxalic and citric acid washing.

    PubMed

    Christou, Stavroula Y; Birgersson, Henrik; Fierro, José L G; Efstathiou, Angelos M

    2006-03-15

    The efficiency of dilute oxalic and citric acid solutions on improving the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and catalytic activity of a severely aged (83,000 km) commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) has been investigated. Washing procedures applied after optimization of experimental parameters, namely, temperature, flow-rate, and concentration of acid solution, led to significant improvements of OSC and catalytic activity (based on dynamometer test measurements) of the aged TWC. The latterwas made possible due to the removal of significant amounts of various contaminants accumulated on the catalyst surface (e.g., P, S, Pb, Ca, Zn, Si, Fe, Cu, and Ni) during driving conditions, as revealed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. For the first time, it is demonstrated that dilute oxalic acid solution significantly improves the catalytic activity of an aged commercial TWC toward CO, Cx,Hy, and NOx conversions under real exhaust gas conditions (dynamometer tests) by two to eight times in the 250-450 degrees C range and the OSC quantity by up to 50%. Oxalic acid appears to be more efficient than citric acid in removing specifically P- and S-containing compounds from the catalyst surface, whereas citric acid in removing Pb- and Zn-containing compounds, thus uncovering surface active catalytic sites. PMID:16570632

  5. Hydrogen generation in SRAT with nitric acid and late washing flowsheets. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.

    1992-10-22

    Melter feed preparation processes, incorporating a final wash of the precipitate slurry feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and a partial substitution of the SRAT formic acid requirement with nitric acid, should not produce peak hydrogen generation rates during Cold Chemical Runs (CCR`s) and radioactive operation greater than their current, respective hydrogen design bases of 0.024 lb/hr and 1.5 lb/hr. A single SRAT bench-scale process simulation for CCR-s produced a DWPF equivalent peak hydrogen generation rate of 0.004 lb/hr. During radioactive operation, the peak hydrogen generation rate will be dependent on the extent DWPF deviates from the nominal precipitate hydrolysis and melter feed preparation process operating parameters. Two actual radioactive sludges were treated according to the new flowsheets. The peak hydrogen evolution rates were equivalent to 0.038 and 0.20 lb/hr (DWPF scale) respectively. Compared to the formic acid -- HAN hydrolysis flowsheets, these peak rates were reduced by a factor of 2.5 and 3.4 for Tank 15 and Tank 11 sludges, respectively.

  6. Hydrogen generation in SRAT with nitric acid and late washing flowsheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.

    1992-10-22

    Melter feed preparation processes, incorporating a final wash of the precipitate slurry feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and a partial substitution of the SRAT formic acid requirement with nitric acid, should not produce peak hydrogen generation rates during Cold Chemical Runs (CCR's) and radioactive operation greater than their current, respective hydrogen design bases of 0.024 lb/hr and 1.5 lb/hr. A single SRAT bench-scale process simulation for CCR-s produced a DWPF equivalent peak hydrogen generation rate of 0.004 lb/hr. During radioactive operation, the peak hydrogen generation rate will be dependent on the extent DWPF deviates from the nominal precipitate hydrolysis and melter feed preparation process operating parameters. Two actual radioactive sludges were treated according to the new flowsheets. The peak hydrogen evolution rates were equivalent to 0.038 and 0.20 lb/hr (DWPF scale) respectively. Compared to the formic acid -- HAN hydrolysis flowsheets, these peak rates were reduced by a factor of 2.5 and 3.4 for Tank 15 and Tank 11 sludges, respectively.

  7. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler chickens after successive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the size of the populations of different groups of bacteria in the normal flora of the skin of processed broilers were examined after each of five consecutive washings with mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA). Skin from commercially processed broiler carcasses was ...

  8. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  9. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  10. Methodology for modeling the disinfection efficiency of fresh-cut leafy vegetables wash water applied on peracetic acid combined with lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Van Haute, S; López-Gálvez, F; Gómez-López, V M; Eriksson, Markus; Devlieghere, F; Allende, Ana; Sampers, I

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to i) assess the feasibility of water disinfection in fresh-cut leafy greens wash water and ii) to compare the disinfectant efficiency of water disinfectants was defined and applied for a combination of peracetic acid (PAA) and lactic acid (LA) and comparison with free chlorine was made. Standardized process water, a watery suspension of iceberg lettuce, was used for the experiments. First, the combination of PAA+LA was evaluated for water recycling. In this case disinfectant was added to standardized process water inoculated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 (6logCFU/mL). Regression models were constructed based on the batch inactivation data and validated in industrial process water obtained from fresh-cut leafy green processing plants. The UV254(F) was the best indicator for PAA decay and as such for the E. coli O157 inactivation with PAA+LA. The disinfection efficiency of PAA+LA increased with decreasing pH. Furthermore, PAA+LA efficacy was assessed as a process water disinfectant to be used within the washing tank, using a dynamic washing process with continuous influx of E. coli O157 and organic matter in the washing tank. The process water contamination in the dynamic process was adequately estimated by the developed model that assumed that knowledge of the disinfectant residual was sufficient to estimate the microbial contamination, regardless the physicochemical load. Based on the obtained results, PAA+LA seems to be better suited than chlorine for disinfecting process wash water with a high organic load but a higher disinfectant residual is necessary due to the slower E. coli O157 inactivation kinetics when compared to chlorine. PMID:26065727

  11. Effects of acid washing on stable isotope ratios of C and N in penaeid shrimp and seagrass: Implications for food-web studies using multiple stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, S.E.; Kempster, M.A.; Loneragan, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effects of acid washing on the carbon and nitrogen composition and stable isotope ratios of C and N in shrimp (Metapenaeus spp.) and seagrass (Enhalus acoroides). Acid washing did not affect the mean {delta}{sup 13}C ratios for juvenile Metapenaeus moyebi and resulted in only an ecologically insignificant change (0.3%) in mean {delta}{sup 13}C ratios for larger metapenaeus bennettae. In contrast, acid washing increased the mean {delta}{sup 15}N signatures of shrimp tissue ({approximately}3%) and decreased that of seagrass ({approximately}1.8%) to a degree that may confound the interpretation of food webs. The increase in %C and %N in both shrimp and seagrass after acid washing suggests that the changes in isotope ratios are due to loss of molecules comparatively low in C and N. Treating samples by acid washing also resulted in an increase in the variation among individuals for both {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C, which would lead to a loss of statistical power for testing differences between species, sites, or seasons. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Hand Washing

    MedlinePlus

    ... dirty little secrets: Students don't wash their hands often or well. In one study, only 58% of female and 48% of male middle- and high-school students washed their hands after using the bathroom. Yuck! previous continue How ...

  13. Soil washing of fluorine contaminated soil using various washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Jo, Raehyun; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Bench-scale soil washing experiments were conducted to remove fluoride from contaminated soils. Five washing solutions including hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and tartaric acid (C4H6O6) were tested. The concentration of the washing solutions used ranged from 0.1 to 3 M with a liquid to solid ratio of 10. The soil washing results showed that the most effective washing solution for the removal of fluoride from contaminated soils was HCl. The highest fluoride removal results of approximately 97 % from the contaminated soil were obtained using 3 M HCl. The fluoride removal efficiency of the washing solution increases in the following order: C4H6O6 < NaOH < H2SO4 < HNO3 < HCl. PMID:25552323

  14. Sequential soil washing techniques using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide for remediating arsenic-contaminated soils in abandoned iron-ore mines.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min; Hwang, Jung Sung; Choi, Sang Il

    2007-01-01

    Sequential washing techniques using single or dual agents [sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions] were applied to arsenic-contaminated soils in an abandoned iron-ore mine area. We investigated the best remediation strategies to maximize arsenic removal efficiency for both soils and arsenic-containing washing solution through conducting a series of batch experiments. Based on the results of a sequential extraction procedure, most arsenic prevails in Fe-As precipitates or coprecipitates, and iron exists mostly in the crystalline forms of iron oxide. Soil washing by use of a single agent was not effective in remediating arsenic-contaminated soils because arsenic extractions determined by the Korean standard test (KST) methods for washed soils were not lower than 6mg kg(-1) in all experimental conditions. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that iron-ore fines produced mobile colloids through coagulation and flocculation in water contacting the soils, containing dissolved arsenic and fine particles of ferric arsenate-coprecipitated silicate. The first washing step using 0.2M HCl was mostly effective in increasing the cationic hydrolysis of amorphous ferrihydrite, inducing high removal of arsenic. Thus, the removal step of arsenic-containing flocs can lower arsenic extractions (KST methods) of washed soils. Among several washing trials, alternative sequential washing using 0.2M HCl followed by 1M HCl (second step) and 1M NaOH solution (third step) showed reliable and lower values of arsenic extractions (KST methods) of washed soils. This washing method can satisfy the arsenic regulation of washed soil for reuse or safe disposal application. The kinetic data of washing tests revealed that dissolved arsenic was easily readsorbed into remaining soils at a low pH. This result might have occurred due to dominant species of positively charged crystalline iron oxides characterized through the sequential extraction procedure. However

  15. Removal of arsenic and cadmium with sequential soil washing techniques using Na2EDTA, oxalic and phosphoric acid: Optimization conditions, removal effectiveness and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-08-01

    Testing of sequential soil washing in triplicate using typical chelating agent (Na2EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid) and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated by heavy metals close to a mining area. The aim of the testing was to improve removal efficiency and reduce mobility of heavy metals. The sequential extraction procedure and further speciation analysis of heavy metals demonstrated that the primary components of arsenic and cadmium in the soil were residual As (O-As) and exchangeable fraction, which accounted for 60% and 70% of total arsenic and cadmium, respectively. It was determined that soil washing agents and their washing order were critical to removal efficiencies of metal fractions, metal bioavailability and potential mobility due to different levels of dissolution of residual fractions and inter-transformation of metal fractions. The optimal soil washing option for arsenic and cadmium was identified as phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na2EDTA sequence (POE) based on the high removal efficiency (41.9% for arsenic and 89.6% for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects of the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals. PMID:27179243

  16. Spray washing carcasses with alkaline solutions of lauric acid to reduce bacterial contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions to reduce carcass bacterial contamination was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Campylobacter coli. In one trial, in...

  17. Effect of Washing Broiler Carcasses in Potassium Hydroxide and Lauric Acid on Native Bacterial Flora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the bactericidal effect of mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA) on the native microflora of broiler carcasses. Eviscerated carcasses obtained from a local, commercial poultry processing facility were placed in solutions of 1.0% KOH and 2.0 ...

  18. Bacteria recovered from whole-carcass rinsates of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of spray washing carcasses with lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) on bacteria recovered from whole-carcass-rinsates (WCR) was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Camp...

  19. Hand washing.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    A surgery matron has writt en a hand hygiene promotional video rap to encourage staff, patients and visitors to wash their hands. Vicky Cartwright from University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust rewrote the lyrics to 1990s hit rap, Ice Ice Baby. PMID:27380706

  20. Efficacy of electrolyzed water and an acidic formulation compared with regularly used chemical sanitizers for tableware sanitization during mechanical and manual ware-washing protocols.

    PubMed

    Handojo, Aldo; Lee, Jaesung; Hipp, Joel; Pascall, Melvin A

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated residual bacteria and different food types left on tableware items after various washing and sanitization protocols. Escherichia coli K-12 and Staphylococcus epidermidis were inoculated into whole milk and soft cream cheese. The milk was used to contaminate regular drinking glasses and the cheese was used to contaminate plates and silverware. These tableware items were washed in manual (43 degrees C) and mechanical (49 degrees C) washers and sanitized with different sanitizers (24 degrees C) for 5 s. Quaternary ammonium compound, sodium hypochlorite, peroxyacetic acid, neutral electrolyzed water (NEW), and a combination of citric acid with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (acidic formulation) were used as the chemical sanitizers. Tap water was used as a control. Results showed that at least 5-log reductions in both bacterial numbers were achieved for all sanitizers in both types of washers, except for the control. With mechanical dishwashing, the NEW and acidic formulation treatments reduced bacterial populations by >6.9 and >6.0 log CFU per tableware item, respectively. With the manual operation, bacterial numbers were reduced by >5.4 and >6.0 log CFU per tableware item, respectively. This study revealed that NEW and the acidic formulation are as effective as the other chemical sanitizers for food contact surface sanitization in manual and mechanical ware washing. PMID:19610348

  1. Part 2. Comparison of emergency washing solutions in 70% hydrofluoric acid-burned human skin in an established ex vivo explants model

    PubMed Central

    Burgher, François; Mathieu, Laurence; Lati, Elian; Gasser, Philippe; Peno-Mazzarino, Laurent; Blomet, Joël; Hall, Alan H; Maibach, Howard I

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is a small and partially dissociated acid (pKa 3.2), able to deeply penetrate into human skin in addition to the corrosiveness of the hydrogen ion (H+) and the toxicity of the fluoride ion (F-). However, there has been a lack of experimental studies to objectively characterize the results of human HF skin exposure decontamination. Methodology/principal findings: A previously established experimental method using a human skin explants ex vivo model (Part 1. Experimental 70% hydrofluoric acid (HF) burns: Histological observations in an established human skin explants ex vivo model) described the lesions that appeared following 70% HF penetration. Within 5min, 70% HF penetrates to the dermis. Using the same experimental conditions, a comparison study of two different washing protocols was performed: water + topical calcium gluconate (CaG) versus Hexafluorine®. In these conditions, washing for 15min with running tap water followed by topical CaG ointment only delayed burn onset, while severe tissue damage appeared later. In contrast, after washing with Hexafluorine® over 10 min, no histological lesions developed. These results are in accordance with the results of accidental human industrial case reports. Conclusion/significance: Amphoteric and hypertonic Hexafluorine® can deactivate H+ and chelate F- ions. Based on these results, it should be considered as a promising first-aid decontamination solution to prevent or minimize significant local and systemic consequences of concentrated HF skin exposures. PMID:21083510

  2. Comparison of water wash, trimming, and combined hot water and lactic acid treatments for reducing bacteria of fecal origin on beef carcasses.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A; Lucia, L M; Goodson, K J; Savell, J W; Acuff, G R

    1998-07-01

    Cleaning treatments, such as high-pressure water wash at 35 degrees C or trim, alone and combined with sanitizing treatments, such as hot water (95 degrees C at the source), warm (55 degrees C) 2% lactic acid spray, and combinations of these two sanitizing methods, were compared for their effectiveness in reducing inoculated numbers (5.0 to 6.0 log CFU/cm2) of Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, aerobic plate counts, Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, thermotolerant coliforms, and generic E. coli on hot beef carcass surface areas in a model carcass spray cabinet. Log reductions in numbers of all tested organisms by water wash or trim alone were significantly smaller than the log reductions obtained by the different combined treatments. Regardless of the cleaning treatment (water wash or trim) or surface area, the range for mean log reductions by hot water was from 4.0 to > 4.8 log CFU/cm2, by lactic acid spray was from 4.6 to > 4.9 log CFU/cm2, by hot water followed by lactic acid spray was from 4.5 to > 4.9 log CFU/cm2, and by lactic acid spray followed by hot water was from 4.4 to > 4.6 log CFU/cm2, for S. typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7. Identical reductions were obtained for thermotolerant coliforms and generic E. coli. No differences in bacterial reductions were observed for different carcass surface regions. Water wash and trim treatments caused spreading of the contamination to other areas of the carcass surface while providing an overall reduction in fecal or pathogenic contamination on carcass surface areas. This relocated contamination after either water wash or trim was most effectively reduced by following with hot water and then lactic acid spray. This combined treatment yielded 0% positive samples for S. typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7, thermotolerant coliforms, and generic E. coli on areas outside the inoculated areas, whereas percent positive samples after applying other combined treatments ranged from 22 to 44% for S. typhimurium, 0 to

  3. Revision of the nonequilibrium thermal dissociation and stringent washing approaches for identification of mixed nucleic acid targets by microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Pozhitkov, Alex E.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Noble, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Microarray experiments typically involve washing steps that remove hybridized nonspecific targets with the purpose of improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The quality of washing ultimately affects downstream analysis of the microarray and interpretation. The paucity of fundamental studies directed towards understanding the dissociation of mixed targets from microarrays makes the development of meaningful washing/dissociation protocols difficult. To fill the void, we examined activation energies and preexponential coefficients of 47 perfect match (PM) and double-mismatch (MM) duplex pairs to discover that there was no statistical difference between the kinetics of the PM and MM duplexes. Based on these findings, we evaluated the nonequilibrium thermal dissociation (NTD) approach, which has been used to identify specific microbial targets in mixed target samples. We found that the major premises for various washing protocols and the NTD approach might be seriously compromised because: (i) nonspecific duplexes do not always dissociate before specific ones, and (ii) the relationship between dissociation rates of the PM and MM duplexes depends on temperature and duplex sequence. Specifically for the NTD, we show that previously suggested use of reference curves, indices of curves and temperature ramps lead to erroneous conclusions. PMID:17430966

  4. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water. PMID:26215790

  5. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, P.H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D.W.G. )

    1991-06-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history. 16 refs.

  6. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history.

  7. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1991-06-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history.

  8. Difference analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover before and after washing with water.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Shi, Linli; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-10-01

    The difference in the enzymatic hydrolysis yield of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) before and after washing with water reached approximately 15 % under the same conditions. The reasons for the difference in the yield between ASC and washed ASC (wASC) were determined through the analysis of the composition of ASC prehydrolyzate and sugar concentration of enzymatic hydrolyzate. Salts produced by neutralization (CaSO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), sugars (polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides), sugar-degradation products (weak acids and furans), and lignin-degradation products (ethyl acetate extracts and nine main lignin-degradation products) were back-added to wASC. Results showed that these products, except furans, exerted negative effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the characteristics of acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment, the five sugar-degradation products' mixture and salts [Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4] showed minimal negative inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. By contrast, furans demonstrated a promotion effect. Moreover, soluble sugars, such as 13 g/L xylose (decreased by 6.38 %), 5 g/L cellobiose (5.36 %), 10 g/L glucose (3.67 %), as well as lignin-degradation products, and ethyl acetate extracts (4.87 %), exhibited evident inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, removal of soluble sugars and lignin-degradation products could effectively promote the enzymatic hydrolysis performance. PMID:27277746

  9. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make the nasal wash solution. Do not use tap water for the nasal wash (unless boiled or filtered ... water. You may use: Distilled water Sterilized water Tap water that has been boiled for 1 minute (at ...

  10. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    Salt water washes; Nasal irrigation; Nasal lavage; Sinusitis - nasal wash ... by mixing: 3 teaspoons (tsp) canning or pickling salt (no iodine) 1 tsp baking soda 1 cup warm distilled, filtered, or boiled water To use the wash: Fill the device with ...

  11. Use of 1 % peroxyacetic acid sanitizer in an air-mixing wash basin to remove bacterial pathogen from seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of pathogen free sprouts is tenuous due to problems with the seed sanitizing mixing protocol using liquid sanitizer on the seed surface. Commercial treatments by irradiation or ozone gas of artificially inoculated seeds resulted in less than 1 log reduction. Use of peroxyacetic acid (1%...

  12. Late Washing efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-08-31

    Interim Waste Technology has demonstrated the Late Washing concept on the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. In two tests, washing reduced the [NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}] from 0.08 M to approximately 0.01 M on slurries with 2 year equivalent radiation exposures and 9.5 wt. % solids. For both washes, the [NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}] decreased at rates near theoretical for a constant volume stirred vessel, indicating approximately l00% washing efficiency. Permeate flux was greater than 0.05 gpm/ft{sup 2} for both washes at a transmembrane pressure of 50 psi and flow velocity of 9 ft/sec.

  13. Wash water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Rousseau, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The Wash Water Recovery System (WWRS) is intended for use in processing shower bath water onboard a spacecraft. The WWRS utilizes flash evaporation, vapor compression, and pyrolytic reaction to process the wash water to allow recovery of potable water. Wash water flashing and foaming characteristics, are evaluated physical properties, of concentrated wash water are determined, and a long term feasibility study on the system is performed. In addition, a computer analysis of the system and a detail design of a 10 lb/hr vortex-type water vapor compressor were completed. The computer analysis also sized remaining system components on the basis of the new vortex compressor design.

  14. SOIL WASHING TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a water-based process for mechanically scrubbing soils ex-situ to remove undesirable contaminants. he process removes contaminants from soils in one of two ways: by dissolving or suspending them in the wash solution (which is later treated by conventional wastewat...

  15. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  16. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-25

    The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed. PMID:26521089

  17. TANK 7 CHARACTERIZATION AND WASHING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

    2010-02-04

    A 3-L PUREX sludge sample from Tank 7 was characterized and then processed through a series of inhibited water washes to remove oxalate, sodium, and other soluble ions. Current plans use Tank 7 as one of the feed sources for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7). Tank 7 is high in oxalate due to the oxalic acid cleaning of the sludge heels from Tanks 5 and 6 and subsequent transfer to Tank 7. Ten decant and nine wash cycles were performed over a 47 day period at ambient temperature. Initially, seven decants and seven washes were completed based on preliminary estimates of the number of wash cycles required to remove the oxalate in the sludge. After reviewing the composition data, SRNL recommended the completion of 2 or 3 more decant/wash cycles to ensure all of the sodium oxalate had redissolved. In the first 7 washes, the slurry oxalate concentration was 12,300 mg/kg (69.6% oxalate removal compared to 96.1% removal of the other soluble ions). After all ten decants were complete, the slurry oxalate concentration was 3,080 mg/kg (89.2% oxalate removal compared to 99.0% of the other soluble ions). The rate of dissolution of oxalate increased significantly with subsequent washes until all of the sodium oxalate had been redissolved after seven decant/wash cycles. The measured oxalate concentrations agreed very well with LWO predictions for washing of the Tank 7 sample. Highlights of the analysis and washing of the Tank 7 sample include: (1) Sodium oxalate was detected in the as-received filtered solids. 95% of the oxalate was insoluble (undissolved) in the as-received slurry. (2) No sodium oxalate was detected in the post-wash filtered solids. (3) Sodium oxalate is the last soluble species that redissolves during washing with inhibited water. In order to significantly reduce the sodium oxalate concentration, the sludge must be highly washed, leaving the other soluble anions and cations (including sodium) very low in concentration. (4) The post-wash slurry had 1% of the soluble anions

  18. The effectiveness of acetic acid wash protocol and the interpretation patterns of blood contaminated cervical cytology ThinPrep® specimens

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Nora K.; Ahmed, Yasin; Sethi, Seema; Neill, Daniel; Kalinicheva, Tatyana; Shidham, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: ThinPrep® (TP) cervical cytology, as a liquid-based method, has many benefits but also a relatively high unsatisfactory rate due to debris/lubricant contamination and the presence of blood. These contaminants clog the TP filter and prevent the deposition of adequate diagnostic cells on the slide. An acetic acid wash (AAW) protocol is often used to lyse red blood cells, before preparing the TP slides. Design: From 23,291 TP cervical cytology specimens over a 4-month period, 2739 underwent AAW protocol due to initial unsatisfactory smear (UNS) with scant cellularity due to blood or being grossly bloody. Randomly selected 2739 cervical cytology specimens which did not undergo AAW from the same time period formed the control (non-AAW) group. Cytopathologic interpretations of AAW and non-AAW groups were compared using the Chi-square test. Results: About 94.2% of the 2739 cases which underwent AAW were subsequently satisfactory for evaluation with interpretations of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) 4.9% (135), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) 3.7% (102), and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) 1% (28). From the 2739 control cases, 96.3% were satisfactory with ASCUS 5.5% (151), LSIL 5.1% (139), and HSIL 0.7% (19). The prevalence of ASCUS interpretations was similar (P = 0.33). Although there were 32% more HSIL interpretations in the AAW group (28 in AAW vs. 19 in non-AAW), the difference was statistically insignificant (P = 0.18). AAW category; however, had significantly fewer LSIL interpretations (P = 0.02). The percentage of UNS cases remained higher in the AAW group with statistical significance (P < 0.01). Conclusions: While AAW had a significantly higher percent of UNS interpretations, the protocol was effective in rescuing 94.2% of specimens which otherwise may have been reported unsatisfactory. This improved patient care by avoiding a repeat test. The prevalence of ASCUS and HSIL

  19. Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Lauren K; Harrison, Mark A; Berrang, Mark E; Jones, Deana R

    2016-07-01

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures were evaluated for Salmonella reduction: pH 11 at 48.9°C (industry standard), pH 11 at ambient temperature (∼20°C), pH 6 at 48.9°C, and pH 6 at ambient temperature. Alkaline washes contained potassium hydroxide-based detergent, while pH 6 washes contained approximately 200 ppm of chlorine and a proprietary chlorine stabilizer (T-128). When eggs were inoculated by immersion in a cell suspension of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, all treatments resulted in a slight and similar reduction of Salmonella numbers (approximately 0.77 log CFU/ml of shell emulsion reduction). When eggs were inoculated by droplet on the shell surface, Salmonella counts were reduced by approximately 5 log CFU when washed with chlorine plus the chlorine stabilizer at both temperatures and with the alkaline wash at the high temperature. The reductions in Salmonella by these treatments were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from each other but were significantly (P < 0.05) more than the reduction observed for the 20°C alkaline treatment and 20°C control water treatments. Ambient temperature acidic washes reduced Salmonella contamination to the same degree as the standard pH 11 warm water wash and may be a viable option to reduce cost, increase shelf life, and slow pathogen growth in and on shell eggs. PMID:27357042

  20. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  1. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  2. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  3. Domestic wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    System consists of filtration unit, reverse-osmosis module, tanks, pumps, plumbing, and various gauges, meters, and valves. After water is used in washing machine or shower, it is collected in holding tank. Water is pumped through series of five particulate filters. Pressure tank supplies processed water to commode water closet.

  4. Wash Your Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... do if you don't have soap and clean, running water? Washing hands with soap and water is the ... specific questions. More Information CDC's Handwashing Work Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings Water-related Hygiene Hand Hygiene to Help Prevent Flu ...

  5. Soil washing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.

    1995-12-01

    Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

  6. Washing Out the Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering. TecH2Ozone significantly reduces the amount of water and chemical used as compared to traditional commercial laundry systems. This reduction has resulted in lower cost and shorter wash cycles. And due to the reduced use of chemicals, a significant portion of the rinse water is recycled back into the system for reuse. TecH2Ozone customers, such as hotels and other large commercial laundry facilities, have felt the benefits of this equipment. Because of the reduced cycle times, fewer washers are needed and there is a notable increase in the cleanliness of the laundry. The reduction in chemical residues is a boon to customers with allergies and those prone to skin irritation from chemicals retained in regular laundry. AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering.

  7. [Washing copper (II)-contaminated soil using surfactant solutions].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bao-wei; Wu, Yong-qi; Ma, Chan-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-jia

    2009-10-15

    The batch equilibrium washing of copper (II) in the soil matrix by anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzyl sulfonate (SDBS), nonionic surfactant, octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (TX100), and their mixture (SDBS-TX100), was studied and compared. The influences of surfactant concentrations, washing time, pH values of solutions, ratios of soil to water and inorganic salts on washing efficiency were investigated. It was shown that the washing efficiency differed with the kinds of surfactants. Given the initial surfactant concentrations, the washing of copper (II) by single SDBS was greater than those by single TX100 and the mixed SDBS-TX100. The washing efficiency by 6 000 mg x L(-1) of SDBS was up to 46.3%, which was 5.8, 10.8, 10.8 and 19.3 times as those by SDBS-TX100 (3:1), SDBS-TX100 (1:1), SDBS-TX100 (1:3) and single TX100 respectively. When the ratio of soil to water was 1 to 10 and washing time reached 24 h, the washing efficiency achieved the maximum. pH values of solutions had obvious effect on the washing of copper (II). The washing efficiency of copper decreased sharply with the increase of pH. At the high acidity (pH = 1.50), the washing efficiency of copper (II) was up to 95%. The smaller the ratios of soil to water were, the higher the washing efficiencies would be. The existence of inorganic salts with the certain concentrations, such as Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, could not influence the washing capacity of surfactants, but the excessive Mg2+ (more than 500 mg x L(-1)) could resulted in the precipitation of SDBS. The results will make an implication for surfactant-enhanced remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:19968132

  8. Behavior of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli relevant to lettuce washing processes and consideration of factors for evaluating washing process surrogates.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiping; Wang, Xue; Yen, Li-Han; Ding, Hongliu; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2014-11-01

    Postharvest processes for fresh produce commonly include washing in water containing antimicrobial chemicals, such as chlorine; however, if the antimicrobials are not present in sufficient levels, washing can promote the spread of contamination that might be present. To understand cross-contamination risk during washing, we tested a collection of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC), including O157:H7 and other non-O157 strains, for certain traits during washing of fresh-cut lettuce, i.e., sensitivity to sublethal chlorine levels and ability to cross-contaminate (detach from and attach to) lettuce in the presence of sublethal chlorine levels. Nonpathogenic E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and Pediococcus pentosaceus lactic acid bacterial species (LAB) were included as potential washing process validation surrogates. As measured by extension of the lag phase of growth in media containing 0.15 ppm of chlorine, chlorine sensitivity varied among the STECs. Cross-contamination was assessed by evaluating transfer of bacteria from inoculated to uninoculated leaves during washing. Without chlorine, similar transfer to wash water and uninoculated leaves was shown. In 1 ppm of chlorine, cross-contamination was not detected with most strains, except for the substantial transfer by a STEC O111 strain and EcN in some replicates. Strain O111 and EcN showed less inactivation in 0.25 ppm of chlorine water compared with O157 (P < 0.05). LAB showed similar transfer and similar chlorine inactivation to O157. Considering together the sublethal chlorine sensitivity and detachment/attachment traits, neither EcN nor LAB displayed optimal characteristics as washing process surrogates for the STEC strains, although further evaluation is needed. This work demonstrated a range of behaviors of STEC strains during lettuce washing and may be helpful in hazard characterization, identifying factors to consider for evaluating washing process efficacy, and identifying phenotypic traits to select

  9. Can washing-pretreatment eliminate the health risk of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash reuse?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Pan, Yun; Zhang, Lingen; Yue, Yang; Zhou, Jizhi; Xu, Yunfeng; Qian, Guangren

    2015-01-01

    Although the reuse of washing-pretreated MSWI fly ash bas been a hot topic, the associated risk is still an issue of great concern. The present study investigated the influence of washing-pretreatment on the total contents and bioaccessibility of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash. Furthermore, the study incorporated bioaccessibility adjustment into probabilistic risk assessment, to quantify the health risk from multi-pathway exposure to the concerned chemicals as a result of reusing washed MSWI fly ash. The results revealed that both water-washing and acid-washing process have resulted in the concentrated heavy metal content, and have reduced the bioaccessibility of heavy metals. Besides, the acid-washing process increased the cancer risk in most cases, while the effect of water-washing process was uncertain. However, both water-washing and acid-washing pretreatment could decrease the hazard index based on bioaccesilbility. Despite the uncertainties accompanying these procedures, the results indicated that, in this application scenario, only water-washing or acid-washing process cannot reduce the actual risk from all samples to acceptable level, especially for cancer risk. PMID:25450931

  10. Efficacy of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and UV-Ozonated Water Combination for Inactivating Escherichia Coli O157:H7 on Romaine and Iceberg Lettuce during Spray Washing Process.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Hsin; Hung, Yen-Con

    2016-07-01

    Spray washing is a common sanitizing method for the fresh produce industry. The purpose of this research was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of spraying slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and a combination of ozonated water with ultraviolet (UV) in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on romaine and iceberg lettuces. Both romaine and iceberg lettuces were spot inoculated with 100 μL of a 3 strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 to achieve an inoculum of 6 log CFU/g on lettuce. A strong antimicrobial effect was observed for the UV-ozonated water combination, which reduced the population of E. coli by 5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 on both lettuces. SAEW achieved about 5 log CFU/g reductions in the bacterial counts on romaine lettuce. However, less than 2.5 log CFU/g in the population of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced on iceberg lettuce. The difference may be due to bacteria aggregation near and within stomata for iceberg lettuce but not for romaine lettuce. The UV light treatment may stimulate the opening of the stomata for the UV-ozonated water treatment and hence achieve better bacterial inactivation than the SAEW treatment for iceberg lettuce. Our results demonstrated that the combined treatment of SAEW and UV-ozonated water in the spray washing process could more effectively reduce E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce, which in turn may help reduce incidences of E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks. PMID:27305593

  11. The behavior of silver nanotextiles during washing.

    PubMed

    Geranio, L; Heuberger, M; Nowack, B

    2009-11-01

    The widespread use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in commercial products, especially textiles, will likely result in an unknown spread of Ag into the environment. The quantification and characterization of the Ag released from nano-Ag-products is an important parameter needed to predict the effect of Ag-NPs on the environment. The aim of this study was to determine the amount and the form of Ag released during washing from nine fabrics with different ways of silver incorporation into or onto the fibers. The effect of pH, surfactants, and oxidizing agents was evaluated. The results show that little dissolution of Ag-NPs occurs under conditions relevant to washing (pH 10) with dissolved concentrations 10 times lower than at pH 7. However, bleaching agents such as hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid (formed by the perborate/TAED system) can greatly accelerate the dissolution of Ag. The amount and form of Ag released from the fabrics as ionic and particulate Ag depended on the type of Ag-incorporation into the textile. The percentage of the total silver emitted during one washing of the textiles varied considerably among products (from less than 1 to 45%). In the washing machine the majority of the Ag (at least 50% but mostly >75%) was released in the size fraction >450 nm, indicating the dominant role of mechanical stress. A conventional silver textile did not show any significant difference in the size distribution of the released silver compared to many of the textiles containing nano-Ag. These results have important implications for the risk assessment of Ag-textiles and also for environmental fate studies of nano-Ag, because they show that under conditions relevant to washing, primarily coarse Ag-containing particles are released. PMID:19924931

  12. Effects of soap-water wash on human epidermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Phuong, Christina; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Skin decontamination is a primary interventional method used to decrease dermal absorption of hazardous contaminants, including chemical warfare agents, pesticides and industrial pollutants. Soap and water wash, the most common and readily available decontamination system, may enhance percutaneous absorption through the "wash-in effect." To understand better the effect of soap-water wash on percutaneous penetration, and provide insight to improving skin decontamination methods, in vitro human epidermal penetration rates of four C(14) -labeled model chemicals (hydroquinone, clonidine, benzoic acid and paraoxon) were assayed using flow-through diffusion cells. Stratum corneum (SC) absorption rates of these chemicals at various hydration levels (0-295% of the dry SC weights) were determined and compared with the results of the epidermal penetration study to clarify the effect of SC hydration on skin permeability. Results showed accelerated penetration curves of benzoic acid and paraoxon after surface wash at 30 min postdosing. Thirty minutes after washing (60 min postdosing), penetration rates of hydroquinone and benzoic acid decreased due to reduced amounts of chemical on the skin surface and in the SC. At the end of the experiment (90 min postdosing), a soap-water wash resulted in lower hydroquinone penetration, greater paraoxon penetration and similar levels of benzoic acid and clonidine penetration compared to penetration levels in the non-wash groups. The observed wash-in effect agrees with the enhancement effect of SC hydration on the SC chemical absorption rate. These results suggest SC hydration derived from surface wash to be one cause of the wash-in effect. Further, the occurrence of a wash-in effect is dependent on chemical identity and elapsed time between exposure and onset of decontamination. By reducing chemical residue quantity on skin surface and in the SC reservoir, the soap-water wash may decrease the total quantity of chemical absorbed in the

  13. Hydrologic data from the study of acidic contamination in the Miami Wash-Pinal Creek area, Arizona, water years 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konieczki, Alice D.; Angeroth, Cory E.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1984, hydrologic data have been collected as part of a U.S. Geological Survey study of the occurrence and movement of acidic contamination in the aquifer and streams of the Pinal Creek drainage basin near Globe, Arizona. Ground-water data from that study are presented for water years 1994, 1995, and 1996 and include location, construction information, site plans, water levels, chemical and physical field measurements, and selected chemical analyses of water samples for nine monitoring well groups. Monthly precipitation data and long-term precipitation statistics are presented for two sites.

