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Sample records for acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins

  1. Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectin G Promotes Atherosclerosis and Liver Inflammation by Suppressing the Protective Functions of B-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Sabrina; Hendrikx, Tim; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Ozsvar-Kozma, Maria; Göderle, Laura; Mallat, Ziad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Nitschke, Lars; Binder, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is initiated and sustained by hypercholesterolemia, which results in the generation of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) and other metabolic byproducts that trigger inflammation. Specific immune responses have been shown to modulate the inflammatory response during atherogenesis. The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G) is a negative regulator of the functions of several immune cells, including myeloid cells and B-1 cells. Here, we show that deficiency of Siglec-G in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibits plaque formation and diet-induced hepatic inflammation. We further demonstrate that selective deficiency of Siglec-G in B cells alone is sufficient to mediate these effects. Levels of B-1 cell-derived natural IgM with specificity for OxLDL were significantly increased in the plasma and peritoneal cavity of Siglec-G-deficient mice. Consistent with the neutralizing functions of OxLDL-specific IgM, Siglec-G-deficient mice were protected from OxLDL-induced sterile inflammation. Thus, Siglec-G promotes atherosclerosis and hepatic inflammation by suppressing protective anti-inflammatory effector functions of B cells. PMID:26947073

  2. Multivalent Interactions of Human Primary Amine Oxidase with the V and C22 Domains of Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-Like Lectin-9 Regulate Its Binding and Amine Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fair-Mäkelä, Ruth; Salo-Ahen, Outi M. H.; Guédez, Gabriela; Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Grönholm, Janne; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salminen, Tiina A.

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-9 (Siglec-9) on leukocyte surface is a counter-receptor for endothelial cell surface adhesin, human primary amine oxidase (hAOC3), a target protein for anti-inflammatory agents. This interaction can be used to detect inflammation and cancer in vivo, since the labeled peptides derived from the second C2 domain (C22) of Siglec-9 specifically bind to the inflammation-inducible hAOC3. As limited knowledge on the interaction between Siglec-9 and hAOC3 has hampered both hAOC3-targeted drug design and in vivo imaging applications, we have now produced and purified the extracellular region of Siglec-9 (Siglec-9-EC) consisting of the V, C21 and C22 domains, modeled its 3D structure and characterized the hAOC3–Siglec-9 interactions using biophysical methods and activity/inhibition assays. Our results assign individual, previously unknown roles for the V and C22 domains. The V domain is responsible for the unusually tight Siglec-9–hAOC3 interactions whereas the intact C22 domain of Siglec-9 is required for modulating the enzymatic activity of hAOC3, crucial for the hAOC3-mediated leukocyte trafficking. By characterizing the Siglec-9-EC mutants, we could conclude that R120 in the V domain likely interacts with the terminal sialic acids of hAOC3 attached glycans whereas residues R284 and R290 in C22 are involved in the interactions with the active site channel of hAOC3. Furthermore, the C22 domain binding enhances the enzymatic activity of hAOC3 although the sialic acid-binding capacity of the V domain of Siglec-9 is abolished by the R120S mutation. To conclude, our results prove that the V and C22 domains of Siglec-9-EC interact with hAOC3 in a multifaceted and unique way, forming both glycan-mediated and direct protein-protein interactions, respectively. The reported results on the mechanism of the Siglec-9–hAOC3 interaction are valuable for the development of hAOC3-targeted therapeutics and diagnostic tools. PMID:27893774

  3. A C-type lectin with an immunoglobulin-like domain promotes phagocytosis of hemocytes in crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-07-14

    C-type lectins are important immune molecules that participate in host defense response. The present work reports a novel C-type lectin (PcLec3) from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Sequence analysis found that PcLec3 encodes a polypeptide with252 amino acid residues, which contains an immunoglobulin-like domain (IG) and a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) arranged in tandem. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that PcLec3 is enriched expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas cells, in which PcLec3 was up-regulated following bacterial challenge by Vibrio anguillarum. Function analysis using recombinant full-length PcLec3, IG, and CTLD proteins revealed that these recombinant proteins had the capacity to bind carbohydrates and bacteria, while IG determined the cell binding activity. However, only full-length PcLec3 promotes the phagocytic activity of hemocytes and subsequent clearance of invasive bacteria. Taken together, these results manifest that PcLec3 acts as a hemocyte adhesion molecule to promote hemocyte phagocytosis against invasive V. anguillarum.

  4. A C-type lectin with an immunoglobulin-like domain promotes phagocytosis of hemocytes in crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-01-01

    C-type lectins are important immune molecules that participate in host defense response. The present work reports a novel C-type lectin (PcLec3) from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Sequence analysis found that PcLec3 encodes a polypeptide with252 amino acid residues, which contains an immunoglobulin-like domain (IG) and a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) arranged in tandem. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that PcLec3 is enriched expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas cells, in which PcLec3 was up-regulated following bacterial challenge by Vibrio anguillarum. Function analysis using recombinant full-length PcLec3, IG, and CTLD proteins revealed that these recombinant proteins had the capacity to bind carbohydrates and bacteria, while IG determined the cell binding activity. However, only full-length PcLec3 promotes the phagocytic activity of hemocytes and subsequent clearance of invasive bacteria. Taken together, these results manifest that PcLec3 acts as a hemocyte adhesion molecule to promote hemocyte phagocytosis against invasive V. anguillarum. PMID:27411341

  5. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsuda, Eisuke

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. {yields} Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D{sub 3} and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  6. Physiochemical studies on achatininH, a novel sialic acid-binding lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, C; Basu, S; Mandal, C

    1989-01-01

    We have purified a sialic acid-binding lectin, achatininH, in a single step by affinity chromatography, having high affinity for 9-O-acetylneuraminic acid. The physicochemical characterization of the interaction of achatininH with bivalent metal ions and sialic acid derivatives by the use of spectrofluorimetry, spectropolarimetry and precipitin reaction is reported. From fluorescence quenching studies the binding of Ca2+ (Ka = 251 +/- 9 M-1) and of Mn2+ (Ka = 86 +/- 5 M-1) was found to be weak, but their presence is absolutely necessary for sugar binding as well as biological activity. The nature and position of the substituent group play a very important role in the binding affinity. AchatininH shows a high affinity for 9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Ka = 1.20 x 10(3) +/- 0.07 x 10(3) M-1) compared with that for the 4-O-acetyl derivative. In oligomers the binding strength increases in the order monosaccharide less than disaccharide less than trisaccharide. The binding affinity of achatininH for the disaccharide was found to reach a peak around pH 8. From c.d. spectral studies achatininH was found to have a high beta-sheet content (46%) and a low alpha-helix content (24%). From precipitin analysis at least one sugar-binding site on each of the 16 monomer subunits of the protein is indicated. PMID:2920028

  7. Purification of Two Novel Sugar Acid-binding Lectins from Haplomitrium Mnioides (bryophyte, Plantae) and their Preliminary Characterization.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Two novel sugar acid-binding lectins were purified from Haplomitrium mnioides (Lindb.) Schust. using a procedure consisting of ammonium sulfate precipitation, G-50 gel filtration, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and HW-50 gel filtration. We reported their partial physicochemical properties: molecular weight, affinity for carbohydrates and organic acids, pH stability, and dependence of their hemagglutination activity on metal ions. We also determined their N-terminal amino acid sequences. H. mnioides lectins (HMLs) were monomers (one with a molecular weight of approximately 27 kDa, and the other with a molecular weight of approximately 105 kDa) under both nonreducing and reducing conditions. They were named HML27 and HML105, respectively. Both HMLs had an affinity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, D-glucuronic acid, D-glucaric acid, bovine submaxillary mucin, heparin, and organic acids, such as citrate, 2-oxoglutaric acid, and D-2-hydroxyglutarate. Furthermore, HML27 had an affinity for α-D-galacturonic acid, D-malate, L-malate, and pyruvate, while HML105 had an affinity for D-gluconic acid. HML27 and HML105 are novel plant lectins: they have an affinity for sugar acids and organic acids and specifically recognize the carboxyl group, and there is no homology between their N-terminal amino acid sequences and those of the previously described lectins and agglutinins.

  8. A glucuronic acid binding leguminous lectin with mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-02-01

    A dimeric 64-kDa lectin was purified from seeds of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivar number 1. The purification protocol entailed Q-Sepharose, Affi-gel blue gel, Mono S and Superdex 75. The lectin-enriched fraction was adsorbed on Q-Sepharose and Affi-gel blue gel and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Hemagglutinating activity was adsorbed on Mono S and eluted with a linear 0.3-1 M NaCl gradient. Gel filtration on Superdex 75 yielded a single absorbance peak which appeared as a single 32-kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate poylacylamide gel electrophoresis. Full hemagglutinating activity was observed when the lectin was exposed to a pH ranging from 3 to 11. About 50% activity remained at pH 12, and about 25% at pH 0 to pH 2. Activity was totally abolished at pH 13-14. The activity was completely preserved when the ambient temperature was 20 °C-60 °C. However, only 50% and 12.5% of the activity remained at 65 °C and 70 °C, respectively. Activity was barely discernible at 75 °C and completely abrogated at and above 80 °C. Hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by glucuronic acid. Maximum mitogenic activity of the lectin toward murine splenocytes occurred at a lectin concentration of 0.488 µM. The mitogenic activity was nearly eliminated in the presence of 250 mM glucuronic acid. The lectin did not exhibit antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) cells, breast cancer (MCF7) cells, and nasopharynegeal carcinoma CNE stage 1 and stage 2 cells. It was also devoid of significant anti-HIV reverse transcriptase activity.

  9. Cloning and transcriptional analysis of two sialic acid-binding lectins (SABLs) from razor clam Solen grandis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialong; Wei, Xiumei; Liu, Xiangquan; Xu, Jie; Yang, Dinglong; Yang, Jianmin; Fang, Jinghui; Hu, Xiaoke

    2012-04-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin (SABL) plays crucial role in both innate and adaptive immune responses benefiting from its predominant affinity toward glycan. In the present study, two SABLs from razor clam Solen grandis (designated as SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2) were identified, and their expression patterns, both in tissues and towards microorganism glycan stimulation, were then characterized. The cDNA of SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 was 988 and 1281 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 744 and 570 bp, respectively, and deduced amino acid sequences showed high similarity to other invertebrates SABLs. Both SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 encoded a C1q domain. SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 were found to be constitutively expressed in a wide range of tissues with different levels, including mantle, gill, gonad, hemocyte, muscle, and hepatopancreas, and both of them were highly expressed in hepatopancreas. SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 could be significantly induced after razor clams were stimulated by acetylated subunits-containing glycan LPS and PGN, suggesting the two SgSABLs might perform potential function of glycan recognition. In addition, SgSABL-2 could also be induced by β-1,3-glucan. All these results indicated that SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 might be involved in the immune response against microbe infection and contributed to the pathogens recognition.

  10. Novel galactonic acid-binding hexameric lectin from Hibiscus mutabilis seeds with antiproliferative and potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze Kwan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2009-01-01

    A hexameric 150-kDa lectin was isolated from dried Hibiscus mutabilis seeds using a chromatographic protocol that involved ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration on Superdex 75 and Superdex 200. The lectin was not adsorbed on SP-Sepharose and was eluted from the Superdex 75 column in the void volume. It was eluted in the first peak from Superdex 200. It was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose and could not be easily desorbed. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin, which was stable at pH 4-7 and up to 50 degrees C, could be inhibited by 25 mM galactonic acid. This is the first report of a galactonic acid-binding lectin. It potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 0.2 microM. It exhibited weak antiproliferative activity towards both hepatoma HepG2 cells (40% inhibition) and breast cancer MCF-7 cells (50% inhibition) at 100 microM concentration of the lectin. It did not inhibit mycelial growth of a number of fungi tested.

  11. Secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 promote recovery after rat spinal cord injury by altering macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kohki; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Kano, Fumiya; Kondo, Megumi; Noda, Mariko; Hashimoto, Noboru; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Suzumura, Akio; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-02-11

    Engrafted mesenchymal stem cells from human deciduous dental pulp (SHEDs) support recovery from neural insults via paracrine mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we show that the conditioned serum-free medium (CM) from SHEDs, administered intrathecally into rat injured spinal cord during the acute postinjury period, caused remarkable functional recovery. The ability of SHED-CM to induce recovery was associated with an immunoregulatory activity that induced anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages. Secretome analysis of the SHED-CM revealed a previously unrecognized set of inducers for anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9). Depleting MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 from the SHED-CM prominently reduced its ability to induce M2-like macrophages and to promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The combination of MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 synergistically promoted the M2-like differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro, and this effect was abolished by a selective antagonist for CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) or by the genetic knock-out of CCR2. Furthermore, MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 administration into the injured spinal cord induced M2-like macrophages and led to a marked recovery of hindlimb locomotor function after SCI. The inhibition of this M2 induction through the inactivation of CCR2 function abolished the therapeutic effects of both SHED-CM and MCP-1/ED-Siglec-9. Macrophages activated by MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 extended neurite and suppressed apoptosis of primary cerebellar granule neurons against the neurotoxic effects of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Our data suggest that the unique combination of MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 repairs the SCI through anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophage induction.

  12. A Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif revealed in an adenovirus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Christoph; Bru, Thierry; McBride, Ryan; Robison, Elizabeth; Nycholat, Corwin M; Kremer, Eric J; Paulson, James C

    2012-01-01

    Sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of transmembrane receptors that are well documented to play roles in regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. To see whether the features that define the molecular recognition of sialic acid were found in other sialic-acid-binding proteins, we analyzed 127 structures with bound sialic acids found in the Protein Data Bank database. Of these, the canine adenovirus 2-fiber knob protein showed close local structural relationship to Siglecs despite low sequence similarity. The fiber knob harbors a noncanonical sialic-acid recognition site, which was then explored for detailed specificity using a custom glycan microarray comprising 58 diverse sialosides. It was found that the adenoviral protein preferentially recognizes the epitope Neu5Acα2-3[6S]Galβ1-4GlcNAc, a structure previously identified as the preferred ligand for Siglec-8 in humans and Siglec-F in mice. Comparison of the Siglec and fiber knob sialic-acid-binding sites reveal conserved structural elements that are not clearly identifiable from the primary amino acid sequence, suggesting a Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif that comprises the consensus features of these proteins in complex with sialic acid. PMID:22522600

  13. Members of a Novel Protein Family Containing Microneme Adhesive Repeat Domains Act as Sialic Acid-binding Lectins during Host Cell Invasion by Apicomplexan Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M.; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J.; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for α2–3- over α2–6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to α2–9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6′sulfo-sialyl Lewisx might have implications for tissue tropism. PMID:19901027

  14. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribo-nuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase-3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase-3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase-3/7. PMID:27513956

  15. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribonuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA‑MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA‑MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase‑3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase‑3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA‑MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase‑3/7.

  16. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, FeiFei; Zheng, JunKe; Kang, XunLei; Deng, Mi; Lu, ZhiGang; Kim, Jaehyup; Zhang, ChengCheng

    2015-12-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRB1-5) signal through immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in their intracellular domains and recruit phosphatases protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6, SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6, SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP) to negatively regulate immune cell activation. These receptors are known to play important regulatory roles in immune and neuronal functions. Recent studies demonstrated that several of these receptors are expressed by cancer cells. Importantly, they may directly regulate development, drug resistance, and relapse of cancer, and the activity of cancer stem cells. Although counterintuitive, these findings are consistent with the generally immune-suppressive and thus tumor-promoting roles of the inhibitory receptors in the immune system. This review focuses on the ligands, expression pattern, signaling, and function of LILRB family in the context of cancer development. Because inhibition of the signaling of certain LILRBs directly blocks cancer growth and stimulates immunity that may suppress tumorigenesis, but does not disturb normal development, LILRB signaling pathways may represent ideal targets for treating hematological malignancies and perhaps other tumors.

  17. Importance of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Danilo Santana Alessio; de Souza, Cármino Antonio; Aranha, Francisco José Penteado; Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic diseases, such as multiple myeloma, bone marrow aplasia and leukemia. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility is an important tool to prevent post-transplant complications such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease, but the high rates of relapse limit the survival of transplant patients. Natural Killer cells, a type of lymphocyte that is a key element in the defense against tumor cells, cells infected with viruses and intracellular microbes, have different receptors on their surfaces that regulate their cytotoxicity. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are the most important, interacting consistently with human leukocyte antigen class I molecules present in other cells and thus controlling the activation of natural killer cells. Several studies have shown that certain combinations of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigens (in both donors and recipients) can affect the chances of survival of transplant patients, particularly in relation to the graft-versusleukemia effect, which may be associated to decreased relapse rates in certain groups. This review aims to shed light on the mechanisms and effects of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors - human leukocyte antigen associations and their implications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and to critically analyze the results obtained by the studies presented herein. PMID:23284260

  18. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  19. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  20. Structure of filamin A immunoglobulin-like repeat 10 from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Page, Richard C; Clark, Jeffrey G; Misra, Saurav

    2011-08-01

    Filamin A (FlnA) plays a critical role in cytoskeletal organization, cell motility and cellular signaling. FlnA utilizes different binding sites on a series of 24 immunoglobulin-like domains (Ig repeats) to interact with diverse cytosolic proteins and with cytoplasmic portions of membrane proteins. Mutations in a specific domain, Ig10 (FlnA-Ig10), are correlated with two severe forms of the otopalatodigital syndrome spectrum disorders Melnick-Needles syndrome and frontometaphyseal dysplasia. The crystal structure of FlnA-Ig10 determined at 2.44 Å resolution provides insight into the perturbations caused by these mutations.

  1. Cysteine Proteases Inhibitors with immunoglobulin-like fold in protozoan parasites and their role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Lopez-Castillo, Laura Margarita; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Brieba, Luis G

    2016-08-13

    The number of protein folds in nature is limited, thus is not surprising that proteins with the same fold are able to exert different functions. The cysteine protease inhibitors that adopt an immunoglobulin-like fold (Ig-ICPs) are inhibitors encoded in bacteria and protozoan parasites. Structural studies indicate that these inhibitors resemble the structure of archetypical proteins with an Ig fold, like antibodies, cadherins or cell receptors. The structure of Ig-ICPs from four different protozoan parasites clearly shows the presence of three loops that form part of a protein-ligand interaction surface that resembles the antigen binding sites of antibodies. Thus, Ig-ICPs bind to different cysteine proteases using a tripartite mechanism in which their BC, DE and FG loops are responsible for the main interactions with the target cysteine protease. Ig-ICPs from different protozoan parasites regulate the enzymatic activity of host or parasite's proteases and thus regulate virulence and pathogenesis.

  2. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor genes in the Mongolian population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Aili; Ju, Zhong; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor (KIR) is highly polymorphic in genotype, haplotype and allele levels. This study was done to investigate KIR genes frequencies, genotypes and inheritance in Mongolian. Gene-specific PCR amplification was used to identify the presence or absence of 16 KIR loci.KIR genotypes were obtained by a KIR genotypes website. The KIR genes frequencies of Mongolian were compared to 24 different populations around the world. The distribution of haplotype B in Mongolian was higher than that in Mongoloid and less than that in Caucasian. Thirty discovered genotypes and five novel genotypes were identified from 1 to 34 individuals. 37.8% of Mongolian carried KIR haplotype AA.Mongolian was exhibited between North Mongoloid and Caucasus by principal component and genetic tree analysis.

  3. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and cytomegalovirus reactivation during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Hernández, D L; Benítez-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez-Cuevas, J S; Rosales-Saavedra, T; Guerra-Palomares, S E; Comas-García, A; Noyola, D E; García-Sepúlveda, C A

    2016-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) represents an important public health concern as it is associated with severe morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients, HIV-infected individuals and pregnant women given the risk of congenital infection. Congenital CMV is a leading cause of neurological sequelae, developmental delay and birth defects worldwide. Cytomegalovirus can be transmitted to the foetus following maternal infection or reactivation. NK cells expressing killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are part of the innate immune system and the first line of defence against viral incursions. Previous reports have shown that KIR genes are associated with CMV infections in the post-transplant setting. In this study, we set out to determine whether a protective effect of KIR genes over CMV infection is seen in Mexican pregnant women. Cytomegalovirus infection was assessed through nucleic acid testing in 200 pregnant women and 600 healthy blood donors comprising the Mexican mestizo reference population. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and HLA-C genotypes were obtained from 200 pregnant women and 300 reference samples using a comprehensive PCR-SSP approach. We observed statistically lower carrier frequencies of cB03|tA01 gene-content haplotype, of cB03 haplotype motif, of the KIR2DL5 + 2DS3/2DS5 gene pair and of KIR2DL5 amongst CMV-positive pregnant women in comparison with those CMV negative. None of these were associated with CMV status in the reference population. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the most important factor determining CMV status during third-trimester pregnancies was the KIR2DL5 + 2DS3/2DS5 gene pair (OR 0.376 (95%CI 0.174, 0.811, P = 0.013). Our results indicate that CMV-protective KIR gene associations described in Caucasoid populations are also present in the genetically distinct Mexican mestizo population. Our results suggest that certain KIR gene combinations provide protection against CMV infections occurring

  4. Clinical significance of leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expression in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xueshan; Miao, Fang; Cao, Yanning; Xue, Jiangnan; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is broadly expressed on the majority of immune cells; however, the biological role of LAIR in solid tumors has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, using immunohistochemical staining analysis, the expression of LAIR-1 in human cervical cancer (HCC) and nontumor-adjacent tissue specimens was determined, and the results indicated that the expression of LAIR-1 in HCC tissue was higher compared with that in noncancerous tissue. The χ2 test was used to analyze the correlation between the expression of LAIR-1 in tumor tissues with clinicopathological parameters. The results showed that the expression of LAIR-1 in the cancer cell nucleus was significantly associated with tumor size, pathological differentiation, T classification and clinical stage. In addition, the expression in the cytoplasm was evidently associated with the number of positive lymph nodes. The HCC cell line, ME-180, which does not express LAIR-1, was stably transfected using LAIR-1 cDNA. Cell Counting Kit-8 and an annexin V assay showed that the overexpression of LAIR-1 in ME-180 cells suppressed the proliferation and anti-apoptosis capacity of the cells. These findings demonstrated that LAIR-1 is markedly overexpressed in HCC tissue, and that its expression status is associated with tumor progression. LAIR-1 may be a biomarker and target in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:28105100

  5. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  6. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development.

  7. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology – as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  8. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Vendelbosch, Sanne; de Boer, Martin; Gouw, Remko A T W; Ho, Cynthia K Y; Geissler, Judy; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Moorhouse, Michael J; Lardy, Neubury M; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV) has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (auto)immunity and infectious disease.

  9. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) locus profiles in the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Meriem, Bani; Jihen, Seket; Houda, Kaabi; Ghaya, Cherif; Manel, Chaabane; Hedi, Bellali; Slama, Hmida

    2015-05-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of inhibitory and activatory receptors that are expressed by most natural killer (NK) cells. The KIR gene family is polymorphic: genomic diversity is achieved through differences in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The number of KIR loci has been reported to vary among individuals, resulting in different KIR haplotypes. In this study we report the genotypic structure of KIRs in 267 unrelated and healthy Tunisian subjects by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method. All 16 KIR genes were observed in the population with different frequencies; framework genes KIR3DP1 and KIR3DL2 and the nonframework genes KIR2DL1 and KIR2DP1 were present in all individuals. A total of 26 different KIR gene profiles and 54 subgenotypes were observed in the tested population samples. Genotype 1, with a frequency of 36.6%, is the most commonly observed in the Tunisian population. Our results showed that the Tunisian population possesses the previously reported general features of the Caucasian as well as African populations, with some additional interesting differences. Such knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in populations is very useful in the study of associations with diseases and in selection of donors for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation.

  10. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor repertoire analysis in a Caucasian Spanish cohort with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, Ruth; Campillo, Jose A; Legaz, Isabel; Valdés, Mariano; Salama, Hortensia; Boix, Francisco; Hernández-Martínez, A M; Eguia, Jorge; González-Martínez, G; Moya-Quiles, Maria R; Minguela, Alfredo; García-Alonso, Ana; Carballo, Fernando; Muro, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Immunological molecules are implicated in inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]). Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are also genetically variable proteins involved in immune function. They are expressed by NK cells and certain T lymphocytes, regulate specificity and function by interaction with HLA Class I molecules, may be either inhibitory or activating and are polymorphic both in terms of alleles and haplotype gene content. Genetic associations between activating KIRs and certain autoimmune and inflammatory diseases have been reported; however, a possible association between KIR and IBD remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between KIR repertoire and IBD pathologies in a Spanish cohort. KIR variability was analyzed using PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP). Inhibitory KIR2DL5 was found more frequently in UC and IBD patient groups than in healthy controls (P = 0.028 and P = 0.01, respectively), as was activating KIR2DS1 (P = 0.02, Pc > 0.05, UC vs. Controls; P = 0.001, Pc = 0.01, IBD vs Controls; P = 0.01, Pc > 0.05, Controls vs CR), KIR2DS5 (P = 0.0028, Pc = 0.04, Controls vs UC; P = 0.0001, Pc = 0.0017, Controls vs IBD; P = 0.01, Pc > 0.05, Controls vs CD) and KIR3DS1 (P = 0.012, Pc > 0.05, Controls vs IBD). Our data suggest that imbalance between activating and inhibitory KIR may partially explain the different pathogeneses of these IBDs and that there is a hypothetical role for the telomeric B region (which contains both KIR2DS5 and KIR2DS1) in these diseases.

  11. Association of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genes with Hodgkin's Lymphoma in a Familial Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fionnuala; Orsi, Laurent; Amiel, Corinne; Lependeven, Catherine; Antoni, Guillemette; Hermine, Olivier; Brice, Pauline; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Canioni, Danielle; Brière, Josette; Raphael, Martine; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Clavel, Jacqueline; Middleton, Derek; Vivier, Eric; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the major environmental factor associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), a common lymphoma in young adults. Natural killer (NK) cells are key actors of the innate immune response against viruses. The regulation of NK cell function involves activating and inhibitory Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which are expressed in variable numbers on NK cells. Various viral and virus-related malignant disorders have been associated with the presence/absence of certain KIR genes in case/control studies. We investigated the role of the KIR cluster in HL in a family-based association study. Methodology We included 90 families with 90 HL index cases (age 16–35 years) and 255 first-degree relatives (parents and siblings). We developed a procedure for reconstructing full genotypic information (number of gene copies) at each KIR locus from the standard KIR gene content. Out of the 90 collected families, 84 were informative and suitable for further analysis. An association study was then carried out with specific family-based analysis methods on these 84 families. Principal Findings Five KIR genes in strong linkage disequilibrium were found significantly associated with HL. Refined haplotype analysis showed that the association was supported by a dominant protective effect of KIR3DS1 and/or KIR2DS1, both of which are activating receptors. The odds ratios for developing HL in subjects with at least one copy of KIR3DS1 or KIR2DS1 with respect to subjects with neither of these genes were 0.44[95% confidence interval 0.23–0.85] and 0.42[0.21–0.85], respectively. No significant association was found in a tentative replication case/control study of 68 HL cases (age 18–71 years). In the familial study, the protective effect of KIR3DS1/KIR2DS1 tended to be stronger in HL patients with detectable EBV in blood or tumour cells. Conclusions This work defines a template for family-based association studies based on full genotypic

  12. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Associations with Autoimmune and Allergic Diseases, Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion, and Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kuśnierczyk, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of cell surface inhibitory or activating receptors expressed on natural killer cells and some subpopulations of T lymphocytes. KIR genes are clustered in the 19q13.4 region and are characterized by both allelic (high numbers of variants) and haplotypic (different numbers of genes for inhibitory and activating receptors on individual chromosomes) polymorphism. This contributes to diverse susceptibility to diseases and other clinical situations. Associations of KIR genes, as well as of genes for their ligands, with selected diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and non-small cell lung cancer are discussed in the context of NK and T cell functions. PMID:23372569

  13. Genomic structure of PIR-B, the inhibitory member of the paired immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Alley, T L; Cooper, M D; Chen, M; Kubagawa, H

    1998-03-01

    The genes encoding the murine paired immunoglobulin-like receptors PIR-A and PIR-B are members of a novel gene family which encode cell-surface receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) and their non-inhibitory/activatory counterparts. PIR-A and PIR-B have highly homologous extracellular domains but distinct transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. A charged arginine in the transmembrane region of PIR-A suggests its potential association with other transmembrane proteins to form a signal transducing unit. PIR-B, in contrast, has an uncharged transmembrane region and several ITIMs in its cytoplasmic tail. These characteristics suggest that PIR-A and PIR-B which are coordinately expressed by B cells and myeloid cells, serve counter-regulatory roles in humoral and inflammatory responses. In the present study we have determined the genomic structure of the single copy PIR-B gene. The gene consists of 15 exons and spans approximately 8 kilobases. The first exon contains the 5' untranslated region, the ATG translation start site, and approximately half of the leader peptide sequence. The remainder of the leader peptide sequence is encoded by exon 2. Exons 3-8 encode the six extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains and exons 9 and 10 code for the extracellular membrane proximal and transmembrane regions. The final five exons (exons 11-15) encode for the ITIM-bearing cytoplasmic tail and the 3' untranslated region. The intron/exon boundaries of PIR-B obey the GT-AG rule and are in phase I, with the notable exception of the three boundaries determined for ITIM-containing exons. A microsatellite composed of the trinucleotide repeat AAG in the intron between exons 9 and 10 provides a useful marker for studying population genetics.

  14. Analysis of EST and lectin expressions in hemocytes of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) (Bivalvia: Mollusca) infected with Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Young-Mee; Park, Kyung-Il; Kim Cho, Somi; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Moonjae

    2006-01-01

    The hemocytes of invertebrates play key roles in both cellular and humoral immune reactions by phagocytosis or delivering immune factors such as lectin and anti-microbial peptides. Bacterial infection causes changes in components such as lectins, anti-bacterial peptides, and lysosomal enzymes of plasma or hemolymph in molluscs. Previously, we found that infection with the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus, increases lectin synthesis in hemocytes. In order to investigate the patterns of genes expressed in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) infected with the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni, we constructed a cDNA library and sequenced 1850 clones (expressed sequence tags). A total of 79 ESTs, were related to 29 functional immune genes such as C-type lectin, lysozyme, and cystatin B, in Manila clams. Lectins were the largest group of immune-function ESTs found in our Manila clams library. Among 7 lectin clones, two full length cDNAs of lectins were cloned. MCL-3, which is a simple C-type lectin composed of 151 amino acids, has a relatively short signal sequence of 17aa and single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of approximately 130 residues. It is highly homologous to eel C-type lectin. The sequence of mc-sialic acid-binding lectin consists of 168 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 19.2 and shows high homology to sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail, Cepaea hortensis. The expression of 7 different lectins in hemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR using gene-specific primers. Hemocytes from Perkinsus-infected clam expressed different sets of lectins than with Vibrio infection. These results demonstrate that several lectins are involved in Manila clam innate immunity and different challenges induce expression of different lectins.

  15. The role of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor haplotypes on the outcome of unrelated donor haematopoietic SCT for thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Littera, R; Orrù, N; Vacca, A; Bertaina, A; Caocci, G; Mulargia, M; Giardini, C; Piras, E; Mastronuzzi, A; Vinti, L; Orrù, S; Locatelli, F; Carcassi, C; La Nasa, G

    2010-11-01

    Recent insight into the pathophysiology of acute GVHD after allogeneic haematopoietic SCT has led to a growing interest in the role of natural killer (NK) cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is mainly regulated by the interaction of activating and inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with their respective ligands. To investigate the impact of KIRs and their ligands on haematopoietic SCT outcome, we performed a retrospective study of 78 transfusion-dependent thalassaemia patients (median age 10 years, range 1-29 years) transplanted from an unrelated donor selected using high-resolution molecular typing for both class I and II loci after a myeloablative conditioning regimen. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of CsA, short-term MTX and anti-thymocyte globulin in all patients. We found that patients transplanted from donors homozygous for KIR haplotype A had a greater risk of developing grade II-IV acute GVHD compared with those transplanted from a donor carrying at least one B haplotype (hazard ratio=4.5, 99% confidence interval=1.2-17.1, P=0.003). Our study suggests that KIR genotyping of donor and recipient pairs could contribute to the identification of patients at high risk for developing severe complications of haematopoietic SCT and thus may help with the choice of intensity of GVHD prophylaxis.

  16. Paracrine regulation of growth factor signaling by shed leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei; Holmlund, Camilla; Nilsson, Jonas; Inui, Shigeki; Lei, Ting; Itami, Satoshi; Henriksson, Roger; Hedman, Hakan

    2011-02-15

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a recently discovered negative regulator of growth factor signaling. The LRIG1 integral membrane protein has been demonstrated to regulate various oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), by cell-autonomous mechanisms. Here, we investigated whether LRIG1 ectodomains were shed, and if LRIG1 could regulate cell proliferation and EGF signaling in a paracrine manner. Cells constitutively shed LRIG1 ectodomains in vitro, and shedding was modulated by known regulators of metalloproteases, including the ADAM17 specific inhibitor TAPI-2. Furthermore, shedding was enhanced by ectopic expression of Adam17. LRIG1 ectodomains appeared to be shed in vivo, as well, as demonstrated by immunoblotting of mouse and human tissue lysates. Ectopic expression of LRIG1 in lymphocytes suppressed EGF signaling in co-cultured fibroblastoid cells, demonstrating that shed LRIG1 ectodomains can function in a paracrine fashion. Purified LRIG1 ectodomains suppressed EGF signaling without any apparent downregulation of EGFR levels. Taken together, the results show that the LRIG1 ectodomain can be proteolytically shed and can function as a non-cell-autonomous regulator of growth factor signaling. Thus, LRIG1 or its ectodomain could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of growth factor receptor-dependent cancers.

  17. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Java, Kalimantan, Timor and Irian Jaya.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interactions with specific human leucocyte antigen class I molecules on target cells. Population studies performed over the last several years have established that KIR gene frequencies (GFs) and genotype content vary considerably among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity, some of which have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have determined the frequencies of 16 KIR genes and pseudogenes and genotypes in 193 Indonesian individuals from Java, East Timor, Irian Jaya (western half of the island of New Guinea) and Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all four populations. Variation in GFs between populations was observed, except for KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3, KIR2DP1 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GFs between populations, both principal component analysis and a phylogenetic tree showed close clustering of the Kalimantan and Javanese populations, while Irianese populations were clearly separated from the other three populations. Our results indicate a high level of KIR polymorphism in Indonesian populations that probably reflects the large geographical spread of the Indonesian archipelago and the complex evolutionary history and population migration in this region.

  18. [DNA extraction from coagulated human blood for application in genotyping techniques for human leukocyte antigen and immunoglobulin-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia; Clementino, Samaia Laface; Melo, Fabiano Cavalcante de; Braga, Marco Antônio; Souza, Cleonice de; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize a method for extracting high-quality DNA from samples of coagulated blood. Forty-eight samples of human coagulated blood were used for DNA extraction by means of the EZ-DNA commercial kit (Biological Industries, Beit Haemek, Israel), the Neoscience column kit (One Lambda Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and a modified salting-out method. Only the salting-out method was able to extract high concentrations of DNA (mean, 180 ng/(1/4)microl), which were measured using the Qubit fluorescence detector (Invitrogen, USA). This method enabled amplification of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) genes using the Luminex PCR-SSO (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific oligonucleotide) technology, which demands good quality DNA, and amplification of KIR (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes using an in-house PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific primer) technique, which demands a specific concentration of DNA (10 ng/(1/4)microl). We concluded that the modified salting-out technique was very efficient, simple and fast for DNA extraction from human coagulated blood samples, with the aim of genotyping the HLA and KIR genes.

  19. Associations between genes for killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their ligands in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Karabon, Lidia; Jedynak, Anna; Pamula-Pilat, Jolanta; Tecza, Karolina; Kula, Dorota; Kowal, Monika; Frydecka, Irena; Grzybowska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate function of NK cells and subsets of T cells. HLA class I molecules are ligands for inhibitory KIRs while specificity of activating KIRs is mainly unknown. Both KIR and HLA genotypes are highly polymorphic. In this study we analyzed associations of KIR and KIR ligand genes with the incidence and clinical course of epithelial ovarian cancer. DNA of 142 patients was analyzed for KIR genes and 103 samples were typed for HLA class I. Control group consisted of 200 healthy individuals, including 83 women, analyzed separately. The frequency of KIR genes in patients and controls were comparable. HLA-C group 1 (ligand for KIR2DL2/3) was more frequent in patients than in controls (86.4% vs. 67.5%, p=0.002). The frequency of KIR2DS4fl was higher in patients with endometrioid cancer (72.3%) compared with other histological subtypes (36.5%, p=0.004) and controls (29.5%, p=0.0001). KIR and KIR ligand genotype did not influence significantly the clinical course of the disease. We conclude that the genotype of KIR ligands is strongly associated with the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer while KIR2DS4fl confers susceptibility to endometrioid subtype of the disease.

  20. Paternal HLA-C and Maternal Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genotypes in the Development of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gamliel, Moriya; Anderson, Karen L.; Ebstein, Richard P.; Yirmiya, Nurit; Mankuta, David

    2016-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of cell surface proteins found on natural killer cells, which are components of the innate immune system. KIRs recognize MHC class I proteins, mainly HLA-C and are further divided into two groups: short-tailed 2/3DS activating receptors and long-tailed 2/3DL inhibitory receptors. Based on the Barker Hypothesis, the origins of illness can be traced back to embryonic development in the uterus, and since KIR:HLA interaction figures prominently in the maternal–fetal interface, we investigated whether specific KIR:HLA combinations may be found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) children compared with their healthy parents. This study enrolled 49 ASD children from different Israeli families, and their healthy parents. Among the parents, a higher frequency of HLA-C2 allotypes was found in the fathers, while its corresponding ligand 2DS1 was found in higher percentage in the maternal group. However, such skewing in KIR:HLA frequencies did not appear in the ASD children. Additionally, analysis of “overall activation” indicated higher activation in maternal than in paternal cohorts. PMID:27517034

  1. Engineering a Lys-Asn isopeptide bond into an immunoglobulin-like protein domain enhances its stability

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hanna; Young, Paul G.; Squire, Christopher J.; Baker, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    The overall stability of globular protein structures is marginal, a balance between large numbers of stabilizing non-covalent interactions and a destabilizing entropic term. Higher stability can be engineered by introduction of disulfide bonds, provided the redox environment is controlled. The discovery of stabilizing isopeptide bond crosslinks, formed spontaneously between lysine and asparagine (or aspartic acid) side chains in certain bacterial cell-surface proteins suggests that such bonds could be introduced by protein engineering as an alternative protein stabilization strategy. We report the first example of an isopeptide bond engineered de novo into an immunoglobulin-like protein, the minor pilin FctB from Streptococcus pyogenes. Four mutations were sufficient; lysine, asparagine and glutamic acid residues were introduced for the bond-forming reaction, with a fourth Val/Phe mutation to help steer the lysine side chain into position. The spontaneously-formed isopeptide bond was confirmed by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography, and was shown to increase the thermal stability by 10 °C compared with the wild type protein. This novel method for increasing the stability of IgG-like proteins has potential to be adopted by the field of antibody engineering, which share similar β-clasp Ig-type domains. PMID:28202898

  2. Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    fatty acid probe anilinonaphtalene-8- sulphonic acid (ANS) was measured. ANS readily associates with various FABPs and its fluorescence is highly...DAMD17-03-1-0249 TITLE: Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein and Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Leslie J. (Willmert) Donato...DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 Apr 03 – 13 Apr 06 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein and Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  3. Human-specific evolution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Guethlein, Lisbeth A

    2012-03-19

    In placental mammals, natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphocytes that make unique contributions to immune defence and reproduction, functions essential for survival of individuals, populations and species. Modulating these functions are conserved and variable NK-cell receptors that recognize epitopes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In humans, for example, recognition of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the CD94:NKG2A receptor is conserved, whereas recognition of HLA-A, B and C by the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is diversified. Competing demands of the immune and reproductive systems, and of T-cell and NK-cell immunity-combined with the segregation on different chromosomes of variable NK-cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands-drive an unusually rapid evolution that has resulted in unprecedented levels of species specificity, as first appreciated from comparison of mice and humans. Counterparts to human KIR are present only in simian primates. Observed in these species is the coevolution of KIR and the four MHC class I epitopes to which human KIR recognition is restricted. Unique to hominids is the emergence of the MHC-C locus as a supplier of specialized and superior ligands for KIR. This evolutionary trend is most highly elaborated in the chimpanzee. Unique to the human KIR locus are two groups of KIR haplotypes that are present in all human populations and subject to balancing selection. Group A KIR haplotypes resemble chimpanzee KIR haplotypes and are enriched for genes encoding KIR that bind HLA class I, whereas group B KIR haplotypes are enriched for genes encoding receptors with diminished capacity to bind HLA class I. Correlating with their balance in human populations, B haplotypes favour reproductive success, whereas A haplotypes favour successful immune defence. Evolution of the B KIR haplotypes is thus unique to the human species.

  4. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Sumatra, Sulawesi and Moluccas Islands.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2010-10-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interaction with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules on target cells. Like HLA class I genes that are characterised by extreme allelic polymorphism, KIR genes are diverse and vary in both gene content and allelic polymorphism. Population studies conducted over the last several years have showed that KIR gene frequencies (GF) and genotype content vary among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity. Some studies have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have recently reported the distribution of KIR genes in populations from Java (Central Javanese and the Sundanese of West Java), East Timor (Timorese), Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo (Dayaks) and Irian Jaya (Western half of the island of New Guinea; Melanese). We here extend analysis of the KIR genes in populations from North Sulawesi (Minahasans), West Sumatra (Minangs) and Moluccas Islands. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all three populations. Variation in GF between populations was observed, except for the KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GF between populations, both principal component analysis and phylogenetic tree analyses showed a close relationship between Minahasan and Moluccan populations that are clustered with Timorese in the same clade. The Minang tribe lies between the Javanese/Kalimantan and the Timorese/Minahasan/Moluccan clades, whereas Irianese show the greatest genetic distances from other Indonesian populations. The results correspond well with the history of migration in Indonesia and will contribute to the understanding of the genetic as well as the geographic history of the region.

  5. Activating killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their cognate HLA ligands are significantly increased in autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Westover, Jonna B.; Gibbons, Cole; Johnson, Randall C.; Ward, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) proteins are expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and appear important in innate and adaptive immunity. There are about 14 KIR genes on chromosome 19q13.4, composed of those that inhibit and those that activate NK cell killing. Haplotypes have different combinations of these genes meaning that not all genes are present in a subject. There are two main classes of cognate human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands (HLA-Bw4 and HLA-C1/C2) that bind to the inhibitory/activating receptors. As a general rule, the inhibitory state is maintained except when virally infected or tumor cells are encountered; however, both increased activation and inhibition states have been associated with susceptibility and protection against numerous disease states including cancer, arthritis, and psoriasis. Utilizing DNA from 158 Caucasian subjects with autism and 176 KIR control subjects we show for the first time a highly significant increase in four activating KIR genes (2DS5, 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS4) as measured by chi square values and odds ratios. In addition, our data suggests a highly significant increase in the activating KIR gene 2DS1 and its cognate HLA-C2 ligand (2DS1+C2; p=0.00003 [Odds Ratio=2.87]). This information ties together two major immune gene complexes, the Human Leukocyte Complex and the Leukocyte Receptor Complex, and may partially explain immune abnormalities observed in many subjects with autism. PMID:22884899

  6. Association between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in populations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui-ling; Ma, Shu-juan; Tan, Hong-zhuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recently, a growing number of studies show that the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene polymorphisms may play a role in the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility. Nonetheless, the results were inconsistent. Thus, a meta-analysis was carried out by integrating multiple research to clarify the association between KIR polymorphisms and SLE susceptibility. Methods: The Web of Science, Embase (Ovid), PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, the Chinese Biomedical Database and CNKI, Wanfang databases (last search was updated on May 15, 2016) were systematically searched to select studies on addressing the association between the KIR polymorphisms and susceptibility to SLE in populations. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated. Results: A total of 10 published case-control studies involving 1450 SLE patients and 1758 controls were available for this meta-analysis. Results suggested that KIR2DL1 might be a risk factor for SLE (OR 2DL1 =1.047, 95% CI=1.011–1.083) in all subjects. The KIR2DL3, KIR2DL5 were identified as protective factors for SLE in Asian populations (OR2DL3= 0.215, 95% CI = 0.077–0.598; OR2DL5 = 0.588, 95% CI = 0.393–0.881), but not in Caucasians. Conclusions: The meta-analysis results suggested that 2DL1 might be a potential risk factor and 2DL3, 2DL5 might be protective factors for SLE in Asians but not in Caucasians. PMID:28272205

  7. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and Their HLA Ligands are Related with the Immunopathology of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Dalalio, Márcia Machado de Oliveira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Oliveira, Camila de Freitas; de Araújo, Silvana Marques; de Oliveira Marques, Divina Seila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) ligands in the susceptibility of chronic Chagas disease. This case-control study enrolled 131 serologically-diagnosed Chagas disease patients (59 men and 72 women, mean age of 60.4 ± 9.8 years) treated at the University Hospital of Londrina and the Chagas Disease Laboratory of the State University of Maringa. A control group was formed of 165 healthy individuals - spouses of patients or blood donors from the Regional Blood Bank in Maringa (84 men and 81 women, with a mean age of 59.0 ± 11.4 years). Genotyping of HLA and KIR was performed by PCR-SSOP. KIR2DS2-C1 in the absence of KIR2DL2 (KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/C1+) was more frequent in Chagas patients (P = 0.020; Pc = 0.040; OR = 2.14) and, in particular, those who manifested chronic chagasic cardiopathy—CCC (P = 0.0002; Pc = 0.0004; OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 2.30–18.60) when compared to the control group, and when CCC group was compared to the patients without heart involvement (P = 0.010; Pc = 0.020; OR = 3.97). The combination pair KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/KIR2DL3+/C1+ was also positively associated with chronic chagasic cardiopathy. KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 were related to immunopathogenesis in Chagas disease. The combination of KIR2DS2 activating receptor with C1 ligand, in the absence of KIR2DL2, may be related to a risk factor in the chronic Chagas disease and chronic chagasic cardiopathy. PMID:25978047

  8. BCR/ABL alters the function of NK cells and the acquisition of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs).