  14. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  15. 27 CFR 19.328 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 19.328 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.328 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits therefrom may be run into a wash tank or a...

  16. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  17. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  18. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  19. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  20. Removal, redistribution, and potential risks of soil Cd, Pb, and Zn after washing with various extractants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunle; Chen, Yanhui; Xie, Tuanhui; Wang, Ming Kuang; Wang, Guo

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of four different washing extractants--HCl, FeCl3, citric acid, and EDTA--in removing Cd, Pb, and Zn from polluted soil was studied. The removal of these metals, their redistribution between fractions, and the potential risks posed by them, in soils washed with the tested extractants, were examined. Although all the rounds of washing removed Cd, Pb, and Zn from soil, the first round removed more metals than subsequent rounds. Each of the four extractants had different effects on the removal of the metals. At the end of the first round of washing, HCl, EDTA, and FeCl3 were the most effective in removing Zn, Pb, and Cd, respectively. Both the single round and five successive rounds of washing with various extractants resulted in significant increases in Pb in the exchangeable/acid extractable fraction. Washing with HCl, EDTA, and FeCl3 significantly reduced potential risks (calculated as the Potential Risk Index, PRI) posed by Cd in washed soil. The first round of washing, using all extractants, increased the risks posed by Pb and Zn. However, five successive rounds of washing with FeCl3 and EDTA reduced the risk posed by Pb, and washing with citric acid and FeCl3 increased the risks posed by Zn. EDTA and HCl were better for reducing Zn risks, and successive washing with EDTA and FeCl3 were more effective in reducing Pb risks than the other extractants. Finally, five successive rounds of washing, with all the extractants, effectively reduced the potential risks posed by Cd. Among the four reagents, EDTA was advised to be the alternative of the washing reagent by significantly reducing the PRI values of Cd, Pb, and Zn. PMID:26104899

  1. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils. PMID:26086811

  2. Does bottle type and acid-washing influence trace element analyses by ICP-MS on water samples? A test covering 62 elements and four bottle types: high density polyethene (HDPE), polypropene (PP), fluorinated ethene propene copolymer (FEP) and perfluoroalkoxy polymer (PFA).

    PubMed

    Reimann, C; Siewers, U; Skarphagen, H; Banks, D

    1999-10-01

    Groundwater samples from 15 boreholes in crystalline bedrock aquifers in South Norway (Oslo area) have been collected in parallel in five different clear plastic bottle types (high density polyethene [HDPE], polypropene [PP, two manufacturers], fluorinated ethene propene copolymer [FEP] and perfluoroalkoxy polymer [PFA]. In the cases of polyethene and polypropene, parallel samples have been collected in factory-new (unwashed) bottles and acid-washed factory-new bottles. Samples have been analysed by ICP-MS techniques for a wide range of inorganic elements down to the ppt (ng/l) range. It was found that acid-washing of factory-new flasks had no clear systematic beneficial effect on analytical result. On the contrary, for the PP-bottles concentrations of Pb and Sn were clearly elevated in the acid-washed bottles. Likewise, for the vast majority of elements, bottle type was of no importance for analytical result. For six elements (Al, Cr, Hf, Hg, Pb and Sn) some systematic differences for one or more bottle types could be tentatively discerned, but in no case was the discrepancy of major cause for concern. The most pronounced effect was for Cr, with clearly elevated concentrations returned from the samples collected in HDPE bottles, regardless of acid-washing or not. For the above six elements, FEP or PFA bottles seemed to be marginally preferable to PP and HDPE. In general, cheap HDPE, factory new, unwashed flasks are suitable for sampling waters for ICP-MS ultra-trace analysis of the elements tested. PMID:10570838

  3. A Window-Washing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Skyscrapers sure do have a lot of windows, and these windows are cleaned and checked regularly. All this takes time, money, and puts workers at potential risk. Might there be a better way to do it? In this article, the author discusses a window-washing challenge and describes how students can tackle this task, pick up the challenge, and creatively…

  4. 1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. TIPPLE AND CLEANING PLANT TO RIGHT. IN CENTER IS A TANK USED FOR TREATING MINE REFUSE AND ACID RUNOFF. - Eureka No. 40, Tipple & Cleaning Plant, East of State Route 56, north of Little Paint Creek, Scalp Level, Cambria County, PA

  5. Cadmium Removal from Rice by Separating and Washing Protein Isolate.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yinqiang; Du, Hongying; Xue, Bingying; Niu, Meng; Zhao, Siming

    2016-06-01

    In this study detoxification of 3 Chinese Cd-contaminated cultivars (Jinyou463, Yuchi, and Xiangzaoxian 32) of rice was explored. By separation with an alkaline method, Cd concentrations of the starch isolates were decreased from 0.2769, 0.4037, and 0.5156 mg/kg in starting milled rice to 0.1056, 0.1585, and 0.1923 mg/kg, respectively. However, the Cd concentrations reached up to 2.5905, 3.1628, and 4.8593 mg/kg in the protein isolates, respectively. Therefore, 10 common acids in food industry were investigated to remove Cd from protein isolate by washing process. The optimal washing conditions were 0.5 M citric acid, acid to rice protein isolate ratio of 6:1 v/w, shaking time of 1 h at room temperature. The rice protein isolate showed a significant decrease in Cd concentration and the removal efficiency was more than 95% after 2 washings at optimized conditions. Rice proteins were not degraded at all and had very little loss during citric acid washing process. The study presents a promising way of depurating Cd-contaminated rice, and meanwhile it reduces the risk of heavy metal causing food safety issues effectively. PMID:27159878

  6. A basket for washing benthological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1971-01-01

    Since benthological samples collected with dredges are usually too large to be preserved in toto, a washing method must be employed to reduce the sample volume without losing or damaging the organisms. Traditionally, the sample is washed in a sieve until the volume is small enough for convenient handling or preservation. Most washing procedures are time-consuming and laborious. To save time in washing samples, a washing 'basket' was designed which accomadates a Ponar dredge. The only additional equipment needed to employ the washing basket effectively is a pump that delivers about 8 gallons of water per minute.

  7. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broilers after consecutive washings in potassium hydroxide and lauric aid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria on skin of processed broilers were enumerated after each of five consecutive washes in mixtures of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid. Breast skin was taken from carcasses obtained from a commercial processing facility, and skin was cut into 5 g samples. Portions of skin were washed using ...

  8. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions. PMID:26066704

  9. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  10. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  11. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  12. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  13. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  14. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BloGenesis™ soil washing technology uses a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soil to wastewater. The surfactant used in the soil washing process wa...

  15. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  16. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  17. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  18. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  19. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  20. Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures ...

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF THE WASH-OFF METHOD FOR MEASURING AEROSOL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using the fluorescence-washing technique, oleic acid particles tagged with uranine were extracted and analyzed fluorometrically. The possible sources of errors in the technique were evaluated in this study. First, the sensitivity of uranine fluorescence in different solutions ...

  2. [Strengthening Effects of Sodium Salts on Washing Kerosene Contaminated Soil with Surfactants].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhao-lu; Chen, Quan-yuan; Zhou, Juan; Xie, Mo-han

    2015-05-01

    The impact of sodium salt on kerosene contaminated soil washing with surfactants was investigated. The results indicated that sodium silicate greatly enhanced the washing efficiency of SDS. Sodium tartrate can largely enhance the washing efficiency of SDBS and Brij35. Sodium salts can enhance the washing efficiency on kerosene contaminated with TX-100. No significant differences were observed between different sodium salts. Sodium salt of humic acid and sodium silicate had similar enhancement on kerosene contaminated soil washing with saponin. Sodium humate can be a better choice since its application can also improve soil quality. The enhancement of sodium silicate on kerosene contaminated soil washing with Tw-80 increased with the increase of Tw-80 dosage. However, the impact of sodium chloride and sodium tartrate was opposite to sodium silicate. Sodium salts can reduce surface tension and critical micelle concentration of ionic surfactants to enhance the washing. Sodium salts can also reduce re-adsorption of oil to soil with nonionic surfactants to enhance the washing. Kerosene contamination can increase the contact angle of soil, which indicated the increase of hydrophilicity of soil. Washing with surfactants can reduce the hydrophilicitiy of soil according to contact angle measurement, which indicated that kerosene contaminated soil remediation with surfactant can also benefit nutrient and water transportation in the contaminated soil. PMID:26314139

  3. 49 CFR 230.60 - Time of washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time of washing. 230.60 Section 230.60... Washing Boilers § 230.60 Time of washing. (a) Frequency of washing. All boilers shall thoroughly be washed... inspection. The date of the boiler wash shall be noted on the FRA Form No. 1 or FRA Form No. 3. (See...

  4. Bathing or washing babies after birth?

    PubMed

    Henningsson, A; Nyström, B; Tunnell, R

    One group of healthy full-term newborn babies was washed after birth and another was bathed to remove vernix caseosa and clean the skin. Few infections, none of them serious, occurred in either group. Bacterial colonisation of the umbilical cord on the third day of life was similar in both groups. The rectal temperature fell further and more infants cried during washing than during bathing. Thus bathing the baby after birth makes it calmer, quieter, and more comfortable than washing and causes less heat-loss. Clinical signs of infection and bacterial colonisation rates are no higher after bathing than after washing. PMID:6118769

  5. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  6. Late wash cross-flow filter organic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Baich, M.A.

    1992-11-16

    A recent DOE-Savannah River review of the results and data from the Late Washing Crossflow Fitter assessment identified the fate of biphenyl as a concern in the Late Washing material balance. The concern arose because after the late washing operation only about 40% of the biphenyl remained in the irradiated precipitate and analyses of the spent wash water stream did not account for the missing biphenyl [2]. This document summarizes the results of subsequent filtration studies on the behavior and fate of all known organic precipitate feed components including biphenyl. The study employed a statistically designed material balance across a laboratory crossflow fitter. Data from two separate experiments are presented here. Results of the first study indicated no statistically significant loss of biphenyl, diphenylmercury, 0-terphenyl, diphenylamine, or aniline. Results did indicate minor losses of phenylboric acid, M-terphenyl, P-terphenyl, and a significant production of phenol, believed to be due to the way in which the experiment was performed. A second experiment demonstrated no statistically significant lose of any of the organic compounds.

  7. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. Two operating scenarios were evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-VSL-T01A/B ultrafiltration feed vessels, identified as Integrated Test A. The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-VSL-T02A ultrafiltration feed preparation vessel, identified as Integrated Test B. Washing operations in PEP Integrated Tests A and B were conducted successfully as per the approved run sheets. However, various minor instrumental problems occurred, and some of the process conditions specified in the run sheet were not met during the wash operations, such as filter-loop flow-rate targets not being met. Five analytes were selected based on full solubility and monitored in the post-caustic-leach wash as successful indicators of washing efficiency. These were aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, and free hydroxide. Other analytes, including sodium, oxalate, phosphate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. In the post-oxidative-leach wash, two analytes with full solubility were selected as suitable indicators of washing

  8. SOLVENT WASHING OF PCP CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF WASH FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent washing procedure for the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated soils is presented. his procedure can be used in both in-situ and above ground soil washing applications. he in-situ solvent washing (flushing) of soil was simulated by continuously flushing ...

  9. WASH SOLVENT REUSE IN PAINT PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. eusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. he evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology...

  10. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  11. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets.

    PubMed

    Pineda, A A; Zylstra, V W; Clare, D E; Dewanjee, M K; Forstrom, L A

    1989-01-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous 111In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% [p less than 0.001] vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% [p greater than 0.1], respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake. PMID:2749876

  12. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  13. Contaminant resorption during soil washing

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the applicability of soil washing to a specific site requires some basic research in how contaminants are bound. Much can be learned from sequential extraction methodology based on micronutrient bioavailability studies wherein the soil matrix is chemically dissected to selectively remove particular fixation mechanisms independently. This procedure uses a series of progressively more aggressive solvents to dissolve the principle phases that make up a soil, however, the published studies do not appear to consider the potential for a contaminant released from one type of site to resorb on another site during an extraction. This physical model assumes no ion exchange or adsorption at sites either previously occupied by other ions, or exposed by the dissolution. Therefore, to make engineering use of the sequential extraction data, the release of contamination must be evaluated relative to the effects of resorption. Time release studies were conducted to determine the optimum duration for extraction to maximize complete destruction of the target matrix fraction while minimizing contaminant resorption. Tests with and without a potassium brine present to inhibit cesium resorption indicated extraction efficiency could be enhanced by as much as a factor of ten using the brine.

  14. Generation of chlorine by-products in simulated wash water.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cangliang; Norris, Pauline; Williams, Olivia; Hagan, Stephanie; Li, KaWang

    2016-01-01

    Free chlorine (FC) reacting with organic matter in wash water promotes the formation of chlorine by-products. This study aims to evaluate the dynamic impact of FC and organic load on the generation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) in simulated wash water. Lettuce juice was sequentially added into FC solution with FC periodically replenished. Water samples were collected after each lettuce juice addition to measure water qualities and determine HAAs and THMs using US-Environmental-Protection-Agency (EPA) methods. Concentrations of 88-2103 μg/l of total HAAs and 20.79-859.47 μg/l of total THMs were detected during the study. Monobromoacetic, tribromoacetic, chlorodibromoacetic and trichloroacetic acid were the major HAAs components. Chloroform (trichloromethane) was the primary THMs present. A significant correlation of HAAs with chemical oxygen demand and THMs with FC was observed. Results indicated that optimizing wash water sanitizing systems to limit organic matters and maintain minimal effective FC concentration is critical. PMID:26212946

  15. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  16. Development assessment of wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology is presented. It covers all non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes and subsystems currently under development by NASA. Each approach to wash water reclamation is described in detail. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. It is concluded that a simple multifiltration subsystem composed of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins is the most attractive approach for spacecraft wash water reclamation in earth orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  17. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  18. [Biosynthesis of enniatin by washed cells of Fusarium sambucinum].

    PubMed

    Minasian, A E; Chermenskĭ, D N; Bezborodov, A M

    1979-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the depsipeptide membrane ionophore--enniatin B by the washed mycelium Fusarium sambucinum Fuck 52 377 was studied. Metabolic precursors of enniatin B, alpha-ketovaleric acid, 14C-L-valine, and 14CH3-methionine, were added to the system after starvation. The amino acid content in the metabolic pool increased 1.5 times after addition of alpha-ketovaleric acid, 2.2 times after that of valine, and 2.5 times after addition of methionine. 14C-L-valine and 14CH3-methionine were incorporated into the molecule of enniatin B. Valine methylation in the molecule occurred at the level of synthesized depsipeptide. Amino acids of the metabolic pool performed the regulatory function in the synthesis. PMID:583180

  19. Wash water waste pretreatment system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The use of real wash water had no adverse effect on soap removal when an Olive Leaf soap based system was used; 96 percent of the soap was removed using ferric chloride. Numerous chemical agents were evaluated as antifoams for synthetic wash water. Wash water surfactants used included Olive Leaf Soap, Ivory Soap, Neutrogena and Neutrogena Rain Bath Gel, Alipal CO-436, Aerosol 18, Miranol JEM, Palmeto, and Aerosol MA-80. For each type of soapy wash water evaluated, at least one antifoam capable of causing nonpersistent foam was identified. In general, the silicones and the heavy metal ions (i.e., ferric, aluminum, etc.) were the most effective antifoams. Required dosage was in the range of 50 to 200 ppm.

  20. Additional role of second washing specimen obtained during single bronchoscopy session in diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flexible bronchoscopy with bronchial washing is a useful procedure for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), when a patient cannot produce sputum spontaneously or when sputum smears are negative. However, the benefit of gaining serial bronchial washing specimens for diagnosis of TB has not yet been studied. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to determine the diagnostic utility of additional bronchial washing specimens for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB in suspected patients. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 174 patients [sputum smear-negative, n = 95 (55%); lack of sputum specimen, n = 79 (45%)] who received flexible bronchoscopy with two bronchial washing specimens with microbiological confirmation of pulmonary TB in Samsung Medical Center, between January, 2010 and December, 2011. Results Pulmonary TB was diagnosed by first bronchial washing specimen in 141 patients (81%) out of 174 enrolled patients, and an additional bronchial washing specimen established diagnosis exclusively in 22 (13%) patients. Smear for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) was positive in 46 patients (26%) for the first bronchial washing specimen. Thirteen patients (7%) were positive only on smear of an additional bronchial washing specimen. Combined smear positivity of the first and second bronchial washing specimens was significantly higher compared to first bronchial washing specimen alone [Total cases: 59 (34%) vs. 46 (26%), p < 0.001; cases for smear negative sputum: 25 (26%) vs. 18 (19%), p = 0.016; cases for poor expectoration: 34 (43%) vs. 28 (35%), p = 0.031]. The diagnostic yield determined by culture was also significantly higher in combination of the first and second bronchial washing specimens compared to the first bronchial washing. [Total cases: 163 (94%) vs. 141 (81%), p < 0.001; cases for smear negative sputum: 86 (91%) vs. 73 (77%), p < 0.001; cases for poor expectoration: 77 (98%) vs. 68 (86%), p = 0

  1. Efficacy of wash solutions in recovering Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Toxoplasma gondii from basil.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Venessa; Torres, Maria; Ortega, Ynés R

    2014-08-01

    Parasitic diseases can be acquired by ingestion of contaminated raw or minimally processed fresh produce (herbs and fruits). The sensitivity of methods used to detect parasites on fresh produce depends in part on the efficacy of wash solutions in removing them from suspect samples. In this study, six wash solutions (sterile E-Pure water, 3% levulinic acid-3% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1 M glycine, 0.1 M phosphate-buffered saline, 0.1% Alconox, and 1% HCl-pepsin) were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Toxoplasma gondii from basil. One hundred or 1,000 oocysts of these parasites were inoculated onto the adaxial surfaces of 25 g of basil leaves, placed in stomacher bags, and stored for 1 h at 21°C or 24 h at 4°C. Leaves were hand washed in each wash solution for 1 min. DNA was extracted from the wash solutions and amplified using PCR for the detection of all parasites. Oocysts inoculated at a concentration of 1,000 oocysts per 25 g of basil were detected in all wash solutions. At an inoculum concentration of 100 oocysts per 25 g, oocysts were detected in 18.5 to 92.6% of the wash solutions. The lowest variability in recovering oocysts from basil inoculated with 100 oocysts was observed in 1% HCl-pepsin wash solution. Oocyst recovery rates were higher at 1 h than at 24 h postinoculation. Unlike most bacteria, parasites cannot be enriched; therefore, an optimal recovery process for oocysts from suspected foods is critical. The observations in this study provide guidance concerning the selection of wash solutions giving the highest retrieval of parasite oocysts. PMID:25198596

  2. [Analysis of washing efficiency and change in lead speciation in lead-contaminated soil of a battery factory].

    PubMed

    Ren, Bei; Huang, Jin-lou; Miao, Ming-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Lead-contaminated soil with different pollution load in a lead battery factory in the southwest of China was chosen as the research object, the lead content and speciation were analyzed, and different washing agents were screened. The lead washing efficiency and lead speciation were analyzed under different pH conditions, and the soil of different particle size was washed using different duration to determine the best washing time. The results showed that the soil of sites A and B in the factory was severely contaminated, the lead concentration reaching 15,703.22 mg x kg(-1) and 1747.78 mg x kg(-1), respectively, and the proportion of the active-state lead was relatively high, while the residue state accounted for only 17.32%, 11.64%, 14.6% and 10.2%. EDTA and hydrochloric acid showed the best extraction effect in the 5 washing agents tested, which included EDTA, hydrochloric acid, citric acid, rhamnolipid and SDS. Cleaning under acidic conditions could not only effectively extract the total amount of lead but also effectively reduce the environmental risk of active-state lead. pH 4-7 was suggested as the most appropriate condition. The cleaning effect of coarse sand and fine sand was good, while for washing powder clay, it is better to improve the process, with the optimal washing time determined as 240 min. PMID:24289026

  3. Hand washing promotion for preventing diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I; Ehiri, John E; Arikpo, Dachi; Meremikwu, Martin M; Critchley, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea accounts for 1.8 million deaths in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). One of the identified strategies to prevent diarrhoea is hand washing. Objectives To assess the effects of hand washing promotion interventions on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (27 May 2015); CENTRAL (published in the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5); MEDLINE (1966 to 27 May 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 27 May 2015); LILACS (1982 to 27 May 2015); PsycINFO (1967 to 27 May 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index (1981 to 27 May 2015); ERIC (1966 to 27 May 2015); SPECTR (2000 to 27 May 2015); Bibliomap (1990 to 27 May 2015); RoRe, The Grey Literature (2002 to 27 May 2015); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and reference lists of articles up to 27 May 2015. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Selection criteria Individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs that compared the effects of hand washing interventions on diarrhoea episodes in children and adults with no intervention. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We stratified the analyses for child day-care centres or schools, community, and hospital-based settings. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included 22 RCTs: 12 trials from child day-care centres or schools in mainly high-income countries (54,006 participants), nine community-based trials in LMICs (15,303 participants), and one hospital-based trial among people with acquired immune deficiency

  4. 30 CFR 206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.459 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  5. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  6. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  7. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  8. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  9. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  10. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  11. 30 CFR 206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.260 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  12. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  13. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  14. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  15. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  16. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  17. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  18. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  19. Washing of waste prior to landfilling.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana

    2012-05-01

    The main impact produced by landfills is represented by the release of leachate emissions. Waste washing treatment has been investigated to evaluate its efficiency in reducing the waste leaching fraction prior to landfilling. The results of laboratory-scale washing tests applied to several significant residues from integrated management of solid waste are presented in this study, specifically: non-recyclable plastics from source separation, mechanical-biological treated municipal solid waste and a special waste, automotive shredded residues. Results obtained demonstrate that washing treatment contributes towards combating the environmental impacts of raw wastes. Accordingly, a leachate production model was applied, leading to the consideration that the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), parameters of fundamental importance in the characterization of landfill leachate, from a landfill containing washed wastes, are comparable to those that would only be reached between 90 and 220years later in the presence of raw wastes. The findings obtained demonstrated that washing of waste may represent an effective means of reducing the leachable fraction resulting in a consequent decrease in landfill emissions. Further studies on pilot scale are needed to assess the potential for full-scale application of this treatment. PMID:22245736

  20. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  1. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  2. Lead removal via soil washing and leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Man, X. D.; Walsh, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    A soil washing and leaching process was tested for removing lead from soils. A soil-washing circuit, including size and gravity separations, was employed to remove the coarse metallic lead particles, while the leaching was applied to remove fine metallic lead particles and other lead species. The soil-washing tests proved that the metallic lead particles larger than 0.15 mm (100 mesh) could be effectively removed. The sodium-chloride-based leaching solution with ferric chloride or sodium hypochlorite as oxidants was adopted in the leaching. The leaching experimental results indicated that under the pH of 2 and Eh of 1,300 mV, the metallic lead particles smaller than 0.15 mm and other lead species can be dissolved in the leaching solution within 60 minutes.

  3. Wash solvent reuse in paint production

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, A.B.; Heater, K.J.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1994-04-01

    The project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. Reusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. The evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology was conducted by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Pollution Prevention Research Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The evaluation was conducted with the cooperation and assistance of Vanex Color, Inc. The product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic impacts of this technology change, as it has been implemented by Vanex, were examined. Two batches of a solvent-borne alkyd house paint were prepared at Vanex--one batch made with 100%-new solvent and the other with 30%-wash solvent--and sampled for laboratory analysis at Battelle.

  4. What Happens at a Car Wash?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barbara; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A class of 3- to 5-year-old children in a child care center in the midwestern United States chose to study a car wash as a group project. This article discusses how the project evolved, describes the three phases of the project, and provides the teachers' reflections on the project. Photos taken during the project and children's sketches are…

  5. An Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presently, commercial eggs are washed with water containing an alkali detergent at approximately pH 11 followed by a chlorine rinse. At this pH, it is likely that there is little, if any, free chlorine in the final rinse to act as an antimicrobial against pathogens like Salmonella. Using a chlorine ...

  6. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL WASHING SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three component technologies of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS). Tested in the SITE demonstration were a Soil Washer (SW), and Aqueous Treatment System (ATS), and a Slurry Bio-Reactor (SBR). The Soil Washer operates on the principle that a significant fraction of the...

  8. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  9. SOIL-WASHING TECHNOLOGY AND PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing in the United States has been studied and evaluated with increasing thoroughness during the last 15 to 20 years. It is now entering a phase of actual use and acceptance as its applicability and economics become clearer. This paper reviews the principles behind soil...

  10. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY - BIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesisSM soil washing technology was developed by BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. to remove organic compounds from soil. The technology uses a proprietary solution (BioGenesisSM cleaner) to transfer organic compounds from the soil matrix to a liquid phase. BioGenesis claims...

  11. Prototype wash water renovation system integration with government-furnished wash fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The requirements of a significant quantity of proposed life sciences experiments in Shuttle payloads for available wash water to support cleansing operations has provided the incentive to develop a technique for wash water renovation. A prototype wash water waste renovation system which has the capability to process the waste water and return it to a state adequate for reuse in a typical cleansing fixture designed to support life science experiments was investigated. The resulting technology is to support other developments efforts pertaining to water reclamation by serving as a pretreatment step for subsequent reclamation procedures.

  12. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jamie; Ananthapadmanabhan, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Design: Biochemical and clinical assays. Setting: Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Participants: Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Measurements: Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. Results: The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores <3 and erythema scores <2 (both on a 0-6 scale) indicated an initial reduction in visual dryness. In subjects with eczema, normal use resulted in significant improvements (p<0.05) at Week 4 compared with baseline in skin dryness (change from baseline = −0.73), rash (−0.56), itch (−0.927), tightness (−0.585), and all eczema (−0.756). The glycinate-based body wash removed 56 percent of a long-lasting cosmetic foundation from skin compared with less than 30 percent removed by two competitive products tested. The glycinate-based body wash was preferred over a competitive mild cleansing product overall. Conclusion: The patented glycinate-containing body wash demonstrated better product mildness and patient-preferred attributes and clinical benefits. PMID:23882306

  13. Biodiesel production by two-stage transesterification with ethanol by washing with neutral water and water saturated with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Mendow, G; Veizaga, N S; Sánchez, B S; Querini, C A

    2012-08-01

    Industrial production of ethyl esters is impeded by difficulties in purifying the product due to high amounts of soap formed during transesterification. A simple biodiesel wash process was developed that allows successful purification of samples containing high amounts of soap. The key step was a first washing with neutral water, which removed the soaps without increasing the acidity or affecting the process yield. Afterward, the biodiesel was washed with water saturated with CO(2), a mild acid that neutralized the remaining soaps and extracted impurities. The acidity, free-glycerine, methanol and soaps concentrations were reduced to very low levels with high efficiency, and using non-corrosive acids. Independently of the initial acidity, it was possible to obtain biodiesel within EN14214 specifications. The process included the recovery of soaps by hydrolysis and esterification, making it possible to obtain the theoretical maximum amount of biodiesel. PMID:22721682

  14. Efficacy of household washing treatments for the control of Listeria monocytogenes on salad vegetables.

    PubMed

    Nastou, Aikaterini; Rhoades, Jonathan; Smirniotis, Petros; Makri, Ioanna; Kontominas, Michael; Likotrafiti, Eleni

    2012-10-15

    The efficacy of household decontamination methods at reducing Listeria monocytogenes on fresh lettuce (Lactuca sativa), cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and parsley (Petroselinum sativum) was studied. Inoculated vegetable pieces were immersed in washing solutions and surviving L. monocytogenes enumerated. Parameters investigated were storage temperature prior to washing, dipping water temperature, agitation, acetic acid concentration and immersion time. The results indicated that the storage temperature significantly affects the efficacy of dipping vegetables in water for the control of L. monocytogenes, as the reduction in count was greatest when products had been stored at cooler temperatures. Decontamination with acetic acid (up to 2.0% v/v) was shown to have some effect in most cases, but the highest observed decrease in count was 2.6 log cfu/g. Experiments investigating the effect of exposure time to acetic acid (0.5% and 1.0% v/v, up to 30 min immersion) indicated that immersing the vegetables for more than 10 min is of minimal benefit. The most significant factor affecting washing and decontamination efficacy was the vegetable itself: L. monocytogenes colonizing cucumber epidermis was far more resistant to removal by washing and to acid treatment than that on the leafy vegetables, and L. monocytogenes on parsley was the most susceptible. This shows that published decontamination experiments (often performed with lettuce) cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other vegetables. PMID:23107504

  15. Chlorine wash for fresh-cut processing: Can it work better?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine is the most commonly used sanitizer for fresh-cut produce wash. Alternative sanitizers, such as ozonated water, peroxyacetic acid, electrolyzed water, have been developed and applied for fresh-cut produce sanitization, with varying degrees of success. Other technologies, such as electric be...

  16. An Automatic Washing Machine to Remove Aluminum From Astronomical Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitelli, Valentina

    Cleaning of large astronomical mirrors, before aluminization, required in the past a large amount of manual operations on the surface. With very large mirrors, 8 meter or more, manual operations become time consuming, expensive and often dangerous, both for mirror surface and operators. A fully automated procedure is thus mandatory when handling large mirrors. To this aim we experimented on a small scale (60 cm) an automatic procedure, free from any manual contact with the mirror, capable of removing old aluminum and leaving a clean, wet surface ready for a successful new aluminization. First we manually treated small borosilicate mirrors, obtained from the LBT primary mirror glass batch, with different sequences of chemicals, commonly used to this purpose. These small mirrors were checked with a Wyko interferometer before and after treating, to trace change in roughness of the surface. Quality and stability of the new aluminum deposition after cleaning was also checked. The washing machine prototype is composed by a water proof box on rigid PVC with a moving arm, a pump and a series of tanks containing the used chemicals. All the adopted components can be used with acids and other corrosive fluids. The machine is designed to hold the mirror in vertical position. An arm with 10 cm spaced nozzles moves up and down in front of the mirror spraying the adopted chemicals in a defined sequence. A pump forces the liquid through the circuit. After the washing, the mirror is left, protected from the dust in the washing machine, for about 2 hours to drip the water, then is moved into the vacuum pump to check the final result of aluminizing the cleaned surface. A homogeneous layer of aluminum follows only after a careful cleaning, otherwise a fast oxidize process, or a inhomogeneous aluminum coating appear. Scaling times, fluxes and costs from this experiment to large size mirrors leads to realistic, affordable figures.

  17. Investigation into the durability of washed rice straw for equine bedding and the repetitive use of washing water.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Akira; Endo, Daisuke; Ikeda, Shuhei; Sukemori, Seizi

    2011-04-01

    The present experiment investigated durability during the repetitive use of washed rice straw, as bedding material, and washing water as a model study. Residual nitrogen levels, elasticity, and water suction rates for washed rice straw-adhered urea were measured. In addition, outflow levels of nitrogen and mineral ions (Na(+), NO(2)(-) + NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), PO(4)(3-), Cl(-)) for washing water were measured to determine durability. Nitrogen levels of rice straw significantly (P<0.05) decreased after two washings. There was no significant change in elasticity of repetitively used rice straw. Suction rates of rice straw after the second and third washings increased significantly (P<0.05) compared to the first time. With regard to the number of washings, the mineral ion outflow level in the washing water for nitrogen, Na(+), NO(2)(-) + NO(3)(-) and PO(4)(3-) after each washing was not significant. However, nitrogen outflow level tended to decrease after the third washing. SO(4)(-) and Cl(-) did significantly decrease (P<0.05) with the number of washings. In this study, it was considered that rice straw and washing water could be used repetitively three times. Furthermore, in order to maintain effluent standards, washing water from the first washing needs to be processed in a septic tank. PMID:21729215

  18. Remediation of metal polluted hotspot areas through enhanced soil washing--evaluation of leaching methods.

    PubMed

    Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Yillin, Li; Strömvall, Ann-Margret

    2013-10-15

    Soil washing offers a permanent remediation alternative for metal polluted sites. In addition, the washed out metals can be recovered from the leachate and re-introduced into the social material cycle instead of landfilled. In this paper, soil, bark and bark-ash washing was tested on four different metal polluted soil and bark samples from hotspots at former industrial sites. Six different leaching agents; HCl, NH4Cl, lactic acid, EDDS and two acidic process waters from solid waste incineration, were tested, discussed and evaluated. For the soil washing processes, the final pH in the leachate strongly influences the metal leachability. The results show that a pH < 2 is needed to achieve a high leaching yield, while <50 w% of most metals were leached when the pH was higher than 2 or below 10. The acidic process waste waters were generally the most efficient at leaching metals from all the samples studied, and as much as 90-100 w% of the Cu was released from some samples. Initial experiments show that from one of these un-purified leachates, Cu metal (>99% purity) could be recovered. After a single leaching step, the metal contents of the soil residues still exceed the maximum limits according to the Swedish guidelines. An additional washing step is needed to reduce the contents of easy soluble metal compounds in the soil residues. The overall results from this study show that soil and bark-ash washing followed by metal recovery is a promising on-site permanent alternative to remediate metal polluted soils and to utilize non-used metal resources. PMID:23811538

  19. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  20. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities...

  1. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities...