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Elena G; Dylla, Scott J; Olsen, Krista; Lenvik, Todd; Soignier, Yvette; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2003-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells decrease in function during chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) progression from chronic phase to blast crisis, and they can become BCR/ABL(+) late in the disease course. To study this altered function, NK92 cells were transduced with the BCR/ABL oncogene. In contrast to the parental cells, which died when deprived of interleukin 2 (IL-2), p210(+) NK92 cells proliferated and survived indefinitely in the absence of IL-2. BCR/ABL also decreased the natural cytotoxicity of NK92 cells against K562 targets, without affecting IL-2, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Although the ABL-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI-571) had no effect on parental NK92 cells, it markedly decreased the growth and survival of IL-2-independent p210(+) NK92 cells. In contrast to the parental cell line, serial analysis of p210(+) NK92 cells detected small populations that clonally expressed one or more killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Unlike the decreased natural cytotoxicity, the function of the activating CD158j receptor remained intact. Southern blotting and hybridization with an enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) probe showed that KIR(-) and KIR(+) NK92 cells were all derived from the same clone, suggesting that KIR acquisition remains dynamic at the maturational stage represented by the NK92 cell line. When tested in primary CD56(+bright) NK cells, p210 induced partial IL-2-independent growth and increased KIR expression similar to findings in NK92 cells. This is the first study to show that BCR/ABL, well known for its effects on the myeloid lineage, can alter the function of lymphoid cells, which may be associated with the defect in innate immunity associated with CML progression.

  9. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in the Bengali population of northern West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Guha, P; Bhattacharjee, S; Chaudhuri, T K

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Subcontinent exhibits extensive diversity in its culture, religion, ethnicity and linguistic heritage, which symbolizes extensive genetic variations within the populations. The highly polymorphic Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) family plays an important role in tracing genetic differentiation in human population. In this study, we aimed to analyse the KIR gene polymorphism in the Bengali population of northern West Bengal, India. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the KIR gene polymorphism in the Bengalis of West Bengal, India. Herein, we have studied the distribution of 14 KIR genes (KIR3DL1-3DL3, KIR2DL1-2DL5, KIR2DS1-2DS5 AND KIR3DS1) and two pseudogenes (KIR3DP1 and 2DP1) in the Bengalis. Apart from the framework genes (KIR2DL4, 3DL2, 3DL3 and 3DP1), which are present in all the individuals, the gene frequencies of other KIR genes varied between 0.34 and 0.88. Moreover, upon comparing the KIR polymorphism of the Bengalis with the available published data of other world populations, it has been found that the Indo-European-speaking Bengalis from the region share both Dravidian and Indo-Aryan gene pool with considerable influences of mongoloid and European descents. Furthermore, evidences from previously published data on human leucocyte antigen and Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity support the view. Our results will help to understand the genetic background of the Bengali population, in illustrating the population migration events in the eastern and north-eastern part of India, in explaining the extensive genetic admixture amongst the different linguistic groups of the region and also in KIR-related disease researches.

  10. Structural and functional analysis of slit and heparin binding to immunoglobulin-like domains 1 and 2 of Drosophila Robo.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Noémi; Howitt, Jason A; Hussain, Sadaf-Ahmahni; Hohenester, Erhard

    2008-06-06

    Recognition of the secreted protein Slit by transmembrane receptors of the Robo family provides important signals in the development of the nervous system and other organs, as well as in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans serve as essential co-receptors in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that the second leucinerich repeat domain of Slit, D2, binds to the N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domains of Robo, IG1-2. Here we present two crystal structures of Drosophila Robo IG1-2, one of which contains a bound heparin-derived oligosaccharide. Using structure-based mutagenesis of a Robo IG1-5 construct we identified key Slit binding residues (Thr-74, Phe-114, Arg-117) forming a conserved patch on the surface of IG1; mutation of similarly conserved residues in IG2 had no effect on Slit binding. Mutation of conserved basic residues in IG1 (Lys-69, Arg-117, Lys-122, Lys-123), but not in IG2, reduced binding of Robo IG1-5 to heparin, in full agreement with the Robo-heparin co-crystal structure. Our collective results, together with a recent crystal structure of a minimal human Slit-Robo complex ( Morlot, C., Thielens, N. M., Ravelli, R. B., Hemrika, W., Romijn, R. A., Gros, P., Cusack, S., and McCarthy, A. A. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 14923-14928 ), reveal a contiguous HS/heparin binding surface extending across the Slit-Robo interface. Based on the size of this composite binding site, we predict that at least five HS disaccharide units are required to support Slit-Robo signaling.

  11. Inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (iKIR) mismatches improve survival after T-cell-repleted haploidentical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bastos-Oreiro, Mariana; Anguita, Javier; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Fernández, Lucía; Buces, Elena; Navarro, Almudena; Pascual, Cristina; Pérez-Corral, Ana; Balsalobre, Pascual; Muñoz, Cristina; Kwon, Mi; Serrano, David; Perez-Martinez, Antonio; Buño, Ismael; Gayoso, Jorge; Díez-Martín, José Luís

    2016-05-01

    Alloreactivity triggered by interaction between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and natural killer (NK) cells plays a role in the graft-versus-tumor effect after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Our aim in this study was to evaluate this role in the setting of T-cell-repleted haploidentical SCT with postinfusion high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy). We included 33 patients. Among patient-donor pairs with at least 1 inhibitory KIR (iKIR) gene mismatch, event-free survival (EFS) and cumulative incidence of relapse 1 year after transplant were significantly better (85% vs. 37% [P = 0.008] and 18% vs. 46% [P = 0.041], respectively). A subanalysis in 12 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) showed an improvement in EFS 1 year after transplant in those patients with KIR ligand mismatch (100% vs. 25%, P = 0.012), although overall survival (OS) was not affected (85% vs. 80%, P = 0.2). Eight of 12 patient-donors pairs presented iKIR mismatches. Of note, this outcome was better in the small subgroup, both for EFS (100% vs. 25%, P = 0.012) and for OS (100% vs. 37%, P = 0.004). Our data suggest that in the setting of T-cell-repleted haploidentical SCT with PT-Cy, iKIR mismatch is associated with improved survival, with particularly good results for both iKIR and KIR ligand mismatches in patients with HL.

  12. Urinary intestinal fatty acid binding protein predicts necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Katherine E; Winston, Abigail B; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Dawood, Hassan Y; Fashemi, Titilayo; Fichorova, Raina N; Van Marter, Linda J

    2014-06-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis, characterized by sudden onset and rapid progression, remains the most significant gastrointestinal disorder among premature infants. In seeking a predictive biomarker, we found intestinal fatty acid binding protein, an indicator of enterocyte damage, was substantially increased within three and seven days before the diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis.

  13. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  14. IMPAIRED NATURAL KILLER CELL LYSIS IN BREAST CANCER PATIENTS WITH HIGH LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALTERED EXPRESSION OF KILLER IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Varker, Kimberly A.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Welt, Marilyn; Suleiman, Samer; Thornton, Lisa; Andersen, Barbara L.; Carson, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Background We previously reported that cancer-related psychological stress is associated with reduced natural killer (NK) cell lysis. We hypothesized that reduced NK cell cytotoxicity in patients with increased levels of stress would correlate with alterations in the expression of inhibitory NK cell receptors (killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, or KIRs). The specific aim of this study was to examine KIR expression in patients with high or low levels of psychologic stress and correlate alterations in KIR expression with NK cell function. Materials and Methods 227 patients underwent baseline evaluation of cancer-related psychological stress and were randomized to psychosocial intervention versus observation. From this population, two groups were defined based on pre-treatment measurements of NK lytic activity, stress levels, and the availability of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Group I (n = 9) had low stress by the Impact of Events Scale (IES), and high NK cell lysis at the 50:1 effector: target ratio (NK50 = 52–89%). Group II (n = 8) had high stress and low NK50 (27–52%). Lymphokine activated killer (LAK) activity, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and expression of cytokine receptors, adhesion molecules, and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) were assessed in PBMC. Results Incubation of PBMC with NK-stimulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, or IL-15) led to significant increases in cytotoxic activity regardless of IES/NK50 scores. There were no significant group differences in NK cell surface expression of the IL-2 receptor components CD25 and CD122, antibody-dependent lysis of HER2/neu-positive SKBr3 cells treated with an anti-HER2/neu monoclonal antibody, expression of adhesion molecules (CD2, CD11a, CD18) and markers of activation (CD69), or expression of the KIRs CD158a, NKG2a, NKB1, and CD161. However, levels of CD158b were significantly higher in Group I after incubation in media alone or with IL-2, and CD94

  15. Deciphering the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor system at super-resolution for natural killer and T-cell biology.

    PubMed

    Béziat, Vivien; Hilton, Hugo G; Norman, Paul J; Traherne, James A

    2017-03-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are components of two fundamental biological systems essential for human health and survival. First, they contribute to host immune responses, both innate and adaptive, through their expression by natural killer cells and T cells. Second, KIR play a key role in regulating placentation, and hence reproductive success. Analogous to the diversity of their human leucocyte antigen class I ligands, KIR are extremely polymorphic. In this review, we describe recent developments, fuelled by methodological advances, that are helping to decipher the KIR system in terms of haplotypes, polymorphisms, expression patterns and their ligand interactions. These developments are delivering deeper insight into the relevance of KIR in immune system function, evolution and disease.

  16. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation.

  17. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  19. Lectin typing of Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, N; Benjamin, J; Skirrow, M B

    1990-01-01

    Isolates of Campylobacter jejuni, C coli, C fetus and C laridis were tested for agglutination reactions with a panel of five lectins: Arachis hypogaea, Bauhinia purpurea, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum vulgaris and Wisteria floribunda. Twenty three patterns of agglutination (lectin types) were recorded among 376 isolates. Patterns were consistent and reproducible. Only 4.5% of isolates were untypable because of autoagglutination. Some lectin types were found exclusively or predominantly in a species, but others were shared between species. Forty two per cent of C jejuni and 35% of C coli isolates belonged to lectin type 4. There was no apparent correlation between lectin type and serotype; different lectin types were found among strains of single Penner and Lior serotypes. Lectin typing is a simple and economical procedure suitable for use in non-specialist laboratories, either as an adjunct to serogrouping or, after further development, as a sole typing scheme. PMID:2262570

  20. Human NK cells maintain licensing status and are subject to killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and KIR-ligand inhibition following ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Alderson, Kory A; Phillips, Emily; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Gan, Jacek; Campana, Dario; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Infusion of allogeneic NK cells is a potential immunotherapy for both hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) on human NK cells and KIR-ligands on tumor cells influence the magnitude of NK function. To obtain sufficient numbers of activated NK cells for infusion, one potent method uses cells from the K562 human erythroleukemia line that have been transfected to express activating 41BB ligand (41BBL) and membrane-bound interleukin 15 (mbIL15). The functional importance of KIRs on ex vivo expanded NK cells has not been studied in detail. We found that after a 12-day co-culture with K562-mbIL15-41BBL cells, expanded NK cells maintained inhibition specificity and prior in vivo licensing status determined by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions. Addition of an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) induced NK-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and augmented killing of CD20+ target cells. However, partial inhibition induced by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions persisted. Finally, we found that extended co-cultures of NK cells with stimulatory cells transduced to express various KIR-ligands modified both the inhibitory and activating KIR repertoires of the expanded NK cell product. These studies demonstrate that the licensing interactions known to occur during NK ontogeny also influence NK cell function following NK expansion ex vivo with HLA-null stimulatory cells.

  1. The terminal portion of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein LigA confers protective immunity against lethal infection in the hamster model of leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Éverton F.; Medeiros, Marco A.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Matsunaga, Jim; Esteves, Gabriela S.; Ramos, João G. R.; Santos, Cleiton S.; Croda, Júlio; Homma, Akira; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Haake, David A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.

    2007-01-01

    Subunit vaccines are a potential intervention strategy against leptospirosis, which is a major public health problem in developing countries and a veterinary disease in livestock and companion animals worldwide. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are a family of surface-exposed determinants that have Ig-like repeat domains found in virulence factors such as intimin and invasin. We expressed fragments of the repeat domain regions of LigA and LigB from Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Immunization of Golden Syrian hamsters with Lig fragments in Freund’s adjuvant induced robust antibody responses against recombinant protein and native protein, as detected by ELISA and immunoblot, respectively. A single fragment, LigANI, which corresponds to the six carboxy-terminal Ig-like repeat domains of the LigA molecule, conferred immunoprotection against mortality (67-100%, P <0.05) in hamsters which received a lethal inoculum of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni. However, immunization with this fragment did not confer sterilizing immunity. These findings indicate that the carboxy-terminal portion of LigA is an immunoprotective domain and may serve as a vaccine candidate for human and veterinary leptospirosis. PMID:17629368

  2. A second gene for the African green monkey poliovirus receptor that has no putative N-glycosylation site in the functional N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, S; Ise, I; Sato, Y; Yonekawa, H; Gotoh, O; Nomoto, A

    1992-01-01

    Using cDNA of the human poliovirus receptor (PVR) as a probe, two types of cDNA clones of the monkey homologs were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from an African green monkey kidney cell line. Either type of cDNA clone rendered mouse L cells permissive for poliovirus infection. Homologies of the amino acid sequences deduced from these cDNA sequences with that of human PVR were 90.2 and 86.4%, respectively. These two monkey PVRs were found to be encoded in two different loci of the genome. Evolutionary analysis suggested that duplication of the PVR gene in the monkey genome had occurred after the species differentiation between humans and monkeys. The NH2-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain, domain 1, of the second monkey PVR, which lacks a putative N-glycosylation site, mediated poliovirus infection. In addition, a human PVR mutant without N-glycosylation sites in domain 1 also promoted viral infection. These results suggest that domain 1 of the monkey receptor also harbors the binding site for poliovirus and that sugar moieties possibly attached to this domain of human PVR are dispensable for the virus-receptor interaction. Images PMID:1331508

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  4. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-07-18

    C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1'. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys.

  5. Genotypic diversity of the Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) and their HLA class I Ligands in a Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Suliman Y. Al; Alkuriji, Afrah; Alwasel, Saleh; Dar, javid Ahmed; Alhammad, Alwaleed; Christmas, Stephen; Mansour, Lamjed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) have been used as good markers for the study of genetic predisposition in many diseases and in human genetic population dynamics. In this context, we have investigated the genetic diversity of KIR genes and their main HLA class I ligands in Saudi population and compared the data with other studies of neighboring populations. One hundred and fourteen randomly selected healthy Saudi subjects were genotyped for the presence or absence of 16 KIR genes and their HLA-C1, -C2, -Bw4Thr80 and Bw4Ile80 groups, using a PCR-SSP technique. The results show the occurrence of the framework genes (3DL2, 3DL3 and 2DL4) and the pseudogenes (2DP1 and 3DP1) at highest frequencies. All inhibitory KIR (iKIR) genes appeared at higher frequencies than activating genes (aKIR), except for 2DS4 with a frequency of 90.35%. A total of 55 different genotypes were observed appearing at different frequencies, where 12 are considered novel. Two haplotypes were characterized, AA and Bx (BB and AB), which were observed in 24.5% and 75.5% respectively of the studied group. The frequencies of iKIR + HLA associations were found to be much higher than aKIR + HLA. KIR genes frequencies in the Saudi population are comparable with other Middle Eastern and North African populations. PMID:27007893

  6. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Huth, T K; Brenu, E W; Staines, D R; Marshall-Gradisnik, S M

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results.

  7. Nucleic acid-binding specificity of human FUS protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueyin; Schwartz, Jacob C.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    FUS, a nuclear RNA-binding protein, plays multiple roles in RNA processing. Five specific FUS-binding RNA sequence/structure motifs have been proposed, but their affinities for FUS have not been directly compared. Here we find that human FUS binds all these sequences with Kdapp values spanning a 10-fold range. Furthermore, some RNAs that do not contain any of these motifs bind FUS with similar affinity. FUS binds RNA in a length-dependent manner, consistent with a substantial non-specific component to binding. Finally, investigation of FUS binding to different nucleic acids shows that it binds single-stranded DNA with three-fold lower affinity than ssRNA of the same length and sequence, while binding to double-stranded nucleic acids is weaker. We conclude that FUS has quite general nucleic acid-binding activity, with the various proposed RNA motifs being neither necessary for FUS binding nor sufficient to explain its diverse binding partners. PMID:26150427

  8. Effect of cytokines on Siglec-1 and HIV-1 entry in monocyte-derived macrophages: the importance of HIV-1 envelope V1V2 region.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Ousman; Trinh, Hung V; Kim, Jiae; Alsalmi, Wadad; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Peachman, Kristina K; Gao, Guofen; Thomas, Rasmi; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Venigalla B; Rao, Mangala

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages express relatively low levels of CD4. Despite this, macrophages can be effectively infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Macrophages have a critical role in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission; however, the mechanism or mechanisms of virus infection are poorly understood. We report that growth factors, such as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and macrophage colony-stimulating factor affect the phenotypic profile and permissiveness of macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages derived from granulocyte macrophage and macrophage colony-stimulating factors was predominantly facilitated by the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-1. The number of sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin receptors on macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly greater than on granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages, and correspondingly, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection was greater in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages. Single-genome analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the differences in infectivity was not due to differences in viral fitness or in viral variants with differential infectivity but was due to reduced viral entry into the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages. Anti-sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin, trimeric glycoprotein 145, and scaffolded V1V2 proteins were bound to sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin and significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry and infection. Furthermore, sialic acid residues present in the V1V2 region of the envelope protein mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1

  9. Effect of cytokines on Siglec-1 and HIV-1 entry in monocyte–derived macrophages: the importance of HIV-1 envelope V1V2 region

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Ousman; Trinh, Hung V.; Kim, Jiae; Alsalmi, Wadad; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ehrenberg, Philip K.; Peachman, Kristina K.; Gao, Guofen; Thomas, Rasmi; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Alving, Carl R.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rao, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and monocyte–derived macrophages express relatively low levels of CD4. Despite this, macrophages can be effectively infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Macrophages have a critical role in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission; however, the mechanism or mechanisms of virus infection are poorly understood. We report that growth factors, such as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and macrophage colony-stimulating factor affect the phenotypic profile and permissiveness of macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of monocyte–derived macrophages derived from granulocyte macrophage and macrophage colony-stimulating factors was predominantly facilitated by the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-1. The number of sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin receptors on macrophage colony-stimulating factor–derived monocyte–derived macrophages was significantly greater than on granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor–derived monocyte–derived macrophages, and correspondingly, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection was greater in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor–derived monocyte–derived macrophages. Single-genome analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the differences in infectivity was not due to differences in viral fitness or in viral variants with differential infectivity but was due to reduced viral entry into the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor–derived monocyte–derived macrophages. Anti-sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin, trimeric glycoprotein 145, and scaffolded V1V2 proteins were bound to sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin and significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry and infection. Furthermore, sialic acid residues present in the V1V2 region of the envelope protein mediated human immunodeficiency

  10. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  11. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  12. Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and involved in cell proliferation and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qizhi; Fu, Aili; Yang, Shude; He, Xiaoli; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhou, Jiadi; Luan, Xiying; Yu, Wenzheng; Xue, Jiangnan

    2015-03-06

    Previous studies have shown that leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is expressed on most types of hamatopoietic cells and negatively regulate immune response, but the roles of LAIR-1 in tumor of the non-hematopoietic lineage have not been determined. Despite advances in therapy of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), many questions relating to EOC pathogenesis remain unanswered. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of LAIR-1 expression in EOC and explore the possible association between LAIR-1 and cancer. In this study, a tissue microarray containing 78 ovarian cancer cases was stained following a standard immunohistochemical protocol for LAIR-1 and the correlation of LAIR-1 expression with clinicopathologic features was assessed. LAIR-1 was detected to express in tumor cells of ovarian cancer tissues (73.1%) and EOC cell lines COC1 and HO8910, not in normal ovarian tissues. In addition, LAIR-1 expression correlates significantly with tumor grade (p = 0.004). Furthermore, down-regulation of LAIR-1 in HO8910 cells increased cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasion. These data suggest that LAIR-1 has a relevant impact on EOC progression and may be helpful for a better understanding of molecular pathogenesis of cancer. - Highlights: • LAIR-1 is expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer cells. • LAIR-1 expression correlates significantly with tumor grade. • Down-regulation of LAIR-1 expression increased cell proliferation and invasion. • LAIR-1 may be a novel candidate for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  13. High prevalence of HHV8 infection and specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors allotypes in Sardinian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Elisabetta; Rizzo, Roberta; Ingianni, Angela; Contini, Pierpaolo; Pompei, Raffaello; Di Luca, Dario

    2014-10-01

    The development of type 2 diabetes is thought to involve both environmental, possibly infectious, and genetic factors. Recently, a high prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) infection was observed in type 2 diabetes patients, and specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) allotypes were associated to both increased susceptibility to herpesvirus infection and risk to develop diabetes. However, no clear gene-disease or virus-disease associations have been established. To investigate the possible interplay between HHV8 infection, KIR allotype and type 2 diabetes, virus prevalence and KIR genotype were analyzed by PCR in 168 patients affected by type 2 diabetes and 108 control individuals belonging to the Sardinian population. Results showed a significant increase of HHV8 prevalence in type 2 diabetes patients versus controls (57% vs. 17%, P < 0.001), and a significant increase of KIR2DL2/DS2 homozygosity in diabetes patients infected with HHV8 compared to uninfected ones (64% vs. 14%, P < 0.0001), resulting in a significant OR of 11.31. In addition, the analysis of the frequency of the KIR2DL2/DS2 receptor and its HLA-C1 ligand, accordingly to the status of HHV8 infection, showed a significant increased correlation between KIR2DL2/DS2, type 2 diabetes and HLA-C1C1 genotype in the type 2 diabetes patients infected with HHV8 compared to uninfected ones (62% vs. 15%, P < 0.0001, OR = 8.64). These findings provide preliminary evidence that HHV8 infection might be a cofactor for type 2 diabetes in a specific subset of genetically susceptible individuals, and suggest the possibility that such patients might have an impaired immune-mediated component contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes.

  14. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore.

    PubMed

    Jacquez, Pedro; Avila, Gustavo; Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax.

  15. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  16. [Homology modeling and eukaryotic expression of a modified αβ TCR harboring the immunoglobulin-like domain of γδ TCR].

    PubMed

    Tao, Changli; Shao, Hongwei; Shen, Han; Huang, Shulin

    2016-08-01

    Objective To design, construct and express a chimeric αβ TCR harboring the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of γδ TCR in Jurkat T cells. Methods The fusion sites of TCR δIg were determined by bioinformatics analysis. Then the protein structures of TCR α δIg and TCR β δIg were predicted by homology modeling. Furthermore, the structures of TCR α δIg and TCR β δIg were compared with the wild type (wt) TCR α and TCR β respectively by combinatorial extension (CE). After that, the TCR α δIg and TCR β δIg were fused to fluorescent protein ECFP and EYFP respectively via the overlap PCR, and then the fusion genes (TCR α δIg-ECFP and TCR β δIg-EYFP) were cloned into pIRES2-EGFP vector and respectively located at the upstream and downstream of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). The recombinant prokaryotic expression vector pIRES-TCR βδIg-EYFP/TCR αδIg-ECFP was transferred into Jurkat T cells. Finally, the expression of TCR δIg in Jurkat T cells was monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results The variable region structure of the TCR δIg did not change and the antigen recognition active regions remained stable compared to the wtTCR. The recombinant expression plasmid was successfully constructed as confirmed by PCR identification and sequencing analysis. CLSM showed that TCR δIg was expressed and located at the plasma membrane of Jurkat T cells. Conclusion The design of TCR δIg was reasonable and the TCR δIg could be expressed on Jurkat T cell surface.

  17. Increased frequencies of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genes KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 are associated with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, S E; Ní Chorcora, C; Dring, M M; Stallings, R L; O'Meara, A; Gardiner, C M

    2015-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumour in children. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are known to mediate the direct cytotoxicity of neuroblastoma tumour cells. Natural variation in the highly polymorphic killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their cognate human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands results in considerable diversity in NK cell function. As the early onset of neuroblastoma suggests the contribution of genetic factors, we investigated if individual KIR genes, combined KIR gene haplotypes or compound KIR-HLA ligand genotypes could influence susceptibility to neuroblastoma. Genotype analysis of the KIR genes as well as their three major HLA class I ligand groups, HLA-C1, HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4, was carried out in a cohort of 201 neuroblastoma patients compared with 240 healthy control subjects using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. We found a significant increase in the frequency of KIR2DL2 (P = 0.019) as well as KIR2DS2 (P = 0.008) in patients with neuroblastoma compared with the healthy control group. While the incidence of the least inhibitory compound KIR-HLA-C genotype, KIR2DL3 in the presence of HLA-C1 was slightly reduced in neuroblastoma patients, this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.069). In summary, while KIR-HLA compound genotypes have previously been implicated in predicting treatment outcomes in neuroblastoma, here we show that the presence of the individual KIR genes, KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2, irrespective of HLA-C genotype is associated with the onset of this embryonal malignancy.

  18. Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B4 regulates key signalling molecules involved in FcγRI-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijeong; Raftery, Mark J.; Thomas, Paul S.; Geczy, Carolyn L.; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    FcγRI cross-linking on monocytes may trigger clathrin-mediated endocytosis, likely through interaction of multiple intracellular molecules that are controlled by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events. However, the identity of phospho-proteins and their regulation are unknown. We proposed the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B4 (LILRB4) that inhibits FcγRI-mediated cytokine production via Tyr dephosphorylation of multiple kinases, may also regulate endocytosis/phagocytosis through similar mechanisms. FcγRI and/or LILRB4 were antibody-ligated on THP-1 cells, lysates immunoprecipitated using anti-pTyr antibody and peptides sequenced by mass spectrometry. Mascot Search identified 25 Tyr phosphorylated peptides with high confidence. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that the most significantly affected pathways were clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Fc-receptor dependent phagocytosis. Tyr phosphorylation of key candidate proteins in these pathways included common γ-chain of the Fc receptors, Syk, clathrin, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase Cbl, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate, tripartite motif-containing 21 and heat shock protein 70. Importantly, co-ligation of LILRB4 with FcγRI caused significant dephosphorylation of these proteins and was associated with suppression of Fc receptor-dependent uptake of antibody-opsonised bacterial particles, indicating that LILRB4. These results suggest that Tyr phosphorylation may be critical in FcγRI-dependent endocytosis/phagocytosis that may be regulated by LILRB4 by triggering dephosphorylation of key signalling proteins. PMID:27725776

  19. Asian population frequencies and haplotype distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes among Chinese, Malay, and Indian in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi Chuan; Chan, Soh Ha; Ren, Ee Chee

    2008-11-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) gene frequencies have been shown to be distinctly different between populations and contribute to functional variation in the immune response. We have investigated KIR gene frequencies in 370 individuals representing three Asian populations in Singapore and report here the distribution of 14 KIR genes (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4, 2DS5, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1) with two pseudogenes (2DP1, 3DP1) among Singapore Chinese (n = 210); Singapore Malay (n = 80), and Singapore Indian (n = 80). Four framework genes (KIR3DL3, 3DP1, 2DL4, 3DL2) and a nonframework pseudogene 2DP1 were detected in all samples while KIR2DS2, 2DL2, 2DL5, and 2DS5 had the greatest significant variation across the three populations. Fifteen significant linkage patterns, consistent with associations between genes of A and B haplotypes, were observed. Eighty-four distinct KIR profiles were determined in our populations, 38 of which had not been described in other populations. KIR haplotype studies were performed using nine Singapore Chinese families comprising 34 individuals. All genotypes could be resolved into corresponding pairs of existing haplotypes with eight distinct KIR genotypes and eight different haplotypes. The haplotype A2 with frequency of 63.9% was dominant in Singapore Chinese, comparable to that reported in Korean and Chinese Han. The A haplotypes predominate in Singapore Chinese, with ratio of A to B haplotypes of approximately 3:1. Comparison with KIR frequencies in other populations showed that Singapore Chinese shared similar distributions with Chinese Han, Japanese, and Korean; Singapore Indian was found to be comparable with North Indian Hindus while Singapore Malay resembled the Thai.

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen-C Genotype and Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor-Ligand Matching in Korean Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Park, Ki Hyun; Park, Hye Sun; Ryu, Ji Hyeong; Lim, Jihyang; Kim, Yonggoo; Na, Gun Hyung; Kim, Dong Goo

    2017-01-01

    Background The interaction between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and HLA class I regulates natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and function. The impact of NK cell alloreactivity through KIR in liver transplantation remains unelucidated. Since the frequency of HLA-C and KIR genotypes show ethnic differences, we assessed the impact of HLA-C, KIR genotype, or KIR-ligand mismatch on the allograft outcome of Korean liver allografts. Methods One hundred eighty-two living donor liver transplant patients were studied. Thirty-five patients (19.2%) had biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (AR), and eighteen (9.9%) had graft failure. The HLA-C compatibility, KIR genotypes, ligand-ligand, and KIR-ligand matching was retrospectively investigated for association with allograft outcomes. Results Homozygous C1 ligands were predominant in both patients and donors, and frequency of the HLA-C2 allele in Koreans was lower than that in other ethnic groups. Despite the significantly lower frequency of the HLA-C2 genotype in Koreans, donors with at least one HLA-C2 allele showed higher rates of AR than donors with no HLA-C2 alleles (29.2% vs 15.7%, P=0.0423). Although KIR genotypes also showed ethnic differences, KIR genotypes and the number of activating KIR/inhibitory KIR were not associated with the allograft outcome. KIR-ligand mismatch was expected in 31.6% of Korean liver transplants and had no impact on AR or graft survival. Conclusions This study could not confirm the clinical impact of KIR genotypes and KIR-ligand mismatch. However, we demonstrated that the presence of HLA-C2 allele in the donor influenced AR of Korean liver allografts. PMID:27834065

  1. Risk of Classic Kaposi Sarcoma With Combinations of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Loci: A Population-Based Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, James J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Vitale, Francesco; Lauria, Carmela; Whitby, Denise; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Carrington, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a complication of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Other oncogenic viral infections and malignancies are associated with certain HLA alleles and their natural killer (NK) cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands. We tested whether HLA-KIR influences the risk of KSHV infection or KS. Methods. In population-based case-control studies, we compared HLA class I and KIR gene frequencies in 250 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 280 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 576 KSHV-seronegative controls composing discovery and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to calculate sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results. In both the discovery and validation cohorts, KS was associated with HLA-A*11:01 (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.4; P = .002) and HLA-C*07:01 (adjusted OR, 1.6; P = .002). Consistent associations across cohorts were also observed with activating KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I and homozygosity for HLA-C group 1. With KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.6; P = .01), but the KS risk was 2-fold higher (adjusted OR, 2.1; P = .002). Similarly, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR, 0.6; P = .01) but the KS risk 80% higher with HLA-C group 1 homozygosity (adjusted OR, 1.8; P = .005). Conclusions. KIR-mediated NK cell activation may decrease then risk of KSHV infection but enhance KSHV dissemination and progression to KS if infection occurs. PMID:26268853

  2. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:26107617

  3. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J.; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • C1 inhibitors of fishes have two Ig domains fused in the N-terminal end. • Spliceosomal introns gain in two Ig domains of selected ray-finned fishes. • C1 inhibitors gene is maintained from 450 MY on the same locus. • C1 inhibitors gene is missing in frog and lampreys. • C1 inhibitors of tetrapod and fishes differ in the RCL region. - Abstract: C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1′. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys.

  4. Immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 is expressed by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and correlates with survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Goeje, Pauline L; Bezemer, Koen; Heuvers, Marlies E; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Groen, Harry Jm; Smit, Egbert F; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hendriks, Rudi W; Aerts, Joachim Gjv; Hegmans, Joost Pjj

    2015-07-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play an important role in immune suppression and accumulate under pathologic conditions such as cancer and chronic inflammation. They comprise a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that exert their immunosuppressive function via a variety of mechanisms. Immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 (ILT3) is a receptor containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) that can be expressed on antigen-presenting cells and is an important regulator of dendritic cell tolerance. ILT3 exists in a membrane-bound and a soluble form and can interact with a yet unidentified ligand on T cells and thereby induce T-cell anergy, regulatory T cells, or T suppressor cells. In this study, we analyzed freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 105 patients with non-small cell lung cancer and 20 healthy controls and demonstrated for the first time that ILT3 is expressed on MDSCs. We show that increased levels of circulating MDSCs correlate with reduced survival. On the basis of ILT3 cell surface expression, an ILT3(low) and ILT3(high) population of polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs could be distinguished. Interestingly, in line with the immunosuppressive function of ILT3 on dendritic cells, patients with an increased proportion of PMN-MDSCs and an increased fraction of the ILT3(high) subset had a shorter median survival than patients with elevated PMN-MDSC and a smaller ILT3(high) fraction. No correlation between the ILT3(high) subset and other immune variables was found. ILT3 expressed on MDSCs might reflect a previously unknown mechanism by which this cell population induces immune suppression and could therefore be an attractive target for immune intervention.

  5. Report From the First and Second Spanish Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genotyping Workshops: External Quality Control for Natural Killer Alloreactive Donor Selection in Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Planelles, D; Vilches, C; González-Escribano, F; Muro, M; González-Fernández, R; Sánchez, F; Gonzalo Ocejo, J; Eiras, A; Caro, J L; Palou, E; Campillo, J A; de Juan, M D; Montes, O; Balas, A; Marín, L; Torío, A; Fernández-Arquero, M; González-Roiz, C; López-Vázquez, A; Cisneros, E; Abad-Molina, C; López, R; Abad-Alastruey, M L; Serra, C; García-Alonso, A M; Vicario, J L

    2016-11-01

    An important factor affecting the success in the setting of related haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the graft-versus-leukemia effect mediated by natural killer (NK) cells when the donor displays NK alloreactivity versus the recipient. NK cell function is regulated by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and it has been described that donor KIR genotype influences transplantation outcome. This has led to a requirement of laboratories to have a quality assurance program for validation and control of their KIR genotyping methods. The goal of the 1st and 2nd Spanish KIR Genotyping Workshops was to provide an external proficiency testing program in KIR genotyping for Spanish immunology and transplant laboratories. These workshops were conducted during the years 2014-2016 and consisted of 17 participating laboratories typing a set of 20 samples. The presence/absence of 16 mandatory KIR loci (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4, 2DS5, 2DP1, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1, and 3DP1) was evaluated per sample. Methods for KIR genotyping included polymerase chain reaction with the use of sequence-specific primers and sequence-specific oligoprobes. Consensus typing was reached in all samples, and the performance of laboratories in external proficiency testing was satisfactory in all cases. The polymorphism detected in the small sample studied in both workshops is indicative of an ample variety of KIR gene profiles in the Spanish population.

  6. Expression of Leukocyte Inhibitory Immunoglobulin-like Transcript 3 Receptors by Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hen Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Faisal; Bahr, Janice M; Yellapa, Aparna; Bitterman, Pincas; Abramowicz, Jacques S; Edassery, Seby L; Basu, Sanjib; Rotmensch, Jacob; Barua, Animesh

    2012-04-01

    Attempts to enhance a patient's immune response and ameliorate the poor prognosis of ovarian cancer (OVCA) have largely been unsuccessful owing to the suppressive tumor microenvironment. Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 (ILT3) inhibitory receptors have been implicated in immunosuppression in several malignancies. The expression and role of ILT3 in the progression of ovarian tumors are unknown. This study examined the expression and association of ILT3 in ovarian tumors in laying hens, a spontaneous preclinical model of human OVCA. White Leghorn laying hens were selected by transvaginal ultrasound scanning. Serum and normal ovaries or ovarian tumors were collected. The presence of tumors and the expression of ILT3 were examined by routine histology, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In addition to stromal immune cell-like cells, the epithelium of the ovarian tumors also expressed ILT3 with significantly high intensity than normal ovaries. Among different subtypes of ovarian carcinomas, serous OVCA showed the highest ILT3 staining intensity, whereas endometrioid OVCA had the lowest intensity. Similar to humans, an immunoreactive protein band of approximately 55 kDa for ILT3 was detected in the ovarian tumors in hens. The patterns of ILT3 protein and messenger RNA expression by ovarian tumors in different subtypes and stages were similar to those of immunohistochemical staining. The results of this study suggest that laying hens may be useful to generate information on ILT3-associated immunosuppression in OVCA. This animal model also offers the opportunity to develop and test anti-ILT3 immunotherapy to enhance antitumor immunity against OVCA in humans.

  7. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  8. Evolutionary diversification of the avian fatty acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L; Piontkivska, Helen

    2011-12-15

    Phylogenetic analysis of avian and other vertebrate fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) supported the hypothesis that several gene duplications within this family occurred prior to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of tetrapods and bony fishes. The chicken genome encodes two liver-expressed FABPs: (1) L-FABP or FABP1; and (2) Lb-FABP. We propose that the latter be designated FABP10, because in our phylogenetic analysis it clustered with zebrafish FABP10. Bioinformatic analysis of across-tissue gene expression patterns in the chicken showed some congruence with phylogenetic relationships. On the basis of expression, chicken FABP genes seemed to form two major groups: (1) a cluster of genes many of which showed predominant expression in the digestive system (FABP1, FABP2, FABP6, FABP10, RBP1, and CRABP1); and (2) a cluster of genes most of which had predominant expression in tissues other than those of the digestive system, including muscle and the central nervous system (FABP3, FABP4, FABP5, FABP7, and PMP2). Since these clusters corresponded to major clusters in the phylogenetic tree as well, it seems a plausible hypothesis that the earliest duplication in the vertebrate FABP family led to the divergence of a gut-specialized gene from a gene expressed mainly in nervous and muscular systems. Data on gene expression in livers of two lines of chickens selected for high growth and low growth showed differences between FABP1 and FABP10 expressions in the liver, supporting the hypothesis of functional divergence between the two chicken liver-expressed FABPs related to food intake.

  9. Expression of liver fatty acid binding protein in hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Ferrell, Linda D.; Gill, Ryan M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Loss of expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) by immunohistochemistry has been shown to be characteristic of a subset of hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs) in which HNF1A is inactivated. Transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma is thought to be a very rare phenomenon in the HNF1A-inactivated variant of HCA. However, we recently observed 2 cases at our institution, 1 definite hepatocellular carcinoma and 1 possible hepatocellular carcinoma, with loss of LFABP staining, raising the possibility that LFABP down-regulation may be associated with hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Our aim was to evaluate hepatocellular carcinomas arising in various backgrounds and with varying degrees of differentiation for loss of LFABP staining. Twenty total cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were examined. Thirteen cases arose in a background of cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (n = 8) or steatohepatitis (n = 5); 7 cases arose in a noncirrhotic background, with 2 cases arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA and 2 cases arising within inflammatory variant HCA. Complete loss of expression of LFABP was seen in 6 of 20 cases, including 2 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA. Thus, loss of staining for LFABP appears to be common in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be seen in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, LFABP loss should not be interpreted as evidence for hepatocellular adenoma over carcinoma, when other features support a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The findings raise consideration for a role of HNF1A inactivation in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, particularly in less differentiated tumors. PMID:26997447

  10. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins.

  11. Differential association of gene content polymorphisms of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors with placental malaria in HIV- and HIV+ mothers.

    PubMed

    Omosun, Yusuf O; Blackstock, Anna J; Gatei, Wangeci; Hightower, Allen; van Eijk, Anne Maria; Ayisi, John; Otieno, Juliana; Lal, Renu B; Steketee, Richard; Nahlen, Bernard; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Slutsker, Laurence; Shi, Ya Ping

    2012-01-01

    Pregnant women have abundant natural killer (NK) cells in their placenta, and NK cell function is regulated by polymorphisms of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Previous studies report different roles of NK cells in the immune responses to placental malaria (PM) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infections. Given these references, the aim of this study was to determine the association between KIR gene content polymorphism and PM infection in pregnant women of known HIV-1 status. Sixteen genes in the KIR family were analyzed in 688 pregnant Kenyan women. Gene content polymorphisms were assessed in relation to PM in HIV-1 negative and HIV-1 positive women, respectively. Results showed that in HIV-1 negative women, the presence of the individual genes KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3 increased the odds of having PM, and the KIR2DL2/KIR2DL2 homozygotes were associated with protection from PM. However, the reverse relationship was observed in HIV-1 positive women, where the presence of individual KIR2DL3 was associated with protection from PM, and KIR2DL2/KIR2DL2 homozygotes increased the odds for susceptibility to PM. Further analysis of the HIV-1 positive women stratified by CD4 counts showed that this reverse association between KIR genes and PM remained only in the individuals with high CD4 cell counts but not in those with low CD4 cell counts. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibitory KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3, which are alleles of the same locus, play a role in the inverse effects on PM and PM/HIV co-infection and the effect of KIR genes on PM in HIV positive women is dependent on high CD4 cell counts. In addition, analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) of the PM relevant KIR genes showed strong LD in women without PM regardless of their HIV status while LD was broken in those with PM, indicating possible selection pressure by malaria infection on the KIR genes.

  12. Lectins and Tetrahymena - A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-09-01

    The unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena is a complete organism, one of the most highly developed protozoans, which has specialized organelles performing each of the functions characteristic to the cells of higher ranked animals. It is also able to produce, store, and secrete hormones of higher ranked animals and also react to them. It produces lectins that can bind them and has functions, which are influenced by exogenous lectins. The review lists the observations on the relationship between lectins and Tetrahymena and try to construe them on the basis of the data, which are at our disposal. Considering the data, lectins can be used by Tetrahymena as materials for influencing conjugation, for stimulating hormone receptors, and by this, mimic the hormonal functions. Lectins can influence phagocytosis and movement of the cells as well as the cell division. As Tetrahymena can recognize both related and hostile cells by the help of lectins and surface sugars, it could be surmised a complex predator-prey system. This could determine the survival of the population as well as the nourishment conditions. When Tetrahymena is pathogenic, it can use lectins as virulence factors.

  13. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  14. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  15. Nucleic acid binding property of the gene products of rice stripe virus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Delin; Ma, Xiangqiang; Qu, Zhicai; Hull, Roger

    2005-10-01

    GST fusion proteins of the six gene products from RNAs 2,3 and 4 of the tenuivirus, Rice stripe virus (RSV), were used to study the nucleic acid binding activities in vitro. Three of the proteins, p3, pc3 and pc4, bound both single- and double-stranded cDNA of RSV RNA4 and also RNA3 transcribed from its cDNA clone, while p2, pc2-N (the N-terminal part of pc2) nor p4 bound the cDNA or RNA transcript. The binding activity of p3 is located in the carboxyl-terminus amino acid 154-194, which contains basic amino acid rich beta-sheets. The acidic amino acid-rich amino-terminus (amino acids 1-100) of p3 did not have nucleic acid binding activity. The related analogous gene product of the tenuivirus, Rice hoja blanca virus, is a suppressor of gene silencing and the possibility of the nucleic acid binding ability of RSV p3 being associated with this property is discussed. The C-terminal part of the RSV nucleocapsid protein, which also contains a basic region, binds nucleic acids, which is consistent with its function. The central and C-terminal regions of pc4 bind nucleic acid. It has been suggested that this protein is a cell-to-cell movement protein and nucleic acid binding would be in accord with this function.

  16. Breast Cancer Prevention by Fatty Acid Binding Protein MRG-Induced Pregnancy Like Mammary Gland Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Annual Summary 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 AUG 2004 - 31 JUL 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Breast Cancer Prevention by Fatty Acid Binding Protein...differentiation. Overexpression of MRG in human breast cancer cells induced differentiation with changes in cellular morphology and a significant increase

  17. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  18. The frequencies of Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are similar to those in Guillian Barre syndrome but differ from those of controls, suggesting a role for NK cells in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Stefan; Csurhes, Peter; McCombe, Pamela

    2015-08-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired inflammatory neuropathy, which has similar clinical and pathological features to Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), but differs in time course. We investigated the frequency of genes encoding Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in subjects with CIDP, in subjects with GBS and in healthy controls. There were no differences in KIR gene frequency among the 3 groups. The gene frequencies for HLA-B Bw4-I were significantly greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from GBS. The frequency of the combination of 3DL1/HLA-B Bw4I was greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from that of GBS. These data raise the possibility of NK cell function being an important factor in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  19. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  20. Diverse roles of the nucleic acid binding protein KHSRP in cell differentiation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Briata, Paola; Bordo, Domenico; Puppo, Margherita; Gorlero, Franco; Rossi, Martina; Bizzozzero, Nora Perrone; Gherzi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein KHSRP (KH-Type Splicing Regulatory Protein) modulates RNA life and gene expression at various levels. KHSRP controls important cellular functions as different as proliferation, differentiation, metabolism and response to infectious agents. We summarize and discuss experimental evidence providing a potential link between changes in KHSRP expression/function and human diseases including neuromuscular disorders, obesity, type II diabetes, and cancer. PMID:26708421

  1. Diverse roles of the nucleic acid-binding protein KHSRP in cell differentiation and disease.

    PubMed

    Briata, Paola; Bordo, Domenico; Puppo, Margherita; Gorlero, Franco; Rossi, Martina; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora; Gherzi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The single-stranded nucleic acid-binding protein KHSRP (KH-type splicing regulatory protein) modulates RNA life and gene expression at various levels. KHSRP controls important cellular functions as different as proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and response to infectious agents. We summarize and discuss experimental evidence providing a potential link between changes in KHSRP expression/function and human diseases including neuromuscular disorders, obesity, type II diabetes, and cancer.