  2. 6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND FOR MONITORING MOVEMENT OF DAM AND EARTH. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTHWEST. DAM AND SPILLWAY VISIBLE IN BOTTOM OF PHOTO. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Plasma-depleted platelet concentrates prepared with a new washing solution.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Shibata, K; Kora, S

    1993-01-01

    In certain clinical situations, complete removal of the plasma proteins from the platelet concentrates (PCs) is necessary by washing prior to transfusion. A simple electrolyte solution with a pH of 6.5 was developed for washing PCs. The platelet-rich plasma collected with acid-citrate-dextrose solution by apheresis in a 0.6-liter polyolefin bag was centrifuged. After removal of the supernatant plasma from pelleted platelet buttons, 200 ml of a washing solution consisting of 90 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 3 mM MgCl2, 17 mM NaH2PO4, 8 mM Na2HPO4, 23 mM Na acetate, 17 mM Na3 citrate, 23.5 mM glucose, 2 mM adenine, 0.1% dextran, and 28.8 mM maltose (pH 6.5) was added to the pelleted platelet button. Steam sterilization of the solution was carried out under nitrogen to avoid caramelization of glucose. After resuspension of the pelleted platelet button with a washing solution and a second centrifugation, Seto additive solution (Seto sol, pH 7.4) was introduced into the bag to resuspend the platelet buttons for storage for 3 days at 22 degrees C. All of these procedures were completed within 3 h using a sterile docking device. In washed PCs, 99.1% of the plasma was removed and platelet recovery was 96%. The washed PCs were compared for 3 days with plasma-poor PCs consisting of 11% plasma and 89% Seto solution. There were no significant differences in percent hypotonic shock response, aggregation, energy metabolism, and morphology of platelets between the two groups during 3 days, except for significant swelling of 3-day-old platelets in washed PCs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8447117

  5. Washing scaling of GeneChip microarray expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-hybridization washing is an essential part of microarray experiments. Both the quality of the experimental washing protocol and adequate consideration of washing in intensity calibration ultimately affect the quality of the expression estimates extracted from the microarray intensities. Results We conducted experiments on GeneChip microarrays with altered protocols for washing, scanning and staining to study the probe-level intensity changes as a function of the number of washing cycles. For calibration and analysis of the intensity data we make use of the 'hook' method which allows intensity contributions due to non-specific and specific hybridization of perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes to be disentangled in a sequence specific manner. On average, washing according to the standard protocol removes about 90% of the non-specific background and about 30-50% and less than 10% of the specific targets from the MM and PM, respectively. Analysis of the washing kinetics shows that the signal-to-noise ratio doubles roughly every ten stringent washing cycles. Washing can be characterized by time-dependent rate constants which reflect the heterogeneous character of target binding to microarray probes. We propose an empirical washing function which estimates the survival of probe bound targets. It depends on the intensity contribution due to specific and non-specific hybridization per probe which can be estimated for each probe using existing methods. The washing function allows probe intensities to be calibrated for the effect of washing. On a relative scale, proper calibration for washing markedly increases expression measures, especially in the limit of small and large values. Conclusions Washing is among the factors which potentially distort expression measures. The proposed first-order correction method allows direct implementation in existing calibration algorithms for microarray data. We provide an experimental 'washing data set' which might

  6. Washing of the AN-107 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; FV Hoopes

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AN-107 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AN-107 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching.

  7. Development and Performance Assessment of Soil Washing Equipment for Soil Contaminated with Radionuclide

    SciTech Connect

    Gye-Nam Kim; Jei-Kwon Moon; Chong-Hun Jung

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a soil washing system and to define the most suitable experimental conditions for the individual elemental equipment in a soil washing system for decontaminating the radioactive soil from around a TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomic) reactor in Korea. Analysis results have shown that the main radionuclides were Cs{sup 137} and Co{sup 60}, the soil particle size ranges from 0.063 mm to 1.0 mm and the radioactive concentration was the strongest in a soil particle smaller than 0.063 mm as predicted. Meanwhile, an oxalic acid was found to be the most efficient chemical agent for washing, especially of cobalt. The scrubbing time of four hours was an optimum time to obtain a removal efficiency of more than 75% for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. A mixing ratio of the soil weight to the volume of the oxalic acid solution, 1:10, was observed to be the best for a washing and it was estimated to be reasonable for 2 cycles of a scrubbing with 1.0 M of oxalic acid to avoid a generation of an excessive waste-solution. (authors)

  8. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-0-3 wt % La.sub.2O.sub.3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO.sub.2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO.sub.4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-3-40% TiO.sub.2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  9. Bacterial Exchange in Household Washing Machines

    PubMed Central

    Callewaert, Chris; Van Nevel, Sam; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Granitsiotis, Michael S.; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Household washing machines (WMs) launder soiled clothes and textiles, but do not sterilize them. We investigated the microbial exchange occurring in five household WMs. Samples from a new cotton T-shirt were laundered together with a normal laundry load. Analyses were performed on the influent water and the ingoing cotton samples, as well as the greywater and the washed cotton samples. The number of living bacteria was generally not lower in the WM effluent water as compared to the influent water. The laundering process caused a microbial exchange of influent water bacteria, skin-, and clothes-related bacteria and biofilm-related bacteria in the WM. A variety of biofilm-producing bacteria were enriched in the effluent after laundering, although their presence in the cotton sample was low. Nearly all bacterial genera detected on the initial cotton sample were still present in the washed cotton samples. A selection for typical skin- and clothes-related microbial species occurred in the cotton samples after laundering. Accordingly, malodour-causing microbial species might be further distributed to other clothes. The bacteria on the ingoing textiles contributed for a large part to the microbiome found in the textiles after laundering. PMID:26696989

  10. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: WARRP Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This activity demonstrated, on a practical scale, the primary unit operations for building a containment structure for radioactive wash waters, washing down a hypothetically radioactively contaminated vehicle, collecting the hypothetically radioactive slurry waste water, filtering the hypothetically radioactive wash waters, disassembling the containment, and transporting the materials for final disposition.

  11. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank....

  12. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank....

  13. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank....

  14. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank....

  15. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank....

  16. Effects of water washing and torrefaction pretreatments on rice husk pyrolysis by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuping; Dong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xiong, Yuanquan; Liu, Xinzhi; Zhu, Shuguang

    2015-10-01

    The influences of water washing, torrefaction and combined water washing-torrefaction pretreatments on microwave pyrolysis of rice husk samples were investigated. The results indicated that the process of combined water washing-torrefaction pretreatment could effectively remove a large portion of inorganics and improve the fuel characteristics to a certain extent. The gas products were rich in combustible compositions and the syngas quality was improved by pretreatment process. The liquid products contained less moisture content, acids and furans, while more concentrated phenols and sugars from microwave pyrolysis of rice husk after pretreatments, especially after the combined water washing-torrefaction pretreatment. Biochar, produced in high yield, has the alkaline pH (pH 8.2-10.0) and high surface area (S(BET) 157.81-267.84 m(2)/g), they have the potential to be used as soil amendments. It is noteworthy that water washing increased the pore surface area of biochar, but torrefaction reduced the pore surface area. PMID:26159301

  17. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Jennifer L.; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; van der Fels-Klerx, H.J. (Ine)

    2015-01-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer. PMID:26213953

  18. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water.

    PubMed

    Banach, Jennifer L; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; van der Fels-Klerx, H J Ine

    2015-08-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant's reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer's efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer. PMID:26213953

  19. Soil Washing Experiment for Decontamination of Contaminated NPP Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Son, J.K.; Kang, K.D.; Kim, K.D.; Ha, J.H.; Song, M.J.

    2006-07-01

    The preliminary experiment was performed to obtain the operating conditions of soil washing decontamination process such as decontamination agent, decontamination temperature, decontamination time and ratio of soil and decontamination agent. To estimate decontamination efficiency, particle size of soil was classified into three categories; {>=} 2.0 mm, 2.0 {approx} 0.21 mm and {<=} 0.21 mm. Major target of this experiment was decontamination of Cs-137. The difference of decontamination efficiency using water and neutral salts as decontamination agent is not high. It is concluded that the best temperature of decontamination agent is normal temperature and the best decontamination time was about 60 minutes. And the best ratio of soil and decontamination agent is 1:10. In case of Cs decontamination for fine soils, the decontamination results using neutral salts such as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows some limits while using strong acid such as sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid shows high decontamination efficiency ({>=}90%). But we conclude that decontamination using strong acid is also inappropriate because of the insufficiency of decontamination efficiency for highly radioactive fine soils and the difficulty for treatment of secondary liquid waste. It is estimated that the best decontamination process is to use water as decontamination agent for particles which can be decontaminated to clearance level, after particle size separation. (authors)

  20. Validation of a washing and sanitizing procedure for cantaloupes at a mexican packing facility.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Casillas, S; Ibarra-Sánchez, L S; Martínez-Gonzáles, N E; Rodríguez-García, M O; Castillo, A

    2010-02-01

    In-plant validation of an alternative washing and sanitizing method was conducted at a cantaloupe packing operation in Mexico. This method consisted of a spray water wash followed by spraying warm (55 to 60 degrees C) 2% (L)-lactic acid solution and was compared with the existing method of spray washing the melons with tap water followed by immersion in a chlorinated water tank. Surface samples (100 cm(2)) were collected from 160 melons subjected to each processing method and tested for counts of aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli. The aerobic plate counts from cantaloupes washed in the dump tank ranged from 3.6 to 5.2 log CFU/cm(2) and were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those from melons treated with the alternative spray method, which ranged from 1.8 to 2.6 log CFU/cm(2). Coliform counts for cantaloupes treated in the dump tank were 0.2 to 2.2 log CFU/cm(2) and were below the detection level (-6.0 log CFU/cm(2)) on cantaloupes treated by the spray method. Growth of E. coli was observed in 2.5% of the samples of cantaloupes treated in the dump tank and in none of the samples of cantaloupes treated by lactic acid spray (P < 0.05). These results support the elimination of dump tanks in cantaloupe packing operations established by the Mexican government for certification of firms exporting cantaloupes to the United States. When a sanitizer is to be applied to the product, lactic acid seems to be a viable option, at least for products such as cantaloupes whose quality is not affected by an acid wash. PMID:20132684

  1. [Feasibility of washing as a remediation technology for the heavy metals-polluted soils left by chemical plant].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Hu, Shao-Ping; Chen, Ying-Xu; Li, Hang

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory simulation tests were conducted to examine the effects of different washing reagents (distilled water, HCl, H3PO4, oxalic acid, and CaCl2) in extracting the heavy metals from contaminated soils left by a chemical plant. The effects of reagent concentration, reaction time, and washing time on the washing efficiency were investigated, and the form variation of test heavy metals was determined before and after HCl washing. Distilled water, H3PO4, and CaCl2 could remove less than 1% of most heavy metals, and the highest removal rate was only 3.58%; while 2 mol HCl x L(-1) could obtain the highest washing efficiency under the optimal conditions, i. e., soil:liquid ratio was 1:3, reaction time was 1 hour, and the soils were washed twice by HCl solution. The removal rates of Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd from test soils were 80.75%, 88.69%, 98.00%, 79.33%, and 95.52%, respectively. Among the washing reagents, HCl could effectively remove all forms of heavy metals. PMID:20873632

  2. Fresh produce washing aid, T-128, enhances inactivation of salmonella and pseudomonas biofilms on stainless steel in chlorinated wash solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of chlorine wash solutions, with/without the washing aid, T-128, on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel coupons was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in the wash water. Biofilms were formed statically on stai...

  3. Face washing promotion for preventing active trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Ejere, Henry OD; Alhassan, Mahmoud B; Rabiu, Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachoma remains a major cause of avoidable blindness among underprivileged populations in many developing countries. It is estimated that about 146 million people have active trachoma and nearly six million people are blind due to complications associated with repeat infections. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of face washing promotion for the prevention of active trachoma in endemic communities. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2015), PubMed (January 1948 to January 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2015), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) (accessed 10 January 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 January 2015. To identify further relevant trials we checked the reference lists of the included trials. Also, we used the Science Citation Index to search for references to publications that cited the trials included in the review. We contacted investigators and experts in the field to identify additional trials. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared face washing with no treatment or face washing combined with antibiotics against antibiotics alone. Trial participants were residents of endemic trachoma communities. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We contacted trial

  4. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  5. Pilot-scale washing of metal contaminated garden soil using EDTA.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2012-05-15

    Ten batches (75kg each) of garden soil with >50% of silt and clay and average 1935mgkg(-1) Pb, 800mgkg(-1) Zn, 10mgkg(-1) Cd and 120mgkg(-1) As were remediated in a pilot-scale chemical extraction plant. Washing with 60mmol ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) per kg of soil on average removed 79, 38, 70, and 80% of Pb, Zn, Cd and As, respectively, and significantly reduced the leachability, phyto-accessibility and oral-availability of residual toxic metals, as assessed using deionised water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid extraction (DTPA) and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) tests. The used soil washing solution was treated before discharge using an electrochemical advanced oxidation process with graphite anode: EDTA was removed by degradation and toxic metals were electro-precipitated onto a stainless steel cathode. The novelty of the remediation technique is separation of the soil from the washing solution and soil rinsing (removal of mobilized contaminants) carried out in the same process step. Another novelty is the reuse of the soil rinsing solution from the previous batch for cleansing the soil sand, soil rinsing and for preparation of the washing solution in subsequent batches. The cost of energy and material expenses and disposal of waste products amounted to approximately 75€ton(-1) of soil. PMID:22410723

  6. TANK 4 CHARACTERIZATION, SETTLING, AND WASHING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2009-09-29

    A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank 12 HM sludge. The Tank 51-E1 sample was decanted by SRNL prior to use in the settling and washing study. The Tank 4 sample was analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. The characterization of the Tank 51-E1 sample, used here in combination with the Tank 4 sample, was reported previously. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 were requested by Liquid Waste Engineering (LWE) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLE-TTR-2009-103. The sample preparation work is governed by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were controlled by an Analytical Study Plan and modifications received via customer communications. Additional scope included a request for a settling study of decanted Tank 51-E1 and a blend of decanted Tank 51-E1 and Tank 4, as well as a washing study to look into the fate of undissolved sulfur observed during the Tank 4 characterization. The chemistry of the Tank 4 sample was modeled with OLI Systems, Inc. StreamAnalyzer to determine the likelihood that sulfate could exist in this sample as insoluble Burkeite (2Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The OLI model was also used to predict the composition of the blended tank materials for the washing study. The following conclusions were drawn from the Tank 4 analytical results reported here: (1) Any projected blend of Tank 4 and the current Tank 51 contents will produce a SB6 composition that is lower in Ca and U than the current SB5 composition being processed by DWPF. (2) Unwashed Tank 4 has a relatively large initial S concentration of 3.68 wt% on a total solids basis, and approximately 10% of the total S is present as an

  7. Washed cell salvage in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Meybohm, Patrick; Choorapoikayil, Suma; Wessels, Anke; Herrmann, Eva; Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell salvage is commonly used as part of a blood conservation strategy. However concerns among clinicians exist about the efficacy of transfusion of washed cell salvage. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which patients, scheduled for all types of surgery, were randomized to washed cell salvage or to a control group with no cell salvage. Data were independently extracted, risk ratio (RR), and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random effects model. The primary endpoint was the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Results: Out of 1140 search results, a total of 47 trials were included. Overall, the use of washed cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 39% (RR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.65; P < 0.001), resulting in an average saving of 0.20 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (weighted mean differences [WMD] = −0.20; 95% CI −0.22 to −0.18; P < 0.001), reduced risk of infection by 28% (RR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.97; P = 0.03), reduced length of hospital stay by 2.31 days (WMD = −2.31; 95% CI −2.50 to −2.11; P < 0.001), but did not significantly affect risk of mortality (RR = 0.92; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.34; P = 0.66). No statistical difference could be observed in the number of patients exposed to re-operation, plasma, platelets, or rate of myocardial infarction and stroke. Conclusions: Washed cell salvage is efficacious in reducing the need for allogeneic RBC transfusion and risk of infection in surgery. PMID:27495095

  8. Heavy metal removal by GLDA washing: Optimization, redistribution, recycling, and changes in soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiyin; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Zhong, Qinmei; Zhang, Chuer; Jia, Yongxia; Li, Ting; Deng, Ouping; Li, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Soil washing, an emerging method for treating soils contaminated by heavy metals, requires an evaluation of its efficiency in simultaneously removing different metals, the quality of the soil following remediation, and the reusability of the recycled washing agent. In this study, we employed N,N-bis (carboxymethyl)-l-glutamic acid (GLDA), a novel and readily biodegradable chelator to remove Cd, Pb, and Zn from polluted soils. We investigated the influence of washing conditions, including GLDA concentration, pH, and contact time on their removal efficiencies. The single factor experiments showed that Cd, Pb, and Zn removal efficiencies reached 70.62, 74.45, and 34.43% in mine soil at a GLDA concentration of 75mM, a pH of 4.0, and a contact time of 60min, and in polluted farmland soil, removal efficiencies were 69.12, 78.30, and 39.50%, respectively. We then employed response surface methodology to optimize the washing parameters. The optimization process showed that the removal efficiencies were 69.50, 88.09, and 40.45% in mine soil and 71.34, 81.02, and 50.95% in polluted farmland soil for Cd, Pb, and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the overall highly effective removal of Cd and Pb was connected mainly to their highly effective removal from the water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fractions. GLDA-washing eliminated the same amount of metals as EDTA-washing, while simultaneously retaining most of the soil nutrients. Removal efficiencies of recycled GLDA were no >5% lower than those of the fresh GLDA. Therefore, GLDA could potentially be used for the rehabilitation of soil contaminated by heavy metals. PMID:27371771

  9. Enhanced salmonella reduction on tomatoes washed in chlorinated water with wash aid T-128

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine is widely used by the fresh and fresh-cut produce industries to reduce microbial populations and to prevent potential pathogen cross contamination during produce washing. However, the organic materials released from produce quickly react with chlorine and degrade its efficacy for pathogen i...

  10. Remediation of toxic metal contaminated soil by washing with biodegradable aminopolycarboxylate chelants.

    PubMed

    Begum, Zinnat A; Rahman, Ismail M M; Tate, Yousuke; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Ex situ soil washing with synthetic extractants such as, aminopolycarboxylate chelants (APCs) is a viable treatment alternative for metal-contaminated site remediation. EDTA and its homologs are widely used among the APCs in the ex situ soil washing processes. These APCs are merely biodegradable and highly persistent in the aquatic environments leading to the post-use toxic effects. Therefore, an increasing interest is focused on the development and use of the eco-friendly APCs having better biodegradability and less environmental toxicity. The paper deals with the results from the lab-scale washing treatments of a real sample of metal-contaminated soil for the removal of the ecotoxic metal ions (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) using five biodegradable APCs, namely [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid, imminodisuccinic acid, methylglycinediacetic acid, DL-2-(2-carboxymethyl) nitrilotriacetic acid (GLDA), and 3-hydroxy-2,2'-iminodisuccinic acid. The performance of those biodegradable APCs was evaluated for their interaction with the soil mineral constituents in terms of the solution pH and metal-chelant stability constants, and compared with that of EDTA. Speciation calculations were performed to identify the optimal conditions for the washing process in terms of the metal-chelant interactions as well as to understand the selectivity in the separation ability of the biodegradable chelants towards the metal ions. A linear relationship between the metal extraction capacity of the individual chelants towards each of the metal ions from the soil matrix and metal-chelant conditional stability constants for a solution pH greater than 6 was observed. Additional considerations were derived from the behavior of the major potentially interfering cations (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn), and it was hypothesized that use of an excess of chelant may minimize the possible competition effects during the single-step washing treatments. Sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the

  11. 38. PHOTOCOPY OF ARCHITECTURAL WASH DRAWING OF CANNELTON MILL 'designed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. PHOTOCOPY OF ARCHITECTURAL WASH DRAWING OF CANNELTON MILL 'designed by Tefft' COURTESY JOHN HAY LIBRARY, BROWN UNIVERSITY - Cannelton Cotton Mill, Front & Fourth Streets, Cannelton, Perry County, IN

  12. Landscape of WASH-relevant Training for Humanitarian Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dorea, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both employed humanitarian personnel as well as those seeking to start a career as an aid worker are often provided with or seek training on the theme of humanitarian water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The objective of this study was to conduct a landscaping exercise of the available WASH-relevant training for humanitarian emergencies. Methods: An open internet search was performed with specific terms related to humanitarian WASH. Retained search results included those training opportunities (including past ones) that were themed around or with a mentioned relevance to humanitarian WASH. Results and Discussion: A total of 42 training courses relevant to humanitarian emergency WASH were retained. In addition to the more generic/introductory trainings, some provided thematic variations such as coordination of WASH responses, project management, risk reduction, information, education and communication (IEC), and complex emergencies. Timely topics such as urban WASH, Ebola, and WASH innovations were also observed indicating the responsiveness of the training providers to the changing needs of humanitarian WASH response programmes. This survey also revealed a large variety in terms of target audience, duration, fees, location, and language of courses. There was no centralised listing of courses available on the Internet. Limitations of this exercise were also discussed. PMID:26064781

  13. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  14. Comparative alkali washing of simulated radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.A.; Ensor, D.D.; Egan, B.Z.

    1996-10-01

    The treatment of large volumes of radioactive sludge generated from uranium and plutonium recovery processes is a pressing problem in the environmental restoration currently planned at various U.S. Department of Energy sites. This sludge, commonly stored in underground tanks, is mainly in the form of metal oxides or precipitated metal hydroxides and the bulk of this material is nonradioactive. One method being developed to pretreat this waste takes advantage of the amphoteric character of aluminum and other nonradioactive elements. Previous studies have reported on the dissolution of eleven elements from simulated sludge using NaOH solutions up to 6M. This work provides a comparative study using KOH. The effectiveness of the alkali washing as a treatment method to reduce the bulk of radioactive sludge requiring long term isolation will be discussed.

  15. Mercury distribution and lipid oxidation in fish muscle: Effects of washing and isoelectric protein precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, Y.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Ren, L.; Egelandsdal, B.; Richards, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all the mercury (Hg) in whole muscle from whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and walleye (Sander vitreus) was present as methyl mercury (MeHg). The Hg content in whole muscle from whitefish and walleye was 0.04-0.09 and 0.14-0.81 ppm, respectively. The myofibril fraction contained approximately three-fourths of the Hg in whitefish and walleye whole muscle. The sarcoplasmic protein fraction (e.g., press juice) was the next most abundant source of Hg. Isolated myosin, triacylglycerols, and cellular membranes contained the least Hg. Protein isolates prepared by pH shifting in the presence of citric acid did not decrease Hg levels. Addition of cysteine during washing decreased the Hg content in washed muscle probably through the interaction of the sulfhydryl group in cysteine with MeHg. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were lower during 2 ??C storage in isolates prepared by pH shifting compared to those of washed or unwashed mince from whole muscle. This was attributed to removing some of the cellular membranes by pH shifting. Washing the mince accelerated lipid peroxide formation but decreased secondary lipid oxidation products compared to that of the unwashed mince. This suggested that there was a lipid hydroperoxide generating system that was active upon dilution of aqueous antioxidants and pro-oxidants. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. An alternative paper based tissue washing method for mass spectrometry imaging: localized washing and fragile tissue analysis.

    PubMed

    van Hove, Erika R Amstalden; Smith, Donald F; Fornai, Lara; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M A

    2011-10-01

    Surface treatment of biological tissue sections improves detection of peptides and proteins for mass spectrometry imaging. However, liquid surface treatments can result in diffusion of surface analytes and fragile tissue sections can be easily damaged by typical washing solvents. Here, we present a new surface washing procedure for mass spectrometry imaging. This procedure uses solvent wetted fiber-free paper to enable local washing of tissue sections for mass spectrometry imaging and tissue profiling experiments. In addition, the method allows fragile tissues that cannot be treated by conventional washing techniques to be analyzed by mass spectrometry imaging. PMID:21952901

  17. Sludge pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Enhanced sludge washing separation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the work conducted in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Treatment Science Task. The main purpose of this task, is to provide the technical basis and scientific understanding to support TWRS baseline decisions and actions, such as the development of an enhanced sludge washing process to reduce the volume of waste that will require high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. One objective within the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask was to establish wash factors for various SST (single-shell tank) sludges. First, analytical data were compiled from existing tank waste characterization reports. These data were summarized on tank-specific worksheets that provided a uniform format for reviewing and comparing data, as well as the means to verify whether the data set for each tank was complete. Worksheets were completed for 27 SST wastes. The analytical water wash data provided tank-specific information about the fraction of each component that dissolves with water, i.e., an estimate of tank-specific wash factors for evaluating tank-by-tank processing. These wash data were then used collectively to evaluate some of the wash factors that are assumed for the overall SST waste inventory; specifically, wash factors for elements that would be found primarily in sludges. The final step in this study was to incorporate the characterization and wash factor data into a spreadsheet that provides insight into the effect of enhanced sludge washing on individual tank sludges as well as for groups of sludges that may be representative of different waste types. Spreadsheet results include the estimated mass and percentage of each element that would be removed with washing and leaching. Furthermore, estimated compositions are given of the final wash and leach streams and residual solids, in terms of both concentration and dry weight percent.

  18. Prototype wash water renovation system integration with goverment-furnished wash fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A total renovation concept for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water to make the water reusable was developed. This concept included ferric chloride pretreatment to coagulate suspended solids such as soap and lint, pressure filtration, and carbon adsorption and ion exchange to remove trace dissolved organics and inorganic salts. A breadboard model which was developed to demonstrate the design adequacy of the various system components and the limits on system capacities and efficiencies.

  19. Physicochemical and microbial quality of stored green slender pepper treated with different washing solutions and packaging films.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Dulal; Kim, Ji Gang; Kim, Yong Phil

    2014-03-01

    The effects of different washing solutions and packaging films on textural, biochemical and microbial quality of green slender peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) were evaluated. Fresh pepper samples were packaged either in 35 µm polypropylene or polyethylene bag without washing or after washing in tap water (TW), 100-ppm chlorine solution, 0.5% calcinated calcium solution followed by 25% ethanol rinsing (CC+E) and 1% citric acid solution followed by 50% ethanol spray (CA+E) and then stored at 10  for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found in gas composition between the two packaging films. Changes in skin puncture force, hue angle, soluble solid content, titratable acidity and pH were statistically insignificant. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll content declined significantly (P < 0.05) in all treatments during storage. Significant reduction (P < 0.05) in aerobic plate count was found in all washing treatments compared to unwashed sample except in TW. Yeast and mold count of chlorine and CC+E-treated samples were lower than other treatments. Samples of these two treatments also received marketable limit of visual quality scores until 4 weeks of storage in polypropylene film. Results suggest that CC+E could be a potential sanitizer and alternative to chlorine washing and polypropylene film would provide a little better advantage than polyethylene for green slender pepper. PMID:23733826

  20. Effects of Shampoo and Water Washing on Hair Cortisol Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Amanda F.; Meyer, Jerrold S.; Henchey, Elizabeth; Dettmer, Amanda M.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Measurement of cortisol in hair is an emerging biomarker for chronic stress in human and nonhuman primates. Currently unknown, however, is the extent of potential cortisol loss from hair that has been repeatedly exposed to shampoo and/or water. Methods Pooled hair samples from 20 rhesus monkeys were subjected to five treatment conditions: 10, 20, or 30 shampoo washes, 20 water-only washes, or a no-wash control. For each wash, hair was exposed to a dilute shampoo solution or tap water for 45 s, rinsed 4 times with tap water, and rapidly dried. Samples were then processed for cortisol extraction and analysis using previously published methods. Results Hair cortisol levels were significantly reduced by washing, with an inverse relationship between number of shampoo washes and the cortisol concentration. This effect was mainly due to water exposure, as cortisol levels following 20 water-only washes were similar to those following 20 shampoo treatments. Conclusions Repeated exposure to water with or without shampoo appears to leach cortisol from hair, yielding values that underestimate the amount of chronic hormone deposition within the shaft. Collecting samples proximal to the scalp and obtaining hair washing frequency data may be valuable when conducting human hair cortisol studies. PMID:21034727

  1. 1. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN CANAL. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  2. 2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN CANAL - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  3. 30 CFR 206.258 - Washing allowances-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., plus interest determined in accordance with 30 CFR 218.202, or shall be entitled to a credit without... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Washing allowances-general. 206.258 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.258 Washing allowances—general. (a) For ad valorem...

  4. 30 CFR 206.457 - Washing allowances-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., plus interest determined in accordance with 30 CFR 218.202, or shall be entitled to a credit, without... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Washing allowances-general. 206.457 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.457 Washing allowances—general. (a) For ad valorem...

  5. Egg wash wastewater: Estrogenic risk or environmental asset?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial production of eggs and egg products requires the washing of eggs to remove urinary / fecal material and broken egg residue. In the case of one Ohio farming facility, 1.6 million birds produce 1.4 million eggs per day, using ~50mL of wash water / egg or ~ 70,000 liters per day. The aqueo...

  6. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING WEST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING WEST. THE NONHISTORIC CHEMICAL BUILDING IS SEEN IN THE BACKGROUND. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  7. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING IN FOREGROUND IS NOT RELATED TO THE MACHINE. THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE LOWER LEFT. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  8. EPA site demonstration of the Biotrol Soil Washing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, M.K.; Skovronek, H.S.; Ellis, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    A pilot-scale soil washing process, patented by BioTrol, was demonstrated on soil that was contaminated by wood treating waste. The BioTrol Soil Washing was demonstrated in a treatment train sequence with two other pilot-scale units of BioTrol technologies for treatment of waste streams from the soil washer. The three technologies of the treatment train were: The BioTrol Soil Washer (BSW), the BioTrol Aqueous Treatment System (BATS), and the Slurry Bioreactor (SBR). The BioTrol processes were evaluated on pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which were the primary soil contaminants at the site. The sandy site soil, consisting of less than 10% of fines, was well suited for treatment by soil washing. The BSW successfully separated the feed soil (100% by weight) into 83% of washed soil, 10% of woody residues, and 7% of fines. The soil washer achieved up to 89% removal of PCP and PAHs, based on the difference between their levels in the feed soil and in the washed soil. The BATS degraded up to 94% of PCP in the process water from soil washing. The SBR achieved over 90% removals of PCP and 70-90% removals of PAHs, respectively from the soil washing. Cost of a commercial-scale soil washing, assuming use of all three technologies, was estimated to be $168 per ton of treated soil.

  9. EPA SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE BIOTROL SOIL WASHING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale soil washing process, patented by BioTrol, Inc., was demonstrate on soil contaminated by wood treating waste, primarily pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote-derived polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although soil washing was the main object of this demonstra...

  10. 2. VIEW OF WASH TANKS Skins are brought in through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WASH TANKS Skins are brought in through hatches, seen on rear wall, and washed of blood and flesh in redwood tanks, with wooden grates to hold skins down in water. Superstructure and screening on tanks are a later alteration, unrelated to this process. - Sealing Plant, St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Saint George, Aleutians West Census Area, AK

  11. Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a screened porch with the original sinks extant. Light and ventilation was borrowed from the wash room into the toilets and bathing rooms. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  12. 7 CFR 2902.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 2902.51 Section 2902.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES... Items § 2902.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts...

  13. 7 CFR 2902.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 2902.51 Section 2902.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES... Items § 2902.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts...

  14. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulation in this section shall be enforced by the Chief, Power Field Division, Columbia Basin Project, U.S... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash....

  15. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulation in this section shall be enforced by the Chief, Power Field Division, Columbia Basin Project, U.S... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash....

  16. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulation in this section shall be enforced by the Chief, Power Field Division, Columbia Basin Project, U.S... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash....

  17. 33 CFR 162.230 - Columbia River, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbia River, Wash. 162.230 Section 162.230 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.230 Columbia River, Wash. (a) Grand Coulee Dam discharge...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.458 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of washing allowances. 1206.458 Section 1206.458 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.458 Determination of washing allowances. (a) Arm's-length contracts. (1) For...

  19. 30 CFR 1206.259 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of washing allowances. 1206.259 Section 1206.259 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.259 Determination of washing allowances. (a) Arm's-length contracts. (1) For...

  20. 30 CFR 1206.259 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 1206.259 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL... equivalent. Washing allowances shall be expressed as a cost per ton of coal washed. (b) Non-arm's-length or no contract. (1) If a lessee has a non-arm's-length contract or has no contract, including...

  1. Harvest maturity, pre-cutting wash and post-processing dip to improve quality of fresh-cut carambola fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Arkin’ carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) fruit harvested at color break or full yellow stage were washed with or without an alkaline solution (pH 12), cut to 10 mm slices, dipped in calcium ascorbate (Ca ASA), ascorbic acid (ASA) or water, and packaged in perforated clamshells for up to 14 days sto...

  2. Metabolism of Red Beet Slices I. Effects of Washing 1

    PubMed Central

    Reed, D. J.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1966-01-01

    The changes in relative participation of pathways of glucose catabolism in red beet slices during washing have been examined using specifically 14C labeled glucoses. Washing of these slices brings about an increase in participation of the pentose phosphate pathway. The composition of the washing medium influences slightly the extent of change in pathway participation. The activity level of certain enzymes participating in the initial stages of glucose catabolism has been measured in fresh and washed beet slices. Fresh slices which barely metabolized gluconate were found to have very little 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Washing brings about a dramatic increase in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity and this increase was accompanied by a marked increase in the ability of the slices to metabolize gluconate. In red beet slices the TPNH generated via pentose phosphate pathway appears to be utilized for biosynthetic reductions rather than as respiratory substrate. PMID:16656302

  3. Salmonella transfer during pilot plant scale washing and roller conveying of tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqiang; Ryser, Elliot T

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella transfer during washing and roller conveying of inoculated tomatoes was quantified using a pilot scale tomato packing line equipped with plastic, foam, or brush rollers. Red round tomatoes (2.3 kg) were dip inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 (avirulent) (4 log CFU/g), air dried for 2 h, and then washed in sanitizer-free water for 2 min. Inoculated tomatoes were then passed single file over a 1.5-m conveyor equipped with plastic, foam, or brush rollers followed by 25 previously washed uninoculated tomatoes. Tomato samples were collected after 2 min of both washing and roller conveying, with all 25 uninoculated tomatoes collected individually after conveying. Roller surface samples were collected before and after conveying the uninoculated tomatoes. Both tomato and surface samples were quantitatively examined for Salmonella by direct plating or membrane filtration using xylose lysine Tergitol 4 agar. Regardless of the roller type, Salmonella populations on inoculated tomatoes did not significantly (P < 0.05) decrease during contact with the roller conveyors. After conveying uninoculated tomatoes over contaminated foam rollers, 96% of the 25 tomatoes were cross-contaminated with Salmonella at >100 CFU per tomato. With plastic rollers, 24 and 76% of tomatoes were cross-contaminated with Salmonella at 10 to 100 and 1 to 10 CFU per tomato, respectively. In contrast, only 8% of 25 tomatoes were cross-contaminated with brush rollers with Salmonella populations of 1 to 10 CFU per tomato. Overall, cross-contamination was greatest with foam, followed by plastic and brush rollers (P < 0.05). Adding peroxyacetic acid or chlorine to the wash water significantly decreased cross-contamination during tomato conveying, with chlorine less effective in controlling Salmonella on foam compared with plastic and brush rollers. PMID:24674428

  4. Wash tool for well having perforated casing

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, T.C.

    1989-03-28

    A tool is described for washing a perforation zone in an earth formation adjacent a perforated casing in a bore hole of a well comprising: a tubular mandrel having an axial flow passage therethrough and adapted to be connected at its upper end to a drill string for receiving pressurized fluid therefrom; an elastomeric tubular packer on each mandrel end section in face to face contact with the outer peripheral surface of the mandrel and defining upper and lower packers; means on the mandrel for securing the upper and lower ends on each of the elastomeric packers in fixed position on the mandrel; a fluid passage through the mandrel wall from the axial flow passage to each of the packers to provide fluid from the mandrel bore to the area between the outer surface of the mandrel and the inner surface of the packers; a second fluid passage in the intermediate section extending through the mandrel wall form the axial flow passage at location between the packers of supplying fluid to the perforation zone adjacent the casing; and means for blocking fluid flow through the second fluid passage at the predetermined fluid pressure, the means being actuated at a second higher predetermined fluid pressure in the mandrel bore to permit fluid flow through the second fluid passage means and the perforated casing to the perforation zone outside the casing. Also described is a method of circulating fluid in a well having a perforated casing at a predetermined depth in the perforation zone.