  2. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression.

  3. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  4. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  5. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  6. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  7. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-04-27

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  8. Nucleic acid binding proteins in highly purified Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Sklaviadis, T; Akowitz, A; Manuelidis, E E; Manuelidis, L

    1993-01-01

    The nature of the infectious agent causing human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a slowly progressive dementia, is controversial. As in scrapie, no agent-specific proteins or nucleic acids have been identified. However, biological features of exponential replication and agent strain variation, as well as physical size and density data, are most consistent with a viral structure--i.e., a nucleic acid-protein complex. It is often assumed that nuclease treatment, which does not reduce infectious titer, leaves no nucleic acids of > 50 bp. However, nucleic acids of 500-6000 bp can be extracted from highly purified infectious complexes with a mass of approximately 1.5 x 10(7) daltons. It was therefore germane to search for nucleic acid binding proteins that might protect an agent genome. We here use Northwestern blotting to show that there are low levels of nonhistone nucleic acid binding proteins in highly purified infectious 120S gradient fractions. Several nucleic acid binding proteins were clearly host encoded, whereas others were apparent only in CJD, but not in parallel preparations from uninfected brain. Small amounts of residual host Gp34 (prion protein) did not bind any 32P-labeled nucleic acid probes. Most of the minor "CJD-specific" proteins had an acidic pI, a characteristic of many viral core proteins. Such proteins deserve further study, as they probably contribute to unique properties of resistance described for these agents. It remains to be seen if any of these proteins are agent encoded. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8516321

  9. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  10. Identification of cytosolic and microsomal bile acid-binding proteins in rat ileal enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; Kramer, W.; Wilson, F.A. )

    1990-09-05

    Studies were performed to determine the subcellular fractions and proteins involved in the intracellular transport of bile acids in rat ileal cells. The photolabile derivative 7,7-azo-taurocholate inhibited the Na(+)-dependent uptake of taurocholate into rat ileal enterocytes reversibly in the dark and irreversibly following photolysis. When photolabeled cells were submitted to subcellular fractionation, greatest radioactivity was found in the soluble protein (SP) fraction with decreasing radioactivity in the brush-border-(BBM), basolateral-(BLM), mitochondria-(MT), microsome-(MC), and Golgi-(GO) enriched fractions. Following trichloroacetic acid precipitation, delipidation, and correction for loss of marker enzyme activity, protein bound radioactivity was in SP greater than BBM greater than MC greater than BLM greater than GO greater than MT. When photolabeled cells were first fractionated and then submitted to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a 99-kDa polypeptide was associated with BBM, 54- and 59-kDa polypeptides with BLM, 14-, 35-, 43-, 59-, and 68-kDa polypeptides with SP and a 20-kDa polypeptide with MC fractions. Immunoprecipitation with known antisera identified the 68-kDa polypeptide as albumin and the 43-kDa polypeptide as actin. No precipitation on the 14-kDa polypeptide was noted with anti-hepatic and anti-intestinal fatty acid-binding proteins. No precipitation of the 35-kDa polypeptide occurred with antibody to the hepatic cytosolic bile acid-binding protein. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized 20-kDa microsomal, and 14- and 35-kDa cytosolic bile acid-binding polypeptides which may be involved in the transcellular movement of bile acids.

  11. Towards an understanding of Mesocestoides vogae fatty acid binding proteins' roles.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Garrido, Natalia; Kun, Alejandra; Paulino, Margot; Esteves, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, MvFABPa and MvFABPb were identified in the parasite Mesocestoides vogae (Platyhelmithes, Cestoda). Fatty acid binding proteins are small intracellular proteins whose members exhibit great diversity. Proteins of this family have been identified in many organisms, of which Platyhelminthes are among the most primitive. These proteins have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo synthesis of fatty acids is absent. Fatty acids should be captured from the media needing an efficient transport system to uptake and distribute these molecules. While HLBPs could be involved in the shuttle of fatty acids to the surrounding host tissues and convey them into the parasite, FABPs could be responsible for the intracellular trafficking. In an effort to understand the role of MvFABPs in fatty acid transport of M. vogae larvae, we analysed the intracellular localization of both MvFABPs and the co-localization with in vivo uptake of fatty acid analogue BODIPY FL C16. Immunohistochemical studies on larvae sections using specific antibodies, showed a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution of each protein with some expression in nuclei and mitochondria. MvFABPs distribution was confirmed by mass spectrometry identification from 2D-electrophoresis of larvae subcellular fractions. This work is the first report showing intracellular distribution of MvFABPs as well as the co-localization of these proteins with the BODIPY FL C16 incorporated from the media. Our results suggest that fatty acid binding proteins could target fatty acids to cellular compartments including nuclei. In this sense, M. vogae FABPs could participate in several cellular processes fulfilling most of the functions attributed to vertebrate's counterparts.

  12. Ligand specificity and conformational stability of human fatty acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, A W; van Moerkerk, H T; Veerkamp, J H

    2001-09-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. At least eight different types of FABP occur, each with a specific tissue distribution and possibly with a distinct function. To define the functional characteristics of all eight human FABPs, viz. heart (H), brain (B), myelin (M), adipocyte (A), epidermal (E), intestinal (I), liver (L) and ileal lipid-binding protein (I-LBP), we studied their ligand specificity, their conformational stability and their immunological crossreactivity. Additionally, binding of bile acids to I-LBP was studied. The FABP types showed differences in fatty acid binding affinity. Generally, the affinity for palmitic acid was lower than for oleic and arachidonic acid. All FABP types, except E-FABP, I-FABP and I-LBP interacted with 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonic acid (ANS). Only L-FABP, I-FABP and M-FABP showed binding of 11-((5-dimethylaminonaphtalene-1-sulfonyl)amino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA). I-LBP showed increasing binding of bile acids in the order taurine-conjugated>glycine-conjugated>unconjugated bile acids. A hydroxylgroup of bile acids at position 7 decreased and at position 12 increased the binding affinity to I-LBP. The fatty acid-binding affinity and the conformation of FABP types were differentially affected in the presence of urea. Our results demonstrate significant differences in ligand binding, conformational stability and surface properties between different FABP types which may point to a specific function in certain cells and tissues. The preference of I-LBP (but not L-FABP) for conjugated bile acids is in accordance with a specific role in bile acid reabsorption in the ileum.

  13. Towards an Understanding of Mesocestoides vogae Fatty Acid Binding Proteins’ Roles

    PubMed Central

    Alvite, Gabriela; Garrido, Natalia; Kun, Alejandra; Paulino, Margot; Esteves, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, MvFABPa and MvFABPb were identified in the parasite Mesocestoides vogae (Platyhelmithes, Cestoda). Fatty acid binding proteins are small intracellular proteins whose members exhibit great diversity. Proteins of this family have been identified in many organisms, of which Platyhelminthes are among the most primitive. These proteins have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo synthesis of fatty acids is absent. Fatty acids should be captured from the media needing an efficient transport system to uptake and distribute these molecules. While HLBPs could be involved in the shuttle of fatty acids to the surrounding host tissues and convey them into the parasite, FABPs could be responsible for the intracellular trafficking. In an effort to understand the role of MvFABPs in fatty acid transport of M. vogae larvae, we analysed the intracellular localization of both MvFABPs and the co-localization with in vivo uptake of fatty acid analogue BODIPY FL C16. Immunohistochemical studies on larvae sections using specific antibodies, showed a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution of each protein with some expression in nuclei and mitochondria. MvFABPs distribution was confirmed by mass spectrometry identification from 2D-electrophoresis of larvae subcellular fractions. This work is the first report showing intracellular distribution of MvFABPs as well as the co-localization of these proteins with the BODIPY FL C16 incorporated from the media. Our results suggest that fatty acid binding proteins could target fatty acids to cellular compartments including nuclei. In this sense, M. vogae FABPs could participate in several cellular processes fulfilling most of the functions attributed to vertebrate’s counterparts. PMID:25347286

  14. Partial purification of fatty-acid binding protein by ammonium sulphate fractionation.

    PubMed

    Avanzati, B; Catalá, A

    1983-07-01

    By fractionation of rat liver cytosol with 70% saturation ammonium sulphate, a soluble fraction showing high affinity for oleic acid was obtained. The binding of oleic acid to this fraction was inhibited by flavaspidic acid. The molecular weight of the main protein present in this fraction was 12 000 as determined by SDS-poly-acrylamide-gel electrophoresis. This soluble fraction stimulated the transfer of oleic acid from microsomes to phosphatidylcholine liposomes as demonstrated by a transfer assay in vitro. The behaviour of this fraction is similar to that described for fatty-acid binding protein.

  15. Influence of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor/HLA ligand matching on achievement of T-cell complete donor chimerism in related donor nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sobecks, R M; Ball, E J; Askar, M; Theil, K S; Rybicki, L A; Thomas, D; Brown, S; Kalaycio, M; Andresen, S; Pohlman, B; Dean, R; Sweetenham, J; Macklis, R; Bernhard, L; Cherni, K; Copelan, E; Maciejewski, J P; Bolwell, B J

    2008-04-01

    Achievement of complete donor chimerism (CDC) after allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (NMHSCT) is important for preventing graft rejection and for generating a graft-vs-malignancy effect. The alloreactivity of NK cells and some T-cell subsets is mediated through the interaction of their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with target cell HLA/KIR ligands. The influence of KIR matching on the achievement of T-cell CDC after NMHSCT has not been previously described. We analyzed 31 patients undergoing T-cell replete related donor NMHSCT following fludarabine and 200 cGy TBI. Recipient inhibitory KIR genotype and donor HLA/KIR ligand matches were used to generate an inhibitory KIR score from 1 to 4 based upon the potential number of recipient inhibitory KIRs that could be engaged with donor HLA/KIR ligands. Patients with a score of 1 were less likely to achieve T-cell CDC (P=0.016) and more likely to develop graft rejection (P=0.011) than those with scores greater than 1. Thus, patients with lower inhibitory KIR scores may have more active anti-donor immune effector cells that may reduce donor chimerism. Conversely, patients with greater inhibitory KIR scores may have less active NK cell and T-cell populations, which may make them more likely to achieve CDC.

  16. Typing of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and their cognate human leukocyte antigen class I ligands predicts survival of Chinese Han patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Liu, Fang; Sansas, Benoit; Kang, Bin; Preville, Xavier; Wu, Xianghua; Chang, Jianhua; Micol, Romain; Wang, Jialei; Meng, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may establish an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that is conducive to tumor growth. Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in immunological surveillance. Activation of NK cells partially depends on the interactions between killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands. We herein investigated the association of KIRs and HLA ligands with survival in metastatic NSCLC (mNSCLC) patients treated with chemotherapy in a Chinese Han population. Polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers was used to type 15 KIRs at the DNA and mRNA level and 6 HLA ligands in 70 mNSCLC patients. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard regression model was applied for multivariate survival analysis, with the stepwise selection, to determine independent predictors of survival. It was observed that patients with KIR2DS4del gene expression at the mRNA level or HLA-Bw4T80 exhibited poor overall survival (OS). The multivariate analysis revealed that HLA-Bw4T80 and KIR2DS4del expression were independent predictors of OS. This observation indicated that the KIR/HLA ligand is a promising predictor of survival in mNSCLC and may also provide a strategy for treatment stratification and patient management.

  17. PKHD1, the Polycystic Kidney and Hepatic Disease 1 Gene, Encodes a Novel Large Protein Containing Multiple Immunoglobulin-Like Plexin-Transcription–Factor Domains and Parallel Beta-Helix 1 Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Onuchic, Luiz F.; Furu, Laszlo; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Hou, Xiaoying; Eggermann, Thomas; Ren, Zhiyong; Bergmann, Carsten; Senderek, Jan; Esquivel, Ernie; Zeltner, Raoul; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Mrug, Michael; Sweeney, William; Avner, Ellis D.; Zerres, Klaus; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Somlo, Stefan; Germino, Gregory G.

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe form of polycystic kidney disease that presents primarily in infancy and childhood and that is characterized by enlarged kidneys and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We have identified PKHD1, the gene mutated in ARPKD. PKHD1 extends over ⩾469 kb, is primarily expressed in human fetal and adult kidney, and includes a minimum of 86 exons that are variably assembled into a number of alternatively spliced transcripts. The longest continuous open reading frame encodes a 4,074-amino-acid protein, polyductin, that is predicted to have a single transmembrane (TM)-spanning domain near its carboxyl terminus, immunoglobulin-like plexin-transcription–factor domains, and parallel beta-helix 1 repeats in its amino terminus. Several transcripts encode truncated products that lack the TM and that may be secreted if translated. The PKHD1-gene products are members of a novel class of proteins that share structural features with hepatocyte growth-factor receptor and plexins and that belong to a superfamily of proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and of cellular adhesion and repulsion. PMID:11898128

  18. Bile acid binding capacity of fish protein hydrolysates from discard species of the West Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gálvez, Raúl; García-Moreno, Pedro J; Morales-Medina, Rocío; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M

    2015-04-01

    Fish protein hydrolysates (FPH), produced from the six main discard species from the West Mediterranean Sea (sardine, horse mackerel, axillary seabream, bogue, small-spotted catshark and blue whiting) were tested for their bile acid binding capacity. This capacity is directly linked to the ability to inhibit bile reabsorption in the ileum and therefore to lower cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. From each species, FPH were obtained by three different enzymatic treatments employing two serine endoproteases (subtilisin and trypsin) sequentially or in combination. The results show statistically significant differences among the fish species, attaining interesting average values of bile acid binding capacity for blue whiting (27.32% relative to cholestyramine on an equal protein basis) and horse mackerel (27.42% relative to cholestyramine on an equal protein basis). The enzymatic treatments did not significantly affect the ability of a given species to bind bile acids. These results are similar to other protein sources, such as soy protein or casein, of proven hypocholesterolemic effect. It can be concluded that fish protein hydrolysates from these discard species are suitable as ingredients in the formulation of cholesterol-lowering supplements.

  19. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid Binding Aspects of Berberine Analogs and Implications for Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Debipreeta; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is one of the most widely known alkaloids belonging to the protoberberine group exhibiting myriad therapeutic properties. The anticancer potency of berberine appears to derive from its multiple actions including strong interaction with nucleic acids exhibiting adenine-thymine base pair specificity, inhibition of the enzymes topoisomerases and telomerases, and stabilizing the quadruplex structures. It was realized that the development of berberine as a potential anticancer agent necessitates enhancing its nucleic acid binding efficacy through appropriate structural modifications. More recently a number of such approaches have been attempted in various laboratories with great success. Several derivatives have been synthesized mostly with substitutions at the 8, 9 and 13 positions of the isoquinoline chromophore, and studied for enhanced nucleic acid binding activity. In this article, we present an up to date review of the details of the interaction of berberine and several of its important synthetic 8, 9 and 13 substituted derivatives with various nucleic acid structures reported recently. These studies provide interesting knowledge on the mode, mechanism, sequence and structural specificity of the binding of berberine derivatives and correlate structural and energetic aspects of the interaction providing better understanding of the structure- activity relations for designing and development of berberine based therapeutic agents with higher efficacy and therapeutic potential.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ligand Dissociation from Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, Dong; Mu, Yuguang; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized “portal region” could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques. PMID:19564911

  1. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer. PMID:28123516

  2. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer.

  3. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  4. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-01-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-binding activity. No hybridization was detected in RNA extracted from ovary, spleen, kidney, or liver, which contain relatively low levels of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein activity. Analysis of genomic clones isolated from an EcoRI bovine genomic library demonstrated that the bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein gene is composed of four exons and three introns. Two putative promoter sequences were identified in the cloned 5' sequence of the gene. Images PMID:3039499

  5. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-08-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-binding activity. No hybridization was detected in RNA extracted from ovary, spleen, kidney, or liver, which contain relatively low levels of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein activity. Analysis of genomic clones isolated from an EcoRI bovine genomic library demonstrated that the bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein gene is composed of four exons and three introns. Two putative promoter sequences were identified in the cloned 5' sequence of the gene.

  6. Spectral characters of lectin saccharide interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deyu; Jiang, Duxiao; Yuan, Chunwei

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we report attempts to directly detect the interaction behavior between erythrocyte and lectin concanavalin a (Con A) as well as phaseolus vulgaris (PHA) on the polystyrene film surface. In the procedure, an optical transducer based reflectance interferometry was set up and used to detect the film thickness change during the lectin adsorption and lectin- erythrocyte interaction. The specific interactions among Con A, PHA and erythrocyte were obtained. The solubility monosaccharide inhibition test confirmed that there is affinity between (alpha) - D-mannose and Con A.

  7. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker.

  8. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker. PMID:26871720

  9. Model of β-Sheet of Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein of Locusta migratoria Displays Characteristic Topology.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Nadeem A; Hai, Abdul; Alruwaili, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    The β-sheet of muscle fatty acid binding protein of Locusta migratoria (Lm-FABP) was modeled by employing 2-D NMR data and the Rigid Body Assembly method. The model shows the β-sheet to comprise ten β-strands arranged anti-parallel to each other. There is a β-bulge between Ser 13 and Gln 14 which is a difference from the published structure of β-sheet of bovine heart Fatty Acid Binding Protein. Also, a hydrophobic patch consisting of Ile 45, Phe 51, Phe 64 and Phe 66 is present on the surface which is characteristic of most Fatty Acid Binding Proteins. A "gap" is present between βD and βE that provides evidence for the presence of a portal or opening between the polypeptide chains which allows ligand fatty acids to enter the protein cavity and bind to the protein.

  10. From keys to bulldozers: expanding roles for winged helix domains in nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Harami, Gábor M; Gyimesi, Máté; Kovács, Mihály

    2013-07-01

    The winged helix domain (WHD) is a widespread nucleic-acid-binding protein structural element found in all kingdoms of life. Although the overall structure of the WHD is conserved, its functional properties and interaction profiles are extremely versatile. WHD-containing proteins can exploit nearly the full spectrum of nucleic acid structural features for recognition and even covalent modification or noncovalent rearrangement of target molecules. WHD functions range from sequence-recognizing keys in transcription factors and bulldozer-like strand-separating wedges in helicases to mediators of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Further investigations are needed to understand the contribution of WHD structural dynamics to nucleic-acid-modifying enzymatic functions.

  11. Structural analysis of ibuprofen binding to human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4).

    PubMed

    González, Javier M; Fisher, S Zoë

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4) has been proposed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. However, FABP4 displays a naturally low selectivity towards hydrophobic ligands, leading to the possibility of side effects arising from cross-inhibition of other FABP isoforms. In a search for structural determinants of ligand-binding selectivity, the binding of FABP4 towards a group of small molecules structurally related to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was analyzed through X-ray crystallography. Several specific hydrophobic interactions are shown to enhance the binding affinities of these compounds, whereas an aromatic edge-to-face interaction is proposed to determine the conformation of bound ligands, highlighting the importance of aromatic interactions in hydrophobic environments.

  12. Neurologic syndrome associated with homozygous mutation at MAG sialic acid binding site.

    PubMed

    Roda, Ricardo H; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Boucekkine, Houda; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-08-01

    The MAG gene encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an abundant protein involved in axon-glial interactions and myelination during nerve regeneration. Several members of a consanguineous family with a clinical syndrome reminiscent of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and demyelinating leukodystrophy on brain MRI were recently found to harbor a homozygous missense p.Ser133Arg MAG mutation. Here, we report two brothers from a nonconsanguineous family afflicted with progressive cognitive impairment, neuropathy, ataxia, nystagmus, and gait disorder. Exome sequencing revealed the homozygous missense mutation p.Arg118His in MAG. This Arg118 residue in immunoglobulin domain 1 is critical for sialic acid binding, providing a compelling mechanistic basis for disease pathogenesis.

  13. Expression of fatty acid binding proteins is altered in aged mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pu, L; Igbavboa, U; Wood, W G; Roths, J B; Kier, A B; Spener, F; Schroeder, F

    1999-08-01

    Brain membrane lipid fatty acid composition and consequently membrane fluidity change with increasing age. Intracellular fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) such as heart H-FABP and the brain specific B-FABP, detected by immunoblotting of brain tissue, are thought to be involved in fatty acid uptake, metabolism, and differentiation in brain. Yet, almost nothing is known regarding the effect of age on the expression of the cytosolic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) or their content in brain subfractions. Electrophoresis and quantitative immunoblotting were used to examine the content of these FABPs in synaptosomes in brains from 4, 15, and 25 month old C57BL/6NNia male mice. Brain H-FABP and B-FABP were differentially expressed in mouse brain subcellular fractions. Brain H-FABP was highly concentrated in synaptosomal cytosol. The level of brain H-FABP in synaptosomes, synaptosomal cytosol, and intrasynaptosomal membranes was decreased 33, 35, and 43%, respectively, in 25 month old mice. B-FABP was detected in lower quantity than H-FABP. More important, B-FABP decreased in synaptosomes, synaptic plasma membranes, and synaptosomal cytosol from brains of 25 month old mice. In contrast to H-FABP, B-FABP was not detectable in the intrasynaptosomal membranes in any of the three age groups of mice. In conclusion, expression of both H-FABP and B-FABP was markedly reduced in aged mouse brain. Age differences in brain H-FABP and B-FABP levels in synaptosomal plasma membranes and synaptosomal cytosol may be important factors modulating neuronal differentiation and function.

  14. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  15. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins.

  16. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  17. In vitro bile acid binding and short-chain fatty acid profile of flax fiber and ethanol co-products.

    PubMed

    Fodje, Adele M L; Chang, Peter R; Leterme, Pascal

    2009-10-01

    Fibers from flaxseed and co-products from ethanol production could be potential sources of dietary fiber in human diet. In vitro fermentation and bile acid binding models were used to investigate the metabolic effects of lignaMax (Bioriginal Food and Science Corp., Saskatoon, SK, Canada) flax meal, spent flax meal, soluble flax gum, wheat insoluble fiber (WIF), and rye insoluble fiber (RIF). Wheat and rye bran were used as reference samples. Bile acid binding of substrates was analysed at taurocholate ([(14)C]taurocholate) concentration of 12.5 mM. Soluble flax gum showed the highest bile acid binding (0.57 micromol/mg of fiber) (P acid binding between wheat bran (0.2 micromol/mg of fiber) and WIF (0.26 micromol/mg of fiber). RIF had higher (P acid binding (0.20 micromol/mg of fiber) than rye bran (0.13 micromol/mg of fiber). Substrates were hydrolyzed and incubated with pig fecal samples. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profile and gas accumulation (G(f)) were compared. Soluble flax gum generated the highest amount of acetic and propionic acids. SCFA profiles of wheat/rye brans and WIF/RIF were similar (except for butyric acid). G(f) for soluble flax gum was greater (P < .001) than that of spent flax meal. G(f) values of the wheat samples were similar, whereas the G(f) of the rye bran was higher (P < .001) than that of RIF. Fractional degradation rate (micro(t = T/2)) (P < .001) was also recorded. The highest mu(t = T/2) was observed for the soluble flax gum. Oil-depleted flaxseed fractions and WIF/RIF (co-products from ethanol production) could be potential sources of dietary fiber in human nutrition.

  18. Temporal profile of intestinal tissue expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Leda Bertoncini; Figueira, Rebeca Lopes; Gonçalves, Frances Lilian Lanhellas; Mitidiero, Luís Felipe Tsuyoshi; Silva, Orlando Castro e; Peiró, José Luis; Sbragia, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing enterocolitis is a severe multifactorial intestinal disorder that primarily affects preterm newborns, causing 20-40% mortality and morbidity. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been reported to be a biomarker for the detection of intestinal injuries. Our aim was to assess intestinal tissue injury and the molecular expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein over time in a necrotizing enterocolitis model. METHODS: A total of 144 Newborn rats were divided into two groups: 1) Control, which received breastfeeding (n=72) and 2) Necrotizing Enterocolitis, which received formula feeding and underwent hypoxia and hypothermia (n=72). A total of six time points of ischemia (2 times a day for 3 days; 12 pups for each time point) were examined. Samples were collected for analysis of body weight, morphological and histological characteristics, intestinal weight, intestinal weight/body weight ratio, injury grade, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels. RESULTS: Body and intestinal weights were lower in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005 and p<0.0005, respectively). The intestinal weight/body weight ratio was higher in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005) only at the sixth ischemia time point. The Necrotizing Enterocolitis group displayed higher expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (p<0.0005) and showed greater tissue damage than the Control group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein was an efficient marker of ischemic injury to the intestine and a good correlation was demonstrated between the time of ischemic injury and the grade of intestinal injury. PMID:27464299

  19. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  20. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  1. Intestinal Fatty-Acid Binding Protein and Metronidazole Response in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Mario R.; Bloom, Barry T.; Arrieta, Antonio; Capparelli, Edmund; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian; Kearns, Gregory L.; van den Anker, John; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In premature infants with suspected intra-abdominal infection, biomarkers for treatment response to antimicrobial therapy are lacking. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) is specific to the enterocyte and is released in response to intestinal mucosal injury. I-FABP has not been evaluated as a surrogate marker of disease response to antimicrobial therapy. We examined the relationship between metronidazole exposure and urinary I-FABP concentrations in premature infants with suspected intra-abdominal infection. Study design We conducted an intravenous metronidazole pharmacokinetic study, collecting ≤3 urine samples per infant for I-FABP concentration measurements. We analyzed the relationship between I-FABP concentrations and measures of metronidazole exposure and pharmacokinetics, maturational factors, and other covariates. Results Twenty-six samples from 19 premature infants were obtained during metronidazole treatment. When analyzed without regard to presence of necrotic gastrointestinal disease, there were no significant associations between predictor variables and I-FABP concentrations. However, when the sample was limited to premature infants with necrotic gastrointestinal disease, an association was found between average predicted metronidazole concentration and I-FABP concentration (p=0.006). Conclusion While a predictive association between urinary I-FABP and metronidazole systemic exposure was not observed, the data suggest the potential of this endogenous biomarker to serve as a pharmacodynamic surrogate for antimicrobial treatment of serious abdominal infections in neonates and infants. PMID:25318626

  2. Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Ix, Joachim H.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Although fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) may increase risk of diabetes and exert negative cardiac inotropy, it is unknown whether plasma concentrations of FABP4 are associated with incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We prospectively analyzed data on 4,560 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study. FABP4 was measured at baseline using ELISA, and SCD events were adjudicated through review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards to estimate effect measures. During a median followup of 11.8 years, 146 SCD cases occurred. In a multivariable model adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors, relative risk of SCD associated with each higher standard deviation (SD) of plasma FABP4 was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.95–1.38), P = 0.15. In a secondary analysis stratified by prevalent diabetes status, FABP4 was associated with higher risk of SCD in nondiabetic participants, (RR per SD higher FABP4: 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07–1.65), P = 0.009) but not in diabetic participants (RR per SD higher FABP4: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62–1.27), P = 0.50), P for diabetes-FABP4 interaction 0.049. In summary, a single measure of plasma FABP4 obtained later in life was not associated with the risk of SCD in older adults overall. Confirmation of our post-hoc results in nondiabetic people in other studies is warranted. PMID:24455402

  3. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  4. Structural and biochemical characterization of the lungfish (Lepidosiren paradoxa) liver basic fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, S M; Santomé, J A

    2001-04-01

    Only one fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) from the liver of the lungfish (Lepidosiren paradoxa) was isolated and characterized. The sequence comparison of lungfish FABP with that of the known members of the liver FABP (L-FABP) and liver basic FABP (Lb-FABP) subfamilies indicates that it is more closely related to chicken, iguana, frog, axolotl, catfish, and shark Lb-FABPs than to mammalian and axolotl L-FABPs. Lungfish liver expression of this single Lb-FABP contrasts with the other fish studied so far which coexpress an Lb-FABP with heart-adipocyte and/or intestinal FABP types. The lungfish liver FABP expression pattern resembles that of tetrapods, which only expresses liver type FABPs. Lungfish Lb-FABP is one of the two FABPs reported to have a disulfide bridge. The molecular modeling of lungfish Lb-FABP predicts that nine of the conserved residues of Lb-FABPs are oriented toward the binding cavity, thus suggesting they are related to the protein binding characteristics.

  5. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  6. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  7. DNA Methylation of Cellular Retinoic Acid-Binding Proteins in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Ortiz, Ana L; Salcedo-Vargas, Mauricio; Vargas-Requena, Claudia L; López-Díaz, José A; De la Mora-Covarrubias, Antonio; Silva-Espinoza, Juan C; Jiménez-Vega, Florinda

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the methylation status of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) gene promoters and associated them with demographic characteristics, habits, and the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in patients with cervical cancer (CC), low and high squamous intraepithelial lesions, and no intraepithelial lesion. Women (n = 158) were selected from the Colposcopy Clinic of Sanitary Jurisdiction II in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Demographic characteristics and habit information were collected. Cervical biopsy and endocervical scraping were used to determine methylation in promoter regions by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction technique. We found hemi-methylation patterns in the promoter regions of CRABP1 and CRABP2; there was 28.5% hemi-methylation in CRABP1 and 7.0% in that of CRABP2. Methylation in CRABP1 was associated with age (≥35 years, P = 0.002), family history of cancer (P = 0.032), the presence of HPV-16 (P = 0.013), and no alcohol intake (P = 0.035). These epigenetic changes could be involved in the CC process, and CRABP1 has the potential to be a predictive molecular marker of retinoid therapy response.

  8. Recent insights into the biological functions of liver fatty acid binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, GuQi; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; de Lemos, Andrew; Burczynski, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Over four decades have passed since liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP)1 was first isolated. There are few protein families for which most of the complete tertiary structures, binding properties, and tissue occurrences are described in such detail and yet new functions are being uncovered for this protein. FABP1 is known to be critical for fatty acid uptake and intracellular transport and also has an important role in regulating lipid metabolism and cellular signaling pathways. FABP1 is an important endogenous cytoprotectant, minimizing hepatocyte oxidative damage and interfering with ischemia-reperfusion and other hepatic injuries. The protein may be targeted for metabolic activation through the cross-talk among many transcriptional factors and their activating ligands. Deficiency or malfunction of FABP1 has been reported in several diseases. FABP1 also influences cell proliferation during liver regeneration and may be considered as a prognostic factor for hepatic surgery. FABP1 binds and modulates the action of many molecules such as fatty acids, heme, and other metalloporphyrins. The ability to bind heme is another cytoprotective property and one that deserves closer investigation. The role of FABP1 in substrate availability and in protection from oxidative stress suggests that FABP1 plays a pivotal role during intracellular bacterial/viral infections by reducing inflammation and the adverse effects of starvation (energy deficiency). PMID:26443794

  9. Polymerization and nucleic acid-binding properties of human L1 ORF1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Kathryn E.; Hickman, Alison B.; Jones, Charles E.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Furano, Anthony V.

    2012-01-01

    The L1 (LINE 1) retrotransposable element encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p. ORF2p is the L1 replicase, but the role of ORF1p is unknown. Mouse ORF1p, a coiled-coil-mediated trimer of ∼42-kDa monomers, binds nucleic acids and has nucleic acid chaperone activity. We purified human L1 ORF1p expressed in insect cells and made two findings that significantly advance our knowledge of the protein. First, in the absence of nucleic acids, the protein polymerizes under the very conditions (0.05 M NaCl) that are optimal for high (∼1 nM)-affinity nucleic acid binding. The non-coiled-coil C-terminal half mediates formation of the polymer, an active conformer that is instantly resolved to trimers, or multimers thereof, by nucleic acid. Second, the protein has a biphasic effect on mismatched double-stranded DNA, a proxy chaperone substrate. It protects the duplex from dissociation at 37°C before eventually melting it when largely polymeric. Therefore, polymerization of ORF1p seemingly affects its interaction with nucleic acids. Additionally, polymerization of ORF1p at its translation site could explain the heretofore-inexplicable phenomenon of cis preference—the favored retrotransposition of the actively translated L1 transcript, which is essential for L1 survival. PMID:21937507

  10. Expression of liver fatty acid binding protein alters growth and differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, F; Atshaves, B P; Starodub, O; Boedeker, A L; Smith, R R; Roths, J B; Foxworth, W B; Kier, A B

    2001-03-01

    Although expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) modulates cell growth, it is not known if L-FABP also alters cell morphology and differentiation. Therefore, pluripotent embryonic stem cells were transfected with cDNA encoding L-FABP and a series of clones expressing increasing levels of L-FABP were isolated. Untransfected ES cells, as well as ES cells transfected only with empty vector, spontaneously differentiated from rounded adipocyte-like to fibroblast-like morphology, concomitant with marked reduction in expression of stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA-1). These changes in morphology and expression of SSEA-1 were greatest in ES cell clones expressing L-FABP above a threshold level. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed that L-FABP was primarily localized in a diffuse-cytosolic pattern along with a lesser degree of punctate L-FABP expression in the nucleus. Nuclear localization of L-FABP was preferentially increased in clones expressing higher levels of L-FABP. In summary, L-FABP expression altered ES cell morphology and expression of SSEA-1. Taken together with the fact that L-FABP was detected in the nucleus, these data suggested that L-FABP may play a more direct, heretofore unknown, role in regulating ES cell differentiation by acting in the nucleus as well as cytoplasm.

  11. Fatty acid binding protein 4 in circulating leucocytes reflects atherosclerotic lesion progression in Apoe(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Agardh, Hanna E; Gertow, Karl; Salvado, Dolores M; Hermansson, Andreas; van Puijvelde, Gijs H; Hansson, Göran K; n-Berne, Gabrielle Paulsso; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2013-02-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers for atherosclerosis is important to aid in early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify potential biomarkers in circulating cells reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression in the vessel wall. We performed gene arrays on circulating leucocytes from atherosclerosis prone Apoe(-/-) mice with increasing ages, using C57BL/6 mice as healthy controls. We identified fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) mRNA to be augmented in mice with established disease compared with young Apoe(-/-) or controls. Interestingly, the transcript FABP4 correlated significantly with lesion size, further supporting a disease associated increase. In addition, validation of our finding on protein level showed augmented FABP4 in circulating leucocytes whereas, importantly, no change could be observed in plasma. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated FABP4 to be present mainly in circulating neutrophils and to some extent in monocytes. Moreover, FABP4-positive neutrophils and macrophages could be identified in the subintimal space in the plaque. Using human circulating leucocytes, we confirmed the presence of FABP4 protein in neutrophils and monocytes. In conclusion, we have showed that cellular levels of FABP4 in circulating leucocytes associate with lesion development in the experimental Apoe(-/-) model. The increased expression is primarily localized to neutrophils, but also in monocytes. We have identified FABP4 in leucocytes as a potential and easy accessible biomarker of atherosclerosis which could be of future clinical relevance.

  12. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  13. Astrocyte fatty acid binding protein-7 is a marker for neurogenic niches in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Young, John K; Heinbockel, Thomas; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2013-12-01

    Recent research has determined that newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of the macaque are frequently adjacent to astrocytes immunoreactive for fatty acid binding protein-7 (FABP7). To investigate if a similar relationship between FABP7-positive (FABP7+) astrocytes and proliferating cells exists in the rodent brain, sections of brains from juvenile rats were stained by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate newborn cells (antibody to Ki67 protein) and FABP7+ astrocytes. In rat brains, FABP7+ astrocytes were particularly abundant in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and were frequently close to dividing cells immunoreactive for Ki67 protein. FABP7+ astrocytes were also present in the olfactory bulbs, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medulla subjacent to the area postrema, sites where more modest numbers of newborn neurons can also be found. These data suggest that regional accumulations of FABP7+ astrocytes may represent reservoirs of cells having the potential for neurogenesis. Because FABP7+ astrocytes are particularly abundant in the hippocampus, and since the gene for FABP7 has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, age-related changes in FABP7+ astrocytes (mitochondrial degeneration) may be relevant to age-associated disorders of the hippocampus.

  14. Hepatic Induction of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 Plays a Pathogenic Role in Sepsis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bingfang; Li, Yujin; Gao, Li; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Yiwen; Chai, Xiaojuan; Xu, Meishu; Yan, Jiong; Lu, Peipei; Ren, Songrong; Zeng, Su; Liu, Yulan; Xie, Wen; Huang, Min

    2017-03-06

    Sepsis is defined as the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Herein, we report an essential role of the fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4; alias adipocyte protein 2 or aP2), a lipid-binding chaperone, in sepsis response. Bioinformatic analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus data sets showed the level of FABP4 was higher in the nonsurvival sepsis patients' whole blood compared to the survival cohorts. The expression of Fabp4 was induced in a liver-specific manner in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysaccharide treatment models of sepsis. The induction of Fabp4 may have played a pathogenic role, because ectopic expression of Fabp4 in the liver sensitized mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response and worsened the animal's survival. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of Fabp4 markedly alleviated the CLP responsive inflammation and tissue damage and improved survival. We conclude that FABP4 is an important mediator of the sepsis response. Early intervention by pharmacological inhibition of FABP4 may help to manage sepsis in the clinic.

  15. Genetic ablation of the fatty acid binding protein FABP5 suppresses HER2-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Lobo, Glenn; Doud, Mary Kathryn; von Lintig, Johannes; Seachrist, Darcie; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Noy, Noa

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid binding protein FABP5 shuttles ligands from the cytosol to the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ (encoded for by Pparδ), thereby enhancing the transcriptional activity of the receptor. This FABP5/PPARδ pathway is critical for induction of proliferation of breast carcinoma cells by activated EGFR. In this study, we show that FABP5 is highly upregulated in human breast cancers and we provide genetic evidence of the pathophysiological significance of FABP5 in mammary tumorigenesis. Ectopic expression of FABP5 was found to be oncogenic in 3T3 fibroblasts where it augmented the ability of PPARδ to enhance cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To determine whether FABP5 was essential for EGFR-induced mammary tumor growth, we interbred FABP5-null mice with MMTV-ErbB2/HER2 oncomice which spontaneously develop mammary tumors. FABP5 ablation relieved activation of EGFR downstream effector signals, decreased expression of PPARδ target genes that drive cell proliferation, and suppressed mammary tumor development. Our findings establish that FABP5 is critical for mammary tumor development, rationalizing the development of FABP5 inhibitors as novel anticarcinogenic drugs. PMID:23722546

  16. DNA Methylation of Cellular Retinoic Acid-Binding Proteins in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Ortiz, Ana L.; Salcedo-Vargas, Mauricio; Vargas-Requena, Claudia L.; López-Díaz, José A.; De la Mora-Covarrubias, Antonio; Silva-Espinoza, Juan C.; Jiménez-Vega, Florinda

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the methylation status of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) gene promoters and associated them with demographic characteristics, habits, and the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in patients with cervical cancer (CC), low and high squamous intraepithelial lesions, and no intraepithelial lesion. Women (n = 158) were selected from the Colposcopy Clinic of Sanitary Jurisdiction II in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Demographic characteristics and habit information were collected. Cervical biopsy and endocervical scraping were used to determine methylation in promoter regions by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction technique. We found hemi-methylation patterns in the promoter regions of CRABP1 and CRABP2; there was 28.5% hemi-methylation in CRABP1 and 7.0% in that of CRABP2. Methylation in CRABP1 was associated with age (≥35 years, P = 0.002), family history of cancer (P = 0.032), the presence of HPV-16 (P = 0.013), and no alcohol intake (P = 0.035). These epigenetic changes could be involved in the CC process, and CRABP1 has the potential to be a predictive molecular marker of retinoid therapy response. PMID:27867303

  17. Polymorphic Nucleic Acid Binding of Bioactive Isoquinoline Alkaloids and Their Role in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Motilal; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive alkaloids occupy an important position in applied chemistry and play an indispensable role in medicinal chemistry. Amongst them, isoquinoline alkaloids like berberine, palmatine and coralyne of protoberberine group, sanguinarine of the benzophenanthridine group, and their derivatives represent an important class of molecules for their broad range of clinical and pharmacological utility. In view of their extensive occurrence in various plant species and significantly low toxicities, prospective development and use of these alkaloids as effective anticancer agents are matters of great current interest. This review has focused on the interaction of these alkaloids with polymorphic nucleic acid structures (B-form, A-form, Z-form, HL-form, triple helical form, quadruplex form) and their topoisomerase inhibitory activity reported by several research groups using various biophysical techniques like spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, thermal melting, circular dichroism, NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy, viscosity, isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, molecular modeling studies, and so forth, to elucidate their mode and mechanism of action for structure-activity relationships. The DNA binding of the planar sanguinarine and coralyne are found to be stronger and thermodynamically more favoured compared to the buckled structure of berberine and palmatine and correlate well with the intercalative mechanism of sanguinarine and coralyne and the partial intercalation by berberine and palmatine. Nucleic acid binding properties are also interpreted in relation to their anticancer activity. PMID:20814427

  18. Coexistence of multiple minor states of fatty acid binding protein and their functional relevance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binhan; Yang, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic over a wide range of timescales, but determining the number of distinct dynamic processes and identifying functionally relevant dynamics are still challenging. Here we present the study on human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hIFABP) using a novel analysis of 15N relaxation dispersion (RD) and chemical shift saturation transfer (CEST) experiments. Through combined analysis of the two types of experiments, we found that hIFABP exists in a four-state equilibrium in which three minor states interconvert directly with the major state. According to conversion rates from the major “closed” state to minor states, these minor states are irrelevant to the function of fatty acid transport. Based on chemical shifts of the minor states which could not be determined from RD data alone but were extracted from a combined analysis of RD and CEST data, we found that all the minor states are native-like. This conclusion is further supported by hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments. Direct conversions between the native state and native-like intermediate states may suggest parallel multitrack unfolding/folding pathways of hIFABP. Moreover, hydrogen-deuterium exchange data indicate the existence of another locally unfolded minor state that is relevant to the fatty acid entry process. PMID:27677899

  19. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M.; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  20. Effect of limited enzymatic hydrolysis on linoleic acid binding properties of β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos; Santiago, Liliana G

    2014-03-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a member of lipocalin family, proteins with ability to bind small hydrophobic ligands, such as retinol, vitamins and fatty acids. Moreover, BLG is susceptible to protease action producing a wide range of polypeptides depending on the hydrolysis degree (HD). In the present work, the effect of limited enzymatic hydrolysis on fatty acid binding properties of BLG was studied. Linoleic acid (LA) was used as a model fatty acid. Limited enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using α-chymotrypsin immobilised on agarose microparticles. BLG hydrolysates were produced at HD: 1%, 3% and 5%. In order to determine the influence of HD on BLG molecular weight SDS-PAGE was used. BLG structural modification and LA binding properties were monitored by means of fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The increase in HD produced: (i) a BLG degradation and a molecular weight distribution of BLG hydrolysates and (ii) an increased exposition of buried hydrophobic residues, however it was observed a decrease in surface hydrophobicity possibly due to a deterioration of hydrophobic protein domains. It was observed that enzymatic hydrolysis treatment produced a decrease in BLG ability for binding LA. It was concluded that limited enzymatic hydrolysis could deteriorate the specific site on BLG structure necessary for binding LA.

  1. Heart fatty acid binding protein in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction: where do we stand today?

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Josa, Miguel; Pomar, Jose Luis; Mestres, Carlos Alberto; Gherli, Tiziano

    2007-01-01

    Heart fatty acid binding protein (hFABP) is a novel small cytosolic protein that is abundant in the heart. It is highly cardiac-specific (i.e. expressed primarily in cardiac tissue), but is also expressed at low concentrations in tissues outside the heart. After myocardial ischemic damage, hFABP can be detected in the blood as early as 1-3 h after onset of chest pain, with peak values reached at 6-8 h and plasma levels returning to normal within 24-30 h. hFABP's clinical diagnostic value is very limited in the presence of renal failure and skeletal muscle diseases as it is completely renally eliminated. In these conditions, the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may be overestimated. The combination of initial hFABP release after symptom onset, rapid kidney clearance from the circulation and high cardiac specificity suggests great potential for clinical use. Serial measurements of hFABP in the first 24 h after onset of symptoms in AMI patients can: (a) identify patients who are susceptible to reperfusion strategies, (b) detect perioperative AMIs, (c) distinguish patients who reperfuse their infarct-related artery from those who do not, as early as 30 min after starting thrombolytic treatment, (d) detect re-infarction if it occurs within 10 h after symptom onset, and (e) permit an accurate estimation of myocardial infarct size providing important prognosis information.

  2. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM.

  3. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m2; all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  4. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of a leaf-specific lectin from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-11-01

    Lectins were isolated from roots and leaves of ramsons and compared to the previously described bulb lectins. Biochemical analyses indicated that the root lectins AUAIr and AUAIIr are identical to the bulb lectins AUAI and AUAII, whereas the leaf lectin AUAL has no counterpart in the bulbs. cDNA cloning confirmed that the leaf lectin differs from the bulb lectins. Northern blot analysis further indicated that the leaf lectin is tissue-specifically expressed. Sequence comparisons revealed that the ramsons leaf lectin differs considerably from the leaf lectins of garlic, leek, onion and shallot.