  5. Eggshell bacterial contamination of non-washed and washed eggs from caged and cage-free hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the microbiology of non-washed and washed table eggs obtained from caged and cage-free laying hens housed on either all shavings or all wire slat environments. Both Hy-Line W-37 white and Hy-Line brown strains were used. On each of four replication sample days ...

  6. Eggshell bacterial levels of non-washed and washed eggs from caged and cage-free hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacteria levels of non-washed and washed eggs obtained from caged and cage-free laying hens housed on either all shavings or all wire slat floors were determined. On eight sample days (from 22 to 52 weeks at 4 week intervals), 20 eggs were collected from each pen (n=120/sample day). Ten eggs p...

  7. Chelant soil-washing technology for metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate here, in a pilot-scale experiment, the feasibility of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)based washing technology for soils contaminated with potentially toxic metals. Acid precipitation coupled to initial alkaline toxic metal removal and an electrochemical advanced oxidation process were used for average recovery of 76 +/- 2% of EDTA per batch and total recycle of water in a closed process loop. No waste water was generated; solid wastes were efficiently bitumen-stabilized before disposal. The technology embodiment, using conventional process equipment, such as a mixer for soil extraction, screen for soil/gravel separation, filter chamber presses for soil/liquid and recycled EDTA separation and soil rinsing, continuous centrifuge separator for removal of precipitated metals and electrolytic cells for process water cleansing, removed up to 72%, 25% and 66% of Pb, Zn and Cd from garden soil contaminated with up to 6960, 3797 and 32.6 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, in nine 60kg soil batches. Concentrations of Pb and Zn remaining in the remediated soil and bioaccessible from the simulated human intestinal phase soil were reduced by 97% and 96% and were brought under the level of determination for Cd. In the most cost-effective operation mode, the material and energy costs of remediation amounted to 50.5 Euros ton(-1) soil and the total cost to 299 Euros ton(-1). PMID:24701937

  8. Improving Efficiency of Layer-By Coating on Nanosized Particles with Non-Washing Assembly Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutava, T.; Pattekari, P.; Parekh, G.; Lvov, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Non-washing layer-by-layer assembly allows to obtain concentrated (3-5 mg/mL) colloids of 150-200 nm diameter capsules encasing poorly soluble drug nanocrystals or soft gellike nanoparticles. Aggregation of the nanoparticles is prevented by using low molecular weight block-copolymers of poly(amino acids) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in a combination with heparin and bovine serum albumin at every bilayer building step. Minimal amounts of the polyelectrolytes are used to recharge the surface of nanoparticles in the non-washing LbL process. Such PEGylated shells result in drug nanocapsules with a high colloidal stability in PBS buffer and increased protein adhesion resistance.

  9. Room environment influence on eggshell bacterial levels of non-washed and washed eggs from caged and cage-free laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacteria levels of non-washed and washed eggs obtained from caged and cage-free hens housed in either wire slats or shaving-covered pens were determined. On eight days (from 22 to 52 wk), 20 eggs were collected from each pen. Ten eggs/pen were washed with a commercial egg washing solution, whi...

  10. Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

  11. Effects of water washing on removing organic residues in bottom ashes of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Ching; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Hong, Pui-Kwan Andy; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Due to their potential toxicity and odourous nature, the residual organics in municipal solid waste incinerators are recently gaining attention as an important issue of resources recovery apart from their complex mixture of organic counterpart. Studies of the organic fractions in municipal solid waste incinerator residues have been limited. In this study, extended solid-phase extraction of the water-washed bottom ash and liquid-phase extraction of the washing water were carried out with regard to bottom ash samples from three mass-burning incinerators in Taipei County (Taiwan) during four consecutive seasons of year 2008-2009. Supercritical fluid extraction and Soxtec extraction techniques along with GC-MS were successfully used to characterize the residual organics in weathered and washed bottom ashes. Supercritical fluid extraction provided the quantification of aliphatics and aromatic compounds such as hexanoic acid and benzaldehyde, respectively. Soxtec extraction was useful for qualitative analysis of aromatic and aliphatic groups in the ashes and many of which were odourous and toxic compounds. By mixing one unit weight (g) bottom ash with two unit volume (mL) water for 15 min, total organic carbon in the bottom ash was greatly reduced (e.g., from 4.1 to 1.8 wt.%). Among the removed were foul odour-causing compounds such as pyridine and quinoline derivatives, while some aromatic compounds such as 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and low-molecular-weight aliphatics such as hexanoic acid remained. The results here suggest that washing with water can be an effective pre-treatment step for removing odour-causing and environmental concerned organics. PMID:21112610

  12. Hand washing frequencies and procedures used in retail food services.

    PubMed

    Strohbehn, Catherine; Sneed, Jeannie; Paez, Paola; Meyer, Janell

    2008-08-01

    Transmission of viruses, bacteria, and parasites to food by way of improperly washed hands is a major contributing factor in the spread of foodborne illnesses. Field observers have assessed compliance with hand washing regulations, yet few studies have included consideration of frequency and methods used by sectors of the food service industry or have included benchmarks for hand washing. Five 3-h observation periods of employee (n = 80) hand washing behaviors during menu production, service, and cleaning were conducted in 16 food service operations for a total of 240 h of direct observation. Four operations from each of four sectors of the retail food service industry participated in the study: assisted living for the elderly, childcare, restaurants, and schools. A validated observation form, based on 2005 Food Code guidelines, was used by two trained researchers. Researchers noted when hands should have been washed, when hands were washed, and how hands were washed. Overall compliance with Food Code recommendations for frequency during production, service, and cleaning phases ranged from 5% in restaurants to 33% in assisted living facilities. Procedural compliance rates also were low. Proposed benchmarks for the number of times hand washing should occur by each employee for each sector of food service during each phase of operation are seven times per hour for assisted living, nine times per hour for childcare, 29 times per hour for restaurants, and 11 times per hour for schools. These benchmarks are high, especially for restaurant employees. Implementation would mean lost productivity and potential for dermatitis; thus, active managerial control over work assignments is needed. These benchmarks can be used for training and to guide employee hand washing behaviors. PMID:18724759

  13. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, S.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Pummer, B.; Grothe, H.; Hartmann, S.; Tomsche, L.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Ignatius, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-11-01

    Birch pollen grains are known to be ice nucleating active biological particles. The ice nucleating activity has previously been tracked down to biological macromolecules that can be easily extracted from the pollen grains in water. In the present study, we investigated the immersion freezing behavior of these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules. Therefore we measured the frozen fractions of particles generated from birch pollen washing water as a function of temperature at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). Two different birch pollen samples were considered, with one originating from Sweden and one from the Czech Republic. For the Czech and Swedish birch pollen samples, freezing was observed to start at -19 and -17 °C, respectively. The fraction of frozen droplets increased for both samples down to -24 °C. Further cooling did not increase the frozen fractions any more. Instead, a plateau formed at frozen fractions below 1. This fact could be used to determine the amount of INA macromolecules in the droplets examined here, which in turn allowed for the determination of nucleation rates for single INA macromolecules. The main differences between the Swedish birch pollen and the Czech birch pollen were obvious in the temperature range between -17 and -24 °C. In this range, a second plateau region could be seen for Swedish birch pollen. As we assume INA macromolecules to be the reason for the ice nucleation, we concluded that birch pollen is able to produce at least two different types of INA macromolecules. We were able to derive parameterizations for the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types, using two different methods: a simple exponential fit and the Soccer ball model. With these parameterization methods we were able to describe the ice nucleation behavior of single INA macromolecules from both the Czech and the Swedish birch pollen.

  14. Experimental study of the constituents of space wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.; Colombo, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents experimental data, obtained under controlled conditions, which quantify the various constituents of human origin that may be expected in space wash water. The experiments were conducted with a simulated crew of two male and two female subjects. The data show that the expected wash water contaminants originating from human secretions are substantially lower than theoretical projections indicated. The data presented are immediately useful and may have considerable impact on the tradeoff comparisons among various unit processes and systems under consideration by NASA for recycling space wash water.

  15. Hygiene for the newborn--to bath or to wash?

    PubMed Central

    Hylén, A. M.; Karlsson, E.; Svanberg, L.; Walder, M.

    1983-01-01

    Appropriate skin care of newborns is performed partly to prevent infection but also for aesthetic and cleansing purposes. Skin care should involve cleansing with a non-toxic, non-abrasive neutral material. This study compared the relative risks and benefits of washing versus bathing with regard to bacterial colonization rate, clinical infection rate, body temperature and crying. The results confirm our clinical impression that bathing and washing routines do not differ with regard to signs of infection or other clinical complications. However, the washing routine does increase the babies heat loss and make them less comfortable. PMID:6663065

  16. Morphological alteration, lysosomal membrane fragility and apoptosis of the cells of Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Dutta, Manab Kumar; Acharya, Avanti; Mukhopadhyay, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Sajal

    2015-12-01

    Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is a component of laundry detergent. Domestic effluent, drain water and various anthropogenic activities have been identified as major routes of sodium carbonate contamination of the freshwater ecosystem. The freshwater sponge, Eunapius carteri, bears ecological and evolutionary significance and is considered as a bioresource in aquatic ecosystems. The present study involves estimation of morphological damage, lysosomal membrane integrity, activity of phosphatases and apoptosis in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Exposure to washing soda resulted in severe morphological alterations and damages in cells of E. carteri. Fragility and destabilization of lysosomal membranes of E. carteri under the sublethal exposure was indicative to toxin induced physiological stress in sponge. Prolonged exposure to sodium carbonate resulted a reduction in the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the cells of E. carteri. Experimental concentration of 8 mg/l of washing soda for 192 h yielded an increase in the physiological level of cellular apoptosis among the semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, which was suggestive to possible shift in apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. The results were indicative of an undesirable shift in the immune status of sponge. Contamination of the freshwater aquifers by washing soda thus poses an alarming ecotoxicological threat to sponges. PMID:26313128

  17. Percutaneous penetration and pharmacodynamics: Wash-in and wash-off of sunscreen and insect repellent.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jocelyn; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of skin cancer and mosquito-transmitted diseases has increased use of insect repellents and sunscreens. The challenge in setting recommendations for use and reapplication, especially when used concomitantly, lies in finding the balance between applying a durable product effective in withstanding natural and physical factors such as water, sweat, temperature and abrasion, while limiting percutaneous absorption and decreasing risk of potential dermal and systemic toxicity. Inorganic sunscreens show no or little percutaneous absorption or toxic effects in comparison to organic sunscreens, which show varying levels of dermal penetration and cutaneous adverse effects. An alternative to N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), the traditional gold standard compound in insect repellents, picaridin appears as efficacious, has lower risk of toxicity, and when used simultaneously with sunscreen may decrease percutaneous absorption of both compounds. Conversely, combined use of DEET and sunscreen results in significantly higher absorption of both compounds. It is important to increase consumer awareness of "washing in" of various compounds leading to increased risk of toxicity, as well as differences in reapplication need due to "washing off" caused by water, sweat and abrasion. Although much remains to be studied, to maximize efficacy and decrease toxicity, contemporary research tools, including dermatopharmokinetics, should aid these prospective advances. PMID:26811157

  18. PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. An; evaluation was conducted on four different cleane...

  19. Washing off intensification of cotton and wool fabrics by ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    Peila, R; Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Rehman, S; Sicardi, S; Rovero, G

    2015-03-01

    Wet textile washing processes were set up for wool and cotton fabrics to evaluate the potential of ultrasound transducers (US) in improving dirt removal. The samples were contaminated with an emulsion of carbon soot in vegetable oil and aged for three hours in fan oven. Before washing, the fabrics were soaked for 3 min in a standard detergent solution and subsequently washed in a water bath. The dirt removal was evaluated through colorimetric measurements. The total color differences ΔE of the samples were measured with respect to an uncontaminated fabric, before and after each washing cycle. The percentage of ΔE variation obtained was calculated and correlated to the dirt removal. The results showed that the US transducers enhanced the dirt removal and temperature was the parameter most influencing the US efficiency on the cleaning process. Better results were obtained at a lower process temperature. PMID:25258212

  20. Control of helminth contamination of raw vegetables by washing.

    PubMed

    Avcioğlu, Hamza; Soykan, Emel; Tarakci, Umit

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the control of helminth egg contamination of raw vegetables by washing. A total of 199 unwashed and 199 washed lettuce, parsley, carrots, dill, rocket, and green-peppers, provided by a catering service in Bursa, Turkey, between March and June 2009, were subjected to helminth egg count under light microscopy. Helminth eggs were detected in six (3.0%) unwashed samples and not in any washed samples (p<0.01). Ascaris lumbricoides and Toxocara spp. were detected in four (2.0%) and two (1.0%) unwashed vegetables, respectively, mostly among leafy vegetables such as lettuce and parsley. Our data confirm that washing procedures before consumption of raw vegetables regardless of the providers' sanitation should be performed to avoid transmission of helminths. PMID:20569015

  1. 38. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden REAR ELEVATION OF W. C. PRATT'S COUNTRY SEAT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  2. 37. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden SIDE ELEVATION OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR W. C. PRATT, ESQr - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  3. 6. VIEW OF THREE BEARS LAKE, SHOWING WASHED UP 12' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THREE BEARS LAKE, SHOWING WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  4. 7. CLOSEUP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, THREE BEARS LAKE, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  5. SOIL WASHING TREATABILITY TESTS FOR PESTICIDE- CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1987 Sand Creek Operable Unit 5 record of decision (ROD) identified soil washing as the selected technology to remediate soils contaminated with high levels of organochlorine pesticides, herbicides, and metals. Initial treatability tests conducted to assess the applicability...

  6. Documentation of a decision framework to support enhanced sludge washing

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    This document describes a proposed decision model that, if developed to its fullest, can provide a wide range of analysis options and insights to pretreatment/sludge washing alternatives. A recent decision has been made to terminate this work

  7. View of Steel Flume Bridge #2 crossing over wash. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Steel Flume Bridge #2 crossing over wash. Looking downstream, southwest - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Bridge No. 2, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  8. Bioherbicidal activity from washed spores of Myrothecium verrucaria.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Mark A; Boyette, C Douglas; Hoagland, Robert E

    2012-05-01

    The fungal plant pathogen, Myrothecium verrucaria, is highly virulent to several important weed species and has potential utility as a bioherbicide. However the production of macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins by this fungus presents significant safety concerns. It was discovered that trichothecenes are removed from M. verrucaria spores by repeated washes with water. These washed spores retained bioherbicidal efficacy against kudzu when tested in field trials and on sicklepod when tested under greenhouse conditions. Changes in the growth medium combined with washing spores with water resulted in greater than 95% reduction in roridin A and verrucarin A. Washing spores reduced trichothecene concentrations in spore preparations with no significant effect on plant biomass reduction, thus demonstrating the possibility of M. verrucaria formulations with improved safety to researchers, producers and applicators. PMID:22806015

  9. 7. PRESSURE CONDUIT ACROSS SCHOOL HOUSE WASH ON THE POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PRESSURE CONDUIT ACROSS SCHOOL HOUSE WASH ON THE POWER CANAL Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, February 21, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  10. Appraisal of guidelines for pre-operative body wash.

    PubMed

    Edström, Elisabet; Westerberg, Lisa; Henricson, Maria

    The pre-operative body wash is a strategy for reducing post-operative infection. However, there is a lack of knowledge about its importance. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the quality of guidelines for the pre-operative body wash using the AGREE instrument--35 guidelines containing instructions for the pre-operative body wash or preparation were included. The AGREE instrument was employed to establish a quality assessment framework that facilitated a comparison of the guidelines. The results were based on the six domains of the AGREE instrument, all of which were found to have low adherence. Descriptive statistics were used to present the assessment score. The AGREE instrument is useful for evaluating the quality of clinical guidelines. The development of evidence-based guidelines must include clinical activities. Further research is required to clarify the pre-operative body wash process and how it should be performed to reduce post-operative infection. PMID:25426523

  11. Why Is Hand Washing So Important? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Campylobacter Infections Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease MRSA Food Poisoning Diarrhea Tips From School Nurses on ... Hands Without Spreading Germs? Hand Washing Staph Infections MRSA Flu Facts Why Should I Care About Germs? ...

  12. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE OUTSIDE FACE OF THE NORTH WALL OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE RIGHT. THE SETTLING RESERVOIR IS ELEVATED ABOVE THE FILTERING RESERVOIR TO ACHIEVE GRAVITY WATER FLOW FROM THE SETTLING RESERVOIR INTO THE FILTERING RESERVOIR. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  13. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  14. Conformational changes in proteins recovered from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle through pH shift washing treatments.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Ramírez-Suárez, Juan C; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; García-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Peña-Ramos, Aida

    2016-04-01

    Conformational and thermal-rheological properties of acidic (APC) and neutral (NPC) protein concentrates were evaluated and compared to those of squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle proteins (SM). Surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl status, secondary structure profile, differential scanning calorimetry and oscillatory dynamic rheology were used to evaluate the effect of treatments on protein properties. Acidic condition during the washing process (APC) promoted structural and conformational changes in the protein present in the concentrate produced. These changes were enhanced during the heat setting of the corresponding sol. Results demonstrate that washing squid muscle under the proposed acidic conditions is a feasible technological alternative for squid-based surimi production improving its yield and gel-forming ability. PMID:26593553

  15. Immunotoxicity of washing soda in a freshwater sponge of India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2015-03-01

    The natural habitat of sponge, Eunapius carteri faces an ecotoxicological threat of contamination by washing soda, a common household cleaning agent of India. Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Domestic effluent, drain water and various human activities in ponds and lakes have been identified as the major routes of washing soda contamination of water. Phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules are important immunological responses offered by the cells of sponges against environmental toxins and pathogens. Present study involves estimation of phagocytic response and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase in E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Sodium carbonate exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phagocytic response of sponge cells under 4, 8, 16 mg/l of the toxin for 96h and all experimental concentrations of the toxin for 192h. Washing soda exposure yielded an initial increase in the generation of the superoxide anion and nitric oxide followed by a significant decrease in generation of these cytotoxic agents. Sponge cell generated a high degree of phenoloxidase activity under the experimental exposure of 2, 4, 8, 16 mg/l of sodium carbonate for 96 and 192 h. Washing soda induced alteration of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses of E. carteri was indicative to an undesirable shift in their immune status leading to the possible crises of survival and propagation of sponges in their natural habitat. PMID:25497767

  16. A Comparative Study of Induced Sputum and Bronchial Washings in Diagnosing Sputum Smear Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandava, Venu; Namballa, Usha Rani; Makala, Sravani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is one of the most important public health problem worldwide. Detecting patients with active pulmonary Koch’s disease is an important component of tuberculosis control programs. However, at times in patients even with a compatible clinical picture, sputum smears do not reveal acid-fast bacilli and smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis remains a common problem. Aim The present study is aimed to compare the results of induced sputum and bronchial washings smear in patients suspected to have sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A prospective study conducted from August 2014 to July 2015, comprising 120 patients fulfilling study criteria. Patients with respiratory symptoms and chest roentgenogram suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis with no previous history of anti-tuberculosis treatment and two spontaneous sputum smear samples negative for acid fast bacilli were included. Patients with active haemoptysis and sputum positive were excluded from the study. Sputum induction was done by using 5-10 ml of 3% hypertonic saline through ultrasonic nebulizer taking safety precautions. All the patient underwent fibreoptic bronchoscopy after six hours fasting on the same day. About 20 ml of normal saline instilled into the suspected pathology area and washings were taken with gentle suction. The sample processing and fluorescent staining for acid fast bacilli was done in a designated microscopy lab. Results Out of 120 sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients, induced sputum smear examination detected acid fast bacilli in 76 patients (63.3%) and acid fast bacilli detected from bronchial washings in 94 patients (78.3%). Smear positivity was higher in cavitary and infiltrative lesions as compared to consolidation and infrahilar pattern disease. Conclusion Even though both induced sputum and bronchial washings procedures were valuable for the diagnosis of sputum smear negative, sputum induction with hypertonic

  17. Effect of washing on the post-thaw quality of cryopreserved ram epididymal spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Touqeer; Islam, Rafiqul; Lone, Farooz Ahmad; Malik, Asloob Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of washing on the post-thaw quality of ram cauda epididymal spermatozoa (P1: Unwashed, P2: Washed). Materials and Methods: Fresh testicles of adult healthy slaughtered rams were collected and transported to the laboratory in an ice chest, where they were weighed, and cauda epididymides were separated. These cauda epididymides were used for recovery of spermatozoa in tris-citric acid fructose buffer by incision method. Spermatozoa samples showing ≥70% progressive motility were pooled and processed further. The mean values (±standard error) of various parameters such as the percentage of sperm motility, live sperm, intact acrosome, and hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST) reacted spermatozoa were recorded. Results: In this experiment, the percent sperm motility, live spermatozoa, and intact acrosome both at pre-freeze and post-thaw were higher (p>0.05) in P1 than P2. However, the post-thaw percent HOST reacted spermatozoa was slightly higher (p>0.05) for P2 than P1. Conclusion: Washing of cauda epididymal spermatozoa has no significant adverse effect on the quality during cryopreservation. Therefore, this processing method can be applied wherever necessary before the extension of the recovered spermatozoa sample in different ram extenders. PMID:27284230

  18. Tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash in atopic dermatitis-prone subjects.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Staci; Meckfessel, Matthew H; Lio, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease characterized by eczematous eruptions and impaired skin barrier function. Patients, as well as their families, frequently report reductions in quality of life. Pruritus, lack of sleep, and impaired social functioning all contribute to this reduction. A skincare regimen of gentle cleansing and daily moisturization is integral to managing atopic dermatitis. While there are a multitude of reports supporting the use of moisturizers, there is a paucity regarding the use of cleansers, especially cleansers formulated with ingredients known to improve skin hydration. A clinical study was conducted to assess the tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash formulated with the filaggrin break-down products arginine and pyrrolidone carboxylic acid in subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin (Cetaphil® RestoraDerm® Body Wash). The results of this study indicate that Cetaphil RestoraDerm Body Wash was well tolerated, reduced itch, improved quality of life, and was well-liked by subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin. PMID:25226012

  19. Effects of water washing and torrefaction on the pyrolysis behavior and kinetics of rice husk through TGA and Py-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuping; Dong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water washing and torrefaction on the pyrolysis behavior and kinetics of rice husk were investigated through TGA and Py-GC/MS in this study. Two iso-conversional methods, i.e. Starink and FWO methods were applied for determination of the activation energy of original and pretreated rice husk samples at three different heating rates. It was found that activation energy of water washed rice husk was lower than that of original rice husk. Whereas, the activation energy increased with the increase of torrefaction temperature. The result of Py-GC/MS analysis indicated that both water washing and torrefaction pretreatments decreased the contents of acids, ketones, aldehydes and furans, while significantly increased the contents of sugars, especially levoglucosan. The relative content of released levoglucosan from pyrolysis of rice husk sample with combined water washing and 280°C torrefaction pretreatment is almost 9 times of that from original rice husk, which is about 3%. PMID:26343572

  20. No-wash ethanol precipitation of dye-labeled reaction products improves DNA sequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    The advent of DNA sequencing has significantly accelerated molecular biology and clinical genetic testing. Despite recent increases in next-generation sequencing throughput, the most popular platform for DNA sequencing is still the multi-capillary DNA sequencer, which is ideally suited for small-scale sequencing projects and is highly accurate. However, the methods remain time-consuming and laborious. Here, I describe a modified ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) method that skips the washing step in ethanol precipitation. My improvements to standard methods save labor, time, and cost per run and increase the sequence reads by 5 to 10%. This modified method will provide immediate benefits to many researchers. PMID:25256164

  1. 40 CFR 447.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash ink subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash ink subcategory. 447.10 Section 447.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-Base Solvent Wash Ink Subcategory § 447.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash ink...-base ink where the tank washing system uses solvents. When a plant is subject to effluent...

  2. Treatment of car wash wastewater by UF membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istirokhatun, Titik; Destianti, Puti; Hargianintya, Adenira; Oktiawan, Wiharyanto; Susanto, Heru

    2015-12-01

    The existence of car wash service facilitates car owners to remove dirt and grime from their vehicles. However, the dirt washed off vehicles as well as the cleaning materials themselves may be harmful to the environment if they are not properly managed and discharged. Many technologies have been proposed to treat car wash wastewater such as coagulation flocculation, tricking filter and flocculation-flotation. Nevertheless, these technologies have low efficiency to eliminate oil and small organic compounds. Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes were used in this study to treat car wash wastewater. This study investigated the performance of UF membranes under various pressures to remove COD, oil and grease, and also turbidity from car wash waste water. The membrane performance was examined by investigation of permeate flux and membrane rejection. The results meet the standard of environmental regulation and it is possible to be reused. The highest rejection was shown by PES10 (polyethersulfone 10 kDa) in 1 bar operation with complete rejection for both turbidity and oil and grace and 95% rejection for COD.

  3. Treatment of tunnel wash water and implications for its disposal.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, M; Renman, G; Byman, L; Svenstam, G; Norling, M

    2014-01-01

    The use of road tunnels in urban areas creates water pollution problems, since the tunnels must be frequently cleaned for traffic safety reasons. The washing generates extensive volumes of highly polluted water, for example, more than fivefold higher concentrations of suspended solids compared to highway runoff. The pollutants in the wash water have an affinity for particulate material, so sedimentation should be a viable treatment option. In this study, 12 in situ sedimentation trials were carried out on tunnel wash water, with and without addition of chemical flocculent. Initial suspended solids concentration ranged from 804 to 9,690 mg/L. With sedimentation times of less than 24 hours and use of a chemical flocculent, it was possible to reach low concentrations of suspended solids (<15 mg/L), PAH (<0.1 μg/L), As (<1.0 μg/L), Cd (<0.05 μg/L), Hg (<0.02 μg/L), Fe (<200 μg/L), Ni (<8 μg/L), Pb (<0.5 μg/L), Zn (<60 μg/L) and Cr (<8 μg/L). Acute Microtox(®) toxicity, mainly attributed to detergents used for the tunnel wash, decreased significantly at low suspended solids concentrations after sedimentation using a flocculent. The tunnel wash water did not inhibit nitrification. The treated water should be suitable for discharge into recipient waters or a wastewater treatment plant. PMID:24845317

  4. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a ``Late Wash` facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  5. WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

    2008-04-28

    The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus

  6. A clinically applicable method to preserve urine and bladder washing cells for flow cytometric monitoring of bladder cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Deitch, A D; Andreotti, V A; Strand, M A; Howell, L; deVere White, R W

    1990-04-01

    We describe a method to fix exfoliated bladder cells that is suitable for followup of bladder cancer patients by deoxyribonucleic acid flow cytometry. After fixation with room temperature methanol plus acetic acid (20:1, volume:volume) urine and bladder washing samples from these patients can be stored at room temperature for 3 to 7 days and then assessed reliably for the presence of aneuploidy and the percentage of hyperdiploid cells. For those with active transitional cell carcinoma diagnostic accuracy comparing fresh to fixed specimens was improved from 58 to 92% with urine and from 50 to 100% with washing samples. For patients with a history of transitional cell carcinoma who currently are free of disease the false positive rate remains unchanged after fixation. The procedure described is suitable for use in the outpatient clinic and should permit shipping of samples without refrigeration to a central flow cytometry facility for analysis. PMID:2179581

  7. Gravity and magnetic study of Yucca Wash, southwest Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.; Sikora, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Gravity and ground magnetic data were collected along five traverses across and one traverse along Yucca Wash in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site. Two additional ground magnetic profiles were collected approximately 100 m to either side of the longitudinal profile. These data do not indicate major vertical offsets greater than 100 m using a density contrast of 0.2 to 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} along the proposed Yucca Wash fault. A broad magnetic high coincides with the location of the hydrologic gradient. Density profiling, a technique used to determine the average density of small topographic features, suggests that the density of near-surface material in the vicinity of Yucca Wash is about 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}.

  8. Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford Tank C-106 sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Hoopes, F.V.; Steele, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the results of a laboratory-scale washing and caustic leaching test performed on sludge from Hanford Tank C-106. The purpose of this test was to determine the behavior of important sludge components when subjected to washing with dilute or concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions. The results of this laboratory-scale test were used to support the design of a bench-scale washing and leaching process used to prepare several hundred grams of high-level waste solids for vitrification tests to be done by private contractors. The laboratory-scale test was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1996 as part of the Hanford privatization effort. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS; EM-30).

  10. Synergetic effect of a novel wash aid, T-128, in improving chlorine efficacy against bacterial pathogens in wash solution containing high organic loads

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine is widely used as a sanitizer in commercial fresh-cut wash water for produce processing of bagged leafy greens. However, free chlorine depletion occurs rapidly when high organic content loads are introduced directly into the wash solution as part of the washing operation process. This chl...

  11. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  12. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE SUCTION (INTAKE) HOSE IS SEEN AT THE LEFT RESTING ON THE FILTER BED SURFACE; THE DISCHARGE HOSE IS AT THE RIGHT, RUNNING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE CENTRAL VERTICAL AXLE TO THE CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. FROM THE PUMP WATER IS DISCHARGED THROUGH THE HORIZONTAL PIPE LOCATED UNDER THE EDGE OF PLATFORM DECK INTO THE WASTE-WATER TROUGH (NOT SEEN IN THIS VIEW). - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  13. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ELECTRIC TROLLEY IS SEEN AT THE LEFT. THE BULKHEAD SEEN AT THE LOWER RIGHT IS NOT PART OF THE MACHINE; IT WAS INSTALLED TO RETAIN THE FILTER SAND AFTER THE MACHINE WAS NO LONGER USED. THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 4 IS SEEN IN THE DISTANCE BELOW THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE TROLLEY. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  14. Effects of washing produce contaminated with the snail and slug hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with three common household solutions.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A; Cowie, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  15. Application and evaluation of the washing effect in the collector well using pilot plant with washing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, B. H.

    2012-04-01

    Riverbed/bank filtration (RBF) is a natural process used as a first step in drinking water treatment. RBF systems consist of well fields that draw water from an aquifer that is hydraulically connected to surface waters. The benefits of RBF are multiple and include a reduction of turbidity, total coliform, microbial contaminants natural organic matter, and organic contaminants. Some of the disadvantages of RBF include the difficulty of preventing river water from infiltrating the aquifer in in-stances of severe river contamination, the geochemical reaction of the infiltrate with aquifer materials that may raise the aqueous concentrations of Fe2+, Mn2+, As, NH4+, CH4, Ca2+ and HCO3- , and clogging of the riverbed. For example, has demonstrated that riverbed clogging may decrease the specific capacity of RBF wells (flow reduction in the collector well etc.). The objective of this study is to optimization and evaluation the washing effect on various nozzle type and intervals, soil retention rate in the collector well using pilot plant with washing device for prevention flow reduction in the collector well. The Pilot plant experiments were conducted under various conditions; two kinds nozzle type (spray nozzle of circle type (single - Full Cone, multi - Hollow Cone) and spray nozzle of fan shape type (Veejet)), two different nozzle intervals (200 mm, 400mm) and a various soil retention rate in the collector well (10 ~ 40%). The results of experiment showed that in the nozzle type case, the washing effect of the veeject nozzle was more effective than other (Full Cone, Hollow Cone) nozzle through spray results (range, strength and height). In the nozzle interval conditions, washing effect is 200 mm better than 400 mm through spray distance and soil height. The washing efficiency in the collector well increased on soil retention rate decreased and the nozzle injection pressure increased using washing device

  16. Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. 30 CFR 206.259 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., subject to monitoring, review, audit, and possible future adjustment. The lessee shall have the burden of... as a separate line entry on the Form MMS-4430. (2) In conducting reviews and audits, MMS will examine... monitoring, review, audit, and possible future adjustment. The lessee must claim a washing allowance...

  18. 36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - DRIVE FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  19. 35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - RIVER FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  20. 62. May 1985. NORTH END OF WASH HOUSE (Negative slightly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. May 1985. NORTH END OF WASH HOUSE (Negative slightly reticulated. Tree behind fence is common fig, Ficus carica.) - Borough House, West Side State Route 261, about .1 mile south side of junction with old Garners Ferry Road, Stateburg, Sumter County, SC

  1. Ultrasonic system for continuous washing of textiles in liquid layers.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Juarez, Juan A; Riera, Enrique; Acosta, Victor; Rodríguez, Germán; Blanco, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    The use of ultrasonic energy for washing of textiles has been tried several times without achieving practical development. In fact, the softness of the fibres makes the cavitation to produce small erosion effect and the reticulate structure of the fabric favours the formation of air bubble layers which obstruct wave penetration. In addition, a high proportion of water with respect to the wash load and a certain water degassing is required to assure efficiency and homogeneity in the wash performance. Such requirements have hindered the commercial development of the ultrasonic washing machines for domestic purposes. For specific industrial applications, a great part of these limitations may be overcome. This article deals with a new process in which the fabric is exposed to the ultrasonic field in a flat format. Such process has been implemented at laboratory and at semi-industrial stage by using specially designed power ultrasonic transducers with rectangular plate radiators. The cleaning effect is produced by the intense cavitation field generated by the plate radiator within a thin layer of liquid where the fabric is introduced. The homogeneity of such effect is achieved by the successive exposure of all the fabric areas to the intense acoustic field. In this paper the structure and performance of the developed system are shown. PMID:19574081

  2. Ink and Wash Painting for Children with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Chih-Ming; Chao, Hsin-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Five children with visual impairments received instruction in drawing, using ink and wash painting and calligraphy techniques. A special system developed by a blind Taiwanese Chinese calligrapher, Tsann-Cherng Liaw, was used to help the children orient and refine their work. Children's performance on simple drawing tasks was compared before and…

  3. Efficacy of Post-Wash Shell Egg Sanitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine (Cl) solutions of 100-200 ppm are the standard by which post-wash shell egg sanitizers are measured. Any facility that packages eggs with the USDA grade shields must use a comparable sanitizer. While chlorine solutions are inexpensive, non-corrosive, and safe to handle, they are not very ...

  4. WASHING STUDIES FOR PCP AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and lo...

  5. Accidental entrapment of cats in front-loading washing machines

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Sarah A.; Gaunt, Matthew C.; Taylor, Susan M.; Snead, Elizabeth C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Two clinical cases of accidental entrapment of cats in front-loading washing machines are described. One cat died the day after presentation as a result of aspiration pneumonia and head trauma, despite supportive care. The second cat survived with supportive treatment, but developed dermatologic complications 10 d later. PMID:21119868

  6. Decay kinetics of free chlorine in fresh produce wash system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorinated water wash is a critical step employed in the production of fresh-cut produce. The efficacy of chlorinated water was affected largely by the concentration of active chlorine ingredients, which degrades due to the presence of microorganisms, as well as inorganic and organic matters. It is...

  7. View of gantry crane (manufactured by Ederer Corporation, Seattle, Wash., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of gantry crane (manufactured by Ederer Corporation, Seattle, Wash., 1971) for Powerhouse No. 3, looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  8. MAGNETITE RECOVERY IN COAL WASHING BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a demonstration of the successful recovery of magnetite from mixtures of magnetite and coal, like those found in a coal-washing circuit, by High Gradient Magnetic Separation. The demonstration was part of a research program at Francis Bitter National Magnet L...

  9. Conservation of water for washing beef heads at harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop methods to conserve water necessary to cleanse beef heads prior to USDA–FSIS inspection. This was to be accomplished by establishing a baseline for the minimum amount of water necessary to adequately wash a head and application of image analysis to provi...

  10. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL/SEDIMENT WASHING SYSTEM BERGMANN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bergmann USA Soil/Sediment Washing System is a waste minimization technique designed to separate or "partition" soils and sediments by grain size and density. In this water-based volume reduction process, hazardous contaminants are concentrated into a small residual portion...

  11. Conservation of water for washing beef heads at harvest.

    PubMed

    DeOtte, R E; Spivey, K S; Galloway, H O; Lawrence, T E

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this research was to develop methods to conserve water necessary to cleanse beef heads prior to USDA-FSIS inspection. This was to be accomplished by establishing a baseline for the minimum amount of water necessary to adequately wash a head and application of image analysis to provide an objective measure of head cleaning. Twenty-one beef heads were manually washed during the harvest process. An average 18.75 L (2.49 SD) and a maximum of 23.88 L were required to cleanse the heads to USDA-FSIS standards. Digital images were captured before and after manual washing then evaluated for percentage red saturation using commercially available image analysis software. A decaying exponential curve extracted from these data indicated that as wash water increased beyond 20 L the impact on red saturation decreased. At 4 sigma from the mean of 18.75 L, red saturation is 16.0 percent, at which logistic regression analysis indicates 99.994 percent of heads would be accepted for inspection, or less than 1 head in 15,000 would be rejected. Reducing to 3 sigma would increase red saturation to 27.6 percent, for which 99.730 percent of heads likely would be accepted (less than 1 in 370 would be rejected). PMID:20374798

  12. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  13. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  14. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  15. 30 CFR 1206.458 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 1206.458 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL.... (b) Non-arm's-length or no contract. (1) If a lessee has a non-arm's-length contract or has no... will be based upon the lessee's reasonable actual costs. All washing allowances deducted under a...

  16. Understanding wash efficiency and chloride transfer in copper solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, D. J.

    2003-07-01

    Carryover of entrained aqueous from primary leaching operations into copper electrowinning electrolytes introduces impurities that can affect cathode quality and cause corrosion. As a result, more operations are introducing wash stages in their solvent extraction circuits in an attempt to dilute these entrainments with high-quality water.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF ENTEROBACTERICEAE FROM WASHED AND UNWASHED COMMERCIAL SHELL EGGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, little attention has been given to the microbiology of commercial processed eggs. Therefore, to evaluate the effect of processing on the safety and quality of retail shell eggs, a storage study was conducted with unwashed and commercially washed eggs. For each of three repetitions, shell...

  18. Removal of arsenic from Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil with soil washing using magnetic iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaemaro; Zhao, Xin; Lee, Jong Keun; Kim, Jae Young

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic compounds are considered carcinogen and easily enter drinking water supplies with their natural abundance. US Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing a regulation to reduce the public health risks from arsenic in drinking water by revising the current drinking water standard for arsenic from 50 ppb to 10 ppb in 2001 (USEPA, 2001). Therefore, soil remediation is also growing field to prevent contamination of groundwater as well as crop cultivation. Soil washing is adjusted as ex-situ soil remediation technique which reduces volume of the contaminated soil. The technique is composed of physical separation and chemical extraction to extract target metal contamination in the soil. Chemical extraction methods have been developed solubilizing contaminants containing reagents such as acids or chelating agents. And acid extraction is proven as the most commonly used technology to treat heavy metals in soil, sediment, and sludge (FRTR, 2007). Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic iron oxide have been used in diverse areas including information technology and biomedicine. Magnetic iron oxides also can be used as adsorbent to heavy metal enhancing removal efficiency of arsenic concentration. In this study, magnetite is used as the washing agent with acid extraction condition so that the injected oxide can be separated by magnetic field. Soil samples were collected from three separate areas in the Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil to have synergy effect with phytoremediation. Each sample was air-dried and sieved (2mm). Soil washing condition was adjusted on pH in the range of 0-12 with hydrogen chloride and sodium hydroxide. After performing soil washing procedure, arsenic-extracted samples were analyzed for arsenic concentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). All the soils have exceeded worrisome level of soil contamination for region 1 (25mg/kg) so the soil remediation techniques are

  19. Environmental Impacts Of Zirab Coal Washing Plant, Mazandaran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F.; Esmaeili, A.

    2009-04-01

    Extraction and beneficiation operations associated with coal mining increase the rate of chemical reaction of waste material to air and water media. Zirab coal washing plant is located on the bank of the Cherat stream in Mazandaran province, Iran. coal Mined from central Alborz coalfield mines is not suitable for use in Iranian Steel Corporation. Hence, coal ash content is reduced by physical and chemical processes in this plant. These processes leave a large quantity of liquid and solid wastes that accumulate in waste dump and tailing dam. sediment and water samples taken from Sheshrudbar and Cherat streams and also from Talar river show high concentration of Cd, Mo and As in water samples of coal washing plant and the associated drainage. Eh-pH diagrams revealed the chemical species of elements in water. The enrichment factor and geoaccumulation index show that Cd, Hg, Mo and V are enriched in bottom sediments of the coal washing plant and decrease with increasing distance from the plant. Sequential extraction analysis Results of three sediment samples of Cherat stream show that silicate bound is the major phase in samples taken before and after the plant, but adjacent to the plant, organic bound is dominant. The high concentration of Cd and Mo in the water soluble phase, is noticeable and may result in high mobility and bioavailability of these elements. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests on six samples, before and after the coal washing plant support the obtained results. Keywords: Zirab; coal washing plant; Sequential extraction analysis; Mann-whitney; Wilcoxon; Enrichment factor; Geoaccumulation index.

  20. Hand Washing Among School Children in Bogotá, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Freeman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed hand-washing behaviors and intentions among school children in Bogotá, Colombia, to help identify and overcome barriers to proper hygiene practices. Methods. Data on hand-washing behavior and intentions and individual and contextual factors were collected from 2042 sixth- through eighth-grade students in 25 schools in Bogotá via anonymous questionnaires. A member of the school administration or teaching staff completed a questionnaire about the school environment. Site inspections of bathroom facilities were conducted. Results. Only 33.6% of the sample reported always or very often washing hands with soap and clean water before eating and after using the toilet. About 7% of students reported regular access to soap and clean water at school. A high level of perceived control was the strongest predictor of positive hand-washing intentions (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.8, 7.5). Students with proper hand-washing behavior were less likely to report previous-month gastrointestinal symptoms (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.6, 0.9) or previous-year school absenteeism (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.6, 0.9). Conclusions. Scarcity of adequate facilities in most schools in Bogotá prevents children from adopting proper hygienic behavior and thwarts health promotion efforts. The current renovation program of public schools in Bogotá provides a unique opportunity to meet the challenges of providing a supportive environment for adoption of healthy behaviors. PMID:19008513

  1. Multivariate statistical analyses of groundwater surrounding Forty mile wash

    SciTech Connect

    Woocay, A.; Walton, J.C.

    2007-07-01

    Groundwater chemistry data from 211 sampling locations in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada are analyzed using multivariate statistical methods in order to better understand groundwater chemical evolution, ascertain potential flow paths and determine hydrochemical facies. Correspondence analysis of the major ion chemistry is used to define relationships between and among major ions and sampling locations. A k-means cluster analysis is used to determine hydrochemical facies based on correspondence analysis dimensions. The derived dimensions and hydrochemical facies are presented as bi-plots and overlaid on a digital elevation model of the region giving a visual picture of potential interactions and flow paths. A distinct signature of the groundwater chemistry along the extended flow path of Fortymile Wash can be observed along with some potential interaction at possible fault lines near Highway I-95. The signature from Fortymile Wash is believed to represent the relict of water that infiltrated during past pluvial periods when the amount of runoff in the wash was significantly larger than during the current drier period. This hypothesis appears to be supported by hydrogen-2 and oxygen-18 data which indicate that younger groundwater is found in the upper part of the wash near Yucca Mountain and older groundwater is found in the lower region of the wash near Amargosa River. The range of the hydrogen-2 data corresponds to precipitation in a period of relatively cold climate and has a similar spatial signature to the oxygen-18 data. If the hypothesis that current groundwater chemistry primarily reflects past focused infiltration of surface runoff rather than regional groundwater migration is correct, then saturated zone transport from Yucca Mountain may be much slower than is currently anticipated. (authors)

  2. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on bonding maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  3. Effects of organic and inorganic additives on flotation recovery of washed cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resuspended in water.

    PubMed

    DeSousa, Sandro Rogério; Laluce, Cecilia; Jafelicci, Miguel

    2006-03-01

    Separation of microbial cells by flotation recovery is usually carried out in industrial reactors or wastewater treatment systems, which contain a complex mixture of microbial nutrients and excretion products. In the present study, the separation of yeast cells by flotation recovery was carried out using a simple flotation recovery systems containing washed yeast cells resuspended in water in order to elucidate the effects of additives (defined amounts of organic and inorganic acids, ethanol, surfactants and sodium chloride) on the cellular interactions at interfaces (cell/aqueous phase and cell/air bubble). When sodium chloride, organic acids (notably propionic, succinic and acetic acids) and organic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Nonidet P40) were added to the flotation recovery system, significant increases in the cell recovery of yeast hydrophobic cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain FLT-01) were observed. The association of ethanol to acetic acid solution (a minor by-product of alcoholic fermentation) in the flotation recovery system, containing washed cells of strain FLT-01 resuspended in water, leading to an increased flotation recovery at pH 5.5. Thus, the association among products of the cellular metabolism (e.g., ethanol and acetic acid) can improve yeast cell recovery by flotation recovery. PMID:16500092

  4. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  5. Scavenging of BHCs and DDTs from soil by thermal desorption and solvent washing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan Fei; Yang, Hong; Zhan, Xin Hua; Zhou, Li Xiang

    2013-03-01

    Intensive remediation of abandoned former organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) manufacturing areas is necessary because the central and surrounding soils contaminated by OCPs are harmful to crop production and food safety. Organochlorine and its residues are persistent in environments and difficult to remove from contaminated soils due to their low solubility and higher sorption to the soils. We performed a comprehensive study on the remediation of OCPs-contaminated soils using thermal desorption technique and solvent washing approaches. The tested soil was thermally treated at 225, 325, 400, and 500 °C for 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, and 90 min, respectively. In addition, we tested soil washing with several organic solvents including n-alcohols and surfactants. The optimal ratio of soil/solvent was tested, and the recycling of used ethanol was investigated. Finally, activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), urease (URE), alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase (ACP), and invertase (INV) were assayed in the treated soils. The tested soil was thermally treated at 500 °C for 30 min, and the concentration of contaminants in soil was decreased from 3,115.77 to 0.33 mg kg(-1). The thermal desorption in soil was governed by the first-order kinetics model. For the chemical washing experiment, ethanol showed a higher efficiency than any other solvent. Using a 1:20 ratio of soil/solvent, the maximum removal of OCPs was achieved within 15 min. Under this condition, approximately 87 % of OCPs was removed from the soils. More than 90 % of ethanol in the spent wash fluid could be recovered. Activities of some enzymes in soils were increased after ethanol treatment. But ALP, ACP, and INV activities were decreased and PPO and URE showed slightly higher activities following remediation by thermal treatment. Both heating temperature and time were the key factors for thermal desorption of OCPs. The n-alcohol solvent showed higher removal of OCPs from soils than surfactants. The highly efficient

  6. Apparatus for washing particulate material. [Removal of silicone oil from microspheres by trichloroethylene

    DOEpatents

    Rivera, A.L.; Fowler, V.L.; Justice, G.V.

    1983-12-29

    Transport of nuclear fuel microspheres through a wash liquid is facilitated by feeding a slurry containing the microspheres into the wash liquid via a column having a vibrating tubular screen located under its lower end.

  7. Study of Soil Washing for Remediation of Pb and Zn Contaminated Coastal Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.

    2013-12-01

    As a result of analyzing the pre-treatment process of Pb, Zn in contaminated coastal landfill soil presented by Korean Soil Analysis Method, the each concentration was presented 577.00mg/kg, 3894.34mg/kg. This soil was critically contaminated with Pb and Zn because it was exceeded the Standard of soil contamination(2area: Pb-400mg/kg, Zn-600mg/kg). Soil remediation efficiency of the soil washing process for the removal of Pb and Zn was determined to be consistent with the results. The batch experiment on the several washing solutions(HCl, HNO3), washing solutions concentrations(0.1-0.8M) and the ratio of soil vs. solution for soil washing(1:3, 1:5 and 1:10) was performed. The results of experiments, washing time was appropriate in 30 minutes. The removal efficiency of soil washing increased as the ratio of soil vs. washing solution increased. But, in the case of heavy metals, the soil vs. solution for soil washing was determined as the optimal ratio of 1 : 5. Five consecutive soil washing with 0.5M of HCl and HNO3 solutions were performed. Results of experiments, in case of Pb was removed by target removal efficiency from soil on the twice washing. With in case of Zn was over on the first washing by target removal efficiency, but suggesting that twice consecutive soil washing is desirable as stability at field. Results of consecutive soil washing experiments, the removal efficiency maintained lower than 10 % after the 4th washing. From the results, demanding consecutive washing is not recommended. Results about the heavy metal contaminated soil washing experiments of the coastal landfill, in the case of HCl with more than 0.5 M of solution was performed at 1:5 of soil ratio vs. solution, 30 minutes of washing time and 2-3 consecutive soil washing. And in the case of HNO3 with 0.8 M of solution was performed various ratios of soil vs. washing solution, suggesting that 2-3 consecutive soil washing was reached to Pb and Zn target removal efficiency. Key words

  8. Particle size separation via soil washing to obtain volume reduction.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Rasor, E; Van Ryn, F

    1999-04-23

    A pilot-plant study was performed using a soil washing pilot plant originally designed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to demonstrate scale-up and potential full-scale remediation. This pilot plant named VORCE (Volume Reduction/Chemical Extraction) was modified to meet the specific requirements for treatment of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and a Department of Energy site soils. After a series of tests on clean soils to develop operating parameters and system performance, the machine was used to treat soils, one contaminated with Thorium-232 and the other with Cesium-137. All indicate that soil washing is very promising for volume reduction treatment. In addition, cost data was generated and is given herein. PMID:10379032

  9. Detergent formulations for wool domestic washings containing immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Silva, Carla J S M; Schroeder, Marc; Guebitz, Georg M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2006-05-01

    The stability of immobilized and native Esperase, a commercial serine protease, was studied by incubating the enzymes in four formulations containing the same amount of anionic and non-ionic surfactants. The results show that the activity of the immobilized enzyme is not affected by the presence of detergents while the native enzyme lost 50% of activity after 20 min of incubation in these four formulations. The washing performance of the detergents prepared with the immobilized Esperase was studied on cotton and wool fabric samples stained with human blood and egg yolk, using as control the detergent containing native Esperase. The best stain removal for cotton samples stained with human blood was achieved using the detergent with immobilized Esperase. Several physical tests confirmed that wool keratin was not degraded by the immobilized Esperase, validating the ability to use formulated detergents containing this immobilized enzyme for safe wool domestic washing. PMID:16791727

  10. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  11. A Wash-Free Homogeneous Colorimetric Immunoassay Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqiao; Rong, Pengfei; Jia, Hongwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Bo; Dong, Qiong; Yang, Cejun; Hu, Pengzhi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Dingbin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and convenient biosensing platforms could be beneficial to timely diagnosis and treatment of diseases in virtually any care settings. Sandwich immunoassays, the most commonly used methods for protein detection, often rely on expensive tags such as enzyme and tedious wash and incubation procedures operated by skilled labor. In this report, we revolutionized traditional sandwich immunoassays by providing a wash-free homogeneous colorimetric immunoassay method without requirement of any separation steps. The proposed strategy was realized by controlling the growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to mediate the interparticle spacing in the protein-AuNP oligomers. We have demonstrated the successful in vitro detection of cancer biomarker in serum samples from patients with high clinical sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26722373

  12. Integrating EDDS-enhanced washing with low-cost stabilization of metal-contaminated soil from an e-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Zhang, Weihua; Yang, Xin; Baek, Kitae; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-09-01

    While chelant-enhanced soil washing has been widely studied for metal extraction from contaminated soils, there are concerns about destabilization and leaching of residual metals after remediation. This study integrated 2-h soil washing enhanced by biodegradable ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and 2-month stabilization using agricultural waste product (soybean stover biochar pyrolyzed at 300 and 700 °C), industrial by-product (coal fly ash (CFA)), and their mixture. After integration with 2-month stabilization, the leachability and mobility of residual metals (Cu, Zn, and Pb) in the field-contaminated soil were significantly reduced, especially for Cu, in comparison with 2-h EDDS washing alone. This suggested that the metals destabilized by EDDS-washing could be immobilized by subsequent stabilization with biochar and CFA. Moreover, when the remediation performance was evaluated for phytoavailability and bioaccessibility, prior EDDS washing helped to achieve a greater reduction in the bioavailable fraction of metals than sole stabilization treatment. This was probably because the weakly-bound metals were first removed by EDDS washing before stabilization. Both individual and combined applications of biochar and CFA showed comparable effectiveness regardless of the difference in material properties, possibly due to the high level of amendments (150 ton ha(-1)). Based on the mobility and bioaccessibility results, the estimated human health risk (primarily resulting from Pb) could be mitigated to an acceptable level in water consumption pathway or reduced by half in soil ingestion pathway. These results suggest that an integration of EDDS washing with soil stabilization can alleviate post-remediation impacts of residual metals in the treated soil. PMID:27337434

  13. Reduction of Salmonella enterica contamination on grape tomatoes by washing with thyme oil, thymol, and carvacrol as compared with chlorine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjian; Wu, Changqing

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, multistate outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovars were traced to tomatoes and resulted in serious economic loss for the tomato industry and decreased consumer confidence in the safety of tomato produce. Purified compounds derived from essential oils such as thymol and carvacrol had wide inhibitory effects against foodborne pathogens including Salmonella. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activities of thymol, carvacrol, and thyme oil against Salmonella on grape tomatoes. Surface-inoculated grape tomatoes were washed with 4% ethanol, 200 ppm of chlorine, or one of six washing solutions (thymol [0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml], thyme oil [1 and 2 mg/ml], and carvacrol [0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml]) for 5 or 10 min. There was no significant difference in the reduction of S. enterica serovars when different washing times were used (P > 0.05). Thymol (especially at the concentration of 0.4 mg/ml) was the most effective (P < 0.05) among the three natural antimicrobial agents, which achieved >4.1-log reductions of S. enterica serovars Typhimurium, Kentucky, Senftenberg, and Enteritidis on grape tomatoes after a 5-min washing and >4.3-log reductions after a 10-min washing. A >4.6-log reduction in the S. enterica populations in comparison to control was observed with the use of thymol solutions. The uses of these antimicrobial agents achieved significant log reductions of Salmonella on inoculated grape tomatoes and decreased dramatically the risk of potential transmission of pathogens from tomatoes to washing solutions. None of these antimicrobial agents decreased the total phenolic and ascorbic acid content, nor did any of them change the color and pH values or affect the taste, aroma, or visual quality of grape tomatoes. Therefore, 0.4 mg/ml thymol has great potential to be an alternative to chlorine-based washing solution for fresh produce. PMID:21219747

  14. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude oil washing during a voyage... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing... § 157.10c(b)(2) shall ensure that each cargo tank that is crude oil washed during a voyage other than...

  15. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude oil washing during a voyage... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing... § 157.10c(b)(2) shall ensure that each cargo tank that is crude oil washed during a voyage other than...

  16. Inactivation of viruses using novel protein A wash buffers.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Glen R; Selvitelli, Keith R; Iliescu, Ionela; Cecchini, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Low pH viral inactivation is typically performed in the eluate pool following the protein A capture step during the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins. However, exposure to low pH has the potential to alter protein quality. To avoid these difficulties, novel wash buffers capable of inactivating viruses while antibodies or Fc-fusion proteins were bound to protein A or mixed mode resins were developed. By equilibrating the column in high salt buffer (2 M ammonium sulfate or 3 M sodium chloride) after loading, the hydrophobic interactions between antibodies and protein A ligands were increased enough to prevent elution at pH 3. The ammonium sulfate was also found to cause binding of an antibody to a mixed mode cation exchange and a mixed mode anion exchange resin at pH values that caused elution in conventional cation and anion exchange resins (pH 3.5 for Capto Adhere and pH 8.0 for Capto MMC), indicating that retention was due to enhanced hydrophobic interactions. The potential of the 2 M ammonium sulfate pH 3 buffer, a 1 M arginine buffer, and a buffer containing the detergent LDAO to inactivate XMuLV virus when used as protein A wash buffers with a 1 hour contact time were studied. The high salt and detergent containing wash buffers provided about five logs of removal, determined using PCR, and complete combined removal and inactivation (> 6 logs), determined by measuring infectivity. The novel protein A washes could provide more rapid, automated viral inactivation steps with lower pool conductivities. PMID:25482293

  17. Preparation of washed platelets from non-anticoagulated human blood.

    PubMed

    Bowry, S K; Müller-Berghaus, G

    1986-09-15

    Sodium citrate is almost always used to anticoagulate blood for the preparation of washed platelet suspensions. Several adverse effects of citrate on platelet functional responses have been reported. We investigated the extent of activation of platelets and plasmatic coagulation during the preparation of washed platelets from human blood to which no anticoagulant was added. Washed platelets from native blood (PNB) were prepared by passing freshly-drawn human blood rapidly through a mixed Sephadex G-25/G-50 column to remove divalent cations. Gel-filtered blood (GFB), diluted by the elution medium containing 0.35% albumin and 2U/ml apyrase, was obtained within 5 minutes of venepuncture. Using CaCl2, the GFB was found to contain a mean of 1.65 X 10 mM calcium. Fibrinopeptide A measurements indicated less activation of plasmatic coagulation in GFB than in citrated blood. Measurements of beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 during the various stages of the preparation of PNB showed no platelet activation. No platelet aggregates, as measured by the platelet aggregate ratio method, were observed in GFB. Transmission electron microscopy showed intact discoid platelets similar to those in platelet-rich plasma. The reduced activation of platelets and of plasmatic coagulation was due to the more effective removal of calcium ions from the blood by gel filtration than chelation by citrate. PNB may thus provide a model for studying the requirements for calcium in platelet function in the absence of any citrate-platelet interactions. PMID:2945282

  18. Waste washing pre-treatment of municipal and special waste.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana; Pivnenko, Kostyantyn

    2012-03-15

    Long-term pollution potential in landfills is mainly related to the quality of leachate. Waste can be conveniently treated prior to landfilling with an aim to minimizing future emissions. Washing of waste represents a feasible pre-treatment method focused on controlling the leachable fraction of residues and relevant impact. In this study, non-recyclable plastics originating from source segregation, mechanical-biological treated municipal solid waste (MSW), bottom ash from MSW incineration and automotive shredder residues (ASR) were treated and the removal efficiency of washing pre-treatment prior to landfilling was evaluated. Column tests were performed to simulate the behaviour of waste in landfill under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The findings obtained revealed how waste washing treatment (WWT) allowed the leachability of contaminants from waste to be reduced. Removal rates exceeding 65% were obtained for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN). A percentage decrease of approximately 60% was reached for the leachable fraction of chlorides, sulphates, fluoride and metals, as proved by a reduction in electric conductivity values (70%). PMID:21968117

  19. Status and progress in sludge washing: A pivotal pretreatment method

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, W.B.; MacLean, G.T.; Meng, C.D.; Winkler, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    Separation of the bulk soluble chemical salts from the insoluble metal hydroxides and radionuclides is central to the strategy of disposing Hanford tank waste. Sludge washing and caustic leaching have been selected as the primary methods for processing the 230 million L (61,000,000 gal) of Hanford tank waste. These processes are very similar to those selected for processing waste at the West Valley Site in New York and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The purpose of sludge washing is to dissolve and remove the soluble salts in the waste. Leaching of the insoluble solids with caustic will be used to dissolve aluminum hydroxide and chromium hydroxide, and convert insoluble bismuth phosphate to soluble phosphate. The waste will be separated into a high-level solids fraction and a liquid fraction that can be disposed of as low-level waste after cesium removal. The washing and leaching operations involve batchwise mixing, settling, and decanting within the existing underground storage tanks.

  20. Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D. II

    1994-03-01

    Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

  1. Recovery of MSWI and soil washing residues as concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Abbà, Alessandro; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues and aggregates derived from contaminated soil washing could be used as alternative aggregates for concrete production. Initially, chemical, physical and geometric characteristics (according to UNI EN 12620) of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes and some contaminated soils were evaluated; moreover, the pollutants release was evaluated by means of leaching tests. The results showed that the reuse of pre-treated MSWI bottom ash and washed soil is possible, either from technical or environmental point of view, while it is not possible for the raw wastes. Then, the natural aggregate was partially and totally replaced with these recycled aggregates for the production of concrete mixtures that were characterized by conventional mechanical and leaching tests. Good results were obtained using the same dosage of a high resistance cement (42.5R calcareous Portland cement instead of 32.5R); the concrete mixture containing 400 kg/m(3) of washed bottom ash and high resistance cement was classified as structural concrete (C25/30 class). Regarding the pollutants leaching, all concrete mixtures respected the limit values according to the Italian regulation. PMID:20537523

  2. Transtracheal wash from a puppy with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew; Olver, Christine; Thrall, Mary Anna

    2006-12-01

    A 4-month-old, intact male Boxer puppy was presented to the Animal Emergency and Critical Care Services of South Florida because of nasal discharge, dehydration, dyspnea, and coughing. The dog had been diagnosed with intestinal parasites and kennel cough approximately 10 days before presentation. Lateral and ventrodorsal radiographs of the thorax revealed an increased bronchointerstitial pattern throughout the lungs. A transtracheal wash was performed. On cytologic examination of direct, Wright-Giemsa-stained smears, small basophilic coccoid structures (0.3-0.9 microm in diameter) were observed in low to moderate numbers within neutrophils and adherent to epithelial cells. The small size of the organisms raised suspicion for Mycoplasma. Culture of the transtracheal wash fluid resulted in growth of a Mycoplasma sp. The patient was treated with enrofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate and made a full recovery. Recognizing Mycoplasma in transtracheal washes could aid in recommending the appropriate culture media or immunologic techniques, which could result in an accurate diagnosis of mycoplasmosis. PMID:17123258

  3. Wash waves generated by high speed displacement ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li-lan; Gao, Gao; Huijsmans, R. H. M.

    2015-10-01

    It is difficult to compute far-field waves in a relative large area by using one wave generation model when a large calculation domain is needed because of large dimensions of the waterway and long distance of the required computing points. Variation of waterway bathymetry and nonlinearity in the far field cannot be included in a ship fixed process either. A coupled method combining a wave generation model and wave propagation model is then used in this paper to simulate the wash waves generated by the passing ship. A NURBS-based higher order panel method is adopted as the stationary wave generation model; a wave spectrum method and Boussinesq-type equation wave model are used as the wave propagation model for the constant water depth condition and variable water depth condition, respectively. The waves calculated by the NURBS-based higher order panel method in the near field are used as the input for the wave spectrum method and the Boussinesq-type equation wave model to obtain the far-field waves. With this approach it is possible to simulate the ship wash waves including the effects of water depth and waterway bathymetry. Parts of the calculated results are validated experimentally, and the agreement is demonstrated. The effects of ship wash waves on the moored ship are discussed by using a diffraction theory method. The results indicate that the prediction of the ship induced waves by coupling models is feasible.

  4. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; McCoy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively. Methods We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. Results There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Conclusion Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing. PMID:26587098

  5. Impact of alternative antimicrobial commercial egg washes on reducing Salmonella contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Table eggs are washed with an alkaline detergent at approximately pH 11 and at a temperature at least 32°C, followed by a chlorine rinse. Both wash temperature and an antimicrobial rinse are required by regulation, but wash pH is not specified. At this pH, little, if any, free chlorine...

  6. 75 FR 35513 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Yakima County, Wash.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Yakima County, Wash... milepost 58.75 near Grandview, in Yakima County, Wash.\\1\\ The line traverses United States Postal Service... to the Central Washington Railroad Company (CWRR). See Central Wash. R.R.-- Lease and...

  7. 9 CFR 590.550 - Washing and sanitizing room or area facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washing and sanitizing room or area... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.550 Washing and sanitizing room or area... properly wash and sanitize all equipment at the rate required by the size of the operation....

  8. 40 CFR 429.110 - Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... washing subcategory. 429.110 Section 429.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Log Washing Subcategory § 429.110 Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory. This subpart applies...

  9. Testing the Effects of Social Norms and Behavioral Privacy on Hand Washing: A Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Maloney, Erin K.; Braz, Mary; Shulman, Hillary C.

    2013-01-01

    A 2-part study examines the influence of normative messages on college males' hand washing perceptions and behaviors. Study 1 tests for the appropriateness of hand washing as a target of social norms campaigns and tests messages designed to change perceived descriptive norms. Results indicated that hand washing behavior is appropriate for health…

  10. 33 CFR 157.114 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.114 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved. If the manuals submitted...

  11. 33 CFR 157.114 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.114 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved. If the manuals submitted...

  12. 33 CFR 157.150 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Recording information after inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Inspections § 157.150 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Recording...

  13. 33 CFR 157.112 - Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved Crude Oil Washing... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.112 Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual. If the manuals submitted under §...

  14. 33 CFR 157.150 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Recording information after inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Inspections § 157.150 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Recording...

  15. 33 CFR 157.112 - Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved Crude Oil Washing... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.112 Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual. If the manuals submitted under §...

  16. SEPARATION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS BY LOW PRESSURE MEMBRANES: TREATMENT OF SOIL-WASH RINSE WATER LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. n the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat he soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were done ...

  17. 16 CFR 1630.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Alternatively the selected sample or oversized specimens thereof may be washed... permanent label containing the following statement: Do Not Wash in Home Machine or Dry Clean—Avoid Rubbing... a shallow pan which has been filled to a depth of 2″ with a wash solution of 1.1 grams of...

  18. 16 CFR 1631.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Alternatively the selected sample or oversized specimens thereof may be washed... permanent label containing the following statement: Do Not Wash in Home Machine or Dry Clean—Avoid Rubbing... a shallow pan which has been filled to a depth of 2” with a wash solution of 1.1 grams of...

  19. 16 CFR 1630.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Alternatively the selected sample or oversized specimens thereof may be washed... permanent label containing the following statement: Do Not Wash in Home Machine or Dry Clean—Avoid Rubbing... a shallow pan which has been filled to a depth of 2″ with a wash solution of 1.1 grams of...

  20. 16 CFR 1631.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Alternatively the selected sample or oversized specimens thereof may be washed... permanent label containing the following statement: Do Not Wash in Home Machine or Dry Clean—Avoid Rubbing... a shallow pan which has been filled to a depth of 2” with a wash solution of 1.1 grams of...

  1. Fostering hand washing before lunch by students attending a special needs young adult program.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which allowed the quality of hand washing to be assessed by comparing the amount visible before and after hand washing using a 3-point scale. Following a baseline period in which hand washing was assessed, participants were exposed to a hand washing training procedure, which improved one participant's hand washing. Next, a lottery system was imposed in which the number of lottery tickets earned each day depended on the quality of hand washing, specifically, on the rating assigned (0, 1, or 2). This condition was associated with improved hand washing by the other four participants. Finally, a condition adding feedback to the lottery system resulted in further improvements in the quality of hand washing for all participants. Follow up data indicated modest maintenance of hand washing after lunch. These results suggest that treatment packages similar to that used in the present study merit further investigation and that Glo Germ is of value in ascertaining the quality of hand washing. PMID:22940163

  2. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  3. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  7. Investigation of the stabilizer elimination during the washing step of charged PLGA microparticles utilizing a novel HPLC-UV-ELSD method.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Markus; Harms, Meike; Hanefeld, Andrea; Mäder, Karsten

    2015-08-01

    Quantification of stabilizer content in microparticles and other products is of great importance for formulation development, drug product quality control as well as for reproducible manufacturing. A fast and sensitive HPLC method with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) capable of detecting docusate sodium (DOSS), poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA; Resomer RG 503 H) and R-1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in a single run was successfully developed. In contrast to previously described methods, hydrolysis of PLGA as pretreatment is not necessary, thereby enabling accurate quantification of stabilizer next to the intact matrix polymer. This method was used to investigate the impact of washing procedures of polymeric microparticles manufactured either with anionic stabilizer DOSS or with cationic stabilizer DOTAP. High amounts of DOSS were detected in the washing water. This finding was consistent with the result that no DOSS could be detected in the washed and dried microparticles (washing water during all washing cycles. However, DOTAP could be quantified in dried particles. The ratio of DOTAP to dry particle mass was approximately 1:10. This is most probably due to the different polymer surfactant interactions (e.g. charge) and the different hydrophilicity of the stabilizers used. PMID:26144665

  8. The calcination process in a system for washing, calcinating, and converting treated municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash into raw material for the cement industry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2011-07-01

    Calcination is the second step in a washing-calcination-conversion system in which treated municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and bottom ash can be reused as raw material in the cement industry and can decompose or stabilize hazardous compounds, reduce residue amounts, and alter residue characteristics. In this research, only fly ash is discussed. Chloride reduction is important if treated fly ash is to be reused in cement; however, the relationship between washed fly ash properties and chloride reduction by calcination is not well understood. This study used washed residues of three types of fly ash-raw fly ash (RFA) from the boiler or economizer of an incineration system, fly ash collected in a bag filter injected with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) for acid removal (CaFA), and fly ash collected in a bag filter injected with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) for acid removal (NaFA)-in calcination experiments with varying temperature (400-1100 degrees C) and atmosphere (100% nitrogen [N2] at 25 mL/min or 10% oxygen [O2] [90% N2] at fluxes of 25, 50, and 75 mL/min). From the perspective of chloride reduction, heating to 1000 degrees C with 1-hr heating time, 1-hr holding time, and an atmosphere of 10% O2/90% N2 was most suitable for calcination. Under these conditions, chloride levels were reduced by 91, 52, and 96% in washed residues of RFA, CaFA, and NaFA, respectively. Among the washed residues, the weight of the washed residue of NaFA decreased the most. PMID:21850828

  9. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    KP Brooks; PR Bredt; GR Golcar; SA Hartley; LK Jagoda; KG Rappe; MW Urie

    2000-06-09

    Approximately 1,400 g of wet Hanford Tank C-104 Sludge was evaluated by Battelle for the high-level waste (HLW) pretreatment processes of ultrafiltration, dilute caustic washing, and elevated-temperature caustic leaching. The filterability of diluted C-104 sludge was measured with a 0.1-{micro}m sintered metal Mott filter using a 24-inch-long, single-element, crossflow filtration system (cells unit filter [CUF]). While the filtrate was being recirculated prior to washing and leaching, a 6.9 wt% solids slurry was evaluated with a matrix of seven 1-hour conditions of varying trans-membrane pressure (30 to 70 psid) and axial velocity (9 to 15 ft/s). The filtrate flux and backpulse efficiency were determined for each condition. The slurry was concentrated to 23 wt% solids, a second matrix of six 1-hour conditions was performed, and data analogous to that recorded in the first matrix were obtained. The low-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.038 to 0.083 gpm/ft{sup 2}. The high-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.0095 to 0.0172 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both cases, the optimum filtrate flux was at the highest axial velocity (15 ft/s) and transmembrane pressure had little effect. Nearly all of the measured filtrate fluxes were more than an order of magnitude greater than the required plant flux for C-104 of 0.00126 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both matrices, the filtrate flux appeared to be proportional to axial velocity, and the permeability appeared to be inversely proportional to the trans-membrane pressure. The first test condition was repeated as the last test condition for each matrix. In both cases, there was a significant decrease in filtrate flux, indicating some filter fouling during the test matrix that could not be removed by backpulsing alone, although the backpulse number and duration were not optimized. Following testing of these two matrices, the material was washed within the CUF by

  10. Physicochemical Quality and Chemical Safety of Chlorine as a Reconditioning Agent and Wash Water Disinfectant for Fresh-Cut Lettuce Washing

    PubMed Central

    Van Haute, Sam; Holvoet, Kevin; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine was assessed as a reconditioning agent and wash water disinfectant in the fresh-cut produce industry. Artificial fresh-cut lettuce wash water, made from butterhead lettuce, was used for the experiments. In the reconditioning experiments, chlorine was added to artificial wash water inoculated with Escherichia coli O157 (6 log CFU/ml). Regression models were constructed based on the inactivation data and validated in actual wash water from leafy vegetable processing companies. The model that incorporated chlorine dose and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the wash water accurately predicted inactivation. Listeria monocytogenes was more resistant to chlorine reconditioning in artificial wash water than Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157. During the washing process with inoculated lettuce (4 log CFU/g), in the absence of chlorine, there was a rapid microbial buildup in the water that accumulated to 5.4 ± 0.4 log CFU/100 ml after 1 h. When maintaining a residual concentration of 1 mg/liter free chlorine, wash water contamination was maintained below 2.7, 2.5, and 2.5 log CFU/100 ml for tap water and artificial process water with COD values of 500 and 1,000 mg O2/liter, respectively. A model was developed to predict water contamination during the dynamic washing process. Only minor amounts of total trihalomethanes were formed in the water during reconditioning. Total trihalomethanes accumulated to larger amounts in the water during the wash water disinfection experiments and reached 124.5 ± 13.4 μg/liter after 1 h of execution of the washing process in water with a COD of 1,000 mg O2/liter. However, no total trihalomethanes were found on the fresh-cut lettuce after rinsing. PMID:23396332

  11. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  12. Development of an improved bone washing and demineralisation process to produce large demineralised human cancellous bone sponges.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Mark J; Rooney, Paul; Kearney, John N

    2015-12-01

    Shaped demineralised bone matrices (DBM) made from cancellous bone have important uses in orthopaedic and dental procedures, where the properties of the material allow its insertion into confined defects, therefore acting as a void filler and scaffold onto which new bone can form. The sponges are often small in size, <1.0 cm(3). In this study, we report on an improved bone washing and demineralisation process that allows production of larger DBM sponges (3.375 or 8.0 cm(3)) from deceased donor bone. These sponges were taken through a series of warm water washes, some with sonication, centrifugation, 100 % ethanol and two decontamination chemical washes and optimally demineralised using 0.5 N hydrochloric acid under vacuum. Demineralisation was confirmed by quantitative measurement of calcium and qualitatively by compression. Protein and DNA removal was also determined. The DBM sponges were freeze dried before terminal sterilisation with a target dose of 25 kGy gamma irradiation whilst frozen. Samples of the sponges were examined histologically for calcium, collagen and the presence of cells. The data indicated lack of cells, absence of bone marrow and a maximum of 1.5 % residual calcium. PMID:25736401

  13. Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.