  5. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions.

  6. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  7. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  8. CSF levels of heart fatty acid binding protein are altered during early phases of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chiasserini, Davide; Parnetti, Lucilla; Andreasson, Ulf; Zetterberg, Henrik; Giannandrea, David; Calabresi, Paolo; Blennow, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    Heart fatty acid binding protein (HFABP) has been proposed as a putative marker for dementia disorders. To evaluate the value of this protein as an early marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we analyzed HFABP level and the classical biomarkers amyloid-β (Aβ)1-42, total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) followed up for four years (n=41), AD (n=32), and subjects with other neurological diseases without dementia (OND, n=25). HFABP levels were higher in AD patients and in MCI converting to AD (MCI-AD) with respect to OND and to cognitively stable MCI patients (MCI-MCI). The receiver operator characteristics analysis for HFABP alone showed a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 81% for AD versus OND (area under the curve, AUC=0.83); sensitivity and specificity were 46% and 94%, respectively, when comparing MCI-MCI versus MCI-AD. CSF HFABP levels showed a strong positive correlation with both t-tau and p-tau. Interestingly, the ratio between HFABP and Aβ1-42 improved the performance in distinguishing AD from OND (sensitivity: 90%; specificity 82%, AUC=0.89), and gave the best accuracy in discriminating MCI-AD from MCI-MCI (sensitivity: 80%; specificity 100%, AUC=0.90). Survival analysis by means of Kaplan-Meier curve showed a significantly higher proportion of MCI patients converting to AD in the group with higher values of HFABP/Aβ1-42 ratio (cut-off=0.7). A significant correlation between HFABP/Aβ1-42 ratio and MMSE annual decrease rate was also documented (p<0.0001). HFABP /Aβ1-42 ratio might be a useful predictor of conversion in MCI patients.

  9. Dynamics of palmitic acid complexed with rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G; Kemple, M D

    1999-02-02

    Dynamics of palmitic acid (PA), isotopically enriched with 13C at the second, seventh, or terminal methyl position, were investigated by 13C NMR. Relaxation measurements were made on PA bound to recombinant rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) at pH 5.5 and 23 degreesC, and, for comparison, on PA incorporated into 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (MPPC) micelles, and dissolved in methanol. The 13C relaxation data, T1, and steady-state nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) obtained at two different magnetic fields were interpreted using the model-free approach [Lipari, G., and Szabo, A. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104, 4546-4559]. The overall rotational correlation time of the fatty acid.protein complex was 2.5 +/- 0.4 ns, which is substantially less than the value expected for the protein itself (>6 ns). Order parameters (S2), which are a measure of the amplitude of the internal motion of individual C-H vectors with respect to the PA molecule, while largest for C-2 and smallest for the methyl carbon, were relatively small (<0.4) in the protein complex. S2 values for given C-H vectors also were smaller for PA in the MPPC micelles and in methanol than in the protein complex. Correlation times reflective of the time scale of the internal motion of the C-H vectors were in all cases <60 ps. These results support the view that the fatty acid is not rigidly anchored within the I-FABP binding pocket, but rather has considerable freedom to move within the pocket.

  10. Increased expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 in preeclamptic Placenta and its relevance to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuying; Peng, Huilian; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hanzhi; Dong, Minyue

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) in the placenta from women with preeclampsia and normal pregnancy, and to delineate the regulatory effects on thophoblast cell by FABP4. We determined the expression of FABP4 by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) or enzyme-linked immunesorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting for protein. Small interference of ribonucleic acid (siRNA) and specific FABP4 inhibitor were used to inhibit FABP4. The proliferation, migration and invasion of trophoblastic cells (Swan-71 and Jar) were evaluated with cell counting kit-8, wound-healing test and transwell analysis respectively. We found the expression of FABP4 was significantly higher in the placenta of preeclamptic women than that of women with normal pregnancy (t = 4.244, P < 0.001 for mRNA; t = 4.536, P < 0.001 for protein). FABP4 siRNA significantly reduced the proliferation of trophoblasts (P < 0.001). The specific inhibition of FABP4 inhibited the proliferation of trophoblasts in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.001) and the inhibitory effect increased as the concentration of inhibitor increased. FABP4 siRNA and specific inhibitor significantly decreased the migration (P < 0.001) and invasion (P < 0.001) of trophoblasts. We concluded the increase in placental FABP4 expression in preeclampsia may affect the function of trophoblast, and this increase may have a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  11. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Clavin, Brendan H.; Hamilton, John; O’Rourke, Joseph R.; Maher, Thomas; Koumas, Christopher; Miao, Erick; Lankop, Jessenia; Elhage, Aya; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Deutsch, Dale; Kaczocha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, has shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working/recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty (SN) given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0, 20.0, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26, or vehicle during a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests [open field, novel object recognition (NOR), social interaction (SI), and SN] paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce CPP or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP- or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested. PMID:27092087

  12. Serum fatty acid binding protein 4, free fatty acids and metabolic risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Sidika E.; Almario, Rogelio U.; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein (FABP) 4 chaperones free fatty acids (FFA) in the adipocytes during lipolysis. Serum FFA relates to Metabolic Syndrome (METS) and serum FABP4 is emerging as a novel risk marker. In 36 overweight/obese women, serum FABP4 and FFA were measured hourly during 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin resistance was determined using frequently sampled intravenous GTT (FS-IVGTT). Serum lipids and inflammation markers were measured at fasting. During OGTT, serum FABP4 decreased by 40%, reaching its nadir at 3h (from 45.3±3.1 to 31.9±1.6 ng/mL) and stayed below the baseline at 5 h (35.9±2.2 ng/mL) (p < 0.0001 for both, compared to the baseline). Serum FFA decreased by 10 fold, reaching a nadir at 2h (from 0.611±0.033 to 0.067±0.004 mmol/L), then rebounded to 0.816±0.035 mmol/ L at 5h (p < 0.001 for both, compared to baseline). Both fasting-FABP4 and nadir-FABP4 correlated with obesity. Nadir-FABP4 correlated also with insulin resistance parameters from FS-IVGTT and with inflammation. Nadir-FFA, but not fasting-FFA, correlated with the METS-parameters. In conclusion, fasting-FABP4 related to metabolic risk markers more strongly than fasting-FFA. Nadir-FABP4 and nadir-FFA measured after glucose loading may provide better risk assessment than the fasting values. PMID:19394980

  13. Characterization of a domoic acid binding site from Pacific razor clam.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Vera L; Bill, Brian D

    2004-08-10

    The Pacific razor clam, Siliqua patula, is known to retain domoic acid, a water-soluble glutamate receptor agonist produced by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. The mechanism by which razor clams tolerate high levels of the toxin, domoic acid, in their tissues while still retaining normal nerve function is unknown. In our study, a domoic acid binding site was solubilized from razor clam siphon using a combination of Triton X-100 and digitonin. In a Scatchard analysis using [3H]kainic acid, the partially-purified membrane showed two distinct receptor sites, a high affinity, low capacity site with a KD (mean +/- S.E.) of 28 +/- 9.4 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 12 +/- 3.8 pmol/mg protein and a low affinity, high capacity site with a mM affinity for radiolabeled kainic acid, the latter site which was lost upon solubilization. Competition experiments showed that the rank order potency for competitive ligands in displacing [3H]kainate binding from the membrane-bound receptors was quisqualate > ibotenate > iodowillardiine = AMPA = fluorowillardiine > domoate > kainate > L-glutamate. At high micromolar concentrations, NBQX, NMDA and ATPA showed little or no ability to displace [3H]kainate. In contrast, Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate showed linearity, indicating the presence of a single binding site with a KD and Bmax of 500 +/- 50 nM and 14 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These results suggest that razor clam siphon contains both a high and low affinity receptor site for kainic acid and may contain more than one subtype of glutamate receptor, thereby allowing the clam to function normally in a marine environment that often contains high concentrations of domoic acid.

  14. Identification of a fatty acid binding protein4-UCP2 axis regulating microglial mediated neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Xu, Hongliang; Nixon, Joshua P; Bernlohr, David A; Butterick, Tammy A

    2017-02-16

    Hypothalamic inflammation contributes to metabolic dysregulation and the onset of obesity. Dietary saturated fats activate microglia via a nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) mediated pathway to release pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in dysfunction or death of surrounding neurons. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are lipid chaperones regulating metabolic and inflammatory pathways in response to fatty acids. Loss of FABP4 in peripheral macrophages via either molecular or pharmacologic mechanisms results in reduced obesity-induced inflammation via a UCP2-redox based mechanism. Despite the widespread appreciation for the role of FABP4 in mediating peripheral inflammation, the expression of FABP4 and a potential FABP4-UCP2 axis regulating microglial inflammatory capacity is largely uncharacterized. To that end, we hypothesized that microglial cells express FABP4 and that inhibition would upregulate UCP2 and attenuate palmitic acid (PA)-induced pro-inflammatory response. Gene expression confirmed expression of FABP4 in brain tissue lysate from C57Bl/6J mice and BV2 microglia. Treatment of microglial cells with an FABP inhibitor (HTS01037) increased expression of Ucp2 and arginase in the presence or absence of PA. Moreover, cells exposed to HTS01037 exhibited attenuated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) compared to PA alone indicating reduced NFκB signaling. Hypothalamic tissue from mice lacking FABP4 exhibit increased UCP2 expression and reduced iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1; microglial activation marker) expression compared to wild type mice. Further, this effect is negated in microglia lacking UCP2, indicating the FABP4-UCP2 axis is pivotal in obesity induced neuroinflammation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a FABP4-UCP2 axis with the potential to modulate the microglial inflammatory response.

  15. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  16. Towards the elucidation of molecular determinants of cooperativity in the liver bile acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ferranti, Pasquale; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Bile acid binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Liver BABPs act in parallel with ileal transporters to ensure vectorial transport of bile salts in hepatocytes and enterocytes, respectively. We describe the investigation of ligand binding to liver BABP, an essential step in the understanding of intracellular bile salt transport. Binding site occupancies were monitored in NMR titration experiments using (15)N-labelled ligand, while the relative populations of differently bound BABP forms were assessed by mass spectrometry. This site-specific information allowed the determination of intrinsic thermodynamic parameters and the identification of an extremely high cooperativity between two binding sites. Protein-observed NMR experiments revealed a global structural rearrangement which suggests an allosteric mechanism at the basis of the observed cooperativity. The view of a molecular tool capable of buffering against significant concentrations of free bile salts in a large range of solution conditions emerges from the observed pH-dependence of binding. We set to determine the molecular determinants of cooperativity by analysing the binding properties of a protein containing a mutated internal histidine. Both mass spectrometry and NMR experiments are consistent with an overall decreased binding affinity of the mutant, while the measured diffusion coefficients of ligand species reveal that the affinity loss concerns essentially one of the two binding sites. We therefore identified a mutation able to disrupt energetic communication functional to efficient binding and conclude that the buried histidine establishes contacts that stabilize the ternary complex.

  17. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family*

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Miller, Darcie J.; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  18. Urinary Excretion of Liver Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein Accurately Reflects the Degree of Tubulointerstitial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Takeshi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a biomarker of chronic kidney disease, in the kidney and the degree of tubulointerstitial damage, folic acid (FA)-induced nephropathy was studied in a mouse model system. As renal L-FABP is not expressed in wild-type mice, human L-FABP (hL-FABP) transgenic mice were used in this study. hL-FABP is expressed in the renal proximal tubules of the transgenic mice that were injected intraperitoneally with FA in NaHCO3 (the FA group) or only NaHCO3 (the control group) and oral saline solution daily during the experimental period. The FA group developed severe tubulointerstitial damage with the infiltration of macrophages and the deposition of type I collagen on days 3 and 7 and recovered to the control level on day 14. The gene and protein expression levels of hL-FABP in the kidney were significantly enhanced on days 3 and 7. Urinary hL-FABP in the FA group was elevated on days 3 and 7 and decreased to the control level on day 14. The protein expression levels of hL-FABP in both the kidney and urine significantly correlated with the degree of tubulointerstitial damage, the infiltration of macrophages, and the deposition of type I collagen. In conclusion, renal expression and urinary excretion of hL-FABP significantly reflected the severity of tubulointerstitial damage in FA-induced nephropathy. PMID:19435794

  19. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Clavin, Brendan H; Hamilton, John; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Maher, Thomas; Koumas, Christopher; Miao, Erick; Lankop, Jessenia; Elhage, Aya; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Deutsch, Dale; Kaczocha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, has shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working/recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty (SN) given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0, 20.0, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26, or vehicle during a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests [open field, novel object recognition (NOR), social interaction (SI), and SN] paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce CPP or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP- or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested.

  20. Structure and nucleic acid binding activity of the nucleoporin Nup157

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Blus, Bartlomiej J.; Janković, Nina Z.; Blobel, Günter

    2013-01-01

    At the center of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a uniquely versatile central transport channel. Structural analyses of distinct segments (“protomers”) of the three “channel” nucleoporins yielded a model for how this channel is constructed. Its principal feature is a midplane ring that can undergo regulated diameter changes of as much as an estimated 30 nm. To better understand how a family of “adaptor” nucleoporins—concentrically surrounding this channel—might cushion these huge structural changes, we determined the crystal structure of one adaptor nucleoporin, Nup157. Here, we show that a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup157 protomer, representing two-thirds of Nup157 (residues 70–893), folds into a seven-bladed β-propeller followed by an α-helical domain, which together form a C-shaped architecture. Notably, the structure contains a large patch of positively charged residues, most of which are evolutionarily conserved. Consistent with this surface feature, we found that Nup15770–893 binds to nucleic acids, although in a sequence-independent manner. Nevertheless, this interaction supports a previously reported role of Nup157, and its paralogue Nup170, in chromatin organization. Based on its nucleic acid binding capacity, we propose a dual location and function of Nup157. Finally, modeling the remaining C-terminal portion of Nup157 shows that it projects as a superhelical stack from the compact C-shaped portion of the molecule. The predicted four hinge regions indicate an intrinsic flexibility of Nup157, which could contribute to structural plasticity within the NPC. PMID:24062435

  1. Fatty acid-binding site environments of serum vitamin D-binding protein and albumin are different

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and albumin (ALB) are abundant serum proteins and both possess high-affinity binding for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. However, certain differences exist. We surmised that in cases where serum albumin level is low, DBP presumably can act as a transporter of fatty acids. To explore this possibility we synthesized several alkylating derivatives of 14C-palmitic acid to probe the fatty acid binding pockets of DBP and ALB. We observed that N-ethyl-5-phenylisooxazolium-3′-sulfonate-ester (WRK ester) of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled DBP; but p-nitrophenyl- and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-esters failed to do so. However, p-nitrophenyl ester of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled bovine ALB, indicating that the micro-environment of the fatty acid-binding domains of DBP and ALB may be different; and DBP may not replace ALB as a transporter of fatty acids. PMID:18374965

  2. The 'helix clamp' in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: a new nucleic acid binding motif common in nucleic acid polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Meier, T; Götte, M; Heumann, H

    1994-01-01

    Amino acid sequences homologous to 259KLVGKL (X)16KLLR284 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) are conserved in several nucleotide polymerizing enzymes. This amino acid motif has been identified in the crystal structure model as an element of the enzyme's nucleic acid binding apparatus. It is part of the helix-turn-helix structure, alpha H-turn-alpha I, within the 'thumb' region of HIV-1 RT. The motif grasps the complexed nucleic acid at one side. Molecular modeling studies on HIV-1 RT in complex with a nucleic acid fragment suggest that the motif has binding function in the p66 subunit as well as in the p51 subunit, acting as a kind of 'helix clamp'. Given its wide distribution within the nucleic acid polymerases, the helix clamp motif is assumed to be a structure of general significance for nucleic acid binding. Images PMID:7527138

  3. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  4. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  5. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  6. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  7. Clinical benefit using sperm hyaluronic acid binding technique in ICSI cycles: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck-Fruchter, Ronit; Shalev, Eliezer; Weiss, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The human oocyte is surrounded by hyaluronic acid, which acts as a natural selector of spermatozoa. Human sperm that express hyaluronic acid receptors and bind to hyaluronic acid have normal shape, minimal DNA fragmentation and low frequency of chromosomal aneuploidies. Use of hyaluronic acid binding assays in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles to improve clinical outcomes has been studied, although none of these studies had sufficient statistical power. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, electronic databases were searched up to June 2015 to identify studies of ICSI cycles in which spermatozoa able to bind hyaluronic acid was selected. The main outcomes were fertilization rate and clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes included cleavage rate, embryo quality, implantation rate, spontaneous abortion and live birth rate. Seven studies and 1437 cycles were included. Use of hyaluronic acid binding sperm selection technique yielded no improvement in fertilization and pregnancy rates. A meta-analysis of all available studies showed an improvement in embryo quality and implantation rate; an analysis of prospective studies only showed an improvement in embryo quality. Evidence does not support routine use of hyaluronic acid binding assays in all ICSI cycles. Identification of patients that might benefit from this technique needs further study.

  8. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent.

  9. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  10. Steam cooking significantly improves in vitro bile acid binding of collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, Talwinder Singh; Chiu, Mei-Chen M; Chapman, Mary H

    2008-06-01

    Bile acid binding capacity has been related to the cholesterol-lowering potential of foods and food fractions. Lowered recirculation of bile acids results in utilization of cholesterol to synthesize bile acid and reduced fat absorption. Secondary bile acids have been associated with increased risk of cancer. Bile acid binding potential has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Previously, we have reported bile acid binding by several uncooked vegetables. However, most vegetables are consumed after cooking. How cooking would influence in vitro bile acid binding of various vegetables was investigated using a mixture of bile acids secreted in human bile under physiological conditions. Eight replicate incubations were conducted for each treatment simulating gastric and intestinal digestion, which included a substrate only, a bile acid mixture only, and 6 with substrate and bile acid mixture. Cholestyramine (a cholesterol-lowering, bile acid binding drug) was the positive control treatment and cellulose was the negative control. Relative to cholestyramine, in vitro bile acid binding on dry matter basis was for the collard greens, kale, and mustard greens, 13%; broccoli, 10%; Brussels sprouts and spinach, 8%; green bell pepper, 7%; and cabbage, 5%. These results point to the significantly different (P < or = .05) health-promoting potential of collard greens = kale = mustard greens > broccoli > Brussels sprouts = spinach = green bell pepper > cabbage as indicated by their bile acid binding on dry matter basis. Steam cooking significantly improved the in vitro bile acid binding of collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage compared with previously observed bile acid binding values for these vegetables raw (uncooked). Inclusion of steam-cooked collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage in our daily diet as health-promoting vegetables should be emphasized. These green

  11. Sex Steroid Modulation of Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.; Monroe, Scott E.; Burnett, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids influence very low density hepatic lipoprotein triglyceride production has not been fully elucidated. In previous studies we showed that [14C]oleate utilization and incorporation into triglycerides were greater in hepatocyte suspensions from adult female rats than from males. The sex differences were not related to activities of the enzymes of triglyceride biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid binding protein (FABP) concentration in liver cytosol was greater in females. These findings suggested that sex differences in lipoprotein could reflect a sex steroid influence on the availability of fatty acids for hepatocellular triglyceride biosynthesis. In the present studies, sex steroid effects on hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization and FABP concentration were investigated directly. Hepatocytes from immature (30-d-old) rats exhibited no sex differences in [14C]oleate utilization. With maturation, total [14C]oleate utilization and triglyceride biosynthesis increased moderately in female cells and decreased markedly in male cells; the profound sex differences in adults were maximal by age 60 d. Fatty acid oxidation was little affected. Rats were castrated at age 30 d, and received estradiol, testosterone, or no hormone until age 60 d, when hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization was studied. Castration virtually eliminated maturational changes and blunted the sex differences in adults. Estradiol or testosterone largely reproduced the appropriate adult pattern of [14C]oleate utilization regardless of the genotypic sex of the treated animal. In immature females and males, total cytosolic FABP concentrations were similar. In 60-d-old animals, there was a striking correlation among all groups (females, males, castrates, and hormone-treated) between mean cytosolic FABP concentration on the one hand, and mean total [14C]oleate utilization (r = 0.91) and incorporation into triglycerides (r = 0.94) on the other. In 30-d-old animals rates of [14C

  12. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-07

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  13. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  14. Lectins, Interconnecting Proteins with Biotechnological/Pharmacological and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila Marcelino dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are proteins extensively used in biomedical applications with property to recognize carbohydrates through carbohydrate-binding sites, which identify glycans attached to cell surfaces, glycoconjugates, or free sugars, detecting abnormal cells and biomarkers related to diseases. These lectin abilities promoted interesting results in experimental treatments of immunological diseases, wounds, and cancer. Lectins obtained from virus, microorganisms, algae, animals, and plants were reported as modulators and tool markers in vivo and in vitro; these molecules also play a role in the induction of mitosis and immune responses, contributing for resolution of infections and inflammations. Lectins revealed healing effect through induction of reepithelialization and cicatrization of wounds. Some lectins have been efficient agents against virus, fungi, bacteria, and helminths at low concentrations. Lectin-mediated bioadhesion has been an interesting characteristic for development of drug delivery systems. Lectin histochemistry and lectin-based biosensors are useful to detect transformed tissues and biomarkers related to disease occurrence; antitumor lectins reported are promising for cancer therapy. Here, we address lectins from distinct sources with some biological effect and biotechnological potential in the diagnosis and therapeutic of diseases, highlighting many advances in this growing field. PMID:28367220

  15. Purification and use of limulin: a sialic acid-specific lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Muresan, V.; Iwanij, V.; Smith, Z.D.; Jamieson, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    A simple and rapid method for the isolation of the sialic acid-specific lectin, Limulus polyphemus hemagglutinin (LPA), from the hemolymph of Limulus polyphemus is described. Declotted hemolymph is adsorbed to an affinity chromatographic column consisting of hog gastric mucin glycopeptides coupled to agarose and LPA is eluted in a single step with a Ca2+-free buffer, giving an apparent purification of approximately 25,000-fold. The eluted material is homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing and consists of identical subunits each of 29,000 daltons. Hemagglutination inhibition studies with horse red blood cells indicate specificity of LPA for N-acetyl- and N-glycolylneuraminic acid; binding is Ca2+ -dependent and abolished by neuraminidase treatment. LPA was covalently coupled to rhodamine and to horseradish peroxidase for use in detection of sialoglycoconjugates on cells and tissues by light and electron microscopy. Examples of the use of LPA for detection of sialoglycoconjugates in rat renal tubules and glomeruli, blood vessels in rat pancreas, and on horse red blood cells are shown. The procedures described here should prove useful as a cytochemical probe for detection of sialoglycoconjugates in a variety of systems. An accompanying article utilizes these probes for the detection of sialoglycoconjugates on the plasmalemma of adult and differentiating rat pancreatic acinar cells.

  16. The mucin MUC1 modulates the tumor immunological microenvironment through engagement of the lectin Siglec-9.

    PubMed

    Beatson, Richard; Tajadura-Ortega, Virginia; Achkova, Daniela; Picco, Gianfranco; Tsourouktsoglou, Theodora-Dorita; Klausing, Sandra; Hillier, Matthew; Maher, John; Noll, Thomas; Crocker, Paul R; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy M

    2016-11-01

    Siglec-9 is a sialic-acid-binding lectin expressed predominantly on myeloid cells. Aberrant glycosylation occurs in essentially all types of cancers and results in increased sialylation. Thus, when the mucin MUC1 is expressed on cancer cells, it is decorated by multiple short, sialylated O-linked glycans (MUC1-ST). Here we found that this cancer-specific MUC1 glycoform, through engagement of Siglec-9, 'educated' myeloid cells to release factors associated with determination of the tumor microenvironment and disease progression. Moreover, MUC1-ST induced macrophages to display a tumor-associated macrophage (TAM)-like phenotype, with increased expression of the checkpoint ligand PD-L1. Binding of MUC1-ST to Siglec-9 did not activate the phosphatases SHP-1 or SHP-2 but, unexpectedly, induced calcium flux that led to activation of the kinases MEK-ERK. This work defines a critical role for aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 and identifies an activating pathway that follows engagement of Siglec-9.

  17. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology.

  18. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  19. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  20. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  1. Liver fatty acid binding protein is the mitosis-associated polypeptide target of a carcinogen in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, J A; Tsichlis, P N; Sorof, S

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes in normal rat liver were found previously to contain a cytoplasmic 14,000-dalton polypeptide (p14) that is associated with mitosis and is the principal early covalent target of activated metabolites of the carcinogen N-2-fluorenylacetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene). The level of immunohistochemically detected p14 was low when growth activity of hepatocytes was low, was markedly elevated during mitosis in normal and regenerating livers, but was very high throughout interphase during proliferation of hyperplastic and malignant hepatocytes induced in rat liver by a carcinogen (N-2-fluorenylacetamide or 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene). We report here that p14 is the liver fatty acid binding protein. The nucleotide sequence of p14 cDNA clones, isolated by screening a rat liver cDNA library in bacteriophage lambda gt11 using p14 antiserum, was completely identical to part of the sequence reported for liver fatty acid binding protein. Furthermore, the two proteins shared the following properties: size of mRNA, amino acid composition, molecular size according to NaDodSO4 gel electrophoresis, and electrophoretic mobilities in a Triton X-100/acetic acid/urea gel. Their pI values overlapped in 2-dimensional isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO4 gel electrophoresis and showed the same response to delipidation. Either polypeptide reacted with and blocked the antiserum raised against the other polypeptide. The two polypeptides bound oleic acid similarly. Finally, identical elevations of cytoplasmic immunostain were detected specifically in mitotic hepatocytes with either antiserum. The collected findings are suggestive that liver fatty acid binding protein may carry ligands that promote hepatocyte division and may transport certain activated chemical carcinogens. Images PMID:3478711

  2. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  3. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Santos, I K; Pereira, M E

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various 125I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  4. A comparison of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin with its deglycosylated derivative.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, D C; Graham, C; Urbaniak, S J; Jeffree, C E; Allen, A K

    1984-06-15

    A deglycosylated derivative of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin was prepared with the use of trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Its properties were generally similar to those of the native lectin, but differences were evident in terms of relative agglutinating activity towards sheep, (untreated) human and trypsin-treated human erythrocytes. The two forms of tomato lectin were used in conjunction with a battery of specific antisera to investigate structural relatedness among solanaceous lectins. Immunological cross-reactivity between tomato, potato and Datura lectins depends on the integrity of the glycosylated region of those lectins; that between Datura lectin and other seed lectins, however, has a separate structural basis.

  5. Bile acid-binding activity of young persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit and its hypolipidemic effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2010-02-01

    The hypolipidemic effects and bile acid-binding properties of young persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit were examined. In an animal experiment, male C57BL/6.Cr mice (n = 5) were fed an AIN-76-modified high fat diet supplemented with 2% or 5% (w/w) dried young persimmon fruit (YP) for 10 weeks. The intake of YP significantly enhanced fecal bile acid excretion and lowered the concentration of hepatic lipids and plasma cholesterol. Analysis of gene expression in liver tissue showed that 2% or 5% YP up-regulated the expression of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 gene. In the 5% group, there were increased expressions of the genes for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Next, the bile acid-binding ability of YP was analysed in vitro using cholic acid (CA). In 100-2000 microM CA solutions, 1% (w/v) YP adsorbed approximately 60% of CA, while dried mature persimmon fruit adsorbed approximately 20% of CA. The positive control, cholestyramine, adsorbed approximately 80% of CA in the 100-2000 microM CA solutions. A crude tannin extract from YP, which contained 54.7% condensed tannins, adsorbed approximately 78% of CA in the 2000 microM CA solutions. These results suggest that the ability of YP to bind bile acid contributes to its hypolipidemic effect in mice.

  6. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted.

  7. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the “lipolysome.” Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  8. Isothermal calorimetric analysis of lectin-sugar interaction.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Matsuo, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool for analyzing lectin-glycan interactions because it can measure the binding affinity and thermodynamic properties such as ∆H and ΔS in a single experiment without any chemical modification or immobilization. Here we describe a method for preparing glycan and lectin solution to minimize the buffer mismatch, setting parameters, and performing experiments.

  9. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment.

  10. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein contains a canonical collagen-like domain, a carbohydrate recognition d...

  11. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  12. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  13. A developmentally regulated lectin in Bufo arenarum embryos.

    PubMed

    Elola, M T; Fink-de-Cabutti, N E; Herkovits, H

    1987-01-01

    We report the levels of an endogenous beta-galactoside lectin activity from Bufo arenarum whole embryos extracts and specific inhibition by saccharides at different developmental stages. Specific activity measured against trypsinized rabbit red blood cells showed relatively high and fluctuating levels during early stages (up to about 76 h post-fertilization) which fell to significantly lower and more constant values at late stages (77-264 h post-fertilization). Lactose is the most potent inhibitor of this lectin activity, and saccharides having alpha-galactoside configurations are weaker inhibitors. At the last embryonic stage, the agglutinating activity showed a different sugar specificity which suggests either the modification of the preexistent lectin or the synthesis of another type of lectin. The possible physiological roles of these lectins in the blockage of polyspermy or in embryonic cell-cell interactions are discussed.

  14. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  15. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  16. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes.

  17. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  18. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  19. Lectin binding to cystic stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R M; Williams, J F

    1984-10-01

    Studies of membrane glycoconjugates of Taenia taeniaeformis were initiated by assays of the lectin binding characteristics of 35-day-old cysticerci. Parasites fixed in glutaraldehyde were incubated with one of the following FITC-labelled lectins: Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), fucose binding protein (FBP) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and either their specific or a nonspecific sugar. Ultraviolet microscopy revealed that only Con A and LCA bound in large amounts to the surface of cysticerci. This binding was partly inhibited by the specific sugar, but the nonspecific sugar had little effect. The lectin not removed by either of the sugars may have been bound nonspecifically to the charged glycocalyx. Lectins were primarily bound on the anterior third of the parasite around the scolex invagination. Kinetic studies of lectin interactions were carried out with LCA and RCA by spectrophotofluorometric analysis of the amount bound specifically or nonspecifically over a range of lectin concentrations. Lens culinaris lectin binding was found to be specific and involve 2 receptors which showed large differences in their affinity for lectin and prevalence on the surface. Ricinus communis lectin did not bind specifically but nonspecific interactions were observed. Adherence of small numbers of host cells was shown to have no measurable effect on the lectin binding characteristics. The results suggest that the major surface carbohydrates exposed are D-mannose and/or D-glucose residues with the other sugar groups poorly represented. This relatively homogeneous surface may have implications for the antigenicity of the parasite in its host.

  20. Isolation and characterization of lectins and lectin-alliinase complexes from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-04-01

    A procedure developed to separate the homodimeric and heterodimeric mannose-binding lectins from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) also enabled the isolation of stable lectin-alliinase complexes. Characterization of the individual lectins indicated that, in spite of their different molecular structure, the homomeric and heteromeric lectins resemble each other reasonably well with respect to their agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity. However, a detailed analysis of the lectin-alliinase complexes from garlic and ramsons bulbs demonstrated that only the heterodimeric lectins are capable of binding to the glycan chains of the alliinase molecules (EC 4.4.1.4). Moreover, it appears that only a subpopulation of the alliinase molecules is involved in the formation of lectin-alliinase complexes and that the complexed alliinase contains more glycan chains than the free enzyme. Finally, some arguments are given that the lectin-alliinase complexes do not occur in vivo but are formed in vitro after homogenization of the tissue.

  1. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  2. Divergent spatial regulation of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein (fabp) genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Bayır, Mehtap; Bayır, Abdulkadir; Wright, Jonathan M

    2015-06-01

    The increased use of plant oil as a dietary supplement with the resultant high dietary lipid loads challenges the lipid transport, metabolism and storage mechanisms in economically important aquaculture species, such as rainbow trout. Fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabp), ubiquitous in tissues highly active in fatty acid metabolism, participate in lipid uptake and transport, and overall lipid homeostasis. In the present study, searches of nucleotide sequence databases identified mRNA transcripts coded by 14 different fatty acid-binding protein (fabp) genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), which include the complete minimal suite of seven distinct fabp genes (fabp1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 10 and 11) discovered thus far in teleost fishes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that many of these extant fabp genes in rainbow trout exist as duplicates, which putatively arose owing to the teleost-specific whole genome duplication (WGD); three pairs of duplicated fabp genes (fabp2a.1/fabp2a.2, fabp7b.1/fabp7b.2 and fabp10a.1/fabp10a.2) most likely were generated by the salmonid-specific WGD subsequent to the teleost-specific WGD; and fabp3 and fabp6 exist as single copy genes in the rainbow trout genome. Assay of the steady-state levels of fabp gene transcripts by RT-qPCR revealed: (1) steady-state transcript levels differ substantially between fabp genes and, in some instances, by as much as 30×10(4)-fold; (2) some fabp transcripts are widely distributed in many tissues, whereas others are restricted to one or a few tissues; and (3) divergence of regulatory mechanisms that control spatial transcription of duplicated fabp genes in rainbow trout appears related to length of time since their duplication. The suite of fabp genes described here provides the foundation to investigate the role(s) of fatty acid-binding proteins in the uptake, mobilization and storage of fatty acids in cultured fish fed diets differing in lipid content, especially the use of plant oil as a dietary supplement

  3. Bile acid-binding ability of kaki-tannin from young fruits of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Kadowaki, Akio; Ozaki, Natsumi; Takenaka, Makiko; Ono, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2011-04-01

    The bile acid-binding ability of a highly polymerized tannin (kaki-tannin) extracted from dried-young fruits of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) was examined. The kaki-tannin was composed mainly of epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin-3-O-gallate and epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate. Bile acid-binding ability of kaki-tannin was examined against cholic acid, glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid and deoxycholic acid in vitro, and its effect on fecal bile acid excretion in mice was also examined. Although the bile acid-binding ability of kaki-tannin was weaker than that of cholestyramine, kaki-tannin adsorbed all the bile acids tested and significantly promoted fecal bile acid excretion in mice when supplied at 1% (w/w) in the diet.

  4. Water-mediated recognition of simple alkyl chains by heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Hirose, Mika; Lethu, Sébastien; Ano, Hikaru; Hara, Toshiaki; Ichihara, Osamu; Kimura, S Roy; Murakami, Satoshi; Ishida, Hanako; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Murata, Michio

    2015-01-26

    Long-chain fatty acids (FAs) with low water solubility require fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) to transport them from cytoplasm to the mitochondria for energy production. However, the precise mechanism by which these proteins recognize the various lengths of simple alkyl chains of FAs with similar high affinity remains unknown. To address this question, we employed a newly developed calorimetric method for comprehensively evaluating the affinity of FAs, sub-Angstrom X-ray crystallography to accurately determine their 3D structure, and energy calculations of the coexisting water molecules using the computer program WaterMap. Our results clearly showed that the heart-type FABP (FABP3) preferentially incorporates a U-shaped FA of C10-C18 using a lipid-compatible water cluster, and excludes longer FAs using a chain-length-limiting water cluster. These mechanisms could help us gain a general understanding of how proteins recognize diverse lipids with different chain lengths.

  5. Characterisation of the nucleic acid binding features of the PRRSV 7ap and its ability to induce antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Olasz, Ferenc; Dénes, Béla; Bálint, Ádám; Magyar, Tibor; Belák, Sándor; Zádori, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    A short alternative open reading frame named ORF7a has recently been discovered within the nucleocapsid gene of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) genome. Proteins (7ap) translated from the ORF7a of two divergent strains - a type I and a type II - are able to completely reduce the motility of nucleic acids at relatively high molar charge ratios in gel retardation assays indicating strong dsDNA- and ssRNA-binding capability. Conserved RNA- and DNA-binding properties suggest that nucleic acid binding is a functional property of the divergent 7aps, and not an arbitrary consequence of their net positive charge. Sera from Hu7ap-immunised pigs and mice did not react with Hu7ap or Hu7ap-GFP; however, antinuclear antibodies were detected in the sera of the immunised animals, suggesting an ability of Hu7ap to interact with or mimic autoantigenic macromolecules.

  6. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-06

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  7. Peri-operative heart-type fatty acid binding protein is associated with acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steven G.; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Eikelboom, John; Kavsak, Peter; McArthur, Eric; Shortt, Colleen; Whitlock, Richard; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a common complication after cardiac surgery and is associated with worse outcomes. Since heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) is a myocardial protein that detects cardiac injury, we sought to determine if plasma H-FABP was associated with AKI in the TRIBE-AKI cohort; a multi-center cohort of 1219 patients at high risk for AKI who underwent cardiac surgery. The primary outcomes of interest were any AKI (Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) stage 1 or higher) and severe AKI (AKIN stage 2 or higher). The secondary outcome was long-term mortality after discharge. Patients who developed AKI had higher levels of H-FABP pre- and post-operatively than patients who did not have AKI. In analyses adjusted for known AKI risk factors, first post-operative log(H-FABP) was associated with severe AKI (adjusted OR 5.39 [95% CI, 2.87-10.11] per unit increase), while pre-operative log(H-FABP) was associated with any AKI (2.07 [1.48-2.89]) and mortality (1.67 [1.17-2.37]). These relationships persisted after adjustment for change in serum creatinine (for first postoperative log(H-FABP)) and biomarkers of cardiac and kidney injury, including brain natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin-I, interleukin-18, liver fatty acid binding protein, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin. Thus, peri-operative plasma H-FABP levels may be used for risk-stratification of AKI and mortality following cardiac surgery. PMID:25830762

  8. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in Small Intestine IDENTIFICATION, ISOLATION, AND EVIDENCE FOR ITS ROLE IN CELLULAR FATTY ACID TRANSPORT

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Manning, Joan A.

    1974-01-01

    A soluble fatty acid-binding protein (FABP), mol wt ∼ 12,000 is present in intestinal mucosa and other tissues that utilize fatty acids, including liver, myocardium, adipose, and kidney. This protein binds long chain fatty acids both in vivo and in vitro. FABP was isolated from rat intestine by gel filtration and isoelectric focusing. It showed a reaction of complete immunochemical identity with proteins in the 12,000 mol wt fatty acid-binding fractions of liver, myocardium, and adipose tissue supernates. (The presence of immunochemically nonidentical 12,000 mol wt FABP in these tissues is not excluded.) By quantitative radial immunodiffusion, supernatant FABP concentration in mucosa from proximal and middle thirds of jejuno-ileum significantly exceeded that in distal third, duodenum, and liver, expressed as micrograms per milligram soluble protein, micrograms per gram DNA, and micrograms per gram tissue. FABP concentration in villi was approximately three times greater than in crypts. Small quantities of FABP were present in washed nuclei-cell membrane, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. However, the amount of FABP solubilized per milligram membrane protein was similar for all particulate fractions, and total membrane-associated FABP was only about 16% of supernatant FABP. Intestinal FABP concentration was significantly greater in animals maintained on high fat diets than on low fat; saturated and unsaturated fat diets did not differ greatly in this regard. The preponderance of FABP in villi from proximal and middle intestine, its ability to bind fatty acids in vivo as well as in vitro, and its response to changes in dietary fat intake support the concept that this protein participates in cellular fatty acid transport during fat absorption. Identical or closely related 12,000 mol wt proteins may serve similar functions in other tissues. Images PMID:4211161

  9. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  10. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  11. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  12. Extensive amino acid sequence homologies between animal lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Paroutaud, P.; Levi, G.; Teichberg, V.I.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have established the amino acid sequence of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from the electric eel and the sequences of several peptides from a similar lectin isolated from human placenta. These sequences were compared with the published sequences of peptides derived from the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from human lung and with sequences deduced from cDNAs assigned to the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins from chicken embryo skin and human hepatomas. Significant homologies were observed. One of the highly conserved regions that contains a tryptophan residue and two glutamic acid resides is probably part of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding site, which, on the basis of spectroscopic studies of the electric eel lectin, is expected to contain such residues. The similarity of the hydropathy profiles and the predicted secondary structure of the lectins from chicken skin and electric eel, in spite of differences in their amino acid sequences, strongly suggests that these proteins have maintained structural homologies during evolution and together with the other ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins were derived form a common ancestor gene.

  13. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  14. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function.

  15. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses.

  16. Cloning and Characterization of Root-Specific Barley Lectin 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, David R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1989-01-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNA library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A+) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A+) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16666982

  17. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS.

  18. Self-assembled carbohydrate-based vesicles for lectin targeting.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marinalva Cardoso; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues; Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Dal-Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the physicochemical interactions between vesicles formed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) and glycosylated polymeric amphiphile N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminyl-PEG900-docosanate (C22PEG900GlcNAc) conjugated with Bauhinia variegata lectin (BVL). Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins capable of binding glycosylated membrane components. Accordingly, the surface functionalization by such entities is considered a potential strategy for targeted drug delivery. We observed increased hydrodynamic radii (RH) of PC+C22PEG900GlcNAc vesicles in the presence of lectins, suggesting that this aggregation was due to the interaction between lectins and the vesicular glycosylated surfaces. Furthermore, changes in the zeta potential of the vesicles with increasing lectin concentrations implied that the vesicular glycosylated surfaces were recognized by the investigated lectin. The presence of carbohydrate residues on vesicle surfaces and the ability of the vesicles to establish specific interactions with BVL were further explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The results indicated that the thickness of the hydrophilic layer was to some extent influenced by the presence of lectins. The presence of lectins required a higher degree of polydispersity as indicated by the width parameter of the log-normal distribution of size, which also suggested more irregular structures. Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis.) analyses revealed that the studied lectin preferentially interacted with the choline and carbonyl groups of the lipid, thereby changing the choline orientation and intermolecular interactions. The protein also discretely reduced the intermolecular communication of the hydrophobic acyl chains, resulting in a disordered state.

  19. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  20. Low abdominal NIRS values and elevated plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a premature piglet model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify early markers of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), we hypothesized that continuous abdominal near-infrared spectroscopy (A-NIRS) measurement of splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation and intermittent plasma intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (pI-FABP) measured every 6 hours can detect NEC...

  1. Steam Cooking Significantly Improves In Vitro Bile Acid Binding of Collard Greens, Kale, Mustard Greens, Broccoli, Green Bell Pepper and Cabbage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid binding capacity has been related to the cholesterol-lowering potential of foods and food fractions. Lowering recirculating bile acids results in utilization of cholesterol to synthesize bile acid and reduced fat absorption. Secondary bile acids have been associated with increasing the r...

  2. Specific interaction of lectins with liposomes and monolayers bearing neoglycolipids.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Vincent; Costa, Maria de Lourdes; Boullanger, Paul; Baszkin, Adam; Rosilio, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of three lectins (wheat germ, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinins: WGA, UEA-I and LTA) with either N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or L-fucose neoglycolipids incorporated into phospholipid monolayers and liposome bilayers was studied at the air/water interface and in bulk solution. The results show that for both systems studied, synthesized neoglycolipids were capable of binding their specific lectin and that, in general, the binding of lectins increased with the increase in the molar fraction of the saccharide derivative incorporated in either the monolayers or bilayers. However, whereas for UEA-I, molecular recognition was enhanced by a strong hydrophobic interaction, for WGA and LTA successful recognition was predominantly related to the distance between neighboring sugar groups. The observed lengthy adsorption times of these lectins onto their specific ligands were attributed to interfacial conformational changes occurring in the proteins upon their adsorption at the interfaces.

  3. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm.

  4. Effect of plant lectins on Ustilago maydis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santiago, A P; Saavedra, E; Pérez Campos, E; Córdoba, F

    2000-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is an edible parasitic basidiomycete, which specifically infects corn (Zea mays) and teocintle (Z. diploperennis). To characterise the interaction between the basidiomycete and its host organism, we tested the effect of plant lectins with well-known sugar specificity on the growth and germination of U. maydis spores. Lectins specific for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, such as those from Dolichos biflorus and Phaseolus lunatus, and the wheatgerm agglutinin specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine inhibited spore germination, but were ineffective in modifying U. maydis cell growth. The galactose-specific lectin from the corn coleoptyle inhibited both germination and cell growth, while the lectin concanavalin A (mannose/glucose specific) activated spore germination and growth. Our results suggest that specific saccharide-containing receptors participate in regulating the growth and maturation of U. maydis spores.

  5. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  6. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit.