    DOEpatents

    Ponnampalam; Elankovan

    2001-09-04

    Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

  14. Fracture coatings in Topopah Spring Tuff along drill hole wash

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, B.A.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture-lining minerals are being studied as part of site characterization to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential high level nuclear waste repository. Fracture coatings in the Paintbrush Group provide information on potential flow paths above the water table both toward and away from the potential repository and provide information on the distribution of fracture-lining minerals needed to model thermal effects of waste emplacement. Fracture coatings within the predominantly non-zeolitic Paintbrush Group vary both with depth and laterally across Yucca Mountain, whereas fracture coatings in tuffs below the Paintbrush Group are related to the mineralogy of the tuffs and follow a consistent pattern of distribution with predominantly quartz, calcite, and manganese oxides in the devitrified intervals and mordenite and clinoptilolite in the zeolitic intervals. The zeolites stellerite and heulandite are more abundant in fractures in the Topopah Spring Tuff in drill holes USW G-1 and UE-25 a{number_sign}l, located along Drill Hole Wash (at the northern end of Yucca Mountain) than in core from other parts of Yucca Mountain. Buesch et al. (2) present evidence for a complex fault system along Drill Hole Wash. To investigate the possibility that the abundant fracture-lining zeolites in USW G-1 and UE-25 a{number_sign} 1 are related to the Drill Hole Wash fault, the Topopah Spring Tuff was examined in drill cores from USW UZ-14, USW G-1, USW NRG-7/7a, and UE-25 a{number_sign}l.

  15. Petrology of Aztec Wash pluton, Eldorado Mountains, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Falkner, C.M.; Miller, C.F. ); Wooden, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Aztec Wash pluton, a 50 km[sup 2] intrusive complex in the northern Eldorado Mountains, was emplaced ca. 16 Ma (Faulds et al., 1990) during extension within the Colorado River Corridor. The pluton displays extreme compositional variability, ranging from olivine gabbro (ca. 50 wt% SiO[sub 2]) to highly evolved aplite (76% SiO[sub 2]). Most of the intrusion is medium grained, homogeneous granite (ca. 72% SiO[sub 2]), but 1/3 is highly heterogeneous and dominated by mafic to intermediate rocks; a 6 [times] 3km, N-S mafic zone almost bisects the pluton. Well-displayed magma mingling and late mafic and felsic dikes verify the coexistence of mafic and felsic melts. Hornblende barometry indicates that the entire exposed portion of Aztec Wash pluton was emplaced at very shallow depth (Wash pluton: felsic magma intruded shallow levels of crust; the base of the magma chamber was intruded by basalt; after the upper portion of the initial magma was largely crystallized, basalt ascended into, perhaps remobilized, and mingled with felsic magma; this ascent may have been facilitated by E-W extension of the crystallizing pluton; more discrete syn- to post-pluton, mafic to felsic dikes mark additional intrusive pulses triggered by basalt intrusion and extensional fracturing. Field relations suggest that the mingling led to mixing in both the main units and the late dikes, but geochemical data indicate that mixing, if it occurred, was not a simple 2-end member process.

  16. Development of a preprototype hyperfiltration wash water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The use of hyperfiltration as a mode of reclamation of waste water on board an extended mission spacecraft was investigated. Two basic approaches are considered with respect to hyperfiltration of wash water recovery. The initial approach involves the use of a hollow fiber permeator and a tubular module, operating at ambient temperature. In this system, relatively large doses of biocides are used to control microbial activity. Since biocides require a long contact time, and many have adverse dematological effects as well as many interact with membrane material, a second approach is considered which involves operating at pasturization temperature.

  17. Geomorphology of Upper Palm Wash, Anza Borrego Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.O.; Hansen, C.L.

    1988-05-01

    The Anza Borrego Desert has many geomorphic features to attract the attention of earth scientists. Deep, narrow stream channels, cut into Tertiary sedimentary rocks exposed west of the Salton Sea, have reaches that are almost devoid of alluvium and therefore are unprotected from the erosive work of running water. The usually dry, relatively small channels provide a microcosm in which to study desert landforms and processes associated with stream erosion and canyon formation. The processes and characteristics associated with these channels in Palm Wash are described in this article. 7 references.

  18. Exploratory tests of washing radioactive sludge samples from the Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Botts, J.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    Exploratory tests were initiated to wash radioactive sludge samples from the waste storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose was to provide preliminary information about (1) the anions in the sludge phase that are soluble in water or dilute acid (e.g., the anions in the interstitial liquid) and (2) the solubilities of sludge constituents in water under process conditions. The experiments were terminated before completion due to changing priorities by the Department of Energy (DOE). This memorandum was prepared primarily for documentation purposes and presents the incomplete data. 3 refs., 13 tabs.

  19. Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing for controlling ambient TSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Min; Chou, Chih-Mei; Su, Kuo-Tung; Tseng, Chao-Heng

    Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing (S/W) for controlling ambient "total suspended particles (TSP)" was evaluated by TSP measurements and determining silt load from active traffic streets. A modified regenerative-air vacuum sweeper (RAVS) and a washer were used in this study. The sweeper made a pass followed by the washer. The S/W efficiencies (η,η) were obtained based on the experimental data of silt loading and TSP. It was found that the direct impact of sweeping on ambient TSP emissions was short-lived lasting no more than 3-4 h. When a vacuum sweeper and a washer, respectively, did a good job collecting or cleaning the visible fine particles on roads, the method of S/W tested in this work was effective at removing the sources of the road dust particles. This paper concludes that street sweeping followed by washing was found to offer a measurable reduction in TSP emission potentials. Typically, the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP is up to 30%. Finally, correlated with η (based on silt loading), a useful equation is proposed to estimate the S/W efficiency, η (based on TSP) with a standard error of ±20%. It seems feasible to predict the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP controlled by the regenerative-air vacuum sweeper and washer used in this work for engineering applications. Effects of traffic volume and wind velocity on the S/W efficiencies are also discussed in the paper.

  20. Washing with contaminated bar soap is unlikely to transfer bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, J. E.; Yackovich, F.

    1988-01-01

    Recent reports of the isolation of microorganisms from used soap bars have raised the concern that bacteria may be transferred from contaminated soap bars during handwashing. Since only one study addressing this question has been published, we developed an additional procedure to test this concern. In our new method prewashed and softened commercial deodorant soap bars (0.8% triclocarban) not active against Gram-negative bacteria were inoculated with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to give mean total survival levels of 4.4 X 10(5) c.f.u. per bar which was 70-fold higher than those reported on used soap bars. Sixteen panelists were instructed to wash with the inoculated bars using their normal handwashing procedure. After washing, none of the 16 panelists had detectable levels of either test bacterium on their hands. Thus, the results obtained using our new method were in complete agreement with those obtained with the previously published method even though the two methods differ in a number of procedural aspects. These findings, along with other published reports, show that little hazard exists in routine handwashing with previously used soap bars and support the frequent use of soap and water for handwashing to prevent the spread of disease. PMID:3402545

  1. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  2. Washing with contaminated bar soap is unlikely to transfer bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heinze, J E; Yackovich, F

    1988-08-01

    Recent reports of the isolation of microorganisms from used soap bars have raised the concern that bacteria may be transferred from contaminated soap bars during handwashing. Since only one study addressing this question has been published, we developed an additional procedure to test this concern. In our new method prewashed and softened commercial deodorant soap bars (0.8% triclocarban) not active against Gram-negative bacteria were inoculated with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to give mean total survival levels of 4.4 X 10(5) c.f.u. per bar which was 70-fold higher than those reported on used soap bars. Sixteen panelists were instructed to wash with the inoculated bars using their normal handwashing procedure. After washing, none of the 16 panelists had detectable levels of either test bacterium on their hands. Thus, the results obtained using our new method were in complete agreement with those obtained with the previously published method even though the two methods differ in a number of procedural aspects. These findings, along with other published reports, show that little hazard exists in routine handwashing with previously used soap bars and support the frequent use of soap and water for handwashing to prevent the spread of disease. PMID:3402545

  3. Modeling of the effect of washing solution flow conditions on Escherichia coli O157:H7 population reduction on fruit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liang, Wei; Feng, Hao; Luo, Yaguang

    2007-11-01

    Washing produce with sanitizing solutions is an important step in reducing microbial populations during postharvest handling. Little information exists regarding the effects of washing solution flow conditions on the efficacy of pathogen reduction during washing. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of washing conditions such as flow velocity, agitation rate, and contact time on the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations from the surfaces of cantaloupe rind and cut apples. Top surfaces of cylindrical samples were spot inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and treated with peroxyacetic acid (POAA; 80 mg/liter) solution under different flow velocities and agitation rates and with different washing modes. Test results indicate that the reduction rate of E. coli O157:H7 increased with the increase in flow velocity and agitation rate under the testing conditions. In a 3-min treatment in the flow-through chamber, the E. coli O157:H7 count reduction on cantaloupe rind and cup apples reached 2.5 and 2.3 log CFU/cm2, respectively, when the flow velocity increased from 0.0 to 0.8 m/min. Agitation conducted at the bottom of the treatment chamber reduced the E. coli O157:H7 population on cut apples by 1.2 log CFU/cm2 in 3 min, whereas in the treatment with the agitation over the top of the chamber, the survival count of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by only 0.8 log CFU/cm2. The experimental data were used to fit four microbial reduction kinetic models. It was found that E. coli O157:H7 reduction from the fruit surfaces was best described by the Weibull model. These findings may be useful in designing produce wash systems for achieving enhanced pathogen reduction and improved produce quality and safety. PMID:18044431

  4. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aman; Singh, Vijay Pratap

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most important steps is accurate impression making for fabrication of fixed partial denture. The two different putty-wash techniques that are commonly used are: (1) Putty-wash one-step technique, (2) putty-wash two-step technique. A uniform wash space is needed for an accurate impression. Nissan et al recommended the use of two-step technique for accurate impression making as there is uniform wash space for the light body material to polymerize. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts obtained from different putty-wash impression techniques using various spacer thickness. The critical factor that influences the accuracy of putty-wash impression techniques is the controlled wash bulk which is absent in one-step putty-wash impression technique and with polyethylene spacer was used. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Arora A, Singh VP. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):33-38. PMID:25206132

  5. WASH has a critical role in NK cell cytotoxicity through Lck-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Zhu, P; Xia, P; Fan, Z

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effector cells of the innate immune system to kill certain virus-infected and transformed cells. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) and SCAR homolog (WASH) has been identified as a member of WASP family proteins implicated in regulating the cytoskeletal reorganization, yet little is known about its function in lymphocytes. Here we demonstrate that WASH is crucial for NK cell cytotoxicity. WASH was found to colocalize with lytic granules upon NK cell activation. Knockdown of WASH expression substantially inhibited polarization and release of lytic granules to the immune synapse, resulting in the impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity. More importantly, our data also define a previously unappreciated mechanism for WASH function, in which Src family kinase Lck can interact with WASH and induce WASH phosphorylation. Mutation of tyrosine residue Y141, identified here as the major site of WASH phosphorylation, partially blocked WASH tyrosine phosphorylation and NK cell cytotoxicity. Taken together, these observations suggest that WASH has a pivotal role for regulation of NK cell cytotoxicity through Lck-mediated Y141 tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:27441653

  6. Hand washing and adolescents. A study from seven schools in Konya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, S Songül; Yalçin, Suzan; Altin, Saliha

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate how and when adolescent students washed their hands and to detect the conditions that affect hand washing in schools. Seven schools were selected in Konya, Turkey. A questionnaire assessing the answers of 'how long', 'when' (frequency of hand-washing in six conditions with a Likert scale; after toilet, before eating, after eating, entering the home, cleaning a room, when sneezed or coughed), 'how' (hand-washing techniques) and 'why' was given to students. According to self report, person who washed his hands more than or equal to 20 sec and had adequate washing techniques (with soap and water) and had washing frequency score more than 20 was defined as having 'proper basic handwash'. Of a total of 1074 students, 1021 responded. According to self reported behaviours and attitudes, soap and water were used in 99.2% of hand washes, and an alcohol preparation was used in 0.2% of cases and wet paper was used in the remaining 0.6% in the schools. The average duration of soap and water washes was 41.8 +/- 39.1 sec. Overall, 42.4% of adolescents had a proper basic handwash. In multivariate analysis female sex, living at home, high knowledge level and urban school were associated with high proper basic handwash. In addition to this, the presence of some complaints about toilets in school affected proper basic hand wash in univariate analysis. Contrary to what had been expected, a factor such as type of school (health trade school) was not found to be associated with high proper basic handwash in both multivariate and univariate analysis. As a result, adolescents have limited knowledge about indications of hand-washing and some problems adversely influenced hand-washing. To increase compliance, problems should be solved and lessons about hand-washing and communicable disease should be given. PMID:15712974

  7. Wash durability and optimal drying regimen of four brands of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets after repeated washing under tropical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The current study was undertaken to determine the optimal wash-drying regimen and the effects of different washing procedures on the efficacy, and durability of four brands of newly introduced long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) under tropical conditions. Methods In the current study, the following four LLINs were tested: Olyset®, PermaNet ®2.0, BASF® and TNT®. Nets were divided into three sets; one set was washed by hand rubbing and air-dried either hanging or spread on the ground in direct sunlight or hanging or spread on the ground under the shade. A second set was washed using the WHO protocol (machine) and the third set was washed by beating the nets on rocks. The biological activities of the nets were assessed by a three-minute bioassay cone test and the residual insecticide contents were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure. Results Nets that were dried hanging under the shade retained more insecticide, 62.5% and recorded higher mortality compared to nets which were dried lying on the ground in direct sunlight 58.8%, nets dried under the shade spread on the ground 56.3%, and 57.8% for nets dried hanging in direct sunlight. It was also observed that nets washed by the standard WHO protocol, retained more insecticide and were more effective in killing mosquitoes compared to nets washed by local methods of hand rubbing and beating on rocks. There were significant differences between drying regimens (p < 0.0001) and between washing procedures (p < 0.001) respectively. However, the effect of net type was statistically insignificant. The statistical differences on individual nets were also compared, for PermaNet® and TNT there were no significant differences observed between the four drying regimens (p = 0.7944 and 0.4703) respectively). For BASF and Olyset, the differences were significant (p < 0.001 and p > 0.0001). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that washing and drying regimen influence

  8. Changes in soil toxicity by phosphate-aided soil washing: effect of soil characteristics, chemical forms of arsenic, and cations in washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Jho, Eun Hea; Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-01-01

    This study was set to investigate the changes in the toxicity of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils after washing with phosphate solutions. The soil samples collected from two locations (A: rice paddy and B: forest land) of a former smelter site were contaminated with a similar level of As. Soil washing (0.5 M phosphate solution for 2 h) removed 24.5% As, on average, in soil from both locations. Regardless of soil washing, Location A soil toxicities, determined using Microtox, were greater than that of Location B and this could be largely attributed to different soil particle size distribution. With soils from both locations, the changes in As chemical forms resulted in either similar or greater toxicities after washing. This emphasizes the importance of considering ecotoxicological aspects, which are likely to differ depending on soil particle size distribution and changes in As chemical forms, in addition to the total concentration based remedial goals, in producing ecotoxicologically-sound soils for reuse. In addition, calcium phosphate used as the washing solution seemed to contribute more on the toxic effects of the washed soils than potassium phosphate and ammonium phosphate. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to use potassium or ammonium phosphate than calcium phosphate for phosphate-aided soil washing of the As-contaminated soils. PMID:25482580

  9. Effect of a school-based hand washing promotion program on knowledge and hand washing behavior of girl students in a middle school of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ankur; Taneja, Davendra Kumar; Badhan, Suresh Kumar; Ingle, Gopal Krishan

    2013-01-01

    The intervention study was conducted in a school of New Delhi to assess the effect of a school based hand-washing promotion program on knowledge and hand-washing behavior among school children and extent of information sharing with parents. Intervention was carried out on randomly selected 300 students (100 each from 6th class to 8th class) with 281 students being part of the final analysis. Tools of the study were hand-washing questionnaire and household survey performa; essay, poster, slogan writing competition; classroom interactions. Data were analyzed in the SPSS 16.0 software and Mcnemar test and Student paired t-test were used. After the program, 95% felt that hand should be washed frequently. Overall, there was a significant improvement in the knowledge regarding hand-washing and frequency of hand-washing practices after the intervention. 42% children shared this information with their parents. The intervention proved effective in improving awareness and highlights the potential of school for hand-washing promotion activities. PMID:23873200

  10. Study of phase transformation and microstructure of alcohol washed titania nanoparticles for thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Gaganjot; Bimbraw, Keshav; Uniyal, Poonam

    2015-08-28

    Nanostructured titania have been successfully synthesized by hydrolysis of alkoxide at calcination temperatures 500 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C. As the calcination temperature increases, alcohol washed samples show lesser rutile content as compared to water washed samples. Morphology and Particle sizes was determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), while thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) was used to determine thermal stability. Alcohol washed samples undergo 30% weight loss whereas 16% in water washed samples was observed. The mean particle sizes were found to be increase from 37 nm to 100.9 nm and 35.3 nm to 55.2 nm for water and alcohol washed samples respectively. Hydrolysis of alkoxide was shown to be an effective means to prepare thermally stable titania by using alcohol washed samples as a precursor.

  11. Effects of egg washing and storage temperature on the quality of eggshell cuticle and eggs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chi; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Wu, Ying-Chen; Lee, Yi-Chain; Tan, Fa-Jui

    2016-11-15

    This study investigated the quality of washed and unwashed eggs stored at 7°C (WC and UC for washed and unwashed eggs, respectively) and 25°C (WR and UR for washed and unwashed eggs, respectively) for 4weeks. The results show that the Haugh unit, albumin pH, thick albumin ratio, yolk index, air cell size, and S-ovalbumin content of UC were significantly the most superior, followed by those of WC, WR, and UR, in that order. Scanning electron microscopy and cuticle staining confirmed the damages and decreased cuticle coverage caused by washing and extended storage. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that cuticle composition changed significantly after washing and storage (P<0.05). High correlations were observed between the quality parameters evaluated. In conclusion, storage temperature critically influenced egg quality, and egg washing reduced cuticle coverage. PMID:27283684

  12. The Effects of Chemical Wash Additives on the Corrosion of Aerospace Alloys in Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Joseph; Hodge, Tim; Barile, Ronald; Heidersbach, Robert; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for comparing the relative effectiveness of four chemical products used for rinsing airplanes and helicopters. The products were applied on a weekly basis to a series of flat alloy panels exposed to an oceanfront marine environment for one year. The results are presented along with comparisons of exposures of the same alloys that were not washed, were washed with seawater, or washed with de-ionized water.

  13. Superstorm Sandy marine debris wash-ups on Long Island - What happened to them?

    PubMed

    Swanson, R Lawrence; Lwiza, Kamazima; Willig, Kaitlin; Morris, Kaitlin

    2016-07-15

    Superstorm Sandy generated huge quantities of debris in the Long Island, NY coastal zone. However, little appears to have been washed offshore to eventually be returned to Long Island's beaches as marine debris wash-ups. Information for our analysis includes debris collection statistics, very high resolution satellite images, along with wind and sea level data. Rigorous debris collection efforts along with meteorological conditions following the storm appear to have reduced the likelihood of debris wash-ups. PMID:27158045

  14. Quantifying the effect of hand wash duration, soap use, ground beef debris, and drying methods on the removal of Enterobacter aerogenes on hands.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane A; Danyluk, Michelle D; Harris, Linda J; Schaffner, Donald W

    2015-04-01

    Hand washing is recognized as a crucial step in preventing foodborne disease transmission by mitigating crosscontamination among hands, surfaces, and foods. This research was undertaken to establish the importance of several keys factors (soap, soil, time, and drying method) in reducing microorganisms during hand washing. A nonpathogenic nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes surrogate for Salmonella was used to assess the efficacy of using soap or no soap for 5 or 20 s on hands with or without ground beef debris and drying with paper towel or air. Each experiment consisted of 20 replicates, each from a different individual with ∼ 6 log CFU/ml E. aerogenes on their hands. A reduction of 1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.7 ± 0.8 log CFU of E. aerogenes was observed for a 5-s wash with no soap and a 20-s wash with soap, respectively. When there was no debris on the hands, there was no significant difference between washing with and without soap for 20 s (P > 0.05). Likewise, there was no significant difference in the reductions achieved when washing without soap, whether or not debris was on the hands (P > 0.05). A significantly greater reduction (P < 0.05) in E. aerogenes (0.5 log CFU greater reduction) was observed with soap when there was ground beef debris on the hands. The greatest difference (1.1 log CFU greater average reduction) in effectiveness occurred when ground beef debris was on the hands and a 20-s wash with water was compared with a 20-s wash with soap. Significantly greater (P < 0.05) reductions were observed with paper towel drying compared with air (0.5 log CFU greater reductions). Used paper towels may contain high bacterial levels (>4.0 log CFU per towel) when hands are highly contaminated. Our results support future quantitative microbial risk assessments needed to effectively manage risks of foodborne illness in which food workers' hands are a primary cause. PMID:25836392

  15. Effects of sheep fleece washings on the germination and growth of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B; Luke, B; Wall, R; Taylor, M; Moore, D

    2009-02-01

    The development of biopesticides against ectoparasites must take into account the effect that an animal host's secretions and host associated micro-organisms may have on the viability of the applied agent. In this study, the effects of secretions washed from the pelt of sheep on the viability and growth of the fungal pathogen Beauveria bassiana, were assessed. The fungal isolate had been obtained from the parasitic sheep scab mite Psoroptes ovis. It was added to 0.05% Tween 80 in which sheep fleece had been washed up to six times, to ascertain whether successive washings had any effect on the viability of conidia over 6 days. The effects of sterile and non-sterile washings on viability and growth were also investigated. Results indicated that substances in the sheep fleece may cause a significant reduction in the viability of conidia. Viability was linked to the number of times the sheep pelt had been washed in the Tween, with conidia incubated in the first wash from the sheep pelt showing a significantly greater decrease in viability compared to those incubated in the sixth wash. Viability was not linked to the sterility of the washes, although there was a significant difference between length of germ tube growth from viable conidia in sterile and non-sterile washings. PMID:19041656

  16. Metal distribution and spectroscopic analysis after soil washing with chelating agents and humic substances.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Hartley, Neil R

    2014-03-01

    Biodegradable chelating agents ([S,S]-ethylenediamine-N,N-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and glutamic-N,N-diacetic acid (GLDA)) and natural humic substances (lignite-derived, standard, and commercially available humic acids) are potentially useful for enhancing soil remediation of timber treatment sites. This study integrated macroscopic and spectroscopic analyses to assess their influence on the distribution and chemical speciation of the remaining metals as well as their interaction with the soil surface after 48-h washing of a field-contaminated soil. The results demonstrated that EDDS and GLDA were an appealing alternative to non-biodegradable ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid, but the three humic substances were less effective. As shown by sequential extractions, Cu was primarily extracted from the carbonate fraction while Cr and As extraction resulted from (co-)dissolution of the oxide fraction. As a result, the relative proportion of strongly bound organic matter and residual fractions increased by 7-16 %. However, it was noteworthy that the exchangeable fraction also increased by 5-11 %, signifying that a portion of the remaining metals was destabilized by chelating agents and transformed to be more labile in the treated soil. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra confirmed the substantial removal of readily accessible Cu from the soil surface, but Cr maintained its original chemical forms of trivalent chromium oxides and iron-chromium coprecipitates, whereas As remained as arsenic trioxide/pentoxide and copper arsenate precipitates. On the other hand, the absence of characteristic peaks of adsorbed carboxylate groups in the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra inferred that the extent of adsorption of chelating agents and humic substances on the bulk soil was insufficient to be characterized by FTIR analysis. These results suggested that attention should be paid to the exchangeable fraction of Cu and oxides/coprecipitates of As prior to possible on

  17. Microbial decolorization and bioremediation of melanoidin containing molasses spent wash.

    PubMed

    Singh, K D; Sharma, S; Dwivedi, A; Pandey, P; Thakur, R L; Kumar, V

    2007-07-01

    Molasses spent wash from cane-molasses based distilleries contains a brown coloured recalcitrantpolymer melanoidin, which if disposed untreated poses a great threat to environment. Microbial decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction was found to be dependent on specific carbon and nitrogen source. Under optimal condition of pH, carbon and nitrogen concentration for each treatment, it was found that Bacillus sp isolated from soil was capable of removing COD (85. 35%) and colour (81.10%) from distillery waste to the maximum extent after 9 days atpH 7 in the medium containing 0.5% peptone, 2% glucose and 10% (v/v), followed by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and lowest reduction was obtained by using native microbial consortium. PMID:18380094

  18. 1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is the Hotel Williams. Next to it is the Williams House (Williams Hotel Annex), HABS No. MI-258 A. Below them are the log cabins built by the American Fur Company (from left to right): Log Building No. 1 (MI-258 C), Log Building No. 2 (MI-258 D), Log Building No. 3 (not documented), Log Building No. 4 (MI-258 E), and Log Building No. 5 (MI-258 F). (Williams Log House, MI-258 B, and Log Building No. 8, MI-258 G, are not shown). The drawing is in the collection of the Michigan Historical Commission. Although it does not have a date, it was painted in the early 20th century after the main building was constructed. - Hotel Williams, Murray Bay, Munising, Alger County, MI

  19. Wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an analytical study and assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft is presented. All non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes, and subsystems currently under development by NASA are considered. Included among these are: filtration, ultrafiltration, carbon adsorption, ion exchange, chemical pretreatment, reverse osmosis, hyperfiltration, and certain urea removal techniques. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. In the final assessment, a simple multifiltration approach consisting of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins receives the highest rating for six-man orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  20. Diphtheria on Skid Road, Seattle, Wash., 1972-75.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, A H; Spearman, J; Tronca, E; Bader, M; Harnisch, J

    1977-01-01

    From July 1972 to December 1975, an unusual outbreak of diphtheria in Seattle, Wash., resulted in a total of 558 cases and carriers, mostly among heavy alcohol users. Skin infections were predominant. Four white men died. The highest attack rate was among native American Indians. Environmental contamination and poor personal hygience were believed to be important in continuation of the epidemic, but could not be proved. Control measures included casefinding, isolation and quarantine, sanitizing dwelling units and mass immunization with Td toxoid. The high-risk geographic area was the city's Skid Road. This area continues to be the reservoir of continuing infection, but not all population subgroups there have been at equal risk. Spread to other geographic areas of the city and county has been minimal and remains under control. PMID:877208

  1. Characterization of a Washed 241-C-106 Sludge Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2001-05-15

    An Envelope D Tank 241-C-106 sample was characterized for solids, elemental, and radioactive isotope content. The work was done by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to support the Hanford River Protection Project (RPP). The sludge from Hanford Tank 241-C-106 is high level waste that is to be included in the first ten years of processing by the RPP Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The sample was a composite of caustic-leached and washed sludge from previous work at the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL). Sludge analysis results were found to compare well with those of previous researchers analyzing leached samples from Tank 241-C-106. Composition of the liquid accompanying the sample was also measured.

  2. Tests of disinfection by heat in a bedpan washing machine.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, G A; Collins, B J; Deverill, C E

    1974-09-01

    Tests of effectiveness of disinfection of metal and polypropylene bedpans were made in a washer fitted with a steam generator. Broth cultures of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, or Streptococcus faecalis (approximately 4 x 10(8) organisms) were sealed in lengths of capillary tubing and attached to the surface of the pans. In other tests, pans were contaminated with an artificial soil containing Str. faecalis (10(8) organisms/ml). In both series of tests, counts of surviving organisms were made at the end of the washing and disinfection cycle. The tests using capillary tubes showed that the Gram-negative bacilli were effectively killed, but not necessarily Gram-positive cocci. However, when incorporated in standard soil, Str. faecalis was killed or removed during the cycle. The results indicate that the disinfection process was effective for metal bedpans, but less so for polypropylene. Possible disadvantages and modification of the machine are suggested. PMID:4214841

  3. Corrosion of radioactive waste tanks containing washed sludge and precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F.; Congdon, J.W.; Oblath, S.B.

    1988-05-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant, the corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline, high-level radioactive waste is controlled by specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Laboratory tests, conducted to determine minimum corrosion inhibitor levels, indicated pitting of carbon steel near the waterline for proposed storage conditions. In situ electrochemical measurements of full-scale radioactive process demonstrations were conducted to assess the validity of laboratory tests. The in situ results are compared to those of laboratory tests, with particular regard given to simulated solution composition. Transition metal hydroxide sludge contains strong passivating species for carbon steel. Washed precipitate contains organic species that lower solution pH and tend to reduce passivating films, requiring higher inhibitor concentrations than the 0.01 M nitrite required for reactor fuel reprocessing wastes.

  4. Washing of cut persimmon with thyme or lemon essential oils.

    PubMed

    Almela, Celia; Castelló, María L; Tarrazó, José; Ortolá, María D

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a minimally processed persimmon product by applying different concentrations of thyme essential oil or lemon essential oil on the product in order to increase its shelf life. Essential oils were applied on cut persimmon in a preliminary stage of immersion, and the samples were then stored at 4 ℃ for seven days. Moisture content, soluble solids content, antioxidant capacity, total phenols, pH, optical and mechanical properties and microbiology counts were periodically analysed. Noteworthy was that the application of thyme essential oil in the washing stage improved the preservation of the fruits' colour. All samples would be considered safe according to microbiology requirements and based on the period of study, regardless of the type of essential oil applied. PMID:23897978

  5. The characterization of biodiesel wash water and the potential for microbial remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamers, Anton

    Biodiesel is a fuel produced from vegetable oils or other lipids that can be substituted for petroleum diesel in many internal combustion engines. Substitution of biodiesel for petroleum diesel has the potential to reduce green house gas emissions, decrease dependence on fossil fuels, add value to agriculture products and localize energy production. The production of biodiesel is a straight forward process and the scale of production varies from backyard brewers producing twenty litres at a time, to large industrial operations which produce thousands of litres. Biodiesel production in Ontario will see a great expansion in the next few years. Amendments to the Clean Air Act in 2006 incorporate a mandate that 2 % renewable content be blended into all diesel fuel by 2012. Since biodiesel is the primary fuel blended with petroleum diesel, the production of biodiesel in Canada will need to increase approximately five-fold from today's capacity. Raw biodiesel must be refined and one of the most common approaches is water washing, in which clean water is passed through the biodiesel. Water is an excellent medium for neutralizing residual catalyst, as well as removing residual methanol and glycerol. However, the resulting biodiesel wash water (BWW) is high in organics and cannot be disposed of in municipal waste streams. Biodiesel wash water from several laboratory and industrial biodiesel production facilities was characterized. The lab produced BWW chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were 150,000 +/- 20,000 mg/L and total solids content averaged 11,170 +/- 600 mg/L of which the majority was total dissolved solids. Soap content averaged 7,900 +/- 800 mg/L and a high pH near 10 was commonly seen. The industrial samples had higher levels of COD (754,200 +/- 162,600 mg/L) and solids (328,900 +/- 24,300 mg/L again mostly containing dissolved solids). Soap content was typically 778,100 +/- 306,500 mg/L, and pH ranged from very alkaline (10 +/- 0.4) to very acidic (1.1 +/- 0

  6. Is the wash-off process of road-deposited sediment source limited or transport limited?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Chen, Xuefei; Hao, Shaonan; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Jiang; Zou, Changliang; Xie, Wenxia

    2016-09-01

    An in-depth understanding of the road-deposited sediments (RDS) wash-off process is essential to estimation of urban surface runoff pollution load and to designing methods to minimize the adverse impacts on the receiving waters. There are two debatable RDS wash-off views: source limited and transport limited. The RDS build-up and wash-off process was characterized to explore what determines the wash-off process to be source limited or transport limited based on twelve RDS sampling activities on an urban road in Beijing. The results showed that two natural rain events (2.0mm and 23.2mm) reduced the total RDS mass by 30%-40%, and that finer particles (<105μm) contributed 60%-80% of the wash-off load. Both single- and multi-rain events caused the RDS particle grain size to become coarser, while dry days made the RDS particle grain size finer. These findings indicated that the bulk RDS particles wash-off tends to be transport limited, but that finer particles tend to be source limited. To further explore and confirm the results of the field experiment, a total of 40 simulated rain events were designed to observe the RDS wash-off with different particle size fractions. The finer particles have a higher wash-off percentage (Fw) than the coarser particles, and the Fw values provide a good view to characterize the wash-off process. The key conclusions drawn from the combined field and simulated experiments data are: (i) Finer and coarser particle wash-off processes tend to be source limited and transport limited, respectively. (ii) The source and transport limited processes occur during the initial period (the first flush) and later periods, respectively. (iii) The smaller and larger rain events tend to be transport limited and source limited, respectively. Overall, the wash-off process is generally a combination of source and transport limited processes. PMID:27135567

  7. Environmental assessment on a soil washing process of a Pb-contaminated shooting range site: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Hwang, Bo-Ram; Moon, Deok-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Seok; Baek, Kitae

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an environmental assessment on a soil washing process for the remediation of a Pb-contaminated shooting range site was conducted, using a green and sustainable remediation tool, i.e., SiteWise ver. 2, based on data relating specifically to the actual remediation project. The entire soil washing process was classified into four major stages, consisting of soil excavation (stage I), physical separation (stage II), acid-based (0.2 N HCl) chemical extraction (stage III), and wastewater treatment (stage IV). Environmental footprints, including greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy consumption, water consumption, and critical air pollutant productions such as PM10, NO x , and SO x , were calculated, and the relative contribution of each stage was analyzed in the environmental assessment. In stage I, the relative contribution of the PM10 emissions was 55.3 % because the soil excavation emitted the fine particles. In stage II, the relative contribution of NO x and SO x emissions was 42.5 and 52.5 %, respectively, which resulted from electricity consumption for the operation of the separator. Stage III was the main contributing factor to 63.1 % of the GHG emissions, 67.5 % of total energy used, and 37.4 % of water consumptions. The relatively high contribution of stage III comes from use of consumable chemicals such as HCl and water-based extraction processes. In stage IV, the relative contributions of GHG emissions, total energy used, and NO x and SO x emissions were 23.2, 19.4, 19.5, and 25.3 %, respectively, which were caused by chemical and electricity demands for system operation. In conclusion, consumable chemicals such as HCl and NaOH, electric energy consumption for system operation, and equipment use for soil excavation were determined to be the major sources of environmental pollution to occur during the soil washing process. Especially, the acid-based chemical extraction process should be avoided in order to improve the sustainability of soil

  8. Determining the sulfuric acid fog concentration in coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zin'kovskaya, S.I.; Okhrimenko, E.L.; Sobko, L.V.