  7. Development and Distribution of Dolichos biflorus Lectin as Measured by Radioimmunoassay 1

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Craig F.; Etzler, Marilynn E.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay, capable of detecting the Dolichos biflorus lectin at concentrations as low as 400 ng/ml, was developed and used to follow the distribution of this lectin in the plant during its life cycle. The lectin was first detected in the seeds of the plant 27 days after flowering and rapidly attained the high level of lectin present in the mature seed. The lectin content of the plant is highest in the seeds and cotyledons and decreases as the storage materials of the cotyledons decrease. A low but measurable amount of material that reacts with antibodies to the seed lectin was detected in the leaves, stems, and pods of the plant. This material gives a precipitin band of only partial identity to the seed lectin when tested in immunodiffusion against antiserum to the seed lectin. No lectin was detected by the radioimmunoassay in the roots of the plant at any stage of development. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:16660399

  8. Hyaluronic Acid Binding Sperm Selection for assisted reproduction treatment (HABSelect): study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Witt, K D; Beresford, L; Bhattacharya, S; Brian, K; Coomarasamy, A; Hooper, R; Kirkman-Brown, J; Khalaf, Y; Lewis, S E; Pacey, A; Pavitt, S; West, R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The selection of a sperm with good genomic integrity is an important consideration for improving intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcome. Current convention selects sperm by vigour and morphology, but preliminary evidence suggests selection based on hyaluronic acid binding may be beneficial. The aim of the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Sperm Selection (HABSelect) trial is to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA)-selection of sperm versus conventionally selected sperm prior to ICSI on live birth rate (LBR). The mechanistic aim is to assess whether and how the chromatin state of HA-selected sperm corresponds with clinical outcomes—clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), LBR and pregnancy loss (PL). Methods and analysis Couples attending UK Centres will be approached, eligibility screening performed and informed consent sought. Randomisation will occur within 24 hours prior to ICSI treatment. Participants will be randomly allocated 1:1 to the intervention arm (physiological intracytoplasmic sperm injection, PICSI) versus the control arm using conventional methods (ICSI). The primary clinical outcome is LBR ≥37 weeks' gestation with the mechanistic study determining LBR's relationship with sperm DNA integrity. Secondary outcomes will determine this for CPR and PL. Only embryologists performing the procedure will be aware of the treatment allocation. Steps will be taken to militate against biases arising from embryologists being non-blinded. Randomisation will use a minimisation algorithm to balance for key prognostic variables. The trial is powered to detect a 5% difference (24–29%: p=0.05) in LBR ≥37 weeks' gestation. Selected residual sperm samples will be tested by one or more assays of DNA integrity. Ethics and dissemination HABSelect is a UK NIHR-EME funded study (reg no 11/14/34; IRAS REF. 13/YH/0162). The trial was designed in partnership with patient and public involvement to help maximise patient benefits. Trial findings will be

  9. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  10. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  11. A lectin with some unique characteristics from the samta tomato.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2006-04-01

    A lectin, with a molecular mass of 79 kDa, and with specificity toward rhamnose and O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, was isolated from samta tomato fruits. The procedure entailed ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-cellulose. The lectin was stable up to 70 degrees C. The lectin activity was potentiated by NaOH solutions (25-100 mM), but was reduced by 50 and 100 mM HCl solutions. The activity of the lectin was reduced in the presence of CaCl(2), MgCl(2) and ZnCl(2), but was potentiated by 5 and 10 mM AlCl(3) solutions. The lectin stimulated the mitogenic response in mouse splenocytes and inhibited human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 6.2 microM.

  12. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K.; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding. PMID:26735581

  13. Molecular characterization, tissue expression, and polymorphism analysis of liver-type fatty acid binding protein in Landes geese.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Shao, D; Sun, X X; Niu, J W; Gong, D Q

    2015-01-23

    Liver weight is an important economic trait in the fatty goose liver industry. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is involved in the formation and metabolism of fatty acids. Thus, we hypothesized that sequence polymorphisms in L-FABP were associated with fatty liver weight in goose. We first isolated, sequenced, and characterized the goose L-FABP gene, which had not been previously reported. The goose L-FABP gene was 2490 bp and included 4 exons coding for a 126-amino acid protein. Analysis of expression levels of the goose L-FABP gene in different tissues showed that the expression level in the liver tissue was higher than in other tissues, and was significantly higher in the liver tissue of overfed geese than in control geese. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism located at 774 bp in the gene was identified in a Landes goose population. To test whether this single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with fatty liver production, liver weight and the ratio of liver to carcass weights were determined for the 3 genotypes with this single nucleotide polymorphism (TT, TG, GG) in overfed Landes geese. Our data indicate that individuals with the GG genotype had higher values for the variables measured than those with the other 2 genotypes, suggesting that L-FABP can be a selection marker for the trait of fatty liver production in goose.

  14. Fatty acid binding protein 7 and n-3 poly unsaturated fatty acid supply in early rat brain development.

    PubMed

    Maximin, Elise; Langelier, Bénédicte; Aïoun, Josiane; Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Bordat, Christian; Lavialle, Monique; Heberden, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), abundant in the embryonic brain, binds with the highest affinity to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and is expressed in the early stages of embryogenesis. Here, we have examined the consequences of the exposure to different DHA levels and of the in utero depletion of FABP7 on early rat brain development. Neurodevelopment was evaluated through the contents of two proteins, connexin 43 (Cx43) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), both involved in neuroblast proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The dams were fed with diets presenting different DHA contents, from deficiency to supplementation. DHA brain embryos contents already differed at embryonic day 11.5 and the differences kept increasing with time. Cx43 and CDK5 contents were positively associated with the brain DHA levels. When FABP7 was depleted in vivo by injections of siRNA in the telencephalon, the enhancement of the contents of both proteins was lost in supplemented animals, but FABP7 depletion did not modify phospholipid compositions regardless of the diets. Thus, FABP7 is a necessary mediator of the effect of DHA on these proteins synthesis, but its role in DHA uptake is not critical, although FABP7 is localized in phospholipid-rich areas. Our study shows that high contents of DHA associated with FABP7 are necessary to promote early brain development, which prompted us to recommend DHA supplementation early in pregnancy.

  15. Renal L-type fatty acid-binding protein mediates the bezafibrate reduction of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Negishi, K; Noiri, E; Maeda, R; Portilla, D; Sugaya, T; Fujita, T

    2008-06-01

    Fibrates, the PPAR alpha ligand-like compounds increase the expression of proximal tubule liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and significantly decrease cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. To study whether the bezafibrate-mediated upregulation of renal L-FABP was involved in this cytoprotective effect we treated transgenic mice of PPAR agonists inducible human L-FABP expression with cisplatin in the presence or absence of bezafibrate. Blood urea nitrogen was unchanged in the first day but increased 3 days after cisplatin. While urinary L-FABP increased over 100-fold 1 day after cisplatin treatment in the transgenic mice it was significantly reduced when these transgenic mice were pretreated with bezafibrate. Cisplatin-induced renal necrosis and apoptosis were significantly reduced in bezafibrate pretreated transgenic mice and this correlated with decreased accumulation of lipid and lipid peroxidation products. Immunohistochemical analysis of kidney tissue of bezafibrate-cisplatin-treated transgenic mice showed preservation of cytoplasmic L-FABP in the proximal tubule, but this was reduced in transgenic mice treated only with cisplatin. L-FABP mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in bezafibrate-cisplatin-treated transgenic mice when compared to mice not fibrate treated. Our study shows that the bezafibrate-mediated upregulation of proximal tubule L-FABP plays a pivotal role in the reduction of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

  16. High Serum Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jer-Chuan; Wu, Du-An; Hou, Jia-Sian; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Chen, Hsin-Dean

    2016-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) is a key mediator of obesity-related metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between A-FABP concentration and MetS in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Fasting blood samples were obtained from 165 type 2 DM volunteers. MetS and its components were defined using diagnostic criteria from the International Diabetes Federation. Among 165 DM patients, 113 patients (68.5%) had MetS. Diabetic persons who had MetS had significantly higher A-FABP levels (P < 0.001) than those without MetS. Female DM persons had higher A-FABP level than man (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences in A-FABP levels were found in use of statin, fibrate, or antidiabetic drugs. Multivariate forward stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that body fat mass (P < 0.001), logarithmically transformed creatinine (log-creatinine; P < 0.001), female DM patients (P < 0.001), and logarithmically transformed high sensitive C-reactive protein (log-hs-CRP; P = 0.013) were positively correlated, while albumin (P = 0.004) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR; P = 0.043) were negatively correlated with serum A-FABP levels in type 2 DM patients. In this study, higher serum A-FABP level was positively associated with MetS in type 2 DM patients. PMID:28042581

  17. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, P.D.; Potter, B.J.; Sorrentino, D.; Zhou, S.L.; Isola, L.M.; Stump, D.; Kiang, C.L.; Thung, S. ); Wada, H.; Horio, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP{sub PM}) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABP{sub PM} have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABP{sub PM} reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of ({sup 3}H)oleate but not that of ({sup 35}S)sulfobromophthalein or ({sup 14}C)taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABP{sub PM} can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABP{sub PM} and mGOT are closely related.

  18. Role of cytosolic liver fatty acid binding protein in hepatocellular oxidative stress: effect of dexamethasone and clofibrate treatment.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, G; Wang, G Q; Yan, J; Jiang, P; Gong, Y; Burczynski, F J

    2007-01-01

    The presence of cysteine and methionine groups together with an ability to bind long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation products makes liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) an attractive candidate against hepatocellular oxidative stress. In this report, we show that pharmacological treatment directed at modulating L-FABP level affected hepatocellular oxidant status. L-FABP expressing 1548-hepatoma cells, treated with dexamethasone or clofibrate, decreased and increased intracellular L-FABP levels, respectively. Oxidative stress was induced by H2O2 incubation or hypoxia-reoxygenation. The fluorescent marker, dichlorofluorescein (DCF), was employed to measure intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hepatocellular damage was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level. Dexamethasone treatment resulted in a significant increase in DCF fluorescence with higher LDH release compared to control cells. Clofibrate treatment, however, resulted in a significant decrease in both parameters (p<0.05). Drug treatments did not affect cytosolic activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), or catalase suggesting that the differences between treated and control cells may likely be associated with varying L-FABP levels. We conclude that L-FABP may act as an effective endogenous cytoprotectant against hepatocellular oxidative stress.

  19. Fatty acid binding proteins have the potential to channel dietary fatty acids into enterocyte nuclei[S

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Adriana; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Canclini, Lucia; Silvarrey, Maria Cecilia; André, Michèle; Babin, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins, including fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) 1 and 2, are highly expressed in tissues involved in the active lipid metabolism. A zebrafish model was used to demonstrate differential expression levels of fabp1b.1, fabp1b.2, and fabp2 transcripts in liver, anterior intestine, and brain. Transcription levels of fabp1b.1 and fabp2 in the anterior intestine were upregulated after feeding and modulated according to diet formulation. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy immunodetection with gold particles localized these FABPs in the microvilli, cytosol, and nuclei of most enterocytes in the anterior intestinal mucosa. Nuclear localization was mostly in the interchromatin space outside the condensed chromatin clusters. Native PAGE binding assay of BODIPY-FL-labeled FAs demonstrated binding of BODIPY-FLC12 but not BODIPY-FLC5 to recombinant Fabp1b.1 and Fabp2. The binding of BODIPY-FLC12 to Fabp1b.1 was fully displaced by oleic acid. In vivo experiments demonstrated, for the first time, that intestinal absorption of dietary BODIPY-FLC12 was followed by colocalization of the labeled FA with Fabp1b and Fabp2 in the nuclei. These data suggest that dietary FAs complexed with FABPs are able to reach the enterocyte nucleus with the potential to modulate nuclear activity. PMID:26658423

  20. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 4 (FABP4): Pathophysiological Insights and Potent Clinical Biomarker of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Saitoh, Shigeyuki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, evidences of an integration of metabolic and inflammatory pathways, referred to as metaflammation in several aspects of metabolic syndrome, have been accumulating. Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), also known as adipocyte FABP (A-FABP) or aP2, is mainly expressed in adipocytes and macrophages and plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in relation to metaflammation. Despite lack of a typical secretory signal peptide, FABP4 has been shown to be released from adipocytes in a non-classical pathway associated with lipolysis, possibly acting as an adipokine. Elevation of circulating FABP4 levels is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiac dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular events. Furthermore, ectopic expression and function of FABP4 in several types of cells and tissues have been recently demonstrated. Here, we discuss both the significant role of FABP4 in pathophysiological insights and its usefulness as a biomarker of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25674026

  1. Importance of the proline-rich multimerization domain on the oligomerization and nucleic acid binding properties of HIV-1 Vif.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Mercenne, Gaëlle; Tournaire, Clémence; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2011-03-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is required for productive infection of non-permissive cells, including most natural HIV-1 targets, where it counteracts the antiviral activities of the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (A3G) and A3F. Vif is a multimeric protein and the conserved proline-rich domain (161)PPLP(164) regulating Vif oligomerization is crucial for its function and viral infectivity. Here, we expressed and purified wild-type Vif and a mutant protein in which alanines were substituted for the proline residues of the (161)PPLP(164) domain. Using dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, we established the impact of these mutations on Vif oligomerization, secondary structure content and nucleic acids binding properties. In vitro, wild-type Vif formed oligomers of five to nine proteins, while Vif AALA formed dimers and/or trimers. Up to 40% of the unbound wild-type Vif protein appeared to be unfolded, but binding to the HIV-1 TAR apical loop promoted formation of β-sheets. Interestingly, alanine substitutions did not significantly affect the secondary structure of Vif, but they diminished its binding affinity and specificity for nucleic acids. Dynamic light scattering showed that Vif oligomerization, and interaction with folding-promoting nucleic acids, favor formation of high molecular mass complexes. These properties could be important for Vif functions involving RNAs.

  2. Crystal structure and nucleic acid-binding activity of the CRISPR-associated protein Csx1 of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Kwan; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2013-02-01

    In many prokaryotic organisms, chromosomal loci known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (CAS) genes comprise an acquired immune defense system against invading phages and plasmids. Although many different Cas protein families have been identified, the exact biochemical functions of most of their constituents remain to be determined. In this study, we report the crystal structure of PF1127, a Cas protein of Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 that is composed of 480 amino acids and belongs to the Csx1 family. The C-terminal domain of PF1127 has a unique β-hairpin structure that protrudes out of an α-helix and contains several positively charged residues. We demonstrate that PF1127 binds double-stranded DNA and RNA and that this activity requires an intact β-hairpin and involve the homodimerization of the protein. In contrast, another Csx1 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 that is composed of 377 amino acids does not have the β-hairpin structure and exhibits no DNA-binding properties under the same experimental conditions. Notably, the C-terminal domain of these two Csx1 proteins is greatly diversified, in contrast to the conserved N-terminal domain, which appears to play a common role in the homodimerization of the protein. Thus, although P. furiosus Csx1 is identified as a nucleic acid-binding protein, other Csx1 proteins are predicted to exhibit different individual biochemical activities.

  3. Cloning and characterization of the fatty acid-binding protein gene from the protoscolex of Taenia multiceps.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hua-Ming; Xie, Yue; Fu, Yan; Yang, Ying-Dong; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xi; Lai, Wei-Ming; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-05-01

    Taenia multiceps (Cestoda: Taeniidae), a worldwide cestode parasite, is emerging as an important helminthic zoonosis due to serious or fatal central nervous system disease commonly known as coenurosis in domestic and wild ruminants including humans. Herein, a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) gene was identified from transcriptomic data in T. multiceps. This gene, which contains a complete coding sequence, was amplified by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding protein, which was named TmFABP, had a molecular weight of 14 kDa, and subsequently was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein was purified on Ni-NTA beads (Bio-Rad). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analyses showed that the purified recombinant protein caused immunogenicity. Immunohistochemical studies showed that TmFABP was expressed at the tegumental level in the protoscolices and in the cells between the body wall and parenchyma layer of the cestode. In sections from gravid proglottids, intense staining was detected in the uterus and eggs. Based on this, TmFABP could be switched on during differentiation of germinative layers to protoscoleces and from metacestodes to adult worms. Taken together, our results already reported for T. multiceps suggest the possibility of TmFABP developing a vaccine to control and prevent coenurosis.

  4. The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) gene is regulated by HNF-4{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Klapper, Maja . E-mail: klapper@molnut.uni-kiel.de; Boehme, Mike; Nitz, Inke; Doering, Frank

    2007-04-27

    The cytosolic human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) is proposed to be involved in intestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of hFABP2 by the endodermal hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF-4{alpha}), involved in regulation of genes of fatty acid metabolism and differentiation. Electromobility shift assays demonstrated that HNF-4{alpha} binds at position -324 to -336 within the hFABP2 promoter. Mutation of this HNF-4 binding site abolished the luciferase reporter activity of hFABP2 in postconfluent Caco-2 cells. In HeLa cells, this mutation reduced the activation of the hFABP2 promoter by HNF-4{alpha} by about 50%. Thus, binding element at position -336/-324 essentially determines the transcriptional activity of promoter and may be important in control of hFABP2 expression by dietary lipids and differentiation. Studying genotype interactions of hFABP2 and HNF-4{alpha}, that are both candidate genes for diabetes type 2, may be a powerful approach.

  5. Techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) hydrocolloids.

    PubMed

    Gannasin, Sri Puvanesvari; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocolloids were extracted from seed mucilage and the pulp fractions from red tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) mesocarp, and characterisation of their techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities was performed. The seed mucilage hydrocolloids that were extracted, using either 1% citric acid (THC) or water (THW), had a good foaming capacity (32-36%), whereas the pulp hydrocolloids that were extracted, using 72% ethanol (THE) or 20mM HEPES buffer (THH), had no foaming capacity. The pulp hydrocolloid, however, possessed high oil-holding and water-holding capacities in the range of 3.3-3.6 g oil/g dry sample and 25-27 g water/g dry sample, respectively. This enabled the pulp hydrocolloid to entrap more bile acids (35-38% at a hydrocolloid concentration of 2%) in its gelatinous network in comparison to commercial oat fibre and other hydrocolloids studied. The exceptional emulsifying properties (80-96%) of both hydrocolloids suggest their potential applications as food emulsifiers and bile acid binders.

  6. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding.

  7. Fatty acid binding protein 4 in circulating leucocytes reflects atherosclerotic lesion progression in Apoe−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Agardh, Hanna E; Gertow, Karl; Salvado, Dolores M; Hermansson, Andreas; Puijvelde, Gijs H; Hansson, Göran K; n-Berne, Gabrielle Paulsso; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers for atherosclerosis is important to aid in early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify potential biomarkers in circulating cells reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression in the vessel wall. We performed gene arrays on circulating leucocytes from atherosclerosis prone Apoe−/− mice with increasing ages, using C57BL/6 mice as healthy controls. We identified fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) mRNA to be augmented in mice with established disease compared with young Apoe−/− or controls. Interestingly, the transcript FABP4 correlated significantly with lesion size, further supporting a disease associated increase. In addition, validation of our finding on protein level showed augmented FABP4 in circulating leucocytes whereas, importantly, no change could be observed in plasma. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated FABP4 to be present mainly in circulating neutrophils and to some extent in monocytes. Moreover, FABP4-positive neutrophils and macrophages could be identified in the subintimal space in the plaque. Using human circulating leucocytes, we confirmed the presence of FABP4 protein in neutrophils and monocytes. In conclusion, we have showed that cellular levels of FABP4 in circulating leucocytes associate with lesion development in the experimental Apoe−/− model. The increased expression is primarily localized to neutrophils, but also in monocytes. We have identified FABP4 in leucocytes as a potential and easy accessible biomarker of atherosclerosis which could be of future clinical relevance. PMID:23387955

  8. Hybridoma anti-DNA autoantibodies from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrate similar nucleic acid binding characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rauch, J; Massicotte, H; Tannenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma anti-DNA antibodies have been generated from the fusion of the GM 4672 lymphoblastoid line with peripheral blood lymphocytes from four normal subjects, nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 441 hybridoma clones were obtained, of which 37 secreted anti-DNA autoantibodies. The nucleic acid binding characteristics of the anti-DNA antibodies produced by two hybridomas from normal subjects, nine hybridomas from RA patients, and 18 hybridomas from SLE patients are reported. The hybridoma anti-DNA antibodies from all three groups showed similar antigen-binding characteristics for denatured DNA (dDNA), native DNA (nDNA), poly(I), poly(dT), and cardiolipin, by both direct binding and competitive binding analyses. One difference noted between normal-derived anti-DNA antibodies and autoimmune-derived antibodies was the inability of the former to react with z-DNA. However, this requires further substantiation with larger numbers of normal-derived clones. The broad overlap of reactivity to nucleic acid antigens among individual anti-DNA autoantibodies found in two clinically different autoimmune diseases, namely RA and SLE, suggests that the pathogenicity of anti-DNA autoantibodies may bear no relationship to their nucleic acid antigen-binding characteristics.

  9. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  10. Marine Lectins DlFBL and HddSBL Fused with Soluble Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor Facilitate Adenovirus Infection in Cancer Cells BUT Have Different Effects on Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bingbing; Mei, Shengsheng; Cui, Lianzhen; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jianhong; Wu, Tao; Li, Gongchu

    2017-01-01

    Cancer development and progression are usually associated with glycosylation change, providing prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets, for various cancers. In this work, Dicentrarchus labrax fucose binding lectin (DlFBL) and Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (HddSBL) were genetically fused with soluble coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (sCAR), and produced through a bacterial expression system. Results showed that recombinant sCAR-DlFBL not only facilitated adenovirus Ad-EGFP infection in K562/ADR and U87MG cells, but also enhanced the cytotoxicity of adenovirus harboring gene encoding Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (PPA) or DlFBL (Ad-PPA or Ad-DlFBL) on U87MG cells through inducing apoptosis. Recombinant sCAR-HddSBL facilitated Ad-EGFP infection, but dramatically counteracted the cytotoxicity of both Ad-PPA and Ad-DlFBL in U87MG cells. Further analysis revealed that sCAR-HddSBL, but not sCAR-DlFBL, significantly upregulated transcription factor E2F1 levels in U87MG cells, which might be responsible for the adverse effect of sCAR-HddSBL on Ad-PPA and Ad-DlFBL. Taken together, our data suggested that sCAR-DlFBL could be further developed to redirect therapeutic adenoviruses to infect cancer cells such as U87MG, and the sCAR-lectin fusion proteins for adenoviral retargeting should be carefully examined for possible survival signaling induced by lectins, such as HddSBL. PMID:28335432

  11. Utilization of lectin-histochemistry in forensic neuropathology: lectin staining provides useful information for postmortem diagnosis in forensic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Katsuji; Tanegashima, Akio; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Ushiyama, Ikuko; Ikemoto, Keiko; Yamasaki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Rand, Steven; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated the deposition of glycoconjugates in human brain tissue with or without brain disorders. In this review we describe the application of lectin-histochemistry techniques to forensic neuropathology. Lectin staining is able to reveal several kinds of carbohydrate-related depositions in addition to the conventional degenerative changes including senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and corpora amylacea. The senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles were clearly stained by Con A, PSA and GSI lectins, the corpora amylacea which is relevant to repeated brain hypoxia and mitochondrial damage was also easily detected by these and many other kinds of lectins. Amorphous spaces were detected around blood vessels and independently from blood vessels by lectin staining in the white matter from patients with brain disorders or severe edema. The white matter lesions were not considered relevant for forensic pathology, until a large group of cerebral white matter lesions were detected in the elderly with increasing frequency by modern neuro-imaging methods. The spherical deposits were newly detected by lectin staining in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation chiefly from patients with schizophrenia or cognitive dysfunctions.

  12. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity.

  13. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  14. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Induces Hepatic Steatosis by Enhancing the Expression of Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun-li; Peng, Xian-e; Zhu, Yi-bing; Yan, Xiao-li; Chen, Wan-nan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated as a potential trigger of hepatic steatosis although molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HBV-associated hepatic steatosis still remain elusive. Our prior work has revealed that the expression level of liver fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was elevated in HBV-producing hepatoma cells. In this study, the effects of HBV X protein (HBx) mediated FABP1 regulation on hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanism were determined. mRNA and protein levels of FABP1 were measured by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting. HBx-mediated FABP1 regulation was evaluated by luciferase assay, coimmunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Hepatic lipid accumulation was measured by using Oil-Red-O staining and the triglyceride level. It was found that expression of FABP1 was increased in HBV-producing hepatoma cells, the sera of HBV-infected patients, and the sera and liver tissues of HBV-transgenic mice. Ectopic overexpression of HBx resulted in upregulation of FABP1 in HBx-expressing hepatoma cells, whereas HBx abolishment reduced FABP1 expression. Mechanistically, HBx activated the FABP1 promoter in an HNF3β-, C/EBPα-, and PPARα-dependent manner, in which HBx increased the gene expression of HNF3β and physically interacted with C/EBPα and PPARα. On the other hand, knockdown of FABP1 remarkably blocked lipid accumulation both in long-chain free fatty acids treated HBx-expressing HepG2 cells and in a high-fat diet-fed HBx-transgenic mice. Therefore, FABP1 is a key driver gene in HBx-induced hepatic lipid accumulation via regulation of HNF3β, C/EBPα, and PPARα. FABP1 may represent a novel target for treatment of HBV-associated hepatic steatosis. IMPORTANCE Accumulating evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies has indicated that chronic HBV infection is associated with hepatic steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism

  15. The human liver fatty acid binding protein T94A variant alters the structure, stability, and interaction with fibrates.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-12-23

    Although the human liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in the complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to that seen with L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using the recombinant human wild-type (WT) T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Nonconservative replacement of the medium-sized, polar, uncharged T residue with a smaller, nonpolar, aliphatic A residue at position 94 of the human L-FABP significantly increased the L-FABP α-helical structure content at the expense of β-sheet content and concomitantly decreased the thermal stability. T94A did not alter the binding affinities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist ligands (phytanic acid, fenofibrate, and fenofibric acid). While T94A did not alter the impact of phytanic acid and only slightly altered that of fenofibrate on the human L-FABP secondary structure, the active metabolite fenofibric acid altered the T94A secondary structure much more than that of the WT T94T L-FABP. Finally, in cultured primary human hepatocytes, the T94A variant exhibited a significantly reduced extent of fibrate-mediated induction of PPARα-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, FATP5, and PPARα itself. Thus, while the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of the human L-FABP for PPARα agonist ligands, it significantly altered the human L-FABP structure, stability, and conformational and functional response to fibrate.

  16. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of human epidermal-type fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP).

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis H; Ludwig, Christian; Hohoff, Carsten; Rademacher, Martin; Hanhoff, Thorsten; Rüterjans, Heinz; Spener, Friedrich; Lücke, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Human epidermal-type fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP) belongs to a family of intracellular 14-15 kDa lipid-binding proteins, whose functions have been associated with fatty acid signalling, cell growth, regulation and differentiation. As a contribution to understanding the structure-function relationship, we report in the present study features of its solution structure and backbone dynamics determined by NMR spectroscopy. Applying multi-dimensional high-resolution NMR techniques on unlabelled and 15N-enriched recombinant human E-FABP, the 1H and 15N resonance assignments were completed. On the basis of 2008 distance restraints, the three-dimensional solution structure of human E-FABP was subsequently obtained (backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 0.92+/-0.11 A; where 1 A=0.1 nm), consisting mainly of 10 anti-parallel beta-strands that form a beta-barrel structure. 15N relaxation experiments (T1, T2 and heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effects) at 500, 600 and 800 MHz provided information on the internal dynamics of the protein backbone. Nearly all non-terminal backbone amide groups showed order parameters S(2)>0.8, with an average value of 0.88+/-0.04, suggesting a uniformly low backbone mobility in the nanosecond-to-picosecond time range. Moreover, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments indicated a direct correlation between the stability of the hydrogen-bonding network in the beta-sheet structure and the conformational exchange in the millisecond-to-microsecond time range. The features of E-FABP backbone dynamics elaborated in the present study differ markedly from those of the phylogenetically closely related heart-type FABP and the more distantly related ileal lipid-binding protein, implying a strong interdependence with the overall protein stability and possibly also with the ligand-binding affinity for members of the lipid-binding protein family. PMID:12049637

  17. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  18. Serum adipocyte-fatty acid binding protein (FABP4) levels in women from Mexico exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Ruíz-Vera, Tania; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia G; González-Palomo, Ana K; Almendarez-Reyna, Claudia I; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a very important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Correspondingly, adipocyte-fatty acid binding protein (FABP4, also known as aP2 and AFABP) has been proposed as a new, meaningful and useful biomarker to predict metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate serum FABP4 levels in Mexican women exposed to PAHs. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene ((1-OHP), exposure biomarker for PAHs) levels were quantified using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique, and serum FABP4 concentrations were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit. The mean urinary 1-OHP level found in women participating in this study was 1.30 ± 1.10 μmol/mol creatinine (2.45 ± 2.10 μg/g creatinine). Regarding serum FABP4 concentrations, the levels ranged from 3.80 to 62.5 ng/mL in the assessed population. Moreover, a significant association (p < 0.001) was found between urinary 1-OHP levels and serum FABP4 concentrations in women after adjusting for potential confounding variables. The presented data in this study can be considered only as a starting point for further studies. Then, in order to elucidate whether FABP4 represents a risk factor for CVD disease in humans exposed to air contaminants (such as PAHs), large epidemiological studies are necessary.

  19. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

    PubMed

    Elmes, Matthew W; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M; Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Tsirka, Stella E; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G

    2015-04-03

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

  20. A Repetitive DNA Element Regulates Expression of the Helicobacter pylori Sialic Acid Binding Adhesin by a Rheostat-like Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vallström, Anna; Olofsson, Annelie; Öhman, Carina; Rakhimova, Lena; Borén, Thomas; Engstrand, Lars; Brännström, Kristoffer; Arnqvist, Anna

    2014-01-01

    During persistent infection, optimal expression of bacterial factors is required to match the ever-changing host environment. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a large set of simple sequence repeats (SSR), which constitute contingency loci. Through a slipped strand mispairing mechanism, the SSRs generate heterogeneous populations that facilitate adaptation. Here, we present a model that explains, in molecular terms, how an intergenically located T-tract, via slipped strand mispairing, operates with a rheostat-like function, to fine-tune activity of the promoter that drives expression of the sialic acid binding adhesin, SabA. Using T-tract variants, in an isogenic strain background, we show that the length of the T-tract generates multiphasic output from the sabA promoter. Consequently, this alters the H. pylori binding to sialyl-Lewis x receptors on gastric mucosa. Fragment length analysis of post-infection isolated clones shows that the T-tract length is a highly variable feature in H. pylori. This mirrors the host-pathogen interplay, where the bacterium generates a set of clones from which the best-fit phenotypes are selected in the host. In silico and functional in vitro analyzes revealed that the length of the T-tract affects the local DNA structure and thereby binding of the RNA polymerase, through shifting of the axial alignment between the core promoter and UP-like elements. We identified additional genes in H. pylori, with T- or A-tracts positioned similar to that of sabA, and show that variations in the tract length likewise acted as rheostats to modulate cognate promoter output. Thus, we propose that this generally applicable mechanism, mediated by promoter-proximal SSRs, provides an alternative mechanism for transcriptional regulation in bacteria, such as H. pylori, which possesses a limited repertoire of classical trans-acting regulatory factors. PMID:24991812

  1. The increased expression of fatty acid-binding protein 9 in prostate cancer and its prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Al Fayi, Majed Saad; Gou, Xiaojun; Forootan, Shiva S.; Al-Jameel, Waseem; Bao, Zhengzheng; Rudland, Philip R.; Cornford, Philip A.; Hussain, Syed A.; Ke, Youqiang

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to numerous studies conducted to investigate the crucial role of fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5) in prostate cancer, investigations on the possible involvement of other FABPs are rare. Here we first measured the mRNA levels of 10 FABPs in benign and malignant prostate cell lines and identified the differentially expressed FABP6 and FABP9 mRNAs whose levels in all malignant cell lines were higher than those in the benign cells. Thereafter we assessed the expression status of FABP6 and FABP9 in both prostate cell lines and in human tissues. FABP6 protein was overexpressed only in 1 of the 5 malignant cell lines and its immunostaining intensities were not significantly different between benign and malignant prostate tissues. In contrast, FABP9 protein was highly expressed in highly malignant cell lines PC-3 and PC3-M, but its level in the benign PNT-2 and other malignant cell lines was not detectable. When analysed in an archival set of human prostate tissues, immunohistochemical staining intensity for FABP9 was significantly higher in carcinomas than in benign cases and the increase in FABP9 was significantly correlated with reduced patient survival times. Moreover, the increased level of staining for FABP9 was significantly associated with the increased joint Gleason scores (GS) and androgen receptor index (AR). Suppression of FABP9 expression in highly malignant PC3-M cells inhibited their invasive potential. Our results suggest that FABP9 is a valuable prognostic marker to predict the outcomes of prostate cancer patients, perhaps by playing an important role in prostate cancer cell invasion. PMID:27779102

  2. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  3. Fatty acid binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues regulate metabolism, reproduction, and life span. The development and growth of adipose tissue are due to increases of both adipocyte cell size and cell number; the latter is mediated by adipocyte progenitors. Various markers have been used to identify either adipocyte progenitors or mature adipocytes. The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), commonly known as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), has been extensively used as a marker for differentiated adipocytes. However, whether aP2 is expressed in adipogenic progenitors is controversial. Using Cre/LoxP-based cell lineage tracing in mice, we have identified a population of aP2-expressing progenitors in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of both white and brown adipose tissues. The aP2-lineage progenitors reside in the adipose stem cell niche and express adipocyte progenitor markers, including CD34, Sca1, Dlk1, and PDGFRα. When isolated and grown in culture, the aP2-expressing SVF cells proliferate and differentiate into adipocytes upon induction. Conversely, ablation of the aP2 lineage greatly reduces the adipogenic potential of SVF cells. When grafted into wild-type mice, the aP2-lineage progenitors give rise to adipose depots in recipient mice. Therefore, the expression of aP2 is not limited to mature adipocytes, but also marks a pool of undifferentiated progenitors associated with the vasculature of adipose tissues. Our finding adds to the repertoire of adipose progenitor markers and points to a new regulator of adipose plasticity.

  4. Liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablation exacerbates weight gain in high-fat fed female mice.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Avery L; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Storey, Stephen M; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-05-01

    Loss of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) decreases long chain fatty acid uptake and oxidation in primary hepatocytes and in vivo. On this basis, L-FABP gene ablation would potentiate high-fat diet-induced weight gain and weight gain/energy intake. While this was indeed the case when L-FABP null (-/-) mice on the C57BL/6NCr background were pair-fed a high-fat diet, whether this would also be observed under high-fat diet fed ad libitum was not known. Therefore, this possibility was examined in female L-FABP (-/-) mice on the same background. L-FABP (-/-) mice consumed equal amounts of defined high-fat or isocaloric control diets fed ad libitum. However, on the ad libitum-fed high-fat diet the L-FABP (-/-) mice exhibited: (1) decreased hepatic long chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation as indicated by lower serum β-hydroxybutyrate level; (2) decreased hepatic protein levels of key enzymes mitochondrial (rate limiting carnitine palmitoyl acyltransferase A1, CPT1A; HMG-CoA synthase) and peroxisomal (acyl CoA oxidase 1, ACOX1) LCFA β-oxidation; (3) increased fat tissue mass (FTM) and FTM/energy intake to the greatest extent; and (4) exacerbated body weight gain, weight gain/energy intake, liver weight, and liver weight/body weight to the greatest extent. Taken together, these findings showed that L-FABP gene-ablation exacerbated diet-induced weight gain and fat tissue mass gain in mice fed high-fat diet ad libitum--consistent with the known biochemistry and cell biology of L-FABP.

  5. High dietary fat exacerbates weight gain and obesity in female liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablated mice.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-02-01

    Since liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) facilitates uptake/oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in cultured transfected cells and primary hepatocytes, loss of L-FABP was expected to exacerbate weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat. Male and female wild-type (WT) and L-FABP gene-ablated mice, pair-fed a defined isocaloric control or high fat diet for 12 weeks, consumed equal amounts of food by weight and kcal. Male WT mice gained weight faster than their female WT counterparts regardless of diet. L-FABP gene ablation enhanced weight gain more in female than male mice-an effect exacerbated by high fat diet. Dual emission X-ray absorptiometry revealed high-fat fed male and female WT mice gained mostly fat tissue mass (FTM). L-FABP gene ablation increased FTM in female, but not male, mice-an effect also exacerbated by high fat diet. Concomitantly, L-FABP gene ablation decreased serum beta-hydroxybutyrate in male and female mice fed the control diet and, even more so, on the high-fat diet. Thus, L-FABP gene ablation decreased fat oxidation and sensitized all mice to weight gain as whole body FTM and LTM-with the most gain observed in FTM of control vs high-fat fed female L-FABP null mice. Taken together, these results indicate loss of L-FABP exacerbates weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat.

  6. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins (FABPs) Are Intracellular Carriers for Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD)*

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew W.; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T.; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P.; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M.; Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Tsirka, Stella E.; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:25666611

  7. Association analyses between brain-expressed fatty-acid binding protein (FABP) genes and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Maekawa, Motoko; Yamada, Kazuo; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Sugihara, Genichi; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao; Nanko, Shinichiro; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Okazaki, Yuji; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2010-03-05

    Deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI) are a biological marker for psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. To unravel PPI-controlling mechanisms, we previously performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in mice, and identified Fabp7, that encodes a brain-type fatty acid binding protein (Fabp), as a causative gene. In that study, human FABP7 showed genetic association with schizophrenia. FABPs constitute a gene family, of which members FABP5 and FABP3 are also expressed in the brain. These FABP proteins are molecular chaperons for polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids. Additionally, the involvement of PUFAs has been documented in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and mood disorders. Therefore in this study, we examined the genetic roles of FABP5 and 3 in schizophrenia (N = 1,900 in combination with controls) and FABP7, 5, and 3 in bipolar disorder (N = 1,762 in the case-control set). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from FABP7 showed nominal association with bipolar disorder, and haplotypes of the same gene showed empirical associations with bipolar disorder even after correction of multiple testing. We could not perform association studies on FABP5, due to the lack of informative SNPs. FABP3 displayed no association with either disease. Each FABP is relatively small and it is assumed that there are multiple regulatory elements that control gene expression. Therefore, future identification of unknown regulatory elements will be necessary to make a more detailed analysis of their genetic contribution to mental illnesses.

  8. Structure predictions of two Bauhinia variegata lectins reveal patterns of C-terminal properties in single chain legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Conceição, Fabricio R; McBride, Alan J A; Pinto, Luciano da S

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and -II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins.

  9. Structure Predictions of Two Bauhinia variegata Lectins Reveal Patterns of C-Terminal Properties in Single Chain Legume Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Conceição, Fabricio R.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Pinto, Luciano da S.

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and –II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins. PMID:24260572

  10. Probing the cons and pros of lectin-induced immunomodulation: case studies for the mistletoe lectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H J

    2001-07-01

    When imagining to monitor animal cells through a microscope with resolution at the molecular level, a salient attribute of their surfaces will be the abundance of glycan chains. They present galactosides at their termini widely extending like tentacles into the extracellular space. Their spatial accessibility and their potential for structural variability endow especially these glycan parts with capacity to act as docking points for molecular sensors (sugar receptors such as lectins). Binding and ligand clustering account for transmission of post-binding signals into the cell interior. The range of triggered activities has turned plant lectins into popular tools in cell biology and immunology. Potential for clinical application has been investigated rigorously only in recent years. As documented in vitro and in vivo for the galactoside-specific mistletoe lectin, its apparent immunomodulatory capacity reflected in upregulation of production of proinflammatory cytokines will not necessarily be clinically favorable but a double-edged sword. In fact, lectin application has been shown to stimulate tumor growth in cell lines, histocultures of human tumors and in two animal models using chemical carcinogenesis or tumor transplantation. When testing immunological effects of the endogenous lectin galectin-1, protection against disorders mediated by activated T cells came up for consideration. Elimination of these cells via CD7-dependent induction of apoptosis, and a shift to the Th2 response by the galectin, are factors to ameliorate disease states. This result encourages further efforts with other galectins. Functional redundancy, synergism, diversity or antagonism among galectins are being explored to understand the actual role of this class of endogenous lectins in inflammation. Regardless of the results of further preclinical testing for galectin-1, these two case studies break new ground in our understanding how glycans as ligands for lectins convey reactivity to

  11. RBscore&NBench: a high-level web server for nucleic acid binding residues prediction with a large-scale benchmarking database.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2016-07-08

    RBscore&NBench combines a web server, RBscore and a database, NBench. RBscore predicts RNA-/DNA-binding residues in proteins and visualizes the prediction scores and features on protein structures. The scoring scheme of RBscore directly links feature values to nucleic acid binding probabilities and illustrates the nucleic acid binding energy funnel on the protein surface. To avoid dataset, binding site definition and assessment metric biases, we compared RBscore with 18 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets, which demonstrated the high and stable accuracy of RBscore. A comprehensive comparison led us to develop a benchmark database named NBench. The web server is available on: http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rbscorenbench/.

  12. Structural analysis of site-directed mutants of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II addresses the relationship between structural integrity and ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Vaezeslami, Soheila; Jia, Xiaofei; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H.

    2008-12-01

    A water network stabilizes the structure of cellular retionic acid binding protein II. The structural integrity of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII) has been investigated using the crystal structures of CRABPII mutants. The overall fold was well maintained by these CRABPII mutants, each of which carried multiple different mutations. A water-mediated network is found to be present across the large binding cavity, extending from Arg111 deep inside the cavity to the α2 helix at its entrance. This chain of interactions acts as a ‘pillar’ that maintains the integrity of the protein. The disruption of the water network upon loss of Arg111 leads to decreased structural integrity of the protein. A water-mediated network can be re-established by introducing the hydrophilic Glu121 inside the cavity, which results in a rigid protein with the α2 helix adopting an altered conformation compared with wild-type CRABPII.

  13. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  14. Lectin histochemistry of palatine glands in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Zaki; Kitaura, Hideki; Honma, Shiho; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the binding pattern of lectins, soybean agglutinin (SBA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (sucWGA) in the developing rat palatine glands. In adult rats, heterogeneous lectin binding patterns were revealed between the anterior and posterior portions of palatine glands, as DBA, VVA, and WGA were bound more intensely and broadly in the posterior portion. SBA, PNA, and sucWGA showed far less reactivity in the anterior than in the posterior portion. At embryonic day 18 (E18), weak labeling was observed with UEA-I and WGA at the basal membrane of terminal buds, UEA-I and PNA labeled the epithelial cord, and there was no apparent binding for SBA, DBA, VVA, and sucWGA. At E20, after acinar lumenization, all lectins were detected at the acinar cell basal membranes. After birth, all lectins detectably labeled at the mucous cell apical membranes and progressively, with maturation, extended from the apical to basal portions of the cytoplasm. Apparent serous cells were observed around postnatal day 10 (PN10) and bound UEA-I. Lectins reached peak reactivity at PN21 and the binding patterns became identical to those of adults around PN28.

  15. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata lectin: isolation, characterization, and comparison.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata var. variegata seeds are rich in proteins. Previously, one of the major storage proteins of the seeds was found to be a trypsin inhibitor that possessed various biological activities. By using another purification protocol, a glucoside- and galactoside-binding lectin that demonstrated some differences from the previously reported B. variegata lectin could be isolated from the seeds. It involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and Mono Q, and also size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was not retained on Affi-gel blue gel but interacted with Q-Sepharose. The lectin was a 64-kDa protein with two 32-kDa subunits. It had low thermostability (stable up to 50 °C) and moderate pH stability (stable in pH 3-10). It exhibited anti-proliferative activity on nasopharyngeal carcinoma HONE1 cells with an IC50 of 12.8 μM after treatment for 48 h. It also slightly inhibited the growth of hepatoma HepG2 cells. The lectin may have potential in aiding cancer treatments.

  16. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Mona; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Abolhasani, Mandan; Charedar, Soroor; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed) were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups). Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+) glucose, D (+) galactose, D (+) mannose, D (−) fructose, D (−) arabinose, L (−) fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin. Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose. Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules) in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins. PMID:23785692

  17. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively.

  18. Recombinant lectins: an array of tailor-made glycan-interaction biosynthetic tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-03-01

    Lectins are a heterogeneous group of proteins found in plants, animals and microorganisms, which possess at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific mono- or oligosaccharides. The range of lectins and respective biological activities is unsurprising given the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and the multiple modes of interaction with proteins. Recombinant DNA technology has been traditionally used for cloning and characterizing newly discovered lectins. It has also been employed as a means of producing pure and sequence-defined lectins for different biotechnological applications. This review focuses on the production of recombinant lectins in heterologous organisms, and highlighting the Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris expression systems, which are the most employed. The choice of expression host depends on the lectin. Non-glycosylated recombinant lectins are produced in E. coli and post-translational modified recombinant lectins are produced in eukaryotic organisms, namely P. pastoris and non-microbial hosts such as mammalian cells. Emphasis is given to the applications of the recombinant lectins especially (a) in cancer diagnosis and/or therapeutics, (b) as anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-insect molecules or (c) in microarrays for glycome profiling. Most reported applications are from recombinant plant lectins. These applications benefit from the tailor-made design associated with recombinant production and will aid in unraveling the complex biological mechanisms of glycan-interactions, bringing recombinant lectins to the forefront of glycobiology. In conclusion, recombinant lectins are developing into valuable biosynthetic tools for biomedical research.

  19. Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SIl Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the...16 Wheat Germ Lectin Electrophoresis to Quantitate Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes ................ 16 Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzyme...vs Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis ......................... 40 Clinical Correlation Using Wheat Germ Lectin 45 Placental Alkaline Phosphatase

  20. Interactional effects of β-glucan, starch, and protein in heated oat slurries on viscosity and in vitro bile acid binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; White, Pamela J

    2012-06-20

    Three major oat components, β-glucan, starch, and protein, and their interactions were evaluated for the impact on viscosity of heated oat slurries and in vitro bile acid binding. Oat flour from the experimental oat line "N979" (7.45% β-glucan) was mixed with water and heated to make oat slurry. Heated oat slurries were treated with α-amylase, lichenase, and/or proteinase to remove starch, β-glucan, and/or protein. Oat slurries treated with lichenase or lichenase combined with α-amylase and/or proteinase reduced the molecular weight of β-glucan. Heat and enzymatic treatment of oat slurries reduced the peak and final viscosities compared with the control. The control bound the least amount of bile acids (p < 0.05); heating of oat flour improved the binding. Heated oat slurries treated with lichenase or lichenase combined with α-amylase and/or proteinase bound the least amount of bile acid, indicating the contribution of β-glucan to binding. Oat slurries treated with proteinase or proteinase and α-amylase together improved the bile acid binding, indicating the possible contribution of protein to binding. These results illustrate that β-glucan was the major contributor to viscosity and in vitro bile acid binding in heated oat slurries; however, interactions with other components, such as protein and starch, indicate the importance of evaluating oat components as whole system.

  1. NMR unfolding studies on a liver bile acid binding protein reveal a global two-state unfolding and localized singular behaviors.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Ugolini, Raffaella; Pedò, Massimo; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-01-01

    The folding properties of a bile acid binding protein, belonging to a subfamily of the fatty acid binding proteins, have been here investigated both by hydrogen exchange measurements, using the SOFAST NMR approach, and urea denaturation experiments. The urea unfolding profiles of individual residues, acting as single probes, were simultaneously analyzed through a global fit, according to a two-state unfolding model. The resulting conformational stability DeltaG(U)(H(2)O)=7.2+/-0.25kcal mol(-1) is in good agreement with hydrogen exchange stability DeltaG(op). While the majority of protein residues satisfy this model, few amino-acids display a singular behavior, not directly amenable to the presence of a folding intermediate, as reported for other fatty acid binding proteins. These residues are part of a protein patch characterized by enhanced plasticity. To explain this singular behavior a tentative model has been proposed which takes into account the interplay between the dynamic features and the formation of transient aggregates. A functional role for this plasticity, related to translocation across the nuclear membrane, is discussed.

  2. Studies on lectins. XLIX. The use of glycosyl derivatives of Dextran T-500 for affinity electrophoresis of lectins.

    PubMed

    Cerovský, V; Tichá, M; Horejsi, V; Kocourek, J

    1980-09-01

    p-Aminophenyl glycosides and glycosylamines were coupled to periodate oxidized Dextran T-500 either directly or through an epsilon-aminocaproic acid spacer. The new glycosylated derivatives of dextran specifically precipitate lectins having the appropriate carbohydrate specificity, and thus were used in the preparation of affinity gels for affinity electrophoresis of lectins. The apparent strength of interaction of several lectins with carbohydrate residues immobilized in this way was less than with carbohydrates immobilized in O-glycosyl polyacrylamide copolymers. The presence of epsilon-aminocaproic spacer had no effect on the strength of interaction. The advantages of this type of macromolecular derivative of the ligand for affinity electrophoresis and some differences between the glycosylated dextrans and O-glycosyl polyacrylamide copolymers are discussed. Dextrans containing bound p-aminophenyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside and p-aminophenyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside were used to study the binding properties of concanavalin A and the lectin from Lathyrus sativus seeds. For the investigation of interaction of lectins from Ricinus communis and Glycine soja seeds, dextran derivatives containing bound p-aminophenyl alpha- and beta-D-galactopyranosides and alpha- and beta-D-galactopyranosylamines were used.

  3. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-09

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  4. Parkia pendula lectin as histochemistry marker for meningothelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Beltrão, E I C; Medeiros, P L; Rodrigues, O G; Figueredo-Silva, J; Valença, M M; Coelho, L C B B; Carvalho, L B

    2003-01-01

    Lectins have been intensively used in histochemical techniques for cell surface characterization. These proteins are involved in several biological processes and their use as histochemical markers have been evaluated since they can indicate differences in cell surfaces. Parkia pendula lectin (PpeL) was evaluated as histochemical marker for meningothelial meningioma biopsies. Tissue slices were incubated with PpeL conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (PpeL-HRP) and Concanavalin A-HRP (ConA-HPR) and the binding visualized with diaminobenzidine and hydrogen peroxide. The lectin-tissue binding was inhibited with D-glucose. PpeL showed to be a useful tool for the characterization of meningothelial tumour and clinico-pathological diagnosis.

  5. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium.

  6. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Donor Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Profile Bx1 Imparts a Negative Effect and Centromeric B-Specific Gene Motifs Render a Positive Effect on Standard-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patient Survival after Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaojing; Wang, Miao; Zhou, Huifen; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wu, Xiaojin; Yuan, Xiaoni; Li, Yang; Wu, Depei; He, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Donor killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) group B profiles (Bx) and homozygous of centromeric motif B (Cen-B/B) are the most preferable KIR gene content motifs for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of transplant from Bx1 donors and the benefit of the presence of Cen-B (regardless of number) were observed for standard-risk acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) patients in this 4-year retrospective study. A total of 210 Chinese patients who underwent unrelated donor HSCT were investigated. Donor KIR profile Bx was associated with significantly improved overall survival (OS; P = .026) and relapse-free survival (RFS; P = .021) and reduced nonrelapse mortality (NRM; P = .017) in AML/MDS patients. A significantly lower survival rate was observed for transplants from Bx1 donors compared with Bx2, Bx3, and Bx4 donors for patients in first complete remission (n = 82; OS: P = .024; RFS: P = .021). Transplant from donors with Cen-B resulted in improved OS (HR = .256; 95% CI, .084 to .774; P = .016) and RFS (HR = .252; 95% CI, .084 to .758; P = .014) in AML/MDS patients at standard risk. However, this particular effect did not increase with a higher number of Cen-B motifs (cB/B versus cA/B; OS: P = .755; RFS: P = .768). No effect was observed on high-risk AML/MDS, acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Avoiding the selection of HSCT donors of KIR profile Bx1 is strongly advisable for standard-risk AML/MDS patients. The presence of the Cen-B motif rather than its number was more important in donor selection for the Chinese population.

  8. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  9. Ribosome-inactivating lectins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Barbieri, L; Bolognesi, A; Buonamici, L; Valbonesi, P; Polito, L; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Stirpe, F

    1997-05-26

    Lectins from Aegopodium podagraria (APA), Bryonia dioica (BDA), Galanthus nivalis (GNA), Iris hybrid (IRA) and Sambucus nigra (SNAI), and a new lectin-related protein from Sambucus nigra (SNLRP) were studied to ascertain whether they had the properties of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP). IRA and SNLRP inhibited protein synthesis by a cell-free system and, at much higher concentrations, by cells and had polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity, thus behaving like non-toxic type 2 (two chain) RIP. APA and SNAI had much less activity, and BDA and GNA did not inhibit protein synthesis.

  10. Fatty acid binding protein facilitates sarcolemmal fatty acid transport but not mitochondrial oxidation in rat and human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham P; Lally, Jamie; Nickerson, James G; Alkhateeb, Hakam; Snook, Laelie A; Heigenhauser, George J F; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2007-01-01

    The transport of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) across mitochondrial membranes is regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) activity. However, it appears that additional fatty acid transport proteins, such as fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36, influence not only LCFA transport across the plasma membrane, but also LCFA transport into mitochondria. Plasma membrane-associated fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) is also known to be involved in sacrolemmal LCFA transport, and it is also present on the mitochondria. At this location, it has been identified as mitochondrial aspartate amino transferase (mAspAT), despite being structurally identical to FABPpm. Whether this protein is also involved in mitochondrial LCFA transport and oxidation remains unknown. Therefore, we have examined the ability of FABPpm/mAspAT to alter mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction increased (P < 0.05) the mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content in rat (+22%) and human skeletal muscle (+33%). By contrast, muscle contraction did not alter the content of mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein in either rat or human muscles. Electrotransfecting rat soleus muscles, in vivo, with FABPpm cDNA increased FABPpm protein in whole muscle (+150%; P < 0.05), at the plasma membrane (+117%; P < 0.05) and in mitochondria (+80%; P < 0.05). In these FABPpm-transfected muscles, palmitate transport into giant vesicles was increased by +73% (P < 0.05), and fatty acid oxidation in intact muscle was increased by +18% (P < 0.05). By contrast, despite the marked increase in mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content (+80%), the rate of mitochondrial palmitate oxidation was not altered (P > 0.05). However, electrotransfection increased mAspAT activity by +70% (P < 0.05), and the mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content was significantly correlated with mAspAT activity (r= 0.75). It is concluded that FABPpm has two distinct functions depending on its subcellular location: (a) it contributes to

  11. Sex Differences in Long Chain Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Burnett, David A.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.

    1979-01-01

    Female sex and estrogen administration are associated with increased hepatic production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; the basis for this has not been fully elucidated. Inasmuch as hepatic lipoprotein production is also influenced by FFA availability and triglyceride biosynthesis, we investigated sex differences in FFA utilization in rat hepatocyte suspensions and in the components of the triglyceride biosynthetic pathway. Isolated adult rat hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with albumin-bound [14C]oleate for up to 15 min. At physiological and low oleate concentrations, cells from females incorporated significantly more 14C into glycerolipids, especially triglycerides, and into oxidation products than did male cells, per milligram cell protein. At 0.44 mM oleate, incorporation into triglycerides in female cells was approximately twice that in male cells. Comparable sex differences were observed in cells from fasted animals and when [14C]-glycerol incorporation was measured. At higher oleate concentrations, i.e., fatty acid:albumin mole ratios in excess of 2:1, these sex differences were no longer demonstrable, suggesting that maximal rates of fatty acid esterification and oxidation were similar in female and male cells. In female and male hepatic microsomes, specific activities of long chain acyl coenzyme A synthetase, phosphatidate phosphohydrolase, and diglyceride acyltransferase were similar, but glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity was slightly greater in females at certain substrate concentrations. Microsomal incorporation of [14C]oleate into total glycerolipids was not significantly greater in females. In further contrast to intact cells, microsomal incorporation of [14C]oleate into triglycerides, although significantly greater in female microsomes, accounted for only a small fraction of the fatty acid esterified. The binding affinity and stoichiometry of partially purified female hepatic fatty acid binding protein (FABP) were similar to

  12. Current Metabolic Status Affects Urinary Liver-Type Fatty-Acid Binding Protein in Normoalbuminuric Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hitomi; Nakashima, Mina; Takaki, Akifusa; Yukawa, Chiduko; Matsumoto, Suzuko; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to study the association between urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a biomarker of tubulointerstitial injury, and the clinical characteristics of normoalbuminuric and albuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes in order to detect the factors affecting urinary L-FABP. Methods Urinary L-FABP levels were measured in 788 patients with type 2 diabetes and again in 666 patients at 6 months after the initial measurement. The association between the urinary L-FABP level and the clinical parameters was investigated in a retrospective cross-sectional study and a subsequent observation. Results The HbA1c (odds ratio (OR): 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11 - 1.79; P < 0.01), systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.05; P < 0.01) levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96 - 1.00; P = 0.01) were significantly associated with the high levels of urinary L-FABP (> 8.4 μg/gCr) in normoalbuminuric patients. However, a logistic regression analysis revealed that use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors (OR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.16 - 4.89; P = 0.02), urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.01; P < 0.01) and serum HDL-cholesterol concentration (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.11 - 0.89; P = 0.03) were significantly associated in albuminuric patients. In the follow-up observation, the change in urinary L-FABP was found to be significantly (P < 0.01) influenced by the change in the HbA1c level in both the normoalbuminuric and albuminuric patients. Conclusions High urinary L-FABP is associated with part of the current metabolic abnormalities, including high levels of HbA1c and systolic blood pressure among normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28270898

  13. Intestinal Fatty Acid-Binding Protein as a Diagnostic Marker for Complicated and Uncomplicated Necrotizing Enterocolitis: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Schurink, Maarten; Kooi, Elisabeth M. W.; Hulzebos, Christian V.; Kox, Rozemarijn G.; Groen, Henk; Heineman, Erik; Bos, Arend F.; Hulscher, Jan B. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early NEC symptoms are non-specific and diagnostic tests lack discriminative power. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), mainly located in small bowel enterocytes, is released into the blood following NEC-associated enterocyte disruption. Aim of this prospective cohort trial was to determine the diagnostic value of I-FABP measured in plasma (I-FABPp) and urine (I-FABPu) for the presence of NEC, to evaluate I-FABP levels during NEC development, and to assess its prognostic value for the progression from suspected to complicated disease. Methods Between 2010 and 2012 we prospectively enrolled neonates with suspected NEC. We measured I-FABP levels eight-hourly from onset of suspected NEC for at least 48 hours, or until surgery. NEC diagnosis was confirmed radiologically or during operation. We defined NEC as complicated if it resulted in surgery and/or death. We determined disease course and diagnostic I-FABP cut-off points. Results The study comprised 37 neonates (24M, 13F), gestational age 28 (24–36) weeks, birth weight 1190 (570–2,400) grams. We found significantly higher I-FABPp and I-FABPu levels in NEC patients (n = 22) than in patients with other diagnoses (n = 15). Cut-off values for diagnosing NEC were 9 ng/mL I-FABPp and 218 ng/mL I-FABPu, with corresponding likelihood ratios (LRs) of 5.6 (95% CI 0.89–35) and 5.1 (95% CI 0.73–36), respectively. I-FABP levels were highest in the first eight hours after symptom onset and gradually decreased over time. Cut-off values for complicated disease were 19 ng/mL I-FABPp and 232 ng/mL I-FABPu, with LRs of 10 (95% CI 1.6–70) and 11 (95% CI 1.6–81), respectively. Conclusions Both plasma and urinary I-FABP levels specifically identify NEC in preterm infants prior to appearance of diagnostic radiological signs suggestive for NEC. Moreover, serial I-FABP measurements accurately predict development of complicated disease. PMID:25793701

  14. Stabilization of an α/β-Hydrolase by Introducing Proline Residues: Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 from Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Jones, Bryan J; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2015-07-21

    α/β-Hydrolases are important enzymes for biocatalysis, but their stability often limits their application. We investigated a plant esterase, salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2), as a model α/β-hydrolase. SABP2 shows typical stability to urea (unfolding free energy 6.9 ± 1.5 kcal/mol) and to heat inactivation (T1/2 15min 49.2 ± 0.5 °C). Denaturation in urea occurs in two steps, but heat inactivation occurs in a single step. The first unfolding step in urea eliminates catalytic activity. Surprisingly, we found that the first unfolding likely corresponds to the unfolding of the larger catalytic domain. Replacing selected amino acid residues with proline stabilized SABP2. Proline restricts the flexibility of the unfolded protein, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the folded conformation. Seven locations for proline substitution were chosen either by amino acid sequence alignment with a more stable homologue or by targeting flexible regions in SABP2. Introducing proline in the catalytic domain stabilized SABP2 to the first unfolding in urea for three of five cases: L46P (+0.2 M urea), S70P (+0.1), and E215P (+0.9). Introducing proline in the cap domain did not stabilize SABP2 (two of two cases), supporting the assignment that the first unfolding corresponds to the catalytic domain. Proline substitutions in both domains stabilized SABP2 to heat inactivation: L46P (ΔT1/2 15min = +6.4 °C), S70P (+5.4), S115P (+1.8), S141P (+4.9), and E215P (+4.2). Combining substitutions did not further increase the stability to urea denaturation, but dramatically increased resistance to heat inactivation: L46P−S70P ΔT1/2 15min = +25.7 °C. This straightforward proline substitution approach may also stabilize other α/β-hydrolases.

  15. SIGLEC-4 (MAG) Antagonists: From the Natural Carbohydrate Epitope to Glycomimetics.

    PubMed

    Schwardt, Oliver; Kelm, Soerge; Ernst, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Siglec-4, also known as myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), is a member of the siglec (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins) family. MAG binds with high preference to sialic acids α(2-3)-linked to D-galactose. Although the involvement and relevance of its sialic acid binding activity is still controversial, it could be demonstrated that interactions of MAG with sialylated gangliosides play an important role in axon stability and regeneration. In this article we describe in detail our current understanding of the biological role and the carbohydrate specificity of siglec-4. Furthermore, this review compiles the intensive research efforts leading from the identification of the minimal oligosaccharide binding epitope in gangliosides via micromolar oligosaccharide mimics to the development of small molecular weight and more drug-like sialic acid derivatives binding with low nanomolar affinities. Such compounds will be useful to elucidate MAG's biological functions, which are currently not fully understood.

  16. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  17. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  18. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  19. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  20. Momordica charantia seed lectin: toxicity, bacterial agglutination and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Nabi, Md Mahamodun; Nurujjaman, Md; Abu Reza, Md; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Uz Zaman, Rokon; Khalid-Bin-Ferdaus, Khandaker Md; Amin, Ruhul; Khan, Md Masudul Hasan; Hossain, Md Anowar; Uddin, Md Salim; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat

    2015-03-01

    In last three decades, several studies were carried out on the D-galactose-specific lectin of Momordica charantia seeds (MCL). In the present study, in vitro growth inhibition (8-23 %) at different concentrations (6-24 μg/ml) of MCL was observed against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. MCL also showed 28, 45, and 75 % growth inhibitions against EAC cells when administered 1.2, 2.0, and 2.8 mg/kg/day (i.p.), respectively for five consequent days in vivo in mice. After lectin treatment, the level of red blood cell and hemoglobin was increased significantly with the decrease of white blood cell and maintained the normal level when compared with EAC-bearing control and normal mice without EAC cells. Although MCL caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of EAC cells, any irregular shape or apoptotic morphological alterations in the lectin-treated EAC cells was not observed by an optical and fluorescence microscope. Lectin showed toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii with an LC50 value of 49.7 μg/ml. Four out of seven pathogenic bacteria were agglutinated by MCL in the absence of inhibitory sugar D-lactose/D-galactose. In conclusion, MCL showed strong cytotoxic effect and therefore can be used as a potent anticancer chemotherapeutic agent.

  1. Lectin Binding to Radopholus citrophilus and R. similis Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Gottwald, T R

    1992-06-01

    Lectin-binding glycoproteins in seven populations of two burrowing nematode sibling species were probed with five different biotinylated lectins on Western blots, and differences were correlated with nematode ability to parasitize citrus and to overcome citrus rootstock resistance. Banding patterns of molecular weight standards were fit best by an exponential decay function, and a predictive equation was used to estimate molecular weights (r(2) = 0.999). A band (131 kDa) that labeled with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) occurred in extracts from cuticles and egg shells of populations of Radopholus citrophilus that parasitize citrus. Wheat germ agglutin labeled a band (58 kDa) in aqueous homogenates of populations that reproduce in roots of citrus rootstock normally resistant to burrowing nematodes. The two sibling species R. citrophilus and R. similis were distinguished by a high molecular weight Con A-labeled band (608 kDa) from cuticle and egg shells. Probing blots with the lectin Limulus polyphemus agglutinin indicated that each population contained a band (12-16 kDa) specifically inhibited by the addition of 25 mM neuraminic acid, suggesting that glycoproteins with sialic acid moieties are present in burrowing nematodes.

  2. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Lectins As Targets for Novel Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, A. V.; Krivozubov, M. S.; Karyagina, A. S.; Gintsburg, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most widespread and troublesome opportunistic pathogens that is capable of colonizing various human tissues and organs and is often resistant to many currently used antibiotics. This resistance is caused by different factors, including the acquisition of specific resistance genes, intrinsic capability to diminish antibiotic penetration into the bacterial cell, and the ability to form biofilms. This situation has prompted the development of novel compounds differing in their mechanism of action from traditional antibiotics that suppress the growth of microorganisms or directly kill bacteria. Instead, these new compounds should decrease the pathogens’ ability to colonize and damage human tissues by inhibiting the virulence factors and biofilm formation. The lectins LecA and LecB that bind galactose and fucose, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides containing these sugars, are among the most thoroughly-studied targets for such novel antibacterials. In this review, we summarize the results of experiments highlighting the importance of these proteins for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity and provide information on existing lectins inhibitors and their effectiveness in various experimental models. Particular attention is paid to the effects of lectins inhibition in animal models of infection and in clinical practice. We argue that lectins inhibition is a perspective approach to combating P. aeruginosa. However, despite the existence of highly effective in vitro inhibitors, further experiments are required in order to advance these inhibitors into pre-clinical studies. PMID:26085942

  3. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... MBL2 gene. Mannose-binding lectin plays an important role in the body's immune response by attaching to foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, or yeast and turning on (activating) the complement system . The complement system is a group of immune system proteins that work together to ...

  4. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  5. X-ray structure of Pur-alpha reveals a Whirly-like fold and an unusual nucleic-acid binding surface.

    PubMed

    Graebsch, Almut; Roche, Stéphane; Niessing, Dierk

    2009-11-03

    The PUR protein family is a distinct and highly conserved class that is characterized by its sequence-specific RNA- and DNA-binding. Its best-studied family member, Pur-alpha, acts as a transcriptional regulator, as host factor for viral replication, and as cofactor for mRNP localization in dendrites. Pur-alpha-deficient mice show severe neurologic defects and die after birth. Nucleic-acid binding by Pur-alpha is mediated by its central core region, for which no structural information is available. We determined the x-ray structure of residues 40 to 185 from Drosophila melanogaster Pur-alpha, which constitutes a major part of the core region. We found that this region contains two almost identical structural motifs, termed "PUR repeats," which interact with each other to form a PUR domain. DNA- and RNA-binding studies confirmed that PUR domains are indeed functional nucleic-acid binding domains. Database analysis show that PUR domains share a fold with the Whirly class of nucleic-acid binding proteins. Structural analysis combined with mutational studies suggest that a PUR domain binds nucleic acids through two independent surface regions involving concave beta-sheets. Structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the core region harbors a third PUR repeat at its C terminus. Subsequent characterization by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and size-exclusion chromatography indicated that PUR repeat III mediates dimerization of Pur-alpha. Surface envelopes calculated from SAXS data show that the Pur-alpha dimer consisting of repeats I to III is arranged in a Z-like shape. This unexpected domain organization of the entire core domain of Pur-alpha has direct implications for ssDNA/ssRNA and dsDNA binding.

  6. Interactions of lectins with plasma membrane glycoproteins of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Nachbar, M S; Oppenheim, J D; Aull, F

    1976-02-06

    Several aspects of the interaction of various lectins with the surface of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells are described. The order of agglutinating activity for various lectins is Ricinus communis greater than wheat germ greater than or equal to concanavalin A greater than or equal to soybean greater than Limulus polyphemus. No agglutination was noted for Ulex europaeus. Using 125I-labeled lectins it was determined that there are 1.6 and 7 times as many Ricinus communis lectin binding sites for concanavalin A and soybean lectins. Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized plasma membrane material was subjected to lectin affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The lectin receptors of the plasma membrane appeared to be heterogeneous and some qualitative differences could be discerned among the electrophoretically analyzed material, which bound to and was specifically eluted from the various lectin affinity columns. The characteristics of elution of bound material from individual lectin columns indicated secondary hydrophobic interactions between concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin and their respective lectin receptor molecules.

  7. Properties of Lectins in the Root and Seed of Lotononis bainesii1

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ian J.; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1984-01-01

    A lectin was purified from the root of Lotononis bainesii Baker by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-blood group substance A + H. The molecular weight of the lectin was estimated by gel filtration to be 118,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the lectin was a tetramer composed of two slightly different subunits with respective molecular weights of 32,000 and 35,000. The lectin had a hexose content of 12% (w/w) and contained the sugars fucose, glucosamine, mannose, and xylose. Root lectin hemagglutination was preferentially inhibited by disaccharides with terminal nonreducing galactose residues. Antigens capable of cross-reaction with root lectin antibody were not detected in the seed of L. bainesii. A lectin from the seed of L. bainesii was partially purified by adsorption to pronase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. The lectin preparation had a molecular weight of approximately 200,000. Galactose and galactono-1,4-lactone inhibited seed lectin hemagglutination but lactose was ineffective. There was no evidence that the root of L. bainesii contained material antigenically related to the seed lectin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663508

  8. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Nsimba-Lubaki, M; Peeters, B; Broekaert, W F

    1985-05-01

    A lectin has been isolated from rhizomes of ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) using a combination of affinity chromatography on erythrocyte membrane proteins immobilized on cross-linked agarose and hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography. The molecular structure of the lectin was determined by gelfiltration, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. It has an unusually high Mr (about 480000) and is most probably an octamer composed of two distinct types of subunits with slightly different Mr (about 60000). Hapten inhibition assays indicated that the Aegopodium lectin is preferentially inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine. Nevertheless, it does not agglutinate preferentially blood-group-A erythrocytes. The ground-elder lectin is a typical non-seed lectin, which occurs virtually exclusively in the underground rhizomes. In this organ it is an abundant protein as it represents up to 5% of the total protein content. The lectin content of the rhizome tissue varies strongly according to its particular location along the organ. In addition, the lectin content changes dramatically as a function of the seasons. The ground-elder lectin differs from all other plant lectins by its unusually high molecular weight. In addition, it is the first lectin to be isolated from a species of the family Apiaceae.

  9. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B (LigB) Binds to Both the C-Terminal 23 Amino Acids of Fibrinogen αC Domain and Factor XIII: Insight into the Mechanism of LigB-Mediated Blockage of Fibrinogen α Chain Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Chang, Eric; Tseng, Andrew; Ptak, Christopher; Wu, Li-Chen; Su, Chun-Li; McDonough, Sean P.; Lin, Yi-Pin; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The coagulation system provides a primitive but effective defense against hemorrhage. Soluble fibrinogen (Fg) monomers, composed of α, β and γ chains, are recruited to provide structural support for the formation of a hemostatic plug. Fg binds to platelets and is processed into a cross-linked fibrin polymer by the enzymatic clotting factors, thrombin and Factor XIII (FXIII). The newly formed fibrin-platelet clot can act as barrier to protect against pathogens from entering the bloodstream. Further, injuries caused by bacterial infections can be confined to the initial wound site. Many pathogenic bacteria have Fg-binding adhesins that can circumvent the coagulation pathway and allow the bacteria to sidestep containment. Fg expression is upregulated during lung infection providing an attachment surface for bacteria with the ability to produce Fg-binding adhesins. Fg binding by leptospira might play a crucial factor in Leptospira-associated pulmonary hemorrhage, the main factor contributing to lethality in severe cases of leptospirosis. The 12th domain of Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB12), a leptospiral adhesin, interacts with the C-terminus of FgαC (FgαCC). In this study, the binding site for LigB12 was mapped to the final 23 amino acids at the C-terminal end of FgαCC (FgαCC8). The association of FgαCC8 with LigB12 (ELISA, KD = 0.76 μM; SPR, KD = 0.96 μM) was reduced by mutations of both charged residues (R608, R611 and H614 from FgαCC8; D1061 from LigB12) and hydrophobic residues (I613 from FgαCC8; F1054 and A1065 from LigB12). Additionally, LigB12 bound strongly to FXIII and also inhibited fibrin formation, suggesting that LigB can disrupt coagulation by suppressing FXIII activity. Here, the detailed binding mechanism of a leptospiral adhesin to a host hemostatic factor is characterized for the first time and should provide better insight into the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. PMID:27622634

  10. Blocking of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum lectins by diverse mammalian milks.

    PubMed

    Zinger-Yosovich, K D; Iluz, D; Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum morbid and mortal infections are initiated by bacterial adherence to host-cell receptors via their adhesins, including lectins (which also contribute to bacterial biofilm formation). Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a galactophilic lectin, PA-IL (LecA), and a fucophilic (Lewis-specific) lectin, PA-IIL (LecB), and C. violaceum produces a fucophilic (H-specific) lectin, CV-IIL. The antibiotic resistance of these bacteria prompted the search for glycosylated receptor-mimicking compounds that would function as glycodecoys for blocking lectin attachment to human cell receptors. Lectins PA-IL and PA-IIL have been shown to be useful for such glycodecoy probing, clearly differentiating between human and cow milks. This article describes their usage, together with CV-IIL and the plant lectin concanavalin A, for comparing the anti-lectin-dependent adhesion potential of diverse mammalian milks. The results show that the diverse milks differ in blocking (hemagglutination inhibition) and differential binding (Western blots) of these lectins. Human milk most strongly inhibited the 3 bacterial lectins (with PA-IIL superiority), followed by alpaca, giraffe, and monkey milks, whereas cow milk was a weak inhibitor. Lectin PA-IL was inhibited strongly by human, followed by alpaca, mare, giraffe, buffalo, and monkey milks, weakly by camel milk, and not at all by rabbit milk. Lectins PA-IIL and CV-IIL were also most sensitive to human milk, followed by alpaca, monkey, giraffe, rabbit, and camel milks but negligibly sensitive to buffalo and mare milks. Plant lectin concanavalinA, which was used as the reference, differed from them in that it was much less sensitive to human milk and was equally as sensitive to cow milk. These results have provided important information on the anti-lectin-dependent adhesion potential of the diverse milks examined. They showed that human followed by alpaca, giraffe, and Rhesus monkey milks efficiently

  11. A motif unique to the human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is important for nucleic acid binding, ATP hydrolysis, RNA/DNA unwinding and HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Garbelli, Anna; Beermann, Sandra; Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-05-12

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication.

  12. Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Is Essential for Efficient Brown Adipose Tissue Fatty Acid Oxidation and Cold Tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Vergnes, Laurent; Chin, Robert; Young, Stephen G.; Reue, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue has a central role in thermogenesis to maintain body temperature through energy dissipation in small mammals and has recently been verified to function in adult humans as well. Here, we demonstrate that the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein, FABP3, is essential for cold tolerance and efficient fatty acid oxidation in mouse brown adipose tissue, despite the abundant expression of adipose-type fatty acid-binding protein, FABP4 (also known as aP2). Fabp3−/− mice exhibit extreme cold sensitivity despite induction of uncoupling and oxidative genes and hydrolysis of brown adipose tissue lipid stores. However, using FABP3 gain- and loss-of-function approaches in brown adipocytes, we detected a correlation between FABP3 levels and the utilization of exogenous fatty acids. Thus, Fabp3−/− brown adipocytes fail to oxidize exogenously supplied fatty acids, whereas enhanced Fabp3 expression promotes more efficient oxidation. These results suggest that FABP3 levels are a determinant of fatty acid oxidation efficiency by brown adipose tissue and that FABP3 represents a potential target for modulation of energy dissipation. PMID:21044951

  13. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 does not interact with the codon 54 polymorphism of the fatty acid binding protein 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Aras, Omer; Noutsou, Marina; Tsai, Michael Y

    2002-08-01

    In type 2 diabetes, the threonine (Thr) for alanine (Ala) codon 54 polymorphism of the fatty acid binding protein 2 gene is associated with elevated fasting and postprandial triglycerides and dyslipidemia when compared with the wild type (Ala-54/Ala-54). To assess whether this is the case in patients with type 1 diabetes, who usually do not manifest the metabolic syndrome, we screened 181 patients with similar glycemic control as the type 2 patients. Thirty percent were heterozygous, and 9% were homozygous for the polymorphism. Mean (+/-SEM) fasting plasma triglyceride levels in patients with the wild type (n = 84), those heterozygous for Ala-54/Thr-54 (n = 44), and those homozygous for the Thr-54 (n = 13) were 1.0 +/- 0.07, 1.1 +/- 0.17, and 1.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter, respectively. In addition, there were no differences in total, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol among the three groups. After a fat load, the postprandial area under the curve of triglyceride in plasma, chylomicrons, and very low-density lipoprotein were similar between the wild type (n = 18) and the Thr-54 homozygotes (n = 12). In conclusion, in contrast to type 2, type 1 diabetes does not interact with the codon 54 polymorphism of the fatty acid binding protein 2 gene to cause hypertriglyceridemia/dyslipidemia. Insulin resistance could account possibly for this difference.

  14. 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of light organ-associated fatty acid-binding protein of Taiwanese fireflies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kai-Li; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of proteins that modulate the transfer of various fatty acids in the cytosol and constitute a significant portion in many energy-consuming cells. The ligand binding properties and specific functions of a particular type of FABP seem to be diverse and depend on the respective binding cavity as well as the cell type from which this protein is derived. Previously, a novel FABP (lcFABP; lc: Luciola cerata) was identified in the light organ of Taiwanese fireflies. The lcFABP was proved to possess fatty acids binding capabilities, especially for fatty acids of length C14-C18. However, the structural details are unknown, and the structure-function relationship has remained to be further investigated. In this study, we finished the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of (15)N/(13)C-enriched lcFABP by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the secondary structure distribution was revealed based on the backbone N, H, Cα, Hα, C and side chain Cβ assignments. These results can provide the basis for further structural exploration of lcFABP.

  15. Liver fatty acid binding protein is required for high rates of hepatic fatty acid oxidation but not for the action of PPARalpha in fasting mice.

    PubMed

    Erol, Erdal; Kumar, Leena S; Cline, Gary W; Shulman, Gerald I; Kelly, Daniel P; Binas, Bert

    2004-02-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been proposed to limit the availability of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) for oxidation and for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha), a fatty acid binding transcription factor that determines the capacity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Here, we used L-FABP null mice to test this hypothesis. Under fasting conditions, this mutation reduced beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) plasma levels as well as BHB release and palmitic acid oxidation by isolated hepatocytes. However, the capacity for ketogenesis was not reduced: BHB plasma levels were restored by octanoate injection; BHB production and palmitic acid oxidation were normal in liver homogenates; and hepatic expression of key PPAR-alpha target (MCAD, mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase, ACO, CYP4A3) and other (CPT1, LCAD) genes of mitochondrial and extramitochondrial LCFA oxidation and ketogenesis remained at wild-type levels. During standard diet, mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase mRNA was selectively reduced in L-FABP null liver. These results suggest that under fasting conditions, hepatic L-FABP contributes to hepatic LCFA oxidation and ketogenesis by a nontranscriptional mechanism, whereas L-FABP can activate ketogenic gene expression in fed mice. Thus, the mechanisms whereby L-FABP affects fatty acid oxidation may vary with physiological condition.

  16. A novel fatty acid-binding protein-like carotenoid-binding protein from the gonad of the New Zealand sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus.

    PubMed

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Sabherwal, Manya; Garama, Daniel; Carne, Alan

    2014-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized protein with a carotenoid-binding function has been isolated and characterized from the gonad of the New Zealand sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus. The main carotenoid bound to the protein was determined by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography to be 9'-cis-echinenone and hence this 15 kDa protein has been called an echinenone-binding protein (EBP). Purification of the EBP in quantity from the natural source proved to be challenging. However, analysis of EBP by mass spectrometry combined with information from the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome sequence and the recently published E. chloroticus transcriptome database, enabled recombinant expression of wild type EBP and also of a cysteine61 to serine mutant that had improved solubility characteristics. Circular dichroism data and ab initio structure prediction suggests that the EBP adopts a 10-stranded β-barrel fold consistent with that of fatty acid-binding proteins. Therefore, EBP may represent the first report of a fatty acid-binding protein in complex with a carotenoid.

  17. A Novel Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Carotenoid-Binding Protein from the Gonad of the New Zealand Sea Urchin Evechinus chloroticus

    PubMed Central

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Sabherwal, Manya; Garama, Daniel; Carne, Alan

    2014-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized protein with a carotenoid-binding function has been isolated and characterized from the gonad of the New Zealand sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus. The main carotenoid bound to the protein was determined by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography to be 9′-cis-echinenone and hence this 15 kDa protein has been called an echinenone-binding protein (EBP). Purification of the EBP in quantity from the natural source proved to be challenging. However, analysis of EBP by mass spectrometry combined with information from the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome sequence and the recently published E. chloroticus transcriptome database, enabled recombinant expression of wild type EBP and also of a cysteine61 to serine mutant that had improved solubility characteristics. Circular dichroism data and ab initio structure prediction suggests that the EBP adopts a 10-stranded β-barrel fold consistent with that of fatty acid-binding proteins. Therefore, EBP may represent the first report of a fatty acid-binding protein in complex with a carotenoid. PMID:25192378

  18. Histochemical characterization of the lectin-binding sites in the equine vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-young; Kang, Tae-young; Lee, Yong-duk; Shin, Tae-kyun

    2003-04-01

    The binding specificities of various lectins, such as the Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), and the Bandeiraea simplicifolia BS-1 (Isolectin B4), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) lectins, were studied in the vomeronasal organ of the horse. The microvilli of the vomeronasal sensory epithelium were positive for DBA, SBA, Isolectin B4, WGA, PNA, and UEA-I. The receptor cells showed intense reactivity for DBA and WGA. Lectins were not detected in the supporting cells or basal cells. The Jacobson's glands were positive for WGA and UEA-I, but lectins were absent from the nerve bundles. From these results, we postulate that several lectin-binding carbohydrates on the microvilli and neurosensory cells are associated with chemoreception in the horse. In addition, the differential lectin-binding patterns in the horse suggest that the carbohydrates present in this particular sense organ are species-specific.

  19. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  20. Leguminous lectins as tools for studying the role of sugar residues in leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, N M; Teixeira, E H; Assreuy, A M; Cavada, B S; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1999-01-01

    The natural physiological ligands for selectins are oligosaccharides found in glycoprotein or glycolipid molecules in cell membranes. In order to study the role of sugar residues in the in vivo lectin anti-inflammatory effect, we tested three leguminous lectins with different carbohydrate binding affinities in the peritonitis and paw oedema models induced by carrageenin in rats. L. sericeus lectin was more anti-inflammatory than D. virgata lectin, the effects being reversed by their specific binding sugars (N-acetylglucosamine and alpha-methylmannoside, respectively). However, V. macrocarpa, a galactose-specific lectin, was not anti-inflammatory. The proposed anti-inflammatory activity of lectins could be due to a blockage of neutrophil-selectin carbohydrate ligands. Thus, according to the present data, we suggest an important role for N-acetylglucosamine residue as the major ligand for selectins on rat neutrophil membranes. PMID:10704148

  1. A galactose-specific lectin from the hemolymph of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata martensii.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Mori, K

    1989-01-01

    1. A lectin in the serum of Pinctada fucata martensii was purified by a combination of affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B coupled with bovine submaxillary gland mucine, anion exchange chromatography on Mono Q and gel filtration on Superose 6. 2. The purified lectin was indicated to be homogeneous by polyacrylamide electrophoresis and rechromatography on Mono Q. 3. The purified lectin was approximately 440,000 in molecular weight and was composed of identical subunits with a molecular weight of approximately 20,000. 4. D-galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine gave a 50% inhibition of agglutination of horse erythrocytes by the lectin at 0.3 and 1.2 mM, respectively. 5. The antibody obtained from rabbit immunized with the purified lectin was monospecific to the lectin judged from the hemagglutination blocking test, immunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting.

  2. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  3. Could plant lectins become promising anti-tumour drugs for causing autophagic cell death?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luo, Y; Zhou, T-T; Zhang, W-Z

    2013-10-01

    Plant lectins, a group of highly diverse carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-immune origin, are ubiquitously distributed through a variety of plant species, and have recently drawn rising attention due to their remarkable ability to kill tumour cells using mechanisms implicated in autophagy. In this review, we provide a brief outline of structures of some representative plant lectins such as concanavalin A, Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin and mistletoe lectins. These can target autophagy by modulating BNIP-3, ROS-p38-p53, Ras-Raf and PI3KCI-Akt pathways, as well as Beclin-1, in many types of cancer cells. In addition, we further discuss how plant lectins are able to kill cancer cells by modulating autophagic death, for therapeutic purposes. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive perspective concerning plant lectins as promising new anti-tumour drugs, with respect to autophagic cell death in future cancer therapeutics.

  4. Large Scale Magnetic Separation of Solanum tuberosum Tuber Lectin from Potato Starch Waste Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Horska, Katerina; Martinez, Lluis M.; Safarikova, Mirka

    2010-12-01

    A simple procedure for large scale isolation of Solanum tuberosum tuber lectin from potato starch industry waste water has been developed. The procedure employed magnetic chitosan microparticles as an affinity adsorbent. Magnetic separation was performed in a flow-through magnetic separation system. The adsorbed lectin was eluted with glycine/HCl buffer, pH 2.2. The specific activity of separated lectin increased approximately 27 times during the isolation process.

  5. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from a false brome grass (Brachypodium sylvaticum).

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, W J; Spaepen, C; Stinissen, H M; Carlier, A R

    1982-01-01

    A lectin has been isolated from embryos of a false brome grass species (Brachypodium sylvaticum) by affinity chromatography on immobilized N-acetylglucosamine. It is a dimeric protein of two identical subunits of mol.wt. 18 000. Although it resembles cereal lectins with respect to its biochemical and physicochemical properties, it differs structurally in several aspects from wheat-germ-agglutinin-like lectins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6816219

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  7. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  8. Parallel quantification of lectin-glycan interaction using ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Seko, Akira; Sakono, Masafumi; Hachisu, Masakazu; Koizumi, Akihiko; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-06-28

    Using ultrafiltration membrane, a simple method for screening protein-ligand interaction was developed. The procedure comprises three steps: mixing ligand with protein, ultrafiltration of the solution, and quantification of unbound ligands by HPLC. By conducting analysis with variable protein concentrations, affinity constants were easily obtained. Multiple ligands can be analyzed simultaneously as a mixture, when concentration of ligands was controlled. Feasibility of this method for lectin-glycan interaction analysis was examined using fluorescently labeled high-mannose-type glycans and recombinant intracellular lectins or endo-α-mannosidase mutants. Estimated Ka values of malectin and VIP36 were in good agreement indeed with those evaluated by conventional methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) or frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). Finally, several mutants of endo-α-mannosidase were produced and their affinities to monoglucosylated glycans were evaluated.

  9. Gliadins bind to reticulin in a lectin-like manner.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, D J; Leonard, J N; Hobday, C M; Griffiths, C E; Powles, A V; Haffenden, G P; Fry, L

    1987-01-01

    It has previously been reported that gliadins bind to reticulin in tissue sections. Three lines of evidence are reported in this study which indicate that the gliadins bind to reticulins because they are lectins which bind to sugars expressed on glycoproteins in reticulin and other sites. First, immunofluorescence studies on tissue sections showed that although gliadin binding is largely confined to areas rich in reticulin, it is, nonetheless, also seen in one or two other sites devoid of reticulin. Second, by using fluorescein-labelled lectins of known specificity, it has been shown that the areas to which gliadins bind in tissue sections (including those sites devoid of reticulin) are rich in particular sugars. Third, it has been shown that one of these sugars, alpha-D-mannose, partially inhibited gliadin binding to tissue sections.

  10. Purification and biological effects of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae) seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de; Aragao, Karoline Saboia; Gomes, Raphaela Cardoso; Freitas Pires, Alana de; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Oliveira Toyama, Daniela de; Nunes de Alencar, Nylane Maria; Criddle, David Neil; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio . E-mail: assreuy@uece.br; Cavada, Benildo Sousa . E-mail: bscavada@ufc.br

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the purification and characterization of a new N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific lectin from Araucaria angustifolia (AaL) seeds (Araucariaceae) and its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. AaL was purified using a combination of affinity chromatography on a chitin column and ion exchange chromatography on Sephacel-DEAE. The pure protein has 8.0 kDa (SDS-PAGE) and specifically agglutinates rabbit erythrocytes, effect that was independent of the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited after incubation with glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. AaL showed antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains, shown by scanning electron microscopy. AaL, intravenously injected into rats, showed anti-inflammatory effect, via carbohydrate site interaction, in the models of paw edema and peritonitis. This lectin can be used as a tool for studying bacterial infections and inflammatory processes.

  11. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  12. Lectins as membrane components of mitochondria from Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Bowles, D J; Schnarrenberger, C; Kauss, H

    1976-11-15

    1. Mitochondria were isolated from developing endosperm of Ricinus communis and were fractionated into outer membrane and inner membrane. The relative purity of the two membrane fractions was determined by marker enzymes. The fractions were also examined by negative-stain electron microscopy. 2. Membrane fractions were sequentially extracted in the following way. (a) Suspension in 0.5M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1; (b)suspension in 0.1M-EDTA (disodium salt)/0.05M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1; (c) sonication in 0.05M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1;(d)sonication in aq. Triton X-100 (0.1%). The membranes were pelleted by centrifugation at 100 000g for 15 min, between each step. Agglutination activity in the extracts was investigated by using trypsin-treated rabbit erythrocytes. 3. The addition of lactose to inner mitochondrial membrane resulted in the solubilization of part of the lectin activity, indicating that the protein was attached to the membrane via its carbohydrate-binding site. Pretreatment of the membranes with lactose before tha usual extraction procedure showed that lactose could extract lectins that normally required more harsh treatment of the membrane for solubilization. 4. Lectins extracted from inner membranes were purified by affinity chromatography on agarose gel. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of purified samples in sodium dodecyl sulphate indicated that at least part of the lectin present in inner mitochondrial membrane was identical with the R. communis agglutinin of mol.wt. 120 000.

  13. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  14. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  15. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs.

  16. A lectin-mediated resistance of higher fungi against predators and parasites.

    PubMed

    Bleuler-Martínez, S; Butschi, A; Garbani, M; Wälti, M A; Wohlschlager, T; Potthoff, E; Sabotiĉ, J; Pohleven, J; Lüthy, P; Hengartner, M O; Aebi, M; Künzler, M

    2011-07-01

    Fruiting body lectins are ubiquitous in higher fungi and characterized by being synthesized in the cytoplasm and up-regulated during sexual development. The function of these lectins is unclear. A lack of phenotype in sexual development upon inactivation of the respective genes argues against a function in this process. We tested a series of characterized fruiting body lectins from different fungi for toxicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the mosquito Aedes aegypti and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. Most of the fungal lectins were found to be toxic towards at least one of the three target organisms. By altering either the fungal lectin or the glycans of the target organisms, or by including soluble carbohydrate ligands as competitors, we demonstrate that the observed toxicity is dependent on the interaction between the fungal lectins and specific glycans in the target organisms. The toxicity was found to be dose-dependent such that low levels of lectin were no longer toxic but still led to food avoidance by C. elegans. Finally, we show, in an ecologically more relevant scenario, that challenging the vegetative mycelium of Coprinopsis cinerea with the fungal-feeding nematode Aphelenchus avenae induces the expression of the nematotoxic fruiting body lectins CGL1 and CGL2. Based on these findings, we propose that filamentous fungi possess an inducible resistance against predators and parasites mediated by lectins that are specific for glycans of these antagonists.