    1982-11-06

    A volumetric method for the analysis of sulfuric acid aerosols at levels of acid greater (25-40 g/m/sup 3/) than those (1 g/m/sup 3/) analyzable by current methods is described. Coke oven gas after acid scrubbing and electrofiltration is passed through a Schott filter (pressure drop 100 mm Hg), the sulfuric acid aerosol being condensed on the filter which is washed with water and the washings filtered with NaOH (0.01 N after electrofilter, 1.0 N after the acid towers) to methyl orange end point. The error is +/- 2%.

  9. Tolerance and Safety of Different Concentrations of Chlorhexidine for Peripartum Vaginal and Infant Washes: HIVNET025

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Craig M.; Gray, Glenda; Read, Jennifer S.; Mwatha, Anthony; Lala, Sanjay; Johnson, Saul; Violari, Avye; Sibiya, Portia Mabali; Fleming, Thomas R.; Koonce, Ann; Vermund, Sten H.; McIntyre, James

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a continuing need to evaluate sustainable interventions for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV type 1. We evaluated different concentrations (0.25%, 1%, and 2%) of chlorhexidine (CHX) for perinatal maternal and infant washes to identify the maximum tolerable concentration of CHX for such an intervention. Methods Women were enrolled during their third trimester at the maternity unit of the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa, and perinatal maternal and infant washes were completed. Subjective maternal symptoms as well as infant examinations were used to assess tolerability of the washes. Results The 0.25% concentration of CHX was well tolerated by the mothers (n = 29). Ten of 79 women (13%) with 1% CHX washes complained of mild vaginal area burning or itching, and washes were stopped in 5 (6%). Twenty-three of 75 women (31%) in the 2% CHX wash group had subjective complaints, and the washes were stopped in 12 (16%). There were no clinical indications of toxicity of the CHX washes among infants. Conclusion A 1% solution of CHX appears to be a safe and tolerable concentration of CHX for consideration in an MTCT prevention trial. PMID:14722445

  10. 26 CFR 1.1091-1 - Losses from wash sales of stock or securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Losses from wash sales of stock or securities. 1.1091-1 Section 1.1091-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1091-1 Losses from...

  11. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent...

  12. An Examination of "Wash-Out" and Workplace Conditions of Beginning Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma; Colem, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) determine the extent of wash-out in two beginning physical education teachers; and (2) determine the workplace conditions these novice teachers experienced that may have influenced the extent of wash-out for them. The interactive factors influencing workplace conditions for physical education teachers…

  13. 33 CFR 110.229 - Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. 110.229 Section 110.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.229 Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. (a)...

  14. Using Olfaction and Unpleasant Reminders to Reduce the Intention-behavior Gap in Hand Washing

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Robert; Crandall, Philip G.; Seo, Han-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Lack of hand washing is a leading cause of food borne illnesses. To successfully increase hand hygiene compliance, interventions must have continual engagement with employees. This study used a real-time prospective memory (PM) scenario to measure the effectiveness of a control and sensory reminders of disgust to influence hand washing behavior and performance. First, a model of hand washing performance was built by having six participants’ hands contaminated with GermGlo (a florescent micro-particle) and then washed their hands using predetermined protocols while monitored by an electronic hand hygiene verification (HHV) system. Next, eighty Hispanic/Latino participants, in a between-group experimental design, performed a PM experiment while one of four reminders were present (hand washing poster, disgusting image, disgusting sound, and disgusting odor) as the HHV recorded their hand washing performance. Visual cues, typical of hand washing campaigns, were not as effective at increasing hand hygiene compliance as disgust-induced sensory cues. Furthermore, olfactory disgust showed a significantly higher probability that individuals would engage in hand washing behaviors than all other conditions. This study provides new insight into the effectiveness of different senses and emotion to reduce the intention-behavior gap associated with modifying behaviors, and broadens current PM research to a real-time application. PMID:26732033

  15. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  16. Factors Influencing Hand Washing Behaviour in Primary Schools: Process Evaluation within a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-01-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57).…

  17. 33 CFR 157.160 - Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.160 Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing. (a) The owner, operator, and master of a tank vessel under §...

  18. 33 CFR 157.160 - Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.160 Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing. (a) The owner, operator, and master of a tank vessel under §...

  19. 33 CFR 157.160 - Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.160 Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing. (a) The owner, operator, and master of a tank vessel under §...

  20. Assessment and speciation of chlorine demand in fresh-cut produce wash water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of high quality, fresh-cut produce is a key driver for the produce industry. A critical area of concern is the chlorinated wash water used during post-harvest processing in large industrial processing facilities. Predominantly using a batch process, wash water is recycled over 8hr shift...

  1. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  2. The effect of contaminant aging upon soil washing removal efficiencies for lead contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, S.R.; Reed, B.E.; Moore, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate lead removal efficiencies from various soils using a variety of washing solutions. Most soil types have a strong affinity for lead. Thus, it is plausible to expect washing solutions that are capable of removing lead could also remove other divalent heavy metals. Four soil samples from the eastern US were collected and characterized for this study. The study soils were then spiked to approximate lead concentrations of 1,000 and 10,000 mg Pb/kg soil. The efficiencies of six washing solutions in removing lead from the contaminated soils were then investigated via lab-scale batch washing experiments. Unlike current field-scale soil washing practices, all particle size fractions were washed and recovered in these experiments. (Solutions investigated include: tap water, HCl, EDTA, HNO{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}COOH, and CaCl{sub 2}.) In order to examine the effect of aging upon soil washing efficiencies, some of the spiked soils were washed a second time after an aging period of nearly 2 years.

  3. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BESCORP SOIL WASHING SYSTEM ALASKAN BATTERY ENTERPRISES SITE - BRICE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BESCORP Soil Washing System is an aqueous volume reduction system that utilizes trommel agitation, high-pressure washing, sizing, and density separation to remove lead, lead compounds, and battery casing chips from soil contaminated by broken lead batteries. The basic concept...

  4. Using Olfaction and Unpleasant Reminders to Reduce the Intention-behavior Gap in Hand Washing.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Robert; Crandall, Philip G; Seo, Han-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Lack of hand washing is a leading cause of food borne illnesses. To successfully increase hand hygiene compliance, interventions must have continual engagement with employees. This study used a real-time prospective memory (PM) scenario to measure the effectiveness of a control and sensory reminders of disgust to influence hand washing behavior and performance. First, a model of hand washing performance was built by having six participants' hands contaminated with GermGlo (a florescent micro-particle) and then washed their hands using predetermined protocols while monitored by an electronic hand hygiene verification (HHV) system. Next, eighty Hispanic/Latino participants, in a between-group experimental design, performed a PM experiment while one of four reminders were present (hand washing poster, disgusting image, disgusting sound, and disgusting odor) as the HHV recorded their hand washing performance. Visual cues, typical of hand washing campaigns, were not as effective at increasing hand hygiene compliance as disgust-induced sensory cues. Furthermore, olfactory disgust showed a significantly higher probability that individuals would engage in hand washing behaviors than all other conditions. This study provides new insight into the effectiveness of different senses and emotion to reduce the intention-behavior gap associated with modifying behaviors, and broadens current PM research to a real-time application. PMID:26732033

  5. REMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH WOOD PRESERVING WASTES: CROSSCURRENT AND COUNTERCURRENT SOLVENT WASHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    solvent washing was evaluated as a method to remove pentachlorophenol (PCP) from aged field soils contaminated with wood treating wastes. Several soil:solvent contact ratios were considered. Solvent washing processes were evaluated based on the removal of PCP from the soil throug...

  6. Remedition case studies: Thermal desorption, soil washing, and in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing thermal desorption, soil washing, and in situ vitrification. This volume contains reports on projects using thermal desorption, including six completed applications at sites contaminated with PCBs, pesticides, or chlorinated aliphatics. Two projects in this volume used soil washing and in situ vitrification technologies.

  7. Investigation of water washes suitable for very small meat plants to reduce pathogens on beef surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Sally Flowers; Henning, William R; Mills, Edward W; Doores, Stephanie; Ostiguy, Nancy; Cutter, Catherine N

    2010-05-01

    Water washing with a handheld hose was performed on beef surfaces to ascertain the most effective combination of methods needed to remove potentially harmful microorganisms. For these experiments, beef brisket surfaces were experimentally inoculated with a fecal slurry containing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter jejuni. In a pilot study, surfaces were washed with cold water (15 degrees C) at various water pressures, spray distances, application times, and drip times, and remaining bacterial populations were determined following the enumeration and isolation of pathogens and naturally occurring hygiene indicators (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli). The most efficacious combinations of these washing conditions were applied subsequently to artificially contaminated beef brisket surfaces in conjunction with hot (77 degrees C), warm (54 degrees C), and additional cold (15 degrees C) water washes. In the cold water washing pilot study, combinations of physical washing conditions significantly reduced all bacterial populations (P < 0.05). Further studies clearly indicated the superior bactericidal effectiveness of hot water washing; E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were reduced by 3.8 and 4.1 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Overall, higher water temperature, longer application times, and shorter spray distances more effectively removed pathogens from inoculated beef surfaces. These findings will be used to formulate water washing recommendations for very small meat processing establishments. PMID:20501042

  8. Washing Machines--Components & Operations; Appliance Repair 2: #9025.03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Designed to familiarize the student with the components and operations of automatic washing machines, this course outline offers instruction on the principles of washing and their relation to the automatic washer, the functions and operations of washer components, identification of various component malfunctions, washer installation, and the…

  9. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing during a voyage. The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2),...

  10. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing during a voyage. The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2),...

  11. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing during a voyage. The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2),...

  12. 33 CFR 157.160 - Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.160 Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing. (a) The owner, operator, and master of a tank vessel under §...

  13. 33 CFR 157.130 - Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil. 157.130 Section 157.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels...

  14. 33 CFR 157.130 - Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil. 157.130 Section 157.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels...

  15. 33 CFR 157.160 - Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.160 Tanks: Ballasting and crude oil washing. (a) The owner, operator, and master of a tank vessel under §...

  16. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  17. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  18. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  19. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PAINT FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent...

  20. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PAINT FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the...

  1. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PAINT FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the...

  2. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PAINT FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the...

  3. Evaluating the Utility of Commercial Videotapes for Teaching Hand Washing to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Nancy E.; Schwartz, Ilene S.; Davis, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of using a commercially available video model to teach three preschoolers with autism to wash their hands. While one child learned 80% of the hand washing steps, 2 of the 3 children did not learn from the commercial model. All were subsequently exposed to a customized video model, which resulted in at least some…

  4. Evaluation of a Hand Washing Program for 2nd-Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tousman, Stuart; Arnold, Dani; Helland, Wealtha; Roth, Ruth; Heshelman, Nannatte; Castaneda, Oralia; Fischer, Emily; O'Neil, Kristen; Bileto, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine if a multiple-week learner-centered hand washing program could improve hand hygiene behaviors of 2nd-graders in a northern Illinois public school system. Volunteers from the Rockford Hand Washing Coalition went into 19 different classrooms for 4 consecutive weeks and taught a learner-centered program.…

  5. 26 CFR 1.1091-1 - Losses from wash sales of stock or securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with the taxpayer's trade or business, or (2) in the case of a corporation, a dealer in stock or... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Losses from wash sales of stock or securities... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities §...

  6. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  7. REMOVAL OF TOXIC METALS IN ELECTROPLATING WASH WATER BY A DONNAN DIALYSIS PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to develop anion-exchange membranes to be used in the removal of copper, cadmium, and zinc, as their complex cyanide anions, from cyanide process electroplating wash waters by a Donnan dialysis process. For these laboratory studies, simulated wash waters p...

  8. Are cannabinoids detected in hair after washing with Cannabio shampoo?

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Kintz, P; Jamey, C; Ludes, B

    1999-09-01

    Today, cannabis plants are used in shampoo preparations, in foodstuffs (e.g., oils, noodles, crackers, etc.), and in beverages (e.g., tea). These products often contain < 1% delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in order to eliminate psychoactive effects, but some of them can include 1 to 3% of THC. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of Cannabio shampoo revealed the presence of THC (412 ng/mL) and two constituents of cannabis plants, cannabidiol (CBD, 4079 ng/mL) and cannabinol (CBN, 380 ng/mL). In order to verify if normal hygiene practices with Cannabio shampoo can result in positive tests for cannabinoids in hair, three subjects washed their hair with this shampoo once daily for two weeks. After this period, hair specimens were collected. In the three hair specimens, THC, CBD, and CBN were never detected within their limits of detection, 0.05, 0.02, and 0.01 ng/mg, respectively. We concluded that the use of Cannabio shampoo during normal hygiene practices cannot be considered as a source of potential contamination of hair. In a second experiment, drug-free hair specimens (200 mg) were incubated in 10 mL water/Cannabio shampoo (20:1, v/v) for 30 min, 2 h, and 5 h. After incubation, hair strands were washed with water and separated into two portions. One portion was extracted directly; the second was decontaminated with methylene chloride and then extracted. After an incubation period of 30 min, the analysis of hair by GC-MS did not reveal the presence of THC, CBD, and CBN in hair, regardless of whether the hair was decontaminated. After an incubation period of 2 h, specimens tested positive for CBD (0.11 ng/mg without decontamination and 0.10 ng/mg with decontamination) and CBN (0.02 ng/mg without decontamination and 0.02 ng/mg after decontamination). After an incubation period of 5 h, specimens tested positive for CBD (0.25 ng/mg without decontamination and 0.14 ng/mg after decontamination) and CBN (0.02 ng/mg without decontamination and 0.02 ng

  9. Reduction of an E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella composite on fresh strawberries by varying antimicrobial washes and vacuum perfusion.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Bailey, Rebecca B; Jin, Tony Z; Fan, Xuetong

    2014-10-17

    A 2011 outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis, which resulted in the death of two individuals, was associated with contaminated strawberries. A study was conducted to identify antimicrobial washes effective at reducing E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica from the surface of fresh whole strawberries during two-minute immersion washes. Twenty-seven antimicrobial treatments were tested. Vacuum perfusion was applied to strawberries during chlorine and peracetic acid treatments to promote infiltration of sanitizer into porous strawberry tissue. Strawberries were inoculated to 7.1logCFU/strawberry with a seven-strain bacterial composite, consisting of three strains of E. coli O157:H7 and four serovars of Salmonella enterica. Berries were air-dried for 2h and immersed in circulating antimicrobial solutions for 120s at 22°C. Four treatments reduced ≥3.0logCFU/strawberry, including (a) 1% acetic acid+1% H2O2, (b) 30% ethanol+1% H2O2, (c) 90ppm peracetic acid, and (d) 1% lactic acid+1% H2O2. Two additional treatments that reduced 2.8logCFU/strawberry were (a) 40% ethanol, and (b) 1% each of phosphoric+fumaric acids. Eight treatments reduced 2.0-2.6logCFU/strawberry. Five treatments reduced <1.45CFU/strawberry, including (a) 1% citric acid, (b) 1% lactic acid, (c) 1% acetic acid, (d) 0.5% each of acetic+citric acids and (e) 0.5% each of acetic+lactic acids. The use of vacuum perfusion with 200ppm chlorine or 90ppm peracetic acid did not reduce greater populations of pathogens than did the same treatments without vacuum perfusion. Fourteen treatments reduced no more pathogens (p<0.05) than did sterile deionized water. Results from this study provide some options for end-point decontamination of strawberries for retail operations just prior to serving to customers. PMID:25146462

  10. Sensitivity of detection of asbestos bodies in sputa and bronchial washings

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.M.; Johnson, E.H.; Coughlin, D.; Greenberg, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    While asbestos bodies (ABs) in sputum and/or bronchial washings are highly specific markers for significant asbestos exposure, comparison of the sensitivity between sputum cytology and bronchial washing cytology for the detection of ABs had not been documented. Review of the files of the Cytopathology Laboratory, Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, for the period 1973 to 1984 identified 11 patients with slides available for review who (1) had been examined by both sputum cytology and bronchial washing cytology and (2) had at least one specimen positive for ABs. Of the 11 evaluable cases, all had ABs in the bronchial washings but ony 6 had ABs in the sputum. In addition, iron stain (e.g., the Prussian blue stain) was found to be more sensitive than the Papanicolaou stain for the detection of ABs in these cases. These findings indicate that iron-stained bronchial washing specimens should be preferred for the cytologic detection of asbestos exposure.

  11. Evaluation of a multifiltration water reclamation subsystem to reclaim domestic clothes wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An evaluation has been performed of a multifiltration water reclamation subsystem to determine its capability to recover water from domestic clothes wash water. A total of 32.89 kg (72.5 lb) of clothes were washed during eight wash cycles which used 1.4 lb of detergent, 145 gallons of hot water and 133.9 gallons of cold water. Water recovered at a weighted average process rate of 3.81 gallons per hour met the majority of the 23 requirements established for potable water by the U.S. Public Health Service. Average power consumed during this evaluation was approximately 71 watt-hours per gallon of water recovered. Filter replacement, which was required primarily for the control of micro-organisms in the recovered water averaged 4.86 filters per 100 gallons of wash water processed. The subsystem removed approximately 98 percent and virtually 100 percent of the phosphates and surfactants, respectively, from the wash water.

  12. Development of quenching and washing protocols for quantitative intracellular metabolite analysis of uninfected and baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trinh T B; Dietmair, Stefanie; Chan, Leslie C L; Huynh, Hoai T; Nielsen, Lars K; Reid, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Metabolomics refer to the global analysis of small molecule metabolites in a biological system, and can be a powerful tool to elucidate and optimize cellular processes, particularly when integrated into a systems biology framework. Determining the endometabolome in cultured animal cells is especially challenging, due to the conflicting demands for rapid quenching of metabolism and retention of membrane integrity, while cells are separated from the complex medium. The challenge is magnified in virus infected cells due to increased membrane fragility. This paper describes an effective methodology for quantitative intracellular metabolite analysis of the baculovirus-insect cell expression system, an important platform for the production of heterologous proteins and baculovirus-based biopesticides. These two applications were represented by Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) and Helicoverpa zea (HzAM1) cells infected with recombinant Autographa californica and wild-type Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedroviruses (AcMNPV and HaSNPV), respectively. Specifically, an ice-cold quenching solution comprising 1.1% w/v NaCl and 0.2% w/v Pluronic® F-68 (NaCl+P) was found to be efficacious in preserving cell viability and minimizing cell leakage during quenching and centrifugation-based washing procedures (prior to extraction using cold 50% v/v acetonitrile). Good recoveries of intracellular adenosine triphosphate, total adenosine phosphates and amino acids were obtained after just one wash step, for both uninfected and infected insect cells. The ability to implement wash steps is critical, as insect cell media are metabolites-rich, while infected insect cells are much more fragile than their uninfected counterparts. Hence, a promising methodology has been developed to facilitate endometabolomic analysis of insect cell-baculovirus systems for bioprocess optimization. PMID:22166686

  13. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R

  14. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, Mfa; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains. PMID:26587340

  15. Washing and changing uniforms: is guidance being adhered to?

    PubMed

    Potter, Yvonne Camilla; Justham, David

    To allay public apprehension regarding the risk of nurses' uniforms transmitting healthcare-associated infections (HCAI), national and local guidelines have been issued to control use, laundry and storage. This paper aims to measure the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs) and healthcare assistants (HCAs) working within a rural NHS foundation Trust and their adherence to the local infection prevention and control (IPC) standard regarding uniforms through a Trust-wide audit. Stratified random sampling selected 597 nursing staff and 399 responded (67%) by completing a short questionnaire based on the local standard. Responses were coded and transferred to SPSS (v. 17) for analysis. The audit found that nursing staff generally adhere to the guidelines, changing their uniforms daily and immediately upon accidental soiling, and wearing plastic aprons where indicated. At home, staff normally machine-wash and then iron their uniforms at the hottest setting. Nevertheless, few observe the local direction to place their newly-laundered uniforms in protective covers. This paper recommends a re-audit to compare compliance rates with baseline figures and further research into the reasons why compliance is lacking to sanction interventions for improvement, such as providing relevant staff education and re-introducing appropriate changing facilities. PMID:22875349

  16. Style-based classification of Chinese ink and wash paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiachuan; Jiang, Jianmin

    2013-09-01

    Following the fact that a large collection of ink and wash paintings (IWP) is being digitized and made available on the Internet, their automated content description, analysis, and management are attracting attention across research communities. While existing research in relevant areas is primarily focused on image processing approaches, a style-based algorithm is proposed to classify IWPs automatically by their authors. As IWPs do not have colors or even tones, the proposed algorithm applies edge detection to locate the local region and detect painting strokes to enable histogram-based feature extraction and capture of important cues to reflect the styles of different artists. Such features are then applied to drive a number of neural networks in parallel to complete the classification, and an information entropy balanced fusion is proposed to make an integrated decision for the multiple neural network classification results in which the entropy is used as a pointer to combine the global and local features. Evaluations via experiments support that the proposed algorithm achieves good performances, providing excellent potential for computerized analysis and management of IWPs.

  17. Reverse osmosis for wash water recovery in space vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, R. W.; Saltonstall, C. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were carried out on both synthetic and real wash water derived from clothes laundry to determine the utility of reverse osmosis in recovering the water for recycle use. A blend membrane made from cellulose di- and triacetates, and a cross-linked cellulose acetate/methacrylate were evaluated. Both were found acceptable. A number of detergents were evaluated, including a cationic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulfate, potassium palmitate, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate. The tests were all made at a temperature of 165 F to minimize microbial growth. Long-term (15 to 30 day) runs were made at 600 and 400 psi on laundry water which was pretreated either by alum addition and sand filtration or by filtration only through 0.5 micron filters. A 30-day run was made using a 2-in. diameter by 22-in. long spiral module at 400 psig with filtering as the pretreatment. The membrane fouling by colloidal matter was found to be controllable. The unit produced initially 55 gal/day and 27 gal/day after 30 days.

  18. Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)

    SciTech Connect

    Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

    1999-03-01

    The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

  19. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, MFA

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains. PMID:26587340

  20. Effect of washing pH on the properties of titanate nanotubes and its activity for photocatalytic oxidation of NO and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhat Huy; Bai, Hsunling

    2015-11-01

    This study reports for the first time on the role of contaminant sodium to neutralize the acidic reaction products during the NOx photocatalytic reaction and prevent surface deactivation of TNTs (titanate nanotubes and their derived materials). TNTs were synthesized by the hydrothermal method and washed under different pH values. The materials were then characterized by SEM, TEM, BET, ICP, TPD, and XRD analyses. The photocatalytic oxidations of NO and NO2 were tested under the ambient condition to evaluate the activity of the materials. The results showed that the value of washing pH was an effective control factor for achieving TNTs with desired microstructure and physical-chemical properties. In the photocatalytic removals of NO and NO2, it revealed that both of the Na content and the structure of TNTs materials play important roles on the NOx removal pathway, initial efficiency and decay rate. The highest efficiencies were achieved by TNTs washed at pH 3-5 (T-3∼5), which may be due to their high amount of crystalline anatase for photocatalytic reaction and high sodium content for neutralization of acidic products. The mechanism based on the neutralization of the HNO3 resultant from the NOx photo-oxidation was also proposed.

  1. Restoration of manufactured gas plant site soil through combined ultrasound-assisted soil washing and bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu; Tan, Min; Ma, Jing; Li, Gang; Qu, Junfeng

    2016-03-01

    An effective ex situ soil remediation technology was developed in this study to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals in a mixed contaminated site. Ultrasonication (20 kHz, 45 min) combined with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (75 g/L) and S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (25 g/L) were efficient in extracting mixed pollutants from the soil. After two successive washing cycles, the removal efficiency of PAHs and heavy metals were approximately 84.5% and 81.3%, respectively. The high removal of metals remarkably reduced soil microtoxicity and thus activated biodegradation activity towards PAHs. Inoculation of PAHs-degrading bacterial strains with nutrients addition further removed 86.8% of residual PAHs in 16 weeks. These results were indicated by the significant increase in the number of PAH degraders and soil enzyme activity. After treatment, the residual levels of individual PAHs and heavy metals could meet Chinese soil quality standard for residential use. The proposed combined cleanup strategy proved to be effective and environmentally friendly for remediation of mixed-contaminated site. PMID:26735729

  2. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Collins, J.L.; Chase, C.W.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both {sup 137}Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report.

  3. ACID RECYCLING TO OPTIMIZE CITRIC ACID-MODIFIED SOYBEAN HULL PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were 1) to develop a wash procedure to remove non-reacted or residual citric acid after soybean hull modification in order to maximize the amount of non- reacted acid removed but minimize the subsequent effect on the product's ability to adsorb copper ion (Cu2+) and 2) t...

  4. Droplet-based microfluidic washing module for magnetic particle-based assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hun; Xu, Linfeng; Oh, Kwang W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform for magnetic particle-based assays by employing in-droplet washing. The droplet-based washing was implemented by traversing functionalized magnetic particles across a laterally merged droplet from one side (containing sample and reagent) to the other (containing buffer) by an external magnetic field. Consequently, the magnetic particles were extracted to a parallel-synchronized train of washing buffer droplets, and unbound reagents were left in an original train of sample droplets. To realize the droplet-based washing function, the following four procedures were sequentially carried in a droplet-based microfluidic device: parallel synchronization of two trains of droplets by using a ladder-like channel network; lateral electrocoalescence by an electric field; magnetic particle manipulation by a magnetic field; and asymmetrical splitting of merged droplets. For the stable droplet synchronization and electrocoalescence, we optimized droplet generation conditions by varying the flow rate ratio (or droplet size). Image analysis was carried out to determine the fluorescent intensity of reagents before and after the washing step. As a result, the unbound reagents in sample droplets were significantly removed by more than a factor of 25 in the single washing step, while the magnetic particles were successfully extracted into washing buffer droplets. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate a magnetic particle-based immunoassay with streptavidin-coated magnetic particles and fluorescently labelled biotin in the proposed continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform. PMID:25379098

  5. Efficient remediation of pentachlorophenol contaminated soil with tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Wang, Li; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that pentachlorophenol contaminated soil can be efficiently remediated with tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent zerovalent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment. 2 mmol L(-1) of tetrapolyphosphate could wash away 52.8% of pentachlorophenol (PCP) at pH 7.0 and 84.2% of pentachlorophenol at pH 11.0 from contaminated soil owing to the promotion effect of tetrapolyphosphate on the soil matrix dispersion and the subsequent solubilization of pentachlorophenol. More importantly, tetrapolyphosphate ions remained in the washing effluent could greatly enhance the molecular oxygen activation by ZVI to oxidize the desorbed PCP without any pH adjustment, and also avoid the competitive consumption of reactive oxygen species, as caused by the common organic surfactants in the washing effluent. Therefore, 85.1% of pentachlorophenol could be aerobically removed from the washing effluent by merely using 5 g L(-1) of ZVI. We also interestingly found that the dissolved iron ions released from the soil could enhance the oxidation of pentachlorophenol in the washing effluent, but the dissolved organic matter had the opposite effect. This study suggests the coupling tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent ZVI/Air treatment is an optional approach to remediate pentachlorophenol contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:25781373

  6. Actin polymerization driven by WASH causes V-ATPase retrieval and vesicle neutralization before exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Carnell, Michael; Zech, Tobias; Calaminus, Simon D.; Ura, Seiji; Hagedorn, Monica; Johnston, Simon A.; May, Robin C.; Soldati, Thierry; Machesky, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    WASP and SCAR homologue (WASH) is a recently identified and evolutionarily conserved regulator of actin polymerization. In this paper, we show that WASH coats mature Dictyostelium discoideum lysosomes and is essential for exocytosis of indigestible material. A related process, the expulsion of the lethal endosomal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans from mammalian macrophages, also uses WASH-coated vesicles, and cells expressing dominant negative WASH mutants inefficiently expel C. neoformans. D. discoideum WASH causes filamentous actin (F-actin) patches to form on lysosomes, leading to the removal of vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) and the neutralization of lysosomes to form postlysosomes. Without WASH, no patches or coats are formed, neutral postlysosomes are not seen, and indigestible material such as dextran is not exocytosed. Similar results occur when actin polymerization is blocked with latrunculin. V-ATPases are known to bind avidly to F-actin. Our data imply a new mechanism, actin-mediated sorting, in which WASH and the Arp2/3 complex polymerize actin on vesicles to drive the separation and recycling of proteins such as the V-ATPase. PMID:21606208

  7. Droplet-based microfluidic washing module for magnetic particle-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun; Xu, Linfeng; Oh, Kwang W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform for magnetic particle-based assays by employing in-droplet washing. The droplet-based washing was implemented by traversing functionalized magnetic particles across a laterally merged droplet from one side (containing sample and reagent) to the other (containing buffer) by an external magnetic field. Consequently, the magnetic particles were extracted to a parallel-synchronized train of washing buffer droplets, and unbound reagents were left in an original train of sample droplets. To realize the droplet-based washing function, the following four procedures were sequentially carried in a droplet-based microfluidic device: parallel synchronization of two trains of droplets by using a ladder-like channel network; lateral electrocoalescence by an electric field; magnetic particle manipulation by a magnetic field; and asymmetrical splitting of merged droplets. For the stable droplet synchronization and electrocoalescence, we optimized droplet generation conditions by varying the flow rate ratio (or droplet size). Image analysis was carried out to determine the fluorescent intensity of reagents before and after the washing step. As a result, the unbound reagents in sample droplets were significantly removed by more than a factor of 25 in the single washing step, while the magnetic particles were successfully extracted into washing buffer droplets. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate a magnetic particle-based immunoassay with streptavidin-coated magnetic particles and fluorescently labelled biotin in the proposed continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform. PMID:25379098

  8. Association between Washing Residue on the Feet and Tinea Pedis in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Kimie; Amemiya, Ayumi; Mugita, Yuko; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Seko, Yoko; Ohashi, Yumiko; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Nagase, Takashi; Ikeda, Mari; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Tinea pedis (TP) may lead to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients; thus, its prevention in diabetic patients is important. TP occurs after dermatophytes on the skin scales of TP patients attach to the feet. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the scales and dermatophytes, and this can be performed using various methods, including foot washing. This study aimed to objectively examine the association between the presence of TP and foot-washing habits. We included 33 diabetic patients, and, of these, 17 had TP. The presence of washing residue on the feet was determined by applying a fluorescent cream to the participants' feet, and images of the feet were captured under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. Our results showed that diabetic patients with TP had higher levels of washing residue on their feet than those without TP. The importance of washing feet to prevent TP needs to be emphasized through educational programs for diabetic patients. Furthermore, the development of an effective foot-washing technique is essential. PMID:25793125

  9. Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Inactivation, Color, and Bioactive Compounds Enhancement on Raspberries during Frozen Storage after Decontamination Using New Formula Sanitizer Washing or Pulsed Light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqing; Chen, Haiqiang; Wu, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    Berries are normally washed before they are frozen. Washing with sanitizer and treatment with pulsed light (PL) were studied for their effectiveness to inactivate foodborne pathogens on raspberries during frozen storage, while maintaining or enhancing major quality parameters. Raspberries were inoculated with Salmonella or Escherichia coli O157:H7 and then underwent a washing treatment with citric acid plus sodium dodecyl sulfate (CA+SDS) or citric acid plus thymol (CA+THY) or treatment with PL (dry PL, water-assisted [wet] PL, and PL-SDS). Pathogen survival was determined immediately after treatments and during frozen storage at -20°C for 3 months. Washing with CA+SDS or CA+THY significantly reduced Salmonella (by 3.6 and 3.2 log CFU/g, respectively) and E. coli O157:H7 (by 4.1 and 3.7 log CFU/g, respectively). At the end of storage, washing with CA+SDS reduced Salmonella to 0.6 log CFU/g and E. coli O157:H7 to 0.5 log CFU/g; washing with CA+THY reduced Salmonella to 0.9 log CFU/g and E. coli O157:H7 to 0.5 log CFU/g. PL-SDS showed decontamination efficacy on raspberries, with 0.7 log CFU/g Salmonella and 0.9 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 surviving at the end of storage; in comparison, in the control, 1.6 log CFU/g Salmonella and 1.5 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 survived. Pathogen survival in raspberries that had been washed or treated with PL-SDS was significantly lower than in untreated raspberries. Major quality parameters, including color, total phenolic content, total anthocyanin content, total bacterial count, and total yeast and mold counts, were evaluated on raspberries immediately after treatments and during frozen storage. Redness increased in PL-treated raspberries. At the end of storage, PL-treated raspberries had significantly higher total phenolic content and total anthocyanin content compared with control samples. Washing with sanitizers and treatment with PL decreased the total bacterial count and total yeast and mold counts on raspberries and maintained