  17. Parkia pendula seed lectin: potential use to treat cutaneous wounds in healthy and immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Coriolano, Marília Cavalcanti; de Melo, Cristiane Moutinho Lagos; Silva, Flávio de Oliveira; Schirato, Giuliana Viegas; Porto, Camila Souza; dos Santos, Paulo Jorge Parreira; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo; Carneiro-Leão, Ana Maria dos Anjos; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso

    2014-03-01

    Parkia pendula seed lectin was used to treat cutaneous wounds of normal and immunocompromised mice, inducing cicatrization. Methotrexate (0.8 mg/kg/week) was used as immunosuppressive drug. Wounds were produced in the dorsal region (1 cm(2)) of female albino Swiss mice (Mus musculus), health and immunocompromised. Wounds were daily topically treated with 100 μL of the following solutions: (1) control (NaCl 0.15 M), (2) control Im (0.15 M NaCl), (3) P. pendula seed lectin (100 μg/mL), and (4) P. pendula seed lectin Im (100 μg/mL). Clinical evaluation was performed during 12 days. Biopsies for histopathology analysis and microbiological examinations were carried out in the second, seventh, and 12th days. The presence of edema and hyperemia was observed in all groups during inflammatory period. The first crust was detected from the second day, only in the groups treated with P. pendula seed lectin. Microbiological analysis of wounds from day 0 to day 2 did not show bacterium at P. pendula seed lectin group; however, Staphylococcus sp. was detected every day in the other groups. The lectin markedly induced a total wound closing at P. pendula seed lectin and P. pendula seed lectin Im groups on 11th day of evolution. The present study suggests that P. pendula seed lectin is a biomaterial potential to show pharmacological effect in the repair process of cutaneous wounds.

  18. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins.

  19. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  20. The three-dimensional structure of codakine and related marine C-type lectins.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Markiv, Anatoly; Smith-Ravin, Juliette

    2007-10-01

    Codakine is a new Ca(2+)-dependent mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) isolated from the gill tissue of the tropical clam, Codakia orbicularis. Bioinformatic analyses with the BLAST program have revealed similarities with marine lectins involved in immunity whose three-dimensional (3D) structures were unknown up until recently. In this article, we present bioinformatic analyses of marine lectins that are homologous to codakine, in particular lectins from the sea worm Laxus oneistus, named mermaid. These lectins are involved in the symbiotic association with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria which are closely related to the C. orbicularis gill symbiont. Using homology modelling, folding that is characteristic of C-type lectins was observed in all the marine Ca(2+)-dependent lectins studied, with conservation of random coiled structures of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and Ca(2+)-binding sites. Like codakine, the marine lectins analysed contain a signal peptide commonly found in secreted and transmembrane proteins. The majority of the predictive 3D models established from the lectins exhibit a common feature, namely the involvement in invertebrate and vertebrate immunity (dendritic cell receptor, macrophage receptor, etc.). These bioinformatic analyses and the literature data support the hypothesis that codakine, like the L. oneistus mermaids, is probably involved in the cellular mediation of symbiosis and defence against pathogenic microorganisms.

  1. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  2. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  3. Fluorescent lectins for local in vivo visualization of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    KleinJan, Gijs Hendrik; Buckle, Tessa; van Willigen, Danny Michel; van Oosterom, Matthias Nathanaël; Spa, Silvia Johara; Kloosterboer, Harmen Egbert; van Leeuwen, Fijs Willem Bernhard

    2014-07-08

    Damage to peripheral nerves caused during a surgical intervention often results in function loss. Fluorescence imaging has the potential to improve intraoperative identification and preservation of these structures. However, only very few nerve targeting agents are available. This study describes the in vivo nerve staining capabilities of locally administered fluorescent lectin-analogues. To this end WGA, PNA, PHA-L and LEL were functionalized with Cy5 (λex max 640 nm; λem max 680 nm). Transfer of these imaging agents along the sciatic nerve was evaluated in Thy1-YFP mice (n = 12) after intramuscular injection. Migration from the injection site was assessed in vivo using a laboratory fluorescence scanner and ex vivo via fluorescence confocal microscopy. All four lectins showed retrograde movement and staining of the epineurium with a signal-to-muscle ratio of around two. On average, the longest transfer distance was obtained with WGA-Cy5 (0.95 cm). Since WGA also gave minimal uptake in the lymphatic system, this lectin type revealed the highest potential as a migration imaging agent to visualize nerves.

  4. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  5. Lectins influence chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Monsefi, Malihezaman; Ghasemi, Mansoureh

    2011-02-01

    The role of cell surface glycoproteins in cell behavior can be characterized by their interactions with plant lectins. This study was designed to identify the effects of lectins on chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells in vitro. Limb bud mesenchymal cells from mouse embryos were cultured in high-density micromass culture. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (ConA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) were added separately to the culture media. Cells were cultured for 5 or 9 days, and cell viability was assayed by neutral red on day 5. The micromasses were stained with alcian blue, alizarin red S and Von Kossa stains, and alkaline phosphatase assays were also done. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin induced an increase in chondrogenesis, calcium precipitation and proteoglycan production. ConA and PNA did not affect chondrocyte differentiation but induced chondrocytes to produce more proteoglycan. Wheat germ agglutinin reduced chondrification and ossification but induced mesenchymal cells to store lipid droplets. Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 was toxic and significantly reduced cell survival. In conclusion, DBA was the most effective inducer of ossification and chondrification. Wheat germ agglutinin induced adipogenesis instead. These assays showed that lectins play important roles in limb bud development.

  6. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  7. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  8. Ganoderma lucidum: a source for novel bioactive lectin.

    PubMed

    U Girjal, Vinay; Neelagund, Shivayogeeswar; Krishnappa, Madappa

    2011-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is known for its high medicinal value, clinically used in treatment for various diseases. We have selected this mushroom for isolation of novel bioactive lectin. The isolation procedure comprised of ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE- cellulose and affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel. Purified lectin was monomer with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE, Gel filtration, MALDI-ToF. It showed hemagglutinating activity against both human and animal erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was not inhibited by simple sugars but inhibited by glycoproteins. The activity was maximal at pH range 4.0-9.0 and at temperature up to 60° C. The hemagglutination activity was stable even in the presence of 10mM EDTA and other divalent metal cations such as CaCl2, MgCl2, ZnCl2, and MnCl2. Lectin was shown antifungal activity against following pathogens Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus Niger, Colletotrichum musae, Botrytis cinerea, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum canis.

  9. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  10. The mannose-specific lectins from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) are encoded by three sets of genes.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Lectin cDNA clones encoding the two mannose-binding lectins from ramsons (allium ursinum L.) bulbs, AUAI and AUAII (AUA, Allium ursinum agglutinin), were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparison of the different cDNA clones isolated revealed three types of lectin clones called LECAUAG0, LECAUAG1 and LECAUAG2, which besides the obvious differences in their sequences also differ from each other in the number of potential glycosylation sites within the C-terminal peptide of the lectin precursor. In vivo biosynthesis studies of the ramson lectins have shown that glycosylated lectin precursors occur in the organelle fraction of radioactively labeled ramson bulbs. Despite the similarities between the A. ursinum and the A. sativum (garlic) lectins at the protein level, molecular cloning of the two ramson lectins has shown that the lectin genes in A. ursinum are organized differently. Whereas in A. sativum the lectin polypeptides of the heterodimeric ASAI are encoded by one large precursor, those of the heterodimeric AUAI lectin are derived from two different precursors. These results are confirmed by Northern blot hybridization of A. ursinum RNA which, after hybridization with a labeled lectin cDNA, reveals only one band of 800 nucleotides in contrast to A. sativum RNA which yields two bands of 1400 and 800 nucleotides. Furthermore it is shown that the two mannose-binding lectins are differentially expressed.

  11. Interaction of linear manno-oligosaccharides with three mannose-specific bulb lectins. Comparison with mannose/glucose-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J

    1992-05-22

    Three new mannose-binding lectins, isolated from daffodil (NPA), amaryllis (HHA), and snowdrop (GNA) bulbs, are capable of precipitating with a linear mannopentaose (Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-2Man). NPA and HHA reacted strongly with the mannopentaose whereas GNA gave a precipitate only at concentrations greater than 500 microM. A phosphate group at C-6 of the nonreducing terminal mannosyl group prevented precipitation in all three cases. The reduced (NaBH4) mannopentaose, Man4Man-ol, did not precipitate with GNA or NPA, but was active with HHA. This activity was lost when Man4Man-ol was converted (NaIO4 then NaBH4; mild acid hydrolysis of the reduced product) into trisaccharide derivatives. With alpha-D-Manp-OMe the three lectins gave UV difference spectra having large positive peaks at 292-293 and 283-284 nm, and a small positive peak at 275 nm, characteristic of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues. The association constants for the interaction with alpha-D-Manp-OMe were very low (NPA, 86; HHA, 66; and GNA, 41 M-1), but the lectins bound methyl (1----3)-alpha-mannobioside with increased affinity (K for NPA 540, for HHA 2400, and for GNA 200 M-1). The bulb lectins lack binding sites for hydrophobic ligands, as judged by their failure to interact with the fluorescent probes 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (TNS).

  12. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  13. Evidence for export of a muscle lectin from cytosol to extracellular matrix and for a novel secretory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A soluble lactose-binding lectin with subunit Mr of 14,500 is believed to function by interacting with extracellular glycoconjugates, because it has been detected extracellularly by immunohistochemistry. This localization has been questioned, however, since the lectin lacks a secretion signal sequence, which challenges the contention that it is secreted. We have demonstrated externalization of this lectin from C2 mouse muscle cells by both immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein and immunohistochemical localization. We further show that externalization of the lectin is a developmentally regulated process that accompanies myoblast differentiation and that the lectin codistributes with laminin in myotube extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical localization during intermediate stages of externalization suggests that the lectin becomes concentrated in evaginations of plasma membrane, which pinch off to form labile lectin- rich extracellular vesicles. This suggests a possible mechanism for lectin export from the cytosol to the extracellular matrix. PMID:2335567

  14. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) of porcine rotavirus strain CRW-8

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Szyczew, Alex J.; Kiefel, Milton J.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-06-01

    The sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) component of the porcine CRW-8 rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and co-crystallized with an N-acetylneuraminic acid derivative. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å, which has enabled determination of the structure by molecular replacement. Rotavirus recognition and attachment to host cells involves interaction with the spike protein VP4 that projects outwards from the surface of the virus particle. An integral component of these spikes is the VP8* domain, which is implicated in the direct recognition and binding of sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and facilitates subsequent invasion by the virus. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of VP8* from porcine CRW-8 rotavirus is reported. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution, enabling the determination of the VP8* structure by molecular replacement.

  16. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX.

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization and evolutionary relationships of the fatty acid-binding protein 10 (Fabp10) of hake (Merluccius hubbsi).

    PubMed

    Crovetto, Cecilia Alejandra; Córdoba, Osvaldo León

    2016-02-01

    A fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) from the liver of Argentine hake (Merluccius hubbsi) was isolated and characterized and its expression analyzed. The determination of its partial primary structures (72%) showed that it presents highest identity with Fabp10, commonly termed liver basic-type FABP. The evolutionary tree showed greater relationship between the Fabp10 of hake (Me Fabp10) and the Fabp10 and the Fabp10a of teleost fish. Me Fabp10 had low affinity for palmitic, oleic and palmitoleic acid and high affinity for bilirubin, lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine, all of them important in the metabolic functions of the liver. Me Fabp10 was able to bind only one cis-parinaric acid molecule and was found to be expressed only in the liver.

  18. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  19. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; ...

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  20. Structural analysis of site-directed mutants of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II addresses the relationship between structural integrity and ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Vaezeslami, Soheila; Jia, Xiaofei; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H.

    2009-09-02

    The structural integrity of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII) has been investigated using the crystal structures of CRABPII mutants. The overall fold was well maintained by these CRABPII mutants, each of which carried multiple different mutations. A water-mediated network is found to be present across the large binding cavity, extending from Arg111 deep inside the cavity to the {alpha} 2 helix at its entrance. This chain of interactions acts as a 'pillar' that maintains the integrity of the protein. The disruption of the water network upon loss of Arg111 leads to decreased structural integrity of the protein. A water-mediated network can be re-established by introducing the hydrophilic Glu121 inside the cavity, which results in a rigid protein with the {alpha}2 helix adopting an altered conformation compared with wild-type CRABPII.

  1. Uncoupling of Obesity from Insulin Resistance Through a Targeted Mutation in aP2, the Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Johnson, Randall S.; Distel, Robert J.; Ellis, Ramsey; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1996-11-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytoplasmic proteins that are expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and bind to fatty acids such as oleic and retinoic acid. Mice with a null mutation in aP2, the gene encoding the adipocyte FABP, were developmentally and metabolically normal. The aP2-deficient mice developed dietary obesity but, unlike control mice, they did not develop insulin resistance or diabetes. Also unlike their obese wild-type counterparts, obese aP2-/- animals failed to express in adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a molecule implicated in obesity-related insulin resistance. These results indicate that aP2 is central to the pathway that links obesity to insulin resistance, possibly by linking fatty acid metabolism to expression of TNF-α.

  2. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  3. Myocardial injury in coronary artery bypass grafting: On-pump versus off-pump comparison by measuring heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein release.

    PubMed

    Malik, Vishwas; Kale, Shailaja C; Chowdhury, Ujjwal K; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Chauhan, Sandeep; Kiran, Usha

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study uses heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (hFABP) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) release to compare myocardial injury in on-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Fifty patients were randomly assigned to on-pump or off-pump CABG. The hFABP and CK-MB concentrations were measured in serial venous blood samples drawn before heparinization in both groups and after aortic unclamping at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours in the on-pump group. In the off-pump group, samples were taken after the last distal anastomosis at the same time intervals as in the on-pump group. The total amount of hFABP and CK-MB released was significantly higher in the on-pump than in the off-pump group (hFABP = 100.43 +/- 77.63 vs 3.94 +/- 0.36 ng/mL, P < 0.0001; CK-MB = 33.33 +/- 3.81 vs 28.65 +/- 3.91 log units, P < 0.001). In all patients, hFABP levels peaked as early as 1 hour after declamping (on-pump group) or 2 hours after the last distal anastomosis (off-pump group), whereas CK-MB peaked only at 4 hours after declamping (on-pump group) or 24 hours after the last distal anastomosis (off-pump group). The lower release of hFABP and CK-MB in the off-pump CABG group indicates that on-pump CABG with cardioplegic arrest causes more myocardial damage than does off-pump CABG. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein is a more rapid marker of perioperative myocardial damage, peaks earlier than CK-MB, and may predict the requirement for intensive monitoring for postoperative myocardial infarction.

  4. High ω-3:ω-6 fatty acids ratio increases fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in human ectopic endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khanaki, Korosh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shabani, Mahdi; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis, a common chronic inflammatory disorder, is defined by the atypical growth of endometrium- like tissue outside of the uterus. Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and fatty acid binding protein4 (FABP4) play several important roles in the inflammatory diseases. Objective: Due to reported potential anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in cultured endometrial cells. Materials and Methods: Ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissues obtained from 15 women were snap frozen. After thawing and tissue digestion, primary mixed stromal and endometrial epithelial cell culture was performed for 8 days in culture mediums supplemented with normal and high ratios of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. sPLA2-IIa in the culture medium and FABP4 level was determined using enzyme immuno assay (EIA) technique. Results: Within ectopic endometrial cells group, the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa were remarkably increased under high ω-3 PUFA exposure compared with control condition (p=0.014 and p=0.04 respectively). Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs may increase the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa in ectopic endometrial cells, since sPLAIIa and FABP4 may affect endometriosis via several mechanisms, more relevant studies are encouraged to know the potential effect of increased cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa on endometriosis. PMID:25709631

  5. Characterization of the sources of protein-ligand affinity: 1-sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene binding to intestinal fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, W R; Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G

    1996-01-01

    1-Sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene (1,8-ANS) was employed as a fluorescent probe of the fatty acid binding site of recombinant rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein (1-FABP). The enhancement of fluorescence upon binding allowed direct determination of binding affinity by fluorescence titration experiments, and measurement of the effects on that affinity of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Solvent isotope effects were also determined. These data were compared to results from isothermal titration calorimetry. We obtained values for the enthalpy and entropy of this interaction at a variety of temperatures, and hence determined the change in heat capacity of the system consequent upon binding. The ANS-1-FABP is enthalpically driven; above approximately 14 degrees C it is entropically opposed, but below this temperature the entropy makes a positive contribution to the binding. The changes we observe in both enthalpy and entropy of binding with temperature can be derived from the change in heat capacity upon binding by integration, which demonstrates the internal consistency of our results. Bound ANS is displaced by fatty acids and can itself displace fatty acids bound to I-FABP. The binding site for ANS appears to be inside the solvent-containing cavity observed in the x-ray crystal structure, the same cavity occupied by fatty acid. From the fluorescence spectrum and from an inversion of the Debye-Hueckel formula for the activity coefficients as a function of added salt, we inferred that this cavity is fairly polar in character, which is in keeping with inferences drawn from the x-ray structure. The binding affinity of ANS is considered to be a consequence of both electrostatic and conditional hydrophobic effects. We speculate that the observed change in heat capacity is produced mainly by the displacement of strongly hydrogen-bonded waters from the protein cavity. PMID:8770188

  6. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species. PMID:28054982

  7. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-04

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species.

  8. Mechanism of entomotoxicity of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-09-01

    Plant lectins have received a lot of attention because of their insecticidal properties. When orally administered in artificial diet or in transgenic plants, lectins provoke a wide range of detrimental effects, including alteration of the digestive enzyme machinery, fecundity drop, reduced feeding, changes in oviposition behavior, growth and development inhibition and mortality. Although many studies reported the entomotoxicity of lectins, only a few of them investigated the mode of action by which lectins exert toxicity. In the present paper we have studied for the first time the insecticidal potential of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) bulbs against the larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). Bioassays on neonate larvae showed that this mannose-specific lectin affected larval growth, causing a development retardation and larval weight decrease. Using primary cell cultures from S. littoralis midguts and confocal microscopy we have elucidated FITC-HHA binding and internalization mechanisms. We found that HHA did not exert a toxic effect on S. littoralis midgut cells, but HHA interaction with the brush border of midgut cells interfered with normal nutrient absorption in the S. littoralis midgut, thereby affecting normal larval growth in vivo. This study thus confirms the potential of mannose-specific lectins as pest control agents and sheds light on the mechanism underlying lectin entomotoxicity.

  9. Preparation and biological properties of a melibiose binding lectin from Bauhinia variegata seeds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2008-11-26

    A dimeric 64-kDa melibiose-binding lectin was isolated from the seeds of Bauhinia variegata. The isolation procedure comprised affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on the first two chromatographic media. Its hemagglutinating activity was stable after 30-min exposure to temperatures up to 70 degrees C. Since lectins may demonstrate biological activities such as antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, antifungal, antiviral, and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities, the isolated lectin was tested for these activities. It was found that the lectin inhibited proliferation in hepatoma HepG2 cells and breast cancer MCF7 cells with an IC(50) of 1.4 microM and 0.18 microM, respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity was inhibited with an IC(50) of 1.02 microM. The lectin and concanavalin A (Con A) evoked maximal mitogenic response from mouse splenocytes at similar concentrations, but the maximal response to B. variegata lectin was only 1/5 of that induced by Con A in magnitude. B. variegata lectin was devoid of antifungal activity.

  10. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of the banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca.

    PubMed

    Singh, D D; Saikrishnan, K; Kumar, Prashant; Dauter, Z; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2004-11-01

    The banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca, MW 29.4 kDa, has been isolated, purified and crystallized. The trigonal crystals contain one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement to a resolution of 3 A. The structure of the subunit is similar to that of jacalin-like lectins.

  12. Architecture of Deinococcus geothermalis biofilms on glass and steel: a lectin study.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Minna; Neu, Thomas R; Raulio, Mari; Kolari, Marko; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2008-07-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is resistant to chemical and physical stressors and forms tenuous biofilms in paper industry. The architecture of its biofilms growing on glass and on stainless acid proof steel was studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent lectins and nanobeads as in situ probes. Hydrophobic nanobeads adhered to the biofilms but did not penetrate to biofilm interior. In contrast, the biofilms were readily permeable towards many different lectins. A skeletal network of glycoconjugates, reactive with Dolichos biflorus and Maclura pomifera lectins, was prominent in the space inside the biofilm colony core but absent on the exterior. Cells in the core space of the biofilm were interconnected by a network of adhesion structures, reactive with Amaranthus caudatus lectin but with none of the 65 other tested lectins. The glycoconjugates connecting the individual cells to steel reacted with Phaseolus vulgaris lectin whereas those connecting to glass mainly reacted with A. caudatus lectin. Envelopes of all cells in the D. geothermalis biofilm reacted with several other lectins, with many different specificities. We conclude that numerous different glycoconjugates are involved in the adhesion and biofilm formation of D. geothermalis, possibly contributing its unique survival capacity when exposed to dehydration, biocidal chemicals and other extreme conditions.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Messenger RNAs for Seed Lectin and Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor in Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Vodkin, Lila O.

    1981-01-01

    The mRNAs for seed lectin and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor of soybean have been highly enriched by immunoadsorption of the polysomes synthesizing these proteins. Polysomes isolated from developing seed of variety Williams were incubated with monospecific rabbit antibodies produced against lectin subunits or trypsin inhibitor protein. The polysomal mixture was passed over a column containing goat anti-rabbit antibodies bound to Sepharose. Bound polysomes were eluted and the mRNA was selected by passage over oligo(dT)-cellulose. Lectin complementary DNA hybridized to an 1150-nucleotide message and trypsin inhibitor complementary DNA hybridized to a 770-nucleotide message in blotting experiments using total poly(A) RNA. Translation of soybean lectin mRNA using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate yielded a major polypeptide of 32,300 whereas the molecular weight for purified lectin subunits was 30,000. Trypsin inhibitor mRNA directed the synthesis of a 23,800-dalton polypeptide as compared to 21,500 daltons for trypsin inhibitor marker protein. Lectin specific polysomes could not be obtained from a soybean variety which lacks detectable lectin protein whereas trypsin inhibitor-specific polysomes were bound by immunoselection. These results confirmed the specificity of the immunoadsorption procedure and strongly indicated that the lectinless variety was deficient or substantially reduced in functional lectin mRNA. Images PMID:16661996

  14. Translational control of discoidin lectin expression in drsA suppressor mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, S; Leone, S; Ostermeyer, E

    1991-01-01

    Genetic analysis in Dictyostelium discoideum has identified regulatory genes which control the developmental expression of the discoidin lectin multigene family. Among these, the drsA mutation is a dominant second-site suppressor of another mutation, disB, which has the discoidinless phenotype. We now demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the drsA allele exerts its suppressive effect on the disB mutation. Interestingly, drsA does not merely bypass the disB mutation and restore the wild-type pattern of lectin expression. Rather, drsA mutant cells have high levels of discoidin lectin synthesis during growth but do not express lectins during aggregation. In contrast, wild-type cells only express lectin protein during the aggregation period of development. Phenocopies of the drsA mutation show a pattern of discoidin expression similar to that seen in the bona fide mutant. These data suggest that there may be a mechanism of negative feedback, resulting from the high levels of discoidin lectin made during growth, which inhibits further discoidin lectin expression during development. Northern (RNA) analysis of developing drsA mutant cells shows that these cells contain high levels of discoidin mRNA, although no discoidin lectin protein is being translated from these messages. Therefore, expression of the discoidin gene family can be controlled at the level of translation as well as transcription. Images PMID:2038325

  15. Small unilamellar vesicles as reagents: a chemically defined, quantitative assay for lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Rando, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Samll unilamellar vesicles containing synthetic glycolipids can be prepared. These vesicles are aggregated by the appropriate lectin (Orr et al., 1979; Rando and Bangerter, 1979; Slama and Rando, 1980). It is shown here that extent of aggregation of these vesicles as measured by light scattering at 360 nm, is, under certain conditions, linear with amount of lectin added. This forms the basis of a rapid and simple quantitative assay for lectins using the modified vesicles as a defined chemical substrate. The assay is sensitive to lectin concentrations in the low ..mu..g range. The assay is applied here to studies on concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin and the ..cap alpha..-fucosyl binding lectin from Ulex europaeus (Type I).

  16. Assessment of weak sugar-binding ability using lectin tetramer and membrane-based glycans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To consider biological significance of glycosylation of proteins, it is necessary to evaluate the importance of sugar-recognition processes mediated by lectins. Though the interaction between sugars and proteins, especially animal lectins, is quite weak with K d approximately 10(-4) M, cellular and molecular recognitions mediated via sugar-protein interaction increase their avidity by 1-3 orders of magnitude by the self-association of both receptors and their ligands on cell surfaces. To assess the weak interaction between lectins and their sugar ligands, we established lectin tetramer binding to cell surface glycans using flow cytometry. This strategy is highly sensitive, and useful to determine whether or not a putative lectin domain may have sugar-binding ability.

  17. Deterrent activity of plant lectins on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) oviposition.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Amin; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy J; Smagghe, Guy

    2006-09-01

    A set of 14 plant lectins was screened in a binary choice bioassay for inhibitory activity on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) oviposition. Coating of chickpea seeds (Cicer arietinum L.) with a 0.05% (w/v) solution of plant lectins caused a significant reduction in egg laying. Control experiments with heat inactivated lectin and BSA indicated that the observed deterrent effects are specific and require carbohydrate-binding activity. However, no clear correlation could be established between deterrent activity and sugar-binding specificity/molecular structure of the lectins. Increasing the insect density reduced the inhibitory effect of the lectins confirming that female insects are capable of adjusting their oviposition rates as a function of host availability.

  18. High-resolution crystal structures of Colocasia esculenta tarin lectin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patricia R; Meagher, Jennifer L; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T; Stuckey, Jeanne A

    2017-01-01

    Tarin, the Colocasia esculenta lectin from the superfamily of α-d-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins, is a tetramer of 47 kDa composed of two heterodimers. Each heterodimer possesses homologous monomers of ~11.9 (A chain) and ~12.7 (B chain) kDa. The structures of apo and carbohydrate-bound tarin were solved to 1.7 Å and 1.91 Å, respectively. Each tarin monomer forms a canonical β-prism II fold, common to all members of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) family, which is partially stabilized by a disulfide bond and a conserved hydrophobic core. The heterodimer is formed through domain swapping involving the C-terminal β-strand and the β-sheet on face I of the prism. The tetramer is assembled through the dimerization of the B chains from heterodimers involving face II of each prism. The 1.91 Å crystal structure of tarin bound to Manα(1,3)Manα(1,6)Man reveals an expanded carbohydrate-binding sequence (QxDxNxVxYx4/6WX) on face III of the β-prism. Both monomers possess a similar fold, except for the length of the loop, which begins after the conserved tyrosine and creates the binding pocket for the α(1,6)-terminal mannose. This loop differs in size and amino-acid composition from 10 other β-prism II domain proteins, and may confer carbohydrate-binding specificity among members of the GNA-related lectin family.

  19. Dietary garlic (Allium sativum) lectins, ASA I and ASA II, are highly stable and immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Clement, Fatima; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2010-10-01

    The immunomodulatory proteins present in garlic have recently been shown to be identical to the garlic lectins ASA I and ASA II [Clement F, Pramod SN, Venkatesh YP. Int. Immunopharmacol. 2010; 10: 316-324]. In this study, the stability of garlic lectins as a function of pH, temperature and denaturants has been examined in relation to biological activity (hemagglutination and hagocytosis). Stability of garlic lectins in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was assessed by their hemagglutination activity, immunoreactivity, and intactness by SDS-PAGE. Garlic lectins were moderately stable in SGF for up to 30 min; while they retained hemagglutination activities, immunoreactivity with the respective rabbit antiserum decreased immediately (0.5 min) to 10-30%. ASA I retained ~80% hemagglutination activity in the pH range 2-12; however, ASA II retained only 40% in the pH ranges 2-4 and 10-12. Garlic lectins exposed to 60 °C (30 min) and pepsin (1 and 2 min) retained hemagglutination and phagocytic activities. Urea (4M) and Gdn.HCl (2M) did not affect hemagglutination. The immunogenicity of garlic lectins upon oral feeding in BALB/c mice was examined. A lectin-specific serum IgG response was seen in mice comparable to the oral immunogen, phytohemagglutinin. The recovered lectin in feces of mice administered with garlic lectins showed antigenicity identical to that of the administered proteins. The stabilities of the garlic lectins, their ability to withstand the gastrointestinal passage, and their recognition by the immune system upon oral feeding reinforce the reported presence of natural antibodies to garlic proteins in normal human sera.

  20. Adaptive evolution of a novel Drosophila lectin induced by parasitic wasp attack.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Erin S; Schlenke, Todd A

    2012-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has long been used as a model for the molecular genetics of innate immunity. Such work has uncovered several immune receptors that recognize bacterial and fungal pathogens by binding unique components of their cell walls and membranes. Drosophila also act as hosts to metazoan pathogens such as parasitic wasps, which can infect a majority of individuals in natural populations, but many aspects of their immune responses against these more closely related pathogens are poorly understood. Here, we present data describing the transcriptional induction and molecular evolution of a candidate Drosophila anti-wasp immunity gene, lectin-24A. Lectin-24A has a secretion signal sequence and its lectin domain suggests a function in sugar group binding. Transcript levels of lectin-24A were induced significantly stronger and faster following wasp attack than following wounding or bacterial infection, demonstrating lectin-24A is not a general stress response or defense response gene but is instead part of a specific response against wasps. The major site of lectin-24A transcript production is the fat body, the main humoral immune tissue of flies. Interestingly, lectin-24A is a new gene of the D. melanogaster/Drosophila simulans clade, displaying very little homology to any other Drosophila lectins. Population genetic analyses of lectin-24A DNA sequence data from African and North American populations of D. melanogaster and D. simulans revealed gene length polymorphisms segregating at high frequencies as well as strong evidence of repeated and recent selective sweeps. Thus, lectin-24A is a rapidly evolving new gene that has seemingly developed functional importance for fly resistance against infection by parasitic wasps.

  1. Lectin sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles for detection of some bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Vardan K; Bazukyan, Inga L

    2013-03-05

    A method of bacteria detection by sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles is presented. Anisotropic silver nanoparticles with two bands of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are prepared and sensitized with potato lectin. These nanoparticles are able to detect three bacterial species: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. The interaction of these bacteria with such nanoparticles induces drastic changes in optical spectra of nanoparticles that are correlated with bacteria titer. The maximal sensitivity is observed for S. aureus (up to 1.5×10(4) mL(-1)).

  2. Probing lectin and sperm with carbohydrate-modified quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Anandakathir; Fang, Jim-Min; Chou, Pi-Tai; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chu, Rea-Min; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2005-10-01

    We report the encapsulation of quantum dots with biologically important beta-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in different ratios, together with studies of their specific/sensitive multivalent interactions with lectins and sperm by fluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering microscopy, confocal imaging techniques, and flow cytometry. These GlcNAc-encapsulated quantum dots (QDGLNs) specifically bind to wheat germ agglutinin, and cause fluorescence quenching and aggregation. Further studies of QDGLNs and the mannose-encapsulated QDs (QDMANs) with sperm revealed site-specific interactions, in which QDGLNs bind to the head of the sperm, while QDMANs spread over the whole sperm body.

  3. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity.

  4. Two novel lectins from Parkia biglandulosa and Parkia roxburghii: isolation, physicochemical characterization, mitogenicity and anti-proliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Singh, Jatinder; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Agrewala, Javed N; Kaur, Manpreet

    2005-08-01

    Two mannose/glucose specific seed lectins were isolated from Parkia biglandulosa and Parkia roxburghii and were characterized w.r.t various physicochemical properties. Unlike other Parkia lectins a comparison of native and subunit molecular mass showed that both Parkia lectins were heterotetramers. Parkia biglandulosa lectin was found to be T-cell mitogen as revealed by IL-2 bioassay. These lectins showed anti-proliferative effect on two murine macrophage cancer cell lines i.e. P 388DI (50%) and J774 (70%). In addition Parkia roxburghii also inhibited proliferation of HB98 (65.47%), a B-cell hybridoma cell line.

  5. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology.

  6. In vitro bile acid binding of mustard greens, kale, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with sautéing compared with raw or other methods of preparation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid binding capacity has been related to cholesterol-lowering potential of foods and food fractions. Lowered recirculating bile acids results in utilization of cholesterol to synthesize bile acid and reduced fat absorption. Secondary bile acids have been associated with increased risk of can...

  7. The degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors during germination of white kidney beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; Tamminga, S; Leenaars, P P; Schering, J; Ter Maat, D W

    1994-04-01

    White kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cv Processor, contain a relatively high content of phaseolin (storage protein), lectins and a special group of glycoproteins as well as a considerable amount of protein-type trypsin inhibitors. Protein digestion of raw 'Processor' beans in monogastrics, for example pigs, is disturbed by poorly digested, phaseolin lectins, which can bind to carbohydrates in brush border membranes of the small intestinal epithelium, and trypsin inhibitors. The effect of the germination of white kidney beans on lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors was studied in order to achieve a degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors and an increase of in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein of bean flour. Therefore, whole bean extracts were examined throughout a germination period of up to seven days for their lectin and phaseolin pattern, lectin content, binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes and trypsin inhibitor content. In addition the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis by pepsin and pancreatin of the protein from flours of (un)germinated white kidney beans was studied. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a degradation of E-lectins and a disappearance of L-lectins and phaseolin during germination. Results indicated a decrease of the lectin content by 85%, a loss of binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes by 91%, and a decrease of trypsin inhibitors by 76%, in bean flour after germination for seven days. A maximum in in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of protein from bean flour was already established after germination for half a day.

  8. Isolation and characterization of two Korean mistletoe lectins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Bong; Song, Seong Kyu; Yoon, Taek Joon; Yoo, Yung Choon; Lee, Kwan Hee; Her, Erk; Kim, Jong Bae

    2007-11-30

    Two isolectins (KML-IIU and the KML-IIL) were individually isolated from the previously reported Korean mistletoe lectin, KML-C, by using an immunoaffinity column. Molecular weights of the KML-IIU and the KML-IIL were 64 kDa and 60 kDa respectively. Both of the lectins were composed of heterogeneous A and B subunits linked with a disulfide bond, and showed the same carbohydrate-binding specificities for Gal and GalNAc. However, they are different not only in biophysical properties (glycosylation and amino acid compositions) but also bioactivities (cell killing and cytokine induction). The KML-IIL showed 17-145 times stronger in cytotoxicities to various human and mouse cancer cell lines than the KML-IIU. The KML-IIL also induced TNF-alpha secretion from mouse peritoneal macrophages 4.5 times better than the KML-IIU. The results demonstrated isolectins in Korean mistletoe were varied in bioactivities and the KML-IIL may be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  9. Anti-Neuroblastoma Properties of a Recombinant Sunflower Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Marcela; Genoula, Melanie; Silveyra, María Ximena; De Oliveira Carvalho, André; Regente, Mariana; Del Río, Marianela; Ribeiro Soares, Júlia; Moreira Gomes, Valdirene; De La Canal, Laura

    2017-01-01

    According to their sugar recognition specificity, plant lectins are proposed as bioactive proteins with potential in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Helja is a mannose-specific jacalin-like lectin from sunflower which was shown to inhibit the growth of certain fungi. Here, we report its recombinant expression in a prokaryotic system and its activity in neurobalstoma cells. Helja coding sequence was fused to the pET-32 EK/LIC, the enterokinase/Ligation-independent cloning vector and a 35 kDa protein was obtained in Escherichia coli representing Helja coupled to thioredoxin (Trx). The identity of this protein was verified using anti-Helja antibodies. This chimera, named Trx-rHelja, was enriched in the soluble bacterial extracts and was purified using Ni+2-Sepharose and d-mannose-agarose chromatography. Trx-rHelja and the enterokinase-released recombinant Helja (rHelja) both displayed toxicity on human SH-SY5Y neuroblastomas. rHelja decreased the viability of these tumor cells by 75% according to the tetrazolium reduction assay, and microscopic analyses revealed that the cell morphology was disturbed. Thus, the stellate cells of the monolayer became spheroids and were isolated. Our results indicate that rHelja is a promising tool for the development of diagnostic or therapeutic methods for neuroblastoma cells, the most common solid tumors in childhood. PMID:28075401

  10. Altered binding of Ulex europaeus I lectin to psoriatic epidermis.

    PubMed

    Kariniemi, A L; Holthöfer, H; Miettinen, A; Virtanen, I

    1983-11-01

    We have used Ulex europaeus I (UEA I) lectin, specific for alpha-L-fucose-containing glycoconjugates, in fluorescence microscopy to stain cryostat sections of human skin from normal persons and patients with psoriasis and lichen simplex. In normal skin the upper layers of the stratum spinosum and the stratum granulosum were strongly reactive with UEA I, whereas the lower layers of the epidermis did not react. The staining intensity of the upper epidermis was similar to that of the endothelium of dermal blood vessels. Biopsies of the lesional skin of lichen simplex showed an intense UEA I-specific staining throughout the whole epidermis, similar in intensity to that seen in the upper epidermis of normal skin. In psoriatic lesions positive UEA I-specific fluorescence was seen throughout the whole epidermis, but the fluorescence was more faint and often granular. In uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients the whole epidermis showed a diffuse UEA I-specific fluorescence, differing in this respect from normal skin. In normal skin UEA I binds to epidermal cells which are at a certain state of differentiation. The results with psoriatic epidermis confirm that both uninvolved and lesional epidermis have a defect in epidermal maturation, as shown by the altered binding of UEA I lectin.

  11. Lectin functionalized quantum dots for recognition of mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Beate S.; de Farias, Patricia M. A.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; de C. Ferreira, Ricardo; Júnior, Severino A.; Figueiredo, Regina C. B. Q.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2006-02-01

    In this study we use CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots functionalized with concanavalin-A (Con-A) lectin, specific to glucose/mannose residues, to investigate cell alterations regarding carbohydrate profile in human mammary tissues diagnosed as fibroadenoma (benign tumor). These particles were functionalized with glutaraldehyde and Con-A and incubated with tissue sections of normal and to Fibroadenoma, a benign type of mammary tumor. The tissue sections were deparafinized, hydrated in graded alcohol and treated with a solution of Evans Blue in order to avoid autofluorescence. The fluorescence intensity of QD-Con-A stained tissues showed different patterns, which reflect the carbohydrate expression of glucose/mannose in fibroadenoma when compared to the detection of the normal carbohydrate expression. The pattern of unspecific labeling of the tissues with glutaraldehyde functionalized CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots is compared to the targeting driven by the Con-A lectin. The preliminary findings reported here support the use of CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots as specific probes of cellular alterations and their use in diagnostics.

  12. Mannose-binding lectin may affect pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Çalkavur, Şebnem; Erdemir, Gülin; Onay, Hüseyin; Altun Köroğlu, Özge; Yalaz, Mehmet; Zekioğlu, Osman; Aksu, Güzide; Özkınay, Ferda; Akercan, Fuat; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system and acts as a complement activator through the lectin pathway. Genetic variations of MBL and low MBL levels cause several infection problems, which may also be related to pregnancy problems. We aimed to investigate the role of MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels in pregnancy problems and premature delivery. In this prospective study, MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels were studied in 45 mothers who delivered earlier than 35 gestational weeks. The frequency of MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B was much higher (homozygous 4.4% and heterozygous 33.3%) in the study group mothers than the previously reported frequency in the healthy Turkish population (homozygous 2-6%, heterozygous 12-20%). MBL variant allele B frequency was closely related to low MBL levels (<0.1 μg/ml), vaginitis and increased IL-6 levels. The median MBL levels were lower than the critical level of 0.1 μg/ ml in study mothers who had recurrent miscarriage, infertility, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm premature rupture of membranes with duration of longer than 72 hours, tocolysis, histological chorioamnionitis, urinary tract infection and vaginitis. MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B is related to low serum MBL levels, increased IL-6 levels, genitourinary infections and may cause pregnancy-related problems such as infertility, recurrent miscarriage and preterm delivery.

  13. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  14. Characterization of Caenorhabditis Elegans Lectin-Binding Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Link, C. D.; Silverman, M. A.; Breen, M.; Watt, K. E.; Dames, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have identified 45 mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans that show ectopic surface binding of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA). These mutations are all recessive and define six genes: srf-2, srf-3, srf-4, srf-5, srf-8 and srf-9. Mutations in these genes fall into two phenotypic classes: srf-2, -3, -5 mutants are grossly wild-type, except for their lectin-binding phenotype; srf-4, -8, -9 mutants have a suite of defects, including uncoordinated movement, abnormal egg laying, and defective copulatory bursae morphogenesis. Characterization of these pleiotropic mutants at the cellular level reveals defects in the migration of the gonadal distal tip cell and in axon morphology. Unexpectedly, the pleiotropic mutations also interact with mutations in the lin-12 gene, which encodes a putative cell surface receptor involved in the control of cell fate. We propose that the underlying defect in the pleiotropic mutations may be in the general processing or secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:1516818

  15. Use of lectin-functionalized particles for oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Diesner, Susanne C; Wang, Xue-Yan; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Untersmayr, Eva; Gabor, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy, in recent times, has found its application in a variety of immunologically mediated diseases. Oral immunotherapy may not only increase patient compliance but may, in particular, also induce both systemic as well as mucosal immune responses, due to mucosal application of active agents. To improve the bioavailability and to trigger strong immunological responses, recent research projects focused on the encapsulation of drugs and antigens into polymer particles. These particles protect the loaded antigen from the harsh conditions in the GI tract. Furthermore, modification of the surface of particles by the use of lectins, such as Aleuria aurantia lectin, wheatgerm agglutinin or Ulex europaeus-I, enhances the binding to epithelial cells, in particular to membranous cells, of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Membranous cell-specific targeting leads to an improved transepithelial transport of the particle carriers. Thus, enhanced uptake and presentation of the encapsulated antigen by antigen-presenting cells favor strong systemic, but also local, mucosal immune responses. PMID:22834202

  16. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL) domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL) family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family. PMID:19930663

  17. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  18. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  19. Chemical modification studies on a lectin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast).

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, M; Basu, J; Ghosh, A; Chakrabarti, P

    1987-01-01

    The effect of chemical modification on a galactose-specific lectin isolated from a fatty acid auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in order to identify the type of amino acids involved in its agglutinating activity. Modification of 50 free amino groups with succinic anhydride or citraconic anhydride led to an almost complete loss of activity. This could not be protected by the inhibitory sugar methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside. Treatment with N-bromosuccinimide and N-acetylimidazole, for the modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues, did not affect lectin activity. Modification of carboxy groups with glycine ethyl ester greatly affected lectin activity, although sugars afford partial protection. Modification of four thiol groups with N-ethylmaleimide was accompanied by a loss of 85% of the agglutinating activity, and two thiol groups were found to be present at the sugar-binding site of the lectin. Modification of 18 arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione and 26 histidine residues with ethoxyformic anhydride led to a loss of lectin activity. However, in these cases, modification was not protected by the abovementioned inhibitory sugar, suggesting the absence of these groups at the sugar-binding site. In all the cases, immunodiffusion studies with modified lectin showed no gross structural changes which could disrupt antigenic sites of the lectin. Images Fig. 5. PMID:3128265

  20. Effective inhibition of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes by lectins and niacinamide is reversible.

    PubMed

    Greatens, Amanda; Hakozaki, Tomohiro; Koshoffer, Amy; Epstein, Howard; Schwemberger, Sandy; Babcock, George; Bissett, Donald; Takiwaki, Hirotsugu; Arase, Seiji; Wickett, R Randall; Boissy, Raymond E

    2005-07-01

    Skin pigmentation results in part from the transfer of melanized melanosomes synthesized by melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Plasma membrane lectins and their glycoconjugates expressed by these epidermal cells are critical molecules involved in this transfer process. In addition, the derivative of vitamin B(3), niacinamide, can inhibit melanosome transfer and induce skin lightening. We investigated the effects of these molecules on the viability of melanocytes and keratinocytes and on the reversibility of melanosome-transfer inhibition induced by these agents using an in vitro melanocyte-keratinocyte coculture model system. While lectins and neoglycoproteins could induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner to melanocytes or keratinocytes in monoculture, similar dosages of the lectins, as opposed to neoglycoproteins, did not induce apoptosis to either cell type when treated in coculture. The dosages of lectins and niacinamide not affecting cell viability produced an inhibitory effect on melanosome transfer, when used either alone or together in cocultures of melanocytes-keratinocytes. Cocultures treated with lectins or niacinamide resumed normal melanosome transfer in 3 days after removal of the inhibitor, while cocultures treated with a combination of lectins and niacinamide demonstrated a lag in this recovery. Subsequently, we assessed the effect of niacinamide on facial hyperpigmented spots using a vehicle-controlled, split-faced design human clinical trial. Topical application of niacinamide resulted in a dose-dependent and reversible reduction in hyperpigmented lesions. These results suggest that lectins and niacinamide at concentrations that do not affect cell viability are reversible inhibitors of melanosome transfer.

  1. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications.

  2. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  3. Isolation and analysis of mannose/trehalose/maltose specific lectin from jack bean with antibruchid activity.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Velayutham, Veeramani; Kamalanathan, Tamilarasan; Periasamy, Mullainadhan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2016-10-01

    A lectin with insecticidal property against the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus was successfully isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using standard affinity chromatography. The isolated molecule typically behaved like a lectin in its characteristics. It agglutinated indicator red blood cells (RBC) in its native as well as enzyme treated conditions. The enzyme treated RBC types exhibited a very high hemagglutination (HA) titre values and this property of isolated molecule behaved like arcelin, the lectin-like molecules reported from several species of Phaseolus. As a characteristic feature of a lectin, the isolated molecule effectively inhibited the agglutination of indicator RBC types with simple and complex carbohydrates including glycoproteins. This nature of the isolated molecule also relate with characteristic feature of arcelin isoforms in inhibiting HA activity with complex glycoproteins as reported in many studies. Most interestingly, the present study disclosed trehalose as a potent inhibitor of C. virosa lectin. Therefore, feeding insect pests on the lectin like arcelin could serve as antibiosis factor/anti-insect activity. The molecular characteristics of this isolated molecule and its mass studies too revealed its homology with arcelin, arcelin-1, 2 and 6 isoforms of P. vulgaris and lectin from Canavalia cathartica, C. lineata and C. brasiliensis.

  4. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  5. Characterization and molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata, Epipactis helleborine and Cymbidium hybrid.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-04-15

    Mannose-binding lectins were purified from the leaves of three Orchidaceae species, namely Listera ovata (twayblade), Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine) and Cymbidium hybrid, using affinity chromatography on Mannose - Sepharose-4B. Apparently, the Orchidaceae lectins are dimeric proteins composed of lectin subunits of 12-13 kDa. All of the isolated lectins exhibit exclusive specificity towards mannose. A cDNA library constructed from poly(A) rich RNA isolated from leaves of L. ovata was screened for cDNA clones encoding the lectin using colony hybridization. Since N-terminal sequence analysis of the twayblade lectin revealed some sequence similarity to the previously cloned mannose-binding lectin Hippeastrum hybrid (amaryllis) ovaries, the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone was used as a probe to screen the L. ovata library. Subsequently, the cDNA clone encoding the L. ovata lectin was used to screen the cDNA libraries from the taxonomically related orchid species Cymbidium hybrid and E. helleborine. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from different Orchidaceae species revealed approximately 50% sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The Orchidaceae lectins are apparently translated from mRNAs consisting of approximately 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins which are converted into the mature lectins following post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  6. Physicochemical properties and oxidative inactivation of soluble lectin from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) brain.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sabika; Banu, Naheed

    2008-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins present in a wide variety of plants and animals, which serve various important physiological functions. A soluble beta-galactoside binding lectin has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from buffalo brain using ammonium sulphate precipitation (40-70%) and gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G50-80 column. The molecular weight of buffalo brain lectin (BBL) as determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions was 14.2 kDa, however, with gel filtration it was 28.5 kDa, revealing the dimeric form of protein. The neutral sugar content of the soluble lectin was estimated to be 3.3%. The BBL showed highest affinity for lactose and other sugar moieties in glycosidic form, suggesting it to be a beta-galactoside binding lectin. The association constant for lactose binding as evidenced by Scatchard analysis was 6.6 x 10(3) M(-1) showing two carbohydrate binding sites per lectin molecule. A total inhibition of lectin activity was observed by denaturants like guanidine HCl, thiourea and urea at 6 M concentration. The treatment of BBL with oxidizing agent destroyed its agglutination activity, abolished its fluorescence, and shifted its UV absorption maxima from 282 to 250 nm. The effect of H2O2 was greatly prevented by lactose indicating that BBL is more stable in the presence of its specific ligand. The purified lectin was investigated for its brain cell aggregation properties by testing its ability to agglutinate cells isolated from buffalo and goat brains. Rate of aggregation of buffalo brain cells by purified protein was more than the goat brain cells. The data from above study suggests that the isolated lectin may belong to the galectin-1 family but is glycosylated unlike those purified till date.

  7. Seasonal lectin binding variations of thumb pad in the frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2014-01-01

    The thumb pad is one of the most common secondary sexual characteristics in frogs. Although it is known that amphibian skin has affinity for several lectins, there is no report regarding lectin-binding affinity of the thumb pad or its structural components. This study investigated localization and seasonal variation of specific carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates in both the epidermal and dermal components of the frog thumb pad at the light microscopic level using lectin histochemistry. The study consisted of four seasonal groups of the frog species, Pelophylax ridibundus (Synonym of Rana ridibunda): active, prehibernating, hibernating and posthibernating. Four horseradish peroxidase conjugated lectins were employed. It was found that dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and ulex europaeus (UEAI) gave positive reactions in both epidermal layers and breeding glands. These three lectins bound specific secretory cells in the breeding glands, and the distribution of the cells and epithelial lectin reactions exhibited seasonal changes. In addition, UEA-I and peanut agglutinin (PNA) showed an affinity in granular glands and the granular zone of mixed glands. Generally, epidermal lectin binding showed dense affinity during the posthibernation period. DBA, UEA-I, and WGA-specific cells in the mucous gland decreased gradually until the posthibernation period. These findings suggest that differences of lectin binding in the thumb pad may be related to functional activities and, thus, seasonal adaptations. Moreover, the presence of specific lectin-binding cells in the breeding glands indicated that they consisted of heterogeneous secretory cell composition or that the cells were at different secretory stages.

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of carbohydrate binding to the basic lectin from winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus).

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-03-05

    A basic lectin (pI approximately 10.0) was purified to homogeneity from the seeds of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) by affinity chromatography on Sepharose 6-aminocaproyl-D-galactosamine. The lectin agglutinated trypsinized rabbit erythrocytes and had a relative molecular mass of 58,000 consisting of two subunits of Mr 29,000. The lectin binds to N-dansylgalactosamine, leading to a 15-fold increase in dansyl fluorescence with a concomitant 25-nm blue shift in the emission maximum. The lectin has two binding sites/dimer for this sugar and an association constant of 4.17 X 10(5) M-1 at 25 degrees C. The strong binding to N-dansylgalactosamine is due to a relatively positive entropic contribution as revealed by the thermodynamic parameters: delta H = -33.62 kJ mol-1 and delta S0 = -5.24 J mol-1 K-1. Binding of this sugar to the lectin shows that it can accommodate a large hydrophobic substituent on the C-2 carbon of D-galactose. Studies with other sugars indicate that a hydrophobic substituent in alpha-conformation at the anomeric position increases the affinity of binding. The C-4 and C-6 hydroxyl groups are critical for sugar binding to this lectin. Lectin difference absorption spectra in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine indicate perturbation of tryptophan residues on sugar binding. The results of stopped flow kinetics with N-dansylgalactosamine and the lectin are consistent with a simple one-step mechanism for which k+1 = 1.33 X 10(4) M-1 s-1 and k-1 = 3.2 X 10(-2) s-1 at 25 degrees C. This k-1 is slower than any reported for a lectin-monosaccharide complex so far. The activation parameters indicate an enthalpically controlled association process.

  9. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  10. Receptor mobility and the binding of cells to lectin-coated fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ability of cells to bind to nylon fibers coated with lectin molecules interspaced with varying numbers of albumin molecules has been analyzed. The cells used were lymphoma cells, normal lymphocytes, myeloid leukemia cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, and the fibers were coated with different densities of concanavalin A or the lectins from soybean or wheat germ. Cells fixed with glutaraldehyde did not bind to lectin-coated fibers. The number of cells bound to fibers could be increased by increasing the density of lectin molecules on the fiber, the density of specific receptors on the cell, or the mobility of the receptors. It is suggested that binding of cells to fibers involves alignment and binding of specific cell surface receptors with lectin molecules immobilized on the fibers, and that this alignment requires short-range rapid lateral mobility (RLM) of the receptors. The titration of cell binding to fibers coated with different densities of lectin and albumin has been used to measure the relative RLM of unoccupied cell surface receptors for the lectin. The results indicate a relationship of RLM to lectin-induced cell-to-cell binding. The RLM or receptors for concanavalin A (Con A) was generally found to be higher than that of receptors for the lectins from wheat germ or soybean. Receptor RLM could be decreased by use of metabolic inhibitors or by lowering the temperature. Receptors for Con A had a lower RLM on normal fibroblasts than on SV40-transformed fibroblasts, and trypsinization of normal fibroblasts increased Con A receptor RLM. Normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and lines of myeloid leukemia cells that can be induced to differentiate had a high receptor RLM, whereas lines of myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate had a low receptor RLM. These results suggest that the RLM of Con A receptors is related to the transformation of fibroblasts and the ability of myeloid leukemia cells to undergo differentiation PMID

  11. Recognition of a CD4+ mouse medullary thymocyte subpopulation by Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Lascurain, R; Chávez, R; Gorocica, P; Pérez, A; Montaño, L F; Zenteno, E

    1994-01-01

    We have used the Gal beta(1-->3)GalNAc-specific Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to isolate a thymus cell subpopulation which is different from that sorted with Arachis hypogaea lectin. The cells recognized by A. leucocarpus lectin were predominantly CD4+, whereas a minor proportion of CD8+ cells (approximately 11%) were also identified. The A. leucocarpus-positive cells were located in the thymus medulla and the cortico-medullary junction. The cortex was negative for A. leucocarpus cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7835965

  12. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family.

  13. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:28094778

  14. Structural Basis for Ligand Regulation of the Fatty Acid-binding Protein 5, Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor β/δ (FABP5-PPARβ/δ) Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Eric H.; Goswami, Devrishi; Griffin, Patrick R.; Noy, Noa; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a widely expressed group of calycins that play a well established role in solubilizing cellular fatty acids. Recent studies, however, have recast FABPs as active participants in vital lipid-signaling pathways. FABP5, like its family members, displays a promiscuous ligand binding profile, capable of interacting with numerous long chain fatty acids of varying degrees of saturation. Certain “activating” fatty acids induce the protein's cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation, stimulating PPARβ/δ transactivation; however, the rules that govern this process remain unknown. Using a range of structural and biochemical techniques, we show that both linoleic and arachidonic acid elicit FABP5's translocation by permitting allosteric communication between the ligand-sensing β2 loop and a tertiary nuclear localization signal within the α-helical cap of the protein. Furthermore, we show that more saturated, nonactivating fatty acids inhibit nuclear localization signal formation by destabilizing this activation loop, thus implicating FABP5 specifically in cis-bonded, polyunsaturated fatty acid signaling. PMID:24692551

  15. Fatty acid binding protein expression in different human adipose tissue depots in relation to rates of lipolysis and insulin concentration in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Thörne, A; Hamsten, A; Arner, P

    2002-10-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are expressed in adipose tissue, adipocyte lipid binding protein (ALBP) and keratinocyte lipid binding protein (KLBP). This study investigated FABP expression in visceral and subcutaneous human adipose tissue depots and associations with lipolytic differences between the depots and circulating insulin concentrations. ALBP and KLBP (protein and RNA) were quantified in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue from obese individuals and expressed relative to actin. ALBP RNA and protein expression was significantly higher in subcutaneous compared to omental adipose tissue (both p < 0.05), whereas KLBP RNA and protein expression was no different between the two sites. There were significant inverse correlations between serum insulin concentrations and the ALBP/KLBP RNA ratio in both subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue (both p < 0.02). Basal rates of glycerol and fatty acid release measured in adipocytes isolated from subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue were significantly higher in the former (p < or = 0.02). Therefore the relative ALBP/KLBP content of human adipose tissue is different in different adipose tissue depots and at the RNA level is related to the circulating insulin concentration, at least in obese subjects. The higher rates of basal lipolysis in adipocytes isolated from subcutaneous compared to omental adipose tissue might be related to the increased ALBP content of the former. Therefore adipose tissue FABPs are interesting candidates for investigation to further our understanding of the insulin resistance syndrome and regulation of lipolysis.

  16. X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2) modified with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    SciTech Connect

    Hellberg, Kristina; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Banaszak, Leonard J.; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-07-11

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) have been characterized as facilitating the intracellular solubilization and transport of long-chain fatty acyl carboxylates via noncovalent interactions. More recent work has shown that the adipocyte FABP is also covalently modified in vivo on Cys117 with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a bioactive aldehyde linked to oxidative stress and inflammation. To evaluate 4-HNE binding and modification, the crystal structures of adipocyte FABP covalently and noncovalently bound to 4-HNE have been solved to 1.9 {angstrom} and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. While the 4-HNE in the noncovalently modified protein is coordinated similarly to a carboxylate of a fatty acid, the covalent form show a novel coordination through a water molecule at the polar end of the lipid. Other defining features between the two structures with 4-HNE and previously solved structures of the protein include a peptide flip between residues Ala36 and Lys37 and the rotation of the side chain of Phe57 into its closed conformation. Representing the first structure of an endogenous target protein covalently modified by 4-HNE, these results define a new class of in vivo ligands for FABPs and extend their physiological substrates to include bioactive aldehydes.

  17. L/N-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine reduces plasma aldosterone, albuminuria, and urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Maruyama, Noriaki; Suzuki, Hiroko; Inoshita, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2013-07-01

    Cilnidipine inhibits both L- and N-type calcium channels and has been shown to dilate efferent arterioles as effectively as afferent arterioles. We conducted an open-label, randomized trial to compare the effects of cilnidipine against those of amlodipine on blood pressure (BP), albuminuria, and plasma aldosterone concentration in hypertensive patients with mild- to moderate-stage chronic kidney disease. Patients with BP ≥130/80 mmHg, an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 90-30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and albuminuria ≥30 mg/g, despite treatment with the maximum recommended dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers, were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients received either 10 mg/day cilnidipine (increased to 20 mg/day; n = 35) or 2.5 mg/day amlodipine (increased to 5 mg/day; n = 35). After 48 weeks of treatment, a significant and comparable reduction in systolic and diastolic BP was observed in both groups. The percent reduction in the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio and liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) in the cilnidipine group was significantly greater than in the amlodipine group. Although plasma renin activity did not differ between the two groups, the plasma aldosterone level was significantly decreased in the cilnidipine group. Cilnidipine therefore appears to reduce albuminuria, urinary L-FABP, and plasma aldosterone levels more than amlodipine, and these effects are independent of BP reduction.

  18. Genetic effects of sterol regulatory element binding proteins and fatty acid-binding protein4 on the fatty acid composition of Korean cattle (Hanwoo)

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong-Yep; Lee, Jea-Young; Jang, Ji-Eun; Lee, Seung-Uk

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study identifies single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or gene combinations that affect the flavor and quality of Korean cattle (Hanwoo) by using the SNP Harvester method. Methods Four economic traits (oleic acid [C18:1], saturated fatty acids), monounsaturated fatty acids, and marbling score) were adjusted for environmental factors in order to focus solely on genetic effects. The SNP Harvester method was used to investigate gene combinations (two-way gene interactions) associated with these economic traits. Further, a multifactor dimensionality reduction method was used to identify superior genotypes in gene combinations. Results Table 3 to 4 show the analysis results for differences between superior genotypes and others for selected major gene combinations using the multifactor dimensionality reduction method. Environmental factors were adjusted for in order to evaluate only the genetic effect. Table 5 shows the adjustment effect by comparing the accuracy before and after correction in two-way gene interactions. Conclusion The g.3977-325 T>C and (g.2988 A>G, g.3977-325 T>C) combinations of fatty acid-binding protein4 were the superior gene, and the superior genotype combinations across all economic traits were the CC genotype at g.3977-325 T>C and the AACC, GACC, GGCC genotypes of (g.2988 A>G, g.3977-325 T>C). PMID:27492349

  19. The bovine fatty acid binding protein 4 gene is significantly associated with marbling and subcutaneous fat depth in Wagyu x Limousin F2 crosses.

    PubMed

    Michal, J J; Zhang, Z W; Gaskins, C T; Jiang, Z

    2006-08-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is expressed in adipose tissue, interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and binds to hormone-sensitive lipase and therefore, plays an important role in lipid metabolism and homeostasis in adipocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of the bovine FABP4 gene with fat deposition. Both cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of the bovine gene were retrieved from the public databases and aligned to determine its genomic organization. Primers targeting two regions of the FABP4 gene were designed: from nucleotides 5433-6106 and from nucleotides 7417-7868 (AAFC01136716). Direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products on two DNA pools from high- and low-marbling animals revealed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): AAFC01136716.1:g.7516G>C and g.7713G>C. The former SNP, detected by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism using restriction enzyme MspA1I, was genotyped on 246 F2 animals in a Waygu x Limousin F2 reference population. Statistical analysis showed that the FABP4 genotype significantly affected marbling score (P = 0.0398) and subcutaneous fat depth (P = 0.0246). The FABP4 gene falls into a suggestive/significant quantitative trait loci interval for beef marbling that was previously reported on bovine chromosome 14 in three other populations.

  20. Interaction of brain fatty acid-binding protein with the polyunsaturated fatty acid environment as a potential determinant of poor prognosis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Emara, Marwan; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common adult brain cancers. In spite of aggressive treatment, recurrence occurs in the great majority of patients and is invariably fatal. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are abundant in brain, particularly ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Although the levels of ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are tightly regulated in brain, the ω-6:ω-3 ratio is dramatically increased in malignant glioma, suggesting deregulation of fundamental lipid homeostasis in brain tumor tissue. The migratory properties of malignant glioma cells can be modified by altering the ratio of AA:DHA in growth medium, with increased migration observed in AA-rich medium. This fatty acid-dependent effect on cell migration is dependent on expression of the brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) previously shown to bind DHA and AA. Increased levels of enzymes involved in eicosanoid production in FABP7-positive malignant glioma cells suggest that FABP7 is an important modulator of AA metabolism. We provide evidence that increased production of eicosanoids in FABP7-positive malignant glioma growing in an AA-rich environment contributes to tumor infiltration in the brain. We discuss pathways and molecules that may underlie FABP7/AA-mediated promotion of cell migration and FABP7/DHA-mediated inhibition of cell migration in malignant glioma. PMID:23981365

  1. Deficiency in pulmonary surfactant proteins in mice with fatty acid binding protein 4-Cre-mediated knockout of the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xinxin; Yuan, Fang; Zhao, Jing; Li, Ziru; Wang, Xian; Guan, Youfei; Tang, Chaoshu; Sun, Guang; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2013-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) forms a heterodimmer with tuberous sclerosis complex 2, to inhibit signalling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1). The mTORC1 stimulates cell growth by promoting anabolic cellular processes, such as gene transcription and protein translation, in response to growth factors and nutrient signals. Originally designed to test the role of TSC1 in adipocyte function, mice in which the gene for TSC1 was specifically deleted by the fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4)-Cre (Fabp4-Tsc1cKO mice) died prematurely within 48 h after birth. The Fabp4-Tsc1cKO mouse revealed a much smaller phenotype relative to the wild-type littermates. Maternal administration of rapamycin, a classical mTOR inhibitor, significantly increased the survival time of Fabp4-Tsc1cKO mice for up to 23 days. Both macroscopic and microscopic haemorrhages were observed in the lungs of Fabp4-Tsc1cKO mice, while other tissues showed no significant changes. Levels of surfactant proteins A and B demonstrated a significant decrease in the Fabp4-Tsc1cKO mice, which was rescued by maternal injection of rapamycin. Co-localization of FABP4 or TSC1 with surfactant protein B was also detected in neonatal pulmonary tissues. Our study suggests that TSC1-mTORC1 may be critical for the synthesis of surfactant proteins A and B.

  2. The nucleic acid-binding protein PcCNBP is transcriptionally regulated during the immune response in red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Aldo; Costa, Salvatore; Tagliavia, Marcello; Maggio, Teresa; Salamone, Monica; Adamo, Giorgia; Ragusa, Maria Antonietta; Bennici, Carmelo; Masullo, Tiziana; Mazzola, Salvatore; Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Cuttitta, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Gene family encoding cellular nucleic acid binding proteins (CNBP) is well conserved among vertebrates; however, there is limited knowledge in lower organisms. In this study, a CNBP homolog from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii was characterised. The full-length cDNA of PcCNBP was of 1257 bp with a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 63 bp and a 3'-UTR of 331 bp with a poly (A) tail, and an open-reading frame (ORF) of 864 bp encoding a polypeptide of 287 amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of about 33 kDa. The predicted protein possesses 7 tandem repeats of 14 amino acids containing the CCHC zinc finger consensus sequence, two RGG-rich single-stranded RNA-binding domain and a nuclear localization signal, strongly suggesting that PcCNBP was a homolog of vertebrate CNBP. The PcCNBP transcript was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues of unchallenged crayfish, including hepatopancreas, gill, eyestalk, haemocytes, intestine, stomach and cuticle with highest expression in haemocytes, intestine, gills and hepatopancreas. The mRNA expression of PcCNBP in haemocytes was modulated at transcriptional level by different immune challenges, suggesting its involvement in the immune response of P. clarkii during both bacteria and viruses infection.

  3. Conserved charged amino acids are key determinants for fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs)-membrane interactions. A multi-methodological computational approach.

    PubMed

    Zamarreño, Fernando; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Amundarain, María Julia; Viso, Juan Francisco; Córsico, Betina; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2017-03-16

    Based on the analysis of the mechanism of ligand transfer to membranes employing in vitro methods, Fatty Acid Binding Protein (FABP) family has been divided in two subgroups: collisional and diffusional FABPs. Although the collisional mechanism has been well characterized employing in vitro methods, the structural features responsible for the difference between collisional and diffusional mechanisms remain uncertain. In this work, we have identified the amino acids putatively responsible for the interaction with membranes of both, collisional and diffusional, subgroups of FABPs. Moreover, we show how specific changes in FABPs' structure could change the mechanism of interaction with membranes. We have computed protein-membrane interaction energies for members of each subgroup of the family, and performed Molecular Dynamics simulations that have shown different configurations for the initial interaction between FABPs and membranes. In order to generalize our hypothesis, we extended the electrostatic and bioinformatics analysis over FABPs of different mammalian genus. Also, our methodological approach could be used for other systems involving protein-membrane interactions.

  4. The Human CCHC-type Zinc Finger Nucleic Acid-Binding Protein Binds G-Rich Elements in Target mRNA Coding Sequences and Promotes Translation.

    PubMed

    Benhalevy, Daniel; Gupta, Sanjay K; Danan, Charles H; Ghosal, Suman; Sun, Hong-Wei; Kazemier, Hinke G; Paeschke, Katrin; Hafner, Markus; Juranek, Stefan A

    2017-03-21

    The CCHC-type zinc finger nucleic acid-binding protein (CNBP/ZNF9) is conserved in eukaryotes and is essential for embryonic development in mammals. It has been implicated in transcriptional, as well as post-transcriptional, gene regulation; however, its nucleic acid ligands and molecular function remain elusive. Here, we use multiple systems-wide approaches to identify CNBP targets and function. We used photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) to identify 8,420 CNBP binding sites on 4,178 mRNAs. CNBP preferentially bound G-rich elements in the target mRNA coding sequences, most of which were previously found to form G-quadruplex and other stable structures in vitro. Functional analyses, including RNA sequencing, ribosome profiling, and quantitative mass spectrometry, revealed that CNBP binding did not influence target mRNA abundance but rather increased their translational efficiency. Considering that CNBP binding prevented G-quadruplex structure formation in vitro, we hypothesize that CNBP is supporting translation by resolving stable structures on mRNAs.

  5. Identification of polymorphism in fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) gene and its association with milk fat traits in riverine buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Dubey, Praveen Kumar; Goyal, Shubham; Mishra, Shailendra Kumar; Arora, Reena; Mukesh, Manishi; Niranjan, Saket Kumar; Kathiravan, Periasamy; Kataria, Ranjit Singh

    2016-04-01

    The fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) gene, known to be associated with fat percentage of milk and meat in bovines, was screened among swamp and riverine buffaloes for polymorphism detection and further association with milk fat contents. An SNP g.307C > T was identified in the intron 2 (+53 exon 2) region of FABP3 gene of Indian buffaloes. The SNP identified was genotyped in 692 animals belonging to 15 riverine, swamp and hybrid (riverine × swamp) buffalo populations of diverse phenotypes and utilities, by PCR-RFLP. A marked contrast was observed between the C and T allele frequencies in three types of buffaloes. The frequency of C allele ranged from 0.67 to 0.96 in pure swamp buffalo populations, with the highest in Mizoram (0.96). Whereas the frequency of T allele was high across all the Indian riverine buffalo breeds, ranging from 0.57 to 0.96. None of the genotypes at FABP3 g.307C > T locus was found to have significant association with milk fat and other production traits in Mehsana dairy buffalo breed. Our study revealed marked differences in the allele frequencies between riverine and swamp buffaloes at FABP3 g.307C > T locus, without any significant association with different milk traits in riverine buffaloes.

  6. Epidermal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (E-FABP) Is Not Required for the Generation or Maintenance of Effector and Memory T Cells following Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Schmidt, Nathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Following activation of naïve T cells there are dynamic changes in the metabolic pathways used by T cells to support both the energetic needs of the cell and the macromolecules required for growth and proliferation. Among other changes, lipid metabolism undergoes dynamic transitions between fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis as cells progress from naïve to effector and effector to memory T cells. The hydrophobic nature of lipids requires that they be bound to protein chaperones within a cell. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) represent a large class of lipid chaperones, with epidermal FABP (E-FABP) expressed in T cells. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of E-FABP in antigen-specific T cell responses. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, we observed similar clonal expansion, contraction and formation of memory CD8 T cells in WT and E-FABP-/- mice, which also exhibited similar phenotypic and functional characteristics. Analysis of Listeria-specific CD4 T cells also revealed no defect in the expansion, contraction, and formation of memory CD4 T cells in E-FABP-/- mice. These data demonstrate that E-FABP is dispensable for antigen-specific T cell responses following a bacterial infection. PMID:27588422

  7. Serum liver-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts recovery of graft function after kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Akihiro; Kusaka, Mamoru; Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Ishii, Junichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Maruyama, Takahiro; Sasaki, Hitomi; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka

    2014-06-01

    Kidneys procured by donation after cardiac death (DCD) may increase the donor pool but are associated with high incidence of delayed graft function (DGF). Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level is an early biomarker of renal injury after kidney transplantation (KTx); however, its utility is limited in DGF cases owing to urine sample unavailability. We examined whether serum L-FABP level predicts functional recovery of transplanted DCD kidneys. Consecutive patients undergoing KTx from living related donors (LD), brain-dead donors (BD), or DCD were retrospectively enrolled. Serum L-FABP levels were measured from samples collected before and after KTx. Serum L-FABP decreased rapidly in patients with immediate function, slowly in DGF patients, and somewhat increased in DGF patients requiring hemodialysis (HD) for >1 wk. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that DGF was predicted with 84% sensitivity (SE) and 86% specificity (SP) at cutoff of 9.0 ng/mL on post-operative day (POD) 1 and 68% SE and 90% SP at 6.0 on POD 2. DGF >7 d was predicted with 83% SE and 78% SP at 11.0 on POD 1 and 67% SE and 78% SP at 6.5 on POD 2. Serum L-FABP levels may predict graft recovery and need for HD after DCD KTx.

  8. Effects of linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids (efamol evening primrose oil) on fatty acid-binding proteins of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Roy, A K; Demarco, A C; Raha, S K; Shay, J; Garvey, M; Horrobin, D F

    We have studied the effects of Efamol evening primrose oil (EPO) on fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABP) of rat liver. EPO contains 72% cis-linoleic acid and 9% cis-gamma linolenic acid. EPO has been clinically used for treatment of a number of diseases in humans and animals. EPO is also known to lower cholesterol level in humans and animals. Feeding of an EPO supplemented diet to rats (n = 9) for 2 months decreases the oleate binding capacity of purified L-FABP of rat liver whereas the palmitate binding activity was increased by 38%. However, EPO feeding did not alter the L-FABP concentrations significantly as measured by using the fluorescence fatty acid probe, dansylamino undecanoic acid. Endogenous fatty acid analysis of L-FABPs revealed significant qualitative and quantitative changes in fatty acid pattern after EPO feeding. EPO feeding decreased the endogenous palmitate level by 53% and oleate level by 64% in L-FABPs and also EPO feeding decreased the total endogenous fatty acid content from 62 nanomole per mg of protein to 42 nanomole per mg of L-FABP (n = 3).

  9. Impact of clinical context on acute kidney injury biomarker performances: differences between neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and L-type fatty acid-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Toshifumi; Isshiki, Rei; Hayase, Naoki; Sumida, Maki; Inokuchi, Ryota; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Application of acute kidney injury (AKI) biomarkers with consideration of nonrenal conditions and systemic severity has not been sufficiently determined. Herein, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and nonrenal disorders, including inflammation, hypoperfusion and liver dysfunction, were evaluated in 249 critically ill patients treated at our intensive care unit. Distinct characteristics of NGAL and L-FABP were revealed using principal component analysis: NGAL showed linear correlations with inflammatory markers (white blood cell count and C-reactive protein), whereas L-FABP showed linear correlations with hypoperfusion and hepatic injury markers (lactate, liver transaminases and bilirubin). We thus developed a new algorithm by combining urinary NGAL and L-FABP with stratification by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, presence of sepsis and blood lactate levels to improve their AKI predictive performance, which showed a significantly better area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC-ROC 0.940; 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.793–0.985] than that under NGAL alone (AUC-ROC 0.858, 95% CI 0.741–0.927, P = 0.03) or L-FABP alone (AUC-ROC 0.837, 95% CI 0.697–0.920, P = 0.007) and indicated that nonrenal conditions and systemic severity should be considered for improved AKI prediction by NGAL and L-FABP as biomarkers. PMID:27605390

  10. Up-regulation of the expression of the gene for liver fatty acid-binding protein by long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Meunier-Durmort, C; Poirier, H; Niot, I; Forest, C; Besnard, P

    1996-01-01

    The role of fatty acids in the expression of the gene for liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) was investigated in the well-differentiated FAO rat hepatoma cell line. Cells were maintained in serum-free medium containing 40 microM BSA/320 microM oleate. Western blot analysis showed that oleate triggered an approx. 4-fold increase in the cytosolic L-FABP level in 16 h. Oleate specifically stimulated L-FABP mRNA in time-dependent and dose-dependent manners with a maximum 7-fold increase at 16 h in FAO cells. Preincubation of FAO cells with cycloheximide prevented the oleate-mediated induction of L-FABP mRNA, showing that protein synthesis was required for the action of fatty acids. Run-on transcription assays demonstrated that the control of L-FABP gene expression by oleate was, at least in part, transcriptional. Palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were similarly potent whereas octanoic acid was inefficient. This regulation was also found in normal hepatocytes. Therefore long-chain fatty acids are strong inducers of L-FABP gene expression. FAO cells constitute a useful tool for studying the underlying mechanism of fatty acid action. PMID:8912685

  11. The Crystal Structure of Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a New Family of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Proteins in Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, William; Haouz, Ahmed; Graña, Martin; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Betton, Jean-Michel; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    The gene Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is conserved within the order Actinomycetales but absent elsewhere. The crystal structure of Rv0813c reveals a new family of proteins that resemble the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) found in eukaryotes. Rv0813c adopts the 10-stranded β-barrel fold typical of FABPs but lacks the double-helix insert that covers the entry to the binding site in the eukaryotic proteins. The barrel encloses a deep cavity, at the bottom of which a small cyclic ligand was found to bind to the hydroxyl group of Tyr192. This residue is part of a conserved Arg-X-Tyr motif much like the triad that binds the carboxylate group of fatty acids in FABPs. Most of the residues forming the internal surface of the cavity are conserved in homologous protein sequences found in CG-rich prokaryotes, strongly suggesting that Rv0813c is a member of a new family of bacterial FABP-like proteins that may have roles in the recognition, transport, and/or storage of small molecules in the bacterial cytosol. PMID:17172346

  12. cDNA structure, expression and nucleic acid-binding properties of three RNA-binding proteins in tobacco: occurrence of tissue-specific alternative splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, T; Sugita, M; Sugiura, M

    1993-01-01

    Three cDNAs encoding RNA-binding proteins were isolated from a tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) cDNA library. The predicted proteins (RGP-1) are homologous to each other and consist of a consensus-sequence type RNA-binding domain of 80 amino acids in the N-terminal half and a glycine-rich domain of 61-78 amino acids in the C-terminal half. Nucleic acid-binding assay using the in vitro synthesized RGP-1 protein confirmed that it is an RNA-binding protein. Based on its strong affinity for poly(G) and poly(U), the RGP-1 proteins are suggested to bind specifically to G and/or U rich sequences. All three genes are expressed in leaves, roots, flowers and cultured cells, however, the substantial amount of pre-mRNAs are accumulated especially in roots. Sequence analysis and ribonuclease protection assay indicated that significant amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs, which are produced by differential selection of 5' splice sites, are also present in various tissues. Tissue-specific alternative splicing was found in two of the three genes. The alternatively spliced mRNAs are also detected in polysomal fractions and are suggested to produce truncated polypeptides. A possible role of this alternative splicing is discussed. Images PMID:8371974

  13. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  14. Cell- and region-specific expression of sugar chains in the mouse epididymal epithelium using lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Shota; Fukui, Tatsuya; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2012-02-01

    To understand the cytochemical properties of epididymal epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in the mouse epididymis were examined using the technique of lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns depending on the type of lectins were observed in the epididymal epithelium. Principal cells expressed N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and Fucose in the proximal region of the epididymis and Mannose, Glucose, and Galactose in the distal region of the epididymis. Basal cells expressed Mannose, Glucose, Galactose, and GlcNAc in the proximal region and Galactose in the distal region. On the other hand, clear cells expressed various sugar residues and differences among regions were not observed. Interestingly, principal cells, clear cells, and basal cells specifically reacted with Ulex Europaeus-Agglutinin I (UEA-I lectin), Maackia Amurensis-Lectin I (MAL-I lectin), and Griffonia simplicifolia Lectin I-B4 (GS-I B lectin), respectively. These findings indicate that the selectivity in lectin reactivity for distinct cell types and segment-dependent staining in the epididymis may be related to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, because some lectins stain particular cells or cellular compartments selectively, these lectins could be useful markers for histopathological evaluation of diseases or diagnosis of male infertility.

  15. A novel L-type lectin was required for the multiplication of WSSV in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunjia; Wang, Yuqing; Zhao, Lingling; Qin, Zhendong; Yuan, Junfa; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Lan, Jiangfeng

    2016-08-01

    L-type lectins are involved in glycoproteins secretory pathways and are associated with many immune responses. There is growing evidence that L-type lectins are also involved in viral replication. In this study, a novel L-type lectin (named as PcL-lectin) was identified from red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii). Gene sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the PcL-lectin was a kind of endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment-53 (ERGIC-53). The expression level of PcL-lectin was significantly down regulated in crayfish after challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Recombinant PcL-lectin protein facilitated the replication of WSSV in crayfish. In addition, WSSV replication was decreased when endogenous PcL-lectin was knocked down by RNA interference in crayfish. Furthermore, PcL-lectin may interact with VP24, an envelope protein of WSSV. Our results suggest that PcL-lectin may be required for the multiplication of WSSV, and will pave a new way for the developing of strategies against WSSV infection.

  16. Biodiversity of mannose-specific lectins within Narcissus species.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Susanna; Codina, Carlos; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Davidson, Elaine; Stewart, Derek

    2002-04-24

    Mannose-specific lectins (MSLs) were isolated from the bulbs of 27 species of wild Spanish Narcissi and compared to the commercially available MSL from daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, NPA). Molecular weight analysis showed the monomers of all the MSLs were at, or around, 12.5 kD. Haemagglutination assays showed that the MSLs exhibited activities at up to four times greater than that displayed by NPA and other MSLs derived from other species such as Galanthus nivalus (snowdrop) and Allium ursinum (ramson). Elution profiles from ion exchange chromatography exhibited similarities for species within the same taxonomic section suggesting that this method could aid in species classification. Further analysis by isoelectric focusing showed many isolectins are present in vivo and that even within a single peak from ion exchange chromatography there are numerous isolectins present. The basis of the isolectin heterogeneity is suggested to reside in the tetraploidy (sometime triploidy) nature of Narcissus genes.

  17. Data on IL-17 production induced by plant lectins

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Fernandes, Fabrício Freitas; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    We reported in article da Silva et al. (2016) [2] that ArtinM induces the IL-17 production through interaction with CD4+ T cells and stimulation of IL-23 and IL-1. Besides ArtinM, other plant lectins (PLs) induce IL-17 production by murine spleen cells. The IL-17 production induced by PLs was evaluated regarding the involvement of IL-23, IL-6, Th1-, and Th2-cytokines. Furthermore, the effect exerted TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 on the PLs׳ performance in the induction of IL-17 was examined. The current data were compared to the known ArtinM ability to induce Th17 immunity. PMID:27222857

  18. Atomic- Resolution Crystal Structure of the Antiviral Lectin Scytovirin

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei,T.; Botos, I.; Ziolkowska, N.; Bokesch, H.; Krumpe, L.; McKee, T.; O'Keefe, B.; Dauter, Z.; Wlodawer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of the natural and recombinant antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) were solved by single-wavelength anomalous scattering and refined with data extending to 1.3 Angstroms and 1.0 Angstroms resolution, respectively. A molecule of SVN consists of a single chain 95 amino acids long, with an almost perfect sequence repeat that creates two very similar domains (RMS deviation 0.25 Angstroms for 40 pairs of Ca atoms). The crystal structure differs significantly from a previously published NMR structure of the same protein, with the RMS deviations calculated separately for the N- and C-terminal domains of 5.3 Angstroms and 3.7 Angstroms, respectively, and a very different relationship between the two domains. In addition, the disulfide bonding pattern of the crystal structures differs from that described in the previously published mass spectrometry and NMR studies.

  19. [Dynamic of lectin activity during germination of bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, N V

    2006-01-01

    PHA quantity and activity dynamics during early germination of bean seed were investigated. Electrophoretic characteristics, subunits composition and carbohydrate-binding specificity of lectin extracted from white kidney bean cv. Bilozerna were studied. It was shown that investigated lectin consisted of 2 subunits E and L with molecular weight 34 and 36 kDa, respectively, analogously to purified PHA ("Serva", Germany), and specifically bound N-acetyl-D-galactosamin and galactose. During germination both quantity and activity of PHA were dramatically decreasing in embryonic axes and in cotyledons, possibly, as a result of the lectin release from seeds to the environment. It is very likely that one of the defence mechanisms of germinating seeds is related with the releasing of lectins that are able to bind components of the bacterial cell wall and to inhibit their growth.

  20. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-09-10

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl.

  1. Mechanisms of the insecticidal action of TEL (Talisia esculenta lectin) against Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; de Castro, Márcia Mota; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado

    2004-06-01

    Plant lectins have insecticidal activity that is probably mediated through their ability to bind carbohydrates. To examine the influence of sugars on the insecticidal activity of a lectin from Talisia esculenta seeds (TEL), the lectin was mixed with mannose, glucose, or mannose plus glucose. Mannose abolished the insecticidal activity. Affinity chromatography showed that TEL bound to midgut proteins of the insect Callosobruchus maculatus. Immunoblotting showed that TEL recognized some proteins, probably glycoproteins, present in the midgut membrane of this insect. The principal proteases responsible for digestive proteolysis in fourth instar larvae of C. maculatus were purified by chromatography on activated thiol-Sepharose. These purified proteases were unable to digest TEL after a 15-h incubation. These results suggest that the insecticidal activity of TEL involves a specific carbohydrate-lectin interaction with glycoconjugates on the surface of digestive tract epithelial cells, as well as binding to assimilatory glycoproteins present in midgut extracts and resistance to enzymatic digestion by cysteine proteinases.

  2. Lectin-Magnetic Beads for Plasma Membrane Isolation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane proteins mainly function to transmit external signals into the cell. Many plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g., HER2 and EGFR) are known to mediate oncogenic progression, making them prime targets for cancer therapy. Recently, it has become important to identify plasma membrane proteins that are differentially expressed in normal versus cancer cells, in drug-sensitive versus drug-resistant cells, or among tumor cells that metastasize to different organ sites because these differentially expressed membrane proteins may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. In addition, there is an increased interest in identifying cell-surface proteins that could serve as markers for stem cells, progenitor cells, or cells of different lineages. Traditionally, membrane isolation requires multiple centrifugation steps to isolate different organelles based on their density. With the advent of affinity matrix technology, it is possible to separate organelles based on their molecular differences. A defining characteristic of the plasma membrane is that plasma membrane proteins are more extensively glycosylated than are intracellular membrane proteins. As a result, affinity chromatography employing lectin, a carbohydrate-binding protein, is commonly used to isolate plasma membrane proteins. We have extended this concept for plasma membrane isolation by using concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin with mannose specificity. Here we describe a protocol that uses immobilized ConA bound to magnetic beads to isolate plasma membranes from homogenized cell lysates. The captured plasma membrane proteins are then solubilized from the ConA-magnetic beads by detergents in the presence of a competing sugar, methyl α-mannopyranoside.

  3. Evidence for an increase in positive surface charge and an increase in susceptibility to trypsin of Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina) on its interaction with galactose, a hapten sugar of the lectin.

    PubMed

    Komano, H; Kurama, T; Nagasawa, Y; Natori, S

    1992-05-15

    When Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina), an insect humoral lectin, was eluted from a column of DEAE-cellulose in the presence of galactose (a hapten sugar of this lectin), it emerged at a lower salt concentration than when galactose was absent. In the presence of galactose the lectin was, in addition, more susceptible to trypsin digestion. The lectin was found to have an affinity for basic proteins such as histone H3 and sarcotoxin IA, but this property was lost in the presence of galactose. These results suggested that the lectin changes its conformation on interaction with galactose. This change is suggested to result in the exposure of some hidden lysine and/or arginine residues.

  4. Evidence for an increase in positive surface charge and an increase in susceptibility to trypsin of Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina) on its interaction with galactose, a hapten sugar of the lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Kurama, T; Nagasawa, Y; Natori, S

    1992-01-01

    When Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina), an insect humoral lectin, was eluted from a column of DEAE-cellulose in the presence of galactose (a hapten sugar of this lectin), it emerged at a lower salt concentration than when galactose was absent. In the presence of galactose the lectin was, in addition, more susceptible to trypsin digestion. The lectin was found to have an affinity for basic proteins such as histone H3 and sarcotoxin IA, but this property was lost in the presence of galactose. These results suggested that the lectin changes its conformation on interaction with galactose. This change is suggested to result in the exposure of some hidden lysine and/or arginine residues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1599400

  5. Glycoconjugates in the mandibular salivary gland of adult dogs revealed by lectin histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pedini, V; Ceccarelli, P; Gargiulo, A M

    1994-11-01

    The glycosidic residues in the mandibular glands of five adult dogs were studied by using seven different lectin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates. In some cases a treatment with sialidase preceded the lectin staining. The mucous acinar cells contained oligosaccharides with alpha- and beta-N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylglucosamine and fucose residues, whereas the demilunar cells contained glycoconjugates rich in sialic acid linked to the penultimate disaccharide galactosyl-(beta 1-->3) N-acetylgalactosamine.

  6. Lectin staining patterns in human gastric mucosae with and without exposure to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Junior, Mario R.; Cavalcanti, Carmelita L.B.; Pontes-Filho, Nicodemos T.; Carvalho Jr, Luiz B.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate qualitative changes in the glycoconjugate expression in human gastric tissue of positive and negative patients for Helicobacter pylori, through lectins: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A). The lectins recognized differently the glycoconjugates in the superficial mucous layer at the gastric tissues. The results suggest a significant change in the carbohydrate moieties present on the surface of the gastric cells during infection. PMID:24031208

  7. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  8. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  9. Isolation and antiproliferative activity of Lotus corniculatus lectin towards human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shaista; Majeed, Rabiya; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Ganai, Bashir Ahmad; Wani, Ishfak; Rakhshanda, Syed; Qurishi, Yasrib; Sharma, P R; Hamid, Abid; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Rabia

    2013-12-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the anti cancer activity of a lectin isolated from Lotus corniculatus seeds. A tetrameric 70kDa galactose specific lectin was purified using two step simple purification protocol which involved affinity chromatography on AF-BlueHC650M and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The lectin was adsorbed on AF-BlueHC650M and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 yielded a major peak absorbance that gave two bands of 15kDa and 20kDa in SDS PAGE. Hemagglutination activity was completely preserved, when the temperature was in the range of 20-60°C. However, drastic reduction in activity occurred at temperatures above 60°C. Full hemagglutination activity was retained at ambient pH 4-12. Thereafter no activity was observed above pH 13. Hemaglutination of the lectin was inhibited by d-galactose. The lectin showed a strong antiproliferative activity towards human leukemic (THP-1) cancer cells followed by lung cancer (HOP62) cells and HCT116 with an IC50 of 39μg/ml and 50μg/ml and 60μg/ml respectively. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0G1 phase confirming that Lotus corniculatus lectin induced apoptosis. Morphological observations showed that Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) treated THP-1 cells displayed apparent apoptosis characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of membrane enclosed apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) effectively inhibits the cell migration in a dose dependent manner as indicated by the wound healing assay.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of lectin receptor-like kinases in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yongil; Labbé, Jessy; Muchero, Wellington; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara S.; Kennedy, Megan; Johnson, Jenifer; Sreedasyam, Avinash; Schmutz, Jeremy; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Chen, Jin -Gui

    2016-09-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) belong to a large protein family with over 600 members in Arabidopsis and over 1000 in rice. Among RLKs, the lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) possess a characteristic extracellular carbohydrate-binding lectin domain and play important roles in p