  10. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  11. Record of Hybridization Preserved in Zircon, Aztec Wash Pluton, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, S. A.; Miller, C. F.; Claiborne, L. L.; Wooden, J. L.; Mazdab, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    The mid-Miocene Aztec Wash pluton comprises a smaller granite zone and a larger, highly heterogeneous zone in which evidence for interaction between basaltic and granitic magmas is ubiquitous. Granitic rocks in both zones show textural and compositional evidence for crystal accumulation and melt fractionation. In the heterogeneous zone, basalts have chilled, crenulate margins against granitic rocks, and there is widespread evidence for mechanical contamination of each lithology (coarse resorbed alkali feldspar in fine-grained mafic rock; mafic enclaves in granite). "Grey rocks" of intermediate composition are exposed on dm to 100's of m-scale as enclaves, pods, and initially subhorizontal sheets. They are variable texturally, but most are dominantly fine- grained and equigranular. Textures of grey rocks are consistent with rapid solidification from melt-rich magma, and, in combination with isotopic compositions intermediate between felsic and mafic rocks of the pluton, suggest an origin by near-complete homogenization of a hybrid melt (Bleick et al. 2005; Ericksen 2005). The elemental chemistry of zircon preserves information about the evolving magmatic environment in which it was hosted (Claiborne et al., 2006). Owing to its slow dissolution rate, it has the potential to survive periods of undersaturation with only partial resorption. Thus, it may record drastic shifts in T and melt chemistry that would accompany mafic-felsic hybridization. We are investigating zircon zoning patterns by cathodoluminescence (CL) and elemental compositions by SHRIMP-RG to evaluate the record of processes that they preserve. Temperatures of zircon growth are estimated using Ti-in-zircon thermometry (Watson et al. 2006), assuming a(TiO2) of ca. 0.7 (sphene +/-ilmenite are ubiquitous). Zircons from the granite zone yield estimated T's of 700-860 C, whereas those from grey rocks range from 710- 910 C. While both granite and grey zircon populations show dramatic T variations among and

  12. Protective Effect of Hand-Washing and Good Hygienic Habits Against Seasonal Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingbin; Ou, Jianming; Zhang, Lijie; Shen, Xiaona; Hong, Rongtao; Ma, Huilai; Zhu, Bao-Ping; Fontaine, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous observational studies have reported protective effects of hand-washing in reducing upper respiratory infections, little is known about the associations between hand-washing and good hygienic habits and seasonal influenza infection. We conducted a case-control study to test whether the risk of influenza transmission associated with self-reported hand-washing and unhealthy hygienic habits among residents in Fujian Province, southeastern China. Laboratory confirmed seasonal influenza cases were consecutively included in the study as case-patients (n = 100). For each case, we selected 1 control person matched for age and city of residence. Telephone interview was used to collect information on hand-washing and hygienic habits. The associations were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. Compared with the poorest hand-washing score of 0 to 3, odds ratios of influenza infection decreased progressively from 0.26 to 0.029 as hand-washing score increased from 4 to the maximum of 9 (P < 0.001). Compared with the poorest hygienic habit score of 0 to 2, odds ratios of influenza infection decreased from 0.10 to 0.015 with improving score of hygienic habits (P < 0.001). Independent protective factors against influenza infection included good hygienic habits, higher hand-washing score, providing soap or hand cleaner beside the hand-washing basin, and receiving influenza vaccine. Regular hand-washing and good hygienic habits were associated with a reduced risk of influenza infection. These findings support the general recommendation for nonpharmaceutical interventions against influenza. PMID:26986125

  13. Aqueous Geochemistry of the Pueblo Colorado Wash Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandamouz, A.; Ort, M. H.; Breit, G. N.; Hiza, M.; Parnell, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Pueblo Colorado Wash alluvial aquifer, located in northeastern Arizona on the Navajo Nation, is about 20 km long and 2-5 km wide and formed by infilling a canyon as deep as 70 m in Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks. This aquifer is the main source of drinking water for many Navajo communities. The composition of shallow water (<20 m) in the aquifer contrasts with that from deeper parts. The shallower water is distinguished by low specific conductance (<1 mS cm-1) and higher dissolved oxygen, while the deeper parts have a wide range of values for specific conductance (<1-22 mS cm-1) and low dissolved oxygen. Some wells (deeper water) are sulfate dominant whilst most springs and shallow wells (shallow water) are bicarbonate dominant. A comparison of two datasets-one from 1960's, and the other from the current study started in 2004-shows that the concentration of ions, such as Cl- and SO42-, in the water from some wells is much higher in samples taken in 2004. High concentrations of SO42-, Cl-, F- , K+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ in different wells and springs follow no apparent spatial trends. δ 13C data have a wide range, from -3.4 in shallow water to -11.7 in deep water. The low δ 13C values along with the high dissolved Fe, Mn, and Ba in some wells and springs are consistent with microbial respiration in the aquifer. The δ 18O and δ D show that the shallow water has experienced varying amounts of evaporation. The differences in water composition reflect the heterogeneity in the alluvium and older formations surrounding the aquifer, and the role of water-sediment interactions in the water composition. Temporal increases in salinity are attributed to decreased rainfall and increased withdrawal of water for domestic supplies. Results highlight the sensitivity of water quality in small aquifers to climate shifts and development.

  14. Arsine Poisoning in a Slag-Washing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Kipling, M. D.; Fothergill, R.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in an aluminium recovery works after the simultaneous occurrence of haemolytic anaemia in two workers in the slag disposal plant. The first worker was admitted to hospital suffering from nausea, backache, and haematuria. Jaundice developed on the next day. His urine contained protein, urobilin, haemoglobin, and methaemoglobin but no red cells. During the course of his illness the haemoglobin was reduced to 6·8 g./100 ml. There was no abnormality of the blood film and red cell fragility was normal. A fellow worker was affected at the same time and was treated at home for the same symptoms. Examination five days later showed a haemoglobin level similar to that of the first worker. He had suffered the same symptoms eight years previously, and at this time another worker had suffered from jaundice at home and a third had been investigated for neurological symptoms. Ten years previously another worker had been admitted to hospital with anaemia, jaundice, and haemoglobinuria. At this works scrap aluminium is melted with sodium chloride and fluorspar as a flux. The slag from the furnace is later broken up and dissolved in a rotating drum by a stream of water. The soluble portion is carried into a lagoon, whilst the 3% aluminium is retained in the drum and discharged weekly. Two men are employed at a time and another six have been employed in the past 10 years. Five parts per million of arsine were found to be present in the atmosphere during slag washing, but higher levels would have occurred on the occasions when slag from the making of an aluminium copper alloy from copper with an arsenic content was similarly treated. The mechanism of arsenic production is discussed and the literature on the role of aluminium reviewed. PMID:14106139

  15. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (. gamma. -HCH) activates washed rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lalau-Keraly, C.; Delautier, D.; Benveniste, J.; Puiseux-Dao, S.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea-pig macrophages, ..gamma..-HCH triggers activation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Since these two biochemical events are also involved in platelet activation, the authors examined the effects of ..gamma..-HCH on washed rabbit platelets. Release of /sup 14/C-serotonin (/sup 14/C-5HT) and ATP from platelets prelabelled with /sup 14/C-5HT was measured simultaneously with aggregation. ..gamma..-HCH induced shape-change, aggregation and release reaction of platelets. Maximal aggregation (89 arbitrary units, AU), was observed using 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH, and was associated with 38.1 +/- 6.9% and 161 +/- 48 nM for /sup 14/C-5HT and ATP release respectively (mean +/- 1 SD, n=3). Using 80 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH yielded 18 AU, 12.8 +/- 1.0% and 27 +/- 14 nM for aggregation, C-5HT and ATP release respectively (n=3). No effect was observed with 40 ..mu.. M ..gamma..-HCH. Aspirin (ASA), a cyclooxygenase blocker, did not affect ..gamma..-HCH-induced platelet activation. Apyrase (APY), an ADP scavenger, inhibited by 90% aggregation induced by 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH and slightly inhibited (15%) the /sup 14/C-5HT release. In the presence of both ASA and APY, 96% inhibition of aggregation and 48% inhibition of /sup 14/C-5HT release were observed. Thus, ..gamma..-HCH induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner ADP, but not cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonate metabolites, is involved in ..gamma..-HCH-induced aggregation, whereas, both appear to play a role in ..gamma..-HCH-induced release reaction.

  16. Stratigraphy of the Lower and Middle Triassic Union Wash Formation, east-central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.; Orchard, Michael J.

    The authors describe the lithology, stratigraphy, and contact relations of the Union Wash Formation at its type locality and at two additional localities: the Cerro Gordo area near the crest of the Inyo Mountians, 25 km southeast of Union Wash, and the Darwin area, another 35 km to the southeast. The descriptions given are largely based on recent work and are intended to supercede previous descriptions of the formation by the authors and their coworkers. In addition, they list new conodont identifications that, together with ammonoids identified by previous workers, constrain the age of the Union Wash Formation in those three areas to Early and Middle Triassic.

  17. Morphological degradation of human hair cuticle due to simulated sunlight irradiation and washing.

    PubMed

    Richena, M; Rezende, C A

    2016-08-01

    Morphological changes in hair surface are undesirable, since they cause shine loss, roughness increase and split ends. These effects occur more frequently in the cuticle, which is the outermost layer of the hair strand, and thus the most exposed to the environmental damages. Sunlight irradiation contributes significantly to these morphological alterations, which motivates the investigation of this effect on hair degradation. In this work, the influence of irradiation and hand-washing steps on the morphology of pigmented and non-pigmented hair cuticle was investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To simulate daily conditions, where hair is hand-washed and light exposed, samples of dark brown and gray hair underwent three different conditions: 1) irradiation with a mercury lamp for up to 600h; 2) irradiation with the mercury lamp combined with washes with a sodium lauryl sulphate solution; and 3) only washing. A new preparation procedure was applied for TEM samples to minimize natural variations among different hair strands: a single hair strand was cut into two neighbouring halves and only one of them underwent irradiation and washing. The non-exposed half was used as a control, so that the real effects caused by the controlled irradiation and washing procedures could be highlighted in samples that had very similar morphologies initially. More than 25images/sample were analysed using FESEM (total of 300 images) and ca. 150images/sample were obtained with TEM (total of 900 images). The results presented herein show that the endocuticle and the cell membrane complex (CMC) are the cuticle structures more degraded by irradiation. Photodegradation alone results in fracturing, cavities (Ø≈20-200nm) and cuticle cell lifting, while the washing steps were able to remove cuticle cells (≈1-2 cells removed after 60 washes). Finally, the combined action of irradiation and washing caused the most severe

  18. Monitoring Changes in Channel Morphology in Las Vegas Wash with Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    To borrow from a popular adage, "What happens in Las Vegas [Wash], stays in Las Vegas [Wash]"—but only with a lot of help. This past decade has seen a concerted effort to curb erosion and sediment transport along the 12 mile long channel between East Las Vegas and Lake Mead. Las Vegas Wash is prototypical of an urban river in an arid environment that is being impacted by increasing urban development and impervious surface runoff within its drainage area. Rapid urbanization since the 1970s has increased the flow of water into Las Vegas Wash, causing severe channel destabilization. Within two decades millions of cubic yards of rocks and sediment were scoured out of the wash and transported downstream to Lake Mead. The wetlands that once covered over 2,000 acres within Las Vegas Wash dwindled to 200 acres in the 1990s as the channel became as much as 40 feet deeper and 300 feet wider at some points. In 1999 the Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee (LVWCC) initiated a 20-year plan to construct erosion control structures (weirs) for channel stabilization and rock riprap for stream bank protection. The hope is to design structures that will slow down the water flow, trap sediments, and to eventually restore much of the wetland environment. Using high-resolution satellite imagery from the Global Fiducials Program Library housed at the U. S. Geological Survey, this transition is being tracked from 1999 to the present. From November 1999 to July 2008 new residential and commercial development has claimed an additional 12 square kilometers (3000 acres) of land in Henderson, NV, along the south side of Las Vegas Wash. Even with the increased volume of surface and groundwater runoff entering the wash, current sediment yields are much lower than the 1999 totals. The imagery documents the construction of 14 of the 22 LVWCC planned weirs by the year 2011. It also shows many miles of stream bank stabilization by riprap, planting of riparian vegetation and placing of

  19. Operation of the Oxide Washer for Water-Washing Solubles out of Impure Pu Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, K E; Close, W L; Krikorian, O H; Summers III, H V

    2006-01-30

    An evaluation has been made for using the Oxide Washer to wash water-soluble materials out of impure Pu oxide. It is found that multiple washes are needed to reduce the water-soluble materials to very low levels in the impure Pu oxides. The removal of the wash water from the Oxide Washer is accompanied by particulates of the impure Pu oxide, which subsequently need to be filtered out. In spite of the additional filtration needed, the overall level of manpower required for processing is still only about one third of that for an all-manual operation.

  20. 26 CFR 1.1091-2 - Basis of stock or securities acquired in “wash sales”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1091-2 Basis of stock or securities acquired in “wash sales”. (a) In general. The application of section 1091(d) may be... special rule as to the adjustment to basis required under section 1091(d) in the case of wash...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1092(b)-1T - Coordination of loss deferral rules and wash sale rules (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Coordination of loss deferral rules and wash..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1092(b)-1T Coordination of loss deferral rules and wash sale rules (temporary). (a) In...

  2. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in Holstein steers using the washing rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting HP and RQ. The plateau of RQ values was 0.87 ± 0.01 and 0.72 ± 0.01 for unwashed and washed rumen, respectively. The RQ decreas...

  3. 33 CFR 157.110 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.110 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for foreign tank...

  4. 33 CFR 157.108 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for U.S. tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.108 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for U.S. tank...

  5. 33 CFR 157.110 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.110 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for foreign tank...

  6. 33 CFR 157.108 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for U.S. tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.108 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual for U.S. tank...

  7. SEPARATION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS BY LOW PRESSURE MEMBRANES: TREATMENT OF SOIL-WASH RINSE-WATER LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. In the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat the soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were don...

  8. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to

  9. Evaluation of performance and community dynamics of microorganisms during treatment of distillery spent wash in a three stage bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Garima; Gopal, Madhuban; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    The ability of Emericella nidulans var. lata, Neurospora intermedia and Bacillus sp. to treat distillery spent wash in a three stage bioreactor was investigated. Process parameters were optimized in shake flask cultures with the individual strains before treatment of the effluent in a 15-l bioreactor. Treatment was first carried out by the fungi followed by bacteria. The treated effluent showed significant reduction in color (82%) and COD (93%) after 30 h. Metabolites formed after degradation of complex polymers in distillery effluent were assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and included furan, simple acid types and organic compounds. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA sequences amplified from DNA isolated from the reactor communities indicated the presence of other organisms besides those introduced initially. The microbial communities were able to carry out bioremediation of distillery effluent and produce discharge that conforms to safety standards. PMID:20156685

  10. Effects of washing, peeling, storage, and fermentation on residue contents of carbaryl and mancozeb in cucumbers grown in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Saeedi Saravi, S S; Shokrzadeh, M

    2016-06-01

    Cucumbers grown in two different greenhouses were exposed to mancozeb and carbaryl at different times. The effects of 10-day preharvest period, water and detergent washing, peeling, predetermined storage period at 4°C (refrigeration), and fermentation on the reduction of residue levels in the plant tissues were investigated. Mancozeb and carbaryl residues in cucumbers were determined by gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Results showed that residue levels in samples, which were collected after 10 days following the pesticide application, were significantly lower than the samples collected after 2 h subsequent to the pesticide application. The culinary applications were effective in reducing the residue levels of the pesticides in cucumbers. As a result, non-fermentative pickling in sodium chloride and acetic acid was the most effective way to reduce the mancozeb and carbaryl residues of the cucumbers. PMID:25342670

  11. Parametric evaluation of a dual-layer dynamic hyperfiltration membrane for recovery of spacecraft wash water at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Performance data consisting of solute rejections and product flux have been measured, as dependent on the operational parameters. These parameters were pressure, 5,000,000 N/sq m (750 psia) to 7,000,000 N/sq m (1040 psia); temperature, 347 K (165 F) to 368 K (200 F); velocity, 1.6 m/s to 10 m/s; and concentration (up to 14x). Tests were carried out on analog wash water. Data taken include rejections of organic materials (TOC), ammonia, urea, and an assortment of ions. The membrane used was a dual-layer, polyacrylic acid over zirconium oxide, deposited in situ on a porcelain ceramic substrate.

  12. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  13. ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF SOIL WASH FLUIDS FROM A WOOD PRESERVING SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated system has been developed to remediate sols contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This system involves the coupling of two treatment technologies, soil solvent washing and anaerobic biotreatment of the extract. Specif...

  14. Health Care Workers Skipped Hand Washing One-Third of The Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158291.html Health Care Workers Skipped Hand Washing One-Third of the ... 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Staff at many outpatient health care facilities in New Mexico failed to follow recommendations ...

  15. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.711 Cheddar, colby, washed or... permit removal of all packaging material and surface defects. The cheese should at least meet...

  16. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.711 Cheddar, colby, washed or... permit removal of all packaging material and surface defects. The cheese should at least meet...

  17. [Effect of final washing in a small volume of water on processing of periapical radiographs].

    PubMed

    Silveirae Souza, E M; Taga, E M; Tavano, O

    1990-01-01

    The main goal this research was to find out the effectiveness of the final wash in periapical X-ray films. Spectrophotometry determined the residues of sodium hyposulphite taken as a positive sign for the effectiveness of wash on developed films. Three different kinds of film, two Kodak and one Agfa were used. Films were different sensibility and underwent tests. Two containers, one for the intermediate and other for the final wash were used in the first test; in the second, only one container was used for both washes. A residue of 0.4 mg of sodium hyposulphite was considered acceptable. On the three films used, the acorent of sodium hyposulphite detected was inferior to 0.4 mg in the first test, after 5 minutes exposure, nevertheless the small volume of water used. The second test showed a with range of variation in results and so it not recommend. PMID:2135445

  18. Analysis of extensively washed hair from cocaine users and drug chemists to establish new reporting criteria.

    PubMed

    Morris-Kukoski, Cynthia L; Montgomery, Madeline A; Hammer, Rena L

    2014-01-01

    Samples from a self-proclaimed cocaine (COC) user, from 19 drug users (postmortem) and from 27 drug chemists were extensively washed and analyzed for COC, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine (NC), cocaethylene (CE) and aryl hydroxycocaines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Published wash criteria and cutoffs were applied to the results. Additionally, the data were used to formulate new reporting criteria and interpretation guidelines for forensic casework. Applying the wash and reporting criteria, hair that was externally contaminated with COC was distinguished from hair collected from individuals known to have consumed COC. In addition, CE, NC and hydroxycocaine metabolites were only present in COC users' hair and not in drug chemists' hair. When properly applied, the use of an extended wash, along with the reporting criteria defined here, will exclude false-positive results from environmental contact with COC. PMID:25100648

  19. Relationship between occurrence mode of arsenic in coal and its washing rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, M.-S.; Zheng, B.-S.; Finkelman, R.B.; Hu, Jiawen; Wu, D.-S.; Li, S.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of 15 raw coals and washed coals collected from Southwestern, the washing rate of arsenic, sulfur and ash from raw coals was studied. The average washing rate of arsenic in raw coal is 38%. Arsenic of raw coals is mainly associated with pyrite and sulfide. However, arsenic of some raw coals is mainly or wholly associated with organic matter and mineral enwrapped by organic matter. It is difficult to remove such part of arsenic and it will enrich in the washed coals. The results show that there is a little relationship between occurrence mode of arsenic associated with organic sulfur and rank of coal, but it is complicated with age of coal-bearing strata.

  20. Brief communication: Choice of washing method of hair samples for trace element analysis in environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Sen, J; Das Chaudhuri, A B

    2001-07-01

    Determination of inseparable exogenous and endogenous levels of toxic trace elements such as lead in human scalp hair has been used to understand and assess population exposure to such elements. For any such analysis, washing of the hair samples to remove superficial contamination is the foremost requirement. However, the use of such washing methods prior to elemental analysis removes minute quantities of trace elements from the hair strands. This degree of loss is dependent on the washing method employed. In the present study, the element lead has been determined in human scalp hair after three methods of hair washing. It is apparent that the nonionic detergent-acetone method is best suited for securing valid lead analysis results in human scalp hair. PMID:11424080

  1. 5. Building E9; view of top of wash tank showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Building E-9; view of top of wash tank showing agitator and RDX line entering tank; third floor, looking NW. (Harms and Ryan) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  2. 16 CFR 1631.61 - Hide carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Alternatively the selected sample or oversized specimens thereof may be washed, dry-cleaned, or shampooed...

  3. 16 CFR 1630.61 - Hide carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Alternatively the selected sample or oversized specimens thereof may be washed, dry-cleaned, or shampooed...

  4. Teaching a Young Autistic Boy How to Wash His Hands and Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quenville, Pam

    1980-01-01

    Marked positive changes were observed in face and hand washing behavior over the 10 session behavior modification program which employed a chocolate milkshake as the major material reinforcer. (Author/DLS)

  5. Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane: Sand wash basin, Colorado and Wyoming. Topical report, August 1, 1991-April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; McMurry, R.G.

    1993-08-01

    Contents: tectonic evolution, stratigraphic setting, and coal fracture patterns of the sand wash basin; stratigraphy and coal occurrence of the upper cretaceous mesaverde group, sand wash basin; coal rank, gas content, and composition and origin of coalbed gases, mesaverde group, sand wash basin; hydrologic setting of the upper mesaverde group, sand wash basin; stratigraphy and coal occurrence of the paleocene fort union formation, sand wash basin; coal rank, gas content, and composition and origin of coalbed gases, fort union formation, sand wash basin; hydrologic setting of the fort union formation, sand wash basin; and resources and producibility of coalbed methane in the sand wash basin.

  6. Ultrasonic and mechanical soil washing processes for the remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seulgi; Lee, Wontae; Son, Younggyu

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic/mechanical soil washing process was investigated and compared with ultrasonic process and mechanical process using a relatively large lab-scale sonoreactor. It was found that higher removal efficiencies were observed in the combined processes for 0.1 and 0.3 M HCl washing liquids. It was due to the combination effects of macroscale removal for the overall range of slurry by mechanical mixing and microscale removal for the limited zone of slurry by cavitational actions.

  7. Development of a two-stage membrane-based wash-water reclamation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, S. B.

    1988-01-01

    A two-stage membrane-based subsystem was designed and constructed to enable the recycle of wash waters generated in space. The first stage is a fouling-resistant tube-side-feed hollow-fiber ultrafiltration module, and the second stage is a spiral-wound reverse-osmosis module. Throughout long-term tests, the subsystem consistently produced high-quality permeate, processing actual wash water to 95 percent recovery.

  8. 33 CFR 157.130 - Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design... vessel having a COW system under §§ 157.10(e), 157.10a(a)(2), or 157.10c(b)(2) carries more than one grade of crude oil, the COW system must be capable of washing the cargo tanks with the grades of...

  9. 33 CFR 157.130 - Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design... vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2), or § 157.10c(b)(2) carries more than one grade of crude oil, the COW system must be capable of washing the cargo tanks with the grades of...

  10. 33 CFR 157.130 - Crude oil washing with more than one grade of crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design... vessel having a COW system under §§ 157.10(e), 157.10a(a)(2), or 157.10c(b)(2) carries more than one grade of crude oil, the COW system must be capable of washing the cargo tanks with the grades of...

  11. Treatment techniques for the recycling of bottle washing water in the soft drinks industry.

    PubMed

    Ramirez Camperos, E; Mijaylova Nacheva, P; Diaz Tapia, E

    2004-01-01

    The soft drink production is an important sector in the manufacturing industry of Mexico. Water is the main source in the production of soft drinks. Wastewater from bottle washing is almost 50% of the total wastewater generated by this industry. In order to reduce the consumption of water, the water of the last bottle rinse can be reused in to the bottle pre-rinse and pre-washing cycles. This work presents the characterization of the final bottle washing rinse discharge and the treatability study for the most appropriate treatment system for recycling. Average characteristics of the final bottle wash rinse were as follows: Turbidity 40.46 NTU, COD 47.7 mg/L, TSS 56 mg/L, TS 693.6 mg/L, electrical conductivity 1,194 microS/cm. The results of the treatability tests showed that the final rinse water can be used in the pre-rinse and pre-washing after removing the totality of the suspended solids, 80% of the COD and 75% of the dissolved solids. This can be done using the following treatment systems: filtration-adsorption-reverse osmosis, or filtration-adsorption-ion exchange. The installation of these treatment techniques in the soft drink industry would decrease bottle washing water consumption by 50%. PMID:15344780

  12. The integration of innovative technologies into a physical-separation-based soil washing system

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    An innovative system`s approach to the treatment of soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has been proposed to effectively and cost competitively treat a significant mass of soil. The use of an integrated soil treatment system to decontaminate FEMP soils is a unique application of the soil washing technology. Due to the unfavorable soil particle size distribution and the ubiquitous distribution of uranium among these particle size fractions, conventional soil washing processes commonly used on predominantly sandy soils alone may not achieve the desirable waste minimization level without the inclusion of innovative technologies. This objective of this paper is to briefly describe the physical separation and chemical extraction process commonly used in soil washing operation and to present the baseline soil washing approach used on FEMP soils. Noting the successful and not-so-successful processes within the soil washing operation at the FEMP, a proposed innovative system`s approach to treating FEMP soils will be described. This system`s approach will integrate a conventional soil washing operation with proposed innovative technologies.

  13. Remediation of hexachlorobenzene contaminated soils by rhamnolipid enhanced soil washing coupled with activated carbon selective adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinzhong; Chai, Lina; Lu, Xiaohua; Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian

    2011-05-15

    The present study investigates the selective adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from rhamnolipid solution by a powdered activated carbon (PAC). A combined soil washing-PAC adsorption technique is further evaluated on the removal of HCB from two soils, a spiked kaolin and a contaminated real soil. PAC at a dosage of 10 g L(-1) could achieve a HCB removal of 80-99% with initial HCB and rhamnolipid concentrations of 1 mg L(-1) and 3.3-25 g L(-1), respectively. The corresponding adsorptive loss of rhamnolipid was 8-19%. Successive soil washing-PAC adsorption tests (new soil sample was subjected to washing for each cycle) showed encouraging leaching and adsorption performances for HCB. When 25 g L(-1) rhamnolipid solution was applied, HCB leaching from soils was 55-71% for three cycles of washing, and HCB removal by PAC was nearly 90%. An overall 86% and 88% removal of HCB were obtained for kaolin and real soil, respectively, by using the combined process to wash one soil sample for twice. Our investigation suggests that coupling AC adsorption with biosurfactant-enhanced soil washing is a promising alternative to remove hydrophobic organic compounds from soils. PMID:21397398

  14. Effect of Variations of Washing Solution Chemistry on Nanomaterial Physicochemical Changes in the Laundry Cycle.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, Denise M; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-08-18

    Engineered nanoparticle (ENP) life cycles are strongly dependent on the life-cycle of the nanoenhanced products in which they are incorporated. An important phase for ENP associated with textiles is washing. Using a set of liquid and powdered commercially available detergents that span a wide range of different chemistries, washing studies were performed with one "standard" nanoparticle suspended in wash solution to systematically investigate (changes to) particle size distribution, dissolution, reprecipitation (i.e., "new" particle formation), and complexation to particulate matter. Au ENPs were used as a "tracer" through the system. TEM and EDX analysis were performed to observe morphological and chemical changes to the particles, and single-particle ICP-MS was used to build a size distribution of particles in solution. Varying the washing solution chemistry was found to dictate the extent and rate of dissolution, particle destruction, surface chemistry change(s), and new particle formation. Detergent chemistry, dominated by oxidizing agents, was a major factor. The detergent form (i.e., powder vs liquid) was the other decisive factor, with powder forms providing available surfaces for precipitation and sorption reactions. Control experiments with AgNO3 indicated metallic Ag particles formed during the washing process from dissolved Ag, implying not all Ag-NPs observed in a textile washing study are indicative of released Ag-ENPs but can also be the result of sequential dissolution/reduction reactions. PMID:26200479

  15. Evaluating the efficacy of playground washing to reduce environmental metal exposures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Zahran, Sammy; Kristensen, Louise; Rouillon, Marek

    2015-07-01

    Washing and wet mopping is often advocated as a remedial treatment to limit exposure to lead dust. Here, surface and pre- and post-play wipes were measured to ascertain dust metal exposures (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) following play routines at four playgrounds in the smelter city of Port Pirie, South Australia, which are washed regularly. Although post-play hand wipe metals were 55.9% (95% CI: -0.78, -0.34) lower on wash days, loadings increased ∼5.1% (95% CI: 1.2, 11.7) per hour after washing. Despite washing, post-play hand lead exceeded a conservative value of 800 μg/m(2) within 24 h or sooner, with loadings increasing in proximity to the smelter. Post-play lead loadings were always >1000 μg/m(2) at the playground closest to smelter. Playground washing results in short-lived exposure reduction and effective treatment requires elimination of smelter emissions. PMID:25818090

  16. Characterization of the SRNL-Washed tank 51 sludge batch 9 qualification sample

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel have been requested to qualify the next sludge batch (Sludge Batch 9 – SB9) for processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To accomplish this task, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) sent SRNL a 3-L sample of Tank 51H slurry to be characterized, washed, and then used in a lab-scale demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet (after combining with Tank 40H sludge). SRNL has washed the Tank 51H sample per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. A part of the qualification process is extensive radionuclide and chemical characterization of the SRNL-washed Tank 51H slurry. This report documents the chemical characterization of the washed slurry; radiological characterization is in progress and will be documented in a separate report. The analytical results of this characterization are comparable to the Tank Farm projections. Therefore, it is recommended that SRNL use this washed slurry for the ongoing SB9 qualification activities.

  17. Trafficking defects in WASH-knockout fibroblasts originate from collapsed endosomal and lysosomal networks.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Timothy S; Gorman, Jacquelyn A; de Narvajas, Amaia Artal-Martinez; Koenig, Alexander O; Billadeau, Daniel D

    2012-08-01

    The Arp2/3-activator Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and Scar homologue (WASH) is suggested to regulate actin-dependent membrane scission during endosomal sorting, but its cellular roles have not been fully elucidated. To investigate WASH function, we generated tamoxifen-inducible WASH-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (WASHout MEFs). Of interest, although EEA1(+) endosomes were enlarged, collapsed, and devoid of filamentous-actin and Arp2/3 in WASHout MEFs, we did not observe elongated membrane tubules emanating from these disorganized endomembranes. However, collapsed WASHout endosomes harbored segregated subdomains, containing either retromer cargo recognition complex-associated proteins or EEA1. In addition, we observed global collapse of LAMP1(+) lysosomes, with some lysosomal membrane domains associated with endosomes. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfnR) exhibited changes in steady-state cellular localization. EGFR was directed to the lysosomal compartment and exhibited reduced basal levels in WASHout MEFs. However, although TfnR was accumulated with collapsed endosomes, it recycled normally. Moreover, EGF stimulation led to efficient EGFR degradation within enlarged lysosomal structures. These results are consistent with the idea that discrete receptors differentially traffic via WASH-dependent and WASH-independent mechanisms and demonstrate that WASH-mediated F-actin is requisite for the integrity of both endosomal and lysosomal networks in mammalian cells. PMID:22718907

  18. Assessing uncertainty in pollutant build-up and wash-off processes.

    PubMed

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-05-01

    Assessing build-up and wash-off process uncertainty is important for accurate interpretation of model outcomes to facilitate informed decision making for developing effective stormwater pollution mitigation strategies. Uncertainty inherent to pollutant build-up and wash-off processes influences the variations in pollutant loads entrained in stormwater runoff from urban catchments. However, build-up and wash-off predictions from stormwater quality models do not adequately represent such variations due to poor characterisation of the variability of these processes in mathematical models. The changes to the mathematical form of current models with the incorporation of process variability, facilitates accounting for process uncertainty without significantly affecting the model prediction performance. Moreover, the investigation of uncertainty propagation from build-up to wash-off confirmed that uncertainty in build-up process significantly influences wash-off process uncertainty. Specifically, the behaviour of particles <150 μm during build-up primarily influences uncertainty propagation, resulting in appreciable variations in the pollutant load and composition during a wash-off event. PMID:26840516

  19. Wash resistance and efficacy of Olyset net and Permanet 2.0 against Anopheles stephensi in India.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ripu Daman; Mittal, P K; Kapoor, Neera; Razdan, R K; Dash, A P

    2011-12-01

    Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) have been developed for wash resistance and long-lasting effects against mosquito vectors. In this study we evaluated 2 LLIN products, Olyset net and Permanet 2.0, washed for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 times, against Anopheles stephensi, an urban malaria vector in India. We assessed the wash resistance and efficacy of these nets in relation to bloodfeeding inhibition and percent mortality in cone and tunnel test bioassays. Both Olyset and Permanet showed >80% mortality of An. stephensi in cone bioassays after 20 washes. In tunnel tests there was no significant difference between Olyset and Permanet 2.0 in causing total mosquito mortality (immediate and delayed) up to 10 washes and bloodfeeding inhibition and entry rate up to 15 washes. After the 20th wash, Permanet 2.0 was significantly more effective than the Olyset net in causing total mosquito mortality, whereas Olyset net showed less bloodfeeding and entry of mosquitoes as compared to Permanet 2.0. There was a gradual decline in efficacy of both LLIN products as the number of washings increased. Cone bioassays indicated a strong wash resistance in both the LLIN products after 20 washes. However, the tunnel tests demonstrated a gradual decline in efficacy of both products with the number of washings. PMID:22329276

  20. Roles of EDTA washing and Ca²⁺ regulation on the restoration of anammox granules inhibited by copper(II).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Cheng, Ya-Fei; Zhou, Yu-Huang; Buayi, Xiemuguli; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2016-01-15

    We investigated the feasibility of using ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) washing followed by Ca(2+) enhancement for the recovery of anammox reactors inhibited by Cu(II). Kinetic experiments and batch activity assays were employed to determine the optimal concentration of EDTA and washing time; and the performance and physiological dynamics were tracked by continuous-flow monitoring to evaluate the long-term effects. The two-step desorption process revealed that the Cu in anammox granules was primarily introduced via adsorption (approximately, 80.5%), and the portion of Cu in the dispersible layer was predominant (accounting for 71.1%). Afterwards, the Cu internalized in the cells (approximately, 14.7%) could diffuse out of the cells and be gradually washed out of the reactor over the next 20 days. The Ca(2+) addition that followed led to an accelerated nitrogen removal rate recovery slope (0.1491 kgN m(-3) d(-2)) and a normal biomass growth rate (0.054 d(-1)). The nitrogen removal rate returned to normal levels within 90 days and gradual improvements in granular characteristics were also achieved. Therefore, this study provides a new insight that externally removing the adsorbed heavy metals followed by internally repairing the metabolic system may represent an optimal restoration strategy for anammox consortium damaged by heavy metals. PMID:26342